WorldWideScience

Sample records for health benefit plans employee

  1. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) Plan Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A list of all Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) plans available in each state, as well as links to the plan brochures, changes for each plan from the...

  2. Policy Watch: The Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Roger Feldman; Kenneth E. Thorpe; Bradley Gray

    2002-01-01

    This short feature describes the Federal Employees Health Benefits Plan (FEHBP), which provides health insurance benefits to active and retired federal employees and their dependents. The article discusses the FEHBP as a touchstone for research on employment-based health insurance and as a touchstone for health policy reform.

  3. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Enrollment Options Following the Termination of a Plan or Plan Option. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing a final rule to amend the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program regulations regarding enrollment options following the termination of a plan or plan option.

  4. How does the employer contribution for the federal employees health benefits program influence plan selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Curtis S; Thorpe, Kenneth E

    2003-01-01

    Market reform of health insurance is proposed to increase coverage and reduce growth in spending by providing an incentive to choose low-cost plans. However, having a choice of plans could result in risk segmentation. Risk-adjusted payments have been proposed to address risk segmentation but are criticized as ineffective. An alternative to risk adjustment is to subsidize premiums, as in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP). Subsidizing premiums may also increase total premium spending. We find that there is little risk segmentation in the FEHBP and that reducing the premium subsidy would lower government premium spending and slightly increase risk segmentation.

  5. The effect of employee assistance plan benefits on the use of outpatient behavioral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M; McGuire, Thomas G

    2010-12-01

    Nearly half of all US workers have access to an employee assistance plan (EAP). At the same time, most large US employers also purchase health benefits for their employees, and these benefits packages typically include behavioral health services. There is some potential overlap in services covered by the EAP and the health plan, and some employers choose to purchase the two jointly as an 'integrated product'. It is not clear whether EAP services substitute for outpatient behavioral health care services covered by the health plan. To evaluate how the number of EAP visits covered affects the use of regular outpatient behavioral health care (number of visits, and total spending), in an integrated product setting. Analysis of claims, eligibility and benefits data for 26,464 users of behavioral health care for the year 2005. For both EAP and regular behavioral health care, the individuals were enrolled with Managed Health Network (MHN), a large national specialty insurance plan. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to investigate the determinants of the number of regular outpatient visits, and spending for regular outpatient care. To address skewness in the dependent variables, the estimation used generalized linear models with a log link. A limited instrumental variable analysis was used to test for endogeneity of the number of EAP visits covered. Nearly half the enrollees in this sample were in employer plans that allowed 4-5 EAP visits per treatment episode, and 31% were allowed 3 EAP visits per year. Having an EAP visit allowance of 4-5 sessions per episode predicts fewer regular outpatient visits, compared with having an allowance of 3 sessions per year. More generous EAP allowances also reduce payments for outpatient care, with one exception. Greater availability of EAP benefits appears to reduce utilization of regular outpatient care, supporting the idea that the two types of care are to some extent perceived as substitutes. One limitation of this

  6. Carrots and sticks: impact of an incentive/disincentive employee flexible credit benefit plan on health status and medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A D; Karel, T; Zuidema, R

    1999-01-01

    Employee wellness programs aim to assist in controlling employer costs by improving the health status and fitness of employees, potentially increasing productivity, decreasing absenteeism, and reducing medical claims. Most such programs offer no disincentive for nonparticipation. We evaluated an incentive/disincentive program initiated by a large teaching hospital in western Michigan. The HealthPlus Health Quotient program is an incentive/disincentive approach to health promotion. The employer's contribution to the cafeteria plan benefit package is adjusted based on results of an annual appraisal of serum cholesterol, blood pressure, tobacco use, body fat, physical fitness, motor vehicle safety, nutrition, and alcohol consumption. The adjustment (health quotient [HQ]) can range from -$25 to +$25 per pay period. We examined whether appraised health improved between 1993 and 1996 and whether the HQ predicted medical claims. Mean HQ increased slightly (+$0.47 per pay period in 1993 to +$0.89 per pay period in 1996). Individuals with HQs of less than -$10 per pay period incurred approximately twice the medical claims of the other groups (test for linear trend, p = .003). After adjustment, medical claims of employees in the worst category (HQ benefits. Most employees are impacted minimally, but savings are accruing to the employer from reductions in medical claims paid and in days lost to illness and disability.

  7. 76 FR 66637 - Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 29 CFR Part 2570 RIN 1210-AB49 Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security... Determinations, Employee Benefits Security Administration, Room N-5700, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC...

  8. The potential and peril of health insurance tobacco surcharge programs: evidence from Georgia's State Employees' Health Benefit Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liber, Alex C; Hockenberry, Jason M; Gaydos, Laura M; Lipscomb, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    A rapidly growing number of U.S. employers are charging health insurance surcharges for tobacco use to their employees. Despite their potential to price-discriminate, little systematic empirical evidence of the impacts of these tobacco surcharges has been published. We attempted to assess the impact of a health insurance surcharge for tobacco use on cessation among enrollees in Georgia's State Health Benefit Plan (GSHBP). We identified a group of enrollees in GSHBP who began paying the tobacco surcharge at the program's inception in July 2005. We examined the proportion of these enrollees who certified themselves and their family members as tobacco-free and no longer paid the surcharge through April 2011, and we defined this as implied cessation. We compared this proportion to a national expected annual 2.6% cessation rate. We also compared our observation group to a comparison group to assess surcharge avoidance. By April 2011, 45% of enrollees who paid a tobacco surcharge starting in July 2005 had certified themselves as tobacco-free. This proportion exceeded the expected cessation based on 3 times the national rate (p health insurance surcharges in changing behavior, are tempered by the important limitation that enrollees' certification of quitting was self-reported and not subject to additional, clinical verification.

  9. 29 CFR 2510.3-3 - Employee benefit plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... section clarifies the definition in section 3(3) of the term “employee benefit plan” for purposes of title... receive any benefit under the plan even if the contingency for which such benefit is provided should occur... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee benefit plan. 2510.3-3 Section 2510.3-3 Labor...

  10. Reading and understanding employee benefit plan financial statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C; Van Sertima, Michael A

    2004-03-01

    If your employee benefit plan has more than 100 participants, chances are you've had to work your way through the audited financial statements you're required to include with your Form 5500 filing. These statements contain a wealth of information about the financial health of your plan, and understanding them is an important fiduciary responsibility. To strengthen your grasp of financial statements, this article gives an overview that will make a plan's financial statements more informative, explains their basic structure and provides information on some of the more arcane aspects (such as actuarial tables). While this article focuses on Taft-Hartley (multiemployer) plans, much of it applies to other types of employee benefit plans.

  11. 29 CFR 2510.3-2 - Employee pension benefit plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee pension benefit plan. 2510.3-2 Section 2510.3-2... TERMS USED IN SUBCHAPTERS C, D, E, F, AND G OF THIS CHAPTER § 2510.3-2 Employee pension benefit plan. (a) General. This section clarifies the limits of the defined terms “employee pension benefit plan” and...

  12. Benefits Innovations in Employee Behavioral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Bruce; Block, Lori

    2017-01-01

    More and more employers recognize the business impact of behavioral health concerns in the workplace. This article provides insights into some of the current innovations in behavioral health benefits, along with their rationale for development. Areas of innovation include conceptual and delivery models, technological advance- ments, tools for engaging employees and ways of quantifying the business value of behavioral health benefits. The rapid growth of innovative behavioral health services should provide employers with confidence that they can tailor a program best suited to their priorities, organizational culture and cost limitations.

  13. 77 FR 67743 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Coverage for Certain Intermittent Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... employees who work on intermittent schedules eligible to be enrolled in a health benefits plan under the... put their health and safety at risk in order to assist those who have been affected by the storm... health insurance coverage based on the potentially diverse work schedules of intermittent employees...

  14. 75 FR 54542 - Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 29 CFR Part 2570 RIN 1210-AA98 Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans Correction In proposed rule document 2010-21073 beginning on page 53172 in the issue of Monday, August 30, 2010, make the following correction...

  15. 48 CFR 1602.170-9 - Health benefits plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL DEFINITIONS OF WORDS AND TERMS Definitions of FEHBP Terms 1602.170-9 Health benefits plan. Health benefits plan means a group insurance policy, contract... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Health benefits plan. 1602...

  16. Marketing health care to employees: the structure of employee health care plan satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, O A

    1993-01-01

    Providing cost-contained comprehensive quality health care to maintain healthy and productive employees is a challenging problem for all employers. Using a representative panel of metropolitan employees, the author investigates the internal and external structure of employee satisfaction with company-sponsored health care plans. Employee satisfaction is differentiated into four meaningful groups of health care benefits, whereas its external structure is supported by the traditional satisfaction paradigms of expectation-disconfirmation, attribution, and equity. Despite negative disconfirmation, employees register sufficiently high health care satisfaction levels, which suggests some useful strategies that employers may consider implementing.

  17. 75 FR 2161 - Proposed Extension of Information Collection; Comment Request; Employee Benefit Plan Claims...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Proposed Extension of Information Collection; Comment Request; Employee Benefit Plan Claims Procedures Under ERISA AGENCY: Employee Benefits... Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) is soliciting comments on a proposed extension of the...

  18. Restructuring Employee Benefits to Meet Health Care Needs in Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard M; Weinman, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Health care expenses in retirement are the proverbial elephant in the room. Most employees don't know how big the elephant is. As Medicare solvency and retiree health care issues receive increasing attention, it is time to rethink overall benefit approaches and assess what is appropriate and affordable for an organization to help achieve workforce renewal goals and solve delayed retirement challenges. Just as Medicare was never designed to cover all of the post-65 retiree health care costs, neither is a workplace retirement plan designed to cover 100% of preretiree income. Now employers can consider strategies that may better equip retirees to meet both income needs and health care expenses in the most tax-efficient way. By combining defined contribution retirement and health care plans, employers have the power to increase benefits for employees while maintaining total benefits cost.

  19. Employee health benefit redesign at the academic health center: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Weaver, Deirdre C; Splaine, Kevin; Hefner, David S; Kirch, Darrell G; Paz, Harold L

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly escalating cost of health care, including the cost of providing health care benefits, is a significant concern for many employers. In this article, the authors examine a case study of an academic health center that undertook a complete redesign of its health benefit structure to control rising costs, encourage use of its own provider network, and support employee wellness. With the implementation in 2006 of a high-deductible health plan combined with health reimbursement arrangements and wellness incentives, the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (PSHMC) was able to realize significant cost savings and increase use of its own network while maintaining a high level of employee satisfaction. By contracting with a single third-party administrator for its self-insured plan, PSHMC reduced its administrative costs and simplified benefit choices for employees. In addition, indexing employee costs to salary ensured that this change was equitable for all employees, and the shift to a consumer-driven health plan led to greater employee awareness of health care costs. The new health benefit plan's strong focus on employee wellness and preventive health has led to significant increases in the use of preventive health services, including health risk assessments, cancer screenings, and flu shots. PSHMC's experience demonstrates the importance of clear and ongoing communication with employees throughout--before, during, and even after--the process of health benefit redesign.

  20. Impact of the 1978 ADEA Amendments on Employee Benefit Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamorsky, Jeffrey D.

    1978-01-01

    The impact on employee benefit plans of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act amendments that raised the mandatory retirement age is addressed through a discussion and analysis of legislative history, court decisions, Department of Labor regulations, wage-hour rulings, and opinion letters. (Author/JMD)

  1. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  2. 76 FR 31998 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved... Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for calendar year 2012. This is... certain FEHB plans who receive covered health services in States with critical shortages of primary care...

  3. 75 FR 32972 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Medically Underserved Areas for 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Medically Underserved... Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for calendar year 2011. This is... certain FEHB plans who receive covered health services in States with critical shortages of primary care...

  4. Flexible Fringe Benefit Plans Save You Money and Keep Employees Happy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rob

    1987-01-01

    This fringe benefit plan saves money for both employers and employees, provides a better fit for employees' actual benefit needs, and allows employees to choose options from a menu of benefits. One option is a flexible spending plan. Employees place a portion of their before-tax income into a special account from which allowable expenses are paid…

  5. 77 FR 33241 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Nominations for Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (the Council), which is to consist of 15 members to... to the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans to represent any of the groups...

  6. 77 FR 74515 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... charter for the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans is renewed. The Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans shall advise the Secretary of Labor on technical...

  7. 78 FR 36596 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Nominations for Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (the Council), which is to consist of 15 members to... appointment to the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans to represent any of the...

  8. 75 FR 80072 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... charter for the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans is renewed. The Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans shall advise the Secretary of Labor on technical...

  9. 12 CFR 745.9-2 - Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retirement and other employee benefit plan... Coverage § 745.9-2 Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts. (a) Pass-through share insurance. Any shares of an employee benefit plan in an insured credit union shall be insured on a “pass-through...

  10. 12 CFR 330.14 - Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retirement and other employee benefit plan... STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY DEPOSIT INSURANCE COVERAGE § 330.14 Retirement and other employee benefit plan accounts. (a) “Pass-through” insurance. Any deposits of an employee benefit plan in an insured depository...

  11. 75 FR 20314 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program; Miscellaneous Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... employees of the Senate Restaurants after the operations of the Senate Restaurants are contracted to be... business concern to which the Senate Restaurants' food service operations were transferred as described in... continuation of Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) coverage for certain former Senate Restaurant...

  12. 75 FR 76615 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Miscellaneous Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... employees of the Senate Restaurants after the operations of the Senate Restaurants are contracted to be... which the Senate Restaurants' food service operations were transferred as described in section 1 of... continuation of Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) coverage for certain former Senate Restaurant...

  13. 77 FR 42914 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... Federal Flexible Benefits Plan: Pre-Tax Payment of Health Benefits Premiums AGENCY: Office of Personnel... this proposed rule; and (4) update the Federal Flexible Benefits Plan: Pre-Tax Payment of Health...--FEDERAL FLEXIBLE BENEFITS PLAN: PRE-TAX PAYMENTS OF HEALTH BENEFITS PREMIUMS PROGRAM 8. The authority...

  14. 77 FR 43127 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved... determination of the States that qualify as Medically Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health... law that mandates special consideration for enrollees of certain FEHB plans who receive covered health...

  15. 78 FR 50119 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved Areas for 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Medically Underserved... determination of the states that qualify as Medically Underserved Areas under the Federal Employees Health... law that mandates special consideration for enrollees of certain FEHB plans who receive covered health...

  16. Understanding the real risks of changing employee benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jon; St Amour, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    In an environment of constant change, corporations are looking to alter employee benefits programs to make them more responsive to employee and business needs. A complete risk assessment process is the key to preparing for changes to employee benefits programs by providing employers with an analysis of cost savings against the potential negative ramifications of change. This article outlines the steps involved in a complete review of risk assessment. It then discusses how employers can develop successful change management communication strategies if, after conducting a risk assessment, employers decide to move forward with alterations to their employee benefits programs.

  17. Impact of the Prevention Plan on Employee Health Risk Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Loeppke, Ronald; Edington, Dee W.; Bég, Sami

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of The Prevention Plan™ on employee health risks after 1 year of integrated primary prevention (wellness and health promotion) and secondary prevention (biometric and lab screening as well as early detection) interventions. The Prevention Plan is an innovative prevention benefit that provides members with the high-tech/high-touch support and encouragement they need to adopt healthy behaviors. Support services include 24/7 nurse hotlines, one-on-one health coach...

  18. Enhancing employee capacity to prioritize health insurance benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Marion; Goold, Susan Dorr; Parise, Carol; Ginsburg, Marjorie

    2007-09-01

    To demonstrate that employees can gain understanding of the financial constraints involved in designing health insurance benefits. While employees who receive their health insurance through the workplace have much at stake as the cost of health insurance rises, they are not necessarily prepared to constructively participate in prioritizing their health insurance benefits in order to limit cost. Structured group exercises. Employees of 41 public and private organizations in Northern California. Administration of the CHAT (Choosing Healthplans All Together) exercise in which participants engage in deliberation to design health insurance benefits under financial constraints. Change in priorities and attitudes about the need to exercise insurance cost constraints. Participants (N = 744) became significantly more cognizant of the need to limit insurance benefits for the sake of affordability and capable of prioritizing benefit options. Those agreeing that it is reasonable to limit health insurance coverage given the cost increased from 47% to 72%. It is both possible and valuable to involve employees in priority setting regarding health insurance benefits through the use of structured decision tools.

  19. 75 FR 45166 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Nominations for Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (the Council), which is to consist of 15 members to... desiring to recommend one or more individuals for appointment to the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare...

  20. 76 FR 44047 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Nominations for Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (the Council), which is to consist of 15 members to... one or more individuals for appointment to the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension...

  1. Claims procedures for employee benefit plans--Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, Department of Labor. Request for information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-08

    This document requests information from the public concerning the advisability of amending the existing regulation under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) that establishes minimum requirements for employee benefit plan claims procedures. The term "claims procedure" refers to the process that employee benefit plans must provide for participants and beneficiaries who seek to obtain pension or welfare plan benefits, including requests for medical treatment or services, consideration of claims, and review of denials of claims by plans. The primary purpose of this notice is to obtain information to assist the Department of Labor (the Department) in evaluating (1) the extent to which the current claims procedure regulation assures that group health plan participants and beneficiaries are provided with effective and timely means to file and resolve claims for health care benefits, and (1) whether and in what way the existing minimum requirements should be amended with respect to group health plans covered by ERISA. The furnished information also will assist the Department in determining whether the regulation should be amended with respect to pension plans covered by ERISA and in developing legislative proposals to address any identified deficiencies relating to the claims procedures that cannot be addressed by amending the current regulation.

  2. 76 FR 36857 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for Most Community Rated Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... contingency reserve accounts or factored into reduced premiums for enrollees in the following plan year. Under...-TCR community rated plans' contingency reserves. Issuers failing to meet the FEHB-specific MLR... definition of medical loss ratio by HHS in December 2010, upon which this rule relies. Further, plans have...

  3. 76 FR 38282 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for Most Community Rated Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... set but prior to January 1 of the plan year, including book rates filed with the state. Once SSSGs... after rates were set but before January 1 of the plan year, such as new book rates filed in the state in.... OPM's intention is to keep FEHB premiums stable and sustainable using this more transparent...

  4. Five-year examination of utilization and drug cost outcomes associated with benefit design changes including reference pricing for proton pump inhibitors in a state employee health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jill T; Neill, Kathryn K; Davis, Dwight A

    2011-04-01

    The Arkansas State Employee Benefits Division (EBD) is a self-insured program comprising public school and other state employees, their spouses, and dependents. Previous research published in JMCP (2006) showed drug cost savings of $2.20 per member per month (PMPM; 37.6%) or annualized savings of $3.4 million associated with a benefit design change and coverage of the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole over-the-counter (OTC) beginning in March 2004. On May 1, 2005, brand esomeprazole was excluded from coverage, with current users grandfathered for 4 months until September 2005. Reference pricing for PPIs, including esomeprazole but excluding generic omeprazole, was implemented on September 1, 2005, and the beneficiary cost share for all PPIs except generic omeprazole was determined from comparison of the PPI actual price to the $0.90 omeprazole OTC reference price per unit. To examine PPI utilization and drug costs before and after (a) excluding esomeprazole from coverage (with grandfathering current users) and (b) implementing a therapeutic maximum allowable cost (TMAC), or reference-pricing benefit design, for the PPI class in a large state employee health plan with fairly stable enrollment of approximately 127,500 members in 2005 through 2008 and approximately 128,000 members in 2009 Q1. The pharmacy claims database for the EBD was used to examine utilization and cost data for PPIs in a longitudinal analysis for the 61-month period from March 1, 2004, through March 31, 2009. Pharmacy claims data were compared for the period 14 months prior to esomeprazole exclusion (preperiod), 4 months during the esomeprazole exclusion (postperiod 1), and the ensuing 43 months of PPI reference pricing (postperiod 2). PPI cost and utilization data for the intervention group of approximately 127,500 beneficiaries were compared with a group of 122 self-insured employers with a total of nearly 1 million beneficiaries whose pharmacy benefits did not include reference pricing for

  5. 78 FR 60653 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... authority to administer health benefits to Federal employees (as defined in 5 U.S.C. 8901(1)). Because..., in essence, an employer contribution, the final rule clarifies that Members of Congress and... paragraph (c), but may purchase health benefit plans, as defined in 5 U.S.C. 8901(6), that are offered by an...

  6. 78 FR 50112 - Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Extension of Deadline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Advisory Council on Employee Welfare... appointment to the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans. Section 512 of the Employee... of an Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (the Council), which is to...

  7. 20 CFR 1002.261 - Who is responsible for funding any plan obligation to provide the employee with pension benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... obligation to provide the employee with pension benefits? 1002.261 Section 1002.261 Employees' Benefits... and Benefits Pension Plan Benefits § 1002.261 Who is responsible for funding any plan obligation to provide the employee with pension benefits? With the exception of multiemployer plans, which have separate...

  8. 26 CFR 1.410(b)-3 - Employees and former employees who benefit under a plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... theoretical reserve is greater than or equal to the actuarial present value of the fractional rule benefit. (F.... Thus, although individuals who take advantage of the benefit become former employees, the window...

  9. Employee choice of flexible spending account participation and health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Barton H; Marton, James

    2008-07-01

    Despite the fact that flexible spending accounts (FSAs) are becoming an increasingly popular employer-provided health benefit, there has been very little empirical study of FSA use among employees at the individual level. This study contributes to the literature on FSAs using a unique data set that provides three years of employee-level-matched benefits data. Motivated by the theoretical model of FSA choice presented in Cardon and Showalter (J. Health Econ. 2001; 20(6):935-954), we examine the determinants of FSA participation and contribution levels using cross-sectional and random-effect two-part models. FSA participation and health plan choice are also modeled jointly in each year using conditional logit models. We find that, even after controlling for a number of other demographic characteristics, non-whites are less likely to participate in the FSA program, have lower contributions conditional on participation, and have a lower probability of switching to new lower cost share, higher premium plans when they were introduced. We also find evidence that choosing health plans with more expected out-of-pocket expenses is correlated with participation in the FSA program. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Knowledge and perceptions among overweight and obese employees about lifestyle-related health benefit changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Linnan, Laura; Finkelstein, Eric A; Tate, Deborah F; Naseer, Carolyn; Evenson, Kelly R

    2011-01-01

    We investigated perceptions among overweight and obese state employees about changes to health insurance that were designed to reduce the scope of health benefits for employees who are obese or who smoke. Before implementation of health benefit plan changes, 658 state employees who were overweight (ie, those with a body mass index [BMI] of 25-29.9) or obese (ie, those with a BMI of > or = 30) enrolled in a weight-loss intervention study were asked about their attitudes and beliefs concerning the new benefit plan changes. Thirty-one percent of employees with a measured BMI of 40 or greater self-reported a BMI of less than 40, suggesting they were unaware that their current BMI would place them in a higher-risk benefit plan. More than half of all respondents reported that the new benefit changes would motivate them to make behavioral changes, but fewer than half felt confident in their ability to make changes. Respondents with a BMI of 40 or greater were more likely than respondents in lower BMI categories to oppose the new changes focused on obesity (P benefit changes focused on tobacco use (P employees enrolled in a weight-loss study, limiting generalizability to the larger population of state employees. Benefit plan changes that require employees who are obese and smoke to pay more for health care may motivate some, but not all, individuals to change their behaviors. Since confidence to lose weight was lowest among individuals in the highest BMI categories, more-intense intervention options may be needed to achieve desired health behavior changes.

  11. Annual incremental health benefit costs and absenteeism among employees with and without rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Nathan L; Cifaldi, Mary A; Smeeding, James E; Shaw, James W; Brook, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    To assess the impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on absence time, absence payments, and other health benefit costs from the perspective of US employers. Retrospective regression-controlled analysis of a database containing US employees' administrative health care and payroll data for those who were enrolled for at least 1 year in an employer-sponsored health insurance plan. Employees with RA (N = 2705) had $4687 greater average annual medical and prescription drug costs (P employees with RA used an additional 3.58 annual absence days, including 1.2 more sick leave and 1.91 more short-term disability days (both P Employees with RA have greater costs across all benefits than employees without RA.

  12. 78 FR 64873 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... family members under the FEHB and the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP... procedure, Government employees, Health facilities, Health insurance, Health professions, Hostages, Iraq... Administrative practice and procedure, Government employees, Health insurance, Taxes, Wages. 5 CFR Part 894...

  13. Knowledge and Perceptions of Overweight Employees about Lifestyle-Related Health Benefit Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Linnan, Laura; Finkelstein, Eric A.; Tate, Deborah; Naseer, Carolyn; Evenson, Kelly R.

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated overweight state employees’ perceptions about health insurance benefit changes designed to reduce the scope of health benefits for employees who were obese or smoked. Methods Prior to implementation of health benefit plan changes, 658 overweight [body mass index (BMI) ≥25 kg/m2] state employees enrolled in a weight loss intervention study were asked about their attitudes and beliefs of the new benefit plan changes. Results Thirty-one percent of employees with a BMI≥40 kg/ m2 were unaware that their current BMI would place them in a higher risk benefit plan. More than half reported that the new benefit change would motivate them to make behavioral changes, but less than half felt confident in making changes. Respondents with a BMI≥40 kg/m2 were more likely to oppose the new changes focused on BMI categories compared to respondents in lower BMI categories (Pnon-smokers (Pconfidence to lose weight was lowest among those in the highest weight categories, health plan benefit modifications may be required to achieve desired health behavior changes. PMID:21901911

  14. 75 FR 64947 - 154th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register... Employee Benefits Security Administration 154th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and... Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans will be held on November 3-4, 2010. The...

  15. 76 FR 38281 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for Most Community Rated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... CFR Parts 1602, 1615, et al. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for... Part 890; 48 CFR Parts 1602, 1615, 1632, and 1652 RIN 3206-AM39 Federal Employees Health Benefits..., 2011 (76 FR 36857). The document amends the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) regulations at 5...

  16. 78 FR 45615 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION..., the IRS is soliciting comments concerning the Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan. [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Annual Return/Report of Employee Benefit Plan. OMB...

  17. Understanding Employee Awareness of Health Care Quality Information: How Can Employers Benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jean; Feldman, Roger; Carlin, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    Objective To analyze the factors associated with employee awareness of employer-disseminated quality information on providers. Data Sources Primary data were collected in 2002 on a stratified, random sample of 1,365 employees in 16 firms that are members of the Buyers Health Care Action Group (BHCAG) located in the Minneapolis–St. Paul region. An employer survey was also conducted to assess how employers communicated the quality information to employees. Study Design In 2001, BHCAG sponsored two programs for reporting provider quality. We specify employee awareness of the quality information to depend on factors that influence the benefits and costs of search. Factors influencing the benefits include age, sex, provider satisfaction, health status, job tenure, and Twin Cities tenure. Factors influencing search costs include employee income, education, and employer communication strategies. We estimate the model using bivariate probit analysis. Data Collection Employee data were collected by phone survey. Principal Findings Overall, the level of quality information awareness is low. However, employer communication strategies such as distributing booklets to all employees or making them available on request have a large effect on the probability of quality information awareness. Employee education and utilization of providers' services are also positively related to awareness. Conclusions This study is one of the first to investigate employee awareness of provider quality information. Given the direct implications for medical outcomes, one might anticipate higher rates of awareness regarding provider quality, relative to plan quality. However, we do not find empirical evidence to support this assertion. PMID:15533188

  18. Integrated employee assistance program/managed behavioral health care benefits: relationship with access and client characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy Merrick, Elizabeth S; Hodgkin, Dominic; Horgan, Constance M; Hiatt, Deirdre; McCann, Bernard; Azzone, Vanessa; Zolotusky, Galina; Ritter, Grant; Reif, Sharon; McGuire, Thomas G

    2009-11-01

    This study examined service user characteristics and determinants of access for enrollees in integrated EAP/behavioral health versus standard managed behavioral health care plans. A national managed behavioral health care organization's claims data from 2004 were used. Integrated plan service users were more likely to be employees rather than dependents, and to be diagnosed with adjustment disorder. Logistic regression analyses found greater likelihood in integrated plans of accessing behavioral health services (OR 1.20, CI 1.17-1.24), and substance abuse services specifically (OR 1.23, CI 1.06-1.43). Results are consistent with the concept that EAP benefits may increase access and address problems earlier.

  19. Two Decades of Employee-Benefit Plans, 1950-1970: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodrubetz, Walter W.

    This article discusses the long-term growth of employee-benefit plans (which have grown tremendously since 1950) and assesses this trend in terms of real gains. The article states that contributions, by 1970, were nine times greater and benefit outlays 14 times greater than in 1950, and the number of persons covered by most types of benefits grew…

  20. 76 FR 53156 - Submission for Review: Request To Change Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Enrollment for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    ...) 3206-0202, Request to Change Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Enrollment for Spouse Equity.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Request to Change Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Enrollment for Spouse..., Healthcare and Insurance, Office of Personnel Management Title: Request to Change Federal Employees Health...

  1. The views of low-income employees regarding mandated comprehensive employee benefits for the sake of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikes, Katherin A; Hull, Sara C; Danis, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Socioeconomic factors stand in the way of good health for low-income populations. We suggest that employee benefits might serve as a means of improving the health of low-wage earners. We convened groups of low-income earners to design hypothetical employee benefit packages. Qualitative analysis of group discussions regarding state-mandated benefits indicated that participants were interested in a great variety of benefits, beyond health care, that address socioeconomic determinants of health. Long-term financial and educational investments were of particular value. These results may facilitate the design of employee benefits that promote the health of low-income workers.

  2. The Views of Low-Income Employees Regarding Mandated Comprehensive Employee Benefits for the Sake of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adikes, Katherin A.; Hull, Sara C.; Dams, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic factors stand in the way of good health for low-income populations. We suggest that employee benefits might serve as a means of improving the health of low-wage earners. We convened groups of low-income earners to design hypothetical employee benefit packages. Qualitative analysis of group discussions regarding state-mandated benefits indicated that participants were interested in a great variety of benefits, beyond health care, that address socioeconomic determinants of health. Long-term financial and educational investments were of particular value. These results may facilitate the design of employee benefits that promote the health of low-income workers. PMID:20391255

  3. 29 CFR 2509.94-3 - Interpretive bulletin relating to in-kind contributions to employee benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employee benefit plans. 2509.94-3 Section 2509.94-3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL INTERPRETIVE BULLETINS RELATING TO...-kind contributions to employee benefit plans. (a) General. This bulletin sets forth the views of the...

  4. 29 CFR 2509.75-3 - Interpretive bulletin relating to investments by employee benefit plans in securities of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Interpretive bulletin relating to investments by employee benefit plans in securities of registered investment.... That section provides that an investment by an employee benefit plan in securities issued by an...

  5. 78 FR 24235 - 166th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 166th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 166th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  6. 75 FR 27002 - 151st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 151st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 151st open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans will be held on...

  7. 76 FR 55706 - 158th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 158th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Teleconference Meeting Pursuant to the.... 1142, the 158th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans...

  8. 78 FR 5209 - 165th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 165th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 165th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  9. 76 FR 36578 - 156th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 156th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 156th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; (also known as...

  10. 78 FR 44600 - 167th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 167th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 167th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  11. 76 FR 65211 - 159th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 159th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 159th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  12. 78 FR 50112 - 168th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 168th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Teleconference Meeting Pursuant to the.... 1142, the 168th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans...

  13. 75 FR 11199 - 150th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 150th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 150th open meeting of the full Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans will be...

  14. 78 FR 62708 - 169th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 169th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 169th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  15. 76 FR 6498 - 155th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 155th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Teleconference Meeting Pursuant to the.... 1142, the 155th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans...

  16. 77 FR 66186 - 164th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 164th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 164th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  17. 75 FR 57063 - 153rd Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 153rd Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 153rd open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans will be held on...

  18. 77 FR 28406 - 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 161st Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 161st open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  19. 77 FR 11159 - 160th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 160th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 160th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  20. 77 FR 52061 - 163rd Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 163rd Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Teleconference Meeting Pursuant to the.... 1142, the 163rd open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans...

  1. 29 CFR 2509.78-1 - Interpretive bulletin relating to payments by certain employee welfare benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employee welfare benefit plans. 2509.78-1 Section 2509.78-1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL INTERPRETIVE BULLETINS RELATING TO... payments by certain employee welfare benefit plans. The Department of Labor today announced its...

  2. 75 FR 47636 - 152nd Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 152nd Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 152nd open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans will be held on...

  3. 77 FR 59420 - 164th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 164th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 164th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  4. 76 FR 48903 - 157th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 157th Meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to the authority... 157th open meeting of the Advisory Council on Employee Welfare and Pension Benefit Plans (also known as...

  5. Broadening Your Employee Benefit Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaski, Nancy J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Cost increases and realization of the diverse needs of employees have prompted organizations to review the cost and value of employee benefits. Examines alternatives including "cafeteria plans," managed care programs, and disability income plans. (MLF)

  6. 29 CFR 2510.3-1 - Employee welfare benefit plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., or benefits in the event of sickness, accident, disability, death or unemployment, or vacation... legal services, or (ii) any benefit described in section 302(c) of the Labor Management Relations Act... the Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947 (hereinafter “the LMRA”) (other than pensions on retirement...

  7. 76 FR 18810 - Submission for Review: Request To Change Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Enrollment for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Request To Change Federal Employees Health...) 3206-0202, Request to Change Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Enrollment for Spouse Equity... faxed to (202) 606-0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Request to Change Federal Employees Health...

  8. 75 FR 53171 - Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Department's standards concerning the independence, knowledge, and competence of third-party experts retained... transaction is in the interests of the plan and of its participants and beneficiaries, and for exercising its...

  9. 29 CFR 1625.10 - Costs and benefits under employee benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., the “benefit package” approach may not be used to reduce health insurance benefits by more than is..., even though the older worker may thereby receive a lesser amount of benefits or insurance coverage... of group term life insurance coverage for older workers, on the basis of age. However, a benefit-by...

  10. Final rules relating to use of electronic communication and recordkeeping technologies by employee pension and welfare benefit plans. Notice of final rulemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-09

    This document contains final rules under Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (ERISA), concerning the disclosure of certain employee benefit plan information through electronic media, and the maintenance and retention of employee benefit plan records in electronic form. The rules establish a safe harbor pursuant to which all pension and welfare benefit plans covered by Title I of ERISA may use electronic media to satisfy disclosure obligations under Title I of ERISA. The rules also provide standards concerning the use of electronic media in the maintenance and retention of records required by sections 107 and 209 of ERISA. The rules affect employee pension and welfare benefit plans, including group health plans, plan sponsors, administrators and fiduciaries, and plan participants and beneficiaries.

  11. 20 CFR 1002.264 - Is the employee allowed to repay a previous distribution from a pension benefits plan upon being...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... distribution from a pension benefits plan upon being reemployed? 1002.264 Section 1002.264 Employees' Benefits... and Benefits Pension Plan Benefits § 1002.264 Is the employee allowed to repay a previous distribution from a pension benefits plan upon being reemployed? Yes, provided the plan is a defined benefit plan...

  12. Employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Březíková, Tereza

    2009-01-01

    The topic of my bachelor's thesis is the employee motivation and benefits. The thesis is divided in two parts, a theoretical one and a practical one. The theoretical part deals with the theory of motivation and individual employee benefits. The practical part describes employee benefits in ČSOB, where I did my research by questionnaires that were filled in by employees from different departments of ČSOB. These employees answered questions about their work motivation and benefits. The resultts...

  13. Healthy, wealthy, and wise: retirement planning predicts employee health improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubler, Timothy; Pierce, Lamar

    2014-09-01

    Are poor physical and financial health driven by the same underlying psychological factors? We found that the decision to contribute to a 401(k) retirement plan predicted whether an individual acted to correct poor physical-health indicators revealed during an employer-sponsored health examination. Using this examination as a quasi-exogenous shock to employees' personal-health knowledge, we examined which employees were more likely to improve their health, controlling for differences in initial health, demographics, job type, and income. We found that existing retirement-contribution patterns and future health improvements were highly correlated. Employees who saved for the future by contributing to a 401(k) showed improvements in their abnormal blood-test results and health behaviors approximately 27% more often than noncontributors did. These findings are consistent with an underlying individual time-discounting trait that is both difficult to change and domain interdependent, and that predicts long-term individual behaviors in multiple dimensions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Increasing health insurance coverage through an extended Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, B C

    2001-01-01

    The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) could be combined with health insurance tax credits to extend coverage to the uninsured. An extended FEHBP, or "E-FEHBP," would be open to all individuals who were not covered through work or public programs and who also were eligible for the tax credits on the basis of income. E-FEHBP also would be open to employees of very small firms, regardless of their eligibility for tax credits. Most plans available to FEHBP participants would be required to offer enrollment to E-FEHBP participants, although premiums would be rated separately. High-risk individuals would be diverted to a separate high-risk pool, the cost of which would be subsidized by the federal government. E-FEHBP would be administered by the states, or if a state declined, by an entity that contracted with the Office of Personnel Management. While E-FEHBP would provide group insurance to people who otherwise could not get it, premiums could exceed the tax-credit amount and some people still might find the coverage unaffordable.

  15. 29 CFR 825.211 - Maintenance of benefits under multi-employer health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.211 Maintenance of benefits under multi-employer health plans. (a) A... that the employee would have been laid off and the employment relationship terminated; or, (3) The...

  16. Analysis of Employee Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Burešová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The target of this bachelor thesis is to analyze employee benefits from the perspective of employees and to employers suggest possible ideas to improve their provision. The work is divided into two parts: theoretical and practical. The theoretical part describes the overal remuneration of employees, payroll system and employee benefits. Benefits are included in the remuneration system, broken and some of them are defined. The practical part presents a survey among employees in the Czech Repub...

  17. Investigating Employee-Reported Benefits of Participation in a Comprehensive Australian Workplace Health Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Michelle; Blizzard, Leigh; Sanderson, Kristy; Teale, Brook; Nelson, Mark; Chappell, Kate; Venn, Alison

    2016-05-01

    To investigate employee-reported benefits of participation, employee organizational commitment, and health-related behaviors and body mass index (BMI) following implementation of a comprehensive workplace health promotion (WHP) program. State government employees from Tasmania, Australia, completed surveys in 2010 (n = 3408) and 2013 (n = 3228). Repeated cross-sectional data were collected on sociodemographic, health, and work characteristics. Participation in WHP activities, employee-reported organizational commitment, and benefits of participation were collected in 2013. Respondents who participated in multiple activities were more likely to agree that participation had motivated them, or helped them to address a range of health and work factors (trends: P employee organizational commitment. No differences were observed in health-related behaviors and BMI between 2010 and 2013. Healthy@Work (pH@W) was either ineffective, or insufficient time had elapsed to detect a population-level change in employee lifestyle factors.

  18. Enhance Your Employee Benefits Package with a 529 College Savings Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Gregory D.

    2003-01-01

    Recommends the establishment of a 529 college-savings program as part of a school district employee-benefits package. Includes how it works, the benefits to employees, the advantages to school districts, and how to get started. (PKP)

  19. Early Experience with Employee Choice of Consumer-Directed Health Plans and Satisfaction with Enrollment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, Jinnet Briggs; Kind, Elizabeth A; Braun, Barbara L; Bertko, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective To assess the initial impact of offering consumer-defined health plan (CDHP) options on employees. Data Sources/Study Setting A mail survey of 4,680 employees in the corporate offices of Humana Inc. in June 2001. Study Design The study was a cross-sectional mail survey of employees aged 18 and older who were eligible for health care benefits. The survey was conducted following open enrollment. The primary outcome is the choice of consumer-directed health plan or not; the secondary outcome is satisfaction with the enrollment process. Important covariates include sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, race, educational level, exempt or nonexempt status, type of coverage), health status, health care utilization, and plan design preferences. Data Collection Methods A six-page questionnaire was mailed to the home of each employee, followed by a reminder postcard and two subsequent mailings to nonrespondents. Principal Findings The response rate was 66.2 percent. Seven percent selected one of the two new plan options. Because there were no meaningful differences between employees choosing either of the two new options, these groups were combined in multivariate analysis. A logistic regression modeled the likelihood of choosing the novel plan options. Those selecting the new plans were less likely to be black (odds ratio [OR] 0.46), less likely to have only Humana coverage (OR 0.30), and more likely to have single coverage (OR 1.77). They were less likely to have a chronic health problem (OR 0.56) and more likely to have had no recent medical visits (OR 3.21). They were more likely to believe that lowest premiums were the most important plan attribute (OR 2.89) and to think there were big differences in the premiums of available plans (OR 5.19). Employees in fair or poor health were more likely to have a difficult time during the online enrollment process. They were more likely to find the communications very helpful (OR 0.42) and the benefits

  20. 29 CFR 825.212 - Employee failure to pay health plan premium payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.212 Employee failure to pay health plan premium payments. (a)(1) In... obligations to maintain health insurance coverage cease under FMLA if an employee's premium payment is more... an employee's insurance in accordance with this section and fails to restore the employee's health...

  1. 26 CFR 1.401-12 - Requirements for qualification of trusts and plans benefiting owner-employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... expressed or implied. Thus, for example, if contributions are, in fact, made on behalf of an owner-employee... is established, the plan must incorporate all the provisions relating to the eligibility and benefits... trust must be satisfied at the time an owner-employee is first covered under such plan. (2) The term...

  2. Evaluation of a comprehensive employee wellness program at an organization with a consumer-directed health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; Schultz, Alyssa B; Kasiarz, David; Edington, Dee W

    2014-04-01

    Consumer-directed health plans (CDHPs) are popular among employers in the United States. This study examined an employee wellness program and its association with employee health in an organization that recently initiated a CDHP. This retrospective observational analysis compared the health risks, employer-paid health care costs, and short-term disability absences of employees of a large financial services corporation from 2009 to 2010. The two-time health risk appraisal participants had a significant improvement in the percentage of employees in the overall low-risk category. The average annual employer-paid medical and pharmacy costs did not significantly change. For employees who improved their health risk category, there was a commensurate change in costs and absences. In a difficult economic climate, this organization began a health promotion program for employees as well as a new CDHP benefit structure. No short-term reduction in health care usage or overall health status was observed.

  3. Employee Benefit Reporting After ERISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Wesley W.

    1976-01-01

    The statutory reporting requirements of ERISA and some of the regulations recently promulgated are discussed. All type of employee benefit plans are covered. For journal availability see HE 508 741. (LBH)

  4. 78 FR 71676 - Submission for Review: 3206-0201, Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Open Season Express...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: 3206-0201, Federal Employees Health Benefits... opportunity to comment on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0201, Federal Employees Health... ; or faxed to (202) 606-0910. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Open...

  5. Employee choice of a high-deductible health plan across multiple employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lave, Judith R; Men, Aiju; Day, Brian T; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuting

    2011-02-01

    To determine factors associated with selecting a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) rather than a preferred provider plan (PPO) and to examine switching and market segmentation after initial selection. Claims and benefit information for 2005-2007 from nine employers in western Pennsylvania first offering HDHP in 2006. We examined plan growth over time, used logistic regression to determine factors associated with choosing an HDHP, and examined the distribution of healthy and sick members across plan types. We linked employees with their dependents to determine family-level variables. We extracted risk scores, covered charges, employee age, and employee gender from claims data. We determined census-level race, education, and income information. Health status, gender, race, and education influenced the type of individual and family policies chosen. In the second year the HDHP was offered, few employees changed plans. Risk segmentation between HDHPs and PPOs existed, but it did not increase. When given a choice, those who are healthier are more likely to select an HDHP leading to risk segmentation. Risk segmentation did not increase in the second year that HDHPs were offered. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Motivation of employees and employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Haninger, David

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis examines the subject of employee motivation and employee benefits. The basic terms and theories needed to comprehend the subject are explained in the theoretical part of the work. The theoretical part of the work also focuses on employee benefits, mainly the goal of employee benefits and listing of currently available employee benefits. In the practical part of the work is an analysis and comparison of employee benefits used in two companies that are representing privat...

  7. 42 CFR 417.155 - How the HMO option must be included in the health benefits plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... printed materials that meet the requirements of § 417.124(b). (ii) Access may not be more restrictive or... benefits plan. 417.155 Section 417.155 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... Organizations in Employee Health Benefits Plans § 417.155 How the HMO option must be included in the health...

  8. 26 CFR 1.401-14 - Inclusion of medical benefits for retired employees in qualified pension or annuity plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inclusion of medical benefits for retired...-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401-14 Inclusion of medical benefits for retired employees in... employer providing such medical benefits by reason of permanent disability. For purposes of the preceding...

  9. Defined contribution health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronstin, P

    2001-03-01

    This Issue Brief discusses the emerging issue of "defined contribution" (DC) health benefits. The term "defined contribution" is used to describe a wide variety of approaches to the provision of health benefits, all of which have in common a shift in the responsibility for payment and selection of health care services from employers to employees. DC health benefits often are mentioned in the context of enabling employers to control their outlay for health benefits by avoiding increases in health care costs. DC health benefits may also shift responsibility for choosing a health plan and the associated risks of choosing a plan from employers to employees. There are three primary reasons why some employers currently are considering some sort of DC approach. First, they are once again looking for ways to keep their health care cost increases in line with overall inflation. Second, some employers are concerned that the public "backlash" against managed care will result in new legislation, regulations, and litigation that will further increase their health care costs if they do not distance themselves from health care decisions. Third, employers have modified not only most employee benefit plans, but labor market practices in general, by giving workers more choice, control, and flexibility. DC-type health benefits have existed as cafeteria plans since the 1980s. A cafeteria plan gives each employee the opportunity to determine the allocation of his or her total compensation (within employer-defined limits) among various employee benefits (primarily retirement or health). Most types of DC health benefits currently being discussed could be provided within the existing employment-based health insurance system, with or without the use of cafeteria plans. They could also allow employees to purchase health insurance directly from insurers, or they could drive new technologies and new forms of risk pooling through which health care services are provided and financed. DC health

  10. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Removal of Eligible and Ineligible Individuals From Existing Enrollments. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    The United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing a final rule amending Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program regulations to provide a process for removal of certain identified individuals who are found not to be eligible as family members from FEHB enrollments. This process would apply to individuals for whom there is a failure to provide adequate documentation of eligibility when requested. This action also amends Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program regulations to allow certain eligible family members to be removed from existing self and family or self plus one enrollments.

  11. Employee benefits or wage increase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper comes from a survey done during the years 2007–2009. It focused on employee satisfaction with the provision of employee benefits. The research included 21 companies, 7 companies were from the engineering sector, 7 companies from the food industry, 3 companies represented the budgetary sphere, 3 companies the services sector and one company operates in pharmaceutical industry.The questionnaire survey consisted of 14 questions, including 5 identification-questions. The paper presents results of the questions on dealing with employees’ awareness of employee benefits and on choosing between employees’ preferences of wage increase or increase in value of benefits provided.Employees are informed about all options of providing employee benefits. Only in 3 cases employees stated dissatisfaction with information. This answer was related with the responses to the second monitored question. Employees of these companies preferred pay increases before benefits’ increases. There was no effect of gender of the respondents, neither the influence of the sector of operation, in the preference of increases in wages or in benefits. Exceptions were the employees of companies operating in the financial sector, who preferred employee benefits before a wage increase. It was found that employees of companies who participated in research in 2009, preferred wage increases before the extension of employee benefits, although the value of the net wage increase is lower than the monetary value of benefits increase.The paper is a part of solution of the research plan MSM 6215648904 The Czech economy in the process of integration and globalization, and the development of agricultural sector and the sector of services under the new conditions of the integrated European market.

  12. Setting a national minimum standard for health benefits: how do state benefit mandates compare with benefits in large-group plans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Allison; Mika, Stephanie; Nuzum, Rachel; Schoen, Cathy

    2009-06-01

    Many proposed health insurance reforms would establish a federal minimum benefit standard--a baseline set of benefits to ensure that people have adequate coverage and financial protection when they purchase insurance. Currently, benefit mandates are set at the state level; these vary greatly across states and generally target specific areas rather than set an overall standard for what qualifies as health insurance. This issue brief considers what a broad federal minimum standard might look like by comparing existing state benefit mandates with the services and providers covered under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) Blue Cross and Blue Shield standard benefit package, an example of minimum creditable coverage that reflects current standard practice among employer-sponsored health plans. With few exceptions, benefits in the FEHBP standard option either meet or exceed those that state mandates require-indicating that a broad-based national benefit standard would include most existing state benefit mandates.

  13. Corporate management of quality in employee health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, James; Temin, Peter

    2003-01-01

    As large companies move their employees into managed care, they must concern themselves with the quality and price of their employees' health care. Based on a survey of Fortune 500 companies, we show that most are integrating several aspects of quality into their purchasing and contracting decisions by focusing on three dimensions--customer service, network composition, and clinical quality. Companies focus on the customer service dimension while the medical community emphasizes clinical quality.

  14. What is an employee benefit plan?: ERISA preemption of "any willing provider" laws after Pegram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, J

    2001-06-01

    This note considers the implications of a recent Supreme Court decision, Pegram v. Herdrich, for preemption of state laws under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). Though Pegram dealt with a fiduciary liability question, and not preemption specifically, the Court in arriving at its decision laid out a definition of the word "loan"--a word that is used in both the fiduciary liability section of ERISA and the preemption section. The Court's definition focuses upon the relationship between the managed care organization and the employer that hires it. The definition, however, excludes from the meaning of "plan" the relationship between the managed care organization and the health care providers it hires. Thus, this Note argues that according to Pegram, state laws that regulate the relationship between managed care organizations and health care providers, such as "any willing provider" laws, should not be preempted by ERISA.

  15. Types of employee benefits in Lithuania – information disclosed in companies’ financial statements

    OpenAIRE

    Legenzova, Renata

    2012-01-01

    Employees have always been recognized among the most important resources of the companies. To attract, retain and motivate their employees, companies introduce various motivation and compensation methods. In accounting they are commonly named as employee benefits. Employee benefits typically refer to wages and salaries, retirement plans, health insurance, life insurance, disability insurance, vacation and employee stock ownership plans. The aim of this paper is to assess what employee benefit...

  16. 5 CFR 630.1209 - Health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health benefits. 630.1209 Section 630... LEAVE Family and Medical Leave § 630.1209 Health benefits. An employee enrolled in a health benefits plan under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (established under chapter 89 of title 5...

  17. Employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a new guideline looking at improving the health and wellbeing of employees, with a particular focus on organisational culture and context, and the role of line managers.

  18. The employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhrmannová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor's study is to describe and analyze the employee motivation and benefits in the payroll system and human recources field. Theoretical part attends to general terms as the employee motivation, the theory of the motivation,the types of the employee benefits, the influence of benefits to the employee's working performance. The practial part focuses on Elanor company, includes introduction of the company, it's history and the present, the offer of the employee benefits. Ne...

  19. Employee motivation and employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Limburská, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to get acquainted with the issue of employee motivation from a theoretical perspective, and then analyze the incentive system in a selected company - Sellier & Bellot. In conclusion, I would like to evaluate the lessons learned and propose some changes and recommendations for improving motivation in the analyzed company. The work is divided into four parts. The first three are rather theoretical. The first part deals with the explanation of the concept of motivation...

  20. Federal employees health program experiences lack of competition in some areas, raising cost concerns for exchange plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Timothy D; Barker, Abigail R; Pollack, Lisa M; Kemper, Leah M; Mueller, Keith J

    2012-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for creation of health insurance exchanges designed to provide private health insurance plan choices. The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program is a national model that to some extent resembles the planned exchanges. Both offer plans at the state level but are also overseen by the federal government. We examined the availability of plans and enrollment levels in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program throughout the United States in 2010. We found that although plans were widely available, enrollment was concentrated in plans owned by just a few organizations, typically Blue Cross/Blue Shield plans. Enrollment was more concentrated in rural areas, which may reflect historical patterns of enrollment or lack of provider networks. Average biweekly premiums for an individual were lowest ($58.48) in counties where competition was extremely high, rising to $65.13 where competition was extremely low. To make certain that coverage sold through exchanges is affordable, policy makers may need to pay attention to areas where there is little plan competition and take steps through risk-adjustment policies or other measures to narrow differences in premiums and out-of-pocket expenses for consumers.

  1. The effect of distance to provider on employee response to changes in mental health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Lurie, Ithai Z

    2006-10-01

    We assess whether distance to provider moderates the effect of a change in mental health benefits on treatment initiation of employees of a large US-based company for psychiatric disorders. Mental health treatment administrative claims data plus eligibility information provided by a Fortune 50 company for the years 1995-1998 are used for the analysis. The effect of distance is measured using the relative effect of the initiative on residents living far from providers compared to those living close to providers. We model the probability of treatment initiation using a random effects logit specification. We find that the effect of distance to provider has the potential to over-shadow other incentives to initiate treatment, especially at distances greater than 4 miles. These results lend further support to the notion that geographic dispersion of providers should be an important consideration when forming a selective contracting network. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Employees' motivation and emloyees' benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Nedzelská, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor thesis is analysing methods how to stimulate and motivate employees. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with the concept of motivation, concepts close to motivation and selected existing theories of motivation. It also deals with employee benefits, function, division and benefits which are frequently offered to employees. The practical part of the thesis, mainly based on written and online questionnaires, concentrates on motivation of employees at Nedcon Boh...

  3. Reducing Employee Health Insurance Benefits: The Effect of McGann and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Frank H.

    1994-01-01

    The impact of a court decision (McGann vs. H&H Music) concerning reduction of employee health insurance benefits in a case of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the federal Americans with Disabilities Act on college decisions regarding reduction of benefits is examined. Recommendations for college are offered. (MSE)

  4. The North Carolina State Health Plan for Teachers and State Employees: Strategies in Creating Financial Stability While Improving Member Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dee; Horner, Beth

    2018-01-01

    The North Carolina State Health Plan provides health care coverage to more than 700,000 members, including teachers, state employees, retirees, current and former lawmakers, state university and community college personnel, and their dependents. The State Health Plan is a division of the North Carolina Department of State Treasurer, self-insured, and exempt from the Employee Retirement Income Security Act as a government-sponsored plan. With health care costs rising at rates greater than funding, the Plan must take measures to stem cost growth while ensuring access to quality health care. The Plan anticipates focusing on strategic initiatives that drive results and cost savings while improving member health to protect the Plan's financial future. ©2018 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  5. Beyond Your Paycheck: An Employee Benefits Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discusses fringe benefits and points out that employee benefits in medium and large firms account for more than 27 percent of total compensation. Differentiates among statutory (required by law), compensatory (wages paid for time not worked such as vacation and sick leave), and supplementary (including insurance and pension plans) benefits and…

  6. Federal Employees Health Benefits and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Programs' Coverage Exception for Children of Same-Sex Domestic Partners. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-02

    This action amends the rule to create a regulatory exception that allows children of same-sex domestic partners living overseas to maintain their Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Program (FEDVIP) coverage until September 30, 2018. Due to a recent Supreme Court decision, as of January 1, 2016, coverage of children of same-sex domestic partners under the FEHB Program and FEDVIP will generally only be allowed if the couple is married, as discussed in Benefits Administration Letter (BAL) 15-207 dated October 5, 2015. OPM recognizes there are additional requirements placed on overseas federal employees that may not apply to other civilian employees with duty stations in the United States making it difficult to travel to the United States to marry same-sex partners.

  7. Integrated employee assistance program/managed behavioral health plan utilization by persons with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, Elizabeth S Levy; Hodgkin, Dominic; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M; Greenfield, Shelly F; McCann, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    New federal parity and health reform legislation, promising increased behavioral health care access and a focus on prevention, has heightened interest in employee assistance programs (EAPs). This study investigated service utilization by persons with a primary substance use disorder (SUD) diagnosis in a managed behavioral health care (MBHC) organization's integrated EAP/MBHC product (N = 1,158). In 2004, 25.0% of clients used the EAP first for new treatment episodes. After initial EAP utilization, 44.4% received no additional formal services through the plan, and 40.4% received regular outpatient services. Overall, outpatient care, intensive outpatient/day treatment, and inpatient/residential detoxification were most common. About half of the clients had co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses. Mental health service utilization was extensive. Findings suggest that for service users with primary SUD diagnoses in an integrated EAP/MBHC product, the EAP benefit plays a key role at the front end of treatment and is often only one component of treatment episodes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 29 CFR 70.54 - Employee Benefits Security Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Employee Benefits Security Administration. 70.54 Section 70... Records and Filings § 70.54 Employee Benefits Security Administration. (a) The annual financial reports (Form 5500) and attachments/schedules as filed by employee benefit plans under the Employee Retirement...

  9. Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974: rules and regulations for administration and enforcement; claims procedure. Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, Labor. Final regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-11-21

    This document contains a final regulation revising the minimum requirements for benefit claims procedures of employee benefit plans covered by Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA or the Act). The regulation establishes new standards for the processing of claims under group health plans and plans providing disability benefits and further clarifies existing standards for all other employee benefit plans. The new standards are intended to ensure more timely benefit determinations, to improve access to information on which a benefit determination is made, and to assure that participants and beneficiaries will be afforded a full and fair review of denied claims. When effective, the regulation will affect participants and beneficiaries of employee benefit plans, employers who sponsor employee benefit plans, plan fiduciaries, and others who assist in the provision of plan benefits, such as third-party benefits administrators and health service providers or health maintenance organizations that provide benefits to participants and beneficiaries of employee benefit plans.

  10. The challenge of funding hospital employee retirement benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Christina

    2012-12-01

    Hospitals face a difficult challenge in meeting existing benefits obligations to employees while maintaining financial reserves to invest in electronic health records, quality improvement, and more effective integration of care. Although they may no longer be able to afford offering employees defined-benefit plans, many forward-looking healthcare organizations are finding ways to keep their commitments without sacrificing the balance sheet. One such organization is Scripps Health in San Diego, whose innovative benefits packages have contributed to its being ranked 56th in Fortune's "100 Best Companies to Work For" list in 2012.

  11. Do employers know the quality of health care benefits they provide? Use of HEDIS depression scores for health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robst, John; Rost, Kathryn; Marshall, Donna

    2013-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Dissemination of health quality measures is a necessary ingredient of efforts to harness market-based forces, such as value-based purchasing by employers, to improve health care quality. This study examined reporting of Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures for depression to firms interested in improving depression care. METHODS During surveys conducted between 2009 and 2011, a sample of 325 employers that were interested in improving depression treatment were asked whether their primary health plan reports HEDIS scores for depression to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and if so, whether they knew the scores. Data about HEDIS reporting by the health plans were collected from the NCQA. RESULTS HEDIS depression scores were reported by the primary health plans of 154 (47%) employers, but only 7% of employers knew their plan's HEDIS scores. Because larger employers were more likely to report knowing the scores, 53% of all employees worked for employers who reported knowing the scores. A number of structural, health benefit, and need characteristics predicted knowledge of HEDIS depression scores by employers. CONCLUSIONS The study demonstrated that motivated employers did not know their depression HEDIS scores even when their plan publicly reported them. Measures of health care quality are not reaching the buyers of insurance products; however, larger employers were more likely to know the HEDIS scores for their health plan, suggesting that value-based purchasing may have some ability to affect health care quality.

  12. Employee Responses to Health Insurance Premium Increases

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Dana; Leibowitz, Arleen; Robalino, David

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the sensitivity of employees’ health insurance decisions—including the decision to not choose health maintenance organization or fee-for-service coverage—during periods of rapidly escalating healthcare costs. Study Design: A retrospective cohort study of employee plan choices at a single large firm with a “cafeteria-style” benefits plan wherein employees paid all the additional cost of purchasing more generous insurance. Methods: We modeled the probabil...

  13. Predictors of health plan satisfaction among employees in an academic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembe, Allard E; Lu, Bo; Sieck, Cynthia J

    2010-01-01

    This study's goal was to identify the strongest predictors of satisfaction with a health plan offered to employees at a large university in the Midwestern United States. Survey responses from 1533 employees were analyzed (response rate of 51.2%). Unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to identify factors that were statistically associated with plan satisfaction. Multivariate logistic regression analyses followed by likelihood ratio testing were conducted to assess the predictive value of particular variables. The strongest predictors of satisfaction with the health plan were the perceived quality of the plan's wellness and prevention services (OR = 3.69), having a personal doctor or nurse (OR = 2.70), being satisfied with the cost of the health plan (OR = 2.18), and having claims handled correctly (OR = 1.90). The factors that have the greatest individual effect on these findings were the quality of the plan's prevention and wellness services and how effectively the plan communicated how much particular services or visits would cost.

  14. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Federal Employees Health Benefit Plan Equivalent Coverage (FEHBP—Equivalent Health Insurance Coverage). A... coverage. Health benefits coverage that is offered and generally available to State employees in the State... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section...

  15. 29 CFR 1405.11 - Effect on employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to coverage under the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance and Federal Employees Health Benefits Programs. The Government contribution for health insurance of eligible part-time employees will be prorated... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect on employee benefits. 1405.11 Section 1405.11 Labor...

  16. Reducing suboptimal employee decisions can build the business case for employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Christopher; Cyboran, Steven F

    2013-01-01

    Suboptimal employee decisions are prevalent in employee benefit plans. Poor decisions have significant consequences for employees and employers. Improving participant decisions produces beneficial outcomes such as lower labor costs, higher productivity and better workforce management. The business case for employee benefits can be strengthened by applying lessons learned from the field of behavioral economics to employee benefit plan design and to workforce communication. This article explains the types of behavioral biases that influence suboptimal decisions and explores how enlightened employee benefit plan choice architecture and vivid behavioral messaging contribute to human and better organizational outcomes.

  17. 76 FR 2142 - Employee Benefits Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Hearing on Definition of ``Fiduciary'' AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of hearing and extension of comment period. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Employee Benefits Security Administration will...

  18. 78 FR 53704 - Employee Retirement Benefit Plan Returns Required on Magnetic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Purchase Plan Actuarial Information,'' which are required to be filed as part of the Form 5500 or Form 5500..., Courts, Crime, Employment taxes, Estate taxes, Excise taxes, Gift taxes, Income taxes, Investigations... its successor). (ii) Multiemployer and certain money purchase plans. For multiemployer and certain...

  19. 75 FR 68383 - Hearing on Reasonable Contracts or Arrangements for Welfare Benefit Plans Under Section 408(b)(2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Arrangements for Welfare Benefit Plans Under Section 408(b)(2)--Welfare Plan Fee Disclosure AGENCY: Employee... health, disability, severance and other employee welfare benefit plans under section 408(b)(2) of the... affect employee welfare benefit plans. At least one commenter addressed specific concerns of pharmacy...

  20. Employee benefits managers' opinions about addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Bentson H; Lierman, Walter K; Penner, Norman R; McCamant, Lynn E; Zani, Brigid G

    2003-01-01

    Employee benefits managers arrange addictive disease treatment insurance coverage for the majority of people in the United States but little is known about these decision-makers. Managers were surveyed to learn their opinions about addiction treatment. Subjects were 131 people (61 percent female, 94 percent white, average age 46, average of 14 years in the human resources field). Managers were asked to rank health benefits (physical health, dental, alcohol-drug, vision, mental health, employee assistance program, and pharmaceuticals) on 15 dimensions. Managers ranked alcohol-drug abuse treatment worst on fiveitems and second to the worst on another four of the 15 dimensions. On the item considered most important by the managers, respondents noted that employees often (2.8) ask for improved physical health benefits but rarely do so for alcohol and drug (4.1) benefits (p < .001). Education of workers and payers will be needed to change opinions about treatment of addictive disorders.

  1. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program: eligibility for Pathway Programs participants. Interim final rule with request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-06

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing an interim final regulation to update the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) and the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP) regulations to reflect updated election opportunities for participants in the Pathways Programs. The Pathways Programs were created by Executive Order (E.O.) 13562, signed by the President on December 27, 2010, and are designed to enable the Federal Government to compete effectively for students and recent graduates by improving its recruitment efforts through internships and similar programs with Federal agencies. This interim final rule furthers these recruitment and retention efforts by providing health insurance, as well as dental and vision benefits, to eligible program participants and their families.

  2. Awakening consumer stewardship of health benefits: prevalence and differentiation of new health plan models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Meredith; Milstein, Arnold

    2004-08-01

    Despite widespread publicity of consumer-directed health plans, little is known about their prevalence and the extent to which their designs adequately reflect and support consumerism. We examined three types of consumer-directed health plans: health reimbursement accounts (HRAs), premium-tiered, and point-of-care tiered benefit plans. We sought to measure the extent to which these plans had diffused, as well as to provide a critical look at the ways in which these plans support consumerism. Consumerism in this context refers to efforts to enable informed consumer choice and consumers' involvement in managing their health. We also wished to determine whether mainstream health plans-health maintenance organization (HMO), point of service (POS), and preferred provider organization (PPO) models-were being influenced by consumerism. Our study uses national survey data collected by Mercer Human Resource Consulting from 680 national and regional commercial health benefit plans on HMO, PPO, POS, and consumer-directed products. We defined consumer-directed products as health benefit plans that provided (1) consumer incentives to select more economical health care options, including self-care and no care, and (2) information and support to inform such selections. We asked health plans that offered consumer-directed products about 2003 enrollment, basic design features, and the availability of decision support. We also asked mainstream health plans about their activities that supported consumerism (e.g., proactive outreach to inform or influence enrollee behavior, such as self-management or preventive care, reminders sent to patients with identified medical conditions.) We analyzed survey responses for all four product lines in order to identify those plans that offer health reimbursement accounts (HRAs), premium-tiered, or point-of-care tiered models as well as efforts of mainstream health plans to engage informed consumer decision making. The majority of enrollees in

  3. Exploration of Selection Bias Issues for the DoD Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    e.g., employer or Medicare). Thus we focus on the details of theory of consumer preferences and choices in the discussion below, while providing similar...health status. Two important factors in consumer health plan choices are inherent to any insurance market. First, the consumer preferences that guide...important factors in consumer health plan choices are inherent to any insurance market. First, the consumer preferences that guide their choices of

  4. Benefits for employees with children with ADHD: findings from the Collaborative Employee Benefit Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, James M; Fluet, Chris; Kuhlthau, Karen A; Anderson, Betsy; Wells, Nora; Epstein, Susan; Allen, Debby; Tobias, Carol

    2005-02-01

    Parents of most children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are employed. Employers have interest in decreasing employee absenteeism and improving workplace productivity, partly through employee benefits. The authors interviewed employers to (1) determine how they view the needs of employees with children with ADHD and (2) identify benefits that might help employees with children with ADHD. The authors carried out a systematic interview study of mainly family-friendly, large employers in four U.S. urban markets (Boston, Cleveland, Miami, Seattle). Multidisciplinary interview teams used a protocol to gather basic company information, benefit philosophy, current insurance and other employee benefits, and knowledge of ADHD and its impacts on employees. Initially, the interview team and then the larger project team reviewed all protocols for common themes. The authors interviewed staff of 41 employers (human resource managers, work/life program directors, benefits directors). Only 15 of 41 interviewees knew about ADHD, its prevalence, or its effects on parents. They had little knowledge of how differences in managed behavioral health may affect families' access to diagnostic and treatment services for ADHD, although most had experience with primary care management of depression among employees. Employers offer a variety of other benefits, including work/life and employee assistance programs, occasionally providing employees help with caring for a child with a mental health condition, on-site parent training programs, or assistance with child care. Other potentially useful employee benefits include flexible work and leave policies and information and referral services that can link parents with community programs. Although employers have limited awareness of ADHD and its potential effect on employees' work, this study identified opportunities to improve both health insurance and other benefits for employees with children with ADHD.

  5. Using a 401(h) account to fund retiree health benefits from your pension plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David; Singerman, Eduardo

    2003-06-01

    If a health and welfare plan covering retirees faces financial shortfalls, administrators and trustees can fund retiree health benefit payments from a related pension plan that may be in better condition. This method is legal and ethical, but it requires sophisticated accounting techniques for creating an account that provides retiree members with promised benefits while meeting statutory and regulatory requirements.

  6. 41 CFR 60-741.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. 60-741.25 Section 60-741.25 Public Contracts and Property Management... Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. (a) An insurer, hospital, or medical service...

  7. Claims Procedure for Plans Providing Disability Benefits. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    This document contains a final regulation revising the claims procedure regulations under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) for employee benefit plans providing disability benefits. The final rule revises and strengthens the current rules primarily by adopting certain procedural protections and safeguards for disability benefit claims that are currently applicable to claims for group health benefits pursuant to the Affordable Care Act. This rule affects plan administrators and participants and beneficiaries of plans providing disability benefits, and others who assist in the provision of these benefits, such as third-party benefits administrators and other service providers.

  8. 20 CFR 229.45 - Employee benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee benefit. 229.45 Section 229.45 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE Computation of the Overall Minimum Rate § 229.45 Employee benefit. The original...

  9. Employee responses to health insurance premium increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Leibowitz, Arleen A; Robalino, David A

    2004-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity of employees' health insurance decisions--including the decision to not choose health maintenance organization or fee-for-service coverage--during periods of rapidly escalating healthcare costs. A retrospective cohort study of employee plan choices at a single large firm with a "cafeteria-style" benefits plan wherein employees paid all the additional cost of purchasing more generous insurance. We modeled the probability that an employee would drop coverage or switch plans in response to employee premium increases using data from a single large US company with employees across 47 states during the 3-year period of 1989 through 1991, a time of large premium increases within and across plans. Premium increases induced substantial plan switching. Single employees were more likely to respond to premium increases by dropping coverage, whereas families tended to switch to another plan. Premium increases of 10% induced 7% of single employees to drop or severely cut back on coverage; 13% to switch to another plan; and 80% to remain in their existing plan. Similar figures for those with family coverage were 11%, 12%, and 77%, respectively. Simulation results that control for known covariates show similar increases. When faced with a dramatic increase in premiums--on the order of 20%--nearly one fifth of the single employees dropped coverage compared with 10% of those with family coverage. Employee coverage decisions are sensitive to rapidly increasing premiums, and single employees may be likely to drop coverage. This finding suggests that sustained premium increases could induce substantial increases in the number of uninsured individuals.

  10. The technology of benefits outsourcing: helping employees help themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M E; Meuse, D

    1997-01-01

    The exponential growth of health plan offerings and increased use of defined contribution retirement plans has caused a fundamental shift in the way that benefits management is done. Specifically, the authors point out that we are moving into an era of "self-service" in employee benefits, with employees often taking the role of management of their own benefits through use of technology. Outsourcing benefits management through the use of technology has meant the role of HR departments has shifted from personnel administrators to strategic business partners. By outsourcing administrative functions and maximizing the power of new interactive technology, human resource departments are able to focus on the strategic needs of the company to adapt to the challenges of the future.

  11. Benefits for employees with children with special needs: findings from the collaborative employee benefit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, James M; Fluet, Christina F; Honberg, Lynda; Anderson, Betsy; Wells, Nora; Epstein, Susan; Allen, Deborah; Tobias, Carol; Kuhlthau, Karen A

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 13-15 percent of U.S. children have special health care needs. The demands of their caregiving can affect their parents' health and workplace performance. We interviewed forty-one U.S. employers and conducted focus groups with working parents in four U.S. cities to determine the extent to which employers understand the needs of these families and to identify opportunities for improving workplace benefits for these employees beyond health insurance. Employers saw value in improving workforce performance and employee retention through expanded benefits and indicated promising opportunities to improve their response to the needs of employees with children with chronic conditions.

  12. Analysis of employee benefits in company

    OpenAIRE

    Burda, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    The main subject of Bachelor's Thesis called "Analysis of employee benefits in company" is to analyze system of employee benefits used in company Saint-Gobain Construction Products a.s. The theoretical part focuses on the meaning of employee benefits, their categorization, terms of tax legislation a trends. In the practical section of the work, the current state of employee benefits in the firm is discussed and reviewed. A survey was conducted to investigate the satisfaction of employees towa...

  13. UMTRA project office federal employee occupational safety and health program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.lA. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES ampersand H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES ampersand H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites and defines the ES ampersand H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES ampersand H program and covers only federal employees working on the UMTRA Project

  14. Plan amendments--vesting of welfare benefits--settlor intent--ability to terminate health benefits for those on long-term disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Halbach v. Great-West Life & Annuity Ins. Co., 561 F3d 872 (8th Cir. Mo. 2009): Because the vesting of benefits is subject to contractual arrangement under an employee benefit plan, summary judgment was improper where a genuine issue of material fact remained as to the settlor's intent to vest benefits.

  15. Improving Employee Benefits: Doing the Right Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Joe

    1990-01-01

    With some exceptions, child care workers receive fewer employee benefits than workers in other occupations. The employer's and the employee's point of view on employee benefits are discussed. Also considers availability of benefits in child care and the obstacles to improved benefits for workers. (DG)

  16. Workplace Financial Wellness Programs Help Employees Manage Health Care Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Cynthia; Smith, Michael C

    Employers and employees are navigating major changes in health insurance benefits, including the move to high-deductible health plans in conjunction with health savings accounts (HSAs). The HSA offers unique benefits that could prove instrumental in helping workers both navigate current health care expenses and build a nest egg for much larger health care costs in retirement. Yet employees often don't understand the HSA and how to best use it. How can employers help employees make wise benefits choices that work for their personal financial circumstances?

  17. Flexible benefit plans in Dutch organisations

    OpenAIRE

    Hillebrink, C.

    2006-01-01

    Flexible benefit plans give employees a greater say over the composition of their benefits than traditional Dutch benefit plans. These arrangements developed in a time of further individualisation, increasing flexibility in the workplace, and a tight labour market in the Netherlands. By giving employees a choice in the way they are paid, employers hoped to become more attractive employers, and lend a helping hand to employees who were combining work and care. In this study, flexible benefit p...

  18. Health benefits in 2013: moderate premium increases in employer-sponsored plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Gary; Rae, Matthew; Panchal, Nirmita; Damico, Anthony; Whitmore, Heidi; Bostick, Nathan; Kenward, Kevin

    2013-09-01

    Employer-sponsored health insurance premiums rose moderately in 2013, the annual Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust (Kaiser/HRET) Employer Health Benefits Survey found. In 2013 single coverage premiums rose 5 percent to $5,884, and family coverage premiums rose 4 percent to $16,351. The percentage of firms offering health benefits (57 percent) was similar to that in 2012, as was the percentage of workers at offering firms who were covered by their firm's health benefits (62 percent). The share of workers with a deductible for single coverage increased significantly from 2012, as did the share of workers in small firms with annual deductibles of $1,000 or more. Most firms (77 percent), including nearly all large employers, continued to offer wellness programs, but relatively few used incentives to encourage employees to participate. More than half of large employers offering health risk appraisals to workers offered financial incentives for completing the appraisal.

  19. Employee Benefit Status from E-Employee Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Semseddin; Çoklar, Ahmet Naci

    2017-01-01

    The internet is the one of the most important global network and information source in information age. The internet has changed employee's life enormously. The purpose of this study is to clarify the benefitting situations of employees from e-employee services. For this purpose, a 20-item data collection tool, based on the e-employee services put…

  20. Employee contributions: a primer on their use, historical trends and overall fit within benefits strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Hudson A

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of employee contributions as a strategic tool within employee health plans. While most employers require some form of employee contributions for health care, there is no clear "one-size-fits-all" solution. A myriad of strategies are in place, some active and some passive. This article reviews both common and emerging strategies and how they differ based on industry, employer size and region; discusses how employee contribution strategy fits within overall benefits strategy; and provides a strategic framework for approaching employee contributions in the future.

  1. Developing a composite weighted quality metric to reflect the total benefit conferred by a health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskler, Glen B; Braithwaite, R Scott

    2015-03-01

    To improve individual health quality measures, which are associated with varying degrees of health benefit, and composite quality metrics, which weight individual measures identically. We developed a health-weighted composite quality measure reflecting the total health benefit conferred by a health plan annually, using preventive care as a test case. Using national disease prevalence, we simulated a hypothetical insurance panel of individuals aged 25 to 84 years. For each individual, we estimated the gain in life expectancy associated with 1 year of health system exposure to encourage adherence to major preventive care guidelines, controlling for patient characteristics (age, race, gender, comorbidity) and variation in individual adherence rates. This personalized gain in life expectancy was used to proxy for the amount of health benefit conferred by a health plan annually to its members, and formed weights in our health-weighted composite quality measure. We aggregated health benefits across the health insurance membership panel to analyze total health system performance. Our composite quality metric gave the highest weights to health plans that succeeded in implementing tobacco cessation and weight loss. One year of compliance with these goals was associated with 2 to 10 times as much health benefit as compliance with easier-to-follow preventive care services, such as mammography, aspirin, and antihypertensives. For example, for women aged 55 to 64 years, successful interventions to encourage weight loss were associated with 2.1 times the health benefit of blood pressure reduction and 3.9 times the health benefit of increasing adherence with screening mammography. A single health-weighted quality metric may inform measurement of total health system performance.

  2. 41 CFR 60-300.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life... VETERANS, AND ARMED FORCES SERVICE MEDAL VETERANS Discrimination Prohibited § 60-300.25 Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. (a) An insurer, hospital, or medical service company, health...

  3. 41 CFR 60-250.25 - Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Health insurance, life... SEPARATED VETERANS, AND OTHER PROTECTED VETERANS Discrimination Prohibited § 60-250.25 Health insurance, life insurance and other benefit plans. (a) An insurer, hospital, or medical service company, health...

  4. Perils, pitfalls, and benefits of a surgeon as a health system employee: the contracting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graebner, Nancy K

    2011-06-01

    One would be hard pressed today to find a general surgeon or subspecialty-trained general surgeon who has not been approached by a health system to discuss employment. The majority of physicians find these initial discussions with a hospital administrator daunting at best regardless of whether they are just finishing residency or fellowship training or have had many successful years of private practice under their belt. Just as real estate has the mantra of "location, location, location," I would suggest that physician employment by a health system should have the mantra of "relationship, relationship, relationship." The following tips provide guidance on how to better understand the potential perils, pitfalls, and benefits of specific content sections of a standard template employment agreement between a health system and a physician. Physicians should review, understand, and be ready to engage in dialogue with the hospital administrator before involving attorneys. My experience is that if the dialogue begins with the attorneys representing each party, the opportunity to fully develop a partnership relationship between the parties is either lost or at minimum severely delayed in its development.

  5. 29 CFR 825.209 - Maintenance of employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...” shall not include an insurance program providing health coverage under which employees purchase... THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Employee Leave Entitlements Under the Family and Medical... maintain the employee's coverage under any group health plan (as defined in the Internal Revenue Code of...

  6. Benefits in behavioral health carve-out plans of Fortune 500 firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, E L; Garnick, D W; Horgan, C M; Goldin, D; Hodgkin, D; Sciegaj, M

    2001-07-01

    This study examined the prevalence and nature of behavioral health carve-out contracts among Fortune 500 firms in 1997. A survey was conducted of 498 companies that were listed as Fortune 500 firms in 1994 or 1995. A total of 336 firms (68 percent) responded to the survey. Univariate analyses were used to analyze prevalence, types, and amounts of covered services, cost sharing, and benefit limits. A total of 132 firms reported contracting with managed behavioral health organizations; 124 firms answered benefits questions about covered services, cost-sharing levels, and annual and lifetime limits. Most of the plans covered a broad range of services. Cost sharing was typically required, and for inpatient care it was often substantial. Fifteen percent of the firms offered mental health benefits that were below the limits defined in this study as minimal benefit levels, and 34 percent offered substance abuse treatment benefits that fell below minimal levels. The most generous mental health benefits and substance abuse treatment benefits, defined as no limits or a lifetime limit only of $1 million or more, were offered by 31 percent and 20 percent of the firms, respectively. The carve-out contracts of the Fortune 500 firms in this study typically covered a wide range of services, and the benefits appeared generous relative to those reported for other integrated and carve-out plans. However, these benefits generally did not reach the level of parity with typical medical benefits, nor did they fully protect enrollees from the risk of catastrophic expenditures.

  7. 20 CFR 1002.259 - How does USERRA protect an employee's pension benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does USERRA protect an employee's pension... REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT OF 1994 Reemployment Rights and Benefits Pension Plan Benefits § 1002.259 How does USERRA protect an employee's pension benefits? On reemployment, the employee is treated as not having a...

  8. Employee Sabbaticals: Who Benefits and Why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Edmund L.; Connor, Joan M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses benefits of employee sabbaticals including (1) continuing employee education; (2) avoiding technical obsolescence; (3) reducing job-related stress and burnout; (4) creating a more productive work force; and (5) stemming the tide of early retirement. (JOW)

  9. Analysis of employee satisfaction with benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Málková, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on an issue of providing employee benefits. The first part describes the benefits from a theoretical point of view, here is also mentioned a research about the benefits and an impact of the economic crisis on providing the benefits. The second part is focused on describing the benefits of a particular company, KOMIX Inc., an analysis of an employee satisfaction with the benefits with using a questionnaire survey and suggestion of ways to improve the current sys...

  10. Accounting and tax aspects of employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kudláčková, Kristýna

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is dedicated to the exploration and analysis of the implementation of employee benefits such as the types of benefits provided by employers to employees according to Czech accounting and tax regulations. In the theoretical part deals with the topic of employee motivation at the work and describes the best known motivational theories. It tries to highlight the interconnections of social policy, evaluation and remuneration system with the level of employee satisfaction and its impact...

  11. Employee Benefits in a Selected Company

    OpenAIRE

    RODOVÁ, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the analysis of employee benefits and proposes the possible changes in selected organization. The characteristics of thecompany are described in the introduction of practical part. Subsequently, the current situations of benefits in selected companies are provided through questionnaire surveys, where the employee satisfactions with benefits are verified. The obtained information from questionnaires solves the particular employee satisfaction with engagement level and...

  12. Leveraging private and public exchanges in an employee benefits strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Susan; Thompson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Health reform is helping to transform the health insurance marketplace and facilitate new opportunities to reevaluate and restructure the underlying framework of employer-sponsored benefits. Central to these opportunities is the emergence of public health exchanges at the state and federal levels offering a coordinated platform of diverse designs and health plans available on a guaranteed issue basis and often with government-provided subsidies. Parallel and complementary to this trend is the emergence of private health exchanges that similarly offer a diversity of plans on a variety of bases. This article shows why, together, these offerings provide potential streamlined solutions for employers as they reevaluate how they facilitate and support access to affordable coverage for their employees (and retirees).

  13. Employee knowledge of value-based insurance design benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrikson, Nora B; Anderson, Melissa L; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Fishman, Paul; Grossman, David C

    2014-08-01

    Value-based insurance designs (VBD) incorporate evidence-based medicine into health benefit design. Consumer knowledge of new VBD benefits is important to assessing their impact on health care use. To assess knowledge of features of a VBD. The eligible study population was employees receiving healthcare benefits in an integrated care system in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. In 2010, participants completed a web-based survey 2 months after rollout of the plan, including three true/false questions about benefit design features including copays for preventive care visits and chronic disease medications and premium costs. Analysis was completed in 2012. Knowledgeable was defined as correct response to all three questions; self-reported knowledge was also assessed. A total of 3,463 people completed the survey (response rate=71.7%). The majority of respondents were female (80.1%) Caucasians (79.6%) aged 35-64 years (79.0%), reflecting the overall employee population. A total of 45.7% had at least a 4-year college education, and 69.1% were married. About three quarters of respondents correctly answered each individual question; half (52.1%) of respondents answered all three questions correctly. On multivariate analysis, knowledge was independently associated with female gender (OR=1.80, 95% CI=1.40, 2.31); Caucasian race (OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.28, 2.32); increasing household income (OR for ≥$100,000=1.86, 95% CI=1.29, 2.68); nonunion job status (OR compared to union status=1.63, 95% CI=1.17, 2.26); and high satisfaction with the health plan (OR compared to low satisfaction=1.26; 95% CI=1.00, 1.57). Incomplete knowledge of benefits is prevalent in an employee population soon after VBD rollout. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 77 FR 42417 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Coverage for Certain Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... men and women the opportunity to obtain health insurance coverage will help them to protect themselves... professions, Hostages, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Military personnel, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements...

  15. Flexible benefit plans in Dutch organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrink, C.

    2006-01-01

    Flexible benefit plans give employees a greater say over the composition of their benefits than traditional Dutch benefit plans. These arrangements developed in a time of further individualisation, increasing flexibility in the workplace, and a tight labour market in the Netherlands. By giving

  16. Analysis of Employee Benefits in Organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Smilnická, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of bachelor's work is to characterize and to sum up the system of employee benefits in ČSOB, a.s.. In the first part of the work are generally described forms of remuneration, characterized employee benefits, aims and forms how they are provided, options of their classification and current trends in this area. The second part introduces the company and its system of employee benefits. By the help of questionnaire survey realized in the company was analysed the system of benefits and s...

  17. Mental Health and Substance Abuse Insurance Parity for Federal Employees: How Did Health Plans Respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Colleen L.; Ridgely, M. Susan

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental concern with competitive health insurance markets is that they will not supply efficient levels of coverage for treatment of costly, chronic, and predictable illnesses, such as mental illness. Since the inception of employer-based health insurance, coverage for mental health services has been offered on a more limited basis than…

  18. Economic Effects of Legislations and Policies to Expand Mental Health and Substance Abuse Benefits in Health Insurance Plans: A Community Guide Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Verughese; Qu, Shuli; Chattopadhyay, Sajal; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Knopf, John A.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Finnie, Ramona; Thota, Anilkrishna B.

    2015-01-01

    long-term MH/SA patient-level data becomes available to researchers. A limitation of this review is that legislations considered here have been superseded by recent legislations that have stronger and broader impacts on MH/SA benefits within private and public insurance: Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA). Implications for Future Research Economic assessments over the long term such as cost per QALY saved and cost-benefit will be feasible as more data becomes available from plans that implemented recent expansions of MH/SA benefits. Results from these evaluations will allow a better estimate of the economic impact of the interventions from a societal perspective. Future research should also evaluate the more downstream effects on business decisions about labor, such as effects on hiring, retention, and the offer of health benefits as part of an employee compensation package. Finally, the economic effect of the far reaching ACA of 2010 on mental health and substance abuse prevalence and care is also a subject of future research. PMID:25862203

  19. Legislations and policies to expand mental health and substance abuse benefits in health insurance plans: a community guide systematic economic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Verughese; Qu, Shuli; Chattopadhyay, Sajal; Sipe, Theresa Ann; Knopf, John A; Goetzel, Ron Z; Finnie, Ramona; Thota, Anilkrishna B

    2015-03-01

    limitation of this review is that legislations considered here have been superseded by recent legislations that have stronger and broader impacts on MH/SA benefits within private and public insurance: Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA). Economic assessments over the long term such as cost per QALY saved and cost-benefit will be feasible as more data becomes available from plans that implemented recent expansions of MH/SA benefits. Results from these evaluations will allow a better estimate of the economic impact of the interventions from a societal perspective. Future research should also evaluate the more downstream effects on business decisions about labor, such as effects on hiring, retention, and the offer of health benefits as part of an employee compensation package. Finally, the economic effect of the far reaching ACA of 2010 on mental health and substance abuse prevalence and care is also a subject for future research.

  20. Acknowledging and Accounting for Employee Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina MOISESCU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Employee benefits are all forms of counter services granted by anentity in return to services given by the employees. This category includes onlythe benefits covered by the entity, not those from the state or the employee onthe payroll. The employer counting and presenting all the benefits of theemployees, including those provided on the basis of official programs or otherofficial contracts between the entity and the individual employees, groups ofemployees or their representatives, those established on the basis of legalprovisions or by contracts at the level of activity sector, through which theentities are required to contribute to national programs, as well as thoseresulting from unofficial practices give rise to an implicit obligation.Acknowledging and especially assessing these benefits are issues demandingspecial attention.

  1. State Mandated Benefits and Employer Provided Health Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Gruber

    1992-01-01

    One popular explanation for this low rate of employee coverage is the presence of numerous state regulations which mandate that group health insurance plans must include certain benefits. By raising the minimum costs of providing any health insurance coverage, these mandated benefits make it impossible for firms which would have desired to offer minimal health insurance at a low cost to do so. I use data on insurance coverage among employees in small firms to investigate whether this problem ...

  2. 42 CFR 422.106 - Coordination of benefits with employer or union group health plans and Medicaid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... group health plans and Medicaid. 422.106 Section 422.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... plans and Medicaid. (a) General rule. If an MA organization contracts with an employer, labor... enrollees in an MA plan, or contracts with a State Medicaid agency to provide Medicaid benefits to...

  3. Does an employee assistance programme benefit employers and employees alike?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlister, E

    1999-09-01

    EAPs are not a psychological sticking plaster. They are a clinically and corporately balanced service which benefits the employee, via the direct services and the employer, via the feedback in the form of usage statistics derived from the continuous tracking of the account through which organizational and employment issues are identified. Well positioned EAPs offer employees confidential counselling, and information services including legal, financial and child-based issues and are able to offer employers tailored training and consultancy.

  4. Employee benefits in terms of accounting and taxation system

    OpenAIRE

    ŠÍMA, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    The theme of this bachelor thesis is Employee benefits in terms of accounting and taxation system. Some companies also include non-monetary bonuses as a way of rewarding their employees. Employee benefits substantially affect satisfaction, loyalty and motivation of all employees. The popularity of employee benefits is also supported by the effort of the companies to optimise taxes, which is the outcome of employee benefits. The main goal was to characterise employee benefits and to explain it...

  5. Recent developments in employee benefits law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jonathan G; Adler, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The first part of this article highlights important judicial developments involving employee benefits and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 ("ERISA"), as amended, during the latter part of 2003 and the first part of 2004, including the most significant U.S. Supreme Court and federal circuit court decisions. The second part covers recent legislative and regulatory developments in employee benefits law. This article is not meant to be exhaustive, but discusses the more important developments during 2003-2004, with particular focus on issues of concern to the insurance industry.

  6. 20 CFR 1002.260 - What pension benefit plans are covered under USERRA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What pension benefit plans are covered under... REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT OF 1994 Reemployment Rights and Benefits Pension Plan Benefits § 1002.260 What pension...) defines an employee pension benefit plan as a plan that provides retirement income to employees, or defers...

  7. 26 CFR 301.6652-3 - Failure to file information with respect to employee retirement benefit plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... not exceed $5,000. (4) Actuarial statement in case of mergers. The plan administrator (within the... is a failure to file the actuarial statement described in section 6058(b) at the time and in the... as a tax upon the issuance of notice and demand therefor. (e) Effective dates—(1) Annual registration...

  8. 29 CFR 778.214 - Benefit plans; including profit-sharing plans or trusts providing similar benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... fide plan for providing old age, retirement, life, accident, or health insurance or similar benefits... employee on account of severance of employment (or for any other reason) would not result in any increase... mechanics performing contract work subject to the Davis-Bacon Act and related statutes, the provisions of...

  9. Current Economic Issues in Employee Benefits. Background Paper No. 39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Stephen A.

    A multitude of public policy issues currently surround the tax treatment of employee benefits, particularly since the tax-favored status of employer contributions to pensions and health insurance has been blamed for a shrinking tax base that has exacerbated the federal budget deficit, an inefficient and bloated health-care sector, overinsurance by…

  10. Benefits and stressors - Perceived effects of ICT use on employee health and work stress: An exploratory study from Austria and Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninaus, Katharina; Diehl, Sandra; Terlutter, Ralf; Chan, Kara; Huang, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    Stress has become a mass phenomenon in the modern workplace. The use of information and communication technologies is beginning to receive greater attention in the context of occupational stress. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted to examine both stressors and benefits resulting from technologies among practitioners in the advertising, public relations, and journalism industry in Hong Kong and Austria. Results suggest that technologies allow instant availability, which facilitates communication processes as well as information exchange. Notably, modern technologies enable employees to organize their work with greater temporal and spatial flexibility, thus creating an opportunity for better balancing work and private life. However, evolving technologies have come with a cost; the pressure to be constantly available via technologies constitutes a major source of stress, increasing the risk of experiencing prolonged work stress and its adverse consequences on employee health and well-being, such as a burnout. Furthermore, findings suggest that availability pressure may be attributed to an inner obligation rather than to an organizational expectation. Hence, making employees aware of their connectivity behaviour may help to diminish the experience of technology-induced work stress and improve and maintain employees' health and well-being in the long term. Practical implications, limitations, and future research directions are provided.

  11. Evaluation of caregiver-friendly workplace policy (CFWPs) interventions on the health of full-time caregiver employees (CEs): implementation and cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison M; Tompa, Emile; Lero, Donna S; Fast, Janet; Yazdani, Amin; Zeytinoglu, Isik U

    2017-09-20

    Current Canadian evidence illustrating the health benefits and cost-effectiveness of caregiver-friendly workplace policies is needed if Canadian employers are to adopt and integrate caregiver-friendly workplace policies into their employment practices. The goal of this three-year, three study research project is to provide such evidence for the auto manufacturing and educational services sectors. The research questions being addressed are: What are the impacts for employers (economic) and workers (health) of caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s) for full-time caregiver-employees? What are the impacts for employers, workers and society of the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s) in each participating workplace? What contextual factors impact the successful implementation of caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s)? Using a pre-post-test comparative case study design, Study A will determine the effectiveness of newly implemented caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s) across two workplaces to determine impacts on caregiver-employee health. A quasi-experimental pre-post design will allow the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s) to be tested with respect to potential impacts on health, and specifically on caregiver employee mental, psychosocial, and physical health. Framed within a comparative case study design, Study B will utilize cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis approaches to evaluate the economic impacts of the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s) for each of the two participating workplaces. Framed within a comparative case study design, Study C will undertake an implementation analysis of the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s) in each participating workplace in order to determine: the degree of support for the intervention(s) (reflected in the workplace culture); how sex and gender are implicated; co-workers' responses to the chosen intervention(s), and

  12. Estimating the health benefits of planned public transit investments in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Louis-François; Eluru, Naveen; Hatzopoulou, Marianne; Morency, Patrick; Plante, Celine; Morency, Catherine; Reynaud, Frederic; Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Shamsunnahar, Yasmin; Faghih Imani, Ahmadreza; Drouin, Louis; Pelletier, Anne; Goudreau, Sophie; Tessier, Francois; Gauvin, Lise; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2018-01-01

    Since public transit infrastructure affects road traffic volumes and influences transportation mode choice, which in turn impacts health, it is important to estimate the alteration of the health burden linked with transit policies. We quantified the variation in health benefits and burden between a business as usual (BAU) and a public transit (PT) scenarios in 2031 (with 8 and 19 new subway and train stations) for the greater Montreal region. Using mode choice and traffic assignment models, we predicted the transportation mode choice and traffic assignment on the road network. Subsequently, we estimated the distance travelled in each municipality by mode, the minutes spent in active transportation, as well as traffic emissions. Thereafter we estimated the health burden attributed to air pollution and road traumas and the gains associated with active transportation for both the BAU and PT scenarios. We predicted a slight decrease of overall trips and kilometers travelled by car as well as an increase of active transportation for the PT in 2031 vs the BAU. Our analysis shows that new infrastructure will reduce the overall burden of transportation by 2.5 DALYs per 100,000 persons. This decrease is caused by the reduction of road traumas occurring in the inner suburbs and central Montreal region as well as gains in active transportation in the inner suburbs. Based on the results of our study, transportation planned public transit projects for Montreal are unlikely to reduce drastically the burden of disease attributable to road vehicles and infrastructures in the Montreal region. The impact of the planned transportation infrastructures seems to be very low and localized mainly in the areas where new public transit stations are planned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of job insecurity on employee health complaints: A within-person analysis of the explanatory role of threats to the manifest and latent benefits of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Elst, Tinne; Näswall, Katharina; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia; De Witte, Hans; Sverke, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The current study contributes to the literature on job insecurity by highlighting threat to the benefits of work as an explanation of the effect of job insecurity on health complaints. Building on the latent deprivation model, we predicted that threats to both manifest (i.e., financial income) and latent benefits of work (i.e., collective purpose, social contacts, status, time structure, activity) mediate the relationships from job insecurity to subsequent mental and physical health complaints. In addition, in line with the conservation of resources theory, we proposed that financial resources buffer the indirect effect of job insecurity on health complaints through threat to the manifest benefit. Hypotheses were tested using a multilevel design, in which 3 measurements (time lag of 6 months between subsequent measurements) were clustered within 1,994 employees (in Flanders, Belgium). This allowed for the investigation of within-person processes, while controlling for variance at the between-person level. The results demonstrate that job insecurity was related to subsequent threats to both manifest and latent benefits, and that these threats in turn were related to subsequent health complaints (with an exception for threat to the manifest benefit that did not predict mental health complaints). Three significant indirect effects were found: threat to the latent benefits mediated the relationships between job insecurity and both mental and physical health complaints, and threat to the manifest benefit mediated the relationship between job insecurity and physical health complaints. Unexpectedly, the latter indirect effect was exacerbated by financial resources. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Analysis of employee benefits in a certain company

    OpenAIRE

    Valderová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor's thesismis to present motivation, the employee benefits and possibilities of providing them by the employer. Next there will follow analysis of the provided employee benefits in a chosen company. The analysis should reveal if the company applies theoretical knowledge in providing the employee benefits into practical life to meet its employees satisfaction.

  15. ERISA and health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P; Mazo, J; Ladenheim, K

    1995-11-01

    This Issue Brief is designed to provide a basic understanding of the relationship of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) to health plans. It is based, in part, on an Employee Benefit Research Institute-Education and Research Fund (EBRI-ERF) educational briefing held in March 1995. This report includes a section by Peter Schmidt of Arnold & Porter, a section about multiemployer plans written by Judy Mazo of The Segal Company; and a section about ERISA and state health reform written by Kala Ladenheim of the Intergovernmental Health Policy Project. Starting in the late 1980s, three trends converged to make ERISA a critical factor in state health reforms: increasingly comprehensive state health policy experimentation; changes in the makeup of the insurance market (including the rise in self-insurance and the growth of managed care); and increasingly expansive interpretations of ERISA by federal courts. The changing interpretations of ERISA's relationship to three categories of state health initiatives--insurance mandates, medical high risk pools, and uncompensated care pools--illustrate how these forces are playing out today. ERISA does have a very broad preemptive effect. Federal statutes do not need to say anything about preemption in order to preempt state law. For example, if there is a direct conflict, it would be quite clear under the Supremacy Clause [of the U.S. Constitution] that ERISA, or any federal statue, would preempt a directly conflicting state statute. States can indirectly regulate health care plans that provide benefits through insurance contracts by establishing the terms of the contract. And they also raise money by imposing premium taxes. But they cannot do the same with respect to self-funded plans. That is one of the factors that has caused a great rise in the number of self-funded plans. State regulation [of employee benefits] can create three kinds of problems: cost of taxes, fees, or other charges; cost of dealing

  16. 29 CFR 1625.32 - Coordination of retiree health benefits with Medicare and State health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... order to maintain a competitive advantage in the marketplace—using these and other benefits to attract... Coordination of retiree health benefits with Medicare and State health benefits. (a) Definitions. (1) Employee...

  17. Evaluation of caregiver-friendly workplace policy (CFWPs interventions on the health of full-time caregiver employees (CEs: implementation and cost-benefit analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Williams

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current Canadian evidence illustrating the health benefits and cost-effectiveness of caregiver-friendly workplace policies is needed if Canadian employers are to adopt and integrate caregiver-friendly workplace policies into their employment practices. The goal of this three-year, three study research project is to provide such evidence for the auto manufacturing and educational services sectors. The research questions being addressed are: What are the impacts for employers (economic and workers (health of caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s for full-time caregiver-employees? What are the impacts for employers, workers and society of the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s in each participating workplace? What contextual factors impact the successful implementation of caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s? Methods Using a pre-post-test comparative case study design, Study A will determine the effectiveness of newly implemented caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s across two workplaces to determine impacts on caregiver-employee health. A quasi-experimental pre-post design will allow the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s to be tested with respect to potential impacts on health, and specifically on caregiver employee mental, psychosocial, and physical health. Framed within a comparative case study design, Study B will utilize cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analysis approaches to evaluate the economic impacts of the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s for each of the two participating workplaces. Framed within a comparative case study design, Study C will undertake an implementation analysis of the caregiver-friendly workplace policy intervention(s in each participating workplace in order to determine: the degree of support for the intervention(s (reflected in the workplace culture; how sex and gender are implicated; co

  18. Benefits and stressors – Perceived effects of ICT use on employee health and work stress: An exploratory study from Austria and Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninaus, Katharina; Diehl, Sandra; Terlutter, Ralf; Chan, Kara; Huang, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    Stress has become a mass phenomenon in the modern workplace. The use of information and communication technologies is beginning to receive greater attention in the context of occupational stress. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted to examine both stressors and benefits resulting from technologies among practitioners in the advertising, public relations, and journalism industry in Hong Kong and Austria. Results suggest that technologies allow instant availability, which facilitates communication processes as well as information exchange. Notably, modern technologies enable employees to organize their work with greater temporal and spatial flexibility, thus creating an opportunity for better balancing work and private life. However, evolving technologies have come with a cost; the pressure to be constantly available via technologies constitutes a major source of stress, increasing the risk of experiencing prolonged work stress and its adverse consequences on employee health and well-being, such as a burnout. Furthermore, findings suggest that availability pressure may be attributed to an inner obligation rather than to an organizational expectation. Hence, making employees aware of their connectivity behaviour may help to diminish the experience of technology-induced work stress and improve and maintain employees’ health and well-being in the long term. Practical implications, limitations, and future research directions are provided. PMID:26462972

  19. Benefits and stressors – Perceived effects of ICT use on employee health and work stress: An exploratory study from Austria and Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Ninaus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress has become a mass phenomenon in the modern workplace. The use of information and communication technologies is beginning to receive greater attention in the context of occupational stress. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted to examine both stressors and benefits resulting from technologies among practitioners in the advertising, public relations, and journalism industry in Hong Kong and Austria. Results suggest that technologies allow instant availability, which facilitates communication processes as well as information exchange. Notably, modern technologies enable employees to organize their work with greater temporal and spatial flexibility, thus creating an opportunity for better balancing work and private life. However, evolving technologies have come with a cost; the pressure to be constantly available via technologies constitutes a major source of stress, increasing the risk of experiencing prolonged work stress and its adverse consequences on employee health and well-being, such as a burnout. Furthermore, findings suggest that availability pressure may be attributed to an inner obligation rather than to an organizational expectation. Hence, making employees aware of their connectivity behaviour may help to diminish the experience of technology-induced work stress and improve and maintain employees’ health and well-being in the long term. Practical implications, limitations, and future research directions are provided.

  20. Incorporating Employee Heterogeneity into Default Rules for Retirement Plan Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Manchester, Colleen Flaherty

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of incorporating heterogeneity into default rules by examining the choice between retirement plans at a firm that transitioned from a defined benefit (DB) to a defined contribution (DC) plan. The default plan for existing employees varied discontinuously depending on their age. Employing regression discontinuity techniques,…

  1. Statewide Community College Employee Benefit Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Jerry T.

    Health insurance benefit programs in Texas community college districts fall into three groups. Comprising 25% of the districts, districts fall into three groups. Comprising 25% of the districts, the "help me now" group has experienced heavy group health insurance benefit utilization over the past few years and is unable to purchase required…

  2. Can health insurance improve employee health outcome and reduce cost? An evaluation of Geisinger's employee health and wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Daniel D; Pitcavage, James M; Tomcavage, Janet; Steinhubl, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of a health plan-driven employee health and wellness program (known as MyHealth Rewards) on health outcomes (stroke and myocardial infarction) and cost of care. A cohort of Geisinger Health Plan members who were Geisinger Health System (GHS) employees throughout the study period (2007 to 2011) was compared with a comparison group consisting of Geisinger Health Plan members who were non-GHS employees. The GHS employee cohort experienced a stroke or myocardial infarction later than the non-GHS comparison group (hazard ratios of 0.73 and 0.56; P employee health and wellness programs similarly designed as MyHealth Rewards can potentially have a desirable impact on employee health and cost.

  3. 20 CFR 1002.163 - What types of health plans are covered by USERRA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of health plans are covered by USERRA? 1002.163 Section 1002.163 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS... by USERRA? (a) USERRA defines a health plan to include an insurance policy or contract, medical or...

  4. Applying the chronic care model to an employee benefits program: a qualitative inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Gillian L; Wilson, Mark; Barrett, Barbara; Honeycutt, Sally; Hermstad, April K; Kegler, Michelle C

    2013-12-01

    To assess how employee benefits programs may strengthen and/or complement elements of the chronic care model (CCM), a framework used by health systems to improve chronic illness care. A qualitative inquiry consisting of semi-structured interviews with employee benefit administrators and partners from a self-insured, self-administered employee health benefits program was conducted at a large family-owned business in southwest Georgia. Results indicate that the employer adapted and used many health system-related elements of the CCM in the design of their benefit program. Data also suggest that the employee benefits program contributed to self-management skills and to informing and activating patients to interact with the health system. Findings suggest that employee benefits programs can use aspects of the CCM in their own benefit design, and can structure their benefits to contribute to patient-related elements from the CCM.

  5. 26 CFR 1.162-10 - Certain employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain employee benefits. 1.162-10 Section 1... employee benefits. (a) In general. Amounts paid or accrued by a taxpayer on account of injuries received by...) for the benefit of employees, their families, and dependents, at least medical or hospital care, and...

  6. 17 CFR 256.926 - Employee pensions and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., educational or recreational activities for the benefit of employees. ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee pensions and benefits... UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 2. Expense § 256.926 Employee pensions and benefits. This account...

  7. High prevalence of sedentary risk factors amongst university employees and potential health benefits of campus workplace exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Sedentariness and physical inactivity are often reported within white-collar workers, including university campus employees. However, the prevalence of the associated sedentary risk factors and risk reduction intervention strategies within a university campus workplace are less known. This study investigates whether the prevalence of sedentary risk factors within university campus employees could be reduced with a campus based exercise intervention. 56 UK university employees (age = 50.7 ± 10.2, stature = 1.68.8 ± 8.6, body mass = 73.9 ± 15.1) were tested for body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and maximal cardiorespiratory capacity (V̇O2max). The prevalence was analyzed across genders and job roles. An exercise intervention followed for the sedentary employees involving walking and running for 25 min twice/week for 10 weeks at an intensity corresponding to individual's ventilatory threshold (VT). The university workplace demonstrated a prevalence of higher BMI, SBP and DBP than the recommended healthy thresholds, with gender having a significant effect. Males' BMI, SBP and DBP were higher than in females (p employees have a high prevalence of sedentary risk factors across different genders and job roles. These risks can be reduced by an exercise-based intervention administered within the campus workplace, which should be considered in university workplace policies.

  8. 29 CFR 2520.104-24 - Exemption for welfare plans for certain selected employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption for welfare plans for certain selected employees.... (b) Exemption. Under the authority of section 104(a)(3) of the Act, each employee welfare benefit... employee welfare benefit plans: (1) Which are maintained by an employer primarily for the purpose of...

  9. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; and (8) Preventive health services, which must be made available to members and must include at least... HMO is required only to make a good-faith effort to provide or arrange for the provision of the...

  10. Role of employee benefits in the motivation of employees at H1.cz

    OpenAIRE

    Hrubá, Markéta

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focusing on an employee benefits system and its functionality. Theoretical part of the thesis specifies the human resources field as a whole, and its particular aspects, considering mainly the employee remuneration and employee benefits system. It also expands on the relationship between motivation, employee benefits and employee remuneration. The established knowledge are used in a practical part of the thesis, which has been carried out in H1 s.r.o. The company is fi...

  11. Wage and Benefit Changes in Response to Rising Health Insurance Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Dana Goldman; Neeraj Sood; Arleen Leibowitz

    2005-01-01

    Many companies have defined-contribution benefit plans requiring employees to pay the full cost (before taxes) of more generous health insurance choices. Research has shown that employee decisions are quite responsive to these arrangements. What is less clear is how the total compensation package changes when health insurance premiums rise. This paper examines employee compensation decisions during a three-year period when health insurance premiums were rising rapidly. The data come from a si...

  12. How the millennial generation is transforming employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Neil

    2014-01-01

    According to a number of recent studies, the millennial generation, today's incoming young-adult employees, shows far more interest than older generations in a broad spectrum of employee bene its to protect them from various life risks. They are more cautious than boomers or Gen Xers in choosing their financial portfolios and more focused on planning for their long-term future. Millennials even value health insurance almost as much as older adults--despite the fact they're much less likely to use it. These findings are in broad alignment with broader millennial generational traits that LifeCourse Associates has been studying fo many years.

  13. Communicating with Employees about Pension and Welfare Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srb, Jozetta H.

    The purpose of this report is to examine some of the problems of communication with employees about pension and welfare benefits. Issues discussed relate to (1) employees' attitudes toward benefits and benefit communication, (2) the structure of private benefit programs, (3) the case for fair labeling, and (4) the trend toward statutory criteria…

  14. 75 FR 70625 - Annual Funding Notice for Defined Benefit Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... model funding notices. Much of the guidance in FAB 2009-01 has been incorporated into the proposed... Annual Funding Notice for Defined Benefit Plans AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Labor... implement the annual funding notice requirement in the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974...

  15. Analysis of the employee Benefits in Specific Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Procházková, Petra

    2011-01-01

    The main subject of my Bachelor's Thesis called "Analysis of employee Benefits in Specific Organization" is to analyze system of employee benefits used in company RWE Transgas, a. s. in 2010. Theoretical part will specify basic terms in general, which are important to cope with this issue. There will be especially importance, division, risks and trends in benefits. In practical part the analysis of employee benefits in specific joint-stock company is made. Part of this analysis is survey done...

  16. Employer health insurance offerings and employee enrollment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Daniel; Stein, Rebecca; Nicholson, Sean; Bundorf, M Kate

    2005-10-01

    To determine how the characteristics of the health benefits offered by employers affect worker insurance coverage decisions. The 1996-1997 and the 1998-1999 rounds of the nationally representative Community Tracking Study Household Survey. We use multinomial logistic regression to analyze the choice between own-employer coverage, alternative source coverage, and no coverage among employees offered health insurance by their employer. The key explanatory variables are the types of health plans offered and the net premium offered. The models include controls for personal, health plan, and job characteristics. When an employer offers only a health maintenance organization married employees are more likely to decline coverage from their employer and take-up another offer (odds ratio (OR)=1.27, phealth plan coverage an employer offers affects whether its employees take-up insurance, but has a smaller effect on overall coverage rates for workers and their families because of the availability of alternative sources of coverage. Relative to offering only a non-HMO plan, employers offering only an HMO may reduce take-up among those with alternative sources of coverage, but increase take-up among those who would otherwise go uninsured. By modeling the possibility of take-up through the health insurance offers from the employer of the spouse, the decline in coverage rates from higher net premiums is less than previous estimates.

  17. Bureau of Labor Statistics Takes a New Look at Employee Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Robert; Wiatrowski, William

    1982-01-01

    Describes the design, coverage, output, and availability of results of a new annual survey on the incidence and characteristics of employee benefit plans in the private sector, which is conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. (SK)

  18. Who pays for public employee health costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Jeffrey; Cutler, David M

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the incidence of public-employee health benefits. Because these benefits are negotiated through the political process, relevant labor market institutions deviate significantly from the competitive, private-sector benchmark. Empirically, we find that roughly 15 percent of the cost of recent benefit growth was passed onto school district employees through reductions in wages and salaries. Strong teachers' unions were associated with relatively strong linkages between benefit growth and growth in total compensation. Our analysis is consistent with the view that the costs of public workers' benefits are difficult to monitor, contributing to benefit oriented, and often under-funded, compensation schemes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Corporate Benefits of Employee Recreation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Craig

    1984-01-01

    Employee recreation programs have been shown to reduce absenteeism, increase performance and productivity, reduce stress levels, and increase job satisfaction. Studies that present positive results of employee recreation are discussed. (DF)

  20. Identifying the Family, Job, and Workplace Characteristics of Employees Who Use Work-Family Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secret, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Employs a contextual effects perspective to identify family, job, and workplace characteristics associated with the use of work-family benefits of 527 employees in 83 businesses. Determined that particular family problems predict female employee use of paid leave and mental health benefits. Summarizes that workplace size, sector, and culture are…

  1. Retiree health benefits-vesting of welfare benefits-early retirement-duty to bargain-termination of benefits-estoppel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Poore v. Simpson Paper Co., 2009 U.S. App. LEXIS 11170 (9th Cir. Or. May 21, 2009). To be able to sue under ERISA, retirement health plan participants need not show that their benefits are vested the same way pension benefits are vested; the rights to the benefits need not be fixed or unalterable, rather, the employee must have an entitlement to the benefits.

  2. Employee health services integration: meeting the challenge. Successful program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Y C

    1998-02-01

    1. The first step of a successful Employee Health Service integration is to have a plan supported by management. The plan must be presented to the employees prior to implementation in a "user friendly" manner. 2. Prior to computerization of employee health records, a record order system must be developed to prevent duplication and to enhance organization. 3. Consistency of services offered must be maintained. Each employee must have the opportunity to receive the same service. Complexity of services will determine the site of delivery. 4. Integration is a new and challenging development for the health care field. Flexibility and brainstorming are necessary in an attempt to meet both employee and employer needs.

  3. Role of GIS in social sector planning: can developing countries benefit from the examples of primary health care (PHC) planning in Britain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaq, Mohammad; Lodhi, Bilal Khan

    2012-04-01

    Social sector planning requires rational approaches where community needs are identified by referring to relative deprivation among localities and resources are allocated to address inequalities. Geographical information system (GIS) has been widely argued and used as a base for rational planning for equal resource allocation in social sectors around the globe. Devolution of primary health care is global strategy that needs pains taking efforts to implement it. GIS is one of the most important tools used around the world in decentralization process of primary health care. This paper examines the scope of GIS in social sector planning by concentration on primary health care delivery system in Pakistan. The work is based on example of the UK's decentralization process and further evidence from US. This paper argues that to achieve benefits of well informed decision making to meet the communities' needs GIS is an essential tool to support social sector planning and can be used without any difficulty in any environment. There is increasing trend in the use of Health Management Information System (HMIS) in Pakistan with ample internet connectivity which provides well established infrastructure in Pakistan to implement GIS for health care, however there is need for change in attitude towards empowering localities especially with reference to decentralization of decision making. This paper provides GIS as a tool for primary health care planning in Pakistan as a starting point in defining localities and preparing locality profiles for need identification that could help developing countries in implementing the change.

  4. Employee benefits under IAS/IFRS and the Czech accounting legislation, the tax point of view including

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Otavová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of employee benefit is limited in the Czech Accounting Legislation. There are only short-term employee benefits – wages, salaries, when employees has rendered services to an entity during a period – month. Entities could create funds from a net profit –fund for social and cultural benefits which could serve as source of social services financing for employees. There are employee benefits defined very extensive in IAS/IFRS. It is IAS 19 – Employee Benefits which defines four Gross of employee benefits: short-term employee benefits, post employment benefits, other long –term employee benefits and termination benefits. There are defined all conditions for employee benefits re­co­gni­tion and treatments for recording and reporting in IAS 19.The paper is concerned with the employee benefits evaluation. The impact on the tax base is eva­lua­ted. There are the most significant types of employee benefits surveyed. They are divided into five groups with the respect to their impact on the tax base. The impact of these benefits is described from their impact on social insurance and health insurance calculation base point of view, as well.

  5. Teleworking in South Africa: Employee benefits and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Baard; Adèle Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: Virtual working arrangements present possible benefits to organisations and their employees. However, in South Africa, few organisations have implemented teleworking as a specific form of virtual work. The benefits and challenges to teleworkers are therefore largely unknown. Research purpose: The present study aimed to identify employee perceptions of personal benefits and challenges of teleworking. Motivation for the study: The study sought to contribute insights for S...

  6. Health Inequalities Among Korean Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsuk Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social status might be a determinant of occupational health inequalities. This study analyzed the effects of social status on both work environments and health outcomes. Methods: The study sample consisted of 27,598 wage employees aged 15 years and older from among the Korean Working Condition Survey participants in 2011. Work environments included atypical work, physical risks, ergonomic risks, work demands, work autonomy, social supports, and job rewards. Health outcomes comprised general health, health and safety at risk because of work, the World Health Organization-5 Well-being Index, work-related musculoskeletal disease, and work-related injury. Multivariable logistic-regression models were used to identify the associations between social status and work environments and health outcomes. Results: Employees in the demographically vulnerable group had lower occupational status compared with their counterparts. Low social status was largely related to adverse work environments. Especially, precarious employment and manual labor occupation were associated with both adverse work environments and poor health outcomes. Conclusion: Precarious and manual workers should take precedence in occupational health equity policies and interventions. Their cumulative vulnerability, which is connected to demographics, occupational status, adverse work environments, or poor health outcomes, can be improved through a multilevel approach such as labor market, organizations, and individual goals. Keywords: employee health, health equity, social status

  7. Remuneration and Employee Benefits in Organizations in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Urbancová

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In today’s highly competitive environment, the goal of organizations is to recruit, retain and sufficiently stimulate employees to give high quality performance, which may actually be achieved by a well‑developed system of remuneration and a wide range of suitably selected employee benefits. The article aims to identify and evaluate important factors influencing the area of employee remuneration and benefits offered in organizations in the Czech Republic. The research was carried out through a questionnaire survey that involved selected organizations in the Czech Republic (n = 402. The obtained primary data were processed using descriptive and multidimensional statistics. The factors examined in relation to the employee remuneration and benefits include: industries and sectors of organizations; markets in which they operate; the size of organizations by the headcount; the existence or absence of the Human Resource Department. The results confirm that the organizations that want to maintain a good position in the labour market pay attention to their personnel marketing, which is also helped by the right (suitable system of employee remuneration and fringe benefits thanks to which they retain their employees and can increase employee satisfaction and loyalty. Employee benefits are exactly what may distinguish the organizations from their competitors in the labour market.

  8. Employee Benefits for Illinois Public Higher Education Faculty and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report focuses on the group benefits available to Illinois public higher education employees. The study provides a perspective on the range of benefits and the differences in the administration of institutional benefits. Findings reveal the availability of retirement annuities that increase with each 10 years of service; optional retirement…

  9. Employee assistance programs: a preventive, cost-effective benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G S; Gard, L H; Heffernan, W R

    1998-01-01

    Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) provide a much-needed service to the employees of corporations. In these times of reduced benefits and diminished community resources, EAPs can dramatically compensate for those shortages. This article will explore the role of an EAP, the models of service available, and the selection process for choosing a program.

  10. Employee motivation and employee benefits in Henkel s.r.o.

    OpenAIRE

    Svobodová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this bachelor´s study is connection of theme of employee motivation and employee benefits through the theoretical and practical parts. In theoretical part, I general summarize the knowledge, which were written in professional publications, where are explained the definitions of motivation, sources of motivation, theories of motivation. This part will be finished by summary of facts about reward system by benefits, I also explain the advanatages and disadvantages of benefits, which...

  11. Employee Motivation for Personal Development Plan Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisele, Lisa; Grohnert, Therese; Beausaert, Simon; Segers, Mien

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to understand conditions under which personal development plans (PDPs) can effectively be implemented for professional learning. Both the organization's manner of supporting the PDP practice as well as the individual employee's motivation is taken into account. Design/ methodology/approach: A questionnaire was…

  12. Employee benefits in a total rewards framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jane; Hein, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Benefits represent one of the largest investments a company makes in its talent. However, our tendency can be to design, deliver and communicate benefits programs independently, without fully considering how those programs fit within a bigger picture of total rewards. Sure, we need to manage and execute individual benefit programs--but not at the expense of getting a real return on our more significant investment in talent. This article provides employers with perspectives on the value of managing benefits within the broader framework of total rewards, why it works and, most importantly, how to make it work.

  13. The impact of flexible benefits plans on job satisfaction, organizational commitment and turnover intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshizer, B

    1994-01-01

    This study assesses the dimensionality of employee attitudes toward flexible benefits plans and the impact of these plans on measures of job satisfaction, commitment and turnover intent. The study points to the need for more work on the measurement of employee attitudes toward flexible benefits and on the nomological framework of flexible benefits as a construct in compensation research.

  14. Online benefits solutions--a new trend in managing employee benefits programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Mohammad; Brunaczki, Bernadette

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on the array of online benefits solutions offered by technology companies and reports the benefits to both employers and employees. Some of the benefits include reduced paperwork, reduced errors, and reduced administration costs. Companies that can deliver these benefits will be in great demand to help manage benefits programs and streamline the administrative processes.

  15. 75 FR 65511 - Employee Benefits Security Administration; Submission for OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of the Secretary Employee Benefits Security Administration; Submission...--Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), Office of Management and Budget, Room 10235, Washington...: Employee Benefits Security Administration. Type of Review: Extension without change of a currently approved...

  16. Employee Ownership and Perceptions of Work: The Effect of an Employee Stock Ownership Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A small company was studied before and after introduction of an employee stock ownership plan. Employees' commitment to the organization and job satisfaction were higher after plan implementation, while perceived worker influence levels did not change. Findings suggest that ownership changes employees' attitudes without changing employees'…

  17. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(4)-3 - Nondiscrimination in amount of employer-provided benefits under a defined benefit plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of Division S receive their benefit in the form of a straight life annuity and that employees of... accrual rate less than or equal to the employee's most valuable accrual rate. (2) Satisfaction of section... plan, and for determining whether the employee-provided benefits under such a plan are...

  18. 12 CFR 563b.500. - What management stock benefit plans may I implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What management stock benefit plans may I... management stock benefit plans may I implement? (a) During the 12 months after your conversion, you may... employee stock benefit plan (collectively, ESOP), and a management recognition plan (MRP), provided you...

  19. The Association Between Health Program Participation and Employee Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Hartley, Stephen K

    2016-09-01

    Using health plan membership as a proxy for employee retention, the objective of this study was to examine whether use of health promotion programs was associated with employee retention. Propensity score weighted generalized linear regression models were used to estimate the association between telephonic programs or health risk surveys and retention. Analyses were conducted with six study samples based on type of program participation. Retention rates were highest for employees with either telephonic program activity or health risk surveys and lowest for employees who did not participate in any interventions. Participants ranged from 71% more likely to 5% less likely to remain with their employers compared with nonparticipants, depending on the sample used in analyses. Using health promotion programs in combination with health risk surveys may lead to improvements in employee retention.

  20. 29 CFR 2520.104-26 - Limited exemption for certain unfunded dues financed welfare plans maintained by employee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... welfare plans maintained by employee organizations. 2520.104-26 Section 2520.104-26 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REPORTING AND... exemption for certain unfunded dues financed welfare plans maintained by employee organizations. (a) Scope...

  1. Analysis of employee benefits in Factoring KB, a.s.v

    OpenAIRE

    Vachoušek, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to analyze employee benefits - benefits of Factoring KB, a.s. The theoretical part of the generally specifies the basic concepts related to employee benefits needed to cope with the analytical part. The content of this section is primarily a system of employee benefits, classification of employee benefits, tax savings and marginally trends in providing benefits. The analytical part is devoted exclusively to Factoring KB, there is an analysis of employee bene...

  2. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs: essential health benefits in alternative benefit plans, eligibility notices, fair hearing and appeal processes, and premiums and cost sharing; exchanges: eligibility and enrollment. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    This final rule implements provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act. This final rule finalizes new Medicaid eligibility provisions; finalizes changes related to electronic Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) eligibility notices and delegation of appeals; modernizes and streamlines existing Medicaid eligibility rules; revises CHIP rules relating to the substitution of coverage to improve the coordination of CHIP coverage with other coverage; and amends requirements for benchmark and benchmark-equivalent benefit packages consistent with sections 1937 of the Social Security Act (which we refer to as ``alternative benefit plans'') to ensure that these benefit packages include essential health benefits and meet certain other minimum standards. This rule also implements specific provisions including those related to authorized representatives, notices, and verification of eligibility for qualifying coverage in an eligible employer-sponsored plan for Affordable Insurance Exchanges. This rule also updates and simplifies the complex Medicaid premium and cost sharing requirements, to promote the most effective use of services, and to assist states in identifying cost sharing flexibilities. It includes transition policies for 2014 as applicable.

  3. Family planning costs and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Government sponsored family planning programs have had major success in declining birth rates in Barbados, China, Cuba, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Korea, Mexico, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, and Thailand. Non- government programs have had similar success in Brazil and Colombia. These programs have been estimated as preventing over 100 million births in China and 80 million in India. Research indicates that family planning programs can produce a 30-50% drop in fertility. Family planning information and some contraceptives can be best distributed through community organizations. Research also indicates male opposition has been a major factor in wider acceptance of family planning. Surveys indicate that 50% of the woman who want no additional children are not using any birth control. Many governments do not have the resource and money to implement programs. In the developing countries if those who were able to prevent the unwanted births had birth control, the population increases in those countries would have been 1.3% versus 2.2%. In earlier family planning programs foreign assistance paid over 80% of the cost, and national governments 20%; today this is reversed. The World Bank estimates that for major improvements in population growth and women's health, $7 billion will be needed yearly by the year 2000. The countries that have had the similar goals in development of human resources, social services, health, and education. They have attended to the status of women, female employment, and maternal and child health. Estimates are that 1.3 billion couples and individuals will need family planning services by the year 2000, and this will be a formidable task. This key elements of successful family planning programs are community participation, decentralization, and training.

  4. Teleworking in South Africa: Employee benefits and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Baard

    2010-10-01

    Research purpose: The present study aimed to identify employee perceptions of personal benefits and challenges of teleworking. Motivation for the study: The study sought to contribute insights for South African business practice in this under-researched field. Research design, approach and method: This exploratory study collected primary data through the distribution of an electronic questionnaire to 94 employees at three South African organisations, with a 67% response rate. The survey included both closed and open-ended questions that were analysed using a combination of quantitative and qualitative techniques. Main findings: Most of the internationally identified benefits of teleworking were supported by participants, such as improved productivity, increased job satisfaction and organisational loyalty, decreased stress and improved work-life balance. Challenges identified included an increase in working hours and the lack of availability of training opportunities. Practical/managerial implications: The possible employee benefits and challenges of teleworking may assist organisations in devising teleworking practices and procedures that leverage benefits and address challenges inherent in this form of work practice. Contribution/value add: The study aims to supplement the dearth of knowledge about teleworking, specifically in the South African context, to assist organisations practically in their development of this form of virtual work arrangement for the benefit of organisations and their employees.

  5. Association between employee benefits and frailty in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Funes, José Alberto; Paniagua-Santos, Diana Leticia; Escobar-Rivera, Vicente; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Aguilar-Navarro, Sara; Amieva, Hélène

    2016-05-01

    The phenotype of frailty has been associated with an increased vulnerability for the development of adverse health-related outcomes. The origin of frailty is multifactorial and financial issues could be implicated, as they have been associated with health status, well-being and mortality. However, the association between economic benefits and frailty has been poorly explored. Therefore, the objective was to determine the association between employee benefits and frailty. A cross-sectional study of 927 community-dwelling older adults aged 70 years and older participating in the Mexican Study of Nutritional and Psychosocial Markers of Frailty was carried out. Employee benefits were established according to eight characteristics: bonus, profit sharing, pension, health insurance, food stamps, housing credit, life insurance, and Christmas bonus. Frailty was defined according to a slightly modified version of the phenotype proposed by Fried et al. Multinomial logistic regression models were run to determine the association between employee benefits and frailty adjusting by sociodemographic and health covariates. The prevalence of frailty was 14.1%, and 4.4% of participants rated their health status as "poor." Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that employee benefits were statistically and independently associated with the frail subgroup (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74-0.98; P = 0.027) even after adjusting for potential confounders. Fewer employee benefits are associated with frailty. Supporting spreading employee benefits for older people could have a positive impact on the development of frailty and its consequences. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 606-611. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Improving employee well-being through worksite health promotion? The employees' perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nöhammer , Elisabeth; Stummer , Harald; Schusterschitz , Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of worksite health promotion to improve individual well-being from the employees? perspective, analyze benefit categories and develop suggestions for future worksite health promotion program designs. Subjects and methods A questionnaire based on a qualitative study was distributed in four Austrian organizations to cover state-owned,...

  7. Evaluation of caregiver-friendly workplace policy (CFWPs) interventions on the health of full-time caregiver employees (CEs): implementation and cost-benefit analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Allison M.; Tompa, Emile; Lero, Donna S.; Fast, Janet; Yazdani, Amin; Zeytinoglu, Isik U.

    2017-01-01

    Background Current Canadian evidence illustrating the health benefits and cost-effectiveness of caregiver-friendly workplace policies is needed if Canadian employers are to adopt and integrate caregiver-friendly workplace policies into their employment practices. The goal of this three-year, three study research project is to provide such evidence for the auto manufacturing and educational services sectors. The research questions being addressed are: What are the impacts for employers (econom...

  8. Sabbaticals and Employee Motivation: Benefits, Concerns, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Andrew E.; Tang, Thomas Li-Ping

    2005-01-01

    The use of sabbaticals as a means to improve employee motivation and morale is growing rapidly as companies seek ways to retain their star performers and fight the effects of job burnout. In this article, the authors examine the various forms of sabbaticals in diverse industries, the reasons for their use, and the relevant benefits and concerns…

  9. Taxing Employee Benefits in Kind under EU VAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokland, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the circumstances under which the provision of benefits in kind to employees must be characterized as constituting a taxable supply for consideration, and the further consequences of such characterization, taking into account the ECJ’s decision in Astra Zeneca.

  10. 20 CFR 226.13 - Cost-of-living increase in employee vested dual benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cost-of-living increase in employee vested... Annuity § 226.13 Cost-of-living increase in employee vested dual benefit. If the employee's annuity begins June 1, 1975 or later, a cost-of-living increase is added to the total vested dual benefit amount. This...

  11. Employee motivation in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rosak-Szyrocka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Employees of any organization are the most central part so they need to be influenced and persuaded towards task fulfillment. Examinations connected with medical services were carried out using the Servqual method. It was stated that care of employees and their motivation to work is a very important factor regarding employee engagement but also about the overall success of an organization.

  12. Relationship between Employees' Beliefs regarding Training Benefits and Employees' Organizational Commitment in a Petroleum Company in the State of Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Emadi, Mohammed Asad Shareef; Marquardt, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between the beliefs of senior staff Qatari national employees regarding training benefits as measured by the benefits of employee training, and employees' organizational commitment as measured by the three-component model of organizational commitment. This relationship was assessed through a quantitative…

  13. Delaware's Wellness Program: Motivating Employees Improves Health and Saves Money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer J J

    2008-09-01

    Every year, employers around the country evaluate their company benefits package in the hopes of finding a solution to the ever-rising cost of health insurance premiums. For many business executives, the only logical choice is to pass along those costs to the employee. As an employer, our goal in Delaware has always been to come up with innovative solutions to drive down the cost of health insurance premiums while encouraging our employees to take responsibility for their own health and wellness by living a healthy and active lifestyle, and provide them with the necessary tools. The DelaWELL program (N = 68,000) was launched in 2007, after being tested in initial (N = 100) and expanded (N = 1500) pilot programs from 2004 to 2006 in which 3 similar groups were compared before and after the pilot. Employee health risk assessment, education, and incentives provided employees the necessary tools we had assumed would help them make healthier lifestyle choices. In the first pilot, fewer emergency department visits and lower blood pressure levels resulted in direct savings of more than $62,000. In the expanded pilot, in all 3 groups blood pressure was significantly reduced (P employees participating in DelaWELL had a combined weight loss of 5162 lb. Decision makers in the State of Delaware have come up with an innovative solution to controlling costs while offering employees an attractive benefits package. The savings from its employee benefit program have allowed the state to pass along the savings to employees by maintaining employee-paid health insurance contributions at the same level for the past 3 years. DelaWELL has already confirmed our motto, "Although it may seem an unusual business investment to pay for healthcare before the need arises, in Delaware we concluded that this makes perfect sense." This promising approach to improving health and reducing healthcare costs could potentially be applied to other employer groups.

  14. Delaware's Wellness Program: Motivating Employees Improves Health and Saves Money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer “J. J.”

    2008-01-01

    Background Every year, employers around the country evaluate their company benefits package in the hopes of finding a solution to the ever-rising cost of health insurance premiums. For many business executives, the only logical choice is to pass along those costs to the employee. Objectives As an employer, our goal in Delaware has always been to come up with innovative solutions to drive down the cost of health insurance premiums while encouraging our employees to take responsibility for their own health and wellness by living a healthy and active lifestyle, and provide them with the necessary tools. Methods The DelaWELL program (N = 68,000) was launched in 2007, after being tested in initial (N = 100) and expanded (N = 1500) pilot programs from 2004 to 2006 in which 3 similar groups were compared before and after the pilot. Employee health risk assessment, education, and incentives provided employees the necessary tools we had assumed would help them make healthier lifestyle choices. Results In the first pilot, fewer emergency department visits and lower blood pressure levels resulted in direct savings of more than $62,000. In the expanded pilot, in all 3 groups blood pressure was significantly reduced (P employees participating in DelaWELL had a combined weight loss of 5162 lb. Conclusions Decision makers in the State of Delaware have come up with an innovative solution to controlling costs while offering employees an attractive benefits package. The savings from its employee benefit program have allowed the state to pass along the savings to employees by maintaining employee-paid health insurance contributions at the same level for the past 3 years. DelaWELL has already confirmed our motto, “Although it may seem an unusual business investment to pay for healthcare before the need arises, in Delaware we concluded that this makes perfect sense.” This promising approach to improving health and reducing healthcare costs could potentially be applied to other

  15. Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance: Are Employers Good Agents for Their Employees?

    OpenAIRE

    Peele, Pamela B.; Lave, Judith R.; Black, Jeanne T.; Evans III, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Employers in the United States provide many welfare-type benefits, such as life insurance, disability insurance, health insurance, and pensions, to their employees. Employers can be viewed as performing an agency role in purchasing pension, health, and other welfare benefits for their employees. An exploration of their competence in this role as agents for their employees indicates that large employers are very helpful to their employees in this arena. They seem to contribute to individual em...

  16. Telecommuting: Occupational health considerations for employee health and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, M L

    2000-06-01

    1. Information technology has moved "work" out of a centralized location. Employees who telecommute pose significant challenges and considerations for the practice of occupational health nursing. 2. Employer and employee benefits associated with telecommuting are reportedly associated with high levels of job satisfaction. However, the occupational health and safety risks of this new work environment need to be fully assessed and understood. 3. The ergonomic controls to minimize the risk of repetitive motion injuries are the same for both office and home locations. Additional attention need to be paid to implementing risk controls for other physical hazards and psychosocial considerations, as well as personal safety and security issues. 4. The scope of occupational health nursing practice needs to remain dynamic, recognizing the impact new technologies have on the workplace, to continue to meet the needs of the changing workplace.

  17. Health Benefits In 2015: Stable Trends In The Employer Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Gary; Rae, Matthew; Panchal, Nirmita; Whitmore, Heidi; Damico, Anthony; Kenward, Kevin; Long, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    The annual Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust Employer Health Benefits Survey found that in 2015, average annual premiums (employer and worker contributions combined) were $6,251 for single coverage and $17,545 for family coverage. Both premiums rose 4 percent from 2014, continuing several years of modest growth. The percentage of firms offering health benefits and the percentage of workers covered by their employers' plans remained statistically unchanged from 2014. Eighty-one percent of covered workers were enrolled in a plan with a general annual deductible. Among those workers, the average deductible for single coverage was $1,318. Half of large employers either offered employees the opportunity or required them to complete biometric screening. Of firms that offer an incentive for completing the screening, 20 percent provide employees with incentives or penalties that are tied to meeting those biometric outcomes. The 2015 survey included new questions on financial incentives to complete wellness programs and meet specified biometric outcomes as well as questions about narrow networks and employers' strategies related to the high-cost plan tax and the employer shared-responsibility provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. 20 CFR 1002.266 - What are the obligations of a multiemployer pension benefit plan under USERRA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... pension benefit plan under USERRA? 1002.266 Section 1002.266 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... SERVICES EMPLOYMENT AND REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS ACT OF 1994 Reemployment Rights and Benefits Pension Plan Benefits § 1002.266 What are the obligations of a multiemployer pension benefit plan under USERRA? A...

  19. Incorporating Health Education into Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of aligning health education with the goals and functions of employee assistance programs are discussed. The role of the health educator in developing these programs is explained in a description of employee assistance program service standards and specific sub-tasks. (DF)

  20. Active and retired public employees' health insurance: potential data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Melinda Sandler

    2014-12-01

    Employer-provided health insurance for public sector workers is a significant public policy issue. Underfunding and the growing costs of benefits may hinder the fiscal solvency of state and local governments. Findings from the private sector may not be applicable because many public sector workers are covered by union contracts or salary schedules and often benefit modifications require changes in legislation. Research has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently large and representative data on public sector employees. This article highlights data sources researchers might utilize to investigate topics concerning health insurance for active and retired public sector employees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving employee productivity through improved health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Serxner, Seth

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate productivity-related savings associated with employee participation in health promotion programs. Propensity score weighting and multiple regression techniques were used to estimate savings. These techniques were adjusted for demographic and health status differences between participants who engaged in one or more telephonic health management programs and nonparticipants who were eligible for but did not engage in these programs. Employees who participated in a program and successfully improved their health care or lifestyle showed significant improvements in lost work time. These employees saved an average of $353 per person per year. This reflects about 10.3 hours in additional productive time annually, compared with similar, but nonparticipating employees. Participating in health promotion programs can help improve productivity levels among employees and save money for their employers.

  2. Beyond Salaries: Employee Benefits for Teachers in the SREB States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Gale F.

    This report summarizes teachers' and employers' contribution rates to retirement, Social Security and Medicare, and major medical plans. Several Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states have adopted multi-year goals to raise teacher pay, which involves additional costs for benefits tied to those salary increases. These benefits can add…

  3. How does retiree health insurance influence public sector employee saving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert L; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2014-12-01

    Economic theory predicts that employer-provided retiree health insurance (RHI) benefits have a crowd-out effect on household wealth accumulation, not dissimilar to the effects reported elsewhere for employer pensions, Social Security, and Medicare. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any similar research on the impacts of retiree health insurance per se. Accordingly, the present paper utilizes a unique data file on respondents to the Health and Retirement Study, to explore how employer-provided retiree health insurance may influence net household wealth among public sector employees, where retiree healthcare benefits are still quite prevalent. Key findings include the following: Most full-time public sector employees anticipate having employer-provided health insurance coverage in retirement, unlike most private sector workers.Public sector employees covered by RHI had substantially less wealth than similar private sector employees without RHI. In our data, Federal workers had about $82,000 (18%) less net wealth than private sector employees lacking RHI; state/local workers with RHI accumulated about $69,000 (or 15%) less net wealth than their uninsured private sector counterparts.After controlling on socioeconomic status and differences in pension coverage, net household wealth for Federal employees was $116,000 less than workers without RHI and the result is statistically significant; the state/local difference was not. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effects of Telecommuting Intensity on Employee Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Rachel Mosher; Benevent, Richele; Schulte, Patricia; Rinehart, Christine; Crighton, K Andrew; Corcoran, Maureen

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the influence of the intensity of telecommuting on employee health. Study design comprised a longitudinal analysis of employee demographic data, medical claims, health risk assessment data, and remote connectivity hours. Data from Prudential Financial served as the setting. Active employees ages 18 to 64 years who completed the health risk assessment between 2010 and 2011 were the study subjects. Measures included telecommuting status and intensity, and eight indicators of health risk status (obesity, depression, stress, tobacco use, alcohol abuse, poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and an overall risk measure), with employee age, sex, race-ethnicity, job grade, management status, and work location as control variables. Health risks were determined for nontelecommuters and telecommuters working remotely ≤8, 9 to 32, 33 to 72, and ≥73 hours per month. Longitudinal models for each health risk were estimated, controlling for demographic and job characteristics. Telecommuting health risks varied by telecommuting intensity. Nontelecommuters were at greater risk for obesity, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity, and tobacco use, and were at greater overall risk than at least one of the telecommuting groups. Employees who telecommuted ≤8 hours per month were significantly less likely than nontelecommuters to experience depression. There was no association between telecommuting and stress or nutrition. Results suggest that employees may benefit from telecommuting opportunities. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  5. 26 CFR 1.501(c)(9)-2 - Membership in a voluntary employees' beneficiary association; employees; voluntary association of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... A health insurance benefit plan was established by X and Y as the result of a collective bargaining... benefits. (E) A requirement that a member (or a member's dependents) meet a reasonable health standard... Union Benefit Plan is established to provide life insurance benefits to employees of X represented by W...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.35 - Employee emergency action plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Provisions § 1926.35 Employee emergency action plans. (a) Scope and application. This section applies to all...) Names or regular job titles of persons or departments who can be contacted for further information or... the employee in the event of an emergency. The written plan shall be kept at the workplace and made...

  7. 18 CFR 367.9260 - Account 926, Employee pensions and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... medical, educational or recreational activities for the benefit of employees, and administrative expenses.... (7) Expenses in connection with educational and recreational activities for the benefit of employees... are only incidentally engaged in employee pension and benefit activities may be included in accounts...

  8. HealthMarts, HIPCs (health insurance purchasing cooperatives), MEWAs (multiple employee welfare arrangements), and AHPs (association health plans): a guide for the perplexed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M A; Wicks, E K; Lawlor, J S

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers how pending proposals to authorize new forms of group purchasing arrangements for health insurance would fit and function within the existing, highly complex market and regulatory landscape and whether these proposals are likely to meet their stated objectives and avoid unintended consequences. Cost savings are more likely to result from increased risk segmentation than through true market efficiencies. Thus, these proposals could erode previous market reforms whose goal is increased risk pooling. On the other hand, these proposals contain important enhancements, clarifications, and simplification of state and federal regulatory oversight of group purchasing vehicles. Also, they address some of the problems that have hampered the performance of purchasing cooperatives. On balance, although these proposals should receive cautious and careful consideration, they are not likely to produce a significant overall reduction in premiums or increase in coverage.

  9. Association Between Employee Sleep With Workplace Health and Economic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Schultz, Alyssa B; Li, Xingquan

    2017-02-01

    Poor sleep can impact occupational functioning. The current study examines health risks, medical conditions, and workplace economic outcomes associated with self-reported hours of sleep among employees. Employees of a global financial services corporation were categorized on the basis of their self-reported average hours of sleep. Differences in health care costs, productivity measures, health risks, and medical conditions were analyzed by hours of sleep while controlling for confounding variables. A strong U-shaped relationship between health care costs, short-term disability, absenteeism, and presenteeism (on-the-job work loss) and the hours of sleep was found among employees. The nadir of the "U" occurs for 7 or 8 hours of sleep per night. Worksite wellness programs often address health risks and medical conditions and may benefit from incorporating sleep education.

  10. 45 CFR 86.56 - Fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... available to employees or make fringe benefits available to spouses, families, or dependents of employees... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF..., accident, life insurance or retirement benefit, service, policy or plan, any profit-sharing or bonus plan...

  11. Marine Planning Benefits the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) and Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) are management approaches that allow sustainable coastal and ocean planning. The basic unit of management under CMSP is a large region, with the United States coastlines and Great Lakes divided into ...

  12. Disability management: corporate medical department management of employee health and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, W N; Conti, D J

    2000-10-01

    This study describes a proactive in-house program for managing short-term disability (STD) in the workforce of a very large banking system. The goals of this program were to (1) minimize the personal and economic impacts of STD by early intervention, (2) validate the extent and duration of STD, and (3) coordinate medical services and provide guidance to managers that would facilitate an early return to work. This program was made possible by the installation of a comprehensive database, called Occupational Medicine and Nursing Information System. This database mainly includes employees' claims for inpatient and outpatient health services, disability and workers' compensation benefits, wellness program participation, medical examinations and laboratory tests, use of prescription drugs, and results of Health Risk Appraisals. As a result of these efforts, STD event duration declined after this STD management program was implemented in locations heretofore outside the system, and by providing full pay for part-time work after STD, within the system as well. Of note, the average number of STD days per employee showed substantial variation by health plan, including the fact that it was higher (3.9 STD days/employee) for health maintenance organization participants than for indemnity plan members (2.7 STD days/employee).

  13. Understanding health insurance plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000879.htm Understanding health insurance plans To use the sharing features on this ... plan for you and your family. Types of Health Insurance Plans Depending on how you get your health ...

  14. Flexible benefits plans. Perceptions of their effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agho, A O

    1995-01-01

    Flexible benefits plans have been used in businesses since the 1970s to control healthcare costs and meet the needs of an increasingly diverse work force. More recently, healthcare organizations have begun to implement the flexible benefits concept. This study collected data from human resources executives at hospitals with and without flex plans to investigate how they perceive the effectiveness of and the problems associated with such plans.

  15. Employee Health Service for Teaching and Nonteaching Staff: A Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A needs assessment was conducted to identify the health needs of school district employees in planning a comprehensive employee health service. Survey questionnaires were analyzed to determine characteristics of those individuals who may be at greatest health risk. Results indicate that degree of stress can differentiate health risk predictors.…

  16. 42 CFR 457.410 - Health benefits coverage options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health benefits coverage options. 457.410 Section 457.410 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.410 Health benefits coverage options. (a) Types of...

  17. Determinants and benefits of physical activity maintenance in hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Sounan, Charles; Martin, Kara; Trudel, Julie G; Lavigne, Genevieve L; Grover, Steven A; Lowensteyn, Ilka

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether the positive behavioral and anthropometric outcomes of a pedometer-based physical activity 8-week challenge were maintained 6 months after the end of the program. It further investigated the motivational profile of those who maintained their physical activity levels in the months following the end of the program and of those who did not. Hospital employees from a university-affiliated multisite health care center in Canada participated using a questionnaire. Of the 235 participants who completed the 8-week challenge, 157 questionnaires were returned 6 months later. Paired-samples t tests were conducted between the baseline and follow-up scores as well as between the postprogram and follow-up scores to detect significant differences between the measurement points. This study shows that the pedometer-based physical activity helped hospital employees maintain a high level of physical activity as well as maintain a healthy body mass index after 6 months. The results demonstrated that during maintenance the high physical activity group obtained higher scores for identified regulation and intrinsic regulation compared with the other groups. The results of the study revealed that identified and intrinsic regulations are important contributors to maintaining physical activity among hospital employees.

  18. 20 CFR 1002.262 - When is the employer required to make the plan contribution that is attributable to the employee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When is the employer required to make the plan contribution that is attributable to the employee's period of uniformed service? 1002.262 Section 1002.262 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS UNDER...

  19. 26 CFR 1.401(l)-3 - Permitted disparity for defined benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... plan provides no benefits with respect to average annual compensation up to the integration level. The...)(17)(ii) (the definition of final average compensation), the plan could specify that an employee's... of service and an excess benefit percentage of 1.85 percent of average annual compensation in excess...

  20. Employee choice of consumer-driven health insurance in a multiplan, multiproduct setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Stephen T; Feldman, Roger; Christianson, Jon B

    2004-08-01

    To determine who chooses a Consumer-Driven Health Plan (CDHP) in a multiplan, multiproduct setting, and, specifically, whether the CDHP attracts the sicker employees in a company's risk pool. We estimated a health plan choice equation for employees of the University of Minnesota, who had a choice in 2002 of a CDHP and three other health plans--a traditional health maintenance organization (HMO), a preferred provider organization (PPO), and a tiered network product based on care systems. Data from an employee survey were matched to information from the university's payroll system. Chronic illness of the employee or family members had no effect on choice of the CDHP, but such employees tended to choose the PPO. The employee's age was not related to CDHP choice. Higher-income employees chose the CDHP, as well as those who preferred health plans with a national provider panel that includes their physician in the panel. Employees tended to choose plans with lower out-of-pocket premiums, and surprisingly, employees with a chronic health condition themselves or in their family were more price-sensitive. This study provides the first evidence on who chooses a CDHP in a multiplan, multiproduct setting. The CDHP was not chosen disproportionately by the young and healthy, but it did attract the wealthy and those who found the availability of providers more appealing. Low out-of-pocket premiums are important features of health plans and in this setting, low premiums appeal to those who are less healthy.

  1. Benefits and stressors – Perceived effects of ICT use on employee health and work stress: An exploratory study from Austria and Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Katharina Ninaus; Sandra Diehl; Ralf Terlutter; Kara Chan; Anqi Huang

    2015-01-01

    Stress has become a mass phenomenon in the modern workplace. The use of information and communication technologies is beginning to receive greater attention in the context of occupational stress. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted to examine both stressors and benefits resulting from technologies among practitioners in the advertising, public relations, and journalism industry in Hong Kong and Austria. Results suggest that technologies allow instant availability, which facilitates...

  2. Value-Based Benefit Design to Improve Medication Adherence for Employees with Anxiety or Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kimberly J; Aguilar, Kathleen M; Thompson, Eric; Miller, Ross M

    2015-01-01

    Through reduced out-of-pocket costs and wellness offerings, value-based benefit design (VBBD) is a promising strategy to improve medication adherence and other health-related outcomes across populations. There is limited evidence, however, of the effectiveness of these policy-level changes among individuals with anxiety or depression. To assess the impact of a multifaceted VBBD policy that incorporates waived copayments, wellness offerings, and on-site services on medication adherence among plan members with anxiety or depression, and to explore how this intervention and its resulting improved adherence affects other health-related outcomes. A retrospective longitudinal pre/post design was utilized to measure outcomes before and after the VBBD policy change. Repeated measures statistical regression models with correlated error terms were utilized to evaluate outcomes among employees of a self-insured global health company and their spouses (N = 529) who had anxiety or depression after the VBBD policy change. A multivariable linear regression model was chosen as the best fit to evaluate a change in medication possession ratio (MPR) after comparing parameters for several distributions. The repeated measures multivariable regression models were adjusted for baseline MPR and potential confounders, including continuous age, sex, continuous modified Charlson Comorbidity Index, and the continuous number of prescriptions filled that year. The outcomes were assessed for the 1 year before the policy change (January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2011) and for 2 years after the change (January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2013). The primary outcome was a change in MPR. The secondary outcomes included healthcare utilization, medical or pharmacy costs, the initiation of medication, generic medication use, and employee absenteeism (the total number of sick days). The implementation of the VBBD strategy was associated with a significant increase in average MPR (0.65 vs 0.61 in

  3. Nurse manager succession planning: A cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Tracy; Evans, Jennifer L; Tooley, Stephanie; Shirey, Maria R

    2018-03-01

    This commentary presents a cost-benefit analysis to advocate for the use of succession planning to mitigate the problems ensuing from nurse manager turnover. An estimated 75% of nurse managers will leave the workforce by 2020. Many benefits are associated with proactively identifying and developing internal candidates. Fewer than 7% of health care organisations have implemented formal leadership succession planning programmes. A cost-benefit analysis of a formal succession-planning programme from one hospital illustrates the benefits of the programme in their organisation and can be replicated easily. Assumptions of nursing manager succession planning cost-benefit analysis are identified and discussed. The succession planning exemplar demonstrates the integration of cost-benefit analysis principles. Comparing the costs of a formal nurse manager succession planning strategy with the status quo results in a positive cost-benefit ratio. The implementation of a formal nurse manager succession planning programme effectively reduces replacement costs and time to transition into the new role. This programme provides an internal pipeline of future leaders who will be more successful than external candidates. Using an actual cost-benefit analysis equips nurse managers with valuable evidence depicting succession planning as a viable business strategy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Climate Action Benefits: Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides background on the relationship between human health and climate change and describes what the CIRA Health analyses cover. It provides links to the subsectors Air Quality, Extreme Temperature, Labor, and Water Quality.

  5. Benefits for Health; NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. Presentation discusses (1) Bone Health: Vitamin D, Fish Consumption and Exercise (2) Medical Support in Remote Areas (3) ISS Ultrasound 4) Dry electrode EKG System (5) Environmental Factors and Psychological Health.

  6. Work Environment Satisfaction and Employee Health:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Kristensen, Nicolai

    2008-01-01

      This paper investigates whether a satisfactory work environment can promote employee health even after controlling for socioeconomic status and life style factors. A dynamic panel model of health is estimated on worker samples from Denmark, France and Spain, employing both self-assessed general...

  7. Integrated Employee Occupational Health and Organizational-Level Registered Nurse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Schult, Tamara; Eaton, Jennifer Lipkowitz; Awosika, Ebi; McPhaul, Kathleen M

    2016-05-01

    The study examined organizational culture, structural supports, and employee health program integration influence on registered nurse (RN) outcomes. An organizational health survey, employee health clinical operations survey, employee attitudes survey, and administration data were collected. Multivariate regression models examined outcomes of sick leave, leave without pay, voluntary turnover, intention to leave, and organizational culture using 122 medical centers. Lower staffing ratios were associated with greater sick leave, higher turnover, and intention to leave. Safety climate was favorably associated with each of the five outcomes. Both onsite employee occupational health services and a robust health promotion program were associated with more positive organizational culture perceptions. Findings highlight the positive influence of integrating employee health and health promotion services on organizational health outcomes. Attention to promoting employee health may benefit organizations in multiple, synergistic ways.

  8. Supporting the Health of Low Socioeconomic Status Employees: Qualitative Perspectives from Employees and Large Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Amanda T; Hammerback, Kristen; Hannon, Peggy A; Mason, Caitlin; Wilkie, Michelle N; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2018-03-13

    The aim of this study was to identify alignments between wellness offerings low socioeconomic status (SES) employees need and those large companies can provide. Focus groups (employees); telephone interviews (large companies). Employees were low-SES, insured through their employers, and employed by large Washington State companies. Focus groups covered perceived barriers to healthy behaviors at work and potential support from companies. Interviews focused on priorities for employee health and challenges reaching low-SES employees. Seventy-seven employees participated in eight focus groups; 12 companies completed interviews. Employees identified facilitators and barriers to healthier work environments; companies expressed care for employees, concerns about employee obesity, and reluctance to discuss SES. Our findings combine low-SES employee and large company perspectives and indicate three ways workplaces could most effectively support low-SES employee health: create healthier workplace food environments; prioritize onsite physical activity facilities; use clearer health communications.

  9. 29 CFR 2520.101-4 - Annual funding notice for multiemployer defined benefit pension plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pension plans. 2520.101-4 Section 2520.101-4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE... pension plans. (a) In general. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of this section, pursuant to section 101(f) of the Act, the administrator of a defined benefit, multiemployer pension plan shall...

  10. The Great Recession and Workers' Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kanghyock

    2018-03-01

    During a recession, cost-sharing of employer-sponsored health benefits could increase to reduce labor costs in the U.S. Using a variation in the severity of recession shocks across industries, I find evidence that the enrollment rate of high deductible health plans (HDHPs) among workers covered by employer-sponsored health benefits increased more among firms in industries that experienced severe recession shocks. As potential mechanisms, I study employer-side and worker-side mechanisms. I find that employers changed health benefit offerings to force or incentivize workers to enroll in HDHPs. But I find little evidence of an increase in workers' demand for HDHPs due to a reduction in income. These results suggest that the HDHP enrollment rate increased during the Great Recession, as employers tried to save costs of offering health benefits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Changing the way employee benefit communications are produced: outsourcing, a more efficient, less costly process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herren, K

    1995-12-01

    Outsourcing may offer employers an efficient, cost-effective way to produce employee benefit communications. It offers a way to utilize the latest technology to produce personalized benefit statements or to target an announcement of benefit changes to a specific group of employees.

  12. Consumer-directed health plans: what happened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Jeff

    2007-08-01

    CDHPs can stabilize growth in health costs, but the health plan-subscriber relationship should be more transparent. CFOs should ensure that increased cost exposure in CDHPs is paired with broad, deep disease management and employee assistance support. Hospitals should plan for the likelihood that, one way or another, consumers will be paying more of their healthcare bill.

  13. Occupational health hazards among quarry employees in Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational health hazards among quarry employees in Ebonyi state, ... how these problems affect the conditions of employees in such industries in Ebonyi State. ... the level of compliance of safety and protective devices among employees.

  14. Measuring the value of nonwage employee benefits: building a model of the relation between benefit satisfaction and value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathington, Bart L; Jones, Allan P

    2006-11-01

    Researchers have commonly assumed benefits that employees view as more valuable have a greater influence on their attitudes and behaviors. Researchers have used 2 common methods to measure benefit value: attaching a monetary value to benefits and using self-reports of benefit importance. The present authors propose that the 2 approaches are conceptually distinct and have different implications. They use a social exchange perspective to justify this distinction and integrate both approaches and benefit satisfaction into a more comprehensive model of benefit perception. Results suggest that both measures have practical applications depending on the nature of the exchange relationship between the organization and employees. However, this relationship depends on the specific benefit and on employee satisfaction with that benefit. Some benefits lend themselves to a monetary estimate, whereas others lend themselves more to a nonmonetary valuation.

  15. Employee Resourcing: The Planning and Recruitment Phase

    OpenAIRE

    Crowley-Henry, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, in the context of the global financial crisis and economic recession, the demand for and supply of labour have changed. The labour market has moved from being described as 'tight' to being described as 'loose'. A tight labour market is a seller's or jobseeker's market, where organizations find it more difficult to source employees due to high overall national employment levels. On the other hand, a loose labour market is a buyer's or employer's marke...

  16. Professional Preparation in Employee Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, R. Morgan, Jr.; Bailey, William J.

    1983-01-01

    The need for college courses to train personnel to conduct employee health programs in private industry is discussed. A description of a sample graduate-level course is provided, as is a listing of pertinent organizations, programs, books, and articles. (PP)

  17. 5 CFR 890.301 - Opportunities for employees who are not participants in premium conversion to enroll or change...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... only at any time. Exceptions: (i) An employee participating in health insurance premium conversion may... office will determine if the employee has a self and family enrollment in a health benefits plan that... an eligible family member of the employee loses coverage under this part or another group health...

  18. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and as...

  19. Consumer experiences in a consumer-driven health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Parente, Stephen T; Feldman, Roger

    2004-08-01

    To assess the experience of enrollees in a consumer-driven health plan (CDHP). Survey of University of Minnesota employees regarding their 2002 health benefits. Comparison of regression-adjusted mean values for CDHP and other plan enrollees: customer service, plan paperwork, overall satisfaction, and plan switching. For CDHP enrollees only, use of plan features, willingness to recommend the plan to others, and reports of particularly negative or positive experiences. There were significant differences in experiences of CDHP enrollees versus enrollees in other plans with customer service and paperwork, but similar levels of satisfaction (on a 10-point scale) with health plans. Eight percent of CDHP enrollees left their plan after one year, compared to 5 percent of enrollees leaving other plans. A minority of CDHP enrollees used online plan features, but enrollees generally were satisfied with the amount and quality of the information provided by the CDHP. Almost half reported a particularly positive experience, compared to a quarter reporting a particularly negative experience. Thirty percent said they would recommend the plan to others, while an additional 57 percent said they would recommend it depending on the situation. Much more work is needed to determine how consumer experience varies with the number and type of plan options available, the design of the CDHP, and the length of time in the CDHP. Research also is needed on the factors that affect consumer decisions to leave CDHPs.

  20. Personal Costs and Benefits of Employee Intrapreneurship: Disentangling the Employee Intrapreneurship, Well-Being, and Job Performance Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawke, Jason C; Gorgievski, Marjan J; Bakker, Arnold B

    2017-12-28

    Ample studies have confirmed the benefits of intrapreneurship (i.e., employee behaviors that contribute to new venture creation and strategic renewal activities) for firm performance, but research on the personal costs and benefits of engaging in intrapreneurial activities for employees is lacking. Building on job demands-resources and reinforcement sensitivity theories, we examined how employees' reinforcement sensitivity qualified the relationship among their intrapreneurial behavior, subjective well-being, and other-rated job performance. Using a sample of 241 employee dyads, the results of moderated mediation analyses confirmed that employee intrapreneurship related positively to work engagement for employees high (vs. low) in sensitivity to rewards (behavioral approach system), which subsequently related positively to innovativeness and in-role performance and negatively to work avoidance. In contrast, employee intrapreneurship related positively to exhaustion for employees high (vs. low) in sensitivity to punishments (behavioral inhibition system), which subsequently related positively to work avoidance and negatively to in-role performance (but not to innovativeness). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Massachusetts health reform: employer coverage from employees' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sharon K; Stockley, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The national health reform debate continues to draw on Massachusetts' 2006 reform initiative, with a focus on sustaining employer-sponsored insurance. This study provides an update on employers' responses under health reform in fall 2008, using data from surveys of working-age adults. Results show that concerns about employers' dropping coverage or scaling back benefits under health reform have not been realized. Access to employer coverage has increased, as has the scope and quality of their coverage as assessed by workers. However, premiums and out-of-pocket costs have become more of an issue for employees in small firms.

  2. Final Report: Evaluation of Tools and Metrics to Support Employer Selection of Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattke, Soeren; Van Busum, Kristin R; Martsolf, Grant R

    2014-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) places strong emphasis on quality of care as a means to improve outcomes for Americans and promote the financial sustainability of our health care system. Included in the ACA are new disclosure requirements that require health plans to provide a summary of benefits and coverage that accurately describes the benefits under the plan or coverage. These requirements are intended to support employers' procurement of high-value health coverage for their employees. This study attempts to help employers understand the structural differences between health plans and the performance dimensions along which plans can differ, as well as to educate employers about available tools that can be used to evaluate plan options. The study also discusses the extent to which these and other tools or resources are used by employers to inform choices between health plans.

  3. 77 FR 19522 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: New Premium Rating Method for Most Community Rated Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... reconciliation process itself once applied. Additionally, the commenter would like to understand the roles of OPM... methodology unless doing so conflicts with the FEHB contract. Changes Made Since the Interim Final Rule Was... Accounting and price adjustment. * * * * * (b) * * * (4) If rates are determined by comparison with the FEHB...

  4. Employment insecurity and employees' health in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottini, Elena; Ghinetti, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    We use register data for Denmark (IDA) merged with the Danish Work Environment Cohort Survey (1995, 2000, and 2005) to estimate the effect of perceived employment insecurity on perceived health for a sample of Danish employees. We consider two health measures from the SF-36 Health Survey Instrument: a vitality scale for general well-being and a mental health scale. We first analyse a summary measure of employment insecurity. Instrumental variables-fixed effects estimates that use firm workforce changes as a source of exogenous variation show that 1 additional dimension of insecurity causes a shift from the median to the 25th percentile in the mental health scale and to the 30th in that of energy/vitality. It also increases by about 6 percentage points the probability to develop severe mental health problems. Looking at single insecurity dimensions by naïve fixed effects, uncertainty associated with the current job is important for mental health. Employability has a sizeable relationship with health and is the only insecurity dimension that matters for the energy and vitality scale. Danish employees who fear involuntary firm internal mobility experience worse mental health. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Perspectives on workplace health promotion among employees in low-wage industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerback, Kristen; Hannon, Peggy A.; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Clegg-Thorp, Catherine; Kohn, Marlana; Parrish, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Study goals were to (a) understand the attitudes of employees in low-wage industries toward workplace health promotion, including views on appropriateness of employer involvement in employee health, and level of interest in workplace health promotion overall and in specific programs; and (b) determine the potential for extending workplace health promotion to spouses and partners of these employees. Approach Forty-two 60-90-minute interviews Setting Interviews were conducted with couples (married or living together) in the Seattle/King County metropolitan area of Washington State. Participants Forty-two couples with one or more members working in one of five low-wage industries: accommodation/food services, education, health care/social assistance, manufacturing, and retail trade. Method Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts using grounded theory to identify themes. Results Employees consider workplace health promotion both appropriate and desirable, and believe it benefits employers through increased productivity and morale. Most have little personal experience with it and doubt their employers would prioritize employee health. Employees are most interested in efforts focused on nutrition and physical activity. Both employees and their partners support extending workplace health promotion to include partners. Conclusion Employees and their partners are interested in workplace health promotion if it addresses behaviors they care about. Concern over employer involvement in their personal health decisions is minimal; instead, employees view employer interest in their health as a sign that they are valued. PMID:25162321

  6. Perspectives on Workplace Health Promotion Among Employees in Low-Wage Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerback, Kristen; Hannon, Peggy A; Harris, Jeffrey R; Clegg-Thorp, Catherine; Kohn, Marlana; Parrish, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Study goals were to (1) understand the attitudes of employees in low-wage industries toward workplace health promotion, including views on appropriateness of employer involvement in employee health and level of interest in workplace health promotion overall and in specific programs, and (2) determine the potential for extending workplace health promotion to spouses and partners of these employees. The study used 42 interviews of 60 to 90 minutes. Interviews were conducted with couples (married or living together) in the Seattle/King County metropolitan area of Washington State. Study participants were forty-two couples with one or more members working in one of five low-wage industries: accommodation/food services, education, health care/social assistance, manufacturing, and retail trade. The study employed qualitative analysis of interview transcripts using grounded theory to identify themes. Employees consider workplace health promotion both appropriate and desirable and believe it benefits employers through increased productivity and morale. Most have little personal experience with it and doubt their employers would prioritize employee health. Employees are most interested in efforts focused on nutrition and physical activity. Both employees and their partners support extending workplace health promotion to include partners. Employees and their partners are interested in workplace health promotion if it addresses behaviors they care about. Concern over employer involvement in their personal health decisions is minimal; instead, employees view employer interest in their health as a sign that they are valued.

  7. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs; Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008; the Application of Mental Health Parity Requirements to Coverage Offered by Medicaid Managed Care Organizations, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Alternative Benefit Plans. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    This final rule will address the application of certain requirements set forth in the Public Health Service Act, as amended by the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008, to coverage offered by Medicaid managed care organizations, Medicaid Alternative Benefit Plans, and Children’s Health Insurance Programs.

  8. Health Behaviour of Higher Education Employees--Value-Transmitting Conduct of Professionals to Their Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mátó, Veronika; Tarkó, Klára; Tóth, Krisztina; Nagymajtényi, László; Paulik, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Workplaces and employees' health are closely connected. A healthy workforce would increase productivity, effectivity and efficiency which will benefit the employer in financial and moral terms as well. On the contrary, if employees experience stress, long working hours, bad managerial style, not safe working conditions that would lead to ill…

  9. Impact of Dynamics of Planned Change on Employees Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we determined the impact of organizational planned change programmes on the quality of worklife (QWL) of employees. The study involved four organizations selected from both the private and public sector establishments in Port Harcourt. Two organizations were randomly selected from each sector.

  10. Health benefits of particle filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisk, W J

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  12. Health Benefits of Particle Filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

  13. DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLANS, DEFINED BENEFIT PLANS, AND THE ACCUMULATION OF RETIREMENT WEALTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poterba, James; Rauh, Joshua; Venti, Steven; Wise, David

    2010-01-01

    The private pension structure in the United States, once dominated by defined benefit (DB) plans, is currently divided between defined contribution (DC) and DB plans. Wealth accumulation in DC plans depends on the participant's contribution behavior and on financial market returns, while accumulation in DB plans is sensitive to a participant's labor market experience and to plan parameters. This paper simulates the distribution of retirement wealth under representative DB and DC plans. It uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to explore how asset returns, earnings histories, and retirement plan characteristics contribute to the variation in retirement wealth outcomes. We simulate DC plan accumulation by randomly assigning individuals a share of wages that they and their employer contribute to the plan. We consider several possible asset allocation strategies, with asset returns drawn from the historical return distribution. Our DB plan simulations draw earnings histories from the HRS, and randomly assign each individual a pension plan drawn from a sample of large private and public defined benefit plans. The simulations yield distributions of both DC and DB wealth at retirement. Average retirement wealth accruals under current DC plans exceed average accruals under private sector DB plans, although DC plans are also more likely to generate very low retirement wealth outcomes. The comparison of current DC plans with more generous public sector DB plans is less definitive, because public sector DB plans are more generous on average than their private sector counterparts. PMID:21057597

  14. 78 FR 6275 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 430...

  15. When daily planning improves employee performance: The importance of planning type, engagement, and interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Michael R; Weinhardt, Justin M; Brodsky, Andrew; Tangirala, Subrahmaniam; DeVoe, Sanford E

    2018-03-01

    Does planning for a particular workday help employees perform better than on other days they fail to plan? We investigate this question by identifying 2 distinct types of daily work planning to explain why and when planning improves employees' daily performance. The first type is time management planning (TMP)-creating task lists, prioritizing tasks, and determining how and when to perform them. We propose that TMP enhances employees' performance by increasing their work engagement, but that these positive effects are weakened when employees face many interruptions in their day. The second type is contingent planning (CP) in which employees anticipate possible interruptions in their work and plan for them. We propose that CP helps employees stay engaged and perform well despite frequent interruptions. We investigate these hypotheses using a 2-week experience-sampling study. Our findings indicate that TMP's positive effects are conditioned upon the amount of interruptions, but CP has positive effects that are not influenced by the level of interruptions. Through this study, we help inform workers of the different planning methods they can use to increase their daily motivation and performance in dynamic work environments. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Perceived workplace health support is associated with employee productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Hannon, Peggy A; Laing, Sharon S; Kohn, Marlana J; Clark, Kathleen; Pritchard, Scott; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relationship between perceived workplace health support and employee productivity. A quantitative cross-sectional study. Washington State agencies. A total of 3528 employees from six state agencies were included in this analysis. Perceived workplace health support was assessed by two questions that queried respondents on how often they felt supported by the workplace for healthy living and physical activity. The Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire was used to measure health-related absenteeism and presenteeism in the past 7 days. Multivariate linear regression was used to estimate the mean differences in productivity by levels of perceived health support. Most participants were between 45 and 64 years of age and were predominantly non-Hispanic white. Presenteeism varied significantly by the level of perceived workplace health support, with those who felt least supported having higher presenteeism than those who felt most supported. The difference in presenteeism by perceived workplace support remained significant in models adjusting for sociodemographic and health characteristics (mean difference: 7.1% for support for healthy living, 95% confidence interval: 3.7%, 10.4%; 4.3% for support for physical activity, 95% confidence interval: 1.7%, 6.8%). Absenteeism was not associated with perceived workplace health support. Higher perceived workplace health support is independently associated with higher work productivity. Employers may see productivity benefit from wellness programs through improved perceptions of workplace health support.

  17. JOB STRESS AS A PREDICTOR OF EMPLOYEE HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    AZMAN Ismail; NORHAFIZAH Abu Hasan; YU-FEI (Melissa) Chin; YUSOF Ismail; AINON JAUHARIAH Abu Samah

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure the relationship between job stress and employee health. A survey method was employed to collect self-administered questionnaires from employees in established universities in Sarawak, Malaysia. The outcomes of SmartPLS path model revealed three important findings: first, role ambiguity was positively and significantly related to employee health. Second, role conflict was positively and significantly related to employee health. Third, role overload was posi...

  18. Health benefits of Moringa oleifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdull Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Ibrahim, Muhammad Din; Kntayya, Saie Brindha

    2014-01-01

    Phytomedicines are believed to have benefits over conventional drugs and are regaining interest in current research. Moringa oleifera is a multi-purpose herbal plant used as human food and an alternative for medicinal purposes worldwide. It has been identified by researchers as a plant with numerous health benefits including nutritional and medicinal advantages. Moringa oleifera contains essential amino acids, carotenoids in leaves, and components with nutraceutical properties, supporting the idea of using this plant as a nutritional supplement or constituent in food preparation. Some nutritional evaluation has been carried out in leaves and stem. An important factor that accounts for the medicinal uses of Moringa oleifera is its very wide range of vital antioxidants, antibiotics and nutrients including vitamins and minerals. Almost all parts from Moringa can be used as a source for nutrition with other useful values. This mini-review elaborate on details its health benefits.

  19. 26 CFR 1.125-3 - Effect of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) on the operation of cafeteria plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: FMLA does not require an employer to maintain an employee's non-health benefits (e.g., life insurance...: May an employee revoke coverage or cease payment of his or her share of group health plan premiums... returns to work. FMLA also provides the employee a right to be reinstated in the group health plan...

  20. Employee benefits under IAS/IFRS and the Czech accounting legislation, the tax point of view including

    OpenAIRE

    Milena Otavová; Jana Gláserová

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of employee benefit is limited in the Czech Accounting Legislation. There are only short-term employee benefits – wages, salaries, when employees has rendered services to an entity during a period – month. Entities could create funds from a net profit –fund for social and cultural benefits which could serve as source of social services financing for employees. There are employee benefits defined very extensive in IAS/IFRS. It is IAS 19 – Employee Benefits which defines four Gro...

  1. Analyzing best practices in employee health management: how age, sex, and program components relate to employee engagement and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E; Grossmeier, Jessica; Mangen, David J; Gingerich, Stefan B

    2013-04-01

    Examine the influence of employee health management (EHM) best practices on registration, participation, and health behavior change in telephone-based coaching programs. Individual health assessment data, EHM program data, and health coaching participation data were analyzed for associations with coaching program enrollment, active participation, and risk reduction. Multivariate analyses occurred at the individual (n = 205,672) and company levels (n = 55). Considerable differences were found in how age and sex impacted typical EHM evaluation metrics. Cash incentives for the health assessment were associated with more risk reduction for men than for women. Providing either a noncash or a benefits-integrated incentive for completing the health assessment, or a noncash incentive for lifestyle management, strengthened the relationship between age and risk reduction. In EHM programs, one size does not fit all. These results can help employers tailor engagement strategies for their specific population.

  2. 29 CFR 4.176 - Payment of fringe benefits to temporary and part-time employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Payment of fringe benefits to temporary and part-time... to temporary and part-time employees. (a) As set forth in § 4.165(a)(2), the Act makes no distinction, with respect to its compensation provisions, between temporary, part-time, and full-time employees...

  3. Assessing the Business and Employee Benefits Resulting from the Implementation of NVQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, Rodney; Crowe, Julie

    2004-01-01

    National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) have been introduced and developed within a competency framework by successive UK governments. Potential benefits are listed as improved skills, less skills shortages and more appropriate job-employee fit. However, there has been considerable and sustained criticism of NVQs from employers, employees and…

  4. 5 CFR 352.309 - Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Organizations § 352.309 Retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance. (a) Agency action. An employee... entitled to retain coverage for retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance purposes if he or she... he or she wishes to retain coverage under the retirement, health benefits, and group life insurance...

  5. Managing costs, managing benefits: employer decisions in local health care markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Jon B; Trude, Sally

    2003-02-01

    To better understand employer health benefit decision making, how employer health benefits strategies evolve over time, and the impact of employer decisions on local health care systems. Data were collected as part of the Community Tracking Study (CTS), a longitudinal analysis of health system change in 12 randomly selected communities. This is an observational study with data collection over a six-year period. The study used semistructured interviews with local respondents, combined with monitoring of local media, to track changes in health care systems over time and their impact on community residents. Interviewing began in 1996 and was carried out at two-year intervals, with a total of approximately 2,200 interviews. The interviews provided a variety of perspectives on employer decision making concerning health benefits; these perspectives were triangulated to reach conclusions. The tight labor market during the study period was the dominant consideration in employer decision making regarding health benefits. Employers, in managing employee compensation, made independent decisions in pursuit of individual goals, but these decisions were shaped by similar labor market conditions. As a result, within and across our study sites, employer decisions in aggregate had an important impact on local health care systems, although employers' more highly visible public efforts to bring about health system change often met with disappointing results. General economic conditions in the 1990s had an important impact on the configuration of local health systems through their effect on employer decision making regarding health benefits offered to employees, and the responses of health plans and providers to those decisions.

  6. Motivational programme for talents and benefits for employee and employer

    OpenAIRE

    Komárková, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Master thesis is focused on the topic of talent management. It is divided into theoretical and practical part. The theoretical part defines basic terms of talent, talent management, talent management processes - acquisition, development and retention of talented employees in the organization. The second part of the thesis focuses firstly on the introduction of Unicorn and analysis of the current state of talent management in the company. Information was obtained by interviewing concerned peop...

  7. An Employee-Centered Care Model Responds to the Triple Aim: Improving Employee Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kelly; McCorkle, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    Health care expenditures, patient satisfaction, and timely access to care will remain problematic if dramatic changes in health care delivery models are not developed and implemented. To combat this challenge, a Triple Aim approach is essential; Innovation in payment and health care delivery models is required. Using the Donabedian framework of structure, process, and outcome, this article describes a nurse-led employee-centered care model designed to improve consumers' health care experiences, improve employee health, and increase access to care while reducing health care costs for employees, age 18 and older, in a corporate environment.

  8. Employee Health in the Mental Health Workplace: Clinical, Administrative, and Organizational Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jai L; Kapoor, Reena; Cole, Robert; Steiner, Jeanne L

    2016-04-01

    Issues of mental health and employee health have risen to increasing prominence in recent years. However, there have been few explorations of the clinical and administrative challenges that these issues raise, particularly in settings that are themselves mental health workplaces. In order to identify and understand such challenges, a brief case of acute employee illness in a mental health workplace is described followed by a discussion of salient clinical, administrative, and organizational considerations. The case raises questions about medicolegal responsibilities and relationships between clinicians and patients in mental health settings, illuminates tensions between clinical staff and human resources processes, and draws attention to the need for illness prevention and mental health promotion initiatives in the workplace. Increased awareness of these issues, complications, and potential solutions would benefit clinicians, administrators, and mental health institutions.

  9. Health care consumerism: engaging the real buyers--employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Martha

    2005-01-01

    Many employers have begun moving toward health care consumerism strategies designed to encourage employees to take more responsibility for their health care and the cost of that care. Recent surveys suggest ways employers can ensure their consumerism strategies succeed in engaging employees and, ultimately, encourage employees to change their behavior. This article describes what those surveys reveal about employer and employee perspectives on consumerism and suggests steps employers can take to align their interests with those of their employees in order to manage the demand for and use of health care.

  10. Work/Family Benefits: Variables Related to Employees' Fairness Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lauren; Allen, Tammy D.

    2001-01-01

    A study of 283 workers showed that younger people, minorities, those who used flexible work arrangements, and those whose jobs required greater interdependence had more favorable perceptions of family-related benefits. Gender and children's ages influenced perceptions of the fairness of benefits. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  11. 29 CFR 4.182 - Overtime pay of service employees entitled to fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... service employee as his basic cash wage plus 25 cents an hour as a contribution to a welfare and pension plan, which contribution qualifies for exclusion from the regular rate under the Fair Labor Standards...

  12. Health Workforce Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sawai, Abdulaziz; Al-Shishtawy, Moeness M.

    2015-01-01

    In most countries, the lack of explicit health workforce planning has resulted in imbalances that threaten the capacity of healthcare systems to attain their objectives. This has directed attention towards the prospect of developing healthcare systems that are more responsive to the needs and expectations of the population by providing health planners with a systematic method to effectively manage human resources in this sector. This review analyses various approaches to health workforce planning and presents the Six-Step Methodology to Integrated Workforce Planning which highlights essential elements in workforce planning to ensure the quality of services. The purpose, scope and ownership of the approach is defined. Furthermore, developing an action plan for managing a health workforce is emphasised and a reviewing and monitoring process to guide corrective actions is suggested. PMID:25685381

  13. A model for reducing health care employee turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Paul; Holmes, Gary; Murrow, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Explaining the rationale as to why employees leave their jobs has led to many different strategies to retain employees. The model presented here seeks to explain why employees choose to stay or to leave their place of employment. The information from the analysis will provide managers with well-tested tools to reduce turnover and to ascertain what employees value from their work environment in order to help the organization to retain those employees. The model identifies key factors that management can utilize to provide barriers to exit and retain professional employees in their health care units. Recommendations are provided that reward loyalty and build barriers to exit.

  14. Do soccer and Zumba exercise improve fitness and indicators of health among female hospital employees?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barene, S; Krustrup, Peter; Jackman, S R

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled study investigated the effectiveness of soccer and Zumba on fitness and health indicators in female participants recruited from a workplace. One hundred seven hospital employees were cluster-randomized to either a soccer group (SG), Zumba group (ZG), or control group (CG......-term soccer training as well asZumba outside working hours may result in fitness andmodest health benefits among female hospital employees...

  15. Universal precautions: employee resistance and strategies for planned organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, K P; Hogg, M

    1988-01-01

    Health care organizations have been strongly encouraged to design and implement procedures to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS in the workplace. The procedures will have a dramatic impact on the work habits of health care workers and may even challenge some dominant health care values. Therefore, precautionary procedures are likely to meet with mixed reactions and, perhaps, outright resistance from health care workers. This article identifies some plausible causes for employee resistance to precautionary procedures. After describing the dilemma in terms of competing values and conflicting objectives, some practical managerial strategies for reconciling differences and securing broad-based commitment to preventive policies and procedures are proposed.

  16. The health benefits of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, J B; Walzem, R L

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies from numerous disparate populations reveal that individuals with the habit of daily moderate wine consumption enjoy significant reductions in all-cause and particularly cardiovascular mortality when compared with individuals who abstain or who drink alcohol to excess. Researchers are working to explain this observation in molecular and nutritional terms. Moderate ethanol intake from any type of beverage improves lipoprotein metabolism and lowers cardiovascular mortality risk. The question now is whether wine, particularly red wine with its abundant content of phenolic acids and polyphenols, confers additional health benefits. Discovering the nutritional properties of wine is a challenging task, which requires that the biological actions and bioavailability of the >200 individual phenolic compounds be documented and interpreted within the societal factors that stratify wine consumption and the myriad effects of alcohol alone. Further challenge arises because the health benefits of wine address the prevention of slowly developing diseases for which validated biomarkers are rare. Thus, although the benefits of the polyphenols from fruits and vegetables are increasingly accepted, consensus on wine is developing more slowly. Scientific research has demonstrated that the molecules present in grapes and in wine alter cellular metabolism and signaling, which is consistent mechanistically with reducing arterial disease. Future research must address specific mechanisms both of alcohol and of polyphenolic action and develop biomarkers of their role in disease prevention in individuals.

  17. 78 FR 4593 - Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ...'s Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health Benefits in Alternative Benefit Plans...-2334-P] RIN 0938-AR04 Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Programs, and Exchanges: Essential Health... 2010 (collectively referred to as the Affordable Care Act), and the Children's Health Insurance Program...

  18. Impact of Employee Benefits on Families with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Sangeeth; Choueiri, Roula; Neumeyer, Ann; Ajari, Ogheneochuko; Shui, Amy; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the employee benefits parents of children with autism spectrum disorders have, how benefits are used, work change, and job satisfaction. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey study of 435 families with children with autism spectrum disorders residing in the United States. We received 161 surveys…

  19. Employee weight management through health coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, R M; Aldana, S G; Bowden, D E

    2010-01-01

    This study will evaluate the effectiveness of an interactive health coaching intervention at lowering weight. The study involved 5405 overweight or obese employees aged 18-85, who entered the program sometime during 2001-2008. Average body mass index (BMI) significantly decreased from 32.1 at baseline to 31.4 at 3 months, 31.0 at 6 months, and 30.6 at 12 months. Decreasing BMI was more pronounced in older age groups and among women, those using weight loss medication, those with higher BMI, and those with higher motivation and confidence to make behavior changes. When the effects of these variables on the decreasing trend in BMI were simultaneously estimated, only baseline classifications of BMI, health status, and confidence remained significant. Change in BMI through 12 months was -0.7% for those with normal weight, -2.0% for overweight, -3.6% for obese, and -7.1% for morbidly obese individuals at baseline. Among morbidly obese individuals, decrease in BMI through 12 months was -7.6% for those with "high" confidence to lose weight at baseline vs -4.4% for those with low confidence. Better health status at baseline was also related to more pronounced weight loss. Interactive health coaching significantly lowered BMI among participants through 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up.

  20. Organizational climate and employee mental health outcomes: A systematic review of studies in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronkhorst, Babette; Tummers, Lars; Steijn, Bram; Vijverberg, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the high prevalence of mental health problems among health care workers has given rise to great concern. The academic literature suggests that employees' perceptions of their work environment can play a role in explaining mental health outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature in order to answer the following two research questions: (1) how does organizational climate relate to mental health outcomes among employees working in health care organizations and (2) which organizational climate dimension is most strongly related to mental health outcomes among employees working in health care organizations? Four search strategies plus inclusion and quality assessment criteria were applied to identify and select eligible studies. As a result, 21 studies were included in the review. Data were extracted from the studies to create a findings database. The contents of the studies were analyzed and categorized according to common characteristics. Perceptions of a good organizational climate were significantly associated with positive employee mental health outcomes such as lower levels of burnout, depression, and anxiety. More specifically, our findings indicate that group relationships between coworkers are very important in explaining the mental health of health care workers. There is also evidence that aspects of leadership and supervision affect mental health outcomes. Relationships between communication, or participation, and mental health outcomes were less clear. If health care organizations want to address mental health issues among their staff, our findings suggest that organizations will benefit from incorporating organizational climate factors in their health and safety policies. Stimulating a supportive atmosphere among coworkers and developing relationship-oriented leadership styles would seem to be steps in the right direction.

  1. Association of Wage With Employee Participation in Health Assessments and Biometric Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Bruce W; Addy, Carol

    2018-02-01

    To understand differences in health risk assessment (HRA) and biometric screening participation rates among benefits-enrolled employees in association with wage category. Cross-sectional analysis of employee eligibility file and health benefits (wellness and claims) data. Data from self-insured employers participating in the RightOpt private exchange (Conduent HR Services) during 2014. Active employees from 4 companies continuously enrolled in health insurance for which wage data were available. Measures included HRA and biometric screening participation rates and wage status, with employee age, sex, employer, job tenure, household income, geographic location, and health benefits deductible as a percentage of total wages serving as covariates. Employees were separated into 5 groups based on wage status. Logistic regression analysis incorporated other measures as covariates to adjust for differences between groups, with HRA and biometric screening participation rates determined as binary outcomes. Participation rates for HRA and biometric screening were 90% and 87%, respectively, in the highest wage category, decreasing to 67% and 60%, respectively, among the lowest wage category. Employee wage status is associated with significant differences in HRA and biometric participation rates. Generalizing the results generated by modest participation in these offerings to entire populations may risk misinterpretation of results based on variable participation rates across wage categories.

  2. Vape Shop Employees: Public Health Advocates?

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Joy L; Walker, Kandi L; Sears, Clara G; Lee, Alexander S; Smith, Courteney; Siu, Allison; Keith, Rachel; Ridner, S. Lee

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION E-cigarettes have increased in popularity and given rise to a new type of sales outlet?the vape shop. Expanding on work examining vape shop employee e-cigarette and tobacco attitudes and behaviors 1 , this study examined key messages that vape shop employees communicate to customers. METHODS Using informal interviews, observations, and a cross-sectional survey, we examined vape shop employees? (n=16) perceptions and e-cigarette use. Data were collected in nine vape shops in Louis...

  3. Employees are ambivalent about health checks in the occupational setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, O.C.; van der Beek, A.J.; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Employees are increasingly provided with preventive health checks. However, participation rates are low and several ethical issues arise, such as a potential perceived threat to autonomy and privacy. Aims: To assess what employees think about preventive health checks in the occupational

  4. The Significance of Reporting Employee Benefits in Accordance with IFRS in the Czech Business Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Vimrová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research the results of which are presented in this paper, based on an empirical survey of forty financial statements using IFRS by non-financial companies active in the Czech business environment, is to map the process and scope of reporting of employee benefits by Czech companies applying IFRS in the preparation of their consolidated and individual financial statements and to find out the differences in the extent, detail and relevancy of reporting employee benefits in accordance with IFRS among companies whose securities are publicly traded and other companies as well as to measure the differences in the scope, detail and relevancy of reporting employee benefits in accordance with IFRS among companies which are considered the best employers in the Czech Republic and other companies, including the interpretation of results.

  5. Communicating with the workforce during emergencies: developing an employee text messaging program in a local public health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasz, Hilary N; Bogan, Sharon; Bosslet, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Short message service (SMS) text messaging can be useful for communicating information to public health employees and improving workforce situational awareness during emergencies. We sought to understand how the 1,500 employees at Public Health--Seattle & King County, Washington, perceived barriers to and benefits of participation in a voluntary, employer-based SMS program. Based on employee feedback, we developed the system, marketed it, and invited employees to opt in. The system was tested during an ice storm in January 2012. Employee concerns about opting into an SMS program included possible work encroachment during non-work time and receiving excessive irrelevant messages. Employees who received messages during the weather event reported high levels of satisfaction and perceived utility from the program. We conclude that text messaging is a feasible form of communication with employees during emergencies. Care should be taken to design and deploy a program that maximizes employee satisfaction.

  6. Multistate Health Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Moffit PhD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We discuss and evaluate the Multi-State Plan (MSP Program, a provision of the Affordable Care Act that has not been the subject of much debate as yet. The MSP Program provides the Office of Personnel Management with new authority to negotiate and implement multistate insurance plans on all health insurance exchanges within the United States. We raise the concern that the MSP Program may lead to further consolidation of the health insurance industry despite the program’s stated goal of increasing competition by means of health insurance exchanges. The MSP Program arguably gives a competitive advantage to large insurers, which already dominate health insurance markets. We also contend that the MSP Program’s failure to produce increased competition may motivate a new effort for a public health insurance option.

  7. 76 FR 67105 - Cash Balance Plans; Benefit Determinations and Plan Valuations for Statutory Hybrid Plans...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... annuity conversion rate. Under PBGC's operating policy on cash balance plans (established pre-PPA 2006... pension equity plan that provides for the use of deferred annuity conversion factors (or an interest rate... annuity conversion plan that uses a variable interest rate to determine the amount of a benefit, PBGC...

  8. 77 FR 74353 - Benefits Payable in Terminated Single-Employer Plans; Interest Assumptions for Paying Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... regulation will be 0.75 percent for the period during which a benefit is in pay status and 4.00 percent... PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION 29 CFR Part 4022 Benefits Payable in Terminated Single-Employer Plans; Interest Assumptions for Paying Benefits AGENCY: Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...

  9. 5 CFR 839.1121 - What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... will be the amount of the BEDB divided by the present value factor for your age at the time of the... Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)? 839.1121 Section 839.1121 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Benefits § 839.1121 What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)? If you...

  10. Environmental health and health planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    Areas of environmental concern are identified and recommendations for improving environmental health are proposed by the Environmental Health Task Force of the Western Massachusetts Health Planning Council. Environmental health concerns in Western Massachusetts are in the areas of: air pollution; dental health and the specific problem of water flouridation; housing; injury control, including accidental death and disability; land use, and the specific problem of critical receptors; noise pollution; occupational hazards, specifically occupational accidents; pesticides; radiological exposure, particularly medical X-ray exposure and nuclear exposure; rural health care; sanitation; solid waste; and water quality including private and public water supplies, road salting, and rural sewerages. Each area of concern and specific problem are broken down into sections: background information; comments which incorporate recommendations for general problem-solving activities; and resources, including lists of key organization, individuals, laws and regulations, and publications relevant to the area of concern. Recommendations are presented based on long-term and short-term environmental goals. An inventory of environmental health organizations in Western Massachusetts is included. Appendices contain the charge to the Task Force, a definition of environmental health, sources of drinking water, the sanitation and sanitary codes, and housing and sanitation standards. Portions of this document are not fully legible

  11. The Benefits and Dangers of Outsourcing Employees in an Emerging Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damaro Olusoji Arubayi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of the benefits and dangers of outsourcing in an emerging economy using hr managers selected public and private sectors as case studies. The aim of the study was to determine the impact of outsourcing on the employees. The findings suggested that although it has positive outcomes in achievement of organizational goals, employees are weakened by the negative impact of outsourcing as it increases job insecurity, demotivation in the organization. The significance of the study was to highlight the impact of outsourcing on employees and its relation with management although there’s not much empirical evidence, this paper thus addresses this issue. It is hoped that this study would add to knowledge, create awareness, refine the existing practices in the organization and change the attitudes of employees for better performance and organizational success.

  12. Potential benefits of employee portals in public administrations: implementation and proactive behaviour towards the organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Marcos Pérez-Feijoo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is the determination of the advantages achieved through the implementation of an employee portal, both for the government and for the users of the portal. We proposed an adaptation of the Huang, Jin and Yang (2004 model, based on the organizational support theory (Eisenberger et al., 1986. This theory predicts a proactive behaviour of employees wheter they perceive a support of the organization. In this case, the trigger for that perception is the satisfaction derived by the benefits to personnel provided by an employee portal. Through an empirical study, conducted among public school teachers, we have found evidence of the perception of organizational support among public employees when the portal is deployes. However we haven´t found a link between that support and a proactive behaviour towards the organization.

  13. Changes in retiree health benefits: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lissovoy, G; Kasper, J D; Di Carlo, S; Gabel, J

    1990-01-01

    Employers are increasingly concerned by the cost of health benefits provided to retired workers. One reason is that the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB), the organization that establishes "generally accepted accounting principles," has proposed altering the way firms report expenditures for retiree medical coverage on financial statements. We recently completed a national survey of business firms offering retiree health benefits to address three issues: 1) What is the current structure of retiree health benefit plans? 2) What changes are firms planning to implement in the structure of their retiree health benefits? 3) To what extent are these changes due to the FASB proposal? The FASB reporting proposal is only one factor underlying these changes. More important is the real financial pressure on firms due to the accelerating cost of retiree health care.

  14. Employee, State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business Resources Division of Corporations, Business & Professional Licensing Dept. of Commerce Benefits Resources State Employee Directory State Calendar State Training: LearnAlaska State Travel Manager) Web Mail (Outlook) Login Who to Call Health Insurance Insurance Benefits Health and Optional

  15. 75 FR 34571 - Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules Relating to Status as a Grandfathered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Coverage Rules Relating to Status as a Grandfathered Health Plan... of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services... health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan under the Employee Retirement...

  16. The Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP): Assessing Retirees' Cost Share

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiPuccio, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    The Survivor Benefit Plan (SBP) was created to enable a surviving beneficiary of a retired military service member to continue to receive a portion of the retiree's retirement benefits upon the death of the retiree...

  17. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, New York, NY. College Retirement Equities Fund.

    This report, the eighth in a regular biennial survey series, provides standardized comparative information on expenditures by colleges and universities for employee retirement and insurance benefits in 26 tables and 5 charts. The data, collected in 1992 from 577 institutions, reflect information supplied for either fiscal or calendar year 1981.…

  18. College and University Employee Retirement and Insurance Benefits Cost Survey, 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, New York, NY. College Retirement Equities Fund.

    This report, the seventh in a regular biennial survey series, provides standardized comparative information on expenditures by colleges and universities for employee retirement and insurance benefits in 25 tables and 5 charts. The data, collected in 1990 from 634 institutions, reflect information supplied for either fiscal or calendar year 1989.…

  19. Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Perceived Benefits and Barriers, and Intentions among College and University Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Srijana M.; Wigglesworth, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Early detection through routine screening is critical in reducing the incidence rate of colorectal cancer (CRC). Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine college and university employees' knowledge of CRC issues, their perceptions of the benefits of and barriers to CRC screening, and their intentions toward it. Methods: This…

  20. Employee Benefits and Labor Markets in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, William T., Ed.; Woodbury, Stephen A., Ed.

    This book contains 14 original research chapters on various aspects of the employee benefits systems of Canada and the United States. Following an introduction by William Alpert and Stephen Woodbury and an overview chapter, "Does the Composition of Pay Matter?" (Sherwin Rosen), Part 1 of the book consists of three chapters that treat the…

  1. Employee preferences for work-life benefits in a large New Zealand construction company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Morrison

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is a challenging environment in which to work, with job characteristics that are linked to work-life conflict, and it is important for its future sustainability that initiatives to support employee work-life balance are undertaken. 121 head office and site-based employees within a large New Zealand construction company rated their preferences for work-life benefits, and the results were compared with those of a similar previous (Australian study. The most preferred work-life benefit factor (as for the previous Australian study was found to be ‘wellness and personal development’. Results suggest that company provision of a wide variety of work-life benefits from which employees can choose during different stages in their life and career is ideal. Qualitative results suggest some work-life conflict associated with working long hours and weekend work exists. It is proposed that to attract and retain valuable employees, the New Zealand construction industry must provide useful work-life benefits, reasonable working hours, and supportive workplace cultures in line with such initiatives. 

  2. Employee preferences for work-life benefits in a large New Zealand construction company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Morrison

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry is a challenging environment in which to work, with job characteristics that are linked to work-life conflict, and it is important for its future sustainability that initiatives to support employee work-life balance are undertaken. 121 head office and site-based employees within a large New Zealand construction company rated their preferences for work-life benefits, and the results were compared with those of a similar previous (Australian study. The most preferred work-life benefit factor (as for the previous Australian study was found to be ‘wellness and personal development’. Results suggest that company provision of a wide variety of work-life benefits from which employees can choose during different stages in their life and career is ideal. Qualitative results suggest some work-life conflict associated with working long hours and weekend work exists. It is proposed that to attract and retain valuable employees, the New Zealand construction industry must provide useful work-life benefits, reasonable working hours, and supportive workplace cultures in line with such initiatives.

  3. Commuting-related fringe benefits in the Netherlands : Interrelationships and company, employee and location characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Linda; Dijst, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Mobility management measures taken by firms could potentially result in more sustainable transport choices and hence reduce traffic congestion and emissions. Fringe benefits offered to employees are a means to implement those measures. This paper explores the most common commuting-related fringe

  4. Olive Oil: What Are the Health Benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs), you may gain certain health benefits. MUFA s and PUFA s may help lower your risk ... In addition, some research shows that MUFA s may benefit insulin levels and blood sugar control, which can ...

  5. Internal marketing: creating quality employee experiences in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie; Oetjen, Dawn; Rotarius, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    To cope with the recent challenges within the health care industry, health care managers need to engage in the internal marketing of their various services. Internal marketing has been used as an effective management tool to increase employees' motivation, satisfaction, and productivity (J Mark Commun. 2010;16(5):325-344). Health care managers should understand that an intense focus on internal marketing factors will lead to a quality experience for employees that will ultimately have a positive effect on the patient experiences.

  6. Health Insurance for Government Employees in Bangladesh: A Concept Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid, Syed Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Introducing compulsory health insurance for government employees bears immense importance for stepping towards universal healthcare coverage in Bangladesh. Lack of scientific study on designing such scheme, in the Bangladesh context, motivates this paper. The study aims at designing a comprehensive insurance package simultaneously covering health, life and accident related disability risks of the public employees, where the health component would extend to all dependent family members. ...

  7. The Management of NASA Employee Health Problem; Status 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    A system for assessing employee health problems is introduced. The automated billing system is based on an input format including cost of medical services by user and measures in dollars, that portion of resources spent on preventive techniques versus therapeutic techniques. The system is capable of printing long term medical histories of any employee.

  8. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Werner, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary examination of records relating to past Chalk River employees provides some reassurance that large numbers of cancer deaths that might be related to occupational radiation exposure do not exist in the groups of employees studied to the end of 1982. The lack of reliable information on deaths of ex-employees who left AECL for other employment prevented the inclusion of this group in this preliminary study. This information will presumably be obtained during the course of the more comprehensive Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. employee health study. 6 refs

  9. Strategic Planning for Employee Happiness: A Business Goal for Human Service Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Beth; Gould, Karen E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews evidence that employee happiness can substantially affect an organization's performance by influencing employee retention, absenteeism, and work performance. It reviews the workforce and environmental characteristics involved in planning for employee happiness and the steps needed to create an organizational culture in which…

  10. Health Insurance Costs and Employee Compensation: Evidence from the National Compensation Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Priyanka

    2017-12-01

    This paper examines the relationship between rising health insurance costs and employee compensation. I estimate the extent to which total compensation decreases with a rise in health insurance costs and decompose these changes in compensation into adjustments in wages, non-health fringe benefits, and employee contributions to health insurance premiums. I examine this relationship using the National Compensation Survey, a panel dataset on compensation and health insurance for a sample of establishments across the USA. I find that total hourly compensation reduces by $0.52 for each dollar increase in health insurance costs. This reduction in total compensation is primarily in the form of higher employee premium contributions, and there is no evidence of a change in wages and non-health fringe benefits. These findings show that workers are absorbing at least part of the increase in health insurance costs through lower compensation and highlight the importance of examining total compensation, and not just wages, when examining the relationship between health insurance costs and employee compensation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The impact of employee level and work stress on mental health and GP service use: an analysis of a sample of Australian government employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strazdins Lyndall

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study sought to identify the extent to which employee level and work stressors were associated with mental health problems experienced by Australian government employees, and with their use of primary care services. Methods 806 government employees aged between 40 and 44 years were surveyed as part of an epidemiological study conducted in Australia. Data collected from participants included sociodemographic attributes, physical health, psychological measures and work stressors relating to job control, job demands, job security and skills discretion at work. For 88% of these participants, information on visits made to general practitioners (GPs for the six months before and after their survey interview was obtained from health insurance records. Results When work stress and personal factors were taken into account, men at more junior levels reported better mental health, more positive affect and used fewer GP services. Women at middle-management levels obtained less GP care than their more senior counterparts. Both men and women who reported higher levels of work stress were found to have poorer mental health and well-being. The impact of such stressors on GP service use, however, differed for men and women. Conclusion Measures of work stress and not employee level affect the mental health and well-being of government employees. For governments with responsibility for funding health care services, reducing work stress experienced by their own employees offers potential benefits by improving the health of their workforce and reducing outlays for such services.

  12. The impact of employee level and work stress on mental health and GP service use: an analysis of a sample of Australian government employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Ruth A; Jorm, Anthony F; Christensen, Helen; Broom, Dorothy H; Strazdins, Lyndall; D' Souza, Rennie M

    2004-09-30

    This study sought to identify the extent to which employee level and work stressors were associated with mental health problems experienced by Australian government employees, and with their use of primary care services. 806 government employees aged between 40 and 44 years were surveyed as part of an epidemiological study conducted in Australia. Data collected from participants included sociodemographic attributes, physical health, psychological measures and work stressors relating to job control, job demands, job security and skills discretion at work. For 88% of these participants, information on visits made to general practitioners (GPs) for the six months before and after their survey interview was obtained from health insurance records. When work stress and personal factors were taken into account, men at more junior levels reported better mental health, more positive affect and used fewer GP services. Women at middle-management levels obtained less GP care than their more senior counterparts. Both men and women who reported higher levels of work stress were found to have poorer mental health and well-being. The impact of such stressors on GP service use, however, differed for men and women. Measures of work stress and not employee level affect the mental health and well-being of government employees. For governments with responsibility for funding health care services, reducing work stress experienced by their own employees offers potential benefits by improving the health of their workforce and reducing outlays for such services.

  13. Estimating workers' marginal valuation of employer health benefits: would insured workers prefer more health insurance or higher wages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royalty, Anne Beeson

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the cost of health insurance has been increasing much faster than wages. In the face of these rising costs, many employers will have to make difficult decisions about whether to cut back health benefits or to compensate workers with lower wages or lower wage growth. In this paper, we ask the question, "Which do workers value more -- one additional dollar's worth of health benefits or one more dollar in their pockets?" Using a new approach to obtaining estimates of insured workers' marginal valuation of health benefits this paper estimates how much, on average, employees value the marginal dollar paid by employers for their workers' health insurance. We find that insured workers value the marginal health premium dollar at significantly less than the marginal wage dollar. However, workers value insurance generosity very highly. The marginal dollar spent on health insurance that adds an additional dollar's worth of observable dimensions of plan generosity, such as lower deductibles or coverage of additional services, is valued at significantly more than one dollar.

  14. Health benefits of a reduction of PM10 and NO2 exposure after implementing a clean air plan in the Agglomeration Lausanne-Morges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Alberto; Künzli, Nino; Götschi, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Exposure to urban air pollution has been associated with adverse effects on cardio-vascular and respiratory health, both short and long term. Consequently, governments have applied policies to reduce air pollution. Quantitative health impact assessments of hypothetic changes in air pollution have been conducted at national and global level, but assessments of observed air pollution changes associated with specific clean air policies at a local or regional scale remain scarce. This study estimates health impacts attributable to a decrease in PM 10 and NO 2 exposure in the Agglomeration of Lausanne-Morges (ALM), Switzerland, between 2005 and 2015, corresponding to the implementation period of a supra-municipal plan of measures to reduce air pollution in different sectors such as transport, energy, and industry (called Plan OPair 05). The health impact assessment compares health effects attributed to air pollution exposure levels in 2015 (reference case) with those in 2005 (counterfactual scenario), using 2015 as baseline for all other input data. In the ALM, the modeled PM 10 exposure reduction of 3.3μg/m 3 from 2005 to 2015 prevents 26 premature deaths (equivalent to around 290 years of life lost), 215 hospitalization days due to cardio-vascular and respiratory diseases as well as approximately 47,000 restricted activity days annually. Monetized health impacts of the reduction of PM 10 exposure are valued at approximately CHF 36 million annually. Immaterial costs, mainly related to the economic valuation of years of life lost, dominate the monetized health impacts (90% of total value), while savings at the workplace (net loss in production and reoccupation costs) amount to about CHF 1.9 million, and savings in health care costs to about CHF 0.5 million. The assessment is sensitive to the value assigned to immaterial costs and to uncertainties in the relative risk estimates, whereas variations in the baseline year (i.e. using 2005 data instead of 2015 data) affect

  15. Employee stress management: An examination of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies on employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, M Kim; Barry, Adam E; Chaney, J Don

    2015-01-01

    Employees commonly report feeling stressed at work. Examine how employees cope with work and personal stress, whether their coping strategies are adaptive (protective to health) or maladaptive (detrimental to health), and if the manner in which employees cope with stress influences perceived stress management. In this cross-sectional study, a random sample of 2,500 full-time university non-student employees (i.e. faculty, salaried professionals, and hourly non-professionals) were surveyed on health related behaviors including stress and coping. Approximately 1,277 completed the survey (51% ). Hierarchical logistic regression was used to assess the ability of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies to predict self-reported stress management, while controlling for multiple demographic variables. Over half of employees surveyed reported effective stress management. Most frequently used adaptive coping strategies were communication with friend/family member and exercise, while most frequently used maladaptive coping strategies were drinking alcohol and eating more than usual. Both adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies made significant (p stress management. Only adaptive coping strategies (B = 0.265) predicted whether someone would self-identify as effectively managing stress. Use of maladaptive coping strategies decreased likelihood of self-reporting effective stress management. Actual coping strategies employed may influence employees' perceived stress management. Adaptive coping strategies may be more influential than maladaptive coping strategies on perceived stress management. Results illustrate themes for effective workplace stress management programs. Stress management programs focused on increasing use of adaptive coping may have a greater impact on employee stress management than those focused on decreasing use of maladaptive coping. Coping is not only a reaction to stressful experiences but also a consequence of coping resources. Thereby increasing the

  16. Benefit sharing in health research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-02

    Aug 2, 2015 ... [4] Those who contribute to scientific research ought to share in its benefits. .... women to form new relationships, social networks and develop a sense of ... or discoveries about the indigenous biological resources before.

  17. The Issues of Self-Funding Benefits for Texas Independent School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryar, Virginia P.

    This paper examines whether self-funding health benefit plans for employees are appropriate for Texas school districts. In a self-funding plan, the cost of benefits is funded directly by the employer without the protection of an insurance contract. Proponents of the self-funding plan argue that it: (1) controls costs and improves the cash flow;…

  18. Self-Determination Theory With Application to Employee Health Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Brenda M; Barnes, Donelle M

    2018-01-01

    Occupational health nurses motivate employees to engage in healthy behaviors. Both clinicians and researchers need strong theories on which to base decisions for health programs (e.g., healthy diet) and experimental interventions (e.g., workplace walking). The self-determination theory could be useful as it includes concepts of individual autonomy, competence to perform healthy behaviors, and relationships as predictors of health behaviors and outcomes. In this article, the self-determination theory is described and evaluated using Walker and Avant's criteria. The theory is applied to a population of federal employees who smoke. By increasing employees' ability to autonomously choose smoking cessation programs, support their competence to stop smoking, and improve their relationships with both others who smoke and employee health services, smoking cessation should increase.

  19. Enhanced Tobacco Control Initiative at Johns Hopkins Health System: Employee Fairness Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Shabnum; Lucik, Meg; Safeer, Richard

    2018-02-01

    Organizations often fail to establish a clear awareness of what employees consider fair when implementing changes to employee benefits in the workplace. In 2016, the Johns Hopkins Health System (JHHS) enhanced their tobacco control efforts. In addition to enhanced smoking cessation benefits, employees were offered an increased reduction in their insurance premiums if they were nonsmokers. To qualify for the reduction, employees participated in testing rather than relying on self-reporting as had been done in the past. The shift to testing prompted a concern by some senior management at JHHS who did not want employees to feel they were not trusted. As the program unfolded at JHHS, the four-component model of procedural justice was applied to provide a framework for reviewing the implementation of the new voluntary tobacco testing at JHHS from a fairness lens. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the application of the four-component procedural model of justice to the tobacco testing process at JHHS. As approximately 75% of employees participated in the program, the experience at JHHS can be instructive to other employers who are looking to implement changes in their workplaces and how to minimize unintended consequences with their employees.

  20. The relationship between health risks and health and productivity costs among employees at Pepsi Bottling Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Rachel M; Carls, Ginger S; Short, Meghan E; Pei, Xiaofei; Wang, Shaohung; Moley, Susan; Sullivan, Mark; Goetzel, Ron Z

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate relationships between modifiable health risks and costs and measure potential cost savings from risk reduction programs. Health risk information from active Pepsi Bottling Group employees who completed health risk assessments between 2004 and 2006 (N = 11,217) were linked to medical care, workers' compensation, and short-term disability cost data. Ten health risks were examined. Multivariate analyses were performed to estimate costs associated with having high risk, holding demographics, and other risks constant. Potential savings from risk reduction were estimated. High risk for weight, blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol had the greatest impact on total costs. A one-percentage point annual reduction in the health risks assessed would yield annual per capita savings of $83.02 to $103.39. Targeted programs that address modifiable health risks are expected to produce substantial cost reductions in multiple benefit categories.

  1. Active Commuting: Workplace Health Promotion for Improved Employee Well-Being and Organizational Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Nadine C; Nilsson, Viktor O

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper describes a behavior change intervention that encourages active commuting using electrically assisted bikes (e-bikes) for health promotion in the workplace. This paper presents the preliminary findings of the intervention's impact on improving employee well-being and organizational behavior, as an indicator of potential business success. Method: Employees of a UK-based organization participated in a workplace travel behavior change intervention and used e-bikes as an active commuting mode; this was a change to their usual passive commuting behavior. The purpose of the intervention was to develop employee well-being and organizational behavior for improved business success. We explored the personal benefits and organizational co-benefits of active commuting and compared these to a travel-as-usual group of employees who did not change their behavior and continued taking non-active commutes. Results: Employees who changed their behavior to active commuting reported more positive affect, better physical health and more productive organizational behavior outcomes compared with passive commuters. In addition, there was an interactive effect of commuting mode and commuting distance: a more frequent active commute was positively associated with more productive organizational behavior and stronger overall positive employee well-being whereas a longer passive commute was associated with poorer well-being, although there was no impact on organizational behavior. Conclusion: This research provides emerging evidence of the value of an innovative workplace health promotion initiative focused on active commuting in protecting and improving employee well-being and organizational behavior for stronger business performance. It considers the significant opportunities for organizations pursuing improved workforce well-being, both in terms of employee health, and for improved organizational behavior and business success.

  2. Health, work, and personal-related predictors of time to return to work among employees with mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Bültmann, Ute; Madsen, Ida E.H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify health-, personal- and work-related factors predictive of return to work (RTW) in employees sick-listed due to common mental health problems, such as, stress, depression, burnout, and anxiety. Methods: We distributed a baseline questionnaire to employees applying for sickness...... is determined by both health- and work-related factors....... absence benefits. Results: At baseline, about 9% of respondents had quit their job, 10% were dismissed and the remaining 82% were still working for the same employer. The mean time to RTW, measured from the first day of absence, was 25 weeks (median = 21) and at the end of follow-up (52 weeks) 85% had...

  3. 12 CFR 563b.380 - May my employee stock ownership plan purchase conversion shares?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May my employee stock ownership plan purchase... THE TREASURY CONVERSIONS FROM MUTUAL TO STOCK FORM Standard Conversions Offers and Sales of Stock § 563b.380 May my employee stock ownership plan purchase conversion shares? (a) Your tax-qualified...

  4. Qualified Health Plan (QHP) Landscape

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — QHP Landscape Files present basic information about certified Qualified Health Plans and Stand-alone Dental Plans for individuals-families and small businesses...

  5. Health Benefits In 2016: Family Premiums Rose Modestly, And Offer Rates Remained Stable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Gary; Rae, Matthew; Long, Michelle; Damico, Anthony; Whitmore, Heidi; Foster, Gregory

    2016-10-01

    The annual Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust Employer Health Benefits Survey found that in 2016, average annual premiums (employer and worker contributions combined) were $6,435 for single coverage and $18,142 for family coverage. The family premium in 2016 was 3 percent higher than that in 2015. On average, workers contributed 18 percent of the premium for single coverage and 30 percent for family coverage. The share of firms offering health benefits (56 percent) and of workers covered by their employers' plans (62 percent) remained statistically unchanged from 2015. Employers continued to offer financial incentives for completing wellness or health promotion activities. Almost three in ten covered workers were enrolled in a high-deductible plan with a savings option-a significant increase from 2014. The 2016 survey included new questions on cost sharing for specialty drugs and on the prevalence of incentives for employees to seek care at alternative settings. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. Decreasing Physical Inactivity in the Veterans Health Administration Employee Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schult, Tamara M; Schmunk, Sandra K; Awosika, Ebi R

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a comprehensive approach to decrease physical inactivity in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) employee population. The approach included (1) initiatives to decrease physical inactivity in the workplace; (2) two operational surveys to assess system-wide service provision; and (3) two national employee surveys. From 2010 to 2012, 86 employee fitness centers were completed in VA medical centers. A grants program (2010 to 2015) funded smaller projects designed to decrease physical inactivity in the workplace. Projects involved the provision of equipment to decrease sedentary behaviors, including stability balls, treadmill and sit-to-stand desks, stairwell projects, and funding for on-site fitness classes, bicycle racks, and outdoor par courses and walking paths among others. A comprehensive approach to decrease physical inactivity in VHA employees was successful. Overall, self-reported, age-adjusted physical inactivity in VHA employees decreased from 25.3% in 2010 to 16.1% in 2015.

  7. Health contribution to local government planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    When local government considers future land-use plans, the local health authorities are not always included as a key partner. In Cambridgeshire, England, the former Cambridgeshire Health Authority formed a partnership with local government to address this issue. The relationship that developed and the subsequent health impact review provided an opportunity to influence strategic policy and ensure that health objectives are taken into account. Through partnership working, lessons were learned about how to incorporate health issues into a strategic land-use planning document to the overall benefit of the community

  8. Employee perspectives of workplace health promotion in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explored (a) available workplace interventions to support or improve workers health and well-being (b) the kind of health messages employees prefer, and (c) preferred methods of delivery for work place health promotion programmes. This study employed a cross-sectional design by a structured questionnaire ...

  9. Motivations for Health and Their Associations With Lifestyle, Work Style, Health, Vitality, and Employee Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheppingen, A.R. van; Vroome, E.M.M. de; Have, K.C.J.M. ten; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Bos, E.H.; Mechelen, W. van

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Investigate employees' underlying motivational regulatory styles toward healthy living and their associations with lifestyle, work style, health, vitality, and productivity. Methods: Regression analyses on cross-sectional data from Dutch employees (n = 629), obtained as baseline

  10. Motivations for Health and Their Associations With Lifestyle, Work Style, Health, Vitality, and Employee Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scheppingen, A.R.; de Vroome, E.M.M.; ten Have, K.C.J.M.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Bos, E.H.; van Mechelen, W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Investigate employees' underlying motivational regulatory styles toward healthy living and their associations with lifestyle, work style, health, vitality, and productivity. METHODS:: Regression analyses on cross-sectional data from Dutch employees (n = 629), obtained as baseline

  11. A blueprint for community benefit. A CHA-AAHA (Catholic Health Association-American Association of Homes for the Aging) document helps long-term care providers plan for and implement needed services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forschner, B; Trocchio, J

    1993-05-01

    A collaborative effort of the Catholic Health Association (CHA) and the American Association of Homes for the Aging, The Social Accountability Program: Continuing the Community Benefit Tradition of Not-for-Profit Homes and Services for the Aging helps long-term care organizations plan and report community benefit activities. The program takes long-term care providers through five sequential tasks: reaffirming commitment to the elderly and others in the community; developing a community service plan; developing and providing community services; reporting community services; and evaluating the community service role. To help organizations reaffirm commitment, the Social Accountability Program presents a process facilities can use to review their historical roots and purposes and evaluate whether current policies and procedures are consistent with the organizational philosophy. Once this step is completed, providers can develop a community service plan by identifying target populations and the services they need. For facilities developing and implementing such services, the program suggests ways of measuring and monitoring them for budgetary purposes. Once they have implemented services, not-for-profit healthcare organizations must account for their impact on the community. The Social Accountability Program lists elements to be included in community service reports. It also provides guidelines for evaluating these services' effectiveness and the organization's overall community benefit role.

  12. Cost-benefit analysis of comprehensive mental health prevention programs in Japanese workplaces: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Kitamura, Fumihiko; Fukuda, Takashi; Inaba, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    We examined the implementation of mental health prevention programs in Japanese workplaces and the costs and benefits. A cross-sectional survey targeting mental health program staff at 11 major companies was conducted. Questionnaires explored program implementation based on the guidelines of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. Labor, materials, outsourcing costs, overheads, employee mental discomfort, and absentee numbers, and work attendance were examined. Cost-benefit analyses were conducted from company perspectives assessing net benefits per employee and returns on investment. The surveyed companies employ an average of 1,169 workers. The implementation rate of the mental health prevention programs was 66% for primary, 51% for secondary, and 60% for tertiary programs. The program's average cost was 12,608 yen per employee and the total benefit was 19,530 yen per employee. The net benefit per employee was 6,921 yen and the return on investment was in the range of 0.27-16.85. Seven of the 11 companies gained a net benefit from the mental health programs.

  13. Tensions of Health: Narratives of Employee Wellness Program Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lu; Baker, Jane S; Meadows, Cui Zhang

    2016-09-01

    This article examines dialectical tensions in the health narratives of participants of the Employee Wellness Program (EWP) of a large public university in the southeastern United States. Semi-structured interviews (n = 12) with team leaders in the program indicated that health is a multifaceted concept characterized by three pairs of dialectical tensions: autonomy versus connection, private versus public, and control versus lack of control. These findings suggest that to better promote health and wellness in the workplace, EWP staff should consider employees' unique experiences and beliefs about health when designing organization-wide programs and campaigns. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(11)-1 - Contributions to pension plan, employees' annuity plans, and stock bonus and profit-sharing plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Contributions to pension plan, employees... TAXES Insolvency Reorganizations § 1.381(c)(11)-1 Contributions to pension plan, employees' annuity... or transferor corporation in respect of any pension, annuity, stock bonus, or profit-sharing plan. (b...

  15. Eliciting consumer preferences for health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booske, B C; Sainfort, F; Hundt, A S

    1999-10-01

    To examine (1) what people say is important to them in choosing a health plan; (2) the effect, if any, that giving health plan information has on what people say is important to them; and (3) the effect of preference elicitation methods on what people say is important. A random sample of 201 Wisconsin state employees who participated in a health plan choice experiment during the 1995 open enrollment period. We designed a computer system to guide subjects through the review of information about health plan options. The system began by eliciting the stated preferences of the subjects before they viewed the information, at time 0. Subjects were given an opportunity to revise their preference structures first after viewing summary information about four health plans (time 1) and then after viewing more extensive, detailed information about the same options (time 2). At time 2, these individuals were also asked to rate the relative importance of a predefined list of health plan features presented to them. Data were collected on the number of attributes listed at each point in time and the importance weightings assigned to each attribute. In addition, each item on the attribute list was content analyzed. The provision of information changes the preference structures of individuals. Costs (price) and coverage dominated the attributes cited both before and after looking at health plan information. When presented with information on costs, quality, and how plans work, many of these relatively well educated consumers revised their preference structures; yet coverage and costs remained the primary cited attributes. Although efforts to provide health plan information should continue, decisions on the information to provide and on making it available are not enough. Individuals need help in understanding, processing, and using the information to construct their preferences and make better decisions.

  16. [Occupational health protection in business economics--business plan for health intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2011-01-01

    One of the company's actions for strengthening human capital is the protection of health and safety of its employees. Its implementation needs financial resources, therefore, employers expect tangible effectiveness in terms of health and economics. Business plan as an element of company planning can be a helpful tool for new health interventions management. The aim of this work was to elaborate a business plan framework for occupational health interventions at the company level, combining occupational health practices with company management and economics. The business plan of occupational health interventions was based on the literature review, the author's own research projects and meta-analysis of research reports on economic relations between occupational health status and company productivity. The study resulted in the development of the business plan for occupational health interventions at the company level. It consists of summary and several sections that address such issues as the key elements of the intervention discussed against a background of the company economics and management, occupational health and safety status of the staff, employees' health care organization, organizational plan of providing the employees with health protection, marketing plan, including specificity of health interventions in the company marketing plan and financial plan, reflecting the economic effects of health care interventions on the overall financial management of the company. Business plan defines occupational health and safety interventions as a part of the company activities as a whole. Planning health care interventions without relating them to the statutory goals of the company may have the adverse impact on the financial balance and profitability of the company. Therefore, business plan by providing the opportunity of comparing different options of occupational health interventions to be implemented by employers is a key element of the management of employees

  17. Creative benefits from well-connected leaders: leader social network ties as facilitators of employee radical creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Vijaya; Richter, Andreas W; Clarke, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Employee radical creativity critically depends on substantive informational resources from others across the wider organization. We propose that the social network ties of employees' immediate leaders assume a central role in garnering these resources, thereby fostering their employees' radical creativity both independent of and interactively with employees' own network ties. Drawing on data from 214 employees working in 30 teams of a public technology and environmental services organization, we find that team leaders' betweenness centrality in the idea network within their teams as well as among their peer leaders provides creative benefits beyond employees' own internal and external ties. Further, employees' and leaders' ties within and external to the team interactively predict employee radical creativity. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Stock-based Compensation Plans and Employee Incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Zabojnik

    2014-01-01

    Standard principal-agent theory predicts that large firms should not use employee stock options and other stock-based compensation to provide incentives to non-executive employees. Yet, business practitioners appear to believe that stock-based compensation improves incentives, and mounting empirical evidence points to the same conclusion. This paper provides an explanation for why stock-based incentives can be effective. In the model of this paper, employee stock options complement individual...

  19. Physical activity and health benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Orsini, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Physical activity (PA), due to its role in health promotion and disease prevention, is of particular interest to be investigated. The aims of this thesis were: to assess the associations between PA and different health outcomes (lower urinary tract symptoms, cancer incidence, and mortality) in the Cohort of Swedish Men (COSM); to perform a dose-response meta-analysis of published associations between walking and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD); and to provide user-...

  20. [Employees health education--challenges according to the educational level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Elzbieta; Puchalski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Article addresses the problem of increasing Polish employees health education effectiveness according to the differences in educational level. Research model assume that effective method of developing recommendations improving the health education will synthesise scientific findings regarding methodology of conducting such education and knowledge about needs of two target groups: low and high educated employees. Educational solutions were searched in publications related to: health education, andragogy, propaganda and direct marketing. The empirical material used to characterize two target groups came from four research (qualitative and quantitative) conducted by the National Centre for Workplace Health Promotion (Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine) in 2007-2010. Low educated employees' health education should be focused on increasing responsibility for health and strengthening their self-confidence according to the introduction of healthy lifestyle changes. To achieve these goals, important issue is to build their motivation to develop knowledge about taking care of health. In providing such information we should avoid the methods associated with school. Another important issue is creating an appropriate infrastructure and conditions facilitating the change of harmful behaviors undertaken at home and in the workplace. According to high-educated employees a challenge is to support taking health behaviors--although they are convinced it is important for their health, such behaviors are perceived as a difficult and freedom restriction. Promoting behavior change techniques, avoiding prohibitions in the educational messages and creating favorable climate for taking care of health in groups they participate are needed.

  1. Self-rated job performance and absenteeism according to employee engagement, health behaviors, and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Ray M; Aldana, Steven G; Pope, James E; Anderson, David R; Coberley, Carter R; Grossmeier, Jessica J; Whitmer, R William

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the combined influence of employee engagement, health behavior, and physical health on job performance and absenteeism. Analyses were based on 20,114 employees who completed the Healthways Well-Being Assessment from 2008 to 2010. Employees represented three geographically dispersed companies in the United States. Employee engagement, health behavior, and physical health indices were simultaneously significantly associated with job performance and also with absenteeism. Employee engagement had a greater association with job performance than did the health behavior or physical health indices, whereas the physical health index was more strongly associated with absenteeism. Specific elements of the indices were evaluated for association with self-rated job performance and absenteeism. Efforts to improve worker productivity should take a holistic approach encompassing employee health improvement and engagement strategies.

  2. Health insurers promoting employee wellness: strategies, program components and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brigid M; Schoenman, Julie A; Pirani, Hafiza

    2010-01-01

    To examine health insurance companies' role in employee wellness. Case studies of eight insurers. Wellness activities in work, clinical, online, and telephonic settings. Senior executives and wellness program leaders from Blue Cross Blue Shield health insurers and from one wellness organization. Telephone interviews with 20 informants. Health insurers were engaged in wellness as part of their mission to promote health and reduce health care costs. Program components included the following: education, health risk assessments, incentives, coaching, environmental consultation, targeted programming, onsite biometric screening, professional support, and full-time wellness staff. Programs relied almost exclusively on positive incentives to encourage participation. Results included participation rates as high as 90%, return on investment ranging from $1.09 to $1.65, and improved health outcomes. Health insurers have expertise in developing, implementing, and marketing health programs and have wide access to employers and their employees' health data. These capabilities make health insurers particularly well equipped to expand the reach of wellness programming to improve the health of many Americans. By coupling members' medical data with wellness-program data, health insurers can better understand an individual's health status to develop and deliver targeted interventions. Through program evaluation, health insurers can also contribute to the limited but growing evidence base on employee wellness programs.

  3. Health Impaired Employees' Job Satisfaction: New Evidence from Athens, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Drydakis, Nick

    2011-01-01

    By utilizing the 2008 Athens Area Study (AAS) data set, this study investigates four aspects of job satisfaction - total pay, promotion prospects, respect received from one's supervisor, and total job satisfaction - between healthy and heath-impaired employees. Health impaired employees are found to be less satisfied according to all job satisfaction measures even when a large number of productivity features, and job characteristics are controlled for. The outcomes suggest also that women are...

  4. 26 CFR 54.9831-1 - Special rules relating to group health plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... this section. In addition, benefits provided under a health flexible spending arrangement are excepted... of a group health plan. For purposes of this paragraph (c)(3), benefits are not an integral part of a group health plan (whether the benefits are provided through the same plan or a separate plan) only if...

  5. Audit of Sandia Corporation`s pension plans and other prefunded benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-06

    The audit disclosed that Sandia`s pension plans had $588.9 million in excess assets as of December 31, 1990, on a current value basis. If plan terminations and spin-offs occurred, at least $408.8 million of this amount could be returned to the Government without affecting the pension benefits that Sandia employees and retirees have earned. We recommended that Albuquerque take the necessary action to reduce the excess assets in the pension plans and recover the Government`s share. However, Albuquerque disagreed with the recommendation. Albuquerque justified leaving the excess assets in the pension plans to fund future plan amendments; to avoid future funding contributions; to avoid the costs and time-consuming administrative steps associated with taking action; and to prevent damaging effects on employee morale. We analyzed these points, and concluded that they should not prevent the Department from initiating action to return excess assets to the Government. Actuarial analysis of the pension plans showed that, even if certain plan adjustments were made, the plans were overfunded by $256 million as of December 31, 1991 (on an actuarial value basis).

  6. EMPLOYEE PROMOTION PLANNING IN ANALYTICAL HIERARCHY PROCESS PERSPECTIVE: STUDY ON NATIONAL PUBLIC PROCUREMENT AGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayuningtyas A.K.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The promotion process is part of the career development conducted by Civil State Apparatus Employee (Pegawai Aparatur Sipil Negara which should be implemented by applying merit system. Employee-related strategic decision making has not applied merit system as mandated in applied laws. It occurred due to Public Service Appointment Board (Badan Pertimbangan Jabatan dan Kepangkatan not possessing assessment model and criteria which could be used to support promotion process implementation in the appropriate structural position based on employee competence and performance. This study aims to describe and analyze assessment criteria and subcriteria required to be considered in State Civil Servant Officers promotion planning by applying Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP method in National Public Procurement Agency (Lembaga Kebijakan Pengadaan Barang/Jasa Pemerintah. This study uses the explanative quantitative univariate method. Data collection technique used questionnaire instrument. Analytical tool used was AHP. Research result exhibits that ASN employee promotion planning using assessment model is described as follows: Employee Performance Assessment consist of Employee Work Performance element with three criteria and Employee Work Behavior with twenty-three criteria; and Evaluation of Employee Promotion Implementation with eleven criteria. Through the use of AHP methods employee, promotion planning could be utilized as a tool for Baperjakat to produce employee decisions that will be promoted objectively and effectively.

  7. Stepping Up Occupational Safety and Health Through Employee Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 is examined, and it is suggested that employee participation could help improve occupational safety and health in the future, through safety committees, safety circles, safety teams, and individual participation. (MSE)

  8. Health programmes for school employees: improving quality of life, health and productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Lloyd J; Tirozzi, Gerald N; Marx, Eva; Bobbitt-Cooke, Mary; Riedel, Sara; Jones, Jack; Schmoyer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    School health programmes in the 21st century could include eight components: 1) health services; 2) health education; 3) healthy physical and psychosocial environments; 4) psychological, counselling, and social services; 5) physical education and other physical activities; 6) healthy food services; and 7) integrated efforts of schools, families, and communities to improve the health of school students and employees. The eighth component of modern school health programmes, health programmes for school employees, is the focus of this article. Health programmes for school employees could be designed to increase the recruitment, retention, and productivity of school employees by partially focusing each of the preceding seven components of the school health programme on improving the health and quality of life of school employees as well as students. Thus, efforts to improve the quality of life, health, and productivity of school employees may be distinct from, but integrated with, efforts to improve the quality of life, health, and education of students. School employee health programmes can improve employee: 1) recruitment; 2) morale; 3) retention; and 4) productivity. They can reduce employee: 5) risk behaviours (e.g., physical inactivity); 6) risk factors (e.g., stress, obesity, high blood pressure); (7) illnesses; 8) work-related injuries; 9) absentee days; 10) worker compensation and disability claims; and 11) health care and health insurance costs. Further, if we hope to improve our schools' performance and raise student achievement levels, developing effective school employee health programmes can increase the likelihood that employees will: 12) serve as healthy role models for students; 13) implement effective school health programmes for students; and 14) present a positive image of the school to the community. If we are to improve the quality of life, health, and productivity of school employees in the 21st century: school administrators, employees, and

  9. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Psychological contract breach and employee health: The relevance of unmet obligations for mental and physical health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Reimann

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effects of psychological contract breach (PCB on employee mental and physical health (SF-12 using a sample of 3,870 employees derived from a German longitudinal linked employer-employee study across various industries. Results of multivariate regression models and mediation analysis suggest that PCB affects both the mental and the physical health of employees but is more threatening to employee mental health. In addition, mental health partly mediates the effects of PCB on physical health. Also, the findings of this study show that the relative importance of obligations not met by employers differs according to the specific contents of the psychological contract. In conclusion, the results of this study support the idea that PCB works as a psychosocial stressor at work that represents a crucial risk to employee health.

  11. Primary problems associated with the health and welfare of employees observed when implementing lean manufacturing projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampasso, Izabela Simon; Anholon, Rosley; Gonçalves Quelhas, Osvaldo Luiz; Filho, Walter Leal

    2017-01-01

    Lean philosophy is used by companies to increase productivity and reduce costs. Although uncontested benefits are created, it is necessary to highlight the problems related to employees' health and welfare caused by implementing lean manufacturing projects. The primary objective of this paper is to review the literature and identify the most relevant problems created by lean philosophy for employees. Research about the theme was performed on many international databases over three months, and an initial sample of 77 papers was found. Twenty-seven sources were utilized. We identified 22 categories of problems related to health and welfare of employees. The most cited problem was work intensification, mentioned by thirteen papers. Increased stress and increased responsibilities, demands and, consequently, pressure on the workers are among the primary problems observed in the research.

  12. Managers as role models for health: Moderators of the relationship of transformational leadership with employee exhaustion and cynicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranabetter, Caroline; Niessen, Cornelia

    2017-10-01

    Drawing on social learning literature, this study examined managers' health awareness and health behavior (health-related self-regulation) as a moderator of the relationships between transformational leadership and employee exhaustion and cynicism. In 2 organizations, employees (n = 247; n = 206) rated their own exhaustion and cynicism, and their managers' transformational leadership. Managers (n = 57; n = 30) assessed their own health-related self-regulation. Multilevel modeling showed that, as expected, managers' health awareness moderated the relationship between transformational leadership and employee exhaustion and cynicism. Employees experienced less exhaustion and cynicism when transformational leaders were aware of their own health. Managers' health behavior moderated the relationship between transformational leadership and employee exhaustion in 1 organization, but not in the other. With respect to health behavior, we found no significant results for employee cynicism. In sum, the results indicate that when managers are role models for health, employees will benefit more from the transformational leadership style. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find & compare doctors, hospitals, & other providers Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plan In most HMO Plans, you generally ... certain service when needed. Related Resources Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) Private Fee-for-Service (PFFS) Special Needs ...

  14. Impact of employee benefits on families with children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Sangeeth; Choueiri, Roula; Neumeyer, Ann; Ajari, Ogheneochuko; Shui, Amy; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the employee benefits parents of children with autism spectrum disorders have, how benefits are used, work change, and job satisfaction. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey study of 435 families with children with autism spectrum disorders residing in the United States. We received 161 surveys for a response rate of 37%. Families reported using the following benefits: 39% paid family leave, 19% unpaid family leave, 91% flexible work arrangements, and 86% telecommuting. Of respondents, 43% reported stopping work, cutting down on hours worked, or changing jobs because of their child's condition. Having paid family leave was a positive predictor for job satisfaction. Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders have an interest and need for alternative work arrangements. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Benefits of Risk Based Inspection Planning for Offshore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straub, D.M.; Goyet, J.; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2006-01-01

    The economical benefits of applying risk-based inspection planning (RBI) for offshore structures subject to fatigue are evaluated based on experiences from past industrial projects. To this end, the factors influencing the cost of inspection, repair and failure of structures are discussed......, the financial benefit of RBI is assessed....

  16. Disability and employee benefits receipt: evidence from the U.S. Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosulski, Marya R; Donnell, Chandra; Kim, Woo Jong

    2012-01-01

    Studies indicate positive effects of the U.S. Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) in assisting people with disabilities to find independent employment. Underemployment continues to impact access to adequate health care and other benefits. Workers with disabilities receive fewer benefits, overall. With data from the Longitudinal Study of Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program (LSVRSP), the authors compare the rates of receipt of 6 types of benefits for people with physical, mental, and sensory impairments. Although those with physical disabilities are most likely to receive benefits, all groups lack adequate access to health care, sick leave, and vacation. The authors discuss implications for services provision in the current job market.

  17. 5 CFR 5201.105 - Additional rules for Mine Safety and Health Administration employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for Mine Safety and Health Administration employees. The rules in this section apply to employees of... Mine Safety and Health Act. Example: A mine inspector who was a former employee of mining company X... Secretary of labor for Mine Safety and Health or the Assistant Secretary's designee may grant an employee a...

  18. Reshuffle the deck. A simple plan for improving employee motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebolt, Keith; Barton, Thompson

    2003-04-01

    The authors present a strategy for inspiring employees by allowing them to help define their own job roles. As in a bazaar, administrators oversee workers trading tasks and reshaping their positions for maximum effectiveness and job satisfaction.

  19. 5 CFR 837.802 - Benefits under another retirement system for Federal employees based on the most recent separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Benefits under another retirement system for Federal employees based on the most recent separation. 837.802 Section 837.802 Administrative... system for Federal employees based on the most recent separation. (a) Generally. An annuitant who has...

  20. Job-based health benefits in 2002: some important trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Jon; Levitt, Larry; Holve, Erin; Pickreign, Jeremy; Whitmore, Heidi; Dhont, Kelley; Hawkins, Samantha; Rowland, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Based on a national survey of 2,014 randomly selected public and private firms with three or more workers, this paper reports changes in employer-based health insurance from spring 2001 to spring 2002. The cost of health insurance rose 12.7 percent, the highest rate of growth since 1990. Employee contributions for health insurance rose in 2002, from $30 to $38 for single coverage and from $150 to $174 for family coverage. Deductibles and copayments rose also, and employers adopted formularies and three-tier cost-sharing formulas to control prescription drug expenses. PPO and HMO enrollment rose, while the percentage of small employers offering health benefits fell. Because increasing claims expenses rather than the underwriting cycle are the major driver of rising premiums, double-digit growth appears likely to continue.

  1. Benefits of advanced software techniques for mission planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquet, A.; Parrod, Y.; Desaintvincent, A.

    1994-10-01

    The increasing complexity of modern spacecraft, and the stringent requirement for maximizing their mission return, call for a new generation of Mission Planning Systems (MPS). In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the Space Mission Planning and the benefits which can be expected from Artificial Intelligence techniques through examples of applications developed by Matra Marconi Space.

  2. Health Benefits of Outdoor Recreation: Implications for Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenstein, Donna; Ewert, Alan

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews literature related to the positive effects of outdoor education. The following dimensions of health, and the benefits associated with each, are discussed: emotional, social, physical, intellectual, and spiritual. A model of health benefits derived from outdoor recreation is presented, and implications for health education are…

  3. Employees' intentions to retire early : a case of planned behavior and anticipated work conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Karen; van der Vorst, Janine D.M.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the early retirement intentions of 346 older Dutch employees by extending the theory of planned behavior with anticipated work conditions. The results showed that employees who felt a pressure from their spouse to retire early had a strong intention to leave the work force

  4. Attitudes of Employees of Provincial Directorates of National Education and School Administrators towards Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinkurt, Yahya

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the attitudes of employees of Provincial Directorates of National Education and school administrators towards strategic planning. The research was designed as a survey model study. The population of the research consisted of employees of Provincial Directorate of National Education of Kutahya and school…

  5. 75 FR 43109 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Internal Claims and Appeals and... the Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health and Human... health insurance coverage offered in connection with a group health plan under the Employee Retirement...

  6. 26 CFR 1.162-10T - Questions and answers relating to the deduction of employee benefits under the Tax Reform Act of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of employee benefits under the Tax Reform Act of 1984; certain limits on amounts deductible... and Corporations § 1.162-10T Questions and answers relating to the deduction of employee benefits... amendment of section 404(b) by the Tax Reform Act of 1984 affect the deduction of employee benefits under...

  7. Health effects of unemployment benefit program generosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylus, Jonathan; Glymour, M Maria; Avendano, Mauricio

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the impact of unemployment benefit programs on the health of the unemployed. We linked US state law data on maximum allowable unemployment benefit levels between 1985 and 2008 to individual self-rated health for heads of households in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and implemented state and year fixed-effect models. Unemployment was associated with increased risk of reporting poor health among men in both linear probability (b=0.0794; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.0623, 0.0965) and logistic models (odds ratio=2.777; 95% CI=2.294, 3.362), but this effect is lower when the generosity of state unemployment benefits is high (b for interaction between unemployment and benefits=-0.124; 95% CI=-0.197, -0.0523). A 63% increase in benefits completely offsets the impact of unemployment on self-reported health. Results suggest that unemployment benefits may significantly alleviate the adverse health effects of unemployment among men.

  8. Crowdfunding our health: Economic risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Matthew J; Mossialos, Elias

    2017-10-01

    Crowdfunding is an expanding form of alternative financing that is gaining traction in the health sector. This article presents a typology for crowdfunded health projects and a review of the main economic benefits and risks of crowdfunding in the health market. We use evidence from a literature review, complimented by expert interviews, to extend the fundamental principles and established theories of crowdfunding to a health market context. Crowdfunded health projects can be classified into four types according to the venture's purpose and funding method. These are projects covering health expenses, fundraising health initiatives, supporting health research, or financing commercial health innovation. Crowdfunding could economically benefit the health sector by expanding market participation, drawing money and awareness to neglected health issues, improving access to funding, and fostering project accountability and social engagement. However, the economic risks of health-related crowdfunding include inefficient priority setting, heightened financial risk, inconsistent regulatory policies, intellectual property rights concerns, and fraud. Theorized crowdfunding behaviours such as signalling and herding can be observed in the market for health-related crowdfunding. Broader threats of market failure stemming from adverse selection and moral hazard also apply. Many of the discussed economic benefits and risks of crowdfunding health campaigns are shared more broadly with those of crowdfunding projects in other sectors. Where crowdfunding health care appears to diverge from theory is the negative externality inefficient priority setting may have towards achieving broader public health goals. Therefore, the market for crowdfunding health care must be economically stable, as well as designed to optimally and equitably improve public health. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Pension Benefit Insurance and Pension Plan Portfolio Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Crossley; Mario Jametti

    2008-01-01

    Pension benefit guarantee policies have been introduced in several countries to pro- tect private pension plan members from the loss of income that would occur if a plan was underfunded when the sponsoring firm terminates a plan. Most of these public insurance schemes face financial dificulty and consequently policy reforms are being discussed or implemented. Economic theory suggests that such schemes will face moral hazard and adverse selection problems. In this note we test a specific theor...

  10. Effects of a consumer driven health plan on pharmaceutical spending and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Stephen T; Feldman, Roger; Chen, Song

    2008-10-01

    To compare pharmaceutical spending and utilization in a consumer driven health plan (CDHP) with a three-tier pharmacy benefit design, and to examine whether the CDHP creates incentives to reduce pharmaceutical spending and utilization for chronically ill patients, generic or brand name drugs, and mail-order drugs. Retrospective insurance claims analysis from a large employer that introduced a CDHP in 2001 in addition to a point of service (POS) plan and a preferred provider organization (PPO), both of which used a three-tier pharmacy benefit. Difference-in-differences regression models were estimated for drug spending and utilization. Control variables included the employee's income, age, and gender, number of covered lives per contract, election of flexible spending account, health status, concurrent health shock, cohort, and time trend. Results. CDHP pharmaceutical expenditures were lower than those in the POS cohort in 1 year without differences in the use of brand name drugs. We find limited evidence of less drug consumption by CDHP enrollees with chronic illnesses, and some evidence of less generic drug use and more mail-order drug use among CDHP members. The CDHP is cost-neutral or cost-saving to both the employer and the employee compared with three-tier benefits with no differences in brand name drug use. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Research of Employee Benefits in the Ostrava Region / Výzkum Zaměstnaneckých Výhod Na Ostravsku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaněk Michal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of employee benefits that influence employee motivation. Thus they participate not only in creating preconditions for company competitiveness, but also in proper running the company and/or return on investments into employees. In relation to the given questions, selected motivation theories and results of some sociological surveys connected with these problems are characterised briefly in the article as well. The focus of the article is the research into employee benefits in the Ostrava region. The authors of the article paid particular attention to the kinds of benefits provided to employees most frequently at present and how these benefits are perceived by employees themselves

  12. Building benefits for homemakers: a report to the Minister of National Health and Welfare from the Canada Pension Plan Advisory Board

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    ... ̀More effective participation of homemakers in the Canada Pension Plan'. Brought to light are inconsistencies arising from its previous recommendation that an imputed economic value be assigned to the work that homemakers...

  13. Family planning and health: the Narangwal experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqee, R

    1983-06-01

    The findings of a 7-year field experiment conducted in the Indian Punjab show that integrating family planning with health services is more effective and efficient than providing family planning separately. The field experiment was conducted between 1968 and 1974 at Narangwal in the Indian State of Punjab. It involved 26 villages, with a total population of 35,000 in 1971-72. The demographic characteristics of the villages were found to be typical of the area. 5 groups of villages were provided with different combinations of services for health, nutrition and family planning. A control group received no project services. A population study was made of the effects of integrating family planning with maternal and child health services. A nutritional study looked at the results of integrating nutritional care and health services. The effectiveness of integration was evaluated by identifying it both with increased use of family planning and improved health. Efficiency was judged by relating effectiveness to input costs. Distribution of the benefits was also examined. The effectiveness of these different combinations of services on the use of family planning was measured: 1) by all changes in the use of modern methods of family planning, 2) by the number of new acceptors, 3) by the changes in the proportion of eligible women using contraceptives, and 4) by how many people started to use the more effective methods. Results showed the use of family planning increased substantially in the experimental groups, whereas the control group remained constant. It was also found that, though the services combining family planning with maternal health care stimulated more use of family planning, they were more costly than the more integrated srevices. The Narangwal experiment provides significant evidence in favor of combining the provision of family planning and health services, but its potential for replication on a large scale needs to be studied.

  14. Health behaviors and work-related outcomes among school employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCheminant, James D; Merrill, Ray M; Masterson, Travis

    2015-05-01

    To determine the association between selected health behaviors and work-related outcomes among 2398 school-based employees who voluntarily enrolled in a worksite wellness program. This study presents participants' baseline data collected from a personal health assessment used by Well-Steps, a third-party wellness company. Employees with high levels of exercise, fruit/vegetable consumption, or restful sleep exhibited higher job-performance and job-satisfaction, and lower absenteeism (p job-performance (Prevalence Ratio=1.09; 95% CI=1.05-1.13), job-satisfaction (Prevalence Ratio=1.53; 95% CI=1.30-1.80), and lower absenteeism (Prevalence Ratio=1.16; 95% CI=1.08-1.325). Further, number of co-occurring health behaviors influenced other satisfaction and emotional health outcomes. Selected healthy behaviors, individually or co-occurring, are associated with health outcomes potentially important at the worksite.

  15. Health Care Consumerism: Lessons My 401(k) Plan Taught Me.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Allen T

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the U.S. health care system are here. As we think about how individuals will pay for health care--while actively employed and while retired--our experiences with 401(k) plans provide some valuable lessons. In order to support employees in this new health care world--a challenge arguably more daunting than the 401(k) challenge we faced 20 years ago--some very different types of support are needed. Employers should consider providing their employees with the resources to manage health care changes.

  16. Integration of workers' compensation and health insurance prescription drug programs: how does it work and do employees use it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Shadi; Washington, Stephanie; Stapleton, David; Livermoore, Gina

    2004-01-01

    In 1998, New York State designed and developed an integrated workers' compensation (WC)/health plan prescription drug program, ONECARD Rx, in response to cost inefficiencies within the then current system and in an attempt to improve the quality of care provided to WC claimants. This paper describes the benefit's design and development process and factors related to its use. Users and non-users of the program were surveyed through a mailed questionnaire with appropriate telephone follow-up. Eight steps were followed in the development of the benefit. Results obtained from the assessment of ONECARD Rx suggest that factors affecting use mainly relate to the knowledge of both, employees and pharmacists, of the program. The two main differences detected between users and non-users included the state agency the employee works for and the site of residence. Innovative strategies that couple private and public agencies should aim at reducing the costs and eliminating inefficiencies while improving the quality of care, of which satisfaction is an important component. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Public Health Employees' Perception of Workplace Environment and Job Satisfaction: The Role of Local Health Departments' Engagement in Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiali; Verma, Pooja; Leep, Carolyn; Kronstadt, Jessica

    To examine the association between local health departments' (LHDs') engagement in accreditation and their staffs' perceptions of workplace environment and the overall satisfaction with their jobs. Data from the 2014 Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) (local data only) and the 2014 Forces of Change survey were linked using LHDs' unique ID documented by the National Association of County & City Health Officials. The Forces of Change survey assessed LHDs' accreditation status. Local health departments were classified as "formally engaged" in the Public Health Accreditation Board accreditation process if they had achieved accreditation, submitted an application, or submitted a statement of intent. The PH WINS survey measured employees' perception of 3 aspects of workplace environment, including supervisory support, organizational support, and employee engagement. The overall satisfaction was measured using the Job in General Scale (abridged). There are 1884 LHD employees who completed PH WINS and whose agencies responded to the question on the accreditation status of the Forces of Change survey. When compared with employees from LHDs less engaged in accreditation, employees from LHDs that were formally engaged in accreditation gave higher ratings to all 3 aspects of workplace environment and overall job satisfaction. Controlling for employee demographic characteristics and LHD jurisdiction size, the agency's formal engagement in accreditation remained related to a higher score in perceived workplace environment and job satisfaction. After controlling for perceived workplace environment, accreditation status was marginally associated with job satisfaction. The findings provide support for previous reports by LHD leaders on the benefits of accreditation related to employee morale and job satisfaction. The results from this study allow us to further catalog the benefits of accreditation in workforce development and identify factors that may

  18. 29 CFR 2510.3-102 - Definition of “plan assets”-participant contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in cash. (c) Maximum time period for welfare benefit plans. With respect to an employee welfare...) of this section shall apply to such plan as if such plan were an employee welfare benefit plan. (i...) of this section shall apply to such plan as if such plan were an employee welfare benefit plan. [61...

  19. Justice at Work, Job Stress, and Employee Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Kaori; Heaney, Catherine A.

    2009-01-01

    A small but growing literature has documented an association between justice at work and employee health. However, the pathways and mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. This article proposes a conceptual framework that bridges the organizational justice, occupational stress, and occupational epidemiology literatures.…

  20. The Role of Health Co-Benefits in the Development of Australian Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Annabelle; Blashki, Grant; Karoly, David; Wiseman, John

    2016-01-01

    Reducing domestic carbon dioxide and other associated emissions can lead to short-term, localized health benefits. Quantifying and incorporating these health co-benefits into the development of national climate change mitigation policies may facilitate the adoption of stronger policies. There is, however, a dearth of research exploring the role of health co-benefits on the development of such policies. To address this knowledge gap, research was conducted in Australia involving the analysis of several data sources, including interviews carried out with Australian federal government employees directly involved in the development of mitigation policies. The resulting case study determined that, in Australia, health co-benefits play a minimal role in the development of climate change mitigation policies. Several factors influence the extent to which health co-benefits inform the development of mitigation policies. Understanding these factors may help to increase the political utility of future health co-benefits studies. PMID:27657098

  1. The Role of Health Co-Benefits in the Development of Australian Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabelle Workman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reducing domestic carbon dioxide and other associated emissions can lead to short-term, localized health benefits. Quantifying and incorporating these health co-benefits into the development of national climate change mitigation policies may facilitate the adoption of stronger policies. There is, however, a dearth of research exploring the role of health co-benefits on the development of such policies. To address this knowledge gap, research was conducted in Australia involving the analysis of several data sources, including interviews carried out with Australian federal government employees directly involved in the development of mitigation policies. The resulting case study determined that, in Australia, health co-benefits play a minimal role in the development of climate change mitigation policies. Several factors influence the extent to which health co-benefits inform the development of mitigation policies. Understanding these factors may help to increase the political utility of future health co-benefits studies.

  2. Prospective Health: Duke's Approach to Improving Employee Health and Managing Health Care Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, H. Clint, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    If developing a healthy workforce is critical to reining in the skyrocketing cost of health care, then why have so many attempts at preventive health or disease management fallen short? How can employers connect with employees to engage them in changing unhealthy habits or lifestyles? Duke University has launched an innovative new approach called…

  3. Soccer and Zumba as health promotion among female hospital employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barene, Svein

    health care workers a high-risk group for non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and hypertension. In addition, health care workers generally have high physical demanding work tasks, which expose them to physical loads that may impair their musculoskeletal health, work...... concept Zumba, we wanted to evaluate short and long term health effects from these two physical activities among female hospital employees. The primary outcome of the study was cardiovascular fitness (VO2max), whereas body composition, biomarkers in blood, musculoskeletal pain, as well as the work......-related outcomes work ability and perceived physical exertion during work comprised the secondary outcomes. In addition, we measured the adherence to the training and drop-out throughout the intervention period. Methods A 40-weeks cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted on 107 female hospital employees...

  4. Assessment of health literacy of municipal employees in Shemiranat, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solhi, Mahnaz; Jormand, Hanieh

    2017-12-01

    Health literacy is one of the major determinants of health promotion among individuals and within society. The present study is aimed to determine the health literacy status of office employees in Shemiranat using the native instruments of health literacy for Iranian adults (HELIA). The present descriptive-analytical cross-sectional study was done in 2016-17. It was conducted on 360 office employees in Shemiranat. The samples were selected using a multi-stage simple random sampling method. Data collection tools in this study included HELIA questionnaire. The data were imported into SPSS v.18 software and then analyzed using descriptive statistical indices (mean, SD, number, and percentage) and inferential statistics (Chi-square, Pearson's correlation coefficient, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and Kruskal-Wallis test). Written informed consent was obtained from the employees participating in the study and they were assured about confidentiality. Also, they were informed that participation was voluntary. The mean and standard deviation of the total health literacy score among the studied individuals was 125.99±16.01. The mean score of health literacy in the areas of reading (15.36±2.89) and evaluation (5.01±2.8) among the studied individuals was lower than other dimensions of health literacy. Based on the Chi-square test, there was a statistically significant relationship between health literacy and education level, occupational rank, work place, and work experience (p=0.0001 in all the cases). The individuals with medium and good levels of health literacy acquired most of their health-related information through the Internet, friends, relatives, physicians, and health staff. Health literacy status was not sufficient among the studied staff. Thus, it is recommended to perform promotional interventions in order to improve the health literacy status and its dimensions among these staff.

  5. Effect of organisational downsizing on health of employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahtera, J; Kivimäki, M; Pentti, J

    1997-10-18

    Reduction of personnel by businesses and other organisations (organisational downsizing) is common in Europe, but little is known about its effects on the health of employees. We used employers' records to investigate the relation between downsizing and subsequent absenteeism because of ill health in 981 local-government workers who remained in employment in Raisio, south-western Finland, during a period of economic decline (1991-95). Data were separated into three time periods: 1991, before downsizing; 1993, major downsizing in some workplaces and occupations; and 1993-95, after downsizing. We obtained data on sick leave from records kept by the occupational health-care unit in Raisio. We also investigated whether the effects of downsizing were dependent on ten other predictors of sick leave. There was a significant association between downsizing and medically certified sick leave. The rate of absenteeism was 2.3 times greater (95% CI 2.0-2.7) after major downsizing, classified by occupation, than after minor downsizing. The corresponding rate ratios for musculoskeletal disorders and trauma were 5.7 (4.1-8.0) and 2.7 (1.7-4.2), respectively. The effects of downsizing by workplace depended on the age distribution of the staff. When the proportion of employees who were older than 50 years was high, downsizing increased the individual risk of absence because of ill health by 3.2-14.0 times, depending on diagnostic category. When the proportion of employees over 50 years was low, downsizing had only slight effects on health. Other risk factors that increased rates of sick leave after downsizing were age over 44 years, a large workplace, poor health before downsizing, and high income. Downsizing is a risk to the health of employees. But this risk varies according to individual factors, such as age, socioeconomic status, and health, as well as factors related to place of work, for example, size and age structure of the staff.

  6. Income taxes and benefits among Czech employees: Changes since 1989 and cross-national comparison

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večerník, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, 1-2 (2006), s. 2-17 ISSN 0015-1920 Grant - others:Global Development Network(IN) GDN RRC V-37 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : income tax * Czech Republic * social benefits Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.190, year: 2006

  7. Bioactivities and Health Benefits of Wild Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wild fruits are exotic or underutilized. Wild fruits contain many bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and flavonoids. Many studies have shown that wild fruits possess various bioactivities and health benefits, such as free radical scavenging, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer activity. Therefore, wild fruits have the potential to be developed into functional foods or pharmaceuticals to prevent and treat several chronic diseases. In the present article, we review current knowledge about the bioactivities and health benefits of wild fruits, which is valuable for the exploitation and utilization of wild fruits.

  8. Turnover in health care: the mediating effects of employee engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collini, Stevie A; Guidroz, Ashley M; Perez, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to understand the interaction between interpersonal respect, diversity climate, mission fulfilment and engagement to better predict turnover in health care. Registered nurse turnover has averaged 14% and current nursing shortages are expected to spread. Few studies have studied employee engagement as a mediator between organisational context and turnover. Study participants were employees working within 185 departments across ten hospitals within a large healthcare organisation in the USA. Although a total of 5443 employees work in these departments, employee opinion survey responses were aggregated by department before being linked to turnover rates gathered from company records. Engagement fully mediated the relationship between respect and turnover and the relationship between mission fulfilment and turnover. Diversity climate was not related to turnover. Turnover in health care poses a significant threat to the mission of creating a healing environment for patients and these results demonstrate that workplace respect and connection to the mission affect turnover by decreasing engagement. The findings demonstrated that to increase engagement, and improve turnover rates in health care, it would be beneficial for organisations, and nurse management to focus on improving mission fulfilment and interpersonal relationships. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Stress management standards: a warning indicator for employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, A; Haslam, C O

    2013-07-01

    Psychological stress is a major cause of lost working days in the UK. The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) has developed management standards (MS) to help organizations to assess work-related stress. To investigate the relationships between the MS indicator tool and employee health, job attitudes, work performance and environmental outcomes. The first phase involved a survey employing the MS indicator tool, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), job attitudes, work performance and environmental measures in a call centre from a large utility company. The second phase comprised six focus groups to investigate what employees believed contributed to their perceived stress. Three hundred and four call centre employees responded with a response rate of 85%. Significant negative correlations were found between GHQ-12 and two MS dimensions; demands (Rho = -0.211, P job performance, job motivation and increased intention to quit but low stress levels were associated with reduced job satisfaction. Lack of management support, recognition and development opportunities were identified as sources of stress. The findings support the utility of the MS as a measure of employee attitudes and performance.

  10. 45 CFR 618.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health and insurance benefits and services. 618....440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to § 618.235(d), in providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its students, a recipient...

  11. 36 CFR 1211.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health and insurance benefits... Activities Prohibited § 1211.440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to § 1211.235(d), in providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its...

  12. 34 CFR 106.39 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health and insurance benefits and services. 106.39... Prohibited § 106.39 Health and insurance benefits and services. In providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its students, a recipient shall not...

  13. 24 CFR 3.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Health and insurance benefits and... Activities Prohibited § 3.440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to § 3.235(d), in providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its...

  14. 32 CFR 196.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Health and insurance benefits and services. 196... Activities Prohibited § 196.440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to § 196.235(d), in providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its...

  15. 13 CFR 113.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health and insurance benefits and....440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to § 113.235(d), in providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its students, a recipient...

  16. 45 CFR 2555.440 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health and insurance benefits and services. 2555... Activities Prohibited § 2555.440 Health and insurance benefits and services. Subject to § 2555.235(d), in providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its...

  17. 7 CFR 15a.39 - Health and insurance benefits and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Health and insurance benefits and services. 15a.39... Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.39 Health and insurance benefits and services. In providing a medical, hospital, accident, or life insurance benefit, service, policy, or plan to any of its students, a...

  18. Marketing health promotion: hitting or missing the target in occupational health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, S A

    1993-10-01

    1. Occupational health nurses can use marketing strategies to plan, offer, and manage health promotion programs; and to conduct research aimed at better understanding the health needs of workers. 2. By applying a social marketing orientation to health promotion planning, occupational health nurses can tailor programs to fit employees' needs, and deliver health messages that are readily understandable to worker groups. 3. A priority in implementing any occupational health program or service is learning about the needs, desires, and health habits of employees. 4. Greater benefits to employee health may occur by targeting change in structures and systems at the workplace rather than solely focusing on lifestyle issues.

  19. MOTIVATION OF EMPLOYEES AND BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION IN HEALTH CARE ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Miljkovic

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available All health care organizations deal with proposed actions for achievement of goals with the best use of human resources. In that respect, close attention must be paid to motivation of individuals by means of initiative, rewards, leadership, and organizational context within which the work is being organized. The goal is to develop organizational processes and workplace environment that will help them to show the expected results. Motivation is the process of initiation, an activity aimed at achieving specific goals. Employees who do not have clear goals or have no goals at all work slowly, execute given tasks poorly, show lack of interest and complete fewer tasks than the employees who have clear and challenging goals. Employees with clearly defined goals are energetic and more productive. Behavior modification includes the use of four means to achieve this goal, known as intervention strategies. These strategies are: positive incentive, negative incentive, punishment and lack of reaction.

  20. 5 CFR 891.502 - Standards for carrier of uniform plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS Standards for Uniform Plan and... available, the carrier of the uniform plan shall have made at least 1 percent of all group health insurance benefit payments in the United States. If the carrier is an insurance company, it must be licensed to...

  1. Employees' perceptions of the impact of work on health behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Nicola; Jones, Fiona; Harris, Peter R

    2013-07-01

    Research examining the impact of work on health behaviours has rarely provided a complete picture of the impact across health behaviours. Twenty-four employees were interviewed about their smoking, drinking, exercise and eating. Themes included the impact of the work environment, including policy, convenience and workplace cultural norms; business events effecting one's routine and again convenience and workplace cultural norms; being busy at work effecting time and energy for healthy behaviour; and work stress leading to health behaviours being used as coping responses on bad and good days. The impact of work is similar across health behaviours and is primarily detrimental.

  2. The association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiavi, Farzad Faraji; Dashti, Rezvan; Zergani, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Job satisfaction is one of the most challenging organizational concepts, and it is the basis of management policies to increase productivity and efficiency of the organization. The general health rate may affect job satisfaction in several ways. This study aimed to determine the association between job satisfaction and general health among employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. The study population of this cross-sectional research included 100 employees of Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. The data collection instruments were the General Health Questionnaire (28-GHQ) and the Job Descriptive Index (JDI) questionnaire. The data were analyzed using Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient, independent samples t-test, and ANOVA statistical tests in SPSS software. The mean general health was calculated as 26.19 ± 11.04, which indicated a positive psychiatric condition. Job satisfaction with a mean score of 89.67 ± 23.3 was deemed to be relatively dissatisfied. A medium negative and significant association was observed between job satisfaction and general health and its subscales (physical health, anxiety, social, and depression). General health subscales and job satisfaction are associated. Some actions must be planned to cope with the negative factors in general health in order to increase employees' satisfaction in university educational hospitals.

  3. Does Employee Safety Matter for Patients Too? Employee Safety Climate and Patient Safety Culture in Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Eaton, Jennifer Lipkowitz; McPhaul, Kathleen M; Hodgson, Michael J

    2015-04-22

    We examined relationships between employee safety climate and patient safety culture. Because employee safety may be a precondition for the development of patient safety, we hypothesized that employee safety culture would be strongly and positively related to patient safety culture. An employee safety climate survey was administered in 2010 and assessed employees' views and experiences of safety for employees. The patient safety survey administered in 2011 assessed the safety culture for patients. We performed Pearson correlations and multiple regression analysis to examine the relationships between a composite measure of employee safety with subdimensions of patient safety culture. The regression models controlled for size, geographic characteristics, and teaching affiliation. Analyses were conducted at the group level using data from 132 medical centers. Higher employee safety climate composite scores were positively associated with all 9 patient safety culture measures examined. Standardized multivariate regression coefficients ranged from 0.44 to 0.64. Medical facilities where staff have more positive perceptions of health care workplace safety climate tended to have more positive assessments of patient safety culture. This suggests that patient safety culture and employee safety climate could be mutually reinforcing, such that investments and improvements in one domain positively impacts the other. Further research is needed to better understand the nexus between health care employee and patient safety to generalize and act upon findings.

  4. The cost of unintended pregnancies for employer-sponsored health insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Gabriela; Pyenson, Bruce S; Law, Amy W; Lynen, Richard; Trussell, James

    2015-04-01

    Pregnancy is associated with a significant cost for employers providing health insurance benefits to their employees. The latest study on the topic was published in 2002, estimating the unintended pregnancy rate for women covered by employer-sponsored insurance benefits to be approximately 29%. The primary objective of this study was to update the cost of unintended pregnancy to employer-sponsored health insurance plans with current data. The secondary objective was to develop a regression model to identify the factors and associated magnitude that contribute to unintended pregnancies in the employee benefits population. We developed stepwise multinomial logistic regression models using data from a national survey on maternal attitudes about pregnancy before and shortly after giving birth. The survey was conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through mail and via telephone interviews between 2009 and 2011 of women who had had a live birth. The regression models were then applied to a large commercial health claims database from the Truven Health MarketScan to retrospectively assign the probability of pregnancy intention to each delivery. Based on the MarketScan database, we estimate that among employer-sponsored health insurance plans, 28.8% of pregnancies are unintended, which is consistent with national findings of 29% in a survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These unintended pregnancies account for 27.4% of the annual delivery costs to employers in the United States, or approximately 1% of the typical employer's health benefits spending for 1 year. Using these findings, we present a regression model that employers could apply to their claims data to identify the risk for unintended pregnancies in their health insurance population. The availability of coverage for contraception without employee cost-sharing, as was required by the Affordable Care Act in 2012, combined with the ability to identify women who are at high

  5. Oral health benefits of chewing gum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades sugar-free chewing gum has developed in an oral healthcare product, next to the conventional products such as the toothbrush and mouthrinses. In this thesis we investigate the oral health benefits of chewing gum and the effects of additives to chewing gum, such as antimicrobials.

  6. Impact of a Workplace Health Promotion Program on Employees' Blood Pressure in a Public University.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Y Eng

    Full Text Available Workplace health promotion is important in the prevention of non-communicable diseases among employees. Previous workplace health programs have shown benefits such as lowered disease prevalence, reduced medical costs and improved productivity. This study aims to evaluate the impact of a 6-year workplace health promotion program on employees' blood pressure in a public university.In this prospective cohort study, we included 1,365 employees enrolled in the university's workplace health promotion program, a program conducted since 2008 and using data from the 2008-2013 follow-up period. Participants were permanent employees aged 35 years and above, with at least one follow up measurements and no change in antihypertensive medication during the study period. Baseline socio-demographic information was collected using a questionnaire while anthropometry measurements and resting blood pressure were collected during annual health screening. Changes in blood pressure over time were analyzed using a linear mixed model.The systolic blood pressure in the hypertension subgroup decreased 2.36 mmHg per year (p<0.0001. There was also significant improvement in systolic blood pressure among the participants who were at risk of hypertension (-0.75 mmHg, p<0.001. The diastolic blood pressure among the hypertensive and at risk subgroups improved 1.76 mmHg/year (p<0.001 and 0.56 mmHg/year (p<0.001, respectively. However, there was no change in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure among participants in the healthy subgroup over the 6-year period.This study shows that continuing participation in workplace health promotion program has the potential to improve blood pressure levels among employees.

  7. Development Application - Terra Nova Development - Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Canada-Newfoundland Benefits Plan, part of the overall application to develop the Terra Nova Field off the coast of Newfoundland details the benefits to Canadians, but most particularly to residents of Newfoundland and Labrador that a vibrant petroleum industry is expected to bring. In this document the proponents commit themselves to a course of action designed to enhance the opportunities for Canadian and Newfoundland participation in the development, in accordance with the Atlantic Accord legislation. In terms of this legislation, the project proponents are obliged to perform development functions from Newfoundland, acquire goods and services for the Terra Nova Development on a 'best value' basis, but consistent with the procurement policies and procedures for benefits. The proponents must consider Canadian and, in particular, Newfoundland benefits as one of the factors in the procurement of goods and services, and require contactors and subcontractors to adhere to the development's benefits principles, objectives and commitments. A 7-page glossary is also included

  8. Formal intervention in employee health: comparisons of the nature and structure of employee assistance programs and health promotion programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, P M; Blum, T C

    1988-01-01

    Health promotion programs (HPP) and employee assistance programs (EAP) are compared in terms of their structure and process. Two common themes are extracted: a belief that both are beneficial to both employers and employees, and a sense of 'mission'. The technology of HPP and EAP are examined and compared. EAPs' stimulation from Federal funding is contrasted with the more indigenous roots of HPPs. Examination of empirical data comparing organizations with EAPs which have and have not adopted HPPs indicate the former tend to be somewhat more 'caring' toward employees. An examination of program ingredients indicates much greater commonality of structural and processual ingredients within EAPs as compared to HPPs. The extent to which each program type has become more 'populist' in orientation and the implications of these changes for program technology are considered. Finally the paper describes differences in program evaluation stemming from target group definitions in the two types of programs.

  9. A marketing plan for health care in the financial district of San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S

    1987-01-01

    The development of a corporate health marketing program for the Medical Pavilion was based on three assumptions. 1. Medical Pavilion will contribute positively to health care cost containment for employers by providing convenient, quality medical care which will help to reduce employee time lost from work due to physician visits, and through health screening, early diagnosis, and out-patient procedures, decrease unnecessary hospitalization. 2. The level of awareness among chief executive officers, benefits directors, corporate medical directors, and employees will be positively related to utilization of health services at the Medical Pavilion. 3. The Medical Pavilion will be organized on a private practice model; although special programs related to employer coverage and specific benefits may be considered separately. The recommended goals of the corporate health program of the Medical Pavilion were as follows: 1. To develop demographic profiles based on current utilization of medical services in a random sample to corporations in the Financial District. 2. To design a survey of corporate leadership to determine a needs assessment strategy for the development of preventive health services programs to be offered at the Medical Pavilion. 3. To select an advertising and public relations agency; and determine the marketing bridges, for the first year and the following five year period. 4. To evaluate effectiveness of the corporate health marketing plan referral data collected through the Management Information System to be established at the Medical Pavilion.

  10. Does Worksite Culture of Health (CoH) Matter to Employees? Empirical Evidence Using Job-Related Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Youngbum; Marzec, Mary L

    2016-05-01

    This study examines the relationships between the workplace culture of health (CoH), job satisfaction, and turnover intention. We also examined the moderating effect of job classification. Structural equation modeling analysis was performed on data from employees of a Korean life insurance company (N = 880). Workplace CoH directly influenced job satisfaction (β = 0.32; P Job satisfaction was directly associated with intention to leave (β = -0.42; P job satisfaction and intention to leave was stronger for managerial employees than for non-managerial employees. This study showed that a workplace CoH is related to job satisfaction and intention to leave. Supporting health at the workplace has implications beyond health that benefit both employees and the organization.

  11. Texas Employee Health and Fitness Program. An Example of Unique Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Donald F.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The Texas State Employee Health Fitness and Education Act of 1983 enables state agencies and educational institutions to finance employee health and fitness programs. This legislation is discussed and an example of the state-supported program is given. (MT)

  12. Help Preferences Among Employees Who Wish to Change Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard; Villadsen, Ebbe; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-08-01

    To examine the help preferences of employees in the Danish police who had acknowledged that they wished to change health behaviors. In addition, we explored whether preferences varied with age, gender, chronic health concerns, positive expectations of good health, and past experiences of in-house health promotion services (i.e., wellness service). Respondents to an electronic questionnaire who acknowledged wishing to change health behaviors in relation to smoking (n = 845), alcohol (n = 684), eating (n = 4,431), and physical activity (n = 5,179) were asked to choose up to three help alternatives on a predefined list. In descending order, smokers preferred help from nicotine gum, no help, and help and support from family and friends. Alcohol consumers preferred no help or help and support from family and friends or "other" forms. Employees who wanted to change eating habits preferred a free fruit bowl, free nutritional guidance, and healthy food at work. Employees who wanted to change physical activity patterns preferred exercise at work, offers of free exercise, and exercise in a social/collegial context. Wishing to change health behaviors is not always accompanied by perceiving a need for assistance. The no-help option was selected fairly frequently and mostly in relation to alcohol and smoking. A fruit bowl was the most preferred option for help, followed by exercise at work and free exercise. Help from traditional health services was ranked low, possibly reflecting that they are primarily viewed as a solution for stopping disease rather than promoting health. © 2013 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. NIF conventional facilities construction health and safety plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, D W

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this Plan is to outline the minimum health and safety requirements to which all participating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and non-LLNL employees (excluding National Ignition Facility [NIF] specific contractors and subcontractors covered under the construction subcontract packages (e.g., CSP-9)-see Construction Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility [CSP] Section I.B. ''NIF Construction Contractors and Subcontractors'' for specifics) shall adhere to for preventing job-related injuries and illnesses during Conventional Facilities construction activities at the NIF Project. For the purpose of this Plan, the term ''LLNL and non-LLNL employees'' includes LLNL employees, LLNL Plant Operations staff and their contractors, supplemental labor, contract labor, labor-only contractors, vendors, DOE representatives, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, and others such as visitors, students, consultants etc., performing on-site work or services in support of the NIF Project. Based upon an activity level determination explained in Section 1.2.18, in this document, these organizations or individuals may be required by site management to prepare their own NIF site-specific safety plan. LLNL employees will normally not be expected to prepare a site-specific safety plan. This Plan also outlines job-specific exposures and construction site safety activities with which LLNL and non-LLNL employees shall comply

  14. Promoting health and safety for traveling and commuting employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochat-Debroux, Sophia

    2008-09-01

    In a society that relies on a growing market economy and free enterprise, Americans spend inordinate time commuting and traveling for work. Aircraft and private vehicles are the two primary modes of work-related travel, with each having its own inherit risks and hazards. Although much has been written about international travel health, little has been published about protecting the health and safety of workers during domestic business travel. The intent of this article is to highlight the statistics associated with domestic business travel and present sound rationale for an inclusive and comprehensive domestic travel health and safety program for employees.

  15. Employment contracts and health selection: unhealthy employees out and healthy employees in?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Alfred F; Kompier, Michiel A J; Houtman, Irene L D; van den Bossche, Seth N J; Taris, Toon W

    2012-10-01

    The healthy worker effect implies that healthy workers go "up" in employment status whereas less healthy workers go "down" into precarious temporary employment or unemployment. These hypotheses were tested during an economic recession, by predicting various upward and downward contract trajectories, based on workers' health status, work-related well-being, and work ability. Two waves (2008 and 2009) of the Netherlands Working Conditions Cohort Study (N = 7112) were used and logistic regression analyses were performed to test the hypothesis of this study. Lower general health and higher emotional exhaustion at baseline predicted future unemployment among permanent employees. Various downward trajectories were also predicted by lower work-related well-being and lower work ability, whereas the opposite was true for one of the upward trajectories. Workers with lower health, lower work-related well-being, or lower work ability are at risk for ending up in precarious temporary employment or unemployment.

  16. Comparison of the perspectives of managers, employees and clients regarding the individual barriers of family planning counseling in healthcare centers of isfahan in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Safoura; Ehsanpour, Soheila; Kohan, Shahnaze; Farzi, Saba; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Direkvand-Moghaddam, Ashraf

    2014-03-01

    Family planning is a lifestyle that is selected voluntarily and is based on the knowledge, attitude and responsible decision making by couples in order to promote the health and welfare of the family and the advancement of the society. In this regard, family planning counseling plays an important role in making informed decisions if used properly and in a responsible way. Detection of individual barriers in family planning counseling based on the viewpoints of managers, employees and clients who are key participants in the healthcare service provision is a major step towards appropriate planning to modify or eliminate such barriers. The present study was conducted with the goal of comparing managers', employees' and clients' viewpoints about individual barriers in family planning counseling in health care centers in Isfahan in 2012. This was a cross-sectional one-step three-group comparative descriptive study conducted on 295 subjects including 59 managers, 110 employees and 126 clients in medical health care centers in Isfahan in 2012. The managers and employees were selected by census sampling, and the clients were recruited through convenient random sampling. The data collection tool was a researcher-designed questionnaire, which was designed in two sections of fertility and personal characteristics, and viewpoint measurement. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were used to analyze the data. The obtained results showed significant differences between mean scores of viewpoints in three groups of managers, employees and clients concerning individual barriers in family planning counseling. In addition, most of the managers, employees and clients reported individual barriers as an intermediate level barrier in the process of family planning counseling. Results indicate that subjects in three studied groups hold different views regarding the individual barriers in family planning counseling. This difference in the perspectives may be a factor that affects

  17. Employee benefits in multinational firms: Empirical evidence for Romania and Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caran Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyze post-employment benefits provided by multinational firms, focusing on retirement advantages and pension systems in Romania and Serbia from a comparative empirical perspective. Economic literature highlights the essential role played by pension schemes in assuring a proper level of income after retirement, thus reducing poverty and increasing productivity, with significant positive implications upon overall economic activity. our research is based on developing several double-log fixed and random effects models, as well as a dynamic and distributed lags model, using a panel structure over the 2005- 2013 period and a complex set of indicators (national accounts - GDP total and per capita; labor market - employment, unemployment, productivity, earnings; secondary and tertiary education; pension specific data - general beneficiaries, old age and survivor pensioners, total and by gender, and pension expenses as percentage of GDP. The results show that pensions represent an incentive for employees leading to an increase in resource productivity. At the same time, old age pensions are positively shaping economic growth and employment for the two countries considered, significantly reducing the poverty rate for pensioners. Nevertheless, the two pensions systems are modelled by the economic activity, educational background of employees, as well as by the level of net earnings.

  18. Gender (inequality among employees in elder care: implications for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwér Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gendered practices of working life create gender inequalities through horizontal and vertical gender segregation in work, which may lead to inequalities in health between women and men. Gender equality could therefore be a key element of health equity in working life. Our aim was to analyze what gender (inequality means for the employees at a woman-dominated workplace and discuss possible implications for health experiences. Methods All caregiving staff at two workplaces in elder care within a municipality in the north of Sweden were invited to participate in the study. Forty-five employees participated, 38 women and 7 men. Seven focus group discussions were performed and led by a moderator. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the focus groups. Results We identified two themes. "Advocating gender equality in principle" showed how gender (inequality was seen as a structural issue not connected to the individual health experiences. "Justifying inequality with individualism" showed how the caregivers focused on personalities and interests as a justification of gender inequalities in work division. The justification of gender inequality resulted in a gendered work division which may be related to health inequalities between women and men. Gender inequalities in work division were primarily understood in terms of personality and interests and not in terms of gender. Conclusion The health experience of the participants was affected by gender (inequality in terms of a gendered work division. However, the participants did not see the gendered work division as a gender equality issue. Gender perspectives are needed to improve the health of the employees at the workplaces through shifting from individual to structural solutions. A healthy-setting approach considering gender relations is needed to achieve gender equality and fairness in health status between women and men.

  19. Impact of multi-tiered pharmacy benefits on attitudes of plan members with chronic disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Kavita V; Ganther, Julie M; Valuck, Robert J; McCollum, Marianne M; Lewis, Sonya J

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of 2- and 3-tiered pharmacy benefit plans on member attitudes regarding their pharmacy benefits. We performed a mail survey and cross-sectional comparison of the outcome variables in a large managed care population in the western United States. Participants were persons with chronic disease states who were in 2- or 3-tier copay drug plans. A random sample of 10,662 was selected from a total of 25,008 members who had received 2 or more prescriptions for a drug commonly used to treat one of 5 conditions: hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or arthritis. Statistical analysis included bivariate comparisons and regression analysis of the factors affecting member attitudes, including satisfaction, loyalty, health plan choices, and willingness to pay a higher out-of-pocket cost for medications. A response rate of 35.8% was obtained from continuously enrolled plan members. Respondents were older, sicker, and consumed more prescriptions than nonrespondents. There were significant differences in age and health plan characteristics between 2- and 3-tier plan members: respondents aged 65 or older represented 11.7% of 2-tier plan members and 54.7% of 3-tier plan members, and 10.0% of 2-tier plan members were in Medicare+Choice plans versus 61.4% in Medicare+Choice plans for 3-tier plan members (Pbrand-name medications, in general, they were not willing to pay more than 10 dollars (in addition to their copayment amount) for these medications. Older respondents and sicker individuals (those with higher scores on the Chronic Disease Indicator) appeared to have more positive attitudes toward their pharmacy benefit plans in general. Higher reported incomes by respondents were also associated with greater satisfaction with prescription drug coverage and increased loyalty toward the pharmacy benefit plan. Conversely, the more individuals spent for either their health care or prescription medications, the less satisfied

  20. Employee Perceptions of Their Organization's Level of Emergency Preparedness Following a Brief Workplace Emergency Planning Educational Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Lauren A; Terrigino, Elizabeth A; Azim, Sabiya; Snider, Elsa; Rhodes, Darson L; Cox, Carol C

    2016-06-01

    A brief emergency planning educational presentation was taught during work hours to a convenience sample of employees of various workplaces in Northern Missouri, USA. Participants were familiarized with details about how an emergency plan is prepared by management and implemented by management-employee crisis management teams - focusing on both employee and management roles. They then applied the presentation information to assess their own organization's emergency preparedness level. Participants possessed significantly (p employees to become more involved in their organization's emergency planning and response. Educational strategies that involve management-employee collaboration in activities tailored to each workplace's operations and risk level for emergencies should be implemented.

  1. Occupational health and psychological well-being of industrial employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bhardwaj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In the present era of globalization of business the nature of work organizations and its environment are changing radically extending noticeable impact on individual′s job, safety, health, and well-being. Material & Methods : The present study was designed to examine the effects of overall occupational health on psychological well-being in a sample of 150 line-staff operating in a production organization. Psychometrically standardized scales were employed to assess the extent of occupational health and psychological well-being. Results : The analyses of the obtained data revealed that occupational health positively correlates with employees′ mental health. Conclusion : The employees who perceived their work and its physical and psycho-social environment as to be adequate and healthy maintained relatively better overall mental health.

  2. Health Insurance: Understanding Your Health Plan's Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know what your insurance company is paying…Health Insurance: Understanding What It CoversRead Article >>Insurance & BillsHealth Insurance: Understanding What It CoversYour insurance policy lists a package of medical benefits such as tests, drugs, and treatment services. These ...

  3. 76 FR 13304 - Benefits Payable in Terminated Single-Employer Plans; Limitations on Guaranteed Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Taxation Staff specifies that UCEBs include benefits payable with respect to ``facility shutdowns or reductions in workforce.'' Joint Committee on Taxation, Technical Explanation of H.R. 4, the ``Pension... event, plan sponsors typically did not make contributions to provide for advance funding of such...

  4. Paying for individual health insurance through tax-sheltered cafeteria plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A; Monahan, Amy B

    2010-01-01

    When employees without group health insurance buy individual coverage, they do so using after-tax income--costing them from 20% to 50% more than others pay for equivalent coverage. Prior to the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), several states promoted a potential solution that would allow employees to buy individual insurance through tax-sheltered payroll deduction. This technical but creative approach would allow insurers to combine what is known as "list-billing" with a Section 125 "cafeteria plan." However, these state-level reform attempts have failed to gain significant traction because state small-group reform laws and federal restrictions on medical underwriting cloud the legality of tax-sheltered list-billing. Several authorities have taken the position that insurance paid for through a cafeteria plan must meet the nondiscrimination requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act with respect to eligibility, premiums, and benefits. The recently enacted Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act addresses some of the legal uncertainty in this area, but much remains. For health reform to have its greatest effect, federal regulators must clarify whether individual health insurance can be purchased on a pre-tax basis through a cafeteria plan.

  5. Health Plan Finder Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Affordable Care Act requires that HHS establish a mechanism, including an internet website, through which a resident of, or small business in, any State may...

  6. Health Plans - Trend Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page contains several useful trend and competition indicators. Certain files will be updated monthly while others will be updated quarterly. The files are the...

  7. Stigma in the mental health workplace: perceptions of peer employees and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromwall, Layne K; Holley, Lynn C; Bashor, Kathy E

    2011-08-01

    Informed by a structural theory of workplace discrimination, mental health system employees' perceptions of mental health workplace stigma and discrimination against service recipients and peer employees were investigated. Fifty-one peer employees and 52 licensed behavioral health clinicians participated in an online survey. Independent variables were employee status (peer or clinician), gender, ethnicity, years of mental health employment, age, and workplace social inclusion of peer employees. Analysis of covariance on workplace discrimination against service recipients revealed that peer employees perceived more discrimination than clinicians and whites perceived more discrimination than employees of color (corrected model F = 9.743 [16, 87], P = .000, partial ŋ (2) = .644). Analysis of covariance on workplace discrimination against peer employees revealed that peer employees perceived more discrimination than clinicians (F = 4.593, [6, 97], P = .000, partial ŋ (2) = .223).

  8. Health-related behaviours and mental health in Hong Kong employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S; Tse, S; Goodyear-Smith, F; Yuen, W; Wong, P W

    2017-01-01

    Poor physical and mental health in employees can result in a serious loss of productivity. Early detection and management of unhealthy behaviours and mental health symptoms can prevent productivity loss and foster healthy workplaces. To examine health-related behaviours, mental health status and help-seeking patterns in employees, across different industries in Hong Kong. Participants were telephone-interviewed and assessed using the Case-finding and Help Assessment Tool (CHAT) with employee lifestyle risk factors, mental health issues and help-seeking intentions screened across eight industries. Subsequent data analysis involved descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. There were 1031 participants. Key stressors were work (30%), family (19%), money (14%) and interpersonal issues (5%). Approximately 18, 9 and 9% of participants were smokers, drinkers and gamblers, respectively, and only 51% exercised regularly. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were reported by 24 and 31% of employees, respectively. Issues for which they wanted immediate help were interpersonal abuse (16%), anxiety (15%), anger control (14%) and depression (14%). Employees with higher educational attainment were less likely to smoke, drink and gamble than those with lower attainment. Lifestyle and mental health status were not associated with income. Employees in construction and hotel industries smoked more and those in manufacturing drank more than those in other industries. Physical and mental health of Hong Kong employees are concerning. Although employee assistance programmes are common among large companies, initiation of proactive engagement approaches, reaching out to those employees in need and unlikely to seek help for mental health issues, may be useful. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Psychological benefits of physical activity for optimal mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirel, Emmanuel

    Mental health is a worldwide public health concern, as can be seen from the WHO's comprehensive mental health action plan 2013-2020 which was adopted by the 66th World Health Assembly. According to the Mental health commission of Canada (2012), one in five Canadians will personally experience a mental illness in their lifetime, and the WHO shows that mental illness represents the second most prevalent risk of morbidity after heart disease. Physical activity certainly provides an answer to this problem. Physical activity has been shown to improve physical health but it is also one of the most natural and accessible means to improve mental health. The aim of the present article is to propose a biopsychosocial model on the basis of a literature review on the psychological benefits of physical activity. In view of the findings we assume that physical activity increases mental well-being and optimal mental health as opposed to poor mental health. Hence, physical activity provides a state of well-being that enables individuals to realize their own potential, and that helps to cope with the normal stresses of life or adversity. The model certainly opens the way for research and new hypothesis, but it also aims at the promotion of the benefits of physical activity on psychological well-being for optimal mental health.

  10. An annual employee education calendar as the capstone of educational assessment, planning, and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Paula G

    2005-01-01

    Staff development educators can better control their workload and provide a more comprehensive employee education program when the organization adopts a formal five-step process that culminates in the publication of an annual employee education calendar. This article describes the five steps of organization-wide learning needs assessment, resource allocation, priority setting, documentation of the educational plan, and calendar development, including elements and timelines. The annual calendar reflects involvement of staff throughout the facility in the identification, planning, and delivery of education programs. Its publication enhances staff and supervisors' awareness of learning opportunities. Its longer-range perspective assists managers and employees to better plan to meet learning needs and improves participation in staff development activities.

  11. A flexible benefits tax credit for health insurance and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheredge, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    This essay outlines a concept for a "flexible benefits" tax credit for expanding health insurance coverage and other purposes such as retirement savings plans (with potential withdrawals for higher education, first-home ownership, and catastrophic medical expenses). Two examples are presented. The advantages of a flexible benefits tax credit are considered in terms of efficient use of the budget surplus to help meet the varied (and changing) needs of American families, to eliminate major national gaps in health insurance and pension coverage, and to advance other objectives. If the budget surplus is used wisely, political decisionmakers could achieve health insurance coverage for most uninsured workers and children and assure a future with real economic security for American families.

  12. "Telemarketing" hospital services: benefits, pitfalls and the planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafer, J C

    1984-01-01

    "Telemarketing" is an innovative concept used by many firms to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of product delivery efforts. It can be used by hospitals to benefit both patients and physicians. Further, it can be a tool that, if used properly, can improve the image of the hospital and assist in positioning the organization uniquely among its competitors. This paper discusses the exploratory nature, potential problems, and benefits of telemarketing hospital services and offers pre- and post-implementation considerations. This paper also provides an outline of a sample marketing plan that could serve as an initial model for hospitals that might consider this unique marketing approach.

  13. Longevity expectations in the pension fund, insurance, and employee benefits industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in many areas of biomedical science since the 1960s, suggesting likely increases in life expectancy and decreases in morbidity and mortality in the adult population. These changes may pose substantial risks to the pensions and benefits industries. While there is no significant statistical evidence demonstrating rapid decreases in mortality rates, there are conflicting opinions among demographers and biogerontologists on the biological limits of the human lifespan and trends in life expectancy. We administered a survey of the International Employee Benefits Association (IEBA), a large, international industry group. Industry professionals employed by consulting (35%), insurance (24%), pension (14%), and other (27%) companies responded to 32 questions. Respondents showed reasonably conservative views on the future of longevity and retirement, including that for women. The respondents formed their personal longevity expectations based on their family history and, to a lesser degree, on the actuarial life tables. Most of the sample expressed no desire to life past age 100 years, even if the enabling technologies required to maintain a healthy youthful state were available, and only a few respondents in the sample expressed a desire to live for the maximum period (at least) offered by the survey question. The majority of the respondents would not undergo any invasive procedures, and only 56% of the respondents would opt for noninvasive therapies to extend their healthy lifespans to 150 years of age if these were available.

  14. Employee Care

    OpenAIRE

    Zavadilová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The theme of the bachelor's thesis is the issue of employee care and related provision of employee benefits. The main objective is to analyze the effective legislation and characterize the basic areas of employee care. First of all, the thesis focuses on the matter of employee care and related legislation analyzing the working conditions, professional growth of the employees, catering of employees and special conditions for some employees. Furthermore, the special attention is paid to the vol...

  15. Smoking-related health behaviors of employees and readiness to quit: basis for health promotion interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Carol H; Plach, Sandra K; Hewitt, Jeanne Beauchamp; Cashin, Susan E; Kelber, Sheryl; Cisler, Ron A; Weis, Jo M

    2005-06-01

    This report describes patterns of cigarette smoking and interest in smoking cessation programs among employees in a public worksite (n = 6,000) and a private worksite (n = 14,000). Of the 622 employees who attended an employee assistance program (EAP) orientation, 110 (18%) were current smokers. A significantly greater proportion of public employees smoked cigarettes, smoked more heavily, and evaluated their health more poorly compared to private employees. Smokers in both sites were over-represented in unskilled positions. Regardless of worksite, respondents who smoked had similar desires to quit or cut down and were annoyed by the comments of others, felt guilty about smoking, awakened with a desire to smoke, and felt they had a smoking problem. Overall, more than one third of individuals were interested in joining a smoking cessation program. Occupational health nurses may use these findings to design and implement smoking cessation interventions in their workplaces.

  16. Work health determinants in employees without sickness absence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, E; Theorell, T; Nilsson, B; Saraste, H

    2013-01-01

    Working ability is known to be related to good physical condition, clear work tasks, positive feedback and other occupational, organizational and psychosocial factors. In Sweden, high levels of sickness absence are due to stress-related disorders and musculoskeletal pain. To identify work health characteristics in a working population with a large variety of professional skills and occupational tasks. Employers' data on occupation, sickness absence, age and gender in a working population of 11 occupational groups and questionnaire responses regarding work-organization, environment, work stress, pain, health, and socio-demographic factors were collected. Employees with no history of sick-leave were compared with those with a history of sick-leave (1-182 days, mean 25 days). Of 2641 employees, 1961 participated. Those with no history of sick-leave reported less work-related pain, work-related stress, sleep disturbances, worry about their health, 'sick-presenteeism', monotonous work, bent and twisted working positions and exposure to disturbing noise than those with a history of sick-leave (P health, support from superiors, having influence on their working hours and evening and week-end working, longer working hours per week (P health and less neck, shoulder and back pain and more support from their superiors and influence on their working hours.

  17. Motivations for health and their associations with lifestyle, work style, health, vitality, and employee productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Scheppingen, Arjella R; de Vroome, Ernest M M; ten Have, Kristin C J M; Zwetsloot, Gerard I J M; Bos, Ellen H; van Mechelen, Willem

    2014-05-01

    Investigate employees' underlying motivational regulatory styles toward healthy living and their associations with lifestyle, work style, health, vitality, and productivity. Regression analyses on cross-sectional data from Dutch employees (n = 629), obtained as baseline measurement before a workplace health promotion project. Controlled regulation was not associated with smoking and alcohol use, and negatively associated with physical activity, healthy dietary habits, relaxation, and a balanced work style. Autonomous regulation was positively associated with physical activity, healthy dietary habits, and relaxation, and negatively associated with smoking and alcohol use. Healthy lifestyle and work style were associated with perceived health and vitality, which in turn were associated with employees' productivity (absenteeism and presenteeism). Internalization of the value of health is important to promote a healthy lifestyle and work style among employees, and has meaningful business implications.

  18. Nutritional and digestive health benefits of seaweed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Niranjan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Seaweed is a famous delicacy in some parts of the Asia and also a well-known source of important food hydrocolloids, such as agar, alginates, and carrageenan. In addition to the food value of seaweed, several health benefits have also been reported to be present in this valuable food source. It is presumed that the unique features of the marine environment, where the seaweeds are grown, are mainly responsible for most of its properties. Among the functional effects of the seaweed, nutritional and health-related benefits have been widely studied. Compared to the terrestrial plants and animal-based foods, seaweed is rich in some health-promoting molecules and materials such as, dietary fiber, ω-3 fatty acids, essential amino acids, and vitamins A, B, C, and E. In this chapter, the nutritive value of seaweed and the functional effects of its soluble fiber are discussed with a special reference to the digestive health promotion of human. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Cost-benefit analysis of primary prevention programs for mental health at the workplace in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kensuke; Kawakami, Norito; Tsusumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi; Kobayashi, Yuka; Takeuchi, Ayano; Fukuda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    To determine the cost-benefits of primary prevention programs for mental health at the workplace, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies in Japan. We searched the literature, published as of 16 November 2011, using the Pubmed database and relevant key words. The inclusion criteria were: conducted in the workplace in Japan; primary prevention focus; quasi-experimental studies or controlled trials; and outcomes including absenteeism or presenteeism. Four studies were identified: one participatory work environment improvement, one individual-oriented stress management, and two supervisor education programs. Costs and benefits in yen were estimated for each program, based on the description of the programs in the literature, and additional information from the authors. The benefits were estimated based on each program's effect on work performance (measured using the WHO Health and Work Performance Questionnaire in all studies), as well as sick leave days, if available. The estimated relative increase in work performance (%) in the intervention group compared to the control group was converted into labor cost using the average bonus (18% of the total annual salary) awarded to employees in Japan as a base. Sensitive analyses were conducted using different models of time-trend of intervention effects and 95% confidence limits of the relative increase in work performance. For the participatory work environment improvement program, the cost was estimated as 7,660 yen per employee, and the benefit was 15,200-22,800 yen per employee. For the individual-oriented stress management program, the cost was 9,708 yen per employee, and the benefit was 15,200-22,920 yen per employee. For supervisor education programs, the costs and benefits were respectively 5,209 and 4,400-6,600 yen per employee, in one study, 2,949 and zero yen per employee in the other study. The 95% confidence intervals were wide for all these studies. For the point estimates based on these cases, the

  20. How Does Retiree Health Insurance Influence Public Sector Employee Saving?

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Clark; Olivia S. Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Economic theory predicts that employer-provided retiree health insurance (RHI) benefits have a crowd-out effect on household wealth accumulation, not dissimilar to the effects reported elsewhere for employer pensions, Social Security, and Medicare. Nevertheless, we are unaware of any similar research on the impacts of retiree health insurance per se. Accordingly, the present paper utilizes a unique data file on respondents to the Health and Retirement Study, to explore how employer-provided r...