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Sample records for heal animals ethnoveterinary

  1. Wound Healing Properties of Selected Plants Used in Ethnoveterinary Medicine

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    Amos Marume

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants have arrays of phytoconstituents that have wide ranging biological effects like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties key in wound management. In vivo wound healing properties of ointments made of crude methanolic extracts (10% extract w/w in white soft paraffin of three plant species, Cissus quadrangularis L. (whole aerial plant parts, Adenium multiflorum Klotzsch (whole aerial plant parts and Erythrina abyssinica Lam. Ex DC. (leaves and bark used in ethnoveterinary medicine were evaluated on BALB/c female mice based on wound area changes, regular observations, healing skin's percentage crude protein content and histological examinations. White soft paraffin and 3% oxytetracycline ointment were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Wound area changes over a 15 day period for mice treated with C. quadrangularis and A. multiflorum extract ointments were comparable to those of the positive control (oxytetracycline ointment. Wounds managed with the same extract ointments exhibited high crude protein contents, similar to what was observed on animals treated with the positive control. Histological evaluations revealed that C. quadrangularis had superior wound healing properties with the wound area completely returning to normal skin structure by day 15 of the experiment. E. abyssinica leaf and bark extract ointments exhibited lower wound healing properties though the leaf extract exhibited some modest healing properties.

  2. Ethnoveterinary medicine of the Shervaroy Hills of Eastern Ghats, India as alternative medicine for animals.

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    Usha, Swaminathan; Rajasekaran, Chandrasekaran; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    The Eastern Ghats of India is well known for its wealth of natural vegetation and Shervaroy is a major hill range of the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu. Ethnomedicinal studies in the Eastern Ghats of Tamil Nadu or the Shervaroy Hills have been carried out by various researchers. However, there is not much information available on ethnoveterinary medicine in the Eastern Ghats of India. The aim of this study was to examine the potential use of folk plants as alternative medicine for cattle to cure various diseases in the Shervaroy Hills of the Eastern Ghats. Based on interactions with traditional medicine practitioners, it has been observed that a total of 21 medicinal plants belonging to 16 families are used to cure various diseases such as mastitis, enteritis, arthritis, stomatitis, salivation from the mouth, wounding, and conjunctivitis in animals. It has been observed that the traditional knowledge of ethnoveterinary medicine is now confined only among the surviving older people and a few practitioners in the tribal communities of the Shervaroy Hills. Unfortunately, no serious attempts have been made to document and preserve this immense treasure of traditional knowledge.

  3. Traditional Arabic Palestinian ethnoveterinary practices in animal health care: A field survey in the West Bank (Palestine).

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    Ali-Shtayeh, Mohammed S; Jamous, Rana M; Jamous, Rania M

    2016-04-22

    In Palestine, medicinal plants have continued to play a vital role in fulfilling animal healthcare needs of rural communities. However, these valuable resources are being depleted mainly due to over-harvesting, inappropriate agricultural practices (e.g., over use of herbicides), agricultural expansion, and over-grazing. Therefore, immediate action is required to conserve these resources and document the associated knowledge. The purpose of this study was, thus, to document and analyze information associated with medicinal plants that are used in managing animal health problems in the West Bank, Palestine. Ethnobotanical data were collected from Apr 2012 to Feb 2014 mainly using semi-structured interviews with informants sampled using purposive sampling technique and through field observations. The study revealed the use of 138 medicinal plant species in the West Bank for the treatment of several livestock diseases, of these 75 species representing 70 genera and 33 families were reported by 3 independent informants or above. Classification of the ethnoveterinary plant species cited by three informants or above used in a rank-order priority (ROP) based on their claimed relative healing potential has demonstrated that the following are the plants with the highest efficacy: Camellia sinenses, Teucrium capitatum, and Salvia fruticosa with ROPs of 97.1, 93.2, and 91.4, respectively, are used primarily to relieve gastric disorders. Gastrointestinal disorders is the disease group in the study area that scored the highest Informant consensus factor (ICF) value (0.90), followed by urinary, and reproductive disorders (0.89). Our study provided evidence that medicinal plants are still playing important role in the management of livestock diseases, and showed that ethnoveterinary plants used in animal health care in Palestine have been also recorded in human Traditional Arabic Palestinian Herbal Medicine (TAPHM), and demonstrated a strong link between human and veterinary

  4. Medicinal animals used in ethnoveterinary practices of the 'Cariri Paraibano', NE Brazil

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    Lopez Luiz CS

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zootherapy is important in various socio-cultural environments, and innumerous examples of the use of animal derived remedies can currently be found in many urban, semi-urban and more remote localities in all parts of the world, particularly in developing countries. However, although a number of ethnobiological inventories concerning the use of medicinal animals in human health care have been compiled in Brazil in recent years, zootherapeutic practices in ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM are poorly described and neglected in favor of human ethnomedicine. In this sense, the purpose of this study was to describe the local zootherapeutic practices in ethnoveterinary medicine of semi-arid of NE Brazil (Caatinga biome and to contribute to future research about the validation of the effects and side effects of these animal products Methods The information obtained through semi-structured interviews was complemented by free interviews and informal conversations. A total of 67 people were interviewed (53 men and 14 women about the use and commercialization of medicinal animals. To determine the relative importance of each local known species, their use-values (UV were calculated. Diversity of species utilized was compared, between localities, using rarefaction curves and diversity estimate (Chao2 Results and Conclusions A total of 44 animal species (37 vertebrates and 7 invertebrates, distributed among 6 taxonomic categories were found to be used to treat 30 different ailments in livestock and pets. The results of our surveys revealed a rich traditional knowledge of local residents about the use of animals in traditional veterinary medicine. Although it is gradually being discontinued, the perceived efficacy, economic and geographic accessibility were main reasons for popularity of zootherapy in studied areas.

  5. Uses of plants, animal and mineral substances in Mediterranean ethno-veterinary practices for the care of small ruminants.

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    Piluzza, G; Virdis, S; Serralutzu, F; Bullitta, S

    2015-06-20

    The cultural heritage of Sardinian shepherds is rapidly vanishing and survives in the memory of elderly people. The objective of our study was not only to report the usage of plants and their preparation for administration but also the use of other remedies of different origin arising from traditional ethno-veterinary knowledge, as Sardinian shepherds were used to employ plants, animals, minerals and combinations of several substances to prepare remedies for prophylaxis or therapy on their animals. The work was carried out in rural areas of the island of Sardinia (Italy) by interviewing shepherds and filling questionnaires in order to record ethno-veterinary practices traditionally used for animal health care. Ethno-veterinary remedies traditionally utilised for treatments of small ruminants against ecto-and endo-parasites, gastrointestinal diseases, viral and bacterial diseases, wounds, sprains and bruises were identified. Non herbal remedies outnumbered the herbal ones, as usually plant species were mainly used for the care of cattle and equines. A total of 150 ethno-veterinary uses were documented for the treatment of 33 animal conditions, a detailed account of the formulations and their administration to sheep and goats was provided. Herbal remedies involved the use of twenty two spontaneous species and seven cultivated species. This study identifies remedies used in ethno-veterinary practices for small ruminants care in Sardinia, the second major Mediterranean island which has agro-pastoral activities dating back to Neolithic. Moreover, the danger of losing oral traditions, and the increasing attention towards traditional remedies as potential sources of natural products for improving animal health and welfare, support the interest of our survey. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Animal-based medicines used in ethnoveterinary practices in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil.

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    Souto, Wedson M S; Barboza, Raynner R D; Rocha, Michelle S P; Alves, Rômulo R N; Mourão, José S

    2012-09-01

    This work documents the zootherapeutic practices in Ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM) of Pedra Lavrada (6°45'S, 36°28'W), Northeastern Brazil. We interviewed 23 people (22 men and 1 woman), who provided information on animal species used as remedies, body parts used to prepare the remedies, and illnesses for which the remedies were prescribed. We calculated the use-value to determine the most important species. Interviewees cited 11 animal taxa. The main species mentioned were ram - Ovis aries (UV=0.89), crab-eating fox - Cerdocyon thous (UV=0.79), common green iguana - Iguana iguana (UV=0.79), and South American rattlesnake - Caudisona durissa (Linnaeus, 1758) (UV=0.74). The most frequently cited treatments concerned to inflammatory and dermatological ailments or conditions, as well as to obstetric disorders. Similar to other studies, local ethnoveterinary establishes connections with human ethnomedicine. The results suggest that similarities in the repertoire of medicinal resources chosen by local residents reflect the local accessibility/availability of the resources. Our results help to preserve ethnoveterinary knowledge, which is important in enhancing our understanding on the relationship among humans, society and nature, and also to elaborate more effective strategies for conserving natural resources. Other studies for scientific validation of the effects and side effects of these zootherapeutic products are needed before they can be recommended or not for use.

  7. The Use of Herbal Drugs in Organic Animal Production: The Case of Ethnoveterinary Medicine in Central Anatolia Region

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    Çağrı Çağlar Sinmez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic animal production is a natural breeding system in which animal health is protected by giving priority to alternative medicines and treatment as needed by applying appropriate management and feeding methods based on the physiological requirements of animals. Increasing numbers of strains resistant to antibiotics and antiparasitic drugs used in animal breeding have brought about the search for alternative herbal remedies that lead to drug residues in animal products and lead to important health problems in people consuming these products. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic and protective effects of herbal drugs used in organic animal production in ethnoveterinary medicine in the Central Anatolia Region. The material of the study collected as written and declared facts as well as visual data were obtained from animal breeders in the Central Anatolia Region. The results indicated that 30 herbal drugs were used for the treatment of internal diseases, surgical diseases, obstetric and gynecological problems and parasitic diseases in cattle, sheep, horse, poultry, bee, and dog species. Based on the evaluation of the facts that the use of all kinds of synthetic drugs, especially antibiotics, is prohibited or restricted in organic livestock, it can be said that natural herbal drugs instead of artificial substances will provide positive contributions in the protection and treatment of herd health.

  8. Animal-based medicines used in ethnoveterinary practices in the semi-arid region of Northeastern Brazil

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    Wedson M.S. Souto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work documents the zootherapeutic practices in Ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM of Pedra Lavrada (6°45'S, 36°28'W, Northeastern Brazil. We interviewed 23 people (22 men and 1 woman, who provided information on animal species used as remedies, body parts used to prepare the remedies, and illnesses for which the remedies were prescribed. We calculated the use-value to determine the most important species. Interviewees cited 11 animal taxa. The main species mentioned were ram - Ovis aries (UV=0.89, crab-eating fox - Cerdocyon thous (UV=0.79, common green iguana - Iguana iguana (UV=0.79, and South American rattlesnake - Caudisona durissa (Linnaeus, 1758 (UV=0.74. The most frequently cited treatments concerned to inflammatory and dermatological ailments or conditions, as well as to obstetric disorders. Similar to other studies, local ethnoveterinary establishes connections with human ethnomedicine. The results suggest that similarities in the repertoire of medicinal resources chosen by local residents reflect the local accessibility/availability of the resources. Our results help to preserve ethnoveterinary knowledge, which is important in enhancing our understanding on the relationship among humans, society and nature, and also to elaborate more effective strategies for conserving natural resources. Other studies for scientific validation of the effects and side effects of these zootherapeutic products are needed before they can be recommended or not for use.Este trabalho registra as práticas zooterapêuticas na medicina etnoveterinária no município de Pedra Lavrada, Nordeste do Brasil. Entrevistaram-se 23 pessoas (22 homens e uma mulher os quais forneceram informações sobre as espécies usadas como remédios, as partes do corpo usadas para preparar os remédios e as doenças tratadas. Calculou-se o Valor de Uso a fim de determinar quais espécies eram mais importantes. Os entrevistados reportaram 11 animais usados medicinalmente. As

  9. Documentation of Ethnoveterinary Practices for Mastitis in Dairy Animals in Pakistan

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    S. M. Raihan Dilshad, N. U. Rehman*, Nazir Ahmad and A. Iqbal1

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to document the ethnoveterinary practices (EVPs used for the control and treatment of mastitis in cattle and buffaloes in the Sargodha district, Pakistan. The information was collected using rapid and participatory rural appraisal techniques through interviews and focused group discussions with 217 traditional veterinary healers (TVHs over a period of 16 months from September 2005 to December 2006. Thus, 25 different plant species belonging to 20 different families were documented from the study area for the treatment and prophylaxis of mastitis in bovines (cattle and bubalines (dairy buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. The most frequently reported (≥10 times plant species were Capsicum annuum L. (n = 32, Lepidium sativum L. (n =31, Allium sativum L. (n = 28, Sesamum indicum L. (n = 24, Citrus limon (L. Burm. f (n = 22, Zingiber officinale Roscoe (n = 18, Citrullus colocynthis (L. Schrad (n = 18, Curcuma longa L. (n = 16, Cuminum cyminum L. (n = 14, Rosa indica L. (n = 13, Centratherum anthelmisticum L. (n = 12, Triticum aestivum L (n = 11, Nigella sativa L. (n = 11 and Peganum harmala L. (n = 11. All the documented plant species were indigenous to the study area. Materials other than plants used for the treatment of this problem included ammonium chloride. The richness of EVPs in the study area and extensive variation in the doses, methods of preparation, indications, and claims regarding efficacy of plants for mastitis merit controlled studies for their validation.

  10. Ethnoveterinary practices of Covasna County, Transylvania, Romania.

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    Bartha, Sámuel Gergely; Quave, Cassandra L; Balogh, Lajos; Papp, Nóra

    2015-05-06

    Ethnoveterinary medicine is a topic of growing interest among ethnobiologists, and is integral to the agricultural practices of many ethnic groups across the globe. The ethnoveterinary pharmacopoeia is often composed of ingredients available in the local environment, and may include plants, animals and minerals, or combinations thereof, for use in treating various ailments in reared animals. The aim of this study was to survey the current day ethnoveterinary practices of ethnic Hungarian (Székely) settlements situated in the Erdővidék commune (Covasna County, Transylvania, Romania) and to compare them with earlier works on this topic in Romania and other European countries. Data concerning ethnoveterinary practices were collected through semi-structured interviews and direct observation in 12 villages from 2010 to 2014. The cited plant species were collected, identified, dried and deposited in a herbarium. The use of other materials (e.g. animals, minerals and other substances) were also documented. Data were compared to earlier reports of ethnoveterinary knowledge in Transylvania and other European countries using various databases. In total, 26 wild and cultivated plants, 2 animals, and 17 other substances were documented to treat 11 ailments of cattle, horses, pigs, and sheep. The majority of applications were for the treatment of mastitis and skin ailments, while only a few data were reported for the treatment of cataracts, post-partum ailments and parasites. The traditional uses of Armoracia rusticana, Rumex spp., powdered sugar and glass were reported in each village. The use of some plant taxa, such as Allium sativum, Aristolochia clematitis, and Euphorbia amygdaloides was similar to earlier reports from other Transylvanian regions. Although permanent veterinary and medical services are available in some of the villages, elderly people preferred the use of wild and cultivated plants, animals and other materials in ethnoveterinary medicine. Some

  11. Wound healing in animal models: review article

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    Fariba Jaffary

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing and reduction of its recovery time is one of the most important issues in medicine. Wound is defined as disruption of anatomy and function of normal skin. This injury could be the result of physical elements such as  surgical incision, hit or pressure cut of the skin and gunshot wound. Chemical or caustic burn is another category of wound causes that can be induced by acid or base contact irritation. Healing is a process of cellular and extracellular matrix interactions that occur in the damaged tissue. Wound healing consists of several stages including hemostasis, inflammatory phase, proliferative phase and new tissue formation which reconstructs by new collagen formation. Wounds are divided into acute and chronic types based on their healing time. Acute wounds have sudden onset and in normal individuals usually have healing process of less than 4 weeks without any residual side effects. In contrast, chronic wounds have gradual onset. Their inflammatory phase is prolonged and the healing process is stopped due to some background factors like diabetes, ischemia or local pressure. If the healing process lasts more than 4 weeks it will be classified as chronic wound. Despite major advances in the treatment of wounds, still finding effective modalities for healing wounds in the shortest possible time with the fewest side effects is a current challenge. In this review different phases of wound healing and clinical types of wound such as venous leg ulcer, diabetic foot ulcer and pressure ulcer are discussed. Also acute wound models (i.e burn wounds or incisional wound and chronic wound models (such as venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcer, pressure ulcers or bedsore in laboratory animals are presented. This summary can be considered as a preliminary step to facilitate designing of more targeted and applied research in this area.

  12. An Experimental Animal Model for Abdominal Fascia Healing after Surgery

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    Burcharth, J; Pommergaard, H-C; Klein, M

    2013-01-01

    be used to evaluate the actively healing fascia. Such an animal model may promote future research in the prevention of IH. Methods: 86 male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to establish a model involving six experiments (experiments A-F). Mechanical testing of the breaking strength of the healed fascia......Background: Incisional hernia (IH) is a well-known complication after abdominal surgical procedures. The exact etiology of IH is still unknown even though many risk factors have been suggested. The aim of this study was to create an animal model of a weakly healed abdominal fascia that could...... was performed by testing tissue strips from the healed fascia versus the unincised control fascia 7 and 28 days postoperatively. Results: During the six experiments a healing model was created that produced significantly weaker coherent fascia when compared with the control tissue measured in terms...

  13. Ethnoveterinary plant remedies used by Nu people in NW Yunnan of China

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    Shen Shicai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nu people are the least populous ethnic group in Yunnan Province of China and most are distributed in Gongshan County, NW Yunnan. Animal production plays an important role in Nu livelihoods and the Nu people have abundant traditional knowledge of animal management and ethnoveterinary practices. This study documents the animal diseases, ethnoveterinary plant remedies and related traditional knowledge in three Nu villages of Gongshan County. Methods This study was carried out in three Nu villages of Gongshan County between July 2009 and February 2010. Data was obtained through the use of semi-structured questionnaires, field observation and PRA tools. A total of 60 Nu respondents (34 men and 26 women provided information on animal ailments and ethnoveterinary plant medicines used for Nu livestock production. Information on traditional ethnoveterinary medicine knowledge and choice of treatment providers was also obtained. Results Thirty-five animal conditions were identified in the surveyed area. The major and most common animal diseases among livestock were skin conditions, diarrhea, heat, fevers, colds, and parasites. Most ailments occurred between June and August. The ethnoveterinary medicinal use of 45 plant species was documented. Most medicinal species (86.7% were collected from the wild. The most frequently used plant parts were whole plants (35.6%, followed by roots (22.2%. The most important medicinal plant species were Saussurea costus (Falc. Lipech. (UV = 0.67, Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham.ex D.Don (UV = 0.67, Plantago depressa Willd. (UV = 0.63, Rubus corchorifolius L. f. (UV = 0.62, Bupleurum yunnanense Franch. (UV = 0.60, and Polygonum paleaceum Wall. (UV = 0.60. Animal diseases treated with the highest number of ethnoveterinary plant remedies were diarrhea (16 plant species, heat, fever, colds (11 plant species, retained afterbirth (11 plant species, and skin conditions and sores (11 plant species. Many Nu villagers

  14. Osteoporotic Animal Models of Bone Healing: Advantages and Pitfalls.

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    Calciolari, Elena; Donos, Nikolaos; Mardas, Nikos

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the advantages and pitfalls of the available osteoporotic animal models of bone healing. A thorough literature search was performed in MEDLINE via OVID and EMBASE to identify animal studies investigating the effect of experimental osteoporosis on bone healing and bone regeneration. The osteotomy model in the proximal tibia is the most popular osseous defect model to study the bone healing process in osteoporotic-like conditions, although other well-characterized models, such as the post-extraction model, might be taken into consideration by future studies. The regenerative potential of osteoporotic bone and its response to biomaterials/regenerative techniques has not been clarified yet, and the critical size defect model might be an appropriate tool to serve this purpose. Since an ideal animal model for simulating osteoporosis does not exist, the type of bone remodeling, the animal lifespan, the age of peak bone mass, and the economic and ethical implications should be considered in our selection process. Furthermore, the influence of animal species, sex, age, and strain on the outcome measurement should be taken into account. In order to make future studies meaningful, standardized international guidelines for osteoporotic animal models of bone healing need to be set up.

  15. An Ethnoveterinary Remedies Used in the Treatment of Diseases of Aksaray Malaklısı Shepherd Dogs*

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    SİNMEZ, Çağrı Çağlar; ASLIM, Gökhan

    2017-01-01

    The subjects of our study were to report the usage of herbal, animal and mineral remedies on Aksaray Malaklısı shepherd dogs from traditional ethnoveterinary medicine knowledge and to compare the remedies used in traditional veterinary medicine with those used in the other locations of Turkey and countries. The work was carried out in Aksaray province (Turkey) by interviewing dog breeders. Fifty participants provided the information in this paper on the ethnoveterinary remedies used for treat...

  16. Implant healing in experimental animal models of diabetes.

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    Le, Nga N; Rose, Michael B; Levinson, Howard; Klitzman, Bruce

    2011-05-01

    influence wound healing and infection in diabetic patients, to review research concerning diabetes and biomedical implants and device infection, and to critically analyze which diabetic animal model might be advantageous for assessing internal healing adjacent to implanted devices. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  17. Ethnoveterinary practices among sheep rearers in Ona-Ara Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Keywords: Ethnoveterinary medicine, Ethnoveterinary knowledge, Nigeria, Oyo State, Sheep. Received 14-10-2012 ... can be used to provide economical solutions to improve productivity of ... Other factors included road traffic accidents, theft.

  18. Botanical ethnoveterinary therapies in three districts of the Lesser Himalayas of Pakistan.

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    Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Khan, Shujaul Mulk; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Khan, Mir Ajab; Quave, Cassandra Leah; Pieroni, Andrea

    2013-12-20

    Ethnoveterinary knowledge is highly significant for persistence of traditional community-based approaches to veterinary care. This is of particular importance in the context of developing and emerging countries, where animal health (that of livestock, especially) is crucial to local economies and food security. The current survey documents the traditional veterinary uses of medicinal plants in the Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan. Data were collected through interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and by administering questionnaires. A total of 105 informants aged between 20-75 years old who were familiar with livestock health issues (i.e. farmers, shepherds, housewives and herbalists) participated in the study. A total of 89 botanical taxa, belonging to 46 families, were reported to have ethnoveterinary applications. The most quoted families were Poaceae (6 taxa), Fabaceae (6), Asteraceae (5), and Polygonaceae (5). Adhatoda vasica was the most cited species (43%), followed by Trachyspermum ammi (37%), and Zanthoxylum armatum var. armatum (36%). About 126 medications were recorded against more than 50 veterinary conditions grouped into seven categories. The highest cultural index values were recorded for Trachyspermum ammi, Curcuma longa, Melia azedarach, Zanthoxylum armatum var. armatum and Adhatoda vasica. The highest informant consensus factor was found for pathologies related to respiratory and reproductive disorders. Comparison with the local plant-based remedies used in human folk medicine revealed that many of remedies were used in similar ways in local human phytotherapy. Comparison with other field surveys conducted in surrounding areas demonstrated that approximately one-half of the recorded plants uses are novel to the ethnoveterinary literature of the Himalayas. The current survey shows a remarkable resilience of ethnoveterinary botanical knowledge in the study area. Most of the species reported for ethnoveterinary applications are wild and under

  19. Ethno-veterinary control of bovine dermatophilosis and ticks in Zhombe, Njelele and Shamrock resettlement in Zimbabwe.

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    Ndhlovu, Daud Nyosi; Masika, Patrick J

    2013-02-01

    A structured questionnaire survey was conducted to determine the ethno-veterinary practices and other control methods used by smallholder farmers for the management of bovine dermatophilosis and ticks. A total of 153 farmers were interviewed from Njelele, Zhombe communal and Shamrock resettlement areas. Crop production contributed most to livelihoods (83.2 %) while livestock contributed 9.0 %. Over 90 % of the respondents had attended school up to primary level, with 11.4 % undergoing animal health and husbandry training. Treatment of livestock diseases was practised by 96 % of the farmers, and 49.7 % of these farmers used ethno-veterinary medicines. Across the study sites, dermatophilosis was controlled using the following plants: Cissus quadrangularis (59.7 %), Catunaregam spinosa (10.5 %), Pterocarpus angolensis (10.5 %), Kalanchoe lanceolata (5.3 %), Aloe chabaudii (3.5 %), Cassia abbreviata (1.8 %), Dichrostachys cinerea (1.8 %), Urginea sanguinea (1.8 %), Ximenia caffra (1.8 %) and a plant locally called umfanawembila (1.8 %). Carica papaya and two plants, locally called mugimbura and umdungudungu, were used for tick control, and these were reported once from Njelele communal. Other control methods, besides plants or conventional drugs, were used by 28 % of the farmers for the treatment of dermatophilosis and ticks. Some farmers (14.4 %) claimed that ethno-veterinary medicines performed better than conventional drugs. The study revealed that farmers used ethno-veterinary medical practices for the treatment of dermatophilosis but rarely for tick control.

  20. Botanical ethnoveterinary therapies used by agro-pastoralists of Fafan zone, Eastern Ethiopia.

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    Feyera, Teka; Mekonnen, Endalkachew; Wakayo, Befekadu Urga; Assefa, Solomon

    2017-08-09

    In Ethiopia, plant based remedies are still the most important and sometimes the only source of therapeutics in the management of livestock diseases. However, documentation of this indigenous knowledge of therapeutic system still remains at a minimum level. The aim of this study was, thus, to document the traditional knowledge of botanical ethnoveterinary therapies in the agro-pastoral communities of Fafan Zone, Eastern Ethiopia. The study employed a cross-sectional participatory survey. Purposive sampling technique was applied to select key respondents with desired knowledge in traditional animal health care system. Data were gathered from a total of 24 (22 males and 2 females) ethnoveterinary practitioners and herbalists using an in-depth-interview complemented with group discussion and field observation. The current ethnobotanical survey indicated that botanical ethnoveterinary therapies are the mainstay of livestock health care system in the studied communities. A total of 49 medicinal plants belonging to 21 families, which are used by traditional healers and livestock raisers for the treatment of 29 types of livestock ailments/health problems, were identified in the study area. The major plant parts used were leaves (43%) followed by roots (35%). In most cases, traditional plant remedies were prepared by pounding the remedial plant part and mixing it with water at room temperature. The various types of identified medicinal plants and their application in ethnoveternary practice of Fafan zone agro pastoralists indicate the depth of indigenous knowledge in ethnobotanical therapy. The identified medicinal plants could be potentially useful for future phytochemical and pharmacological studies.

  1. Effect of animal products and extracts on wound healing promotion in topical applications: a review.

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    Napavichayanun, Supamas; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2017-06-01

    Wound healing is a natural process of body reaction to repair itself after injury. Nonetheless, many internal and external factors such as aging, comorbidity, stress, smoking, alcohol drinking, infections, malnutrition, or wound environment significantly affect the quality and speed of wound healing. The unsuitable conditions may delay wound healing process and cause chronic wound or scar formation. Therefore, many researches have attempted to search for agents that can accelerate wound healing with safety and biocompatibility to human body. Widely studied wound healing agents are those derived from either natural sources including plants and animals or chemical synthesis. The natural products seem to be safer and more biocompatible to human tissue. This review paper demonstrated various kinds of the animal-derived products including chitosan, collagen, honey, anabolic steroids, silk sericin, peptides, and proteoglycan in term of mechanisms of action, advantages, and disadvantages when applied as wound healing accelerator. The benefits of these animal-derived products are wound healing promotion, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial activity, moisturizing effect, biocompatibility, and safety. However, the drawbacks such as allergy, low stability, batch-to-batch variability, and high extraction and purification costs could not be avoided in some products.

  2. Scintigraphic follow-up of fracture healing in animals

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    Klug, W.; Franke, W.G.; Schulze, M.

    1983-08-01

    Secondary bone fracture healing was analysed by scintigraphic follow-up studies in rabbits using sup(99m)Tc-HEDP. 24 hours after fracture the activity ratio between the fractured and the non-fractured lower limb was 2,2. The maximal count density in the fracture region is found during the 14th and 28th day after fracture. Concomitantly there is a significant increase of bone marrow vessels and content of copper, magnesium, sodium and water in the callus. Although roentgenographic controls and static investigations with respect to consolidation reveal a complete healing already 126 days after fracture, the complete scintigraphic normalisation of the lower limb fracture of the rabbit is found not earlier than at the 203rd day after fracture.

  3. Healing Through States of Consciousness: Animal Sacrifice and Christian Prayer Among the Kachin in Southwest China.

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    Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Healing rituals can be understood in terms of configurations of two states of consciousness-a culturally elaborated everyday waking consciousness, and an enhanced and culturally elaborated state of consciousness. Two healing rituals performed by the ethnic Kachin in Southwest China differentiate these two states of consciousness in their theories of life and death. The first ritual, animal sacrifice, employs the ordinary consciousness, including will and expectation, of participants through the enhanced state of consciousness of the ritual officiant. The second, Christian prayer, utilizes the enhanced consciousness of Christian Congregation to achieve psychic transformation. These two rituals maneuver different configurations of the two states of consciousness in achieving healing efficacy.

  4. Ethnoveterinary survey of tradomedical importance of Bos taurus L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ethnoveterinary uses of B. taurus by-products by traditional practitioners in Nigeria and South Africa. Conclusion: There ... Moreover, there are over 60 species of bacteria, about 100 species ..... bioremediation of pharmaceutical, pesticides and.

  5. [Animal experiment study of anastomosis healing after partial resection of the pre-irradiated thoracic esophagus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, C; Nilles-Schendera, A; Frommhold, H

    2000-01-01

    Multimodal therapeutic concepts in cases of neoplasms of the intestinal tract entail the risk of undesirable complications with respect to healing of wounds and anastomoses. The separate steps of a combined treatment consisting radiation therapy and partial resection of the thoracic esophagus were performed in animal experiments to study the effect of radiation therapy on the healing of anastomoses. Adult non-purebred dogs were irradiated in a defined thoracic field with a Betatron (42 MeV) and subsequently underwent esophagectomy. After resection of a 2 cm segment of the esophagus end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Different methods of irradiation and postoperative observation times resulted in a total of 8 groups of 3 animals each. Fractionated irradiation was definitely better tolerated than irradiation with a high single doses. The temporary delay of the anastomotic healing was documented histologically. Only one case of anastomotic leakage occurred, and impaired wound healing was observed in only one animal. The mode of irradiation must be regarded as important for the clinical course. Fractionated preoperative irradiation in the area of the thoracic esophagus does not lead to any relevant disturbance of wound and anastomotic healing with meticulous surgical technique and adequate intensive postoperative care. The basic feasibility of surgical therapy combined with preoperative radiotherapy in tumors of the upper digestive tract was confirmed by our experimental work.

  6. [Healing of a deep skin wound using a collagen sponge as dressing in the animal experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlarik, K M; Schoots, C; Oosterbaan, J A; Klopper, J P

    1992-10-01

    The high number of available wound dressing materials as well as the scientific reports about the topic indicates that the problem of an ideal wound dressing is not jet solved. In the last thirty years lot of scientific reports about collagen as wound covering has been published. The positive effect of collagen by his application on a wound ist well known. We investigated the effect of a collagen sponge on healing of full thickness skin wound in guinea pig. The animals were divided in two control groups and two experimental groups. In the control group there were air exposed wounds and another wounds covered with paraffin gauze. In the experimental groups were such wounds covered with natural reconstituted collagen sponge as well as wounds covered with chemically prepared collagen sponge with hexamethyldiisocyanat. The results were compared. The air exposed wounds healed in 50 days, the wounds covered with paraffin gauze healed in 48 days. By covering the wounds with collagen sponge the healing was shortened in 24 or 27 days respectively. Not only the healing time was shortened but also the quality of the wound repair by dressing the wounds with collagen sponge was enhanced.

  7. Ethnoveterinary plants for the treatment of camels in Shiwalik regions of Kathua district of Jammu & Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; Manhas, R K

    2015-07-01

    Camel is an important mode of transportation in the hot and hilly tracts of Shiwaliks of Kathua districts. The camel owners of the region lack the modern veterinary facilities and therefore depend heavily upon local treatments for the animal. This ethnoveterinary knowledge of plants is acquired by them from their forefathers and generally moves from one generation to another orally. The oral mode of transferring this valuable knowledge is vulnerable to erosion with the passage of time and generations. Ethnoveterinary information was collected by interviewing 38 camel keepers and traditional healers as per the questionnaire. The data collected was analysed quantitatively using three indices viz. use-value (UV), informant consensus factor (ICF), and fidelity level (Fl %). A total of 41 plants were found to be of ethnoveterinary importance in the present study. Herbs and trees (41.5% each) were the most used life forms. The most used plant part was fruit (27.9%). Rhizome, root and whole plant parts collectively contributed to 18.6%. Most of the ethnoveterinary practices (65.9%) used oral mode of medication. The values of UV and Fl (%) shows that the most important species for curing the ailing camels were Curcuma longa, Trachyspermum ammi, Brassica campestris, Tamarindus indica, Phyllanthus emblica, Cassia fistula, Eruca sativa, Plumbago zeylanica etc. The high values of ICF (0.91-0.99) show that the informants share the knowledge for the treatment of camels amongst themselves on regular basis. A good number of plants are utilised by the informants to cure camels. Most of the preparations used fruits and leaves. Only 18.6% of the practices required destructive collection and such species need sustainable use and conservation. Some of the species like Tamarindus indica, Cassia fistula, Eruca sativa, Albizia lebbeck and Citrus medica require further phytochemical and pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of laser irradiation for healing of the skin-muscle wounds of animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapina, Victoria A.; Veremei, Eduard I.; Pancovets, Evgeniy A.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to study the medical effect of low-intensity laser influence on healing of skin- muscle wounds of agricultural animals. We used the laser radiation of low intensity for cub's therapy: to sucking-pigs after herniotomy and castration, to cattle cubs after skin- muscle wounds. The animals were kept under clinical observation up to their recovery. The recuperation dynamic was observed by changing of blood quotients, leukograms, sizes of inflammatory edema, general behavior of animals. The positive dynamic of blood quotients of the experimental animal groups was really higher than that in control. The analysis of wound healing after laser influence shows that wound surface of experimental group was to a great extent smaller in comparison with control group of animals. So, these facts testify about anti-inflammatory action of laser radiation, which hastens regenerative and rehabilitative processes. Analysis of the obtained experimental data has revealed the positive influence of laser irradiation on the dynamics of wound adhesion of agricultural animals.

  9. Do bisphosphonates inhibit direct fracture healing?: A laboratory investigation using an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaridas, T; Wallace, R J; Salter, D M; Simpson, A H R W

    2013-09-01

    Fracture repair occurs by two broad mechanisms: direct healing, and indirect healing with callus formation. The effects of bisphosphonates on fracture repair have been assessed only in models of indirect fracture healing. A rodent model of rigid compression plate fixation of a standardised tibial osteotomy was used. Ten skeletally mature Sprague-Dawley rats received daily subcutaneous injections of 1 µg/kg ibandronate (IBAN) and ten control rats received saline (control). Three weeks later a tibial osteotomy was rigidly fixed with compression plating. Six weeks later the animals were killed. Fracture repair was assessed with mechanical testing, radiographs and histology. The mean stress at failure in a four-point bending test was significantly lower in the IBAN group compared with controls (8.69 Nmm(-2) (sd 7.63) vs 24.65 Nmm(-2) (sd 6.15); p = 0.017). On contact radiographs of the extricated tibiae the mean bone density assessment at the osteotomy site was lower in the IBAN group than in controls (3.7 mmAl (sd 0.75) vs 4.6 mmAl (sd 0.57); p = 0.01). In addition, histological analysis revealed progression to fracture union in the controls but impaired fracture healing in the IBAN group, with predominantly cartilage-like and undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue (p = 0.007). Bisphosphonate treatment in a therapeutic dose, as used for risk reduction in fragility fractures, had an inhibitory effect on direct fracture healing. We propose that bisphosphonate therapy not be commenced until after the fracture has united if the fracture has been rigidly fixed and is undergoing direct osteonal healing.

  10. Cross-Cultural Analysis of Medicinal Plants commonly used in Ethnoveterinary Practices at South Waziristan Agency and Bajaur Agency, Federally Administrated Tribal Areas (FATA), Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Muhammad Abdul; Adnan, Muhammad; Khan, Amir Hasan; Sufyan, Muhammad; Khan, Shahid Niaz

    2018-01-10

    In remote areas, medicinal plants have an imperative role in curing various livestock's ailments. In Pakistan, people residing in remote areas including South Waziristan Agency and Bajaur Agency depend on traditional herbal remedies for treating their domestic animals. Medicinal plants are an important part of the medical system in these Agencies. The prime goal of the current study is to explore the ethnoveterinary practices in the two regions and discuss cross-cultural consensus on the use of medicinal plants. In this study, we have given detailed description on the ethnoveterinary usage of certain medicinal plants and their recipes. Moreover, we have also elaborated the ethnoveterinary potential of certain plants in relation to their ethnomedicinal, pharmacological and phytochemicals reports. Fieldwork comprised of two fields surveys conducted at South Waziristan Agency and Bajaur Agency. A total of 75 informants from South Waziristan Agency and 80 informants from Bajaur Agency were interviewed with the help of semi-structured questionnaires. Use reports (URs) were recorded for all the documented taxa. Data were quantitatively analyzed by using informant consensus factor (F ic ) index in order to find out information homogeneity provided by the informants. To analyze the cross-cultural consensus, the recorded data were tabulated as well as shown by Venn diagram. Overall, 94 medicinal plant taxa were recorded in the comparative analysis. Out of these, most of the plants species (72 species) were used at Bajaur Agency than South Waziristan Agency (37 species). Cross-cultural analysis showed that only 15 medicinal plants were used in common by the indigenous communities in both Agencies, which indicates a low interregional consensus with regard to the ethnoveterinary practices of medicinal plants. Apiaceae was the dominant family in both regions by representing maximum number of plant species (11 species). Gastro intestinal complexities were common in both regions

  11. Ethnoveterinary Application of Morinda Citrifolia Fruit Puree on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethnoveterinary Application of Morinda Citrifolia Fruit Puree on a Commercial Heifer Rearing Facility with Endemic Salmonellosis. VJ Brooks, TJ De Wolfe, TJ Paulus, J Xu, J Cai, NS Keuler, RG Godbee, SF Peek, SM McGuirk, BJ Dariena ...

  12. Ethno-veterinary practices amongst livestock farmers in Ngamiland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the intervention of conventional veterinary medicine is pervasive in Toteng, and many livestock owners are resorting to it, there is evidence, however, of generalized ethno-veterinary knowledge used to treat and prevent livestock diseases. Local farmers and their herders in Ngamiland are not only knowledgeable ...

  13. Review of animal models used to study effects of bee products on wound healing: findings and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananeh Wael M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-healing wounds are associated with high morbidity and might greatly impact a patient’s well-being and economic status. For many years, scientific research has focused on developing and testing several natural and synthetic materials that enhance the rate of wound healing or eliminate healing complications. Honey has been used for thousands of years as a traditional remedy for many ailments. Recently, honey has reemerged as a promising wound care product especially for infected wounds and for wounds in diabetic patients. In addition to its proposed potent broad-spectrum antibacterial properties, honey has been claimed to promote wound healing by reducing wound hyperaemia, oedema, and exudate, and by stimulating angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation and epithelialisation. Several animal models, including large animals, dogs and cats, and different species of laboratory animals have been used to investigate the efficacy and safety of various natural and synthetic agents for wound healing enhancement. Interpreting the results obtained by these studies is, however, rather difficult and usually hampered by many limiting factors including great variation in types and origins of honey, the type of animal species used as models, the type of wounds, the number of animals, the number and type of controls, and variation in treatment protocols. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the most recent findings and applications of published experimental and clinical trials using honey as an agent for wound healing enhancement in different animal models.

  14. Ethnoveterinary health management practices using medicinal plants in South Asia - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suroowan, Shanoo; Javeed, Faisal; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad; Noor, Mehwish Jamil; Kayani, Sadaf; Javed, Ali; Mahomoodally, Mohamad Fawzi

    2017-06-01

    Animal rearing is the major occupation of most population of South Asian countries. Due to lack of resources and limited approach to modern medicine, most of the livestock raisers prefer to use plant-based traditional medicine also referred to as ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM). Indeed, the use of medicinal plants in South Asia dates back to several centuries with documented evidences. However, there is currently a dearth of documentation and compilation of use of medicinal plants for animal diseases in this part of the world. This review aims to provide an up-to-date compilation of common medicinal plants used for the treatment and/or management of common animal diseases in South Asian countries. Extensive literature search was conducted online and relevant data was retrieved from well-known scientific databases. A total of 276 plants belonging to 95 families have been documented to be in common use for managing 14 different categories of animal diseases. Solanaceae, Lamiaceae, Fabaceae, and Leguminosae were most common plant families in terms of their plant species used for EVM. Gastric diseases were commonly reported and accounted for 72 species of plants used for its treatment followed by the miscellaneous disorders category and skin diseases comprising of 65 and 39 plant species respectively. Herbs accounted for 46% of the total plant species, followed by trees (33%), and shrubs (18%). The EVM were applied through different routes of administration; oral administration accounted for 72% followed by topical application 27%, while burning of plant parts to create smoke around animals to repel insects was less common (1%). It is anticipated that the present review will stimulate further ethnoveterinary research among livestock disease management practices in South Asia.

  15. [Investigation of the healing process of invaginated anastomoses in animal experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szücs, Géza; Barna, Tibor; Tóth, Imre; Bráth, Endre; Gyáni, Károly; Incze, Dénes; Mikó, Irén

    2003-04-01

    The telescopic anastomosis technique is not frequently used method, but its history could have been followed in the surgical literature since the beginning of the XXth century. Authors can use this technique successfully in their clinical practice performing esophago-gastrostomies, esophago-jejunostomies and ileo-colostomies. They would like to show the healing process of these kind of anastomoses in experimental work, using animal subjects, as data regarding this aspect is not found in the literature. The healing process of esophago-gastrostomies, and ileo-colostomies performed on dogs have been examined. 1. The invaginated esophageal or ileal segment (up to 30 mm length of submerged part) has not suffered from ischaemic damage. 2. The invaginated esophageal or ileal segment has been covered by the mucosa of the stomach or colon. 3. The physical strength of the anastomosis has arised gradually based this on the measured bursting pressure values. 4. The quality of the healing process has not depended on the length of the invaginated esophageal or ileal segment (up to 30 mm length of submerged part).

  16. Effect of intraoperative PEEP application on colonic anastomoses healing: An experimental animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoglu, Mehmet; Bostancı, Erdal Birol; Bilgili, Hasan; Türkoğlu, Yıldız; Karadeniz, Ümit; Aydoğ, Gülden; Erçin, Uğur; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Özer, İlter; Akoğlu, Musa

    2015-07-27

    This study aimed to assess the effect of intraoperative PEEP intervention on the healing of colonic anastomoses in rabbits. Thirty-two New Zealand type male rabbits were divided into two groups of sixteen animals each. Following ventilation with tracheostomy, colonic resection and anastomosis were performed in both groups. While 10 cm H2O PEEP level was applied in Group I (PEEP), Group II (ZEEP) was ventilated without PEEP throughout the surgery. Half of the both PEEP and ZEEP group animals were killed on the third postoperative day, while the remaining half on the seventh. Anastomotic bursting pressures, the tissue concentrations in hydroxyproline, and histological assessments were performed. Besides, intraoperative oxygen saturation and postoperative arterial blood gas parameters were also compared. On the first postoperative day, both arterial oxygen tension (PO2) and oxygen saturation (SO2) in the PEEP group were significantly higher than in the ZEEP group. On the seventh postoperative day, the bursting pressures of the anastomoses were significantly higher in the PEEP group, however the hydroxyproline content was significantly lower in the PEEP group than that in the ZEEP group. At day 7, PEEP group was significantly associated with increased neoangiogenesis compared with the ZEEP group. The anastomotic healing process is positively influenced by the intraoperative PEEP application.

  17. The Effect of PRGF on Healing of Clamp-Induced Tendinopathy in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Diliçıkık

    2018-04-01

    Material and Methods: A preliminary study was designed to obtain more apparent tendinopathy changes in the subculture. Histopathologically, second level compression with a clamp for 1 minute followed by releasing for 3 minutes applying the same mechanical stimulus procedure for four times, was defined as the optimal compression mode for the most optimal damage in terms of tendinopathy. Thirty-four female Sprague Downey type rats were divided into five separate groups and clamped tendon damage was formed on unilateral (left Acchilles tendons. The first group was a control group (Kontrol: CN; in the second group tissue specimens were taken from the rats immediately after being clamped (K-0; from the group 3, tissue samples were taken 1 week after clamping (K-7. Immediately after the tendinopathy model was applied to the animals in the fourth group (PRGF, the PRGF injection was performed to the subjects from the blood that was obtained from the control group, while an isotonic saline solution was injected into the subjects in the fifth group (SF, and tissue samples from both groups were obtained 1 week after. Results: The samples were examined by means of a transmission electron microscope. In the K-0 group among the collagenous fibers, vacuoles are observed in the cytoplasm of the edematous areas and fibrocytes, and in comparison, with K-7 and SF group there was a significant increase in fibroblast and collagen fiber synthesis in the PRGF-treated group. Furthermore, fibroblast and new collagen synthesis were observed to be increased in K-7 and SF groups. An intense increase in organelle levels was observed in PRGF group fibroblasts. Conclusion: This data suggests that PRGF may provide a better healing response in tendons with limited healing and circulation, which enhances the activation in the cells at the beginning of the healing process.

  18. Ethnoveterinary treatments by dromedary camel herders in the Suleiman Mountainous Region in Pakistan: an observation and questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziq, Abdul; de Verdier, Kerstin; Younas, Muhammad

    2010-06-21

    The Suleiman mountainous region is an important cradle of animal domestication and the habitat of many indigenous livestock breeds. The dromedary camel is a highly appreciated and valued animal and represents an important genetic resource. Camel herders, living in remote areas, have developed their own ways to treat diseases in camels, based on a long time of experience. Information about the diseases and the ethnoveterinary practices performed was collected from a total of 90 herders and healers by interviews and participant observations. The respondents classified the diseased in major and minor fractions. Clinical signs were given in detail. Mange followed by trypanosomosis and orf were considered the most prevalent diseases, and also caused the greatest economic losses. Orf was regarded the most complex disease. The season was considered to have great influence on the occurrence of the diseases. A variety of different treatments were described, such as medicinal plants, cauterization, odorant/fly repellents, pesticides, larvicides, cold drink, yogurt and supportive therapy (hot food, hot drink). There is paramount need to document and validate the indigenous knowledge about animal agriculture in general and ethnoveterinary practices in particular. This knowledge is rapidly disappearing and represents a cultural heritage as well as a valuable resource for attaining food security and sovereignty.

  19. Documentation of ethnoveterinary practices used in family poultry in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cassius Moreki

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To document the use of indigenous plants used by family poultry rearers to treat and control diseases and parasites in 15 villages of Botswana. Materials and Methods: A total of 1000 family poultry rearers in 15 villages were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Data were also collected through direct observation, village walks, interview of passers-by, group interviews, and meetings with key informants (i.e., traditional leaders, extension agents and chairpersons of village development committees. Results: The ethnoveterinary practices in 15 villages of Botswana were identified and documented. Nineteen plant species representing 15 families were used by family poultry rearers to treat and control poultry diseases and parasites. Most frequently used plants were from Fabaceae, Asteraceae and Liliaceae. Both human and veterinary medications (e.g., vicks, disprin and Compral tablets, blue stones, potassium permanganate, veterinary drugs and vaccines were used in health management. Sixty-six percent of the respondents said they used traditional remedies to control and treat diseases, 19% did not use vaccines or remedies, 2% used vaccines while 13% used drugs to control and treat diseases. Conclusions: Ethnoveterinary medicine predominates in family poultry healthcare. Scientific investigations should be carried out to ascertain the effectiveness of identified plant species used in health management of family poultry. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 18-21

  20. Scintigraphic control of bone-fracture healing under ultrasonic stimulation: An animal experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, W.; Franke, W.G.; Knoch, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    In a model of closed lower-leg fracture in rabbits and of secondary bone-fracture healing, scintigraphic control until biological healing was performed. Biological fracture healing was assumed for a region of interest (ROI)-activity ratio close to 1.0. After application of sup(99m)Tc-HEDP, 151 examinations were performed. ROI activity increased significantly until day 14 p.i. and reached the maximum value (Q=6.44) on day 14 postfracture. Sixty-one lower leg fractures were treated by ultrasound from days 14-28 postfractures. These stimulated fractures were biologically healed on day 168 postfracture. The fractures that were not treated by ultrasound could not be detected by scanning after day 203 postfracture. (orig.)

  1. Ethnoveterinary practices and Potential Herbal Materials for the Treatment of Ticks in North Gondar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achenef Melaku

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Ticks are obligate blood feeding ectoparasites of vertebrates and induce huge production loss in livestock industry and creating serious public health problems in the world. This study was conducted to explore ethnoveterinary practices that are performed by livestock owners to control tick infestation in some districts of North Gondar, Ethiopia and to identify potential herbal materials used to control tick infestation in livestock. Materials and methods: Three districts of the zone were selected from each agroecological zones. The data were collected using semi-structured questionnaire and field observation. Sixty randomly selected livestock owners were used as the source of information. Results: Tick infestation is prevalent in all districts. Loss of body condition, disease transmission and damage on the skin were most commonly mentioned effects of tick infestation on the animals. The most commonly used tick control methods were use of acaricides and manual removal, however, use of herbs, washing with soap and cutting with sharp materials were also mentioned by respondents. Nine potential medicinal plants were identified that could be used to kill or repel ticks. Conclusion: Tick infestation is the problem in the districts. Livestock owners use different techniques to remove tick from the animals and their effectiveness has to be evaluated. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 85-90

  2. The Healing Species: Animal-Assisted Character Education for Improving Student Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda J. Pearson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Healing Species program aims to reduce disruptive behaviors at school by increasing students’ abilities to avoid conflict when possible and to resolve conflicts peaceably when they occur. The program’s 11 lessons incorporate elements of behavior theory that postulate behavior follows belief. This study hypothesized that 5th and 6th grade students who completed the Healing Species curriculum would show fewer normative beliefs favoring aggression, greater empathy, and fewer disciplinary infractions, than a comparable group of students who did not receive the Healing Species program. Lessons included the participation of rescued dogs to emphasize compassion, empathy, responsibility, and forgiveness. Study results offered evidence of improved overall behavior and specific reductions in violence and aggression.

  3. Ethnoveterinary importance of herbal galactogogues - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mohanty

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Galactogogues elicit pharmacological effects, resulting in increased prolactin concentration through interactions with dopamine receptors and thereby augmenting milk supply. Commercially available synthetic drugs induce adverse effect on the neuro-endocrine axis of lactation physiology. Their prolonged uses have caused toxicity which opens a detrimental platform to normal health status of both human and animals. So the researchers have developed a keen interest in traditional herbs, because these are easily available, cheap and with a hope that they may not leave any toxic residues in milk. Phyto-pharmacological research on natural products can contribute for the discovery of new active compounds with novel structures which may serve as a lead for the development of new galactogogues. Although majority of these herbal preparations have not been evaluated their traditional use suggests that they are safe and effective. The purpose of this review paper was to succinctly review recent progress made in the field of commercially available and tranditional galactogogues.

  4. Wound healing with PRGF infiltration in CO(2) laser lesions of the tongue: an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; López-Jornet, Pía; Jiménez-Torres, María José; Orduña-Domingo, Albina

    2009-06-01

    This study was done of the effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on the healing of tongue wounds induced by the CO(2) laser. A prospective blind study was made of 60 Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups after the creation of tongue lesions using the CO(2) laser. Nothing was applied to the resulting wounds in the first group, while PRGF was applied to the 30 wounds in the second group. Wound re-epithelialization and inflammation were measured after 7, 14, and 28 d. No significant differences were seen between the two groups in relation to wound re-epithelialization, and the group without PRGF actually showed significantly better resolution of the inflammatory process after 14 d (p = 0.036). After 28 d, the rat tongue wounds produced by the CO(2) laser showed complete healing, independently of PRGF application.

  5. Wound healing in cell studies and animal model experiments by low level laser therapy; Were clinical studies justified? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas, C.; Criens-Poublon, L. J.; Cockrell, C. T.; de Haan, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    Based on results of cell studies and animal experiments, clinical trials with Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) were performed, which finally did not demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcome of wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the evidence from cell studies and animal

  6. Efficacy of a collagen-based dressing in an animal model of delayed wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Y; Le Broc, D; Ségalen, C; Kurkdjian, E; Gouze, J N

    2016-07-02

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo the efficacy of GBT013, a collagen-based dressing, for the treatment of chronic wounds, in a db/db mouse model of diabetes. Macroscopic and histologic analyses of db/db mice wound healing with GBT013 or saline gauze were assessed. The mRNA expression and the proliferation of dermal fibroblast were investigated. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 activities were quantified. In db/db mice, GBT013 improves wound epithelialisation when compared with saline gauze. Histological analysis of scar tissue also shows an enhancement of remodelling associated with no sign of acute inflammation. In addition, GBT013 significantly decreases interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, significantly increases tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 fibroblast mRNA expression and significantly reduces in vitro MMP-2 and MMP-9 enzymatic activities. Moreover, GBT013 allows cell growth inside the matrix and stimulates proliferation of human dermal fibroblast. By contributing to restore MMPs/TIMPs balance, GBT013 may function in all key stages of wound healing, such as inflammation, proliferation and tissue remodelling, and ultimately may provide a favourable environment for skin repair. This work was supported by Genbiotech, the R&D subsidiary of Laboratoires Genévrier, a pharmaceutical company.

  7. Pulsed ultrasounds accelerate healing of rib fractures in an experimental animal model: an effective new thoracic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Clavo, Bernardino; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro; Rivero, José C; Travieso, María M; Fiuza, María D; Villar, Jesús; García-Castellano, José M; Hernández-Pérez, Octavio; Déniz, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Rib fractures are a frequent traumatic injury associated with a relatively high morbidity. Currently, the treatment of rib fractures is symptomatic. Since it has been reported that pulsed ultrasounds accelerates repair of limb fractures, we hypothesized that the application of pulsed ultrasounds will modify the course of healing in an animal model of rib fracture. We studied 136 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were randomly assigned to different groups of doses (none, 50, 100, and 250 mW/cm(2) of intensity for 3 minutes per day) and durations (2, 10, 20, and 28 days) of treatment with pulsed ultrasounds. In every subgroup, we analyzed radiologic and histologic changes in the bone callus. In addition, we examined changes in gene expression of relevant genes involved in wound repair in both control and treated animals. Histologic and radiologic consolidation was significantly increased by pulsed ultrasound treatment when applied for more than 10 days. The application of 50 mW/cm(2) was the most effective dose. Only the 100 and 250 mW/cm(2) doses were able to significantly increase messenger RNA expression of insulin-like growth factor 1, suppressor of cytokine signaling-2 and -3, and vascular endothelial growth factor and decrease monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and collagen type II-alpha 1. Our findings indicate that pulsed ultrasound accelerates the consolidation of rib fractures. This study is the first to show that pulsed ultrasound promotes the healing of rib fractures. From a translational point of view, this easy, cheap technique could serve as an effective new therapeutic modality in patients with rib fractures. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of wound healing properties of bioactive aqueous fraction from Moringa oleifera Lam on experimentally induced diabetic animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Abubakar Amali; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Cheah, Pike See; Abas, Farida; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication of diabetes, which affects a significant percentage (15%) of diabetics and up to 15%-24% of those affected may require amputation. Therefore, the economic burden of diabetic foot ulcers is enormous and is associated with high cost of treatment and prolongs hospitalization. The present study was conducted to evaluate antibacterial and in vivo wound healing activities of an aqueous fraction of Moringa oleifera on a diabetic condition. Antibacterial activity testing was carried out using agar well and tube dilution techniques. The in vivo study was conducted using six groups of animals that comprise of one normal and diabetic control group each, three treatment groups of 0.5%, 1%, and 2% w/w aqueous fraction, and a positive control group (1% w/w silver sulfadiazine). Rats were induced with diabetes using a combination of streptozotocin 65 and 150 mg/kg nicotinamide daily for 2 days, and excision wounds were created and treated with various doses (0.5%, 1%, and 2% w/w aqueous fraction) daily for 21 days. Biophysical, histological, and biochemical parameters were investigated. The results of the study revealed that aqueous fraction possessed antibacterial activity through inhibition of growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli organisms. The topical application of aqueous fraction revealed enhancement of wound healing under sustained hyperglycemic condition for the duration of the experiment. This enhancement was achieved through decreased wound size, improved wound contraction, and tissue regeneration, as well as downregulation of inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2, and upregulation of an angiogenic marker vascular endothelial growth factor in wound tissue treated with various doses of aqueous fraction of M. oleifera. The findings suggest that aqueous fraction of M. oleifera

  9. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Karla

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Results Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Petiveria alliacea, Renealmia alpinia, Justicia secunda, Phyllanthus urinaria,Phyllanthus niruri,Momordica charantia, Xiphidium caeruleum, Ottonia ovata, Lepianthes peltata, Capsicum frutescens, Costus scaber, Dendropanax arboreus, Siparuma guianensis, Syngonium podophyllum, Monstera dubia, Solanum species, Eclipta prostrata, Spiranthes acaulis, Croton gossypifolius, Barleria lupulina, Cola nitida, Acrocomia ierensis (tentative ID. Conclusion Plant use is based on odour, and plant morphological characteristics and is embedded in a complex cultural context based on indigenous Amerindian beliefs. It is suggested that the medicinal plants exerted a physiological action on the hunter or his dog. Some of the plants mentioned contain chemicals that may explain the ethnomedicinal and ethnoveterinary use. For instance some of the plants influence the immune system or are effective against internal and external parasites. Plant baths may contribute to the health and well being of the hunting dogs.

  10. Medicinal and ethnoveterinary remedies of hunters in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, C; Harper, T; Georges, K; Bridgewater, E

    2001-01-01

    Ethnomedicines are used by hunters for themselves and their hunting dogs in Trinidad. Plants are used for snakebites, scorpion stings, for injuries and mange of dogs and to facilitate hunting success. Plants used include Piper hispidum, Pithecelobium unguis-cati, Bauhinia excisa, Bauhinia cumanensis, Cecropia peltata, Aframomum melegueta, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Jatropha curcas, Jatropha gossypifolia, Nicotiana tabacum, Vernonia scorpioides, Petiveria alliacea, Renealmia alpinia, Justicia secunda, Phyllanthus urinaria,Phyllanthus niruri,Momordica charantia, Xiphidium caeruleum, Ottonia ovata, Lepianthes peltata, Capsicum frutescens, Costus scaber, Dendropanax arboreus, Siparuma guianensis, Syngonium podophyllum, Monstera dubia, Solanum species, Eclipta prostrata, Spiranthes acaulis, Croton gossypifolius, Barleria lupulina, Cola nitida, Acrocomia ierensis (tentative ID). Plant use is based on odour, and plant morphological characteristics and is embedded in a complex cultural context based on indigenous Amerindian beliefs. It is suggested that the medicinal plants exerted a physiological action on the hunter or his dog. Some of the plants mentioned contain chemicals that may explain the ethnomedicinal and ethnoveterinary use. For instance some of the plants influence the immune system or are effective against internal and external parasites. Plant baths may contribute to the health and well being of the hunting dogs.

  11. Human amniotic membrane, best healing accelerator, and the choice of bone induction for vestibuloplasty technique (an animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahad Khoshzaban

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad H Samandari1, Shahriar Adibi2, Ahad Khoshzaban3, Sara Aghazadeh5, Parviz Dihimi4, Siamak S Torbaghan6, Saeed H Keshel5, Zohreh Shahabi71Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dentistry Faculty, 2Dental Research of Torabinejad Research Centre, 3Iranian Tissue Bank Research and Preparation Centre, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dentistry Faculty, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; 5Stem Cells Preparation Unit, Eye Research Center, Farabi Hospital, 6Department of Pathology, Imam Khomeini Medical Centre, 7BMT Center, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranObjective: To investigate the effects of amniotic membrane (AM in bone induction and wound healing after vestibuloplasty surgery on animal samples while receptacle proteins such as growth factors were considered as accelerators for wound healing and bone induction after these operations.Material and methods: Ten adult dogs (5 females, 5 males; race, Iranian mixed; weight, 44 pounds were included, which underwent surgery for transplantation on mandible and maxillary. AM was used for promoting bone induction and healing.Results: The tissue samples were obtained after 2, 8, and 12 weeks for histology survey. No significant differences were observed between male and female or left and right jaws. AM decreased fibrinoleukocytic exudates and inflammation in the experimental group, had significant effects on bone formation, considerably improves wound healing, and gives rise to bone induction (P < 0.0001.Conclusions: Our study findings indicate that the AM is a suitable cover for different injuries and acellular AM has the potential for rapid improvement and bone induction. The AM contains collagen, laminin, and fibronectin, which provide an appropriate substrate for bone induction. This substrate promoted bone induction and might contribute to induction of the progenitor cells and/or stem

  12. Evaluation of wound healing properties of bioactive aqueous fraction from Moringa oleifera Lam on experimentally induced diabetic animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad AA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abubakar Amali Muhammad,1 Palanisamy Arulselvan,1 Cheah Pike See,2 Farida Abas,3 Sharida Fakurazi1,2 1Laboratory of Vaccine and Immunotherapeutics, Institute of Bioscience, 2Unit of Anatomy, Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 3Department of Food Science, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia Abstract: Diabetic foot ulcer is a serious complication of diabetes, which affects a significant percentage (15% of diabetics and up to 15%–24% of those affected may require amputation. Therefore, the economic burden of diabetic foot ulcers is enormous and is associated with high cost of treatment and prolongs hospitalization. The present study was conducted to evaluate antibacterial and in vivo wound healing activities of an aqueous fraction of Moringa oleifera on a diabetic condition. Antibacterial activity testing was carried out using agar well and tube dilution techniques. The in vivo study was conducted using six groups of animals that comprise of one normal and diabetic control group each, three treatment groups of 0.5%, 1%, and 2% w/w aqueous fraction, and a positive control group (1% w/w silver sulfadiazine. Rats were induced with diabetes using a combination of streptozotocin 65 and 150 mg/kg nicotinamide daily for 2 days, and excision wounds were created and treated with various doses (0.5%, 1%, and 2% w/w aqueous fraction daily for 21 days. Biophysical, histological, and biochemical parameters were investigated. The results of the study revealed that aqueous fraction possessed antibacterial activity through inhibition of growth of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli organisms. The topical application of aqueous fraction revealed enhancement of wound healing under sustained hyperglycemic condition for the duration of the experiment. This enhancement was achieved through decreased wound size, improved wound contraction, and tissue

  13. Healing war wounds and perfuming exile: the use of vegetal, animal, and mineral products for perfumes, cosmetics, and skin healing among Sahrawi refugees of Western Sahara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Gabriele; Kourková, Pavlína; Zelený, Václav

    2012-12-27

    Over the past decade, there has been growing interest within ethnobiology in the knowledge and practices of migrating people. Within this, scholars have given relatively less attention to displaced people and refugees: to the loss, maintenance, and adaptation of refugees' ethnobiological knowledge, and to its significance for refugees' wellbeing. This study focuses on cosmetics and remedies used to heal skin afflictions that are traditionally used by Sahrawi refugees displaced in South Western Algerian refugee camps. The research methods included a structured survey carried out with 37 refugee households, semi-structured interviews with 77 refugees, 24 retrospective interviews with refugees and other knowledgeable informants, and a voucher specimen collection of the plants and products cited. We recorded the use of 55 plant species, nine animal species, and six mineral products used within the three main use categories discussed in this paper: 1) Remedies for health issues that are typical of the desert environment where the Sahrawi once lived as nomads and now live as refugees (e.g. eye afflictions); 2) Remedies for wounds that are influenced by the Sahrawi's recent history of guerrilla warfare; and 3) Cosmetics and products used for body care, decoration and perfuming (e.g. hair care, teeth cleansing, henna use) and for aromatizing the air inside of tents and which are widely used in everyday life and social practices. We discuss the changes that have occurred in the patterns of use and procurement of these products with exile and sedentarization in refugee camps, and conclude that refugees are not simply passive recipients of national and international aid, but rather struggle to maintain and recover their traditional ethnobiological practices in exile. Finally, we suggest further research into the ethnobiological practices and knowledge of displaced populations.

  14. Lipid Emulsion Enriched in Omega-3 PUFA Accelerates Wound Healing: A Placebo-Controlled Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi-Chi; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Tien, Chin-Chieh; Chao, Yann-Fen C; Lee, Ru-Ping

    2018-06-01

    The Omega-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) generate bioactive lipid mediators that reduce inflammation. The present study evaluated the effect of SMOFlipid containing ω-3 PUFAs on wound healing. Rats were divided into a SMOFlipid (SMOF) group and a 0.9% saline (placebo) group, with eight rats in each group. Wound excision was performed on the dorsal surface of each rat. In the SMOF group, 1 gm/kg SMOFlipid was dissolved in 3 mL saline as a treatment; in the placebo group, 3 mL saline was prepared as a treatment. The treatments were administered intravenously at an initial rate of 0.2 mL/kg body weight/h immediately after wounding, for 72 h. Blood samples were collected for white blood cell, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 measurements at the baseline and at 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after intervention. Wound areas were measured over a 2-week period after excision, and a histological examination was performed. Compared with the placebo group, SMOFlipid supplementation engendered significant decreases in the wound area on day 3 (78.28 ± 5.25 vs. 105.86 ± 8.89%), day 5 (72.20 ± 4.31 vs. 96.39 ± 4.72%), day 10 (20.78 ± 1.28 vs. 39.80 ± 10.38%), and day 14 (7.56 ± 0.61 vs. 15.10 ± 2.42%). The placebo group had a higher TNF-α level than the SMOF group at 72 h. The IL-10 level was higher in the SMOF group than in the placebo group at 48 h. Histological analysis revealed a higher rate of fibroblast distribution and collagen fiber organization in the SMOF group (P = 0.01). SMOFlipid enriched in ω-3 PUFA accelerates wound healing.

  15. Perception of ethno-veterinary practices in selected villages in Ogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to examine perception of ethno-veterinary practices and information gathering among rural dwellers in selected villages in two local government areas (LGAs) of Ogun state, Nigeria. The aim was to assess the involvement of rural poultry farmers in the use of herbs as alternatives to antibiotics.

  16. Nature's Electric Potential: A Systematic Review of the Role of Bioelectricity in Wound Healing and Regenerative Processes in Animals, Humans, and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Sheena E B

    2017-01-01

    Natural endogenous voltage gradients not only predict and correlate with growth and development but also drive wound healing and regeneration processes. This review summarizes the existing literature for the nature, sources, and transmission of information-bearing bioelectric signals involved in controlling wound healing and regeneration in animals, humans, and plants. It emerges that some bioelectric characteristics occur ubiquitously in a range of animal and plant species. However, the limits of similarities are probed to give a realistic assessment of future areas to be explored. Major gaps remain in our knowledge of the mechanistic basis for these processes, on which regenerative therapies ultimately depend. In relation to this, it is concluded that the mapping of voltage patterns and the processes generating them is a promising future research focus, to probe three aspects: the role of wound/regeneration currents in relation to morphology; the role of endogenous flux changes in driving wound healing and regeneration; and the mapping of patterns in organisms of extreme longevity, in contrast with the aberrant voltage patterns underlying impaired healing, to inform interventions aimed at restoring them.

  17. Healing war wounds and perfuming exile: the use of vegetal, animal, and mineral products for perfumes, cosmetics, and skin healing among Sahrawi refugees of Western Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volpato Gabriele

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade, there has been growing interest within ethnobiology in the knowledge and practices of migrating people. Within this, scholars have given relatively less attention to displaced people and refugees: to the loss, maintenance, and adaptation of refugees’ ethnobiological knowledge, and to its significance for refugees’ wellbeing. This study focuses on cosmetics and remedies used to heal skin afflictions that are traditionally used by Sahrawi refugees displaced in South Western Algerian refugee camps. Methods The research methods included a structured survey carried out with 37 refugee households, semi-structured interviews with 77 refugees, 24 retrospective interviews with refugees and other knowledgeable informants, and a voucher specimen collection of the plants and products cited. Results We recorded the use of 55 plant species, nine animal species, and six mineral products used within the three main use categories discussed in this paper: 1 Remedies for health issues that are typical of the desert environment where the Sahrawi once lived as nomads and now live as refugees (e.g. eye afflictions; 2 Remedies for wounds that are influenced by the Sahrawi’s recent history of guerrilla warfare; and 3 Cosmetics and products used for body care, decoration and perfuming (e.g. hair care, teeth cleansing, henna use and for aromatizing the air inside of tents and which are widely used in everyday life and social practices. Conclusions We discuss the changes that have occurred in the patterns of use and procurement of these products with exile and sedentarization in refugee camps, and conclude that refugees are not simply passive recipients of national and international aid, but rather struggle to maintain and recover their traditional ethnobiological practices in exile. Finally, we suggest further research into the ethnobiological practices and knowledge of displaced populations. Resumen Sanando las heridas de

  18. Healing war wounds and perfuming exile: the use of vegetal, animal, and mineral products for perfumes, cosmetics, and skin healing among Sahrawi refugees of Western Sahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, there has been growing interest within ethnobiology in the knowledge and practices of migrating people. Within this, scholars have given relatively less attention to displaced people and refugees: to the loss, maintenance, and adaptation of refugees’ ethnobiological knowledge, and to its significance for refugees’ wellbeing. This study focuses on cosmetics and remedies used to heal skin afflictions that are traditionally used by Sahrawi refugees displaced in South Western Algerian refugee camps. Methods The research methods included a structured survey carried out with 37 refugee households, semi-structured interviews with 77 refugees, 24 retrospective interviews with refugees and other knowledgeable informants, and a voucher specimen collection of the plants and products cited. Results We recorded the use of 55 plant species, nine animal species, and six mineral products used within the three main use categories discussed in this paper: 1) Remedies for health issues that are typical of the desert environment where the Sahrawi once lived as nomads and now live as refugees (e.g. eye afflictions); 2) Remedies for wounds that are influenced by the Sahrawi’s recent history of guerrilla warfare; and 3) Cosmetics and products used for body care, decoration and perfuming (e.g. hair care, teeth cleansing, henna use) and for aromatizing the air inside of tents and which are widely used in everyday life and social practices. Conclusions We discuss the changes that have occurred in the patterns of use and procurement of these products with exile and sedentarization in refugee camps, and conclude that refugees are not simply passive recipients of national and international aid, but rather struggle to maintain and recover their traditional ethnobiological practices in exile. Finally, we suggest further research into the ethnobiological practices and knowledge of displaced populations. Resumen Sanando las heridas de guerra y perfumando el

  19. Use of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants in cattle by Setswana-speaking people in the Madikwe area of the North West Province of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Van der Merwe

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA methods were employed to document the use of ethnoveterinary medicinal plants in cattle by Setswana-speaking people in the Madikwe area of the North West Province of South Africa. The study indicated that Setswana-speaking people in the North West Province have a rich heritage of ethnoveterinary knowledge, which includes all aspects of ethnoveterinary medicinal plant use. Information was gathered from informants through individual interviews, group interviews, guided field walks and observations. Ethnoveterinary uses in cattle of 45 plant species representing 24 families were recorded. Plants were used in 84 % of the total number of recorded ethnoveterinary remedies. These plants were used alone (64 % or in mixtures (36 % for 29 indications. The most important indications were retained placenta, diarrhoea, gallsickness, fractures, eye inflammation, general ailments, fertility enhancement, general gastrointestinal problems, heartwater, internal parasites, coughing, redwater and reduction of tick burden. Plant materials were prepared in various ways including infusion, decoction, ground fresh material, sap expressed from fresh material, charred and dried. The most common dosage formwas a liquid for oral dosing. Other dosage forms included drops, licks, ointments, lotions and powders. Liquid remedies for oral dosing were always administered using a bottle. Medicinal plant material was preferably stored in a dried form in a cool place out of direct sunlight and wind. Lack of transfer of ethnoveterinary knowledge to younger generations puts this knowledge at risk. RRA was found to be a successful method of investigation for the study of ethnoveterinary medicine.

  20. Evaluation of Bone Healing After Osteotomies Prepared With Er:YAG Laser in Contact and Noncontact Modes and Piezosurgery--An Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrić, Dragana; Blašković, Marko; Gjorgijevska, Elizabeta; Mladenov, Mitko; Tašič, Blaž; Jurič, Ivona Bago; Ban, Ticijana

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the healing of bone tissue treated with Er:YAG laser contact and noncontact modes of and piezosurgery in a rat model using triangular laser profilometry. Twenty-four 10-week-old adult male Wistar rats were used in the study. Three osteotomies on the medial part of tibia were performed in each animal, 1 in the right tibia and 2 in the left tibia. The osteotomies were performed with a piezoelectric device set at maximal power and the Er:YAG laser in contact mode (power, 7.5 W; pulse energy, 375 mJ; repetition rate, 20 Hz; MSP mode) and noncontact mode (power, 7.5 W; pulse energy, 750 mJ; repetition rate, 10 Hz; QSP mode) with a novel type of circular, digitally controlled handpiece (x-Runner). After surgery, 6 animals were immediately euthanized (group 1), and the others were euthanized after 1 week (group 2, n = 6), 2 weeks (group 3, n = 6), and 3 weeks (group 4, n = 6). Bone healing after osteotomy was analyzed using a 3-dimensional laser scanning technique (ie, laser triangulation profilometry). The volume reduction rates are similar for all 3 techniques (0.2 to 0.25 mm(3) per week). Greater volume reduction of 0.25 mm3 per week was observed for the Er:YAG laser in noncontact mode (x-Runner). After 3 weeks, almost complete healing of the prepared osteotomy was observed. Within the limitations of this study, the osteotomies performed by the Er:YAG laser in digitally controlled noncontact mode healed the fastest. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Scintigraphic observation of the course of secondary fracture healing with and without ultrasonic stimulation in animal experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, W.; Franke, W.G.; Schulze, M.

    1986-01-01

    Secondary fracture healing was studied in the course of closed lower leg fractures in rabbit fracture models by /sup 99m/Tc scintiscanning. The ROI activity quotient increased significantly up to the maximum value, Q = 6.44 on the 14th day after fracture. 61 fractures of the lower leg were treated by ultrasonics from the 14th to the 28th day after fracture. These stimulated fractures showed a biologic healing already on the 168th day. Fractures untreated with ultrasonics could not be proved any more scintigraphically only after the 203rd day after fracture. (author)

  2. Role of Daptomycin on Burn Wound Healing in an Animal Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Oriana; Lucarini, Guendalina; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Ghiselli, Roberto; Provinciali, Mauro; Castelli, Pamela; Guerrieri, Mario; Di Primio, Roberto; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar

    2017-09-01

    Prolonged hospitalization and antibiotic therapy are risk factors for the development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in thermal burn patients. We used a rat model to study the in vivo efficacy of daptomycin in the treatment of burn wound infections by S. aureus , and we evaluated the wound healing process through morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. A copper bar heated in boiling water was applied on a paraspinal site of each rat, resulting in two full-thickness burns. A small gauze was placed over each burn and inoculated with 5 × 10 7 CFU of S. aureus ATCC 43300. The study included two uninfected control groups with and without daptomycin treatment, an infected control group that did not receive any treatment, and two infected groups treated, respectively, with intraperitoneal daptomycin and teicoplanin. The main outcome measures were quantitative culture, histological evaluation of tissue repair, and immunohistochemical expression of wound healing markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received daptomycin, which reduced the bacterial load from 10 7 CFU/ml to about 10 3 CFU/g ( P repair by possibly reducing hypertrophic burn scar formation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Ethnoveterinary uses of medicinal plants among traditional herbal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The people of far-flung rural areas still depend to a large extent upon plants and household remedies for curing veterinary ailments. ... The paper deals with 34 ailments commonly found in nine different categories of livestock/animals (i e. buffalo, cow, oxen, sheep, goat, horse, mule, dog and cat) and their treatment with 73 ...

  4. A survey of ethnoveterinary botanical remedies in Ogun State and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty four villages were visited during a cross sectional survey of ethno veterinary botanical remedies used for the management of animal diseases in four local government areas randomly selected cutting across the four geopolitical zones in Ogun State. A total of 323 households were purposively selected and ...

  5. Barking up the same tree: a comparison of ethnomedicine and canine ethnoveterinary medicine among the Aguaruna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernigan Kevin A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work focuses on plant-based preparations that the Aguaruna Jivaro of Peru give to hunting dogs. Many plants are considered to improve dogs' sense of smell or stimulate them to hunt better, while others treat common illnesses that prevent dogs from hunting. This work places canine ethnoveterinary medicine within the larger context of Aguaruna ethnomedicine, by testing the following hypotheses: H1 -- Plants that the Aguaruna use to treat dogs will be the same plants that they use to treat people and H2 -- Plants that are used to treat both people and dogs will be used for the same illnesses in both cases. Methods Structured interviews with nine key informants were carried out in 2007, in Aguaruna communities in the Peruvian department of Amazonas. Informants provided freelists of plants given to dogs and explained the purpose, preparation and route of administration used. For each plant, informants also described any uses for treating people. Botanical voucher specimens were collected and additional informal observations were made, accompanying people on hunting trips. Results Out of 35 plant species given to dogs, 29 (83% are also given to humans for some medicinal purpose, while five are used only for dogs. However, the same plant is used to treat the same illness in both humans and dogs in only 53% of the cases. Forty-three percent of plants used to treat a particular illness for both dogs and people are administered in the same manner for both. Conclusion Results suggest that Aguaruna canine ethnoveterinary medicine is, at least partly, an independent cognitive domain. Some of the difference in plant use between dogs and people can be explained by the fact that certain diseases mentioned only apply to dogs. Although reports of canine ethnoveterinary medicine are very sparse in the literature, Aguaruna practices show some similarities with a few trends reported for other Amazonian societies, particularly, in the

  6. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P.; Howard, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  7. Does footprint preparation influence tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Loitsch, Thomas; Serr, Michaela; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F; Niethammer, Thomas R; Müller, Hans-Helge; Milz, Stefan; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Müller, Peter E

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of footprint spongialization and radiofrequency ablation on rotator cuff repair outcomes compared with an untreated group in a rat model. We randomly assigned 189 Sprague-Dawley rats to either a spongialization, radiofrequency ablation, or untreated group. After separation of the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tubercle, the footprint was prepared by removing the cortical bone with a burr (spongialization), was prepared by ablating soft tissue with a radiofrequency ablation device, or was left unaltered (untreated). Biomechanical testing (after 7 weeks, n = 165) and histologic analysis after 1 and 7 weeks (n = 24) followed reinsertion. The mean load to failure was 17.51 ± 4.46 N/mm(2) in the spongialization group, 15.56 ± 4.85 N/mm(2) in the radiofrequency ablation group, and 19.21 ± 5.19 N/mm(2) in the untreated group. A significant difference was found between the spongialization and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0409), as well as between the untreated and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0014). There was no significant difference between the spongialization and untreated groups (P = .2456). The mean area of fibrocartilage transition, characterized by the presence of type II collagen, was larger after 1 and 7 weeks in the spongialization group (0.57 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.58 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) and untreated group (0.51 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.51 ± 0.2 mm(2), respectively) than in the radiofrequency ablation group (0.11 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.4 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) with P rotator cuff repair may influence tendon-to-bone healing. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Animator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  9. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  10. Different healing process of esophageal large mucosal defects by endoscopic mucosal dissection between with and without steroid injection in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Kouichi; Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Ban, Shinichi; Aikawa, Masayasu; Akimoto, Naoe; Koyama, Isamu; Kita, Hiroto

    2013-04-25

    Stricture formation is one of the major complications after endoscopic removal of large superficial squamous cell neoplasms of the esophagus, and local steroid injections have been adopted to prevent it. However, fundamental pathological alterations related to them have not been well analyzed so far. The aim of this study was to analyze the time course of the healing process of esophageal large mucosal defects resulting in stricture formation and its modification by local steroid injection, using an animal model. Esophageal circumferential mucosal defects were created by endoscopic mucosal dissection (ESD) for four pigs. One pig was sacrificed five minutes after the ESD, and other two pigs were followed-up on endoscopy and sacrificed at the time of one week and three weeks after the ESD, respectively. The remaining one pig was followed-up on endoscopy with five times of local steroid injection and sacrificed at the time of eight weeks after the ESD. The esophageal tissues of all pigs were subjected to pathological analyses. For the pigs without steroid injection, the esophageal stricture was completed around three weeks after the ESD on both endoscopy and esophagography. Histopathological examination of the esophageal tissues revealed that spindle-shaped α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive myofibroblasts arranged in a parallel fashion and extending horizontally were identified at the ulcer bed one week after the ESD, and increased contributing to formation of the stenotic luminal ridge covered with the regenerated epithelium three weeks after the ESD. The proper muscle layer of the stricture site was thinned with some myocytes which seemingly showed transition to the myofibroblast layer. By contrast, for the pig with steroid injection, esophageal stricture formation was not evident with limited appearance of the spindle-shaped myofibroblasts, instead, appearance of stellate or polygocal SMA-positive stromal cells arranged haphazardly in the persistent granulation

  11. ETHNO-VETERINARY MEDICINAL USAGE OF FLORA OF GREATER CHOLISTAN DESERT (PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRAZ M. KHAN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A study on the ethno-veterinary usage of wild medicinal plants of Greater Cholistan desert of Pakistan was conducted from January, 2007 to December, 2008. Information regarding 35 plant species was collected. According to the results, Blepharis sindica was used as galactagogue. Butea monosperma, Calotropis procera and Phyllanthus nirurii were used as emollient, demulcent and antiphlogistic. Amaranthus trilocular, Capparis decidua, Clerodendron phlomoides, Phyllanthus nirurii and Ricinus communis were used as carminative and stomachic. Capparis decidua and Calotropis procera were used as appetizer. Prosopis glandulosa had anodyne properties, Achyranthes aspera had antilithic, while Pedalium murex, Tribulus terrestris and Barleria prionites had diuretic value. Achyranthes aspera, Argemone mexicana, Balanites aegyptiaca, Butea monosperma, Cassia senna, Citrullus colocynthis and Vitex negundo were used as vermifuge. Alhagi camelorum and Balanites aegyptiaca had aperient properties. Barleria prionites and Mollugo nudicaulis had their role in the ripening of an abscess. Ricinus communis and Salvadora oleoides aided in the removal of placenta and lochia. Anamitra cocculus and Argemone mexicana were used as febrifuge. Aerva javanica, Ailanthus excelsa, Amaranthus trilocular, Capparis decidua were used in diarrhoea and dysentery. Argemone mexicana and Ailanthus excelsa were used in ague.

  12. Ethnoveterinary medicines used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in pigs and pets in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, Cheryl; Turner, Nancy; Khan, Tonya; Brauer, Gerhard

    2007-09-30

    This paper documents the medicinal plants used to treat endoparasites and stomach problems in dogs, cats and pigs in British Columbia, Canada. Ethnoveterinary data was collected over a 6-month period in 2003. The majority of the information on pets came from 2 naturopaths, 10 herbalists, 5 dog trainers, breeders and pet shop owners, 9 holistic veterinarians and 6 of 27 organic farmers. Two pig farmers joined the study in the final stages. The following plants were used as anthelmintics: Artemisia cina O. Berg and C.F. Schmidt, Artemisia vulgaris L., Artemisia annua, Calendula officinalis L., Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (all Asteraceae), Mentha piperita L. and Salvia officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) (Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae), Cucurbita pepo L. (Cucurbitaceae), Eugenia caryophyllata Thunb (Myrtaceae), Gentiana lutea L. (Gentianaceae), Hydrastis canadensis L. (Ranunculaceae), Juglans nigra L. (Juglandaceae), Olea europaea L. (Oleaceae) and Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae)). Stomach problems were treated with: Achillea millefolium L. (Asteraceae), Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Asphodelaceae), Elytrigia repens (L.) Desv. ex Nevski (Poaceae), Frangula purshiana (DC.) Cooper (Rhamnaceae), Juniperus communis L. (Cupressaceae), Melissa officinalis L. and M. piperita L. (Lamiaceae), Petroselinum crispum L. (Apiaceae), Plantago major L. and Plantago ovata Forssk. (Plantaginaceae) Rumex crispus L. and Rumex obtusifolius L. (Polygonaceae), Ulmus fulva Michx. (Ulmaceae) and Zingiber officinalis Roscoe (Zingiberaceae). There is insufficient information available to assess the anthelmintic efficacies of C. officinalis, Salvia officinalis, Eugenia caryophyllata and O. europaea; the other plants have mid- to high-level validity for their ethnoveterinary uses.

  13. Wound Healing and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth / For Teens / Wound Healing and ... open to heal through natural scar formation. The Healing Process Before healing begins, the body gears up ...

  14. Biomechanical comparison of single-row, double-row, and transosseous-equivalent repair techniques after healing in an animal rotator cuff tear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Ryan J; Gupta, Akash; Oh, Joo-Han; Chung, Kyung-Chil; McGarry, Michelle H; Gupta, Ranjan; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-08-01

    The transosseous-equivalent (TOE) rotator cuff repair technique increases failure loads and contact pressure and area between tendon and bone compared to single-row (SR) and double-row (DR) repairs, but no study has investigated if this translates into improved healing in vivo. We hypothesized that a TOE repair in a rabbit chronic rotator cuff tear model would demonstrate a better biomechanical profile than SR and DR repairs after 12 weeks of healing. A two-stage surgical procedure was performed on 21 New Zealand White Rabbits. The right subscapularis tendon was transected and allowed to retract for 6 weeks to simulate a chronic tear. Repair was done with the SR, DR, or TOE technique and allowed to heal for 12 weeks. Cyclic loading and load to failure biomechanical testing was then performed. The TOE repair showed greater biomechanical characteristics than DR, which in turn were greater than SR. These included yield load (p repair of a chronic, retracted rotator cuff tear, the TOE technique was the strongest biomechanical construct after healing followed by DR with SR being the weakest. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores do not bleed. Once the scab forms, your ...

  16. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-01-01

    , no pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial...

  17. Non-experimental validation of ethnoveterinary plants and indigenous knowledge used for backyard pigs and chickens in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, C; Georges, K; Brown, G

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents the findings of an exploratory study on ethnoveterinary medicines used for backyard pigs and backyard chickens in Trinidad and Tobago. Research data was collected from 1995 to September 2000. Six plants are used for backyard pigs. Crushed leaves of immortelle (Erythrina pallida, E. micropteryx) are used to remove dead piglets from the uterus. Leaf decoctions of bois canôt (Cecropia peltata) and bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) are used for labour pains or leaves are fed as a postpartum cleanser. Boiled green papaya fruit (Carica papaya) is fed to pigs to induce milk let-down. The leaves and flowers of male papaya plants (Carica papaya) are fed to deworm pigs. Sour orange juice (Citrus aurantium) is given to pigs to produce lean meat, and coffee grounds are used for scours. Eyebright and plantain leaves (Plantago major) are used for eye injuries of backyard chickens. Worm grass (Chenopodium ambrosioides) and cotton bush (Gossypium species) are used as anthelmintics. Aloe gel (Aloe vera) is used for internal injuries and the yellow sap from the cut Aloe vera leaf or the juice of Citrus limonia is used to purge the birds. A literature review revealed few toxicity concerns and the potential usefulness of the plants.

  18. Conducted healing to treat large skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, M I; Petroianu, A; Alberti, L R; Burgarelli, G L; Barbosa, A J A

    2013-01-01

    Improvement of the healing process to provide better aesthetical and functional results continues to be a surgical challenge. This study compared the treatment of skin wounds by means of conducted healing (an original method of treatment by secondary healing) and by the use of autogenous skin grafts. Two skin segments, one on each side of the dorsum,were removed from 17 rabbits. The side that served as a graft donor site was left open as to undergo conducted healing (A)and was submitted only to debridement and local care with dressings. The skin removed from the side mentioned above was implanted as a graft (B) to cover the wound on the other side. Thus, each animal received the two types of treatment on its dorsum (A and B). The rabbits were divided into two groups according to the size of the wounds: Group 1 - A and B (4 cm2)and Group 2 - A and B (25 cm2). The healing time was 19 days for Group 1 and 35 days for Group 2. The final macro- and microscopic aspects of the healing process were analysed comparatively among all subgroups. The presence of inflammatory cells, epidermal cysts and of giant cells was evaluated. No macro- or microscopic differences were observed while comparing the wounds that underwent conducted healing and those in which grafting was employed, although the wounds submitted to conducted healing healed more rapidly. Conducted wound healing was effective for the treatment of skin wounds. Celsius.

  19. Local knowledge held by farmers in Eastern Tyrol (Austria) about the use of plants to maintain and improve animal health and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Christian R; Vogl-Lukasser, Brigitte; Walkenhorst, Michael

    2016-09-12

    The sustainable management of animal health and welfare is of increasing importance to consumers and a key topic in the organic farming movement. Few systematic studies have been undertaken investigating farmers' local knowledge related to this issue. Ethnoveterinary medicine (EVM) is a discipline focusing on local knowledge and folk methods in veterinary medicine, however most ethnoveterinarian studies primarily address the treatment of animal diseases. Very few studies have explored prophylactic methods. An ethnoveterinary research project in Eastern Tyrol (Austria) was conducted in 2004 and 2005 to gather information about local knowledge of animal husbandry from 144 informants, with the emphasis on plants that maintain livestock health and welfare. Informants mentioned a total of 87 plants and 22 plant-based generic terms in the context of maintaining and improving livestock health and welfare. The most important preventive measures for maintaining and improving animal health and welfare were practices related to "fodder" and "feeding". In this category the plants mentioned could be grouped according to three different perceptions about their effect on animals: "Good or bad fodder", "Functional fodder" and "Fodder medicine". In addition to fodder, environmental management, the human-animal relationship, household remedies and cultural/religious activities were also mentioned. When asked about practices in the past that maintained animal health and well-being, interviewees mentioned, for example, the importance of the diversity of sources that used to be available to obtain feed and fodder. The informants' approach that feeding is central to livestock welfare is in line with the standard scientific literature on animal health, including in organic farming. Various scientific studies into common fodder evaluate the nutritive and dietary value, efficiency and safety of fodder. Future studies also have to consider the evaluation of traditional, local fodder

  20. Molecular pathology of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yuko

    2010-12-15

    Skin-wound healing is an orchestrated biological phenomena consisting of three sequential phases, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Many biological substances are involved in the process of wound repair, and this short and simplified overview of wound healing can be adopted to determine wound vitality or wound age in forensic medicine. With the development of genetically engineered animals, essential molecules for skin-wound healing have been identified. Especially, cytokines, and growth factors are useful candidates and markers for the determination of wound vitality or age. Moreover, bone marrow-derived progenitor cells would give significant information to wound age determination. In this review article, some interesting observations are presented, possibly contributing to the future practice of forensic pathologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Bioinspired self-healing materials: lessons from nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaldi, Joseph C

    2018-01-01

    Healing is an intrinsic ability in the incredibly biodiverse populations of the plant and animal kingdoms created through evolution. Plants and animals approach healing in similar ways but with unique pathways, such as damage containment in plants or clotting in animals. After analyzing the examples of healing and defense mechanisms found in living nature, eight prevalent mechanisms were identified: reversible muscle control, clotting, cellular response, layering, protective surfaces, vascular networks or capsules, exposure, and replenishable functional coatings. Then the relationship between these mechanisms, nature’s best (evolutionary) methods of mitigating and healing damage, and existing technology in self-healing materials are described. The goals of this top-level overview are to provide a framework for relating the behavior seen in living nature to bioinspired materials, act as a resource to addressing the limitations/problems with existing materials, and open up new avenues of insight and research into self-healing materials. PMID:29600152

  2. Wound healing properties of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nilesh; Jain, U K; Pathak, A K

    2009-04-01

    The studies on excision wound healing model reveals significant wound healing activity of the methanolic leaf extract (simple ointment 5%) of "Artocarpus heterophyllus" ham which is comparable with standard (Betadine). In the excision model, the period of epithelization, of the extract treated group was found to be higher than the controlgroup and slightly lesser than standard treated group of animals on the up to 16(th) post wounding day.

  3. Wound healing properties of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nilesh; Jain, U.K.; Pathak, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    The studies on excision wound healing model reveals significant wound healing activity of the methanolic leaf extract (simple ointment 5%) of “Artocarpus heterophyllus” ham which is comparable with standard (Betadine). In the excision model, the period of epithelization, of the extract treated group was found to be higher than the controlgroup and slightly lesser than standard treated group of animals on the up to 16th post wounding day. PMID:22557331

  4. Prescription for herbal healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balch, Phyllis A; Bell, Stacey J

    2012-01-01

    .... From the most trusted name in natural healing, Phyllis A. Balch's new edition of Prescription for Herbal Healing provides the most current research and comprehensive facts in an easy-to-read A- to-Z format, including...

  5. Ethnoveterinary treatments for common cattle diseases in four districts of the Southern Province, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syakalima, Michelo; Simuunza, Martin; Zulu, Victor Chisha

    2018-02-01

    Ethno veterinary knowledge has rarely been recorded, and no or limited effort has been made to exploit this knowledge despite its widespread use in Zambia. This study documented the types of plants used to treat important animal diseases in rural Zambia as a way of initiating their sustained documentation and scientific validation. The study was done in selected districts of the Southern Zambia, Africa. The research was a participatory epidemiological study conducted in two phases. The first phase was a pre-study exploratory rapid rural appraisal conducted to familiarize the researchers with the study areas, and the second phase was a participatory rural appraisal to help gather the data. The frequency index was used to rank the commonly mentioned treatments. A number of diseases and traditional treatments were listed with the help of local veterinarians. Diseases included: Corridor disease (Theileriosis), foot and mouth disease, blackleg, bloody diarrhea, lumpy skin disease, fainting, mange, blindness, coughing, bloat, worms, cobra snakebite, hemorrhagic septicemia, and transmissible venereal tumors. The plant preparations were in most diseases given to the livestock orally (as a drench). Leaves, barks, and roots were generally used depending on the plant type. Ethno veterinary medicine is still widespread among the rural farmers in the province and in Zambia in general. Some medicines are commonly used across diseases probably because they have a wide spectrum of action. These medicines should, therefore, be validated for use in conventional livestock healthcare systems in the country to reduce the cost of treatments.

  6. Folk Medicine, Folk Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa SEVER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Folk medicine and folk healing may be defined codified, regulated, taught openly and practised widely, and benefit from thousands of years of experience. On the other hand, it may be highly secretive, mystical and extremely localized, with knowledge of its practices passed on orally. Folk medicine and traditional medical practices emerged as a result of the reactions of primitive men against natural events and their ways of comparing and exchanging the medical practices of relevant communities with their own practices. Magic played an important role in shaping the practices. Folk medicine is the solutions developed by societies against material and moral disorders starting from the mythic period until today. Folk healer, on the other hand, is the wisest and the most respectable person in the society, in terms of materiality and morale. This person has the power of identifying and curing the diseases, disorders, consequently the origin of these diseases and disorders, and the skill of using various drugs for the treatment of the diseases and disorders or applying the practices with the help of information and practices acquired from the tradition. The Turks having rich and deep rooted culture. The Turkısh folk medicine and folk healing that contain rich cultural structure in themselves survive until today by being fed by different sources. Before Islam, the Turks used to believe that there were white and black possessors, ancestors’ spirits (arvaks and their healthy and peaceful life depended on getting on with these spirits. They also believed that diseases were caused when they could no more keep in with possessors and spirits, or when they offended and annoyed them. In such an environment of belief, the visible diseases caused by material reasons were generally cured with products obtained from plants, mines and animals in the region or drugs that were made out of their combinations. On the other hand, in invisible diseases associated with

  7. The science of ultrasound therapy for fracture healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Della Rocca Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture healing involves a complex interplay of cellular processes, culminating in bridging of a fracture gap with bone. Fracture healing can be compromised by numerous exogenous and endogenous patient factors, and intense research is currently going on to identify modalities that can increase the likelihood of successful healing. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has been proposed as a modality that may have a benefit for increasing reliable fracture healing as well as perhaps increasing the rate of fracture healing. We conducted a review to establish basic scince evidence of therapeutic role of lipus in fracture healing. An electronic search without language restrictions was accomplished of three databases (PubMed, Embase, Cinahl for ultrasound-related research in osteocyte and chondrocyte cell culture and in animal fracture models, published from inception of the databases through December, 2008. Studies deemed to be most relevant were included in this review. Multiple in vitro and animal in vivo studies were identified. An extensive body of literature exists which delineates the mechanism of action for ultrasound on cellular and tissue signaling systems that may be related to fracture healing. Research on LIPUS in animal fracture models has demonstrated promising results for acceleration of fracture healing and for promotion of fracture healing in compromised tissue beds. A large body of cellular and animal research exists which reveals that LIPUS may be beneficial for accelerating normal fracture healing or for promoting fracture healing in compromised tissue beds. Further investigation of the effects of LIPUS in human fracture healing is warranted for this promising new therapy.

  8. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meephansan J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jitlada Meephansan,1 Atiya Rungjang,1 Werayut Yingmema,2 Raksawan Deenonpoe,3 Saranyoo Ponnikorn3 1Division of Dermatology, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 2Laboratory Animal Centers, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 3Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand Abstract: Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin after injury. ROS are involved in all phases of wound healing. A balance between oxidative and antioxidative forces is necessary for a favorable healing outcome. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is considered a powerful antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing. Full-thickness dermal wounds were created in 36 healthy female mice, which were divided into a control group and a group receiving 78.9 µM topical astaxanthin treatment twice daily for 15 days. Astaxanthin-treated wounds showed noticeable contraction by day 3 of treatment and complete wound closure by day 9, whereas the wounds of control mice revealed only partial epithelialization and still carried scabs. Wound healing biological markers including Col1A1 and bFGF were significantly increased in the astaxanthin-treated group since day 1. Interestingly, the oxidative stress marker iNOS showed a significantly lower expression in the study. The results indicate that astaxanthin is an effective compound for accelerating wound healing. Keywords: astaxanthin, wound healing, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant 

  9. Faith healing and faith in healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Sarkar and Seshadri have presented an interesting paper in this issue on the ethical approach that a physician should take when faced with requests for faith healing (1). The paper describes four approaches that the physician can take. These are rejecting the request, keeping oneself detached from the issue, endorsing the request and trying to understand the practices concerned so as to make a reasoned decision. This commentary attempts to explore the issue of faith healing further, from the point of view of clinical care. It shall discuss five important dimensions which can supplement the arguments by Sarkar and Seshadri. These are the concepts of faith, spirituality and religion and faith healing; the difference between cure and healing; patient-centred care; the various factors influencing a doctor's response to requests for faith healing; and finally, the ethical issues to be considered while making a decision. Before launching into the discussion, it should be made clear that this commentary refers mainly to those faith healing practices which are not overtly harmful, such as prayers, and wearing rings and amulets.

  10. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  11. Cutaneous wound healing in aging small mammals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Mustoe, Thomas; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-01-01

    As the elderly population grows, so do the clinical and socioeconomic burdens of nonhealing cutaneous wounds, the majority of which are seen among persons over 60 years of age. Human studies on how aging effects wound healing will always be the gold standard, but studies have ethical and practical hurdles. Choosing an animal model is dictated by costs and animal lifespan that preclude large animal use. Here, we review the current literature on how aging effects cutaneous wound healing in small animal models and, when possible, compare healing across studies. Using a literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed databases, studies were limited to those that utilized full-thickness wounds and compared the wound-healing parameters of wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue fill, and tensile strength between young and aged cohorts. Overall, wound closure, reepithelialization, and granulation tissue fill were delayed or decreased with aging across different strains of mice and rats. Aging in mice was associated with lower tensile strength early in the wound healing process, but greater tensile strength later in the wound healing process. Similarly, aging in rats was associated with lower tensile strength early in the wound healing process, but no significant tensile strength difference between young and old rats later in healing wounds. From studies in New Zealand White rabbits, we found that reepithelialization and granulation tissue fill were delayed or decreased overall with aging. While similarities and differences in key wound healing parameters were noted between different strains and species, the comparability across the studies was highly questionable, highlighted by wide variability in experimental design and reporting. In future studies, standardized experimental design and reporting would help to establish comparable study groups, and advance the overall knowledge base, facilitating the translatability of animal data to the human clinical condition.

  12. Appraisal on the wound healing activity of different extracts obtained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... and required quantity of methyl paraben and propyl paraben were dissolved by heating on ... chloride (PVC) tube. Selected animals were randomly ... collagen synthesis it supports the wound healing activity of AM and MP.

  13. Effect of irradiation-timing on the initial socket healing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, Y.; Sela, M.N.; Shlomi, B.; Ulmansky, M.; Sela, J.; Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a single dose of 1500 R on early postextraction socket healing was studied in jaws of rats. A severe delay in healing was found in animals irradiated 2 weeks prior to extraction. Retardation of healing to a lesser degree was demonstrated in sockets irradiated immediately after exodontia. (author)

  14. Biomimetic Self-Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), dimethylacetamide (DMA), dimethylformamide (DMF), and dimethylsulfoxide ( DMSO ) displayed the best results; unfortunately...Both techniques demand the production of a stable emulsion, using solvents that do not react with the healing substances. If water is used (and it...highly cross-linked UF polymer. Healing chemicals, solvents , surfactants, and emulsifiers are not shown. Figure 6. Synthesis of PU capsules

  15. Self Healing Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. Self-healing is a crucial in implementing the next generation of smart grids allowing to ensure a high quality of service to the users. We then map our self-healing procedure in a percolation problem and analyse the interplay between redundancies and topology in improving the resilience of networked infrastructures to multiple failures. We find exact results both for planar lattices and for random lattices, hinting the role of duality in the design of resilient networks. Finally, we introduce a cavity method approach to study the recovery of connectivity after damage in self-healing networks. CNR-PNR National Project ``Crisis-Lab,'' EU HOME/2013/CIPS/AG/4000005013 project CI2C and EU FET project MULTIPLEX nr.317532.

  16. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  17. The effect of local hyperglycemia on skin cells in vitro and on wound healing in euglycemic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Singh, Mansher; Sørensen, Jens A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple previous studies have established that high systemic blood glucose concentration impairs skin wound healing. However, the effects of local hyperglycemia on wound healing are not well defined. Comprehensive animal studies and in vitro studies using both fibroblasts and keratin......BACKGROUND: Multiple previous studies have established that high systemic blood glucose concentration impairs skin wound healing. However, the effects of local hyperglycemia on wound healing are not well defined. Comprehensive animal studies and in vitro studies using both fibroblasts...

  18. Paranormal healing and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Jaap J; Attevelt, Johannes T M; Schouten, Sybo A; Faber, Joop A J; Mees, Evert J Dorhout; Geijskes, Gijsbert G

    1988-01-01

    A prospective randomised trial was carried out to see whether paranormal healing by laying on of hands might reduce blood pressure in essential hypertension and whether such an effect might be due to a paranormal, psychological, or placebo factor. Patients were randomised to three treatment groups: paranormal healing by laying on of hands (n=40), paranormal healing at a distance (n=37), and no paranormal healing (controls; n=38). Healing at a distance and no paranormal healing were investigated double blind. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly reduced in all three groups at week 15 (mean reduction (95% confidence interval) 17·1 (14·0 to 20·2)/8·3 (6·6 to 10·0) mm Hg). Only the successive reductions in diastolic blood pressures among the groups from week to week were significantly different. Each week diastolic pressure was consistently lower (average 1·9 mm Hg) after healing at a distance compared with control, but on paired comparison these differences were not significant. Probably week to week variations among the groups accounted for any differences noted. In this study no treatment was consistently better than another and the data cannot therefore be taken as evidence of a paranormal effect on blood pressure. Probably the fall in blood pressure in all three groups either was caused by the psychosocial approach or was a placebo effect of the trial itself. PMID:3134082

  19. Saliva and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Henk S; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Veerman, Enno C I

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation. A synthetic cyclic variant of histatin exhibits a 1,000-fold higher activity than linear histatin, which makes this cyclic variant a promising agent for the development of a new wound healing medication. Conclusively, recognition of the many roles salivary proteins play in wound healing makes saliva a promising source for the development of new drugs involved in tissue regeneration.

  20. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-Egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-07-01

    To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated.

  1. Healing Becomes a Fishy Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Fish skin skews the contest between healing and the biodegradation of healing molecules toward the healing side. Fish skin is very high in omega-3 fatty acids, compounds that promote healing. And cod evokes virtually no inflammatory or immune response in humans.

  2. Healing Childhood Trauma Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Caelan

    2012-01-01

    Millions of the world's children are exposed to traumatic events and relationships every day. Whatever the cause, this overwhelming stress produces a host of unsettling symptoms and reactions. The author highlights six practical principles that undergird healing interventions.

  3. Understanding traditional African healing

    OpenAIRE

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of tradition...

  4. Mechanoresponsive Healing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Methods are provided to produce new mechanoresponsive healing systems. Additionally, various embodiments provide a two tier self-healing material system concept that provides a non-intrusive method to mitigate impact damage in a structure ranging from low velocity impact damage (e.g., crack damage) to high velocity impact damage (e.g., ballistic damage.) The various embodiments provide the mechanophore linked polymer PBG-BCB-PBG. The various embodiments provide methods for synthesizing PBG-BCB-PBG.

  5. Stem Cells and Engineered Scaffolds for Regenerative Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biraja C. Dash

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The normal wound healing process involves a well-organized cascade of biological pathways and any failure in this process leads to wounds becoming chronic. Non-healing wounds are a burden on healthcare systems and set to increase with aging population and growing incidences of obesity and diabetes. Stem cell-based therapies have the potential to heal chronic wounds but have so far seen little success in the clinic. Current research has been focused on using polymeric biomaterial systems that can act as a niche for these stem cells to improve their survival and paracrine activity that would eventually promote wound healing. Furthermore, different modification strategies have been developed to improve stem cell survival and differentiation, ultimately promoting regenerative wound healing. This review focuses on advanced polymeric scaffolds that have been used to deliver stem cells and have been tested for their efficiency in preclinical animal models of wounds.

  6. Stem Cells and Engineered Scaffolds for Regenerative Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Biraja C; Xu, Zhenzhen; Lin, Lawrence; Koo, Andrew; Ndon, Sifon; Berthiaume, Francois; Dardik, Alan; Hsia, Henry

    2018-03-09

    The normal wound healing process involves a well-organized cascade of biological pathways and any failure in this process leads to wounds becoming chronic. Non-healing wounds are a burden on healthcare systems and set to increase with aging population and growing incidences of obesity and diabetes. Stem cell-based therapies have the potential to heal chronic wounds but have so far seen little success in the clinic. Current research has been focused on using polymeric biomaterial systems that can act as a niche for these stem cells to improve their survival and paracrine activity that would eventually promote wound healing. Furthermore, different modification strategies have been developed to improve stem cell survival and differentiation, ultimately promoting regenerative wound healing. This review focuses on advanced polymeric scaffolds that have been used to deliver stem cells and have been tested for their efficiency in preclinical animal models of wounds.

  7. The effects of cancer and cancer therapies on wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaw, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Based on experimental evidence in rodents, most of the antineoplastic agents will affect wound healing. With most of the agents, this impairment is not sufficient to produce increased morbidity based on the clinical reports in humans. Radiation therapy appears to inhibit healing in both experimental animals and during clinical trials. In spite of this, it is reported that wounds in animals will heal when they are receiving radiation therapy after surgery. Based on the information presented here and experience at the University of Missouri, the decision to use adjuvant therapy should depend on the surgery performed. With a single incision that had no increased tension, there should be no hesitation to use adjuvant therapy. If removal of the tumor required reconstructive surgery, no radiation or chemotherapy should be used until the wound has healed. 30 references

  8. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Meephansan J; Rungjang A; Yingmema W; Deenonpoe R; Ponnikorn S

    2017-01-01

    Jitlada Meephansan,1 Atiya Rungjang,1 Werayut Yingmema,2 Raksawan Deenonpoe,3 Saranyoo Ponnikorn3 1Division of Dermatology, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 2Laboratory Animal Centers, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 3Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand Abstract: Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin afte...

  9. Wound healing activity and chemical standardization of Eugenia pruniformis Cambess

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Diego Duarte Galhardo de Albuquerque; Jamila Alessandra Perini; Daniel Escorsim Machado; Thaís Angeli-Gamba; Ricardo dos Santos Esteves; Marcelo Guerra Santos; Adriana Passos Oliveira; Leandro Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eugenia pruniformis is an endemic species from Brazil. Eugenia genus has flavonoids as one of the remarkable chemical classes which are related to the improvement of the healing process. Aims: To evaluate of wound healing activity of E. pruniformis leaves and to identify and quantify its main flavonoids compounds. Materials And Methods: Wound excision model in rats was used to verify the hydroethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts potential. The animals were divided in four groups o...

  10. BIOTECHNOLOGY BIOPRODUCTS "HEALING-1"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Artiukhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The article presents data on the development of technology and qualitative research, bio-products «Healing-1». One of the promising directions in food biotechnology is the development of new integrated starter-based consortia of microorganisms, which have higher activity compared with cultures prepared using pure cultures. So it was interesting studies on the development of new biotechnology and bio-based microbial consortium of lactic acid bacteria. Based on the analysis of biotechnological properties of native cultures created a new consortium of microorganisms containing lactic acid streptococci and bacilli, allowing the maximum extent possible to implement the physiological, biochemical and technological potential of microorganisms. Scientifically substantiated and experimentally developed a new biotechnology production of bioproducts «Healing-1», obtained on the basis of microbial consortium with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity. Experimentally investigated quality parameters of organic food «Healing-1» using a new microbial consortium as freshly prepared and during storage. Found that antagonistic activity of microflora bio «Healing-1» with respect to pathogenic and conditionally pathogenic bacteria, as well as its resistance to substances in the gastrointestinal tract of man is more pronounced compared to bioproducts obtained using a separate starter, members of the microbial consortium. It should be noted a more pronounced synthesis of exopolysaccharides in bioproduct «Healing-1», which leads to increased viscosity of the system and improves the consistency of bio. New bioproducts have good organoleptic characteristics and contain a high number of viable cells of lactic acid bacteria. High stability and survival of lactic acid bacteria during storage. In the study of attacked proteins bioproducts digestive proteinases «in vitro» found that the fermentation of milk microbial consortium increases the digestibility

  11. Healing the nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Dortzbach

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This article gives the motivations, methodology and some results of a study done in Christian healing interventions in African contexts of� stress and violence. Healing in community has been viewed through the prism of �shalom�. Shalom occurs when people who are in a� right� relationship with God� and� each other enjoy and share together the resources of the earth� in ways� that� show Christ� is Lord of all creation. Charts are given showing� the various kinds of community needs, ways to intervene, and some indications of ways to evaluate the interventions.

  12. Advances and Perspectives on Tissue Repair and Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida M. C.; de Sousa, Ana Paula C.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Wound healing involves local and systemic responses that reflect the etiology of the lesion, type of tissue, systemic condition and others. Despite being essentially the same for different wounds, the pattern of healing may change due to intrinsic and/or extrinsic factors. The type of tissue has also to be considered. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to improve healing including phototherapies such as Laser, LEDs and Lamps. Their effects on soft and mineralized tissues are well reported. The choice of appropriated parameters is essential for the results of the treatment and includes wavelength, power density, energy, duration and frequency of application and others. We studied the effects of different types of light on the healing of both soft and mineralized tissues using different models. We found that the use of Laser and polarized light are effective on improving the healing of diabetic and undernourished animals. We also found that Laser light is capable of improving the healing of drug-induced impairment and on increasing the survival rate of flaps on both diabetic and non-diabetic animals. We have also studied and shown the influence of the laser parameters on the healing of surgical and laser wounds. Lately we verified the positive effect of LEDs on healing. We used Laser/LED light for improving bone healing in conditions such as in dental implants, autologous grafts, biomaterials and fractures. From these reports and our own experience we have no doubt whatsoever that the use of phototherapies, carried out with appropriate parameters, promotes quicker tissue repair.

  13. A rat uterine horn model of genital tract wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaff, W D; Cooley, B C; Shen, W; Gittlesohn, A M; Rock, J A

    1987-11-01

    A rat uterine horn model of genital tract wound healing is described. Healing was reflected by acquisition of strength and elasticity, measured by burst strength (BS) and extensibility (EX), respectively. A tensiometer (Instron Corp., Canton, MA) was used to assess these characteristics in castrated and estrogen-supplemented or nonsupplemented animals. While the horn weights (HW), BS, and EX of contralateral horns were not significantly different, the intra-animal variation of HW was 7.2%, BS was 17.7% and EX was 38.2%. In a second experiment, one uterine horn was divided and anastomosed, and the animal given estrogen supplementation or a placebo pellet. Estrogen administration was found to increase BS and EX of anastomosed horns prior to 14 days, but had no beneficial effect at 21 or 42 days. The data suggest that estrogen may be required for optimal early healing of genital tract wounds.

  14. Healing stone ... by infection

    OpenAIRE

    Micallef, Roderick

    2014-01-01

    Roderick Micallef has a long family history within the construction industry. He coupled this passion with a fascination with science when reading for an undergraduate degree in Biology and Chemistry (University of Malta). http://www.um.edu.mt/think/healing-stone-by-infection/

  15. Frontiers in Healing Racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutstein, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    Author reflects on forty years of experience writing about the civil rights movement. The Institute for Healing Racism, a grassroots movement for participants of diverse backgrounds to study racism and to help discover the oneness of humankind, grew out of the author's concerns. The principles and processes of the Institute are described.…

  16. Definitions of healing and healing interventions across different cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Ann H; Berger, Ann; Cheng, M Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    For centuries healing has been embedded in non-Western cultures. Traditional cultures believe that healing is derived from the divine and utilize a holistic approach to healing including the body, mind, and spirit. The community and environment are key elements in individual healing along with herbal remedies and ceremonies. Western cultures have accepted some traditional methods of relaxation and exercise, such as yoga and tai chi. In this paper we will examine some similar themes of traditional practices to better understand traditional patients' healing paradigm and find new tools as practitioners of Western medicine.

  17. Effects of tretinoin on wound healing in aged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos Peseto, Danielle; Carmona, Erica Vilaça; Silva, Kellyn Cristina da; Guedes, Flavia Roberta Valente; Hummel Filho, Fernando; Martinez, Natalia Peres; Pereira, José Aires; Rocha, Thalita; Priolli, Denise Gonçalves

    2016-03-01

    Aged and adult populations have differences in the structural, biological, and healing properties of skin. Comparative studies of healing under the influence of retinoids in both these populations are very important and, to the best of our knowledge, have not been performed to date. The purpose of this study was to compare the activities of topical tretinoin in aged and adult animal models of wound healing by secondary intention. Male aged rats (24 months old, n = 7) and adult rats (6 months old, n = 8) were used. The rats were assigned to the following groups according to the dates on which wound samples were excised (day 14 or 21 after model creation): treated group, control group, and naive group. Topical application of tretinoin cream was used only on the proximal wound and was applied daily for 7 days. Wound healing areas were measured using metal calipers, and morphological analysis was performed. Slides were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Masson's trichrome, and periodic acid-Schiff stains. Statistical analysis adopted a 5% coefficient for rejection of the null hypothesis. Although aged animals showed skin repair, complete reepithelialization was found on day 21 in some animals of both groups (treated and control). In aged rats, the wound area was significantly smaller in treated wounds than in untreated wounds, resulting in a larger scar area compared with the adult group. When treated wounds were compared, no differences were found between the wound areas in adult and aged rats. As expected, the collagen concentration was higher in normal skin from adult rats than in normal skin from aged animals, but there was no difference when aged skin was treated with tretinoin. These results indicate that tretinoin increases collagen synthesis in aged skin and returns the healing process to a normal state of skin healing. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Neurolaena lobata L. promotes wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Bijoor Shivananda; Ramlogan, Surrin; Chalapathi Rao, AV; Maharaj, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: The leaves of the Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae) plant are used to control diabetes and heal wounds and infections. Aim: The ethanolic extract of N. lobata leaf was evaluated for its ability to heal inflicted wounds in rats using the excision wound model. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into three groups of six each. Test group animals were treated topically with an ethanolic extract of N. lobata (1:1 with petroleum jelly, 100 mg/kg/day). Standard and control group ani...

  19. Microbial symbionts accelerate wound healing via the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos Poutahidis

    Full Text Available Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobacillus reuteri enhances wound-healing properties through up-regulation of the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, a factor integral in social bonding and reproduction, by a vagus nerve-mediated pathway. Bacteria-triggered oxytocin serves to activate host CD4+Foxp3+CD25+ immune T regulatory cells conveying transplantable wound healing capacity to naive Rag2-deficient animals. This study determined oxytocin to be a novel component of a multi-directional gut microbe-brain-immune axis, with wound-healing capability as a previously unrecognized output of this axis. We also provide experimental evidence to support long-standing medical traditions associating diet, social practices, and the immune system with efficient recovery after injury, sustained good health, and longevity.

  20. Influence of hypoandrogenism in skin wound healing resistance in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny Fabrício Magalhães Veloso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study is to verify the effect of testosterone depletion on healing of surgical skin wounds at different ages and postoperative times. Methods: Forty-four Wistar male rats were divided into four groups: Group 1y (n = 11 – young control, sham-operated rats (30 days-old; Group 1A (n = 10 – adult control, sham-operated rats (three to four months old; Group 2Y (n = 10 – young rats after bilateral orchiectomy; and Group 2A (n = 11 – adult rats after bilateral orchiectomy. After six months, a linear incision was performed on the dorsal region of the animals. The resistance of the wound healing was measured in a skin fragment with a tensiometer, on the 7th and 21st postoperative days. Rresults: The wound healing resistance was higher in Group 1Y than in Group 2Y after seven days (p < 0.05. Wound healing resistance at 21 days was higher than at seven days in all groups (p < 0.05. Late wound healing resistance was not different between young and adult rats. Cconclusions: Bilateral orchiectomy decreased the wound healing resistance only in young animals at the seventh postoperative day.

  1. Hypoandrogenism related to early skin wound healing resistance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroianu, A; Veloso, D F M; Alberti, L R; Figueiredo, J A; Rodrigues, F H O Carmo; Carneiro, B G M Carvalho E

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of testosterone depletion on healing of surgical skin wounds at different ages and post-operative periods. Forty-four Wistar male rats were divided into four groups: Group 1Y (n = 11) - young control, sham-operated rats (30-day old); Group 1A (n = 10) - adult control, sham-operated rats (3 to 4-month old); Group 2Y (n = 10) - young rats after bilateral orchiectomy; and Group 2A (n = 11) - adult rats after bilateral orchiectomy. After 6 months, a linear incision was performed on the dorsal region of the animals. The resistance of the wound healing was measured in a skin fragment using a tensiometer, on the 7th and 21st post-operative days. The wound healing resistance was higher in Group 1Y than in Group 2Y after 7 days (P Wound healing resistance at 21 days was higher than at 7 days in all groups (P wound healing resistance was not different between young and adult rats. It is concluded that bilateral orchiectomy diminished the wound healing resistance only in young animals at the 7th post-operative day.

  2. [Healing with art?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühlmann, A Y R Rosalie; Jeekel, J Hans; Pierik, E G J M Robert

    2015-01-01

    Music and other forms of art are increasingly being integrated into hospitals. As well as the aesthetic value of art, more and more attention is being paid to its contribution to the healing of the patient. Scientific research indicates the possible benefits of specific art in healthcare facilities. Using this knowledge of the role and employability of surroundings and art in the healing of patients may be complementary to the high quality of care in the Netherlands. By means of proper, methodologically correct research, it is possible to investigate the use of different aspects of the patient's environment as simple, safe and low-cost measures in improving health and well-being of patients.

  3. Understanding traditional African healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgobi, M G

    2014-09-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists.

  4. Self-healing polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional structure fabricated from a self-healing polymeric material, comprising poly(ester amides) obtained from ethylene glycol, azelaic acid and 1,1-aminoundecanoic acid, wherein polymeric material has a melt index above 2.5 g/10 min. as determined by ASTM D1238 at 190.degree. C. and 2.16kg, impact resistance and ductility sufficient to resist cracking and brittle fracture upon impact by a 9 mm bullet fired at a temperature of about 29.degree. C. at subsonic speed in a range from about 800 feet/sec to about 1000 feet/sec. It has been determined that the important factors necessary for self-healing behavior of polymers include sufficient impact strength, control of the degree of crystallinity, low melting point and the ability to instantly melt at impacted area.

  5. Custom anatomic healing abutments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak S Gowda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants with their increasing success rates and predictability of final outcome are fast becoming the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth. Considering the success of immediate implant placement in reducing tissue loss and achieving good esthetic results, is making it a more popular treatment modality in implant dentistry. Understanding the management of gingival tissues in relation to implants to obtain maximum esthetics is of utmost importance. The use of provisional abutments and immediate temporization has a proven track record of their ability to produce optimal esthetics and to guide the tissue response during the healing phase. With careful patient selection and execution, customized healing abutments can provide an effective method to enhance the esthetic and emergence profile for anterior implant restorations.

  6. Ethnoveterinary herbal remedies used by farmers in four north-eastern Swiss cantons (St. Gallen, Thurgau, Appenzell Innerrhoden and Appenzell Ausserrhoden).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disler, Monika; Ivemeyer, Silvia; Hamburger, Matthias; Vogl, Christian R; Tesic, Anja; Klarer, Franziska; Meier, Beat; Walkenhorst, Michael

    2014-03-31

    Very few ethnoveterinary surveys have been conducted in central Europe. However, traditional knowledge on the use of medicinal plants might be an option for future concepts in treatment of livestock diseases. Therefore the aim of this study was to document and analyse the traditional knowledge and use of homemade herbal remedies for livestock by farmers in four Swiss cantons. Research was conducted in 2012. Fifty farmers on 38 farms were interviewed with the aid of semistructured interviews. Detailed information about the plants used and their mode of preparation were documented as well as dosage, route of administration, category of use, origin of knowledge, frequency of use, and satisfaction with the treatment. In total, 490 homemade remedies were collected. Out of these, 315 homemade remedies contained only one plant species (homemade single species herbal remedies, HSHR), which are presented in this paper. Seventy six species from 44 botanical families were mentioned. The most HSHR were quoted for the families of Asteraceae, Polygonaceae and Urticaceae. The plant species with the highest number of HSHRs were Matricaria recutita L., Calendula officinalis L., Rumex obtusifolius L. and Urtica dioica L. For each HSHR, one to eight different applications were enumerated. A total of 428 applications were documented, the majority of which were used to treat cattle. The main applications were in treatment of skin afflictions and sores, followed by gastrointestinal disorders and metabolic dysfunctions. Topical administration was most frequently used, followed by oral administration. In nearly half of the cases the knowledge on preparing and using herbal remedies was from forefathers and relatives. More than one third of the applications were used more than ten times during the last five years, and in about sixty percent of the cases, the last application was during the last year preceding the interviews. Traditional knowledge of farmers about the use of medicinal plants

  7. Nanotechnology and bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Edward J; Henderson, Janet E; Vengallatore, Srikar T

    2010-03-01

    Nanotechnology and its attendant techniques have yet to make a significant impact on the science of bone healing. However, the potential benefits are immediately obvious with the result that hundreds of researchers and firms are performing the basic research needed to mature this nascent, yet soon to be fruitful niche. Together with genomics and proteomics, and combined with tissue engineering, this is the new face of orthopaedic technology. The concepts that orthopaedic surgeons recognize are fabrication processes that have resulted in porous implant substrates as bone defect augmentation and medication-carrier devices. However, there are dozens of applications in orthopaedic traumatology and bone healing for nanometer-sized entities, structures, surfaces, and devices with characteristic lengths ranging from 10s of nanometers to a few micrometers. Examples include scaffolds, delivery mechanisms, controlled modification of surface topography and composition, and biomicroelectromechanical systems. We review the basic science, clinical implications, and early applications of the nanotechnology revolution and emphasize the rich possibilities that exist at the crossover region between micro- and nanotechnology for developing new treatments for bone healing.

  8. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the wound healing and non-healing wound of skin in the past 30 years. This review mainly focuses on the molecular biology of many cytokines (including growth factors) and other molecular factors such as extracellular matrix (ECM) on wound healing. The molecular biology in cell movement such as epidermal cells in wound healing was also discussed. Moreover many common chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers, leg ulcers, diabetic foot wounds, venous stasis ulcers, etc. usually deteriorate into non-healing wounds. Therefore the molecular biology such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and other molecular factors in diabetes non-healing wounds were also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical evaluation of ethanolic extract of curcumin (Curcuma longa on wound healing in Black Bengal goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Haris Miah

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Ethanol treated turmeric enhances wound healing process in goats. This result could help the veterinarian and the researchers to consider herbal product especially ethanolic extract of turmeric for the treatment and better healing of surgical wounds with minimal complications. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(2.000: 181-186

  10. The Advantages of Traditional Chumash Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Adams

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chumash healing has been practiced in California for ∼13 000 years. Chumash healers treat their patients with prayer, laughter, dreaming, phytotherapy, aromatherapy, healing ceremonies and other techniques. Healing involves first healing the spirit, then healing the body. Chumash people still maintain their unique identity. Chumash Healers still practice the ancient healing arts in California. This lecture is a brief introduction to Chumash Healing.

  11. Wounding the cornea to learn how it heals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, Mary Ann; Zieske, James D; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery; Kyne, Briana M; Pal-Ghosh, Sonali; Tadvalkar, Gauri; Pajoohesh-Ganji, Ahdeah

    2014-04-01

    Corneal wound healing studies have a long history and rich literature that describes the data obtained over the past 70 years using many different species of animals and methods of injury. These studies have lead to reduced suffering and provided clues to treatments that are now helping patients live more productive lives. In spite of the progress made, further research is required since blindness and reduced quality of life due to corneal scarring still happens. The purpose of this review is to summarize what is known about different types of wound and animal models used to study corneal wound healing. The subject of corneal wound healing is broad and includes chemical and mechanical wound models. This review focuses on mechanical injury models involving debridement and keratectomy wounds to reflect the authors' expertise. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mucosal healing in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Coskun, Mehmet; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2013-01-01

    . With the introduction of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors for the treatment of UC, it has become increasingly evident that the disease course is influenced by whether or not the patient achieves mucosal healing. Thus, patients with mucosal healing have fewer flare-ups, a decreased risk of colectomy......, and a lower probability of developing colorectal cancer. Understanding the mechanisms of mucosal wound formation and wound healing in UC, and how they are affected therapeutically is therefore of importance for obtaining efficient treatment strategies holding the potential of changing the disease course of UC....... This review is focused on the pathophysiological mechanism of mucosal wound formation in UC as well as the known mechanisms of intestinal wound healing. Regarding the latter topic, pathways of both wound healing intrinsic to epithelial cells and the wound-healing mechanisms involving interaction between...

  13. Wound healing effects of Heliotropium indicum, Plumbago zeylanicum and Acalypha indica in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, J Suresh; Rao, P Rajeswara; Reddy, Mada S

    2002-02-01

    The ethanolic extracts of Heliotropium indicum, Plumbago zeylanicum and Acalypha indica were evaluated for their wound healing activity in rats. Wound healing activity was studied using excision and incision wound models in rats following topical application. Animals were divided into four groups with six in each group. Ten percent w/v extract of each plant was prepared in saline for topical application. H. indicum possesses better wound healing activity than P. zeylanicum and A. indica. Tensile strength results indicate better activity of H. indicum on remodeling phase of wound healing.

  14. Calcitonin effect on Achilles tendon healing. An experimental study on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, C G; Karachalios, T S; Khaldi, L; Karantanas, A H; Lyritis, G P

    2009-01-01

    A positive potential effect of Calcitonin (CT) on Achilles tendon healing was investigated as well as the ability of MRI to follow the tendon healing process. A standardized tenotomy of the Achilles tendon was performed on forty-two rabbits. Twenty-one animals received daily 21 IU /kg Calcitonin intramuscularly (treatment group CT) during the experiment and the remaining received saline solution (control group P). Seven animals from each group were killed at one, two and three weeks postoperatively. All animals had serial MRI scans and tendon samples underwent biomechanical and histological testing. For both groups, animals of the same subgroup showed statistically significant difference in signal intensity values of MRI between the 1st and 3rd week (pTendon samples from group CT showed statistically significant difference in ultimate tensile strength compared to controls at 2 (ptendon healing stages. It is suggested that Calcitonin enhances Achilles tendon healing process.

  15. Neurolaena lobata L. promotes wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Bijoor Shivananda; Ramlogan, Surrin; Chalapathi Rao, Av; Maharaj, Sandeep

    2014-07-01

    The leaves of the Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae) plant are used to control diabetes and heal wounds and infections. The ethanolic extract of N. lobata leaf was evaluated for its ability to heal inflicted wounds in rats using the excision wound model. Animals were divided into three groups of six each. Test group animals were treated topically with an ethanolic extract of N. lobata (1:1 with petroleum jelly, 100 mg/kg/day). Standard and control group animals were treated with mupirocin and petroleum jelly, respectively. Treatment was given for 13 days and the wound area was measured on alternate days. Parameters of healing assessed were the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialization and hydroxyproline content. Antimicrobial activity of the extract was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Phytochemical analysis of the extract showed the presence of saponins, tannins, alkaloids and flavanoids. Extract-treated animals exhibited 87% reduction in the wound area over 13 days when compared with the control (78%) and standard (83%) groups (P lobata as a pharmacotherapy for wound healing.

  16. Achilles tendon healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, E.H.; Pope, C.F.; Barber, V.; Jokl, P.; Lynch, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on symptomatic Achilles tendon abnormalities (rupture, tendinitis) evaluated with MR imaging during the healing phase after either surgical or conservative treatment. A total of 21 patients were studied. Fifteen of 21 underwent surgery (13 tendon ruptures) and six were managed conservatively (one rupture). MR studies were obtained before treatment in 11, at 3 months in eight, at 6 months in seven, and at 12 months in 12. The 1.5-T spin-echo and gradient-echo images were correlated with clinical results, planter reflex response times, and calf force measurements. Sequential T2 times were obtained from representative levels in the tendons

  17. Healing agent for self-healing cementious material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, H.M.

    2011-01-01

    The invention provides a process for the production of a cementious material. The process comprises mixing cement starting materials and a particulate healing agent to provide the cementious material. The healing agent comprises coated particles, wherein the coated particles comprise bacterial

  18. Evaluation of Cynodon dactylon for wound healing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tuhin Kanti; Pandit, Srikanta; Chakrabarti, Shrabana; Banerjee, Saheli; Poyra, Nandini; Seal, Tapan

    2017-02-02

    Research in the field of wound healing is very recent. The concept of wound healing is changing from day to day. Ayurveda is the richest source of plant drugs for management of wounds and Cynodon dactylon L. is one such. The plant is used as hemostatic and wound healing agent from ethnopharmacological point of view. Aim of the present study is scientific validation of the plant for wound healing activity in detail. Aqueous extract of the plant was prepared and phytochemical constituents were detected by HPLC analysis. Acute and dermatological toxicity study of the extract was performed. Pharmacological testing of 15% ointment (w/w) of the extract with respect to placebo control and standard comparator framycetin were done on full thickness punch wound in Wister rats and effects were evaluated based on parameters like wound contraction size (mm 2 ), tensile strength (g); tissue DNA, RNA, protein, hydroxyproline and histological examination. The ointment was applied on selected clinical cases of chronic and complicated wounds and efficacy was evaluated on basis of scoring on granulation, epithelialization, vascularity as well as routine hematological investigations. Significant results (pCynodon dactylon explores its potential wound healing activity in animal model and subsequent feasibility in human subjects. Phenolic acids and flavonoids present in c. dactylon supports its wound healing property for its anti-oxidative activity that are responsible for collagenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-Healing Laminate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiermann, Brett A. (Inventor); Keller, Michael W. (Inventor); White, Scott R. (Inventor); Sottos, Nancy R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A laminate material may include a first flexible layer, and a self-healing composite layer in contact with the first flexible layer. The composite layer includes an elastomer matrix, a plurality of first capsules including a polymerizer, and a corresponding activator for the polymerizer. The laminate material may self-heal when subjected to a puncture or a tear.

  20. Clinical aspects of tendon healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractWe know that healing of a tendon wound takes place by an invasion of fibreblasts from the surrounding tissues; the tendon itself has no intrinsic healing capacity. lt was Potenza (1962) who proved that a traumatic suture of the tendons within their sheath is followed by disintegration of

  1. Our Pathway toward Healing Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honour, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this article, Robert Honour, Training and Staff Development Manager, at the Fairfax, Virginia, Department of Family Services (DFS), reports on the outcome of "Healing Racism" training at his organization. Participants in "Healing Racism Institutes" are transforming relationships and creating an organizational culture that…

  2. Synthetic Self-Healing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Mollie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-06-02

    Given enough time, pressure, temperature fluctuation, and stress any material will fail. Currently, synthesized materials make up a large part of our everyday lives, and are used in a number of important applications such as; space travel, under water devices, precise instrumentation, transportation, and infrastructure. Structural failure of these material scan lead to expensive and dangerous consequences. In an attempt to prolong the life spans of specific materials and reduce efforts put into repairing them, biologically inspired, self-healing systems have been extensively investigated. The current review explores recent advances in three methods of synthesized self-healing: capsule based, vascular, and intrinsic. Ideally, self-healing materials require no human intervention to promote healing, are capable of surviving all the steps of polymer processing, and heal the same location repeatedly. Only the vascular method holds up to all of these idealities.

  3. Unveiling Cebuano Traditional Healing Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZachiaRaiza Joy S. Berdon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the features of Cebuano’s traditional healing practices. Specifically, it also answers the following objectives: analyze traditional healing in Cebuano’s perspectives, explain the traditional healing process practiced in terms of the traditional healers’ belief, and extrapolate perceptions of medical practitioners toward traditional healing. This study made use of qualitative approach, among five traditional healers who performed healing for not less than ten years, in the mountain barangays of Cebu City. These healers served as the primary informants who were selected because of their popularity in healing. The use of open-ended interview in local dialect and naturalistic observation provided a free listing of their verbatim accounts were noted and as primary narratives. Participation in the study was voluntary and participants were interviewed privately after obtaining their consent. The Cebuano traditional healing practices or “panambal” comprise the use of “himolso” (pulse-checking, “palakaw” (petition, “pasubay” (determining what causes the sickness and its possible means of healing, “pangalap” (searching of medicinal plants for “palina” (fumigation, “tayhop” (gentle-blowing, “tutho” (saliva-blowing,“tuob” (boiling, “orasyon” (mystical prayers, “hilot” (massage, and “barang” (sorcery. Though traditional with medical science disapproval, it contributes to a mystical identity of Cebuano healers, as a manifestation of folk Catholicism belief, in order to do a good legacy to the community that needs help. For further study, researchers may conduct further the studies on the: curative effects of medicinal plants in Cebu, psychological effect pulsechecking healed persons by the mananambal, and unmasking the other features of traditional healing.

  4. Exploring Inpatients' Experiences of Healing and Healing Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorissa MacAllister PhD, AIA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand a patient’s healing experience it is essential to understand the elements that they, the patient, believes contributed to their healing. Previous research has focused on symptom reducers or contributors through environment such as stress. A person’s experience of healing happens over time not instantaneous. Therefore, in this study, the interviews with patients happened after forty-eight hours of hospitalization. This mixed methods study describes the experiences of seventeen inpatients from two healthcare systems using a phenomenological approach combined with evidence based design evaluation methods to document the setting. The qualitative data was analyzed first for reoccurring themes then further explored and defined through quantitative environmental observations. The seventeen patients defined healing as “getting better/well.” Seventy three statements were recorded about contributors and detractors to healing in the physical environment. Three primary themes emerged from the data as positive influencers of a healing experience: being cared for, being comfortable and experiencing something familiar or like home. These results demonstrate that patients perceive their inpatient healing experience through a supported environment.

  5. Deep healing: ritual healing in the teshuvah movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Asaf

    2014-12-01

    Based on an ethnographic analysis of religious healing rituals in Israel, this paper addresses the question of how healer-client relations are structured on these rituals. An examination of what takes place at the rallies held by Rabbi Amnon Yitzhak indicates that, apart from the regular blessings, which can be referred to as ordinary healing, there are some ritual events that can be referred to as 'deep healing'. The current paper demonstrates how deep healing rituals are generally conducted in severe cases through give-and-take between the rabbi and the person upon whom the blessing is bestowed, and that they are linked to relationships between people and the ethic of mutual support.

  6. Progress in corneal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  7. Wound Healing in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa J; Fulton, Ana Tuya

    2016-02-01

    Impaired wound healing in the elderly represents a major clinical problem that is growing as our population ages. Wound healing is affected by age and by co-morbid conditions, particularly diabetes and obesity. This is particularly important in Rhode Island as the state has a very high percentage of vulnerable older adults. A multi- disciplinary approach that incorporates the skills of a comprehensive wound center with specialized nursing, geriatric medicine and palliative care will facilitate rapid wound healing, reduce costs and improve outcomes for our older adults that suffer from 'problem wounds'.

  8. Evaluation of Interferon-gamma Application for Recognition of Patients Afflicted by Non-healing Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Moafi; Hossein Rezvan; Roya Sherkat; Sayyed Hamid Zarkesh-Esfahani; Roya Taleban; Ali Asilian; Mohammad Ali Nilforoushzadeh; Fariba Jaffary; Marjan Mansourian; Fatemeh Sokhanvari; Nazli Ansari

    2017-01-01

    Introduction:Different studies undertaken in the animal modeling show that Interferon-gamma deficiency impairs healing process of Leishmania infection. It seems that the level of Interferon-gamma production could also affect the healing duration of Leishmania lesion in humans. The current study aims to investigate the possibility of Interferon-gamma application for recognition of cases afflicted by non-healing Leishmaniasis. Materials and methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of...

  9. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Arndt

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  10. The effect of whole body vibration on fracture healing – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review examines the efficacy and safety of whole body vibration (WBV on fracture healing. A systematic literature search was conducted with relevant keywords in PubMed and Embase, independently, by two reviewers. Original animal and clinical studies about WBV effects on fracture healing with available full-text and written in English were included. Information was extracted from the included studies for review. In total, 19 articles about pre-clinical studies were selected. Various vibration regimes are reported; of those, the frequencies of 35 Hz and 50 Hz show better results than others. Most of the studies show positive effects on fracture healing after vibration treatment and the responses to vibration are better in ovariectomised (OVX animals than non-OVX ones. However, several studies provide insufficient evidence to support an improvement of fracture healing after vibration and one study even reports disruption of fracture healing after vibration. In three studies, vibration results in positive effects on angiogenesis at the fracture site and surrounding muscles during fracture healing. No serious complications or side effects of vibration are found in these studies. WBV is suggested to be beneficial in improving fracture healing in animals without safety problem reported. In order to apply vibration on fractured patients, more well-designed randomised controlled clinical trials are needed to examine its efficacy, regimes and safety.

  11. Early mechanical stimulation only permits timely bone healing in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufekci, Pelin; Tavakoli, Aramesh; Dlaska, Constantin; Neumann, Mirjam; Shanker, Mihir; Saifzadeh, Siamak; Steck, Roland; Schuetz, Michael; Epari, Devakar

    2018-06-01

    Bone fracture healing is sensitive to the fixation stability. However, it is unclear which phases of healing are mechano-sensitive and if mechanical stimulation is required throughout repair. In this study, a novel bone defect model, which isolates an experimental fracture from functional loading, was applied in sheep to investigate if stimulation limited to the early proliferative phase is sufficient for bone healing. An active fixator controlled motion in the fracture. Animals of the control group were unstimulated. In the physiological-like group, 1 mm axial compressive movements were applied between day 5 and 21, thereafter the movements were decreased in weekly increments and stopped after 6 weeks. In the early stimulatory group, the movements were stopped after 3 weeks. The experimental fractures were evaluated with mechanical and micro-computed tomography methods after 9 weeks healing. The callus strength of the stimulated fractures (physiological-like and early stimulatory) was greater than the unstimulated control group. The control group was characterized by minimal external callus formation and a lack of bone bridging at 9 weeks. In contrast, the stimulated groups exhibited advanced healing with solid bone formation across the defect. This was confirmed quantitatively by a lower bone volume in the control group compared to the stimulated groups.The novel experimental model permits the application of a well-defined load history to an experimental bone fracture. The poor healing observed in the control group is consistent with under-stimulation. This study has shown early mechanical stimulation only is sufficient for a timely healing outcome. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:1790-1796, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Methyl methacrylate as a healing agent for self-healing cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tittelboom, K; De Belie, N; Adesanya, K; Dubruel, P; Van Puyvelde, P

    2011-01-01

    Different types of healing agents have already been tested on their efficiency for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Generally, commercial healing agents are used while their properties are adjusted for manual crack repair and not for autonomous crack healing. Consequently, the amount of regain in properties due to self-healing of cracks is limited. In this research, a methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based healing agent was developed specifically for use in self-healing cementitious materials. Various parameters were optimized including the viscosity, curing time, strength, etc. After the desired properties were obtained, the healing agent was encapsulated and screened for its self-healing efficiency. The decrease in water permeability due to autonomous crack healing using MMA as a healing agent was similar to the results obtained for manually healed cracks. First results seem promising: however, further research needs to be undertaken in order to obtain an optimal healing agent ready for use in practice

  13. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...... are faring. From the utilitarian perspective, the use of sentient animals in research that may harm them is an ethical issue, but harm done to animals can be balanced by benefit generated for humans and other animals. The animal rights view, when thoroughgoing, is abolitionist as regards the use of animals...

  14. Inter-species investigation of the mechano-regulation of bone healing: comparison of secondary bone healing in sheep and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Sara; Prendergast, Patrick J; Duda, Georg N

    2011-04-29

    Inter-species differences in regeneration exist in various levels. One aspect is the dynamics of bone regeneration and healing, e.g. small animals show a faster healing response when compared to large animals. Mechanical as well as biological factors are known to play a key role in the process. However, it remains so far unknown whether different animals follow at all comparable mechano-biological rules during tissue regeneration, and in particular during bone healing. In this study, we investigated whether differences observed in vivo in the dynamics of bone healing between rat and sheep are only due to differences in the animal size or whether these animals have a different mechano-biological response during the healing process. Histological sections from in vivo experiments were compared to in silico predictions of a mechano-biological computer model for the simulation of bone healing. Investigations showed that the healing processes in both animal models occur under significantly different levels of mechanical stimuli within the callus region, which could explain histological observations of early intramembranous ossification at the endosteal side. A species-specific adaptation of a mechano-biological model allowed a qualitative match of model predictions with histological observations. Specifically, when keeping cell activity processes at the same rate, the amount of tissue straining defining favorable mechanical conditions for the formation of bone had to be increased in the large animal model, with respect to the small animal, to achieve a qualitative agreement of model predictions with histological data. These findings illustrate that geometrical (size) differences alone cannot explain the distinctions seen in the histological appearance of secondary bone healing in sheep and rat. It can be stated that significant differences in the mechano-biological regulation of the healing process exist between these species. Future investigations should aim towards

  15. Ascorbic acid for the healing of skin wounds in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CC. Lima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Healing is a complex process that involves cellular and biochemical events. Several medicines have been used in order to shorten healing time and avoid aesthetic damage. OBJECTIVE: to verify the topical effect of ascorbic acid for the healing of rats' skin wounds through the number of macrophages, new vessels and fibroblast verifications in the experimental period; and analyse the thickness and the collagen fibre organization in the injured tissue. METHODS: Male Rattus norvegicus weighing 270 ± 30 g were used. After thionembutal anesthesia, 15 mm transversal incisions were made in the animals' cervical backs. They were divided into two groups: Control Group (CG, n = 12 - skin wound cleaned with water and soap daily; Treated Group (TG, n = 12 - skin wound cleaned daily and treated with ascorbic acid cream (10%. Samples of skin were collected on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days. The sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and picrosirius red for morphologic analysis. The images were obtained and analysed by a Digital Analyser System. RESULTS: The ascorbic acid acted on every stage of the healing process. It reduced the number of macrophages, increased the proliferation of fibroblasts and new vessels, and stimulated the synthesis of thicker and more organized collagen fibres in the wounds when compared to CG. CONCLUSION: Ascorbic acid was shown to have anti-inflammatory and healing effects, guaranteeing a suiTable environment and conditions for faster skin repair.

  16. The Role of Iron in the Skin & Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Anne Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA 320-400 nm portion of the ultraviolet spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anaemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anaemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anaemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialisation. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localised iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary haemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anaemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron haemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation.

  17. Naturally Occurring Wound Healing Agents: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanagioti, E G; Assimopoulou, A N

    2016-01-01

    Nature constitutes a pool of medicines for thousands of years. Nowadays, trust in nature is increasingly growing, as many effective medicines are naturally derived. Over the last decades, the potential of plants as wound healing agents is being investigated. Wounds and ulcers affect the patients' life quality and often lead to amputations. Approximately 43,000,000 patients suffer from diabetic foot ulcers worldwide. Annually, $25 billion are expended for the treatment of chronic wounds, with the number growing due to aging population and increased incidents of diabetes and obesity. Therefore a timely, orderly and effective wound management and treatment is crucial. This paper aims to systematically review natural products, mainly plants, with scientifically well documented wound healing activity, focusing on articles based on animal and clinical studies performed worldwide and approved medicinal products. Moreover, a brief description of the wound healing mechanism is presented, to provide a better understanding. Although a plethora of natural products are in vitro and in vivo evaluated for wound healing activity, only a few go through clinical trials and even fewer launch the market as approved medicines. Most of them rely on traditional medicine, indicating that ethnopharmacology is a successful strategy for drug development. Since only 6% of plants have been systematically investigated pharmacologically, more intensified efforts and emerging advancements are needed to exploit the potentials of nature for the development of novel medicines. This paper aims to provide a reliable database and matrix for thorough further investigation towards the discovery of wound healing agents.

  18. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  19. Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act is concerned with regulating the registration, installation, operation, inspection and safety of X-ray machines. The Act provides for the establishment of the Healing Arts Radiation Protection Commission which is responsible for reporting on all the above matters to the Ontario Minister of Health. In addition the board is responsible for the continuing development of an X-ray safety code and for the submission of an annual report of their activities to the minister

  20. Healing of Stress Fracture in an Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    result of damage in vivo [1,15]. (with hydroxyl ions) at the surface of the hydroxyapatite crystal 54 35 Recently, we have found that positron emission...after loading. Scale bar = 500 pm. 4 1 Li ef al. / Bone xr (2005) xtx-xxv A B C -Comparison of Fatigue Loading with Loading without Fatigue AOL 2.0, I.O...groups in the hydroxyapatite crystal . a t P 3 267 of bone to form fluoroapatite. [𔃿 F]fluoride is deposited pre- The authors would like totha;lnBce Mock

  1. Scintigraphic follow-up of fracture healing in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, W.; Franke, W.G.; Schulze, M.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary bone fracture heating was analysed by scintigraphic follow-up studies in rabbits using sup(99m)Tc-HEDP. 24 hours after fracture the activity ratio between the fractured and the non-fractured lower limb was 2,2. The maximal count density in the fracture region is found during the 14th and 28th day after fracture. Concomitantly there is a significant increase of bone marrow vessels and content of copper, magnesium, sodium and water in the callus. Although roentgenographic controls and static investigations with respect to consolidation reveal a complete heating already 126 days after fracture, the complete scintigraphic normalisation of the lower limb fracture of the rabbit is found not earlier than at the 203rd day after fracture. (orig.) [de

  2. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Healing: through the lens of intentionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahourek, Rothlyn P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and studying healing is one of our challenges as health care providers. This study is a presentation of a secondary analysis of data collected to study intentionality in the context of healing. Six healers and 6 healees, five of each who participate as dyads, described their experiences and their concepts of healing. The theory, Intentionality: the Matrix for Healing (IMH), is presented along with a more expanded definition of healing as an awareness of shift and a transformative process.

  4. Healing history? Aboriginal healing, historical trauma, and personal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldram, James B

    2014-06-01

    What can an exploration of contemporary Aboriginal healing programs such as those offered in Canadian prisons and urban clinics tell us about the importance of history in understanding social and psychological pathology, and more significantly the salience of the concept of "historical trauma"? The form of Aboriginal "healing" that has emerged in recent decades to become dominant in many parts of the country is itself a reflection of historical processes and efforts to ameliorate the consequences of what is today often termed "historical trauma." In other words, contemporary notions of "healing" and the social, cultural, medical, and psychological disruption and distress caused by colonialism and captured in the term "historical trauma" have coevolved in an interdependent manner. I also argue that there is a tension between the attribution of this distress to both specific (e.g., residential schools) and generalized (e.g., colonialism) historical factors, as evident in the "historical trauma" concept, and the prevailing emphasis in many healing programs to encourage the individual to take personal responsibility for their situation and avoid attributing blame to other factors. I conclude that "historical trauma" represents an idiom of distress that captures a variety of historical and contemporary phenomena and which provides a language for expressing distress that is gaining currency, at least among scholars, and that the contemporary Aboriginal healing movement represents an effort to deal with the absence or failure of both "traditional" Aboriginal healing and government-sponsored medical and psychological services to adequately deal with this distress of colonialism. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. Rapid and reliable healing of critical size bone defects with genetically modified sheep muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Ferreira, E; Porter, R M; Glatt, V; Schinhan, M; Shen, Z; Randolph, M A; Kirker-Head, C A; Wehling, C; Vrahas, M S; Evans, C H; Wells, J W

    2015-09-21

    Large segmental defects in bone fail to heal and remain a clinical problem. Muscle is highly osteogenic, and preliminary data suggest that autologous muscle tissue expressing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) efficiently heals critical size defects in rats. Translation into possible human clinical trials requires, inter alia, demonstration of efficacy in a large animal, such as the sheep. Scale-up is fraught with numerous biological, anatomical, mechanical and structural variables, which cannot be addressed systematically because of cost and other practical issues. For this reason, we developed a translational model enabling us to isolate the biological question of whether sheep muscle, transduced with adenovirus expressing BMP-2, could heal critical size defects in vivo. Initial experiments in athymic rats noted strong healing in only about one-third of animals because of unexpected immune responses to sheep antigens. For this reason, subsequent experiments were performed with Fischer rats under transient immunosuppression. Such experiments confirmed remarkably rapid and reliable healing of the defects in all rats, with bridging by 2 weeks and remodelling as early as 3-4 weeks, despite BMP-2 production only in nanogram quantities and persisting for only 1-3 weeks. By 8 weeks the healed defects contained well-organised new bone with advanced neo-cortication and abundant marrow. Bone mineral content and mechanical strength were close to normal values. These data demonstrate the utility of this model when adapting this technology for bone healing in sheep, as a prelude to human clinical trials.

  6. Wound-healing activity of the skin of the common grape (Vitis Vinifera) variant, Cabernet Sauvignon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Ramdath, D Dan; Marshall, Julien R; Isitor, Godwin N; Eversley, Mathew; Xue, Sophia; Shi, John

    2010-08-01

    The common Grape L. (Vitaceae) is regarded as an important medicinal plant. European healers have suggested the use of grapevine sap, juice, and whole grape in the treatment of pain, allergic reactions, inflammation, and to promote wound healing. We evaluated grape-skin powder for its wound-healing activity using an excision wound model in rats. Animals were randomly divided into three groups of six (n = 6) each. The test group animals were treated topically with the grape-skin powder (100 mg/kg/day). The controls and standard group animals were treated with petroleum jelly and mupirocin ointment respectively. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialization, and hydroxyproline content. On day 13, treatment of the wounds with grape-skin powder enhanced significantly the rate of wound contraction (100 %). Treated animals showed significant decrease in the epithelialization period (p < 0.000) and increase in the hydroxyproline content (p < 0.05) when compared to control and the standard. Histological analysis was also consistent with the proposal that grape-skin powder exhibits significant wound-healing potential. Increased rate of wound contraction, hydroxyproline content, and decrease in epithelialization time in the treated animals support the use of grape-skin powder in the management of wound healing. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Local Delivery Is Critical for Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Mediated Site-Specific Murine Aneurysm Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Siham; Motwani, Kartik; Wajima, Daisuke; Fazal, Hanain; Jones, Chad H; Doré, Sylvain; Hosaka, Koji; Hoh, Brian L

    2018-01-01

    Local delivery of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) via our drug-eluting coil has been shown to promote intrasaccular aneurysm healing via an inflammatory pathway. In this study, we validate the importance of local MCP-1 in murine aneurysm healing. Whether systemic, rather than local, delivery of MCP-1 can direct site-specific aneurysm healing has significant translational implications. If systemic MCP-1 is effective, then MCP-1 could be administered as a pill rather than by endovascular procedure. Furthermore, we confirm that MCP-1 is the primary effector in our MCP-1 eluting coil-mediated murine aneurysm healing model. We compare aneurysm healing with repeated intraperitoneal MCP-1 versus vehicle injection, in animals with control poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-coated coils. We demonstrate elimination of the MCP-1-associated tissue-healing response by knockout of MCP-1 or CCR2 (MCP-1 receptor) and by selectively inhibiting MCP-1 or CCR2. Using immunofluorescent probing, we explore the cell populations found in healed aneurysm tissue following each intervention. Systemically administered MCP-1 with PLGA coil control does not produce comparable aneurysm healing, as seen with MCP-1 eluting coils. MCP-1-directed aneurysm healing is eliminated by selective inhibition of MCP-1 or CCR2 and in MCP-1-deficient or CCR2-deficient mice. No difference was detected in M2 macrophage and myofibroblast/smooth muscle cell staining with systemic MCP-1 versus vehicle in aneurysm wall, but a significant increase in these cell types was observed with MCP-1 eluting coil implant and attenuated by MCP-1/CCR2 blockade or deficiency. We show that systemic MCP-1 concurrent with PLGA-coated platinum coil implant is not sufficient to produce site-specific aneurysm healing. MCP-1 is a critical, not merely complementary, actor in the aneurysm healing pathway.

  8. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  9. Animal experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Laz, Alak; Cholakova, Tanya Stefanova; Vrablova, Sofia; Arshad, Naverawaheed

    2016-01-01

    Animal experimentation is a crucial part of medical science. One of the ways to define it is any scientific experiment conducted for research purposes that cause any kind of pain or suffering to animals. Over the years, the new discovered drugs or treatments are first applied on animals to test their positive outcomes to be later used by humans. There is a debate about violating ethical considerations by exploiting animals for human benefits. However, different ethical theories have been made...

  10. Early healing of the alveolar process after tooth extraction: an experimental study in the beagle dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discepoli, Nicola; Vignoletti, Fabio; Laino, Luigi; de Sanctis, Massimo; Muñoz, Fernando; Sanz, Mariano

    2013-06-01

    To describe the early healing events in the alveolar socket during the first 8 weeks of spontaneous healing after tooth extraction. 16 adult beagle dogs were selected and five healing periods were analysed (4 h, 1 week, 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks). Mandibular premolars were extracted and each socket corresponding to the mesial root was left to heal undisturbed. In each healing period, three animals were euthanatized, each providing four study sites. Healing was assessed by descriptive histology and by histometric analysis using as landmarks: the vertical distance between buccal and lingual crest (B'L') and the width of buccal and lingual walls at three different levels. Differences between means for each variable for each healing period were compared (ANOVA; p healing period to a final value of 0.18 (0.08) mm. The lingual width (Lw) remains almost unchanged while the buccal width (Bw) at 1 (Bw1) and 2 (Bw2) mm was reduced in about 40% of its initial value. Minor vertical bone reduction in both the buccal and lingual socket walls were observed. A marked horizontal reduction of the buccal bone wall was observed mostly in its coronal aspect. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  12. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political

  13. Interior design and healing architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig; Hansen, Allan Grutt

    2015-01-01

    . Through a mixed-method study, 43 patients from the outpatient-lung department at Hospital Vendsyssel, Denmark were presented with different types of furniture and materials and were asked about their preferences. Additional questions on their experience of the hospital interior were asked to guide......Hospital design is today influenced by the design concept healing architecture, stating that the patients’ healing process is promoted through accommodating physical surroundings. However, despite the increasing amount of research in the field of healing architecture, research on interior design...... and materials are rather limited. To compliment research in hospital interior design with particular focus on the use of interior textiles, this pilot study explores if the patients’ preferences for more home-like hospital interiors can be linked to a preference for textile-based furniture and materials...

  14. Self-healing of polymer modified concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd_Elmoaty M. Abd_Elmoaty

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Self healing phenomenon of concrete has been observed in traditional, fibrous, self compacting concrete. This phenomenon occurred mainly due to the presence of unhydrated cement particles in the presence of water. Mechanism of polymer in concrete depends on creating a layer and net of polymer around cement particles which enhances the properties of polymer modified concrete. This mechanism may affect the self healing of this type of concrete. This work aims to study the presence of the self healing phenomenon in polymer modified concrete and the related parameters. An experimental investigation on self healing of polymer modified concrete was undertaken. In this research work, effect of polymer type, polymer dose, cement content, cement type, w/cm ratio and age of damage were studied. The healing process extended up to 60 days. Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to evaluate the healing process. Results indicated that, the self healing phenomenon existed in polymer modified concrete as in traditional concrete. The increase of polymer dose increases the healing degree at the same healing time. This increase depends on polymer type. Also, the decrease of w/cm ratio reduces the self healing degree while the use of Type V Portland cement improves the self healing process compared with Type I Portland cement. Cement content has an insignificant effect on healing process for both concrete with and without polymer. In addition, the increase of damage age decreases the efficiency of self healing process.

  15. Holistic nurses' stories of healing of another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzman Hines, Mary; Wardell, Diane Wind; Engebretson, Joan; Zahourek, Rothlyn; Smith, Marlaine C

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the essence and meaning of healing through narrative accounts of holistic nurses, using a qualitative, descriptive design integrating narrative and story inquiry. Twenty-five stories were collected. Seven stories revealed personal healing and have been published in a prior article. Eighteen stories, the focus of this analysis, revealed healing of another. A hybrid method blending narrative and story guided the overall process for the study. Nine themes emerged describing healing of another within three story segments: The Call to Healing, The Experience of Healing, and Insights. The theme within The Call to the Healing Encounter was Drawn by Compassion to the Vulnerability and/or Suffering of Another. Five themes describe the Experience of Healing: Connection: Cocreating Relationships; Taking Risks and Dealing With Skeptical Colleagues; Use of Modalities and Actions as Tools in Developing Self as an Instrument of Healing; Profound, Ineffable Events; and Using Metaphor and Rituals to Describe Healing. Three themes describe Insights: Mutual Transformation, Change, and Reciprocity; Gratitude for the Healing Encounter; and Leaving a Legacy. The metastory, a reconstructed story created by the researchers, was the final phase of research synthesizing and demonstrating themes of healing of another. Results were compared to existing healing literature. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Adenosine Receptors and Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce N. Cronstein

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that application of topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists promotes more rapid wound closure and clinical studies are currently underway to determine the utility of topical A2A adenosine receptor agonists in the therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. The effects of adenosine A2A receptors on the cells and tissues of healing wounds have only recently been explored. We review here the known effects of adenosine A2A receptor occupancy on the cells involved in wound healing.

  17. [Wound healing in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eming, S A; Wlaschek, M; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K

    2016-02-01

    Restoration of tissue integrity is essential for host defense and protection of the organism. The efficacy and quality of skin repair varies significantly over a person's lifetime. Whereas prenatal wound healing is characterized by regeneration and scarless healing, scarring, fibrosis, and loss of function are features of postnatal repair. In fact, aging is the prominent risk factor for chronic wounds, skin fragility, infections, comorbidities, and decreased quality of life. Current strategies for restoration of tissue integrity and wound therapy are not sufficient and require further investigation of the underlying pathomechanisms and the development of causal-based concepts.

  18. Role of whole bone marrow, whole bone marrow cultured cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in chronic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Shareef, Shahjahan; Salgado, Marcela; Shabbir, Arsalan; Van Badiavas, Evangelos

    2015-03-13

    Recent evidence has shown that bone marrow cells play critical roles during the inflammatory, proliferative and remodeling phases of cutaneous wound healing. Among the bone marrow cells delivered to wounds are stem cells, which can differentiate into multiple tissue-forming cell lineages to effect, healing. Gaining insight into which lineages are most important in accelerating wound healing would be quite valuable in designing therapeutic approaches for difficult to heal wounds. In this report we compared the effect of different bone marrow preparations on established in vitro wound healing assays. The preparations examined were whole bone marrow (WBM), whole bone marrow (long term initiating/hematopoietic based) cultured cells (BMC), and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). We also applied these bone marrow preparations in two murine models of radiation induced delayed wound healing to determine which had a greater effect on healing. Angiogenesis assays demonstrated that tube formation was stimulated by both WBM and BMC, with WBM having the greatest effect. Scratch wound assays showed higher fibroblast migration at 24, 48, and 72 hours in presence of WBM as compared to BM-MSC. WBM also appeared to stimulate a greater healing response than BMC and BM-MSC in a radiation induced delayed wound healing animal model. These studies promise to help elucidate the role of stem cells during repair of chronic wounds and reveal which cells present in bone marrow might contribute most to the wound healing process.

  19. Self Healing Coating/Film Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Burton; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Mullenix, Pamela; Calle, Luz; Williams, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing self healing materials and technologies. This project seeks to further develop self healing functionality in thin films for applications such as corrosion protective coatings, inflatable structures, space suit materials, and electrical wire insulation.

  20. Wound healing modulators in a tracheoplasty canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Zúñiga, J Raúl; Hernández-Jiménez, Claudia; Díaz-Martínez, Emmanuel; Jasso-Victoria, Rogelio; Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, Miguel O; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Baltazares-Lipp, Matilde; Santillán-Doherty, Patricio; Santibáñez-Salgado, J Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    Postsurgical tracheal stenosis results from fibrosis formation due to ischemia. There are healing modulators, hyaluronic acid (HA) and collagen polyvinylpyrrolidone (CPVP), which reduce collagen fibers formation. Thus we can hypothesize that the topical application of one of these modulators can diminish postsurgical tracheal scarring and stenosis. The aim of this work was to evaluate the macroscopic, microscopic, and biochemical changes of tracheal healing after the application of HA or CPVP in a canine tracheoplasty model. The study design was prospective experimental investigation in a canine model. Eighteen mongrel dogs underwent three cervical tracheal rings resection and end-to-end anastomosis. They were randomized into three groups according to treatment: group I (control group) (n = 6), topical application of saline solution on tracheal anastomosis; group II (n = 6), topical application of 15 microg HA on tracheal anastomosis; and group III (n = 6), topical application of 2.5 mg CPVP on tracheal anastomosis. They were evaluated clinical, radiological and tracheoscopically during 4 weeks. They were euthanized at the end of the study time. Macroscopic, microscopic, and biochemical changes of tracheal anastomosis healing were analyzed. Collagen formation was quantified by the Woessner method. All the animals survived the surgical procedure and study period. Macroscopic, radiologic, and endoscopic studies showed that animals in group I developed tracheal stenosis, inflammation, and firm fibrous tissue formation, and histological studies also showed severe inflammatory reaction and fibrosis formation. Groups II (HA) and III (CPVP) showed well-organized thin collagen fibers with minimal inflammatory response. Biochemical evaluation revealed a higher collagen concentration in group I animals (analysis of variance [ANOVA] p anastomosis diminished the degree of stenosis and inflammatory reaction. Both modulators improved tracheal healing.

  1. Shamanic Healing for Veterans with PTSD: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Shainsky, Lauri; Weaver, Angela; Engels-Smith, Jan

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious health concern. Current evidence-based treatments for PTSD are efficacious; however, they are not appropriate or tolerated by everyone who needs them. Alternative treatment approaches are needed. Shamanic healing is one such therapy that may potentially be beneficial but no systematic research has been conducted on it for PTSD. The objectives of the case series are to (1) develop a structured replicable shamanic treatment plan for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); (2) collect preliminary data on PTSD-related outcomes, and (3) explore the feasibility and potential for adverse events of the plan. Case series. Clinical. Veterans with PTSD. Shamanic healing. PTSD symptoms, quality of life, and piritual wellness. A semi-structured shamanic healing protocol was created with the following components: rapport building, power animal retrieval, extraction, compassionate spirit release, curse unraveling, soul retrieval, forgiveness/cord-cutting, aspect maturing/soul rematrixing, and divination. Six veterans enrolled in the study (mean age = 49.3 ± 13.1). Qualitative descriptions of the participants, their histories, and effects from the intervention are reported. Preliminary data was collected on PTSD-related outcomes. The protocol was found feasible and acceptable and recommendations for its future use are suggested. Future research is warranted and needed to evaluate the efficacy of shamanic healing as a potential therapy for veterans with PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of the anabolic agent flavichromin on osteotomy healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schargus, G.

    1982-01-01

    In this work it was attempted to attain a quicker consolidation of bone fragments in rabbits after they had undergone a lower jaw osteotomy and fragment fixation and had been treated with the usual osteosynthetic medications as well as doses of the anabolic agent flavichromin to stimulate bone healing. The healing progress of the first four post-operative weeks was clinically, radiologically, and also histologically assessed and it was also attempted to test the value of densitometrically studying the X-ray pictures as a quantitative measurement of the re-mineralisation of the fracture line. Although animal-specific studies do not allow themselves to be directly applied to humans, because the osteogenesis rates differ too greatly from humans and though further studies on dogs should be undertaken, in order to make a more conclusive statement, flavichromin because of its easy applicability should be considered for future use on humans, especially in cases with healing complications. In the healing of bone defects, flavichromin should be considered. (TRV) [de

  3. ACL Graft Healing and Biologics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Bowman, Karl F.; Bedi, Asheesh

    2013-01-01

    Operative reconstruction of a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has become the most broadly accepted treatment. An important, but underreported, outcome of ACL reconstruction is graft failure, which poses a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. An understanding of the tendon-bone healing and the

  4. Healing Magazine, Volume 8, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003

    This volume of "Healing Magazine" features practical, clinical information aimed at sharing current work in children's mental health. The first issue contains articles on intervention for self-injurious behavior, providing school-based grief groups, effectively using time-out as a parenting tool, and KidsPeace's suicide prevention…

  5. Numerical modelling of self healing mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmers, J.J.C.; Borst, de R.; Zwaag, van der S.

    2007-01-01

    A number of self healing mechanisms for composite materials have been presented in the previous chapters of this book. These methods vary from the classical concept of micro-encapsulating of healing agents in polymer systems to the autonomous healing of concrete. The key feature of these self

  6. Evaluating Self Healing Capability of Bituminous Mastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiu, J.; Van de Ven, M.; Wu, S.; Yu, J.; Molenaar, A.

    2012-01-01

    The self-healing capability of bituminous materials has been known for many years. Researches were mostly focused on the self healing behaviour during load repetitions. The tests are either time consuming and/or complex. In this paper, a simple self healing test procedure is presented combining the

  7. Ovariectomy delays alveolar wound healing after molar extractions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Michele Conceição; Zecchin, Karina Gottardello; Campagnoli, Eduardo Bauml; Jorge, Jacks

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the morphological effects of the absence of estrogen on alveolar wound healing of young female rats after tooth extraction. A total of 60 4- to 6-week-old female rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) or sham operations. Three weeks later, the first mandibular molars were extracted. Subsequently, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, or 28 days after tooth extraction. The mandibles were removed, and serial transversal sections of mesial alveolus of the first mandibular molars were obtained for histometric analysis. OVX sockets showed significant increases in fibroblasts and collagen content 3 and 5 days after the extractions, followed by significant decreases in these parameters in the subsequent periods. In accordance with the decreased collagen content in the latest period of healing, new bone formation was significantly reduced in the OVX animals. These findings suggest that the initial molecular changes observed in the absence of estrogen lead to delayed alveolar wound healing.

  8. The Effect of Low Molecular Weight Heparins on Fracture Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Nastoulis, Evangelos; Demesticha, Theano; Demetriou, Thespis

    2015-01-01

    Venous Thromboembolism is a serious complication in the trauma patient. The most commonly studied and used anticoagulant treatment in prophylaxis of thrombosis is heparin. The prolonged use of unfractionated heparin has been connected with increased incidence of osteoporotic fractures. Low molecular-weight-heparins (LMWHs) have been the golden rule in antithrombotic therapy during the previous two decades as a way to overcome the major drawbacks of unfractioned heparin. However there are few studies reporting the effects of LMWHs on bone repair after fractures. This review presents the studies about the effects of LMWHs on bone biology (bone cells and bone metabolism) and underlying the mechanisms by which LMWHs may impair fracture healing process. The authors' research based on literature concluded that there are no facts and statistics for the role of LMWHs on fracture healing process in humans and the main body of evidence of their role comes from in vitro and animal studies. Further large clinical studies designed to compare different types of LMWHs, in different dosages and in different patient or animal models are needed for exploring the effects of LMWHs on fracture healing process.

  9. Sigmund Freud: pioneer in energy healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Stephen D; Edwards, David J

    2010-02-01

    Energy healing is a popular contemporary term for forms of healing that facilitate a natural healing process through harmonizing, rebalancing, and releasing energy flow disturbed or blocked by disease and illness. Biographical evidence indicates that Freud used physical, suggestive, and radiant forms of energy healing, and that his personal life, metapsychology, and psychoanalysis were founded on dynamic, energetic experiences and conceptualizations. Analysis of Freud's life and work leads to the conclusion that in experience, theory, and practice, Freud typified the traditional role of therapist and was a pioneer in modern forms of energy healing.

  10. Sacred space and the healing journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Paul L

    2017-07-01

    Sacred space and spirituality have long been used to heal the mind, body, and spirit. This article illuminates the origins of sacred space and its role as a healing environment from the first human construct, the burial mound, to the 5th Century BCE Greek healing city of Epidaurus. It then examines the role of spirituality as one of the necessary human institutions for a healthy society, according to the Italian philosopher Giambattista Vico. The conclusion then surveys three contemporary healing environments' architecture, the Department of Veteran Affairs Healing Environment Design Guideline (VAHEDG), and how these sacred spaces mend individual and community ailments.

  11. Animated Asphalt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Camilla Skovbjerg

    2015-01-01

    to be understood? How does animation differ in different media? And in particular by focusing on and questioning the gender positions inherent in Mitchell’s theory. Animation has an erotic component of seduction and desire, and what pictures want, becomes for Mitchell, what women want. There is of course no simple...

  12. Animal magic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Writing a popular-science book about animal biophysics is hard work. Authors must read through hundreds of research papers as the subject is so multidisciplinary. On both counts of research and writing, Matin Durrani and Liz Kalaugher have done a good to excellent job with their book Furry Logic: the Physics of Animal Life

  13. Animal ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about...

  14. ANIMAL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes ANIMAL, a two-dimensional Eulerian magnetohydrodynamic computer code. ANIMAL's physical model also appears. Formulated are temporal and spatial finite-difference equations in a manner that facilitates implementation of the algorithm. Outlined are the functions of the algorithm's FORTRAN subroutines and variables

  15. Animal Detectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Bridget; Warnock, Carly

    2015-01-01

    During a two-week inquiry-based 5E learning cycle unit, children made observations and inferences to guide their explorations of animal traits and habitats (Bybee 2014). The children became "animal detectives" by studying a live-feed webcam and digital images of wolves in their natural habitat, reading books and online sources about…

  16. Animation & Neurocinematics*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción

    2015-01-01

    , indeed, can be considered a social/ emotional learning media, which goes beyond the limitations of live action movies. This is due to the diversity of techniques, and its visual plasticity that constructs the impossible. Animators are not real actors but more like the midwife who brings the anima...... into aliveness, which requires knowing how emotions work. Ed Hooks as an expert in training animators and actors, always remarks: “emotions tend to lead to action”. In this paper we want to argue that by producing animated films, as we watch them, cause a stronger effect, not only in our brains, but also in our...... bodies. By using animation as a learning tool we can explore the world of emotions and question beliefs, feelings and actions in order to express our voices and enhance our communication, and well-being, both, internally and with others. Animation can be the visual expression of the emotions in movement...

  17. Longitudinal analysis of osteogenic and angiogenic signaling factors in healing models mimicking atrophic and hypertrophic non-unions in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Minkwitz

    Full Text Available Impaired bone healing can have devastating consequences for the patient. Clinically relevant animal models are necessary to understand the pathology of impaired bone healing. In this study, two impaired healing models, a hypertrophic and an atrophic non-union, were compared to physiological bone healing in rats. The aim was to provide detailed information about differences in gene expression, vascularization and histology during the healing process. The change from a closed fracture (healing control group to an open osteotomy (hypertrophy group led to prolonged healing with reduced mineralized bridging after 42 days. RT-PCR data revealed higher gene expression of most tested osteogenic and angiogenic factors in the hypertrophy group at day 14. After 42 days a significant reduction of gene expression was seen for Bmp4 and Bambi in this group. The inhibition of angiogenesis by Fumagillin (atrophy group decreased the formation of new blood vessels and led to a non-healing situation with diminished chondrogenesis. RT-PCR results showed an attempt towards overcoming the early perturbance by significant up regulation of the angiogenic regulators Vegfa, Angiopoietin 2 and Fgf1 at day 7 and a further continuous increase of Fgf1, -2 and Angiopoietin 2 over time. However µCT angiograms showed incomplete recovery after 42 days. Furthermore, lower expression values were detected for the Bmps at day 14 and 21. The Bmp antagonists Dan and Twsg1 tended to be higher expressed in the atrophy group at day 42. In conclusion, the investigated animal models are suitable models to mimic human fracture healing complications and can be used for longitudinal studies. Analyzing osteogenic and angiogenic signaling patterns, clear changes in expression were identified between these three healing models, revealing the importance of a coordinated interplay of different factors to allow successful bone healing.

  18. Effects on Glycemic Control in Impaired Wound Healing in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) Fatty Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuhiro, Miyajima; Hui Teoh, Soon; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Shinohara, Masami; Fatchiyah, Fatchiyah; Ohta, Takeshi; Yamada, Takahisa

    2018-02-01

    Impaired diabetic wound healing is an important issue in diabetic complications. The present study aims to evaluate the protective effect on glycemic control against impaired diabetic wound healing using a diabetic rat model. We investigated the wound healing process and effect on the impaired wound repair by glycemic control in the Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) fatty rat, which is a new animal model of obese type 2 diabetes and may be a good model for study impaired wound healing. Male SDT fatty rats at 15 weeks of age were administered orally with sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor for 3 weeks. Wounds were induced at 2 weeks after SGLT 2 inhibitor treatment, and the wound areas were periodically examined in morphological and histological analyses. The SDT fatty rats showed a delayed wound healing as compared with the normal rats, but a glycemic control improved the impaired wound healing. In histological analysis in the skin of SDT fatty rats showed severe infiltration of inflammatory cell, hemorrhage and many bacterial masses in the remaining and slight fibrosis of crust on skin tissue . Thought that this results skin performance to be a delay of crust formation and regeneration of epithelium; however, these findings were ameliorated in the SGLT 2 inhibitor treated group. Glycemic control is effective for treatment in diabetic wounds and the SDT fatty rat may be useful to investigate pathophysiological changes in impaired diabetic wound healing.

  19. [Wound healing is still a game of " blind men and an elephant"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, C M

    2016-10-20

    The wound healing includes non-healing and overhealing of the wounds. The results of wound healing are well known by people such as non-healing of the diabetic ulcer or hypertrophic scar after deep burn. In this issue, three papers involve in wound healing, one about autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells injected into wound or scar of rabbit ear, one about severe hypoxia and hypoalbuminemia inducing human hypertrophic scar derived fibroblast apoptosis in vitro, and another about the dysfunction of protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway contributing to the pathophysiological characteristics of diabetic skin and non-healing wound. The basic problem of hypertrophic scar study is lacking an ideal animal model. Although rabbit ear model or red Duroc pig model has been used widely for study on hypertrophic scar, they can not fully represent human dermal fibrosis after deep trauma on the skin. I recommend A novel nude mouse model of hypertrophic scarring using scratched full thickness human skin grafts recently published in Advances in Wound Care to the readers. The author emphasizes that the wound healing study is still in the situation like the game of " blind men and an elephant" .

  20. FLUOXETINE INHIBITS OSTEOBLAST DIFFERENTIATION & MINERALIZATION IN FRACTURE HEALING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Josephson, Anne M; Mehta, Devan; Mizrahi, Matthew; Neibart, Shane S; Liu, Chao; Kennedy, Oran; Castillo, Alesha B; Egol, Kenneth A; Leucht, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Chronic use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of depression has been linked to osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SSRI use on fracture healing in two murine models of bone regeneration. First, we performed a comprehensive analysis of endochondral bone healing in a femur fracture model. C57/BL6 mice treated with fluoxetine, the most commonly prescribed SSRI, developed a normal cartilaginous soft-callus at 14 days after fracture and demonstrated a significantly smaller and biomechanically weaker bony hard-callus at 28 days. In order to further dissect the mechanism that resulted in a smaller bony regenerate, we used an intramembranous model of bone healing and revealed that fluoxetine treatment resulted in a significantly smaller bony callus at 7 and 14 days postinjury. In order to test whether the smaller bony regenerate following fluoxetine treatment was caused by an inhibition of osteogenic differentiation and/or mineralization, we employed in vitro experiments, which established that fluoxetine treatment decreases osteogenic differentiation and mineralization and that this effect is serotonin-independent. Finally, in a translational approach, we tested whether cessation of the medication would result in restoration of the regenerative potential. However, histologic and µCT analysis revealed non-union formation in these animals with fibrous tissue interposition within the callus. In conclusion, fluoxetine exerts a direct, inhibitory effect on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, shown in two disparate murine models of bone repair. Discontinuation of the drug did not result in restoration of the healing potential, but rather led to complete arrest of the repair process. Besides the well-established effect of SSRIs on bone homeostasis, our study provides strong evidence that fluoxetine use negatively impacts fracture healing. PMID:27869327

  1. Curcumin and its topical formulations for wound healing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2017-10-01

    Oxidative damage and inflammation have been identified, through clinical and preclinical studies, as the main causes of nonhealing chronic wounds. Reduction of persistent chronic inflammation by application of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents such as curcumin has been well studied. However, low aqueous solubility, poor tissue absorption, rapid metabolism and short plasma half-life have made curcumin unsuitable for systemic administration for better wound healing. Recently, various topical formulations of curcumin such as films, fibers, emulsion, hydrogels and different nanoformulations have been developed for targeted delivery of curcumin at wounded sites. In this review, we summarize and discuss different topical formulations of curcumin with emphasis on their wound-healing properties in animal models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of nicotine on bone healing and osseointegration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balatsouka, Dimitra; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Lindh, Christian H

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the short-term effect of nicotine on bone healing and osseointegration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen female rabbits were divided into two groups. The test group was exposed to nicotine tartrate for 8 weeks and the control group was exposed to placebo. Nicotine or placebo...... was administered via a miniosmotic pump and plasma cotinine levels were measured weekly. The pump delivered 15 mg of nicotine/day for the animals in the test group. All rabbits had three tibial bone preparations. In the proximal and distal bone bed, implants were placed after 4 weeks (right tibia) and after 6...... and the control group. CONCLUSION: Nicotine exposure in a short period of time did not have a significant impact on bone healing or implant osseointegration in rabbits....

  3. Computed tomography and plain radiography in experimental fracture healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, E.M.; Goldstein, S.A.; Ku, J.; Smith, P.; Matthews, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the relative contribution of plain radiographs and computed tomography to the assessment of fracture healing under experimental circumstances. In 15 sheep, we performed midshaft femoral osteotomies and internal fixation of the resultant segmental fractures. Radiographs were obtained preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. Animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, 24 weeks, and 36 weeks after surgery, and the femoral specimens radiographed. After removal of the internal fixation devices, computed tomographic scans of the specimens were performed. Computed tomography may be of value in the evaluation of fractures of long bones in those cases in which clinical examination and plain radiographs fail to give adequate information as to the status of healing. (orig./SHA)

  4. Animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  5. Animal Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ludrovcová

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: The research is aimed to the animal transports issue, from two points of view – first is the animal cruelty and second is the policy and economic consideration. The goal is to acquaint the readers with the transports risks and its cruelty and evaluation of the economic, political aspects for he involved countries. The study is oriented on more points of view, what is rare in works with a similar theme. Method: This paper examines many issues and examinations from different authors and subsequently summarized the findings with authors own knowledge to one expanded unit. Results: Results proves, that livestock transports have negative impact on animal´s health, environment. Number of transported animals is rising every year. Society: Research familiarize the society with the animal transports, cruelty against animals during them, and influence of transports on some countries, their economy, policy. People get better informed and can form their own opinion on this topic. They may start acting, undertaking some steps to improve the present situation, what could help a lot to animals and environment. Limitations / further research: Future research could show progress and improvement of transports, quality of food supply and economics.

  6. The healing of fractured bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, G E [Central Electricity Generating Board, Cheltenham (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01

    A method utilising neutron beams of width 1 mm, used on D1B (2.4 A) and D20 (1.3 A) to study the healing of fractured bones is presented. It is found that the callus bone uniting the fractured tibia of a sheep, whose healing had been encouraged by daily mechanical vibration over a period of three months, showed no trace of the large preferential vertical orientation of the apatite crystals which is characteristic of the normal bone. Nevertheless the bone had regained about 60% of its mechanical strength and the callus bone, although not oriented, was well crystallized. It is considered that the new monochromator for D20, expected to give increased intensity at 2.5 A, will be of considerable advantage. (author). 2 refs.

  7. Molecular biology of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalliappan Ganapathy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a dynamic process that involves the integrated action of a number of cell types, the extra cellular matrix, and soluble mediators termed cytokines.In recent years considerable advances have been made in the research, knowledge, and understanding of growth factors. Growth factors are, in essence, proteins that communicate activities to cells. Their function is dependent on the receptor site they attach to. Growth factors were initially named for the type of response generated by them, but newer research has shown that many of these cells may accomplish many different types of response. A growth factor′s role in wound repair is a critical component of the successful resolution of a wound. Growth factors help regulate many of the activities involved in healing. The role and function of growth factor is an evolving area of science and offers the potential for treatment alternatives in the future.

  8. Gastronomy healing after transgastric peritoneoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Anders Meller; Andersen, Luise; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Reliable closure and infection prevention are the main barriers for implementation of pure transgastric peritoneoscopy. The primary aim of this study was to assess healing of over the scope clip (OTSC) closed gastrotomies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Pure transgastric peritoneoscopy was ...... adhering to the per protocol definition. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided access was difficult. It lacks reproducibility and needs refinement. Despite a combined decontamination regimen, infectious complications still occurred....

  9. Pain sensitivity and healing of hot-iron cattle brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, C B; Mintline, E M; Banuelos, J; Walker, K A; Hoar, B; Varga, A; Drake, D; Weary, D M

    2014-12-01

    Hot-iron branding is painful for cattle, but little is known about the duration of or effective methods to control this pain. This work quantified pain sensitivity and healing in branded and unbranded animals. In addition, the effects of a single injection of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) were also considered; this has been suggested as practical method of mitigating pain in the hours after the procedure. Calves (mean±SE, 126±2.2 d and 112±2.8 kg) were hot-iron branded and allocated to 1 of 4 treatments: branded with or without flunixin meglumine (intravenous; 1.1 mg/kg) and unbranded with or without this NSAID (n=12/treatment). Pain sensitivity was assessed by applying a known and increasing force with a von Frey anesthesiometer in the center of the brand (or equivalent area in nonbranded treatments) until animals showed a behavioral response. Healing was measured with a 6-point scale (1=fresh brand and 6=no scabbing and fully repigmented). These measures, along with weight gain and surface temperature, were recorded 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 56, and 71 d after branding. Lying behavior was recorded with loggers from the day before to d 27 after branding. Brand wounds were more painful than nonbranded tissue (Pbranding (e.g., d 7; 113±36 g of force for Brand vs. 449±23 g force for No brand, mean±SE) but persisted until d 71 (380±37 g force for Brand vs. 453±23 g of force for No brand, mean±SE); only 67% of brands were fully regimented or healed by this time. The first fully healed brand was identified 8 wk after the procedure. Giving a single injection of flunixin had no brand-specific effects on sensitivity, surface temperature, or healing but improved weight gain in the days after branding in all treated groups (flunixin×brand×day, Pbranding but tended to spend more time lying on d 15 and 26 after the procedure. The magnitude of these differences is small, less than the day-to-day variation, and not brand specific. In summary, brand

  10. Myofibroblasts and colonic anastomosis healing in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliadou Kalliopi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myofibroblasts play a central role in wound healing throughout the body. The process of wound healing in the colon was evaluated with emphasis on the role of myofibroblasts. Methods One hundred male Wistar rats weighing 274 ± 9.1 g (mean age: 3.5 months were used. A left colonic segment was transected and the colon was re-anastomosed. Animals were randomly divided into two groups. The first group experimental animals (n = 50 were sacrificed on postoperative day 3, while the second group rats (n = 50 were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. Healing of colonic anastomosis was studied in terms of anastomotic bursting pressure, as well as myofibroblastic reaction and expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, adhesion formation, inflammatory reaction and neovascularization. Results The mean anastomotic bursting pressure increased from 20.6 ± 3.5 mmHg on the 3rd postoperative day to 148.8 ± 9.6 Hg on the 7th postoperative day. Adhesion formation was increased on the 7th day, as compared to the 3rd day. In addition, the myofibroblastic reaction was more profound on the 7th postoperative day in comparison with the 3rd postoperative day. The staining intensity for α-SMA was progressive from the 3rd to the 7th postoperative day. On the 7th day the α-SMA staining in the myofibroblats reached the level of muscular layer cells. Conclusions Our study emphasizes the pivotal role of myofibroblasts in the process of colonic anastomosis healing. The findings provide an explanation for the reduction in the incidence of wound dehiscence after the 7th postoperative day.

  11. Evaluation of the Wound-Healing Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Morinda citrifolia L. Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Shivananda Nayak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Morinda citrifolia L. (noni is one of the most important traditional Polynesian medicinal plants. The primary indigenous use of this plant appears to be of the leaves, as a topical treatment for wound healing. The ethanol extract of noni leaves (150 mg kg−1 day−1 was used to evaluate the wound-healing activity on rats, using excision and dead space wound models. Animals were randomly divided into two groups of six for each model. Test group animals in each model were treated with the ethanol extract of noni orally by mixing in drinking water and the control group animals were maintained with plain drinking water. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, time until complete epithelialization, granulation tissue weight and hydoxyproline content. On day 11, the extract-treated animals exhibited 71% reduction in the wound area when compared with controls which exhibited 57%. The granulation tissue weight and hydroxyproline content in the dead space wounds were also increased significantly in noni-treated animals compared with controls (P < 0.002. Enhanced wound contraction, decreased epithelialization time, increased hydroxyproline content and histological characteristics suggest that noni leaf extract may have therapeutic benefits in wound healing.

  12. Modeling of anisotropic wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, C.; Javierre, E.; García-Aznar, J. M.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Menzel, A.

    2015-06-01

    Biological soft tissues exhibit non-linear complex properties, the quantification of which presents a challenge. Nevertheless, these properties, such as skin anisotropy, highly influence different processes that occur in soft tissues, for instance wound healing, and thus its correct identification and quantification is crucial to understand them. Experimental and computational works are required in order to find the most precise model to replicate the tissues' properties. In this work, we present a wound healing model focused on the proliferative stage that includes angiogenesis and wound contraction in three dimensions and which relies on the accurate representation of the mechanical behavior of the skin. Thus, an anisotropic hyperelastic model has been considered to analyze the effect of collagen fibers on the healing evolution of an ellipsoidal wound. The implemented model accounts for the contribution of the ground matrix and two mechanically equivalent families of fibers. Simulation results show the evolution of the cellular and chemical species in the wound and the wound volume evolution. Moreover, the local strain directions depend on the relative wound orientation with respect to the fibers.

  13. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg-1, IV was used for diabetes induction. In each wether, an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animal. Photographs were taken in distinct times for planimetric evaluation. Wound samples were taken on day 21 post-wounding for histopathologic evaluations of epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of new blood vessels. The planimetric study showed slightly delay in wound closure of diabetic animals, however, it was not significantly different from nondiabetic wounds (p ≥ 0.05. Furthermore, epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of blood vessels were significantly lower in diabetic group (p < 0.05. We concluded that healing of excisional diabetic wounds in sheep may be compromised, as seen in other species. However, contraction rate of these wounds may not be delayed due to metabolic features of ruminants and these animals might go under surgeries without any serious concern. However, healing quality of these wounds may be lower than normal wounds.

  14. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  15. Mentalizing animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasperbauer, Tyler Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Ethicists have tended to treat the psychology of attributing mental states to animals as an entirely separate issue from the moral importance of animals’ mental states. In this paper I bring these two issues together. I argue for two theses, one descriptive and one normative. The descriptive thesis...... holds that ordinary human agents use what are generally called phenomenal mental states (e.g., pain and other emotions) to assign moral considerability to animals. I examine recent empirical research on the attribution of phenomenal states and agential states (e.g., memory and intelligence) to argue...... that phenomenal mental states are the primary factor, psychologically, for judging an animal to be morally considerable. I further argue that, given the role of phenomenal states in assigning moral considerability, certain theories in animal ethics will meet significant psychological resistance. The normative...

  16. Wound healing activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Sonkamble

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. from the family Convolvulaceae is the world’s sixth largest food crop. The tubers of Ipomoea batatas commonly known as sweet potato are consumed as a vegetable globally. The tubers contain high levels of polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids and vitamins A, B and C, which impart a potent antioxidant activity that can translate well to show wound healing effects. To check their effects on wound healing, the peels and peel bandage were tested on various injury models in rats in the present study.Methods: The methanolic extracts of the peels and peel bandage of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato were screened for wound healing by excision and incision wound models on Wistar rats. Three types of gel formulations were prepared, viz., gel containing 3.0% (w/w peel extract, gel containing 6.0% (w/w peel extract and gel containing 10% (w/w peel extract. Betadine (5% w/w povidone iodine cream was used as a reference standard. In the incision wound model, Tensile strength of the skin was measured. Epithelization time, wound contraction, hydroxyproline content of the scab, and ascorbic acid and malondialdehyde content of the plasma were determined in the excision wound model.Results: In the incision wound model, high tensile strength of the wounded skin was observed in animals treated with the peel extract gels and the peel bandage when compared with wounded control animals. The increase in tensile strength indicates the promotion of collagen fibers and that the disrupted wound surfaces are being firmly knit by collagen. In the excision wound model, significant wound closure was observed on the 4th day in rats treated with all three gel formulations when compared with the wounded control rats. A significant increase inFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2011; 10:403-415hydroxyproline and ascorbic acid content in the gel-treated animals and a significant decrease in malondialdehyde content in the

  17. Regenerative potential and healing dynamics of the periodontium: a critical-size supra-alveolar periodontal defect study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Giuseppe; Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2009-03-01

    The nature and characteristics of the newly formed periodontium obtained following regenerative procedures remain a matter of controversy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regenerative potential of the periodontal attachment and healing dynamics as observed from the spatial distribution of newly formed cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone following optimal circumstances for wound healing/regeneration in a discriminating animal model. Critical-size, 6-mm, supra-alveolar, periodontal defects were surgically created in six young adult Beagle dogs. Space-providing ePTFE devices with 300-microm laser-drilled pores were implanted to support wound stability and space provision in one jaw quadrant/animal. Treatments were alternated between left and right jaw quadrants in subsequent animals. The gingival flaps were advanced to submerge the defect sites for primary intention healing. Histometric analysis followed an 8-week healing interval. Healing was uneventful in all animals. The histometric analysis showed that cementum regeneration (2.99 +/- 0.22 mm) was significantly greater than PDL (2.54 +/- 0.18 mm, p=0.03) and bone regeneration (2.46 +/- 0.26 mm, p=0.03). The wound area showed significant positive non-linear effect on cementum (log beta=1.25, palveolar bone virtually regenerate in parallel under optimal circumstances for periodontal wound healing/regeneration. Moreover, space provision positively influences the extent of periodontal regeneration.

  18. Expression of Neuropeptides and Cytokines in a Rabbit Model of Diabetic Neuroischemic Wound-Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabzdyk, Leena Pradhan; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Guthrie, Patrick; Chun, Maggie; Auster, Michael E; Nabzdyk, Christoph; Deso, Steven; Andersen, Nicholas; LoGerfo, Frank W.; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Objective The present study is designed to understand the contribution of peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy to the wound-healing impairment associated with diabetes. Using a rabbit model of diabetic neuroischemic wound-healing we investigated rate of healing, leukocyte infiltration and expression of cytokines, Interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6, and, neuropeptides, Substance P (SP) and Neuropeptide Y (NPY). Design of study Diabetes was induced in White New Zealand rabbits by administering alloxan while control rabbits received saline. Ten days later animals in both groups underwent surgery. One ear served as a sham and the other was made ischemic (ligation of central+rostral arteries), or neuroischemic (ischemia+ resection of central+rostral nerves). Four, 6mm punch biopsy wounds were created in both ears and wound-healing was followed for ten days using computerized planimetry. Results Non-diabetic sham and ischemic wounds healed significantly more rapidly than diabetic sham and ischemic wounds. Healing was slowest in neuroischemic wounds, irrespective of diabetic status. A high M1/M2 macrophage ratio and a high pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, both indicators of chronic-proinflammatory state, and low neuropeptide expression were seen in pre-injury diabetic skin. Post-injury, in diabetic wounds M1/M2 ratio remained high, the reactive increase in cytokine expression was low and neuropeptide expression was further decreased in neuroischemic wounds. Conclusion This rabbit model illustrates how a combination of a high M1/M2 ratio, a failure to mount post-injury cytokine response as well as a diminished neuropeptide expression contribute to wound-healing impairment in diabetes. The addition of neuropathy to ischemia leads to equivalently severe impaired wound-healing irrespective of diabetes status, suggesting that in the presence of ischemia, loss of neuropeptide function contributes to the impaired healing associated with diabetes. PMID:23755976

  19. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rúben F; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-05-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  20. Animal Models in Burn Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, A.; Amini-Nik, S.; Jeschke, M.G

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than two million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury; to elucidate the pathophysiology and explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review paper aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research. PMID:24714880

  1. Healing characteristics of a new silver-coated, gelatine impregnated vascular prosthesis in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberrueck, T; Meyer, L; Zippel, R; Nestler, G; Wahlers, T; Gastinger, I

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the intraluminal and extraluminal healing behaviour of a new metallic silver coated, gelatine impregnated vascular graft. Comparative animal experimental investigation with randomisation of the animals to control and experimental groups. 24 pigs were assigned to two control and two experimental groups. The prostheses were interposed in the pigs' infrarenal aorta. For the evaluation, macroscopic, histological and immunohistochemical criteria were applied. The macroscopic evaluation after explantation of the prosthesis revealed similar healing characteristics in the control and experimental groups. The microscopic determination of neo-intimal thickness showed no significant differences between the groups; nor did the immunohistochemical investigations show any significant difference between the control group and the silver-coated prosthesis group. No disadvantage of the silver coating in terms of healing and graft patency was found. A possible advantage in terms of the antibacterial effect of the silver coating must be investigated in the clinical setting.

  2. Polarized light improves cutaneous healing on diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Oliveira, Priscila Chagas; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio L.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of 3rd degree burn on diabetic rats submitted or not to treatment with Polarized Light. Diabetes mellitus (Streptozotocin, 60mg/kg) was induced on 45 male Wistar albinus rats and a third degree burn (1.5× 1.5cm) was created in the dorsum of each animal under general anesthesia. After a regular quarantine period, the animals were randomly distributed into three groups as follows: G1: control (no treatment, n =15); G2: Polarized Light (λ=400-2000nm, 20J/cm2) and G3: Polarized Light (λ=400-2000nm, 40J/cm2). The phototherapy performed on group G2 was Polarized Light dose 20J/cm2 and G3 was Polarized Light dose 40J/cm2 (Bioptron®, λ400-2000 nm, 40mW; 2.4J/cm2 per minute; Φ +/- 5.5 cm; Bioptron AG, Monchaltorf, Switzerland). The phototherapy started immediately post-burning and was repeated daily until the day before the animal death. The energy was applied transcutaneously respecting the focal distance of 10cm as recommended by the manufacturer. The dose was 20 or 40J/cm2 (4min 15s or 8min.and 30s). At each time point chosen (7, 14, and 21 days post-burning) and following macroscopic examination, each animal was killed by an overdose of general anesthesia. Slides were stained with HE, Sirius Red, and CK AE1/AE3 antibody. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses were performed under light microscopy. The animals submitted to phototherapy (20J/cm2) showed significant differences on regards revascularization and epithelialization. The use of 20J/cm2 was effective on improving the healing of third degree buns on diabetic animals at both early and late stages of the repair.

  3. Systemic administration of IGF-I enhances healing in collagenous extracellular matrices: evaluation of loaded and unloaded ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Paolo P; Alejandro-Osorio, Adriana L; Grorud, Kelley W; Martinez, Daniel A; Vailas, Arthur C; Grindeland, Richard E; Vanderby, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a crucial role in wound healing and tissue repair. We tested the hypotheses that systemic administration of IGF-I, or growth hormone (GH), or both (GH+IGF-I) would improve healing in collagenous connective tissue, such as ligament. These hypotheses were examined in rats that were allowed unrestricted activity after injury and in animals that were subjected to hindlimb disuse. Male rats were assigned to three groups: ambulatory sham-control, ambulatory-healing, and hindlimb unloaded-healing. Ambulatory and hindlimb unloaded animals underwent surgical disruption of their knee medial collateral ligaments (MCLs), while sham surgeries were performed on control animals. Healing animals subcutaneously received systemic doses of either saline, GH, IGF-I, or GH+IGF-I. After 3 weeks, mechanical properties, cell and matrix morphology, and biochemical composition were examined in control and healing ligaments. Results Tissues from ambulatory animals receiving only saline had significantly greater strength than tissue from saline receiving hindlimb unloaded animals. Addition of IGF-I significantly improved maximum force and ultimate stress in tissues from both ambulatory and hindlimb unloaded animals with significant increases in matrix organization and type-I collagen expression. Addition of GH alone did not have a significant effect on either group, while addition of GH+IGF-I significantly improved force, stress, and modulus values in MCLs from hindlimb unloaded animals. Force, stress, and modulus values in tissues from hindlimb unloaded animals receiving IGF-I or GH+IGF-I exceeded (or were equivalent to) values in tissues from ambulatory animals receiving only saline with greatly improved structural organization and significantly increased type-I collagen expression. Furthermore, levels of IGF-receptor were significantly increased in tissues from hindlimb unloaded animals treated with IGF-I. Conclusion These results

  4. Systemic administration of IGF-I enhances healing in collagenous extracellular matrices: evaluation of loaded and unloaded ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Daniel A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I plays a crucial role in wound healing and tissue repair. We tested the hypotheses that systemic administration of IGF-I, or growth hormone (GH, or both (GH+IGF-I would improve healing in collagenous connective tissue, such as ligament. These hypotheses were examined in rats that were allowed unrestricted activity after injury and in animals that were subjected to hindlimb disuse. Male rats were assigned to three groups: ambulatory sham-control, ambulatory-healing, and hindlimb unloaded-healing. Ambulatory and hindlimb unloaded animals underwent surgical disruption of their knee medial collateral ligaments (MCLs, while sham surgeries were performed on control animals. Healing animals subcutaneously received systemic doses of either saline, GH, IGF-I, or GH+IGF-I. After 3 weeks, mechanical properties, cell and matrix morphology, and biochemical composition were examined in control and healing ligaments. Results Tissues from ambulatory animals receiving only saline had significantly greater strength than tissue from saline receiving hindlimb unloaded animals. Addition of IGF-I significantly improved maximum force and ultimate stress in tissues from both ambulatory and hindlimb unloaded animals with significant increases in matrix organization and type-I collagen expression. Addition of GH alone did not have a significant effect on either group, while addition of GH+IGF-I significantly improved force, stress, and modulus values in MCLs from hindlimb unloaded animals. Force, stress, and modulus values in tissues from hindlimb unloaded animals receiving IGF-I or GH+IGF-I exceeded (or were equivalent to values in tissues from ambulatory animals receiving only saline with greatly improved structural organization and significantly increased type-I collagen expression. Furthermore, levels of IGF-receptor were significantly increased in tissues from hindlimb unloaded animals treated with IGF

  5. Translating 'Asian' Modes of Healing and Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses the 'translation of Asian modes of healing and medicine' in six recently published books by raising seven questions. They serve both to review the volumes and to ask how we have moved from understanding systems of healing in terms of tradition and modernity, science and nonscience, globalization and locality, innovation and cultural heritage, to translating them in terms of assemblages, products, modes of resistance, social (dis-)harmony, and ecological balance. The questions span subjects ranging from the meaning of 'Asian' in Asian modes of healing, the object of healing and classifications of systems of healing to their relation with 'biomedicine,' modernization and the state, the extents to which communities share healing tradition, and their existential meaning in context.

  6. Animated Reconstruction of Forensic Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Hala, Albert; Unver, Ertu

    1998-01-01

    An animated accident display in court can be significant evidentiary tool. Computer graphics animation reconstructions which can be shown in court are cost effective, save valuable time and illustrate complex and technical issues, are realistic and can prove or disprove arguments or theories with reference to the perplexing newtonian physics involved in many accidents: this technology may well revolutionise accident reconstruction, thus enabling prosecution and defence to be more effective in...

  7. Animal toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amdur, M.

    1996-12-31

    The chapter evaluates results of toxicological studies on experimental animals to investigate health effects of air pollutants and examines the animal data have predicted the response to human subject. Data are presented on the comparative toxicity of sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid. The animal data obtained by measurement of airway resistance in guinea pigs and of bronchial clearance of particles in donkeys predicted clearly that sulfuric acid was more irritant than sulfur dioxide. Data obtained on human subjects confirmed this prediction. These acute studies also correctly predicted the comparative toxicity of the two compounds in two year studies of monkeys. Such chronic studies are not possible in human subjects but it is a reasonable to assume that sulfuric acid would be more toxic than sulfur dioxide. Current findings in epidemiological studies certainly support this assumption.

  8. News in wound healing and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Finn; Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2009-01-01

    -TNFalpha) and Lactobacillus plantarum cultures have also been successfully used in hard to heal, atypical wounds. Knowledge on influencing factors as smoking and biofilm on the healing process has also been improved. Smoking results in delayed healing and increased risk of postoperative infection, whereas the role of biofilm...... is still at an exploratory level. Organizing models for optimal wound management are constantly being developed and refined. SUMMARY: Recent knowledge on the importance of new dressing materials containing active substances, new treatments for atypical wounds, influencing factors on the healing process...

  9. Exploring the Concept of Healing Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBose, Jennifer; MacAllister, Lorissa; Hadi, Khatereh; Sakallaris, Bonnie

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based design (EBD) research has demonstrated the power of environmental design to support improved patient, family, and staff outcomes and to minimize or avoid harm in healthcare settings. While healthcare has primarily focused on fixing the body, there is a growing recognition that our healthcare system could do more by promoting overall wellness, and this requires expanding the focus to healing. This article explores how we can extend what we know from EBD about health impacts of spatial design to the more elusive goal of healing. By breaking the concept of healing into antecedent components (emotional, psychological, social, behavioral, and functional), this review of the literature presents the existing evidence to identify how healthcare spaces can foster healing. The environmental variables found to directly affect or facilitate one or more dimension of healing were organized into six groups of variables-homelike environment, access to views and nature, light, noise control, barrier-free environment, and room layout. While there is limited scientific research confirming design solutions for creating healing spaces, the literature search revealed relationships that provide a basis for a draft definition. Healing spaces evoke a sense of cohesion of the mind, body, and spirit. They support healing intention and foster healing relationships.

  10. Animal evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes it possi......This book provides a comprehensive analysis of evolution in the animal kingdom. It reviews the classical, morphological information from structure and embryology, as well as the new data gained from studies using immune stainings of nerves and muscles and blastomere markings, which makes...

  11. Electrical field stimulation promotes anastomotic healing in poorly perfused rat colon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kennelly, Rory

    2011-03-01

    Hypoperfusion of the bowel is a risk factor for anastomotic failure. Electrical field stimulation has been shown to improve repair in ischemic tissue, but its influence in hypoperfused colon has not been investigated. The hypothesis of this experimental animal study was that electrical field stimulation improves anastomotic healing in ischemic bowel.

  12. Expression of immune-related genes during wound healing in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht

    2013-01-01

    , the inflammatory response is limited in early life stages of most animals, and these heal with a much higher degree of regeneration. I will be presenting a selection of results from my PhD studies with a focus on the response to wounding during ontogeny of carp larvae and juveniles aged 7-56 days post...

  13. Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae) in the healing process of gastrorraphy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Orlando José; Barros-Filho, Allan Kardec Duailibe; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Ribas-Filho, Jurandir Marcondes; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro; Santos, Rennan Abud Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Gastrorraphy, isolated or associated with the use of biological adhesives, was throughout the history of surgery the usual way to promote healing in gastric lesions and the use of herbal medicine has been increasingly more employed. To evaluate the wound healing in the stomach of rats with the use of the hydroalcoholic extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (aroeira). Sixty rats, adult males, were divided into two groups: aroeira group and control group. Each one was subdivided into four subgroups of 15 animals (test groups). Each subdivided subgroup was also subdivided into three subgroups of five rats (deaths periods of 7, 14 and 21 days). All animals underwent the same surgical procedure (injury and stomach suture); animals in the aroeira group received daily dose of 100 mg/kg of hydroalcoholic extract via gavage while the control group received isotonic saline solution. Parameters evaluated were: macroscopic and microscopic changes, test for resistance to insufflation of atmospheric air and test for tensile strength. All animals had good healing of the abdominal wall and gastrorraphies without infection and dehiscence. Both groups had adhesions to the gastrorraphies surfaces with neighboring organs. The resistance test by insufflation of atmospheric air and tensile strength showed higher average of pressure on the 7th day and breaking strength in the time periods for the aroeira group. The intensity of chronic inflammation revealed statistically significant differences in the variables fibroblast proliferation and collagen. The use of hydroalcoholic extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi accelerated the stomach healing in rats.

  14. Effects of 3 Topical Plant Extracts on Wound Healing in Beef Cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleven heifers of the Purunã cattle breed were used to evaluate wound healing by second intention. An experimental wound excision model in bovines was created by means of a skin punch of diameter 2cm. The animals were topically treated for 17 days with a saline control or decoctions of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi ...

  15. Effect of preoperative irradiation on healing of low colorectal anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, L.; Sanders, G.; Wahlstrom, E.; Yadegar, J.; Amodeo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of preoperative irradiation on the healing of low colorectal anastomoses was studied experimentally. In 12 dogs in whom preoperative irradiation of 4,000 rads was given before low colorectal stapled anastomosis was performed, anastomotic leakage occurred in 66 percent. More than half of the anastomotic leaks were associated with either severe sepsis or death. In a matched group of control animals that underwent stapled anastomoses without irradiation, no anastomotic complications occurred. The clinical implications of this study are that stapled anastomoses in irradiated colon are at serious risk of anastomotic dehiscence and, therefore, should be protected with a proximal colostomy

  16. Topical application of Acheflan on rat skin injury accelerates wound healing: a histopathological, immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Angeli-Gamba, Thais; Alessandra-Perini, Jessica; Ferreira, Luiz Claudio; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Machado, Daniel Escorsim

    2015-06-30

    Dermal wound healing involves a cascade of complex events including angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling. Several groups have focused in the study of the skin wound healing activity of natural products. The phytomedicine Acheflan®, and its main active constituent is the oil from Cordia verbenacea which has known anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities. To our knowledge, no investigation has evaluated the effect of Acheflan® in an experimental model of skin wound healing. The present study has explored the wound healing property of Acheflan® and has compared it with topical effectiveness of collagenase and fibrinolysin by using Wistar rat cutaneous excision wound model. Animals were divided into four groups: untreated animals are negative control (NC), wounds were treated topically every day with Collagenase ointment (TC), with Fibrinolysin ointment (TF) and with cream Acheflan (TAc). Skin samples were collected on zero, 8th and 15th days after wounding. The healing was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin (HE), picrosirius red, hydoxyproline content and immunohistochemical analysis of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Statistical analysis was done by ANOVA and Student t-test (p Cordia verbenacea) and TC possess higher therapeutic properties for wound healing compared with TF. These ointments seem to accelerate wound healing, probably due to their involvement with the increase of angiogenesis and dermal remodeling.

  17. Antioxidant and wound healing activity of Lavandula aspic L. ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Djemaa, Ferdaous Ghrab; Bellassoued, Khaled; Zouari, Sami; El Feki, Abdelfatteh; Ammar, Emna

    2016-11-01

    Lavandula aspic L. is a strongly aromatic shrub plant of the Lamiaceae family and traditionally used in herbal medicine for the treatment of several skin disorders, including wounds, burns, and ulcers. The present study aimed to investigate the composition and in vitro antioxidant activity of lavender essential oil. In addition, it aimed to evaluate the excision wound healing activity and antioxidant property of a Lavandula aspic L. essential oil formulated in ointment using a rat model. The rats were divided into five groups of six animals each. The test groups were topically treated with the vehicle, lavender ointment (4%) and a reference drug, while the control group was left untreated. Wound healing efficiency was determined by monitoring morphological and biochemical parameters and skin histological analysis. Wound contraction and protein synthesis were also determined. Antioxidant activity was assessed by the determination of MDA rates and antioxidant enzymes (GPx, catalase and superoxide dismutase). The treatment with lavender ointment was noted to significantly enhance wound contraction rate (98%) and protein synthesis. Overall, the results provided strong support for the effective wound healing activity of lavender ointment, making it a promising candidate for future application as a therapeutic agent in tissue repairing processes associated with skin injuries. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transmittance and scattering during wound healing after refractive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Santiago; Martinez-Garcia, C.; Blanco, J. T.; Torres, R. M.; Gonzalez, V. R.; Najera, S.; Rodriguez, G.; Merayo, J. M.

    2004-10-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) are frequent techniques performed to correct ametropia. Both methods have been compared in their way of healing but there is not comparison about transmittance and light scattering during this process. Scattering in corneal wound healing is due to three parameters: cellular size and density, and the size of scar. Increase in the scattering angular width implies a decrease the contrast sensitivity. During wound healing keratocytes activation is induced and these cells become into fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Hens were operated using PRK and LASIK techniques. Animals used in this experiment were euthanized, and immediately their corneas were removed and placed carefully into a cornea camera support. All optical measurements have been done with a scatterometer constructed in our laboratory. Scattering measurements are correlated with the transmittance -- the smaller transmittance is the bigger scattering is. The aim of this work is to provide experimental data of the corneal transparency and scattering, in order to supply data that they allow generate a more complete model of the corneal transparency.

  19. PRFM enhance wound healing process in skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reksodiputro, Mirta; Widodo, Dini; Bashiruddin, Jenny; Siregar, Nurjati; Malik, Safarina

    2014-12-01

    Facial plastic and reconstructive surgery often used skin graft on defects that cannot be covered primarily by a local flap. However, wound healing using skin graft is slow, most of the time the graft is contractured and the take of graft is not optimal. Platelet rich fibrin matrix (PRFM) is a new generation of concentrated platelets that produce natural fibrin and reported to speed up the healing process. Application of PRFM in the skin graft implants is expected to increase the survival of the graft. We used porcine as animal models to elucidate the effect of autologous PRFM on wound healing in full-thickness (FTSG) and split-thickness (STSG) skin grafts. Survival level of the skin graft was determined by using ImageJ software based on the formation of collagen type 1 and graft take. We observed that the use of PRFM in FTSG and STSG increased type 1 collagen formation. We also found that PRFM addition in STSG gave the best skin graft take. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Animal Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCleave, Janice

    2001-01-01

    Presents a set of hands-on, outdoor science experiments designed to teach elementary school students about animal adaptation. The experiments focus on: how color camouflage affects an insect population; how spiderlings find a home; and how chameleons camouflage themselves by changing color. (SM)

  1. Animal radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter presents historical x rays of a wide variety of animals taken within 5 years of the discovery of x radiation. Such photos were used as tests or as illustrations for radiographic publications. Numerous historical photographs are included. 10 refs

  2. Animal impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    The aspen ecosystem is rich in number and species of animals, especially in comparison to associated coniferous forest types. This natural species diversity and richness has been both increased and influenced by the introduction of domestic livestock. The high value of the aspen type as a forage resource for livestock and as forage and cover for wildlife makes the...

  3. Animated symbols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2008-01-01

    an analytic working model called Animated Symbols concerning critical reflection in a dialogic learning process. The model shows dialogue as interactions that involve two types of transformation: inner ‘learning processes' and outer signs and symbols. The classroom-based research study is part of a Ph...

  4. Evaluation of Interferon-gamma Application for Recognition of Patients Afflicted by Non-healing Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moafi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Different studies undertaken in the animal modeling show that Interferon-gamma deficiency impairs healing process of Leishmania infection. It seems that the level of Interferon-gamma production could also affect the healing duration of Leishmania lesion in humans. The current study aims to investigate the possibility of Interferon-gamma application for recognition of cases afflicted by non-healing Leishmaniasis. Materials and methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 32 patients, who were afflicted by healing or non-healing Leishmaniasis, were isolated and the levels of interferon-gamma were determined, using ELISA method. Afterwards, the cut-off point of interferon-gamma to identify patients afflicted by non-healing Leishmaniasis was calculated through ROC-Curve analysis. Furthermore, Leishmanin Skin Test (LST was performed for every patient. Results: Levels of Interferon-gamma produced by PBMCs stimulated with Soluble Leishmania Antigen (SLA or Phytohemaglotinine were significantly higher in healing patients, compared with non-healing individuals (p

  5. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  6. Connective Tissue Characteristics around Healing Abutments of Different Geometries: New Methodological Technique under Circularly Polarized Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Abboud, Marcus; Ramirez-Fernandez, Maria Piedad; Maté-Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Negri, Bruno; Gomez-Moreno, Gerardo; Markovic, Aleksa

    2015-08-01

    To describe contact, thickness, density, and orientation of connective tissue fibers around healing abutments of different geometries by means of a new method using coordinates. Following the bilateral extraction of mandibular premolars (P2, P3, and P4) from six fox hound dogs and a 2-month healing period, 36 titanium implants were inserted, onto which two groups of healing abutments of different geometry were screwed: Group A (concave abutments) and Group B (wider healing abutment). After 3 months the animals were sacrificed and samples extracted containing each implant and surrounding soft and hard tissues. Histological analysis was performed without decalcifying the samples by means of circularly polarized light under optical microscope and a system of vertical and horizontal coordinates across all the connective tissue in an area delimited by the implant/abutment, epithelium, and bone tissue. In no case had the connective tissue formed a connection to the healing abutment/implant in the internal zone; a space of 35 ± 10 μm separated the connective tissue fibers from the healing abutment surface. The total thickness of connective tissue in the horizontal direction was significantly greater in the medial zone in Group B than in Group A (p connective tissue thickness. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Chronic wound repair and healing in older adults: current status and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa; Abadir, Peter; Brem, Harold; Carter, Marissa; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Davidson, Jeff; DiPietro, Luisa; Falanga, Vincent; Fife, Caroline; Gardner, Sue; Grice, Elizabeth; Harmon, John; Hazzard, William R; High, Kevin P; Houghton, Pamela; Jacobson, Nasreen; Kirsner, Robert S; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Margolis, David; McFarland Horne, Frances; Reed, May J; Sullivan, Dennis H; Thom, Stephen; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Walston, Jeremy; Whitney, Jo Anne; Williams, John; Zieman, Susan; Schmader, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    Older adults are more likely to have chronic wounds than younger people, and the effect of chronic wounds on quality of life is particularly profound in this population. Wound healing slows with age, but the basic biology underlying chronic wounds and the influence of age-associated changes on wound healing are poorly understood. Most studies have used in vitro approaches and various animal models, but observed changes translate poorly to human healing conditions. The effect of age and accompanying multimorbidity on the effectiveness of existing and emerging treatment approaches for chronic wounds is also unknown, and older adults tend to be excluded from randomized clinical trials. Poorly defined outcomes and variables; lack of standardization in data collection; and variations in the definition, measurement, and treatment of wounds also hamper clinical studies. The Association of Specialty Professors, in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging and the Wound Healing Society, held a workshop, summarized in this article, to explore the current state of knowledge and research challenges, engage investigators across disciplines, and identify research questions to guide future study of age-associated changes in chronic wound healing. © 2015 by the American Geriatrics Society and the Wound Healing Society.

  8. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing.

  9. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Allamanda cathartica. L. and Laurus nobilis. L. extracts on rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhogadi Vidyasagar

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allamanda cathartica. L. is a perennial shrub used in traditional medicine for treating malaria and jaundice. Laurus nobilis. L. is a tree and has been used for its astringent, healing and diuretic properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the aqueous extracts of Allamanda and Laurus nobilis to evaluate their wound healing activity in rats. Methods Excision and incision wound models were used to evaluate the wound healing activity of both the extracts on Sprague Dawley rats. In each model, animals were divided into four groups of 10 animals each. In both the model, group 1 served as control and group 2 as reference standard. In an excision wound model, group 3 animals were treated with Allamanda (150 mg kg-1 day-1 and group 4 animals were treated with Laurus nobilis (200 mg kg-1 b.w day-1 for 14 days respectively. In the case of incision wound model, group 3 and 4 animals were treated with the extracts of Allamanda and Laurus respectively for 10 days. The effects of vehicles on the rate of wound healing were assessed by the rate of wound closure, period of epithelialisation, tensile strength, weights of the granulation tissue, hydroxyproline content and histopathology of the granulation tissue. Results The aqueous extract of Allamanda promoted wound healing activity significantly in both the wound models studied. High rate of wound contraction (P Allamanda. Histological studies of the granulation tissue from the Allamanda treated group showed the presence of a lesser number of inflammatory cells, and increased collagen formation than the control. In Laurus nobilis treated animals, the rate of wound contraction, weight of the granulation tissue and hydroxyproline content were moderately high (P Laurus nobilis treated animals showed larger number of inflammatory cells, and lesser collagen when compared with the Allamanda treated group of animals. However, it was better than the control group of animals

  10. Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Impairs Fracture Healing in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Hildemberg A R; Zamarioli, Ariane; Sousa Neto, Manoel D; Volpon, Jose B

    2017-03-01

    Nonsmokers may be affected by environmental tobacco smoke (secondhand smoke), but the effects of such exposure on fracture healing have not been well studied. To explore the possible effects of passive inhalation of tobacco smoke on the healing of a diaphyseal fracture in femurs of rats. We hypothesized that secondhand exposure to tobacco smoke adversely affects fracture healing. A mid-diaphyseal fracture was created in the femur of 41 female Wistar rats and fixed with an intramedullary metallic pin; 14 rats were excluded (nine for inadequate fractures and five for K wire extrusion). Tobacco exposure was provided by a smoking machine on a daily basis of four cigarettes a day. Each cigarette yielded 10 mg tar and 0.8 mg nicotine, and was puffed by alternating injections of fresh air for 30 seconds and smoke air for 15 seconds. The smoke exposure was previously adjusted to provide serum levels of cotinine similar to human secondhand tobacco exposure. Cotinine is a predominant catabolite of nicotine that is used as a biological biomarker for exposure to tobacco smoke. In one group (n = 11), the animals were intermittently exposed to tobacco smoke before sustaining the fracture but not afterward. In another group (n = 7), the exposure occurred before and after the fracture. The control group (n = 9) was sham-exposed before and after the fracture. We evaluated the specimens 28 days after bone fracture. The callus quality was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (bone mineral density [BMD], bone mineral content [BMC], and callus area), μCT (callus volume and woven bone fraction), and mechanical bending (maximum force and stiffness). Tobacco exposure resulted in delayed bone callus formation, which is represented by decreased BMD (Control: 0.302 ± 0.008 g/cm 2 vs Preexposed: 0.199 ± 0.008 g/cm 2 and Pre- and Postexposed: 0.146 ± 0.009 g/cm 2 ; mean difference = 0.103 g/cm 2 , 95% CI, 0.094-0.112 g/cm 2 and mean difference = 0.156 g/cm 2 , 95% CI, 0.147-0.167 g

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Bhutani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier′s gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon.

  12. A healing method of tympanic membrane perforations using three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Kim, Seung Won; Choi, Seong Jun; Lim, Ki Taek; Lee, Jong Bin; Seonwoo, Hoon; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Park, Keehyun; Cho, Chong-Su; Choung, Yun-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Both surgical tympanoplasty and paper patch grafts are frequently procedured to heal tympanic membrane (TM) perforation or chronic otitis media, despite their many disadvantages. In this study, we report a new healing method of TM perforation by using three-dimensional (3D) porous chitosan scaffolds (3D chitosan scaffolds) as an alternative method to surgical treatment or paper patch graft. Various 3D chitosan scaffolds were prepared; and the structural characteristics, mechanical property, in vitro biocompatibility, and healing effects of the 3D chitosan scaffolds as an artificial TM in in vivo animal studies were investigated. A 3D chitosan scaffold of 5 wt.% chitosan concentration showed good proliferation of TM cells in an in vitro study, as well as suitable structural characteristics and mechanical property, as compared with either 1% or 3% chitosan. In in vivo animal studies, 3D chitosan scaffold were able to migrate through the pores and surfaces of TM cells, thus leading to more effective TM regeneration than paper patch technique. Histological observations demonstrated that the regenerated TM with the 3D chitosan scaffold consisted of three (epidermal, connective tissue, and mucosal) layers and were thicker than normal TMs. The 3D chitosan scaffold technique may be an optimal healing method used in lieu of surgical tympanoplasty in certain cases to heal perforated TMs.

  13. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies of three plants used in Cameroonian ethnoveterinary medicine: Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae) leaves, Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae) seeds or leaves, and Mimosa pudica L. (Fabaceae) leaves in Kabir chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghonjuyi, Ndaleh Wozerou; Tiambo, Christian Keambou; Taïwe, Germain Sotoing; Toukala, Jean Paul; Lisita, Frederico; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Kimbi, Helen Kuokuo

    2016-02-03

    Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Xanthorrhoeaceae), Carica papaya L. (Caricaceae) and Mimosa pudica L. (Fabaceae) are widely used in the Cameroonian ethnoveterinary medicine as a panacea, and specifically for gastrointestinal disorders as well as an anthelmintic and antibacterial. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of the hydroalcoholic extracts of Aloe vera leaves, Carica papaya leaves or seeds, and Mimosa pudica leaves after acute and sub-chronic administration in chicks. For the acute toxicity test a single administration of each of the four hydroalcoholic extracts was given orally at doses ranging from 40 to 5120 mg/kg (n=5/group/sex). In the sub-chronic study, these extracts were given orally as a single administration to chicks at doses of 80, 160, 320 and 640 mg/kg/day for 42 days. The anti-angiogenic properties of these extracts (5-320 µg/mg) were investigated in the chick chorioallantoic membrane in vivo. In the acute toxicity test, none of the four studied hydroalcoholic extracts induced mortality or significant behavioural changes. The sub-acute treatment with the four plant extracts did not alter either the body weight gain or the food and water consumption. However, the results indicated that Aloe vera leaf extract acute treatment by oral route at doses up to 2560 mg/kg did not produce death in 50% (5/10) of chicks during 24h or 14 days of observation, but 20% (2/10) chicks died. The haematological and biochemical analyses did not show significant differences in any of the parameters examined in female or male groups, with the exception of a transient rise in white blood cell counts at high doses (640 mg/kg). Additionally, these extracts did not have the potential for anti-angiogenic effects through the inhibition of neo-angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane in vivo. The results showed that the therapeutic use of the hydroalcoholic extracts of Aloe vera leaves, Carica papaya leaves or seeds and Mimosa pudica leaves had very low

  14. Biotecnologia animal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Lehmann Coutinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A biotecnologia animal tem fornecido novas ferramentas para os programas de melhoramento e, dessa forma, contribuído para melhorar a eficiência da produção dos produtos de origem animal. No entanto, os avanços têm sido mais lentos do que antecipados, especialmente em razão da dificuldade na identificação dos genes responsáveis pelas características fenotípicas de interesse zootécnico. Três estratégias principais têm sido utilizadas para identificar esses genes - mapeamento de QTL, genes candidatos e sequenciamento de DNA e mRNA - e cada uma tem suas vantagens e limitações. O mapeamento de QTL permite determinar as regiões genômicas que contêm genes, mas o intervalo de confiança do QTL pode ser grande e conter muitos genes. A estratégia de genes candidatos é limitada por causa do conhecimento ainda restrito das funções de todos os genes. Os sequenciamentos de genomas e de sequências expressas podem auxiliar na identificação da posição de genes e de vias metabólicas associadas à característica de interesse. A integração dessas estratégias por meio do desenvolvimento de programas de bioinformática permitirá a identificação de novos genes de interesse zootécnico. Assim, os programas de melhoramento genético se beneficiarão pela inclusão da informação obtida diretamente do DNA na avaliação do mérito genético dos plantéis disponíveis.Animal biotechnology is providing new tools for animal breeding and genetics and thus contributing to advances in production efficiency and quality of animal products. However, the progress is slower than anticipated, mainly because of the difficulty involved in identifying genes that control phenotypic characteristics of importance to the animal industry. Three main strategies: QTL mapping, candidate genes and DNA and mRNA sequencing have been used to identify genes of economic interest to animal breeding and each has advantages and disadvantages. QTL mapping allows

  15. Low-energy extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT improves metaphyseal fracture healing in an osteoporotic rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina A Mackert

    Full Text Available As result of the current demographic changes, osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are becoming an increasing social and economic burden. In this experimental study, extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT, was evaluated as a treatment option for the improvement of osteoporotic fracture healing.A well-established fracture model in the metaphyseal tibia in the osteoporotic rat was used. 132 animals were divided into 11 groups, with 12 animals each, consisting of one sham-operated group and 10 ovariectomized (osteoporotic groups, of which 9 received ESWT treatment. Different energy flux intensities (0.15 mJ/mm2, 0.35 mJ/mm2, or 0.55 mJ/mm2 as well as different numbers of ESWT applications (once, three times, or five times throughout the 35-day healing period were applied to the osteoporotic fractures. Fracture healing was investigated quantitatively and qualitatively using micro-CT imaging, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis, histomorphometric analysis and biomechanical analysis.The results of this study show a qualitative and quantitative improvement in the osteoporotic fracture healing under low-energy (energy flux intensity: 0,15 mJ/mm2 ESWT and with fewer treatment applications per healing period.In conclusion, low-energy ESWT seems to exhibit a beneficial effect on the healing of osteoporotic fractures, leading to improved biomechanical properties, enhanced callus-quantity and -quality, and an increase in the expression of bone specific transcription factors. The results suggest that low-energy ESWT, as main treatment or as adjunctive treatment in addition to a surgical intervention, may prove to be an effective, simple to use, and cost-efficient option for the qualitative and quantitative improvement of osteoporotic fracture healing.

  16. "Healing is a Done Deal": Temporality and Metabolic Healing Among Evangelical Christians in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on fieldwork in independent Samoa, in this article, I analyze the temporal dimensions of evangelical Christian healing of metabolic disorders. I explore how those suffering with metabolic disorders draw from multiple time-based notions of healing, drawing attention to the limits of biomedicine in contrast with the effectiveness of Divine healing. By simultaneously engaging evangelical and biomedical temporalities, I argue that evangelical Christians create wellness despite sickness and, in turn, re-signify chronic suffering as a long-term process of Christian healing. Positioning biomedical temporality and evangelical temporality as parallel yet distinctive ways of practicing healing, therefore, influences health care choices.

  17. TOPICAL ESTROGEN IN WOUND HEALING: A DOUBLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL ON YOUNG HEALTHY PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ASILIAN

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acceleration of wounf healing is intrested because of decreasing the risk of wound complication and infections as well as reducing the cost of treatment. In animal models, it has been proved that estrogen can accelerate wound healing. It has been also suggested that topical estrogen can eliminate effect of aging on wound healing and can increase the speed of wound healing in old people. Methods: We selected 16 young healthy people who developed symmetrical and ulcers (regarding size and depths after dermabrasion, shave and electrocoagulouzon and CO2 laser. Primary lesions of patients were benign and noninfective. Identical and symmetrical lesions of each patient were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. Topical estrogen with concentration of 0.625 mg/g in the base of silver sulfadiazine cream was applied to A ulcers and silver sulfadiazine cream alone was applied on B ulcers. Ulcers were dressed by Telfa gauzes. The A ulcers of each patients were compared to counterpart B ulcers in regard of redness, size, depth, general appearance of ulcers and wound healing duration at three days intervals by a physician. Results: Average time of healing was 10.8 days and 8.5 days for B (n=29 and A (n=29 ulcers, respectively (P < 0.001. In 78 percent of cases, the A ulcers were judged better than B ulcers by physician (P < 0.01. Discussion: It seems that estrogen not only accelerate healing of acute ulcers but also it is efficient in young healthy people who don"t have any hormonal or wound healing problems.

  18. The meaning of healing: transcending suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnew, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Medicine is traditionally considered a healing profession, but it has neither an operational definition of healing nor an explanation of its mechanisms beyond the physiological processes related to curing. The objective of this study was to determine a definition of healing that operationalizes its mechanisms and thereby identifies those repeatable actions that reliably assist physicians to promote holistic healing. This study was a qualitative inquiry consisting of in-depth, open-ended, semistructured interviews with Drs. Eric J. Cassell, Carl A. Hammerschlag, Thomas S. Inui, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Cicely Saunders, Bernard S. Siegel, and G. Gayle Stephens. Their perceptions regarding the definition and mechanisms of healing were subjected to grounded theory content analysis. Healing was associated with themes of wholeness, narrative, and spirituality. Healing is an intensely personal, subjective experience involving a reconciliation of the meaning an individual ascribes to distressing events with his or her perception of wholeness as a person. Healing may be operationally defined as the personal experience of the transcendence of suffering. Physicians can enhance their abilities as healers by recognizing, diagnosing, minimizing, and relieving suffering, as well as helping patients transcend suffering.

  19. Holistic nurses' stories of personal healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marlaine C; Zahourek, Rothlyn; Hines, Mary Enzman; Engebretson, Joan; Wardell, Diane Wind

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the nature, experiences, and meaning of personal healing for holistic nurses through their narrative accounts. The study employed a qualitative descriptive design with methods of narrative and story inquiry. Participants were nurse attendees at an American Holistic Nurses' Association conference who volunteered for the study. They were invited to share a story about healing self or another. Twenty-five stories were collected; seven were about personal healing, and these are the focus of this analysis. Data were analyzed using a hybrid approach from narrative and story inquiry methods. Eleven themes were clustered under three story segments. The themes within the Call to the Healing Encounter are the following: recognition of the need to resolve a personal or health crisis, knowledge of or engagement in self-care practices, and reliance on intuitive knowing. Themes under the Experience of Healing are the following: connections; profound sensations, perceptions, and events; awareness of the reciprocal nature of healing; inner resolution: forgiveness, awakening, and acceptance; use of multiple holistic approaches; and witnessing manifestations of healing. The themes for Insights are the following: gratitude and appreciation and ongoing journey. A metastory synthesizing the themes is presented, and findings are related to existing literature on healing.

  20. Self-healing composites and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Chee Keong; Wang, Chao; Cui, Yi; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-11-08

    A battery electrode includes an electrochemically active material and a binder covering the electrochemically active material. The binder includes a self-healing polymer and conductive additives dispersed in the self-healing polymer to provide an electrical pathway across at least a portion of the binder.

  1. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  2. Use of Oxygen Therapies in Wound Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Finn; Dissemond, Joachim; Baines, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Among other things wound healing requires restoration of macro-And microcirculation as essential conditions for healing.1,2 One of the most 'immediate' requirements is oxygen, which is critically important for reconstruction of new vessels and connective tissue and to enable competent resistance...

  3. Wound Healing and Infection in Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention.......To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention....

  4. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  5. Self-healing cable for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Dryver R. (Inventor); Tolmie, Bernard R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Self-healing cable apparatus and methods disclosed. The self-healing cable has a central core surrounded by an adaptive cover that can extend over the entire length of the self-healing cable or just one or more portions of the self-healing cable. The adaptive cover includes an axially and/or radially compressible-expandable (C/E) foam layer that maintains its properties over a wide range of environmental conditions. A tape layer surrounds the C/E layer and is applied so that it surrounds and axially and/or radially compresses the C/E layer. When the self-healing cable is subjected to a damaging force that causes a breach in the outer jacket and the tape layer, the corresponding localized axially and/or radially compressed portion of the C/E foam layer expands into the breach to form a corresponding localized self-healed region. The self-healing cable is manufacturable with present-day commercial self-healing cable manufacturing tools.

  6. Prayer Healing: A Case Study Research Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijthoff, D.J.; van der Kooi, C.; Glas, Gerrit; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-01-01

    Context • Prayer healing is a common practice in many religious communities around the world. Even in the highly secularized Dutch society, cases of prayer healing are occasionally reported in the media, often generating public attention. There is an ongoing debate regarding whether such miraculous

  7. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, T.E.; Angerman, J.M.; Keenan, W.G.; Linsley, J.G.; Poole, C.M.; Sallese, A.; Simkins, R.C.; Tolle, D.

    1981-01-01

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60 Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60 Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  8. Animal Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Graham K; Tropea, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a wide-ranging snapshot of the state-of-the-art in experimental research on the physics of swimming and flying animals. The resulting picture reflects not only upon the questions that are of interest in current pure and applied research, but also upon the experimental techniques that are available to answer them. Doubtless, many new questions will present themselves as the scope and performance of our experimental toolbox develops over the coming years.

  9. Endogenous PTH deficiency impairs fracture healing and impedes the fracture-healing efficacy of exogenous PTH(1-34.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Ren

    Full Text Available Although the capacity of exogenous PTH1-34 to enhance the rate of bone repair is well established in animal models, our understanding of the mechanism(s whereby PTH induces an anabolic response during skeletal repair remains limited. Furthermore it is unknown whether endogenous PTH is required for fracture healing and how the absence of endogenous PTH would influence the fracture-healing capacity of exogenous PTH.Closed mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were created and stabilized with an intramedullary pin in 8-week-old wild-type and Pth null (Pth(-/- mice. Mice received daily injections of vehicle or of PTH1-34 (80 µg/kg for 1-4 weeks post-fracture, and callus tissue properties were analyzed at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-fracture. Cartilaginous callus areas were reduced at 1 week post-fracture, but were increased at 2 weeks post-fracture in vehicle-treated and PTH-treated Pth(-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated and PTH-treated wild-type mice respectively. The mineralized callus areas, bony callus areas, osteoblast number and activity, osteoclast number and surface in callus tissues were all reduced in vehicle-treated and PTH-treated Pth(-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated and PTH-treated wild-type mice, but were increased in PTH-treated wild-type and Pth(-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated wild-type and Pth(-/- mice.Absence of endogenous PTH1-84 impedes bone fracture healing. Exogenous PTH1-34 can act in the absence of endogenous PTH but callus formation, including accelerated endochondral bone formation and callus remodeling as well as mechanical strength of the bone are greater when endogenous PTH is present. Results of this study suggest a complementary role for endogenous PTH1-84 and exogenous PTH1-34 in accelerating fracture healing.

  10. Endogenous PTH deficiency impairs fracture healing and impedes the fracture-healing efficacy of exogenous PTH(1-34).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongxin; Liu, Bo; Feng, Yuxu; Shu, Lei; Cao, Xiaojian; Karaplis, Andrew; Goltzman, David; Miao, Dengshun

    2011-01-01

    Although the capacity of exogenous PTH1-34 to enhance the rate of bone repair is well established in animal models, our understanding of the mechanism(s) whereby PTH induces an anabolic response during skeletal repair remains limited. Furthermore it is unknown whether endogenous PTH is required for fracture healing and how the absence of endogenous PTH would influence the fracture-healing capacity of exogenous PTH. Closed mid-diaphyseal femur fractures were created and stabilized with an intramedullary pin in 8-week-old wild-type and Pth null (Pth(-/-)) mice. Mice received daily injections of vehicle or of PTH1-34 (80 µg/kg) for 1-4 weeks post-fracture, and callus tissue properties were analyzed at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-fracture. Cartilaginous callus areas were reduced at 1 week post-fracture, but were increased at 2 weeks post-fracture in vehicle-treated and PTH-treated Pth(-/-) mice compared to vehicle-treated and PTH-treated wild-type mice respectively. The mineralized callus areas, bony callus areas, osteoblast number and activity, osteoclast number and surface in callus tissues were all reduced in vehicle-treated and PTH-treated Pth(-/-) mice compared to vehicle-treated and PTH-treated wild-type mice, but were increased in PTH-treated wild-type and Pth(-/-) mice compared to vehicle-treated wild-type and Pth(-/-) mice. Absence of endogenous PTH1-84 impedes bone fracture healing. Exogenous PTH1-34 can act in the absence of endogenous PTH but callus formation, including accelerated endochondral bone formation and callus remodeling as well as mechanical strength of the bone are greater when endogenous PTH is present. Results of this study suggest a complementary role for endogenous PTH1-84 and exogenous PTH1-34 in accelerating fracture healing.

  11. Thermally induced self-healing epoxy/glass laminates with porous layers containing crystallized healing agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Szmechtyk

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Porous glass fiber and paper layers were tested for application in thermally induced self healing epoxy laminates as healing porous layers. Both types of layers were impregnated using high purity bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE epoxy with ability to crystallize during storage under 25 °C. Absorption capacity of porous layers was evaluated. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate BADGE healing agent recrystallization process. Healing porous glass layers (HPGL were selected for further tests. Liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FT IR spectroscopy provided information about average molecular mass of embedded healing agent and functional groups in HPGL layers. Self-healing efficiency of three different laminates with HPGL layers was calculated based on the results of three-point bending test and Charpy impact test. Also, flexural properties and impact strength of laminates were evaluated. The obtained results confirm competitive self healing ability of composites with HPGL.

  12. How faith heals: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes theoretical perspectives from psychology supportive of a healing effect of faith. First, faith is defined as a congruence of belief, trust, and obedience in relation to God or the divine. Second, evidence for a faith-healing association is presented, empirically and in theory. To exemplify religiously sanctioned affirmation of such a connection, selected passages are cited from the Jewish canon attesting to biblical and rabbinic support for a faith factor in longevity, disease risk, mental health and well-being, disease prevention, and healing. Third, reference to theories of hope, learned optimism, positive illusions, and opening up or disclosure, and to theory and research on psychoneuroimmunology and placebos, demonstrates that contemporary psychology can accommodate a healing power of faith. This is summarized in a typology of five hypothesized mechanisms underlying a faith-healing association, termed behavioral/conative, interpersonal, cognitive, affective, and psychophysiological. Finally, implications are discussed for the rapprochement of religion and medicine.

  13. Healing through prayer: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helming, Mary Blaszko

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study using a semistructured interview process explored the experience of being healed through prayer in 20 participants from several Protestant Christian faith traditions. Five cluster themes and their subthemes were identified, such as Spirituality and Suffering (subthemes of Purpose of Suffering and Spiritual Meaning of Suffering); The Healing Experience (subthemes of Problems that Were Healed, Incomplete Healings or Recurrences, and Healing of Friends and Family Members); The Connecting Network of Prayer (subthemes of Connection to God, Connection to Others, Meaning of Prayer, Methods of Prayer, and Unanswered Prayer); Spiritual Transformation of Prayer (subthemes of Changed Lives and Sense of Purpose); and Spiritual Phenomena (subthemes of Sense of God's Presence, Use of Complementary and Alternative Practices, and Mysterious Phenomena).

  14. Sex hormones and mucosal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeland, Christopher G; Sabzehei, Bahareh; Marucha, Phillip T

    2009-07-01

    Wound healing studies, which have chiefly examined dermal tissues, have reported a female advantage in healing rates. In contrast, our laboratory recently demonstrated women heal mucosal wounds more slowly than men. We hypothesized sex hormones influence wound healing rates, possibly through their modulating effects on inflammation. This study involved 329 younger subjects aged 18-43 (165 women, 164 men) and 93 older subjects aged 50-88 (60 women, 33 men). A 3.5mm diameter wound was created on the hard oral palate and videographed daily to assess wound closure. Blood collected at the time of wounding was used to assess circulating testosterone, progesterone and estradiol levels, and in vitro cytokine production in response to LPS. No strong associations were observed between healing times and estradiol or progesterone levels. However, in younger subjects, lower testosterone levels related to faster wound closure. Conversely, in older women higher testosterone levels related to (1) lower inflammatory responses; and (2) faster healing times. No such relationships were seen in older men, or in women taking oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy [HRT]. Older women (50-54 years) not yet experiencing menopause healed similarly to younger women and dissimilarly from age-matched post-menopausal women. This suggests that the deleterious effects of aging on wound healing occur secondary to the effects of menopause. Supporting this, there was evidence in post-menopausal women that HRT augmented wound closure. Overall, this study suggests that human mucosal healing rates are modulated by testosterone levels. Based upon when between-group differences were observed, testosterone may impact upon the proliferative phase of healing which involves immune processes such as re-epithelialization and angiogenesis.

  15. Evaluation of workshops on healing through multicultural counseling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of workshops on healing through multicultural counseling: Sport psychology implications. ... Healing through multicultural counselling workshops were conducted at universities in South Africa and ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  16. Current management of wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-01-01

    in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing......While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information...... containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved....

  17. Bone healing and bone substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Peter D; Hiltzik, David; Govindaraj, Satish; Moche, Jason

    2002-02-01

    With the advent of new biomaterials and surgical techniques, the reconstructive surgeon has a wider range of treatment modalities for the rehabilitation and reconstruction of craniofacial skeletal deformities than ever before. These innovative substances act as true bone graft substitutes, thereby allowing the surgeon to avoid the use of autogenous bone grafts and their associated donor site morbidity. Surgeons have long been interested in producing a composite graft that can heal faster by induction, incorporate with surrounding tissues, and be remodeled to resemble native bone. Currently, there are a host of bone graft substitutes available that vary in both their composition and properties. Craniomaxillofacial surgeons must therefore become comfortable with numerous biomaterials to best tailor the treatment for each patient individually. Ongoing investigations into the next phase of tissue engineering will continue to bring us closer to the ability to regenerate or replace bone.

  18. Self-Healing anticorrosive coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesterova, Tatyana

    %. The number is lower than anticipated and needs to be confirmed. Finally, a 3-D model, based on Monte-Carlo simulations, has been developed for prediction of healing efficiency of a microcapsule-based anticorrosive coating. Two kinds of cracks were considered: cracks accommodated within the bulk coating...... associated with development and testing of this type of coating. A laboratory investigation, to identify the most suitable method for production of mechanically stable (filled with industrially relevant core materials) and forming a free-flowing powder upon drying microcapsules, has been performed. Four...... reduces the intensity of crack formation (both in number and length) compared to filler-containing coatings and prevents the coating from flaking upon damage. Based on specular gloss measurements, a preliminary critical pigment (microcapsule) concentration (CPVC) value was estimated to about 30 vol...

  19. Ultrasound stimulation on bone healing. The optimization of stimulation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosim, R.C.; Paulin, J.B.P.; Goncalves, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Previous works in ultrasonic simulation of bone healing dealt with parameters optimization. Albertin (1983) studied the stimulation time and found forty minutes as ideal. However, this stimulation time was the largest one employed and remained some doubt about the most appropriated value. 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes of stimulation time were selected, while others parameters were held constant with: pulse width in 200 μs, repetition rate in 1000 pulses per second and amplitude in 30 V. Partial incomplete transverse osteotomies were done in the middle third of radio in the right forearm of rabbits. Twenty four animals divided in four subgroups, with 6 animals each were stimulated. The daily stimulation time for each subgroup was 30, 40, 50 and minutes respectively, during 15 consecutive days. The stimulation procedure started 24 hours after surgery. After the stimulation period, radiological, histological and morphometric evaluations were done and greater bone healing was found for the 50 minutes stimulation subgroup, in them new bone was also prominent. (author)

  20. Pharmacological Evaluation of Chrozophora tinctoria as Wound Healing Potential in Diabetic Rat’s Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikesh Maurya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The study was designed to evaluate pharmacological potential of hydroalcoholic leaves extract of Chrozophora tinctoria intended for wound healing in diabetic rats’ model. Methods. The method used to evaluate the pharmacological potential of hydroalcoholic leave extract was physical incision rat model. In this model, cutting of the skin and/or other tissues with a sharp blade has been made and the rapid disruption of tissue integrity with minimal collateral damage was observed shortly. Animals used in the study were divided into four groups that consist of six animals in each group. Group I serves as normal control, Group II serves as disease control, Group III was used as standard treatment (Povidone iodine 50 mg/kg b.w., and Group IV was used for test drug (C. tinctoria 50 mg/kg b.w.. Result. The hydroalcoholic leave extract of Chrozophora tinctoria has been significantly observed to heal the wound (98% in diabetic rats within 21 days, while standard drug (Povidone iodine healed the wound about 95% in the same condition. The oral dose (50 mg/kg b.w. of Chrozophora tinctoria was also found to improve the elevated blood glucose level in comparison to disease control group, which increased after the oral administration of Streptozotocin. Conclusion. The Chrozophora tinctoria has significant wound healing potential in the animal having physically damaged tissue in diabetic condition.

  1. The Probiotic Mixture VSL#3 Accelerates Gastric Ulcer Healing by Stimulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Poonam; De Simone, Claudio; Chadee, Kris

    2013-01-01

    Studies assessing the effect and mechanism of probiotics on diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GI) including gastric ulcers are limited despite extensive work and promising results of this therapeutic option for other GI diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which the probiotic mixture VSL#3 (a mixture of eight probiotic bacteria including Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria and Streptococcus species) heals acetic acid induced gastric ulcer in rats. VSL#3 was administered orally at low (6×109 bacteria) or high (1.2×1010 bacteria) dosages from day 3 after ulcer induction for 14 consecutive days. VSL#3 treatments significantly enhanced gastric ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby VSL#3 exerted its protective effects, we quantified the gene expression of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, protein and expression of stomach mucin-Muc5ac, regulatory cytokine-IL-10, COX-2 and various growth factors. Of all the components examined, only expression and protein production of VEGF was increased 332-fold on day 7 in the ulcerated tissues of animals treated with VSL#3. Predictably, animals treated with VEGF neutralizing antibody significantly delayed gastric ulcer healing in VSL#3 treated animals. This is the first report to demonstrate high efficacy of the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in enhancing gastric ulcer healing. Probiotic efficacy was effective at higher concentrations of VSL#3 by specifically increasing the expression and production of angiogenesis promoting growth factors, primarily VEGF. PMID:23484048

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ...

  3. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ...

  4. Animated war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    in production: Gzim Rewind (Sweden, 2011) by Knutte Wester, and In-World War (USA, expected 2011) by DJ Bad Vegan. These films have themes of war and include film scenes that are ‘machinima’ (real-time animation made in 3D graphic environments) within live action film scenes. Machinima harnesses...... DIY multimedia storytellers explore new ways to tell and to ‘animate’ stories. The article contains four parts: introduction to machinima and the notions of resemiosis and authorial practice, presentation of DIY filmmaking as a practice that intertwines with new networked economics, analysis...

  5. Wound healing potential of ethanolic extract of Kalanchoe pinnata Lam. leaf--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Marshall, Julien R; Isitor, Godwin

    2010-06-01

    The extract of K. pinnata was evaluated for its wound healing activity by using excision wound model in rats. On day 11, animals treated with the ethanolic leaf extract exhibited 86.33% reduction in the wound area, compared to petroleum jelly treated control (69.36%) and the mupirocin treated standard (85.49%). The hydroxyproline content of extract treated animals was higher, as compared to control and the standard groups. Histological analysis was also consistent with the proposal that K. pinnata leaf extract exhibits significant wound healing potential. The increased rate of wound contraction and hydroxyproline content in the extract treated animals supports the claims made by traditional healers of the benefits obtained from the medicinal use of K. pinnata.

  6. The effects of photobiomodulation on healing of bone defects in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Costa Lino, Maíra D.; Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Ferreira Moraes, Michel; Augusto Cardoso, José; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.; Maria Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown positive effects of Low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the repair of bone defects, but there are only a few that associates bone healing in the presence of a metabolic disorder as Diabetes Melitus and LLLT. The aim of this study was to assess histologically the effect of LLLT (AsGaAl), 780nm, 70mW, CW, Ø~0.4mm, 16J/cm2 per session) on the repair of surgical defects created in the femur of diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar Albinus rats. Surgical bone defects were created in 60 animals divided into four groups of 15 animals each: Group C (non-diabetic - control); Group CL (non-diabetic + LLLT); Group CD (diabetic); Group CDL (diabetic + LLLT). The animals on the irradiated group received 16 J/cm2 per session divided into four points around the defect, being the first irradiation immediately after surgery and repeated every 48h for 14 days. The animals were killed 15, 21 and 30 days after surgery. The results of the present investigation showed histological evidence of improved amount of collagen fibers at early stages of the bone healing (15 days) and increased amount of well organized bone trabeculae at the end of the experimental period (30 days) on irradiated animals, (diabetic and non-diabetic) compared to non irradiated ones. It is concluded that LLLT has a positive biomodulative effect on the healing process of bone defects, even when diabetes mellitus was present.

  7. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with autologous platelet concentrate applied in rabbit fibula fraction healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Fagundes Neves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose is to study the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrates in healing the fibula bone of rabbits after induced fractures. METHODS: A total of 128 male New Zealand albino rabbits, between 6-8 months old, were subjected to a total osteotomy of the proximal portion of the right fibula. After surgery, the animals were divided into four groups (n = 32 each: control group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy; autologous platelet concentrate group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site; hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions; and autologous platelet concentrate and hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy, autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site, and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups according to a pre-determined euthanasia time points: 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperative. After euthanasia at a specific time point, the fibula containing the osseous callus was prepared histologically and stained with hematoxylin and eosin or picrosirius red. RESULTS: Autologous platelet concentrates and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, applied together or separately, increased the rate of bone healing compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrate combined increased the rate of bone healing in this experimental model.

  8. The Physiological Mechanisms of Effect of Vitamins and Amino Acids on Tendon and Muscle Healing: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Christopher; Shorthouse, Faye; Kass, Lindsy

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the current literature via systematic review to ascertain whether amino acids/vitamins provide any influence on musculotendinous healing and if so, by which physiological mechanisms. EBSCO, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase Classic/Embase, and MEDLINE were searched using terms including "vitamins," "amino acids," "healing," "muscle," and "tendon." The primary search had 479 citations, of which 466 were excluded predominantly due to nonrandomized design. Randomized human and animal studies investigating all supplement types/forms of administration were included. Critical appraisal of internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane risk of Bias Tool or the Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory Animal Experimentation Risk of Bias Tool for human and animal studies, respectively. Two reviewers performed duel data extraction. Twelve studies met criteria for inclusion: eight examined tendon healing and four examined muscle healing. All studies used animal models, except two human trials using a combined integrator. Narrative synthesis was performed via content analysis of demonstrated statistically significant effects and thematic analysis of proposed physiological mechanisms of intervention. Vitamin C/taurine demonstrated indirect effects on tendon healing through antioxidant activity. Vitamin A/glycine showed direct effects on extracellular matrix tissue synthesis. Vitamin E shows an antiproliferative influence on collagen deposition. Leucine directly influences signaling pathways to promote muscle protein synthesis. Preliminary evidence exists, demonstrating that vitamins and amino acids may facilitate multilevel changes in musculotendinous healing; however, recommendations on clinical utility should be made with caution. All animal studies and one human study showed high risk of bias with moderate interobserver agreement (k = 0.46). Currently, there is limited evidence to support the use of vitamins and amino acids for musculotendinous injury. Both

  9. Animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ellen A

    2010-01-01

    As clinical studies reveal that chemotherapeutic agents may impair several different cognitive domains in humans, the development of preclinical animal models is critical to assess the degree of chemotherapy-induced learning and memory deficits and to understand the underlying neural mechanisms. In this chapter, the effects of various cancer chemotherapeutic agents in rodents on sensory processing, conditioned taste aversion, conditioned emotional response, passive avoidance, spatial learning, cued memory, discrimination learning, delayed-matching-to-sample, novel-object recognition, electrophysiological recordings and autoshaping is reviewed. It appears at first glance that the effects of the cancer chemotherapy agents in these many different models are inconsistent. However, a literature is emerging that reveals subtle or unique changes in sensory processing, acquisition, consolidation and retrieval that are dose- and time-dependent. As more studies examine cancer chemotherapeutic agents alone and in combination during repeated treatment regimens, the animal models will become more predictive tools for the assessment of these impairments and the underlying neural mechanisms. The eventual goal is to collect enough data to enable physicians to make informed choices about therapeutic regimens for their patients and discover new avenues of alternative or complementary therapies that reduce or eliminate chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits.

  10. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. A unique combination of infrared and microwave radiation accelerates wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, J Mark; Warner, Dave; Hardesty, Robert A; Oberg, Kerby C

    2003-01-01

    Light or electromagnetic radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing. The use of selected spectra, including infrared and microwave, has been described; however, no studies to date have examined the potential benefit of combining these spectra. In this study, a device that emits electromagnetic radiation across both the infrared and microwave ranges was used. To test the effects of this unique electromagnetic radiation spectrum on wound healing, two clinically relevant wound-healing models (i.e., tensile strength of simple incisions and survival of McFarlane flaps) were selected. After the creation of a simple full-thickness incision (n = 35 rats) or a caudally based McFarlane flap (n = 33 rats), animals were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: untreated control, infrared, or combined electromagnetic radiation. Treatment was administered for 30 minutes, twice daily for 18 days in animals with simple incisions, and 15 days in animals with McFarlane flaps. The wound area or flap was harvested and analyzed, blinded to the treatment regimens. A p value of less than 0.05 obtained by analysis of variance was considered to be statistically significant. Animals receiving combined electromagnetic radiation demonstrated increased tensile strength (2.62 N/mm2) compared with animals receiving infrared radiation (2.36 N/mm2) or untreated controls (1.73 N/mm2, p radiation had increased flap survival (78.0 percent) compared with animals receiving infrared radiation (69.7 percent) and untreated controls (63.1 percent, p radiation provided a distinct advantage in wound healing that might augment current treatment regimens.

  12. Effect of Asparagus racemosus on fracture healing in rabbits: a radiographic and angiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sunil; Singh, H.N.; Gangwar, A.K.; Devi, Kh. Sangeeta; Waghay, J.Y.

    2009-01-01

    New Zealand white rabbits (18) were randomly divided into groups I and II (control) having 9 animals in each group. The fracture of ulna was created in each animal under general anaesthesia using thiopental sodium (2.5%). Radius acted as a natural splint. The animals of group I were fed with powdered Asparagus racemosus along with rabbit feed throughout the study period. However, in group II animals only powdered rabbit feed was given. Healing at the fracture site was assessed by plain radiography and angiography at 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th day interval. Radiographical observation revealed a well organized and dense callus at 21st day in animals of group I whereas in animals of group II, callus of slightly less radiographic density was observed at this interval. Angiographic observation revealed hypervascularity at the fracture site at 7th and 14th day interval in group I animals. On day 14, in group II animals major vessels lack continuity along with reduced vascularity around the fracture site. The results of present study suggest that feeding of dry root powder of Asparagus racemosus promotes early fracture healing in rabbits

  13. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  14. Ultrasonic Stimulation of Mouse Skin Reverses the Healing Delays in Diabetes and Aging by Activation of Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, James A; Williamson, Rosalind C; Bally, Blandine; Cowell, Christopher A M; Brooks, Rebecca; Stephens, Phil; Harrison, Andrew J; Bass, Mark D

    2015-11-01

    Chronic skin-healing defects are one of the leading challenges to lifelong well-being, affecting 2-5% of populations. Chronic wound formation is linked to age and diabetes and frequently leads to major limb amputation. Here we identify a strategy to reverse fibroblast senescence and improve healing rates. In healthy skin, fibronectin activates Rac1 in fibroblasts, causing migration into the wound bed, and driving wound contraction. We discover that mechanical stimulation of the skin with ultrasound can overturn healing defects by activating a calcium/CamKinaseII/Tiam1/Rac1 pathway that substitutes for fibronectin-dependent signaling and promotes fibroblast migration. Treatment of diabetic and aged mice recruits fibroblasts to the wound bed and reduces healing times by 30%, restoring healing rates to those observed in young, healthy animals. Ultrasound treatment is equally effective in rescuing the healing defects of animals lacking fibronectin receptors, and can be blocked by pharmacological inhibition of the CamKinaseII pathway. Finally, we discover that the migration defects of fibroblasts from human venous leg ulcer patients can be reversed by ultrasound, demonstrating that the approach is applicable to human chronic samples. By demonstrating that this alternative Rac1 pathway can substitute for that normally operating in the skin, we identify future opportunities for management of chronic wounds.

  15. [Surgical management of animal bites in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet-Roumazeille, S; Jayyosi, L; Plenier, Y; Guyot, E; Guillard, T; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children represent a population at risk, because of their short size, their naivety and their attraction to animals. The face and hands are the most specific locations in young children. Wounds are often multiple. In more than half the cases, the child knows the animal, which are dogs and cats by frequency argument. The bite episode occurs mostly when the child is alone with the pet without direct supervision, while playing or stroking the animal. As in all bites, pediatric lesions are infectious, functional and aesthetic emergencies, but the goal of this work was primarily to make a point on principles of surgical management of animal bites in children, highlighting pediatric specificities. Animal bites require psychological, anesthetic and surgical treatment, adapted to the child, in a specialized structure. Hospitalization and general anesthesia are more frequent in children. Any suspicion of mistreatment (and/or abuse) should lead to the child's hospitalization, even if wounds do not justify monitoring in a surgical environment. Emergency surgery is essential to limit functional and aesthetic consequences. The healing capacities of the child and the frequent lack of co-morbidity allow a conservative surgical treatment with suture, repositioning skin flaps and controlled healing in the first place. Immobilization, drainage, and antibiotics will complete the surgery. The healing process, however, leads to a specific management during scar remodeling phase and growth. Psychological care of the child and parents should not be forgotten, and has to start at the same time as surgical treatment at in acute phase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent Advancements in Self-Healing Metallic Materials and Self-Healing Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Volkan; Yan, Xiaojun; Salowitz, Nathan; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.

    2018-04-01

    Engineered self-healing materials inspired by natural biological organisms that can repair damage are receiving increasing interest in recent years. Most studies have been focused on self-healing polymers, concretes, and ceramics. Self-healing metallic materials pose challenges due to the high temperatures used in manufacturing and the chemistries involved. This article summarizes and evaluates the self-healing mechanisms used in metallic materials and reviews recent studies into self-healing in aluminum, zinc, and Sn-Bi alloys. Generalizations about the various classifications are drawn from the review highlighting major hurdles in the widespread practical application of metallic self-healing materials, as well as the potential directions for future studies.

  17. Methylisothiazolinone toxicity and inhibition of wound healing and regeneration in planaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Huizen, Alanna V; Tseng, Ai-Sun; Beane, Wendy S

    2017-10-01

    Methylisothiazolinone (MIT) is a common biocide used in cosmetic and industrial settings. Studies have demonstrated that MIT is a human sensitizer, to the extent that in 2013 MIT was named allergen of the year. Recently, we showed that MIT exposure in Xenopus laevis (the African clawed frog) inhibits wound healing and tail regeneration. However, it is unknown whether MIT affects these processes in other animals. Here, we investigated the effects of MIT exposure in planaria-non-parasitic freshwater flatworms able to regenerate all tissues after injury. Using a common research strain of Dugesia japonica, we determined that intact planarians exposed to 15μM MIT displayed both neuromuscular and epithelial-integrity defects. Furthermore, regenerating (head and tail) fragments exposed to 15μM MIT failed to close wounds or had significantly delayed wound healing. Planarian wounds normally close within 1h after injury. However, most MIT-exposed animals retained open wounds at 24h and subsequently died, and those few animals that were able to undergo delayed wound healing without dying exhibited abnormal regeneration. For instance, head regeneration was severely delayed or inhibited, with anterior structures such as eyes failing to form in newly produced tissues. These data suggest that MIT directly affects both wound healing and regeneration in planarians. Next, we investigated the ability of thiol-containing antioxidants to rescue planarian wound closure during MIT exposure. The data reveal both n-acetyl cysteine and glutathione were each able to fully rescue MIT inhibition of wound healing. Lastly, we established MIT toxicity levels by determining the LC 50 of 5 different planarian species: D. japonica, Schmidtea mediterranea, Girardia tigrina, Girardia dorotocephala, and Phagocata gracilis. Our LC 50 data revealed that concentrations as low as 39μM (4.5ppm) are lethal to planarians, with concentrations of just 5μM inhibiting wound healing, and suggest that phylogeny

  18. Pharmacological effect of Ageratina pichinchensis on wound healing in diabetic rats and genotoxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Cerecero, Ofelia; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Díaz-García, Edgar Rolando; Tortoriello, Jaime

    2014-10-28

    Among the main causes affecting the wound healing process, we find diabetes mellitus, which is due to the occurrence of a prolonged inflammation phase, defects in angiogenesis, and a diminution in fibroblast proliferation. The species Ageratina pichinchensis has been utilized in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of skin wounds. Pharmacological models have demonstrated that an extract obtained from this species improves wound healing and, through a clinical study, it was evidenced that the extract (in a pharmaceutical form) is effective in the treatment of patients with chronic venous ulcers. The 7-O-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-galactin compound was recently identified as responsible for the pharmacological activity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the wound healing activity of an aqueous extract and another hexane-ethyl acetate extract from Ageratina pichinchensis (both standardized in the active compound) in a diabetic foot ulcer rat model, as well as evaluating the possible genotoxic effects produced by the same species. Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were submitted (under anesthesia with pentobarbital) to a circular lesion on the skin (excisional) on the rear of the paw. All animals were topically treated daily until healing. 5-methyl-1 phenyl-2-(1H) Pyridone was used as a positive control treatment. Once the wound was healed, a skin sample was obtained and utilized for histopathological analysis. The possible genotoxic effects produced by the extract, in a model of spermatozoid viability and morphology, were evaluated. The results showed that 100% of animals treated with Ageratina pichinchensis extracts presented wound healing between days 4 and 11 of treatment, while in the positive control group (treated with 5-methyl-1 phenyl-2-(1H) pyridone) and in the negative control group (vehicle), only 70% and 40%, respectively, exhibited wound healing at day 11. Histological analysis demonstrated evidences of an active regenerative

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells increase T-regulatory cells and improve healing following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Amy V; Bible, Letitia E; Song, Kimberly; Livingston, David H; Mohr, Alicia M; Sifri, Ziad C

    2015-07-01

    Rodent lungs undergo full histologic recovery within 1 week following unilateral lung contusion (LC). However, when LC is followed by hemorrhagic shock (HS), healing is impaired. We hypothesize that the intravenous administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in animals undergoing combined LC followed by HS (LCHS) will improve wound healing. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 5-6 per group) were subjected to LCHS with or without the injection of a single intravenous dose of 5 × 10 MSCs following return of shed blood after HS. Rats were sacrificed 7 days following injury. Flow cytometry was used to determine the T-regulatory cell (Treg) population in peripheral blood. Lung histology was graded using a well-established lung injury score (LIS). Components of the LIS include average inflammatory cells per high-power field over 30 fields, interstitial edema, pulmonary edema, and alveolar integrity, with total scores ranging from 0 to 11. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test, expressed as mean (SD). p healing with an LIS unchanged from naive. The addition of HS resulted in a persistently elevated LIS score, whereas the addition of MSCs to LCHS decreased the LIS score back to naive levels. The change in LIS was driven by a significant decrease in edema scores. In rats undergoing LC alone, 10.5% (3.3%) of CD4 cells were Tregs. The addition of HS caused no significant change in Treg population (9.3% [0.7%]), whereas LCHS + MSC significantly increased the population to 18.2% (6.8%) in peripheral blood (p healing following trauma and HS is improved by a single dose of MSCs given immediately after injury. This enhanced healing is associated with an increase in the Treg population and a significant decrease in lung edema score as compared with animals undergoing LCHS. Further study into the role of Tregs in MSC-mediated wound healing is warranted.

  20. Role of endothelial progenitor cells and inflammatory cytokines in healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tecilazich

    Full Text Available To evaluate changes in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and cytokines in patients with diabetic foot ulceration (DFU in association with wound healing.We studied healthy subjects, diabetic patients not at risk of DFU, at risk of DFU and with active DFU. We prospectively followed the DFU patients over a 12-week period. We also investigated similar changes in diabetic rabbit and mouse models of wound healing.All EPC phenotypes except the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR(+CD133(+ were reduced in the at risk and the DFU groups compared to the controls. There were no major EPC differences between the control and not at risk group, and between the at risk and DFU groups. Serum stromal-cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and stem cell factor (SCF were increased in DFU patients. DFU patients who healed their ulcers had lower CD34(+KDR(+ count at visits 3 and 4, serum c-reactive protein (CRP and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF at visit 1, interleukin-1 (IL-1 at visits 1 and 4. EPCs tended to be higher in both diabetic animal models when compared to their non-diabetic counterparts both before and ten days after wounding.Uncomplicated diabetes does not affect EPCs. EPCs are reduced in patients at risk or with DFU while complete wound healing is associated with CD34(+KDR(+ reduction, suggesting possible increased homing. Low baseline CRP, IL-1α and GM-CSF serum levels were associated with complete wound healing and may potentially serve as prognostic markers of DFU healing. No animal model alone is representative of the human condition, indicating the need for multiple experimental models.

  1. Effect of FRG-8813, a new-type histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist, on the recurrence of gastric ulcer after healing by drug treatment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajioka, H; Miyake, H; Matsuura, N

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the recurrence of ulcers in rats after treatment with FRG-8813, (+/-)-2-(furfurylsulfinyl)-N-[4- [4-(piperidinomethyl)-2-pyridyl] oxy-(Z)-2-butenyl] acetamide, a novel histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist. Chronic gastric ulcers were induced by serosa-searing with a hot metal bar, and the ulcer healing and recurrence after treatment with FRG-8813 or famotidine were evaluated by endoscopy for 160 days. At the dose of 30 mg/kg p. o., once daily, the treatment with FRG-8813 or famotidine for 60 days, which was stopped earlier if the ulcer had healed, accelerated the ulcer healing significantly. A subsequent follow-up study on the healed rats showed that the cumulative recurrence rate of rats healed by FRG-8813 was lower than that of naturally healed rats or rats healed by famotidine. In many cases of rats healed by FRG-8813, the regenerated mucosa was normal in contrast with the control of famotidine-healed animals. The mucosal regeneration index of the gastric ulcer after 10 days' administration of FRG-8813 was significantly higher than that obtained with famotidine. After cessation of the treatment with famotidine for 7 days, rebound hyperacidity was induced; but such rebound did not occur with FRG-8813. Considering the low recurrence rate of ulcers after FRG-8813 treatment, we suggest that FRG-8813 treatment may provide additional benefits in peptic ulcer therapy. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Clinically relevant doses of lidocaine and bupivacaine do not impair cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, A; Gilliver, S C; Masterson, G R; Hardman, M J; Ashcroft, G S

    2010-06-01

    Lidocaine and bupivacaine are commonly infiltrated into surgical cutaneous wounds to provide local anaesthesia after surgical procedures. However, very little is known about their effects on cutaneous wound healing. If an inhibitory effect is demonstrated, then the balance between the benefits of postoperative local anaesthesia and the negatives of impaired cutaneous wound healing may affect the decision to use local anaesthesia or not. Furthermore, if a difference in the rate of healing of lidocaine- and bupivacaine-treated cutaneous wounds is revealed, or if an inhibitory effect is found to be dose-dependent, then this may well influence the choice of agent and its concentration for clinical use. Immediately before incisional wounding, we administered lidocaine and bupivacaine intradermally to adult female mice, some of which had been ovariectomized to act as a model of post-menopausal women (like post-menopausal women, ovariectomized mice heal wounds poorly, with increased proteolysis and inflammation). Day 3 wound tissue was analysed histologically and tested for expression of inflammatory and proteolytic factors. On day 3 post-wounding, wound areas and extent of re-epithelialization were comparable between the control and local anaesthetic-treated animals, in both intact and ovariectomized groups. Both tested drugs significantly increased wound activity of the degradative enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-2 relative to controls, while lidocaine also increased wound neutrophil numbers. Although lidocaine and bupivacaine influenced local inflammatory and proteolytic factors, they did not impair the rate of healing in either of two well-established models (mimicking normal human wound healing and impaired age-related healing).

  3. The Oshun Festival: An African Traditional Religious Healing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idowu, Adeyemi I.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the Oshun Festival, an African traditional religious festival, from a healing perspective. Highlights the value of religion in the African culture and discusses various myths. Explores the role of myths in and the place of beliefs in the healing process. Explains rituals and the healing environment, healers, and healing methods. Offers…

  4. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  5. Measurement of pH, exudate composition and temperature in wound healing: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, G; Moore, Z; O'Connor, T

    2017-07-02

    To assess the potential of measurements of pH, exudate composition and temperature in wounds to predict healing outcomes and to identify the methods that are employed to measure them. A systematic review based on the outcomes of a search strategy of quantitative primary research published in the English language was conducted. Inclusion criteria limited studies to those involving in vivo and human participants with an existing or intentionally provoked wound, defined as 'a break in the epithelial integrity of the skin', and excluded in vitro and animal studies. Data synthesis and analysis was performed using structured narrative summaries of each included study arranged by concept, pH, exudate composition and temperature. The Evidence Based Literature (EBL) Critical Appraisal Checklist was implemented to appraise the quality of the included studies. A total of 23 studies, three for pH (mean quality score 54.48%), 12 for exudate composition (mean quality score 46.54%) and eight for temperature (mean quality score 36.66%), were assessed as eligible for inclusion in this review. Findings suggest that reduced pH levels in wounds, from alkaline towards acidic, are associated with improvements in wound condition. Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP), neutrophil elastase (NE) and albumin, in descending order, were the most frequently measured analytes in wounds. MMP-9 emerged as the analyte which offers the most potential as a biomarker of wound healing, with elevated levels observed in acute or non-healing wounds and decreasing levels in wounds progressing in healing. Combined measures of different exudate components, such as MMP/TIMP ratios, also appeared to offer substantial potential to indicate wound healing. Finally, temperature measurements are highest in non-healing, worsening or acute wounds and decrease as wounds progress towards healing. Methods used to measure pH, exudate composition and

  6. Bioethical Problems: Animal Welfare, Animal Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various bioethical issues and problems related to animal welfare and animal rights. Areas examined include: Aristotelian views; animal welfare legislation; Darwin and evolutionary theory; animal and human behavior; and vegetarianism. A 14-point universal declaration of the rights of animals is included. (JN)

  7. Ballistic Puncture Self-Healing Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Yost, William T.; Bogert, Phil B.; Howell, Patricia A.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Burke, Eric R.

    2017-01-01

    Space exploration launch costs on the order of $10,000 per pound provide an incentive to seek ways to reduce structural mass while maintaining structural function to assure safety and reliability. Damage-tolerant structural systems provide a route to avoiding weight penalty while enhancing vehicle safety and reliability. Self-healing polymers capable of spontaneous puncture repair show promise to mitigate potentially catastrophic damage from events such as micrometeoroid penetration. Effective self-repair requires these materials to quickly heal following projectile penetration while retaining some structural function during the healing processes. Although there are materials known to possess this capability, they are typically not considered for structural applications. Current efforts use inexpensive experimental methods to inflict damage, after which analytical procedures are identified to verify that function is restored. Two candidate self-healing polymer materials for structural engineering systems are used to test these experimental methods.

  8. Self-Healing Networks: Redundancy and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the concept of self-healing in the field of complex networks modelling; in particular, self-healing capabilities are implemented through distributed communication protocols that exploit redundant links to recover the connectivity of the system. We then analyze the effect of the level of redundancy on the resilience to multiple failures; in particular, we measure the fraction of nodes still served for increasing levels of network damages. Finally, we study the effects of redundancy under different connectivity patterns—from planar grids, to small-world, up to scale-free networks—on healing performances. Small-world topologies show that introducing some long-range connections in planar grids greatly enhances the resilience to multiple failures with performances comparable to the case of the most resilient (and least realistic) scale-free structures. Obvious applications of self-healing are in the important field of infrastructural networks like gas, power, water, oil distribution systems. PMID:24533065

  9. Nanotoxicity in Systemic Circulation and Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh

    2017-06-19

    Nanotoxicity of nanomaterials is an important issue in view of their potential applications in systemic circulation and wound healing dressing. This account specifically deals with several characteristic features of different nanomaterials which induce hemolysis and how to make them hemocompatible. The shape, size, and surface functionalities of naked metallic as well as nonmetallic nanoparticles surfaces are responsible for the hemolysis. An appropriate coating of biocompatible molecules dramatically reduces hemolysis and promotes their ability as safe drug delivery vehicles. The use of coated nanomaterials in wound healing dressing opens several new strategies for rapid wound healing processes. Properly designed nanomaterials should be selected to minimize the nanotoxicity in the wound healing process. Future directions need new synthetic methods for engineered nanomaterials for their best use in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology.

  10. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall 2007 ... a peak flow meter. Photo courtesy of MCAN Asthma, a reality of daily life for more than ...

  11. Enzymetically regulating the self-healing of protein hydrogels with high healing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuzhou; Luo, Quan; Qiao, Shanpeng; Wang, Liang; Dong, Zeyuan; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-08-25

    Enzyme-mediated self-healing of dynamic covalent bond-driven protein hydrogels was realized by the synergy of two enzymes, glucose oxidase (GOX) and catalase (CAT). The reversible covalent attachment of glutaraldehyde to lysine residues of GOX, CAT, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) led to the formation and functionalization of the self-healing protein hydrogel system. The enzyme-mediated protein hydrogels exhibit excellent self-healing properties with 100% recovery. The self-healing process was reversible and effective with an external glucose stimulus at room temperature. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Vitamin E and the Healing of Bone Fracture: The Current State of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boekhtiar Borhanuddin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The effect of vitamin E on health-related conditions has been extensively researched, with varied results. However, to date, there was no published review of the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Purpose. This paper systematically audited past studies of the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Methods. Related articles were identified from Medline, CINAHL, and Scopus databases. Screenings were performed based on the criteria that the study must be an original study that investigated the independent effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing. Data were extracted using standardised forms, followed by evaluation of quality of reporting using ARRIVE Guidelines, plus recalculation procedure for the effect size and statistical power of the results. Results. Six animal studies fulfilled the selection criteria. The study methods were heterogeneous with mediocre reporting quality and focused on the antioxidant-related mechanism of vitamin E. The metasynthesis showed α-tocopherol may have a significant effect on bone formation during the normal bone remodeling phase of secondary bone healing. Conclusion. In general, the effect of vitamin E on bone fracture healing remained inconclusive due to the small number of heterogeneous and mediocre studies included in this paper.

  13. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  14. The effect of chrysin-loaded nanofiber on wound healing process in male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zoheyr; Sharif Zak, Mohsen; Majdi, Hasan; Seidi, Khaled; Barati, Meisam; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Latifi, Ali Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    Wound healing is an inflammatory process. Chrysin, a natural flavonoid found in honey, has been recently investigated to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. In this work, the effects of chrysin-loaded nanofiber on the expressions of genes that are related to wound healing process such as P53, TIMPs, MMPs, iNOS, and IL-6 in an animal model study were evaluated. The electrospinning method was used for preparation the different concentrations of chrysin-loaded PCL-PEG nanofiber (5%, 10%, and 20% [w/w]) and characterized by FTIR and SEM. The wound healing effects of chrysin-loaded PCL-PEG nanofiber were in vivo investigated in rats, and the expressions of genes related to wound healing process were evaluated by real-time PCR. The study results showed chrysin-loaded PLC-PEG compared to chrysin ointment and control groups significantly increase IL-6, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 (p healing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Studies on Wound Healing Activity of Heliotropium indicum Linn. Leaves on Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, G K; Murthy, P N

    2011-01-01

    The petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Heliotropium indicum Linn. (Family: Boraginaceae) were separately evaluated for their wound healing activity in rats using excision (normal and infected), incision, and dead space wound models. The effects of test samples on the rate of wound healing were assessed by the rate of wound closure, period of epithelialisation, wound breaking strength, weights of the granulation tissue, determination of hydroxyproline, super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and histopathology of the granulation tissues. Nitrofurazone (0.2% w/w) in simple ointment I. P. was used as reference standard for the activity comparison. The results revealed significant promotion of wound healing with both methanol and aqueous extracts with more promising activity with the methanol extract compared to other extracts under study. In the wound infection model (with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa), the methanol extract showed significant healing activity similar to the reference standard nitrofurazone. Significant increase in the granulation tissue weight, increased hydroxyproline content, and increased activity of SOD and catalase level with the animals treated with methanol extract in dead space wound model further augmented the wound healing potential of H. indicum. The present work substantiates its validity of the folklore use.

  16. Impact of Trace Minerals on Wound Healing of Footpad Dermatitis in Broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery; Vazquez-Anon, Mercedes

    2017-05-15

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is used in the poultry industry as an animal welfare criterion to determine stocking density. Trace minerals (TM) play a role in skin integrity and wound healing. This study evaluated the impact of TM on FPD and consisted of 3 treatments supplemented with 0 (NTM), low (LTM) and high (HTM) TM levels in the same basal diet. On d21, 71% birds in all treatments developed mild FPD and pens were top-dressed with dry litter to promote FPD healing. Compared to NTM, LTM reduced area under the curve (AUC) of FPD lesion scores during d21-42, HTM reduced the AUC of FPD lesion scores during d7-21 and d21-42. LTM improved growth performance on d14, HTM improved growth performance on d14 and d28. LTM and/or HTM increased gene expression of VEGF, TIMP3, TIMP4, MMP13, ITGA2, ITGA3 and CD40, which promoted collagen synthesis, deposition and organization; cell migration, matrix remodeling, and angiogenesis. LTM and/or HTM increased inflammation by upregulating TNFα and IL-1β during the early wound healing phase and reduced inflammation by downregulating IL-1β during the late wound healing phase. Our findings showed that TM not only improved growth performance but also reduced FPD development by promoting FPD wound healing.

  17. Are bone turnover markers capable of predicting callus consolidation during bone healing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P; Bail, H J; Schell, H; Michel, R; Amthauer, H; Bragulla, H; Duda, G N

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ability of the following bone turnover markers to monitor the course of callus consolidation during bone healing: Carboxy-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I (PICP), skeletal alkaline phosphatase (sALP), and amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIlINP). Since interfragmentary movements have been proven to possess the ability to document the progression of bone healing in experimental studies, correlations between bone turnover markers and interfragmentary movements in vivo were investigated. Therefore, two different types of osteosyntheses representing different mechanical situations at the fracture site were compared in an ovine osteotomy model. Blood samples were taken preoperatively and postoperatively in weekly intervals over a nine-week healing period. At the same intervals, interfragmentary movements were measured in all sheep. After nine weeks, animals were sacrificed and the tibiae were evaluated both mechanically and histologically. Wide interindividual ranges were observed for all bone turnover markers. The systemic PICP level did not increase with callus consolidation. The bone-healing model seemed to influence the systemic level of PIIINP and sALP but no general correlation between bone turnover markers and interfragmentary movements could be detected. No differences between the different types of osteosyntheses and thus the different mechanical situations were observed. All analyzed markers failed as general predictors for the course of callus consolidation during bone healing.

  18. Topical Application of Sadat-Habdan Mesenchymal Stimulating Peptide (SHMSP Accelerates Wound Healing in Diabetic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H. Al-Elq

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Diminished wound healing is a common problem in diabetic patients due to diminished angiogenesis. SHMSP was found to promote angiogenesis. The present study was carried out to examine the effect of this peptide in healing of wounds in diabetic rabbits. Materials and Methods. Twenty male New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. Diabetes mellitus was induced and the rabbits were randomly divided into two equal groups: control group and peptide group. A-full thickness punch biopsy was made to create a wound of about 10 mm on the right ears of all rabbits. Every day, the wound was cleaned with saline in control groups. In the peptide group, 15 mg of SHMSP was applied after cleaning. On day 15th, all animals were sacrificed, and the wounds were excised with a rim of 5 mm of normal surrounding tissue. Histo-pathological assessment of wound healing, inflammatory cell infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and collagen deposition was performed. Results. There were no deaths among the groups. There was significant increase in wound healing, blood vessel proliferation and collagen deposition, and significant decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration in the peptide group compared to the control group. Conclusion. Topical application of SHMSP improves wound healing in diabetic rabbits.

  19. Acceleration of skin wound healing with tragacanth (Astragalus preparation: an experimental pilot study in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Fayazzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gum tragacanth is a natural complex mixture of polysaccharides and alkaline minerals extracted from species of Astragalus plant, which is found widely in arid regions of the Middle East. In a pilot experimental study we examined the effects of its topical application on wound healing in ten albino adult male rats. Two similar parasagittal elliptical full-thickness wounds (control vs. test samples were created on the dorsum of each animal. Test group samples were fully covered by a thin layer of gum tragacanth daily. The extent of wound healing was evaluated by planimetric analysis on multiple occasions during the 10-day study period. On the 7th day of the study, the percent of wound closure was significantly higher in gum tragacanth-treated specimens compared to the control samples (87%±2% vs. 70%±4%, P<0.001. The majority of wounds in the test group were completely closed by the 10th day of the study. The difference in wound healing index measured by histological examination on day 10 of the study was also statistically meaningful between the two groups (0.624±0.097 vs. 0.255±0.063, P<0.05. The results of this study clearly showed the useful effects of topical application of gum tragacanth in acceleration of skin wound contraction and healing. More studies are encouraged to identify the implicating agents and precisely understand the mechanism by which they exert their wound healing effects.

  20. Chronic Wound Repair and Healing in Older Adults: Current Status and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Lisa; Abadir, Peter; Brem, Harold; Carter, Marissa; Conner-Kerr, Teresa; Davidson, Jeff; DiPietro, Luisa; Falanga, Vincent; Fife, Caroline; Gardner, Sue; Grice, Elizabeth; Harmon, John; Hazzard, William R.; High, Kevin P.; Houghton, Pamela; Jacobson, Nasreen; Kirsner, Robert S.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.; Margolis, David; Horne, Frances McFarland; Reed, May J.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Thom, Stephen; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Walston, Jeremy; Whitney, Jo Anne; Williams, John; Zieman, Susan; Schmader, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are more likely to have chronic wounds than younger people, and the effect of chronic wounds on quality of life is particularly profound in this population. Wound healing slows with age, but the basic biology underlying chronic wounds and the influence of age-associated changes on wound healing are poorly understood. Most studies have used in vitro approaches and various animal models, but observed changes translate poorly to human healing conditions. The effect of age and accompanying multimorbidity on the effectiveness of existing and emerging treatment approaches for chronic wounds is also unknown, and older adults tend to be excluded from randomized clinical trials. Poorly defined outcomes and variables; lack of standardization in data collection; and variations in the definition, measurement, and treatment of wounds also hamper clinical studies. The Association of Specialty Professors, in conjunction with the National Institute on Aging and the Wound Healing Society, held a workshop, summarized in this article, to explore the current state of knowledge and research challenges, engage investigators across disciplines, and identify research questions to guide future study of age-associated changes in chronic wound healing. PMID:25753048

  1. Effect of virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus on experimental burn wound's healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerrou, Zouhir; Maameri, Z; Hamdi-Pacha, Y; Serakta, M; Riachi, F; Djaalab, H; Boukeloua, A

    2010-04-03

    This study aimed to assess the efficiency of the virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus (PLVFO) for burn wounds healing. It was carried out on 6 adult male New Zealand rabbits. Four burn wounds of deep third degree were made on the back of each animal. The first was not treated and served as control (CRL group); the others were covered immediately after burning procedure by 0.5g of one of the following products: Vaseline gel (VAS group), Madecassol(®) cream 1% (MAD group) or 1ml of PLVFO (PLVFO group). The treatments were repeated once daily until complete healing. For four days post burns, the percentage of wound contraction was assessed. Also, the different healing times were noted. The results showed that both PLVFO and Madecassol(®) significantly accelerated wound healing activity compared to wounds dressed with Vaseline and the untreated wounds. However, the level of wound contraction was significantly higher and the healing time was faster in PLVFO group than those of the MAD group, VAS group and CRL group. The different epithelization periods obtained in days were respectively: 30±3.94 (PLVFO group), 33.5±3.78 (MAD group), 34.66±3.88 (VAS group) and 37.16±3.54 (CRL group). We conclude that Pistacia lentiscus virgin fatty oil promotes significantly (p< 0.05) wound contraction and reduces epithelization period in rabbit model.

  2. Reirradiation of healing murine skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, N.H.A.; Aldana, M.W.; Travis, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    The most common way of assessing residual radiation damage in a tissue has been to retreat at a fixed time interval after a first treatment. Previous studies in skin have shown that the greatest proportion of remembered dose (20-40%) was seen if the retreatment interval was one month, shortly after the acute reaction caused by the first treatment has subsided. Moreover, the observed state of the foot at retreatment depended on the size of the first dose. After a priming dose of 22.5 Gy, the peak skin reaction of 0.8 returned to zero by Day 27. On retreatment at Day 30, the foot was indistinguishable from controls. After higher first doses, the feet still had significant reaction scores ranging from 0.5 to more than 1.0. Thus, in this present study, feet were retreated at a common level of healing rather than after a fixed time interval. Mice feet were irradiated with a range of X-ray doses (22.5-37.5 Gy) covering the threshold to full response. The feet were reirradiated when their skin reactions had fallen to a common value of 0.5. The time of this retreatment was therefore earlier (13 days) after the lowest priming dose (22.5 Gy) than after higher doses. In these latter instances retreatment times ranged from 18-40 days. These data are compared with those from schedules where the second irradiations were performed a fixed time after the first treatment

  3. Alveolar wound healing in rats fed on high sucrose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baró, María A; Rocamundi, Marina R; Viotto, Javier O; Ferreyra, Ruth S

    2013-01-01

    The potential for bone repair is influenced by various biochemical, biomechanical, hormonal, and pathological mechanisms and factors such as diet and its components, all of which govern the behavior and function of the cells responsible for forming new bone. Several authors suggest that a high sucrose diet could change the calcium balance and bone composition in animals, altering hard tissue mineralization. The mechanism by which it occurs is unclear. Alveolar healing following tooth extraction has certain characteristics making this type of wound unique, in both animals and humans. The general aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the biological response during alveolar healing following tooth extraction in rats fed on high sucrose diets, by means of osteocyte lacunae histomorphometry, counting empty lacunae and measuring areas of bone quiescence, formation and resorption. Forty-two Wistar rats of both sexes were divided into two groups: an experimental group fed on modified Stephan Harris diet (43% sucrose) and a control group fed on standard balanced diet. The animals were anesthetized and their left and right lower molars extracted. They were killed at 0 hours, 14, 28, 60 and 120 days. Samples were fixed, decalcified in EDTA and embedded in paraffin to prepare sections for optical microscopy which were stained with hematoxylin/eosin. Histomorphometric analysis showed significant differences in the size of osteocyte lacunae between groups at 28 and 60 days, with the experimental group having larger lacunae. There were more empty lacunae in the experimental group at 14 days, and no significant difference in the areas of bone activity. A high sucrose diet could modify the morphology and quality of bone tissue formed in the alveolus following tooth extraction.

  4. [Delayed wound healing post molar extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, R H; De Visscher, J G A M

    2009-02-01

    One month post extraction of the second left maxillary molar the alveolar extraction site showed no signs of healing and was painful. The patient had been using an oral bisphosphonate during 3 years. Therefore, the lesion was diagnosed as bisphosphonate-induced maxillary osteonecrosis. Treatment was conservative. Since one month later the pain had increased and the wound healing had decreased, a biopsy was carried out. Histopathologic examination revealed a non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  5. Ceramic-polylactide composite material used in a model of healing of osseous defects in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myciński, Paweł; Zarzecka, Joanna; Skórska-Stania, Agnieszka; Jelonek, Agnieszka; Okoń, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Maria

    The growing demand for various kinds of bone regeneration material has in turn increased the desire to find materials with optimal physical, chemical, and biological properties. The objective of the present study was to identify the proportions of ceramic and polylactide components in a bone substitute material prepared in collaboration with the Crystal Chemistry of Drugs Team of the Faculty of Chemistry at the Jagiellonian University, which would be optimal for bone regeneration processes. Another goal was to provide a histological analysis of the influence of a ceramic-polylactide composite on the healing of osseous defects in rabbits. The study was performed on laboratory animals (18 New Zealand White rabbits). The following study groups were formed: - group A (study group, 9 animals) - in this group we performed a histological analysis of healing with a ceramic-polylactide composite based on an 80/20 mix of hydroxyapatite and polylactide; - group B (study group, 9 animals) - in this group we performed a histological analysis of healing with a ceramic-polylactide composite with a reduced amount of hydroxyapatite compared to the previous group, i.e. in a ratio of 61/39; - group K (control, 18 animals) - the control group comprised self-healing, standardised osseous defects prepared in the calvarial bone of the rabbits on the contralateral side. In the assessment of histological samples, we were also able to eliminate individual influences that might have led to differentiation in wound healing. The material used in the histological analysis took the form of rabbit bone tissue samples, containing both defects, with margins of around 0.5 cm, taken 1, 3, and 6 months after the experiment. The osseous defects from groups A and B filled with ceramic-polylactide material healed with less inflammatory infiltration than was the case with control group K. They were also characterised by faster regression, and no resorption or osteonecrosis, which allowed for better

  6. [Influence of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (aroeira) and Carapa guianensis Aublet (andiroba) in the healing process of gastrorraphies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Orlando José Dos; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Ribas-Filho, Jurandir Marcondes; Czeczko, Nicolau Gregori; Santos, Rayan Haquim Pinheiro; Santos, Rennan Abud Pinheiro

    2013-06-01

    The gastrorraphy isolated or associated with the use of biological adhesives formed throughout the history of surgery the usual way to promote healing in gastric lesions; however, the use of herbal medicine has been increasingly employed to help the wound healing. To evaluate the wound healing caused in the stomach of rats using extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi and Carapa guianensis Aublet oil. Ninety rats, adult males were divided into three groups: aroeira, andiroba and control group, which were subdivided into three subgroups of five animals according to the time of the deaths (seven, 14 and 21 days). All underwent the same surgical procedure (injury and suture the stomach) differing only to the animals in groups aroeira and andiroba that received a daily dose of 100 mg / kg of hydroalcoholic extract and oil, by gavage, while the control group received normal saline. The parameters evaluated were the macroscopic and microscopic test of resistance to air insufflation and test the traction force. All animals showed good healing of gastric and abdominal wall without infection and dehiscence. Both groups presented neighboring organs adhesions on the gastric surface. The endurance test for air insufflation showed higher average pressure within seven days and the test revealed greater traction force of rupture between seven and 14 days in groups aroeira and andiroba. The intensity of chronic inflammation revealed statistically significant differences in angiogenesis and fibroblast proliferation. The use of extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi and Carapa guianensis Aublet oil favored the gastric wound healing in rats.

  7. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meephansan, Jitlada; Rungjang, Atiya; Yingmema, Werayut; Deenonpoe, Raksawan; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin after injury. ROS are involved in all phases of wound healing. A balance between oxidative and antioxidative forces is necessary for a favorable healing outcome. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is considered a powerful antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing. Full-thickness dermal wounds were created in 36 healthy female mice, which were divided into a control group and a group receiving 78.9 µM topical astaxanthin treatment twice daily for 15 days. Astaxanthin-treated wounds showed noticeable contraction by day 3 of treatment and complete wound closure by day 9, whereas the wounds of control mice revealed only partial epithelialization and still carried scabs. Wound healing biological markers including Col1A1 and bFGF were significantly increased in the astaxanthin-treated group since day 1. Interestingly, the oxidative stress marker iNOS showed a significantly lower expression in the study. The results indicate that astaxanthin is an effective compound for accelerating wound healing.

  8. Low level diode laser accelerates wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Munqith S; Salman, Saif Dawood

    2013-05-01

    The effect of wound illumination time by pulsed diode laser on the wound healing process was studied in this paper. For this purpose, the original electronic drive circuit of a 650-nm wavelength CW diode laser was reconstructed to give pulsed output laser of 50 % duty cycle and 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Twenty male mice, 3 months old were used to follow up the laser photobiostimulation effect on the wound healing progress. They were subdivided into two groups and then the wounds were made on the bilateral back sides of each mouse. Two sessions of pulsed laser therapy were carried along 15 days. Each mice group wounds were illuminated by this pulsed laser for 12 or 18 min per session during these 12 days. The results of this study were compared with the results of our previous wound healing therapy study by using the same type of laser. The mice wounds in that study received only 5 min of illumination time therapy in the first and second days of healing process. In this study, we found that the wounds, which were illuminated for 12 min/session healed in about 3 days earlier than those which were illuminated for 18 min/session. Both of them were healed earlier in about 10-11 days than the control group did.

  9. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Lichte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes. Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  10. Bioimpedance measurement based evaluation of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekonen, Atte; Bergelin, Mikael; Eriksson, Jan-Erik; Vaalasti, Annikki; Ylänen, Heimo; Viik, Jari

    2017-06-22

    Our group has developed a bipolar bioimpedance measurement-based method for determining the state of wound healing. The objective of this study was to assess the capability of the method. To assess the performance of the method, we arranged a follow-up study of four acute wounds. The wounds were measured using the method and photographed throughout the healing process. Initially the bioimpedance of the wounds was significantly lower than the impedance of the undamaged skin, used as a baseline. Gradually, as healing progressed, the wound impedance increased and finally reached the impedance of the undamaged skin. The clinical appearance of the wounds examined in this study corresponded well with the parameters derived from the bioimpedance data. Hard-to-heal wounds are a significant and growing socioeconomic burden, especially in the developed countries, due to aging populations and to the increasing prevalence of various lifestyle related diseases. The assessment and the monitoring of chronic wounds are mainly based on visual inspection by medical professionals. The dressings covering the wound must be removed before assessment; this may disturb the wound healing process and significantly increases the work effort of the medical staff. There is a need for an objective and quantitative method for determining the status of a wound without removing the wound dressings. This study provided evidence of the capability of the bioimpedance based method for assessing the wound status. In the future measurements with the method should be extended to concern hard-to-heal wounds.

  11. Animal welfare: an animal science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koknaroglu, H; Akunal, T

    2013-12-01

    Increasing world population and demand for animal-derived protein puts pressure on animal production to meet this demand. For this purpose animal breeding efforts were conducted to obtain the maximum yield that the genetic makeup of the animals permits. Under the influence of economics which is the driving force behind animal production, animal farming became more concentrated and controlled which resulted in rearing animals under confinement. Since more attention was given on economics and yield per animal, animal welfare and behavior were neglected. Animal welfare which can be defined as providing environmental conditions in which animals can display all their natural behaviors in nature started gaining importance in recent years. This does not necessarily mean that animals provided with good management practices would have better welfare conditions as some animals may be distressed even though they are in good environmental conditions. Consumers are willing to pay more for welfare-friendly products (e.g.: free range vs caged egg) and this will change the animal production practices in the future. Thus animal scientists will have to adapt themselves for the changing animal welfare rules and regulations that differ for farm animal species and countries. In this review paper, animal welfare is discussed from an animal science standpoint. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hope for healing: the mobilization of interest in three types of religious healing in the Netherlands since 1850

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellenga, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The author examines the development of the popularity of religious healing in the Netherlands since 1850 and the factors that contribute to its continuation. He focuses upon three traditions: devotional healing in Roman Catholicism, charismatic healing in Pentecostalism and paranormal healing in

  13. Wound Healing Activity and Chemical Standardization of Eugenia pruniformis Cambess

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Albuquerque, Ricardo Diego Duarte Galhardo; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Angeli-Gamba, Thaís; Esteves, Ricardo dos Santos; Santos, Marcelo Guerra; Oliveira, Adriana Passos; Rocha, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Eugenia pruniformis is an endemic species from Brazil. Eugenia genus has flavonoids as one of the remarkable chemical classes which are related to the improvement of the healing process. Aims: To evaluate of wound healing activity of E. pruniformis leaves and to identify and quantify its main flavonoids compounds. Materials And Methods: Wound excision model in rats was used to verify the hydroethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts potential. The animals were divided in four groups of six and the samples were evaluated until the 15° day of treatment. Hydroxyproline dosage and histological staining with hematoxilin-eosin and Sirius Red were used to observe the tissue organization and quantify the collagen deposition, respectively. Chemical compounds of the ethyl acetate extract were identified by chromatographic techniques and mass spectrometry analysis and total flavonoids content was determined by spectrophotometric method. The antioxidant activity was determined by oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazylhydrate radical photometric (DPPH) assays. Results: The treated group with the ethyl acetate extract showed collagen deposition increase, higher levels of hidroxyproline, better tissue reorganization and complete remodeling of epidermis. Quercetin, kaempferol and hyperoside were identified as main compounds and flavonoids content value was 43% (w/w). The ORAC value of the ethyl acetate extract was 0.81± 0.05 mmol TE/g whereas the concentration to produce 50% reduction of the DPPH was 7.05± 0.09 μg/mL. Conclusion: The data indicate a wound healing and antioxidant activities of E. pruniformis. This study is the first report of flavonoids and wound healing activity of E. pruniformis. KEY MESSAGES Eugenia pruniformis extract accelerates wound healing in skin rat model, probably due to its involvement with the collagen deposition increase, higher levels of hidroxyproline, dermal remodelling and potent antioxidant activity

  14. Topical Application of Aloe vera Accelerated Wound Healing, Modeling, and Remodeling: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel; Moshiri, Ali; Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of large wounds is technically demanding and several attempts have been taken to improve wound healing. Aloe vera has been shown to have some beneficial roles on wound healing but its mechanism on various stages of the healing process is not clear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of topical application of A. vera on cutaneous wound healing in rats. A rectangular 2 × 2-cm cutaneous wound was created in the dorsum back of rats. The animals were randomly divided into 3 groups of control (n = 20), low-dose (n = 20), and high-dose (n = 20) A. vera. The control and treated animals were treated daily with topical application of saline, low-dose (25 mg/mL), and high-dose (50 mg/mL) A. vera gel, up to 10 days, respectively. The wound surface, wound contraction, and epithelialization were monitored. In each group, the animals were euthanized at 10 (n = 5), 20 (n = 5), and 30 (n = 10) days post injury (DPI). At 10, 20, and 30 DPI, the skin samples were used for histopathological and biochemical investigations; and at 30 DPI, the skin samples were also subjected for biomechanical studies. Aloe vera modulated the inflammation, increased wound contraction and epithelialization, decreased scar tissue size, and increased alignment and organization of the regenerated scar tissue. A dose-dependent increase in the tissue level of dry matter, collagen, and glycosaminoglycans' content was seen in the treated lesions, compared to the controls. The treated lesions also demonstrated greater maximum load, ultimate strength, and modulus of elasticity compared to the control ones (P vera improved the biochemical, morphological, and biomechanical characteristics of the healing cutaneous wounds in rats. This treatment option may be valuable in clinical practice.

  15. Investigation of photon-magnetic therapy efficacy in prevention and treatment of experimental local radiation skin lesions. Communication 1. The peculiarities of the course of radiation dermatitis in rats at spontaneous healing and at application of photon-magnetic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syimonova, L.Yi.; Byilogurova, L.V.; Gertman, V.Z.; Kurov, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Local x-ray exposure of the rats at a dose of 50.0 Gy caused development of radiation dermatitis with imperfect skin healing with scars and incomplete restoration of the fleece as a consequence. Administration of photon-magnetic therapy positively influenced healing of skin radiation lesions in locally irradiated animals

  16. Accelerated in vivo wound healing evaluation of microbial glycolipid containing ointment as a transdermal substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonam; Raghuwanshi, Navdeep; Varshney, Ritu; Banat, I M; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2017-10-01

    A potent biosurfactant (BS) producing Bacillus licheniformis SV1 (NCBI GenBank Accession No. KX130852) was isolated from oil contaminated soil sample. Physicochemical investigations (TLC, HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and NMR) revealed it to be glycolipid in nature. Fibroblast culture assay showed cytocompatibility and increased cell proliferation of 3T3/NIH fibroblast cells treated with this biosurfactant when checked using MTT assay and DAPI fluorescent staining. To evaluate the wound healing potential, BS ointment was formulated and checked for its spreadability and viscosity consistency. In vivo wound healing examination of full thickness skin excision wound rat model demonstrated the prompt re-epithelialization and fibroblast cell proliferation in the early phase while quicker collagen deposition in later phases of wound healing when BS ointment was used. These results validated the potential usage of BS ointment as a transdermal substitute for faster healing of impaired skin wound. Biochemical evaluation also substantiated the highest concentration of hydroxyproline (32.18±0.46, ptreated animal tissue samples compared to the control. Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) and Masson's Trichrome staining validated the presence of increased amount of collagen fibers and blood vessels in the test animals treated with BS ointment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of erythropoietin on healing of obstructive vs nonobstructive left colonic anastomosis: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renda Nurten

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anastomotic leakage is an important problem following primary resection in the left colon and is even more prominent when obstruction is present. We aimed to evaluate the possible effects of erythropoietin on the healing of anastomosis under both obstructive and non-obstructive states. Methods Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups. In group I, two cm left colonic resection and primary anastomosis were done. In group II, left colon were completely ligated and 24 hours later animals were re-operated for segmental resection. The same procedures were performed for rats in group III and IV in respect to group I and II and, 500 IU/kg a day erythropoietin were given in the latter two groups for seven days. For the quantative description of anastomotic healing mechanical, biochemical and histopathological parameters were employed on the seventh day and the animals were sacrificied. Results Although erythropoietin had positive effects on bursting pressure in group IV when compared to group II, it has no effect in group III. Despite the increased tissue hydroxyproline levels in group IV, erythropoietin failed to show any effects in group III. Erythropoietin had positive effects on neovascularization, fibroblast proliferiation and storage of collagen in group IV. Conclusion We failed to find any direct and evident effects of erythropoietin on healing of left colonic anastomosis. On the other hand, erythropoietin might prevent negative effects of obstruction on healing.

  18. Hydrogen sulfide accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoguang; Li, Wei; Chen, Qingying; Jiang, Yuxin; Lu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Xue

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of hydrogen sulfide on wound healing in diabetic rats. Experimental diabetes in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (in 0.1 mol/L citrate buffer, Ph 4.5) at dose of 70 mg/kg. Diabetic and age-matched non-diabetic rats were randomly assigned to three groups: untreated diabetic controls (UDC), treated diabetic administrations (TDA), and non-diabetic controls (NDC). Wound Healing Model was prepared by making a round incision (2.0 cm in diameter) in full thickness. Rats from TDA receive 2% sodium bisulfide ointment on wound, and animals from UDC and NDC receive control cream. After treatment of 21 days with sodium bisulfide, blood samples were collected for determination of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), antioxidant effects. Granulation tissues from the wound were processed for histological examination and analysis of western blot. The study indicated a significant increase in levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and a decline in activity of coagulation in diabetic rats treated with sodium bisulfide. Sodium bisulfide treatment raised the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, and decreased tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) protein expression in diabetic rats. The findings in present study suggested that hydrogen sulfide accelerates the wound healing in rats with diabetes. The beneficial effect of H2S may be associated with formation of granulation, anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and the increased level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  19. Use of cultivated plants and non-plant remedies for human and animal home-medication in Liubań district, Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sõukand, Renata; Hrynevich, Yanina; Prakofjewa, Julia; Valodzina, Tatsiana; Vasilyeva, Iryna; Paciupa, Jury; Shrubok, Aliaksandra; Hlushko, Aliaksei; Knureva, Yana; Litvinava, Yulia; Vyskvarka, Siarhei; Silivonchyk, Hanna; Paulava, Alena; Kõiva, Mare; Kalle, Raivo

    2017-10-03

    To use any domestic remedy, specific knowledge and skills are required. Simple logic dictates that the use of wild plants in the context of limited interaction with nature requires prior identification, while in the case of non-plant remedies and cultivated plants this step can be omitted. This paper aims to document the current and past uses of non-plant remedies and cultivated plants in the study region for human/animal medication; to analyze the human medicinal and veterinary use areas in the context of the remedy groups; to qualitatively compare the results with relevant historical publications; and to compare the intensity and purpose of use between the remedy groups. During field studies 134 semi-structured interviews were conducted with locals from 11 villages in the Liubań district of Belarus. Currently used home-remedies as well as those used in the past were documented by employing the folk history method. The subject was approached through health-related uses, not by way of remedies. Interview records were digitalized and structured in Detailed Use Records in order to ascertain local perceptions. An Informant Consensus Factor (FIC) was calculated for remedy groups as well as for different use categories. In the human medication area the use of nearby remedies was neither very diverse nor numerous: 266 DUR for 45 taxa belonging to 27 families were recorded for cultivated plants along with 188 DUR for 58 different non-plant remedies. The FIC values for both remedy groups were lower than for wild plants. In the ethnoveterinary medicine use area there were 48 DUR referring to the use of 14 cultivated plant taxa from 12 families and 72 DUR referring to the use of 31 non-plant remedies. The FIC value for the whole veterinary use area of cultivated plants was relatively low, yet similar to the FIC of wild plants. Differences between remedy groups were pronounced, indicating that in domestic human medicine cultivated plants and non-plant remedies are either

  20. Advanced age diminishes tendon-to-bone healing in a rat model of rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Johannes F; Brown, Philip J; Walters, Jordan; Clark, John A; Smith, Thomas L; Freehill, Michael T; Tuohy, Christopher J; Stitzel, Joel D; Mannava, Sandeep

    2014-04-01

    Advanced patient age is associated with recurrent tearing and failure of rotator cuff repairs clinically; however, basic science studies have not evaluated the influence of aging on tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Hypothesis/ This study examined the effect of aging on tendon-to-bone healing in an established rat model of rotator cuff repair using the aged animal colony from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. The authors hypothesized that normal aging decreases biomechanical strength and histologic organization at the tendon-to-bone junction after acute repair. Controlled laboratory study. In 56 F344xBN rats, 28 old and 28 young (24 and 8 months of age, respectively), the supraspinatus tendon was transected and repaired. At 2 or 8 weeks after surgery, shoulder specimens underwent biomechanical testing to compare load-to-failure and load-relaxation response between age groups. Histologic sections of the tendon-to-bone interface were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin staining, and collagen fiber organization was assessed by semiquantitative analysis of picrosirius red birefringence under polarized light. Peak failure load was similar between young and old animals at 2 weeks after repair (31% vs 26% of age-matched uninjured controls, respectively; P > .05) but significantly higher in young animals compared with old animals 8 weeks after repair (86% vs 65% of age-matched uninjured controls, respectively; P repair, fibroblasts appeared more organized and uniformly aligned in young animals on hematoxylin and eosin slides compared with old animals. Collagen birefringence analysis of the tendon-to-bone junction demonstrated that young animals had increased collagen fiber organization and similar histologic structure compared with age-matched controls (53.7 ± 2.4 gray scales; P > .05). In contrast, old animals had decreased collagen fiber organization and altered structure compared with age

  1. Topically applied connective tissue growth factor/CCN2 improves diabetic preclinical cutaneous wound healing: potential role for CTGF in human diabetic foot ulcer healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, F R; Boughton, P; Lo, L; McLennan, S V; Twigg, S M

    2015-01-01

    Topical application of CTGF/CCN2 to rodent diabetic and control wounds was examined. In parallel research, correlation of CTGF wound fluid levels with healing rate in human diabetic foot ulcers was undertaken. Full thickness cutaneous wounds in diabetic and nondiabetic control rats were treated topically with 1 μg rhCTGF or vehicle alone, on 2 consecutive days. Wound healing rate was observed on day 14 and wound sites were examined for breaking strength and granulation tissue. In the human study across 32 subjects, serial CTGF regulation was analyzed longitudinally in postdebridement diabetic wound fluid. CTGF treated diabetic wounds had an accelerated closure rate compared with vehicle treated diabetic wounds. Healed skin withstood more strain before breaking in CTGF treated rat wounds. Granulation tissue from CTGF treatment in diabetic wounds showed collagen IV accumulation compared with nondiabetic animals. Wound α-smooth muscle actin was increased in CTGF treated diabetic wounds compared with untreated diabetic wounds, as was macrophage infiltration. Endogenous wound fluid CTGF protein rate of increase in human diabetic foot ulcers correlated positively with foot ulcer healing rate (r = 0.406; P diabetic foot ulcers.

  2. Chinese Food and Cancer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong XU Dr.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer treatment, apart from studying the effectiveness of chemo or radiotherapy in killing cancer cells, studies should examine ways of reducing drug side effects on patients and ways of enhancing the bodies’ immune system at the same time. Our defence system not only includes immune response, there are also detoxifying enzymes, anti-oxidant mechanisms, the ability for DNA damage repair and regulation of the hormone metabolism. Harmful environmental oestrogens that enter the human body can cause an increase of 16-α-hydroxyestrone as a harmful estradiol metabolite, the ratio between 16-α-hydroxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestrone relates to the risk of breast cancer. It is suggested that choosing nutritional products (that decrease the amount of 16-α-hydroxyestrone to regulate the hormone metabolism can help with prevention of breast cancer. Increasing the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acid omega-3 (Ω-3 benefits health. Unsaturated fatty acid omega-6 (Ω-6 appears to be easily oxidised which can lead to DNA damage and increase the occurrence of cancer. The most important aspect to this approach is to reduce the ratio between saturated fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid Ω-6, which is harmful to health. Olive oil has a high content of Ω-3 that benefits health. Ω-3 fatty acid can also be obtained from some fish, green vegetables and nuts. Linoleic acid is the most important source of Ω-6 fatty acid. Linolenic acid is the most important source of Ω-3 fatty acid. Natural foods e.g., purslane, is rich in Ω-3; the mustard family vegetables can increase the activity of detoxifying enzymes. Chinese Kiwi fruit drink reduces the side effects of the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide, which is also a DNA damaging agent. Soybean, job's tears, garlic, mushroom varieties and tea have anti-cancer effects. Properly used nutritional products may assist treatment and recovery. Good balanced nutrition is essential for cancer healing.

  3. Chinese Food and Cancer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Xu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer treatment, apart from studying the effectiveness of chemo or radiotherapy in killing cancer cells, studies should examine ways of reducing drug side effects on patients and ways of enhancing the bodies’ immune system at the same time. Our defence system not only includes immune response, there are also detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant mechanisms, the ability for DNA damage repair and regulation of the hormone metabolism. Harmful environmental oestrogens that enter the human body can cause an increase of 16-α-hydroxyestrone as a harmful estradiol metabolite, the ratio between 16-α-hydroxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestrone relates to the risk of breast cancer. It is suggested that choosing nutritional products (that decrease the amount of 16-α-hydroxyestrone to regulate the hormone metabolism can help with prevention of breast cancer. Increasing the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acid omega-3 (Ω-3 benefits health. Unsaturated fatty acid omega-6 (Ω-6 appears to be easily oxidised which can lead to DNA damage and increase the occurrence of cancer. The most important aspect to this approach is to reduce the ratio between saturated fatty acid and polyunsaturated fatty acid Ω-6, which is harmful to health. Olive oil has a high content of Ω-3 that benefits health. Ω-3 fatty acid can also be obtained from some fish, green vegetables and nuts. Linoleic acid is the most important source of Ω-6 fatty acid. Linolenic acid is the most important source of Ω-3 fatty acid. Natural foods e.g., purslane, is rich in Ω-3; the mustard family vegetables can increase the activity of detoxifying enzymes. Chinese Kiwi fruit drink reduces the side effects of the chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide, which is also a DNA damaging agent. Soybean, job’s tears, garlic, mushroom varieties and tea have anti-cancer effects. Properly used nutritional products may assist treatment and recovery. Good balanced nutrition is essential for cancer healing.

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  5. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SUTURE MATERIALS ON TISSUE HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fırat SELVİ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the healing differences in between four different widely used suture materials in the oral surgery practice, including silk (Perma- Hand; Ethicon, INC., Somerville, NJ, USA, polypropylene (Prolene; Ethicon, INC., Somerville, NJ, USA, coated polyglactin 910 (Ethicon, INC., Somerville, NJ, USA. and polyglecaprone 25 (Ethicon, INC., Somerville, NJ, USA . Materials and Methods: 20 male rats were randomly allocated into two groups depending on their sacrification days (post-operative 1st and the 7th days. Four longitudinal incision wounds, each 1cm in size, were created on the dorsum of each animal which were then primarily closed with four different types of sutures. Results: The effects of these suture materials on soft tissue healing were compared histopathologically, by means of density of the cells, necrosis, fibrosis, foreign body reaction, the presence of cells of acute and chronic infection. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups regarding the density of the cells, necrosis, fibrosis, foreign body reaction, and the presence of the cells of acute & chronic infections. Of note, propylene showed slightly less tissue reaction among the other materials. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that there is no only one ideal suture material for surgical practice. The factors related to the patient, the type of the surgery and the quality of the tissue are important to decide an appropriate suture material.

  6. Biosimulation of inflammation and healing in surgically injured vocal folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nicole Y K; Vodovotz, Yoram; Hebda, Patricia A; Abbott, Katherine Verdolini

    2010-06-01

    The pathogenesis of vocal fold scarring is complex and remains to be deciphered. The current study is part of research endeavors aimed at applying systems biology approaches to address the complex biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of vocal fold scarring and other lesions affecting the larynx. We developed a computational agent-based model (ABM) to quantitatively characterize multiple cellular and molecular interactions involved in inflammation and healing in vocal fold mucosa after surgical trauma. The ABM was calibrated with empirical data on inflammatory mediators (eg, tumor necrosis factor) and extracellular matrix components (eg, hyaluronan) from published studies on surgical vocal fold injury in the rat population. The simulation results reproduced and predicted trajectories seen in the empirical data from the animals. Moreover, the ABM studies suggested that hyaluronan fragments might be the clinical surrogate of tissue damage, a key variable that in these simulations both is enhanced by and further induces inflammation. A relatively simple ABM such as the one reported in this study can provide new understanding of laryngeal wound healing and generate working hypotheses for further wet-lab studies.

  7. Wound Healing Activity of Topical Application Forms Based on Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Sharma Datta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Indian medicine—Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P < .01, higher collagen content (P < .05 and better skin breaking strength (P < .01 as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations.

  8. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin [Centre for Advanced Materials Technology (CAMT), School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zhang, Ming-Qiu [Key Laboratory of Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2016-03-09

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  9. Solid State Self-Healing System: Effects of Using Immiscible Healing Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Nabilah Muhamad; Mohd Suzeren Mohd Jamil

    2015-01-01

    The solid state self-healing system was obtained by employs a thermosetting epoxy resin, into which a thermoplastic is dissolved. The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using immiscible healing agents, which are polyvinyl chloride and polyvinyl alcohol, on solid state self-healing system. Healing was achieved by heating the fractured resins to a specific temperature; above their glass transition temperature (Tg) which obtained from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in order for thermal expansion to occur. The thermal properties and bonding formed in the epoxy resins were characterized by means of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Izod impact test was performed in preliminary work. Further work then has been done using compact tension test to demonstrate details self-healing capability of the different specimens. Under compact tension test, it was found that healable resin with PVC has highest healing efficiency followed PVA with 7.4 % and 3 % of average percentage healing efficiencies respectively. These results are due to the different solubility parameters of the thermoset/ network and thermoplastic polymer which led to the phase separation. Morphological studies using microscope optic prove the fracture-healing process and morphological properties of the resins. (author)

  10. Multimodal Composing as Healing: Toward a New Model for Writing as Healing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    The course the author describes here, WRTC 426: Rhetorical "Ethos" and Personal Disclosures: Explorations in Trauma Writing and Writing as Healing, asks students to explore the "writing as healing" movement in English studies and beyond in order to evaluate the efficacy of claims that writing personal narratives can heal…

  11. Lap shear strength and healing capability of self-healing adhesive containing epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazali, Habibah; Ye, Lin; Zhang, Ming-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a self-healing polymeric adhesive formulation with epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules. Epoxy/mercaptan microcapsules were dispersed into a commercialize two-part epoxy adhesive for developing self-healing epoxy adhesive. The influence of different content of microcapsules on the shear strength and healing capability of epoxy adhesive were investigated using single-lap-joints with average thickness of adhesive layer of about 180 µm. This self-healing adhesive was used in bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys adherents after mechanical and alkaline cleaning surface treatment. The adhesion strength was measured and presented as function of microcapsules loading. The results indicated that the virgin lap shear strength was increased by about 26% with addition of 3 wt% of self-healing microcapsules. 12% to 28% recovery of the shear strength is achieved after self-healing depending on the microcapsules content. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study fracture surface of the joints. The self-healing adhesives exhibit recovery of both cohesion and adhesion properties with room temperature healing.

  12. General concept of wound healing, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus O.H. Prasetyono

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a transition of processes which is also recognized as one of the most complex processes in human physiology. Complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and mediators take place in the healing process of wound involving cellular and molecular events. The inflammatory phase is naturally intended to remove devitalized tissue and prevent invasive infection. The proliferative phase is characterized by the formation of granulation tissue within the wound bed, composed of new capillary network, fibroblast, and macrophages in a loose arrangement of supporting structure. This second phase lasts from day 8 to 21 after the injury is also the phase for epithelialisation. The natural period of proliferative phase is a reflection for us in treating wound to reach the goal which ultimately defines as closed wound. The final maturation phase is also characterized by the balancing between deposition of collagen and its degradation. There are at least three prerequisites which are ideal local conditions for the nature of wound to go on a normal process of healing i.e. 1 all tissue involved in the wound and surrounding should be vital, 2 no foreign bodies in the wound, and 3 free from excessive contamination/infection. The author formulated a step ladder of thinking in regards of healing intentions covering all acute and chronic wounds. Regarding the “hierarchy” of healing intention, the fi rst and ideal choice to heal wounds is by primary intention followed by tertiary intention and lastly the secondary intention. (Med J Indones 2009;18:206-14Key words: inflammatory mediator, epithelialisation, growth factor, wound healing

  13. Improved Achilles tendon healing by early mechanical loading in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jihong; Jiang, Dianming; Wen, Shuzheng; Jing, Shangfei; Fan, Dongsheng; Hao, Zengtao; Han, Chaoqian

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structure and the attachment strength of a healing tendon-bone interface and the role of mechanical loading in tendon healing. Sixty rabbits underwent unilateral detachment and repair of the Achilles tendon. Thirty animals were immobilized (Group A), and the others wereallowed loadingimmediately postoperatively (Group B). Animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks and evaluated for histological and biomechanical testing. Statistical analysis was performed with an independent t test with significance set at P = 0.05. The ultimate stress was greater in group B (4.598 ± 1.321 N/mm(2)) compared with the control group (3.388 ± 0.994 N/mm(2)) (P tendon-to-bone interface with a larger area of chondrocytes was found in group B (P tendon-to-bone interface.

  14. The effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma on the skin wound healing process: A comparative experimental study in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daikh Badis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The therapeutic evaluation of the biological effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP used as a surgical adjunct to maintain the inflammatory process and to potentiate tissue healing, make the subject of recent research in regenerative medicine. This study was designed to evaluate the healing activity of PRP by its topical application on the skin experimentally injured in a sheep model. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 9 adult and clinically healthy males sheep. PRP was obtained by a protocol of double centrifugation of whole blood from each animal. After sterile skin preparation, full-thickness excisional wounds (20 mm x 20 mm were created on the back of each animal. The animals were randomly divided into three equal groups of three sheep for each. In Group I, the wounds were treated with PRP, in Group II; wounds were treated with Asiaticoside; in Group III, wounds were treated with saline solution. The different treatments were administered topically every 3 days. Morphometric measurements of the contraction surface of the wounds and histopathological biopsies were carried out at the 3rd, 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th days of healing. Results: The results of the morphometric data obtained revealed that it was significant differences recorded at the 7th and 14th day of healing in favor for animals of Group I. Semi-quantitative histopathological evaluation showed that PRP reduces inflammation during 3 first days post-surgical and promotes epithelialization in 3 weeks of healing. Conclusion: We concluded that topical administration of PRP obtained by double centrifugation protocol could potentially improve the skin healing process in sheep.

  15. Can mesenchymal stem cells reverse chronic stress-induced impairment of lung healing following traumatic injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Amy V; Bible, Letitia E; Livingston, David H; Mohr, Alicia M; Sifri, Ziad C

    2015-04-01

    One week following unilateral lung contusion (LC), rat lungs demonstrate full histologic recovery. When animals undergo LC plus the addition of chronic restraint stress (CS), wound healing is significantly delayed. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent cells capable of immunomodulation, which have been the focus of much research in wound healing and tissue regeneration. We hypothesize that the addition of MSCs will improve wound healing in the setting of CS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-7 per group) were subjected to LC/CS with or without the injection of MSCs. MSCs were given as a single intravenous dose of 5 × 10 cells in 1 mL Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium at the time of LC. Rats were subjected to 2 hours of restraint stress on Days 1 to 6 following LC. Seven days following injury, rats were sacrificed, and the lungs were examined for histologic evidence of wound healing using a well-established histologic lung injury score (LIS) to grade injury. LIS examines inflammatory cells/high-power field (HPF) averaged over 30 fields, interstitial edema, pulmonary edema, and alveolar integrity, with scores ranging from 0 (normal) to 11 (highly damaged). Peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry for the presence of T-regulatory (C4CD25FoxP3) cells. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test, expressed as mean (SD). As previously shown, 7 days following isolated LC, LIS has returned to 0.83 (0.41), with a subscore of zero for inflammatory cells/HPF. The addition of CS results in an LIS of 4.4 (2.2), with a subscore of 1.9 (0.7) for inflammatory cells/HPF. Addition of MSC to LC/CS decreased LIS to 1.7 (0.8), with a subscore of zero for inflammatory cells/HPF. Furthermore, treatment of animals undergoing LC/CS with MSCs increased the %T-regulatory cells by 70% in animals undergoing LC/CS alone (12.9% [2.4]% vs. 6.2% [1.3%]). Stress-induced impairment of wound healing is reversed by the addition of MSCs given

  16. The wild animal as a research animal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA

    2004-01-01

    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e. g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to

  17. Interfacial self-healing of nanocomposite hydrogels: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiming; Gao, Zheming; Yu, Kunhao

    2017-12-01

    Polymers with dynamic bonds are able to self-heal their fractured interfaces and restore the mechanical strengths. It is largely elusive how to analytically model this self-healing behavior to construct the mechanistic relationship between the self-healing properties (e.g., healed interfacial strength and equilibrium healing time) and the material compositions and healing conditions. Here, we take a self-healable nanocomposite hydrogel as an example to illustrate an interfacial self-healing theory for hydrogels with dynamic bonds. In the theory, we consider the free polymer chains diffuse across the interface and reform crosslinks to bridge the interface. We analytically reveal that the healed strengths of nanocomposite hydrogels increase with the healing time in an error-function-like form. The equilibrium self-healing time of the full-strength recovery decreases with the temperature and increases with the nanoparticle concentration. We further analytically reveal that the healed interfacial strength decreases with increasing delaying time before the healing process. The theoretical results quantitatively match with our experiments on nanosilica hydrogels, and also agree well with other researchers' experiments on nanoclay hydrogels. We expect that this theory would open promising avenues for quantitative understanding of the self-healing mechanics of various polymers with dynamic bonds, and offer insights for designing high-performance self-healing polymers.

  18. Componentes ricos em plaquetas na reparação de afecções tendo-ligamentosas e osteo-articulares em animais Components rich in platelets used in wound healing tendon, ligaments and osteo-articular diseases of animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Maia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O plasma rico em plaquetas e o concentrado de plaquetas são fontes de diversos fatores de crescimento, com grande potencial terapêutico. Uma vez liberados dos grânulos alfa das plaquetas ativadas, esses fatores atuarão no sítio da lesão, estimulando a quimiotaxia, fibroplasia e angiogênese, melhorando assim a reparação tecidual. Embora esses componentes ricos em plaquetas sejam de fácil obtenção e de eficácia comprovada na medicina humana e odontologia, a utilização desses componentes na medicina veterinária é relativamente recente, necessitando ainda de estudos controlados. Neste artigo, os aspectos morfológicos das plaquetas, a ação dos fatores de crescimento e a utilização de componentes ricos em plaquetas na reparação tecidual de estruturas tendo-ligamentosas e osteo-articulares são revisados.Platelet-rich plasma and platelet concentrates are involved in growing factors. Both have great therapeutic potential. When the alpha-granules are released by the active platelet, they act in the lesion site stimulating the chemotaxis, the fiberplasia and the angiogenesis. They improve the regeneration of the tissue. Although these rich platelet components are easy to obtain and efficiently to prove by medicine and dentistry, their use on vet medicine is recent. So, much more control studies need to be done. This article reviews morphological aspects of platelets, action of growing factors and use of components rich in platelet in wound healing tendons, ligaments and osteo-articular structures.

  19. Operation technique and healing process of telescopic ileocolostomy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, G; Tóth, I; Barna, T; Bráth, E; Gyáni, K; Mikó, Irén

    2003-01-01

    The healing process of telescopic anastomoses was found in an animal experiment with 12 mongrel dogs. After the division of vessels an ileal segment of different length was invaginated into the lumen of the colon using single-layer interrupted sutures. The following four groups were used: Group A (n = 3): end-to-side ileocolostomy, single-layer interrupted suture (invagination length: 0 mm), survival time: 21 days. Group B (n = 3): invagination length: 20 mm, survival time: 7 days. Group C (n = 3): invagination length: 10 mm, survival time: 21 days. Group D (n = 3): invagination length: 20 mm, survival time: 21 days. At the end of the above survival times the anastomosis area was removed. The bursting pressure was measured and morphological as well as histological examinations were performed. In each case the 0-day look-alikes of anastomoses were performed using the remnant bowels, and bursting pressure measurements were done on these models as well. Anastomosis leakage did not occur. The serosal layer of the intracolonic part of the ileum disappeared during the healing process. The free surface of the intracolonic ileal segment became covered by the sliding mucosa of the colon and the prolapsing mucosa of the ileum. The following could be concluded after the experiments: The inner pressure tolerance of a telescopic ileocolostomy promptly after preparation is better than in case of another single-layer anastomosis. This fact results in increased safety against leakage on the first postoperative days. The inner pressure tolerance of the telescopic ileocolostomy increases during the healing process and it does not depend on the length of the invaginated part (0 day-20 mm: 56 mmHg +/- 6, Group A: 252 +/- 39, Group B: 154 +/- 19, Group C: 249 +/- 20, Group D: 298 +/- 2). There is no difference in pressure tolerance between the telescopic and the end-to-side single-layer interrupted anastomoses after the healing process. The invaginated section within the lumen of the

  20. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Fracture healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundi Raman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Annually, millions of people across the world are inflicted with bone fracture injuries. Untimely healing is a significant burden in terms of socioeconomic costs, personal costs, and patients′ quality of life. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has gained much attention as a potential adjunctive therapy for accelerating fresh fracture healing, but its efficacy remains controversial. This paper is presented in two parts a literature review followed by a systematic review. The literature review highlights the physiology of fracture healing and the influence LIPUS exerts on cells and molecules involved in this healing process. In part two, we present a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing the clinical effectiveness of LIPUS in accelerating the time to fracture healing. The electronic databases we searched for the systematic review are as follows: MEDLINE (from 1996 to November 2008, EMBASE (from 1996 to November 2008, and Healthstar (from 1966 to October 2008. A two-step screening process was used to assess the eligibility of studies yielded by our search. The first step was a review of titles and abstracts for the selection of studies that met the following criteria: (i inclusion of skeletally mature patients with a fresh fracture, (ii a minimum of two treatment arms with at least one arm receiving LIPUS treatment and another arm receiving placebo, (iii random allocation of patients to the different treatment arms, (iv radiological assessment of time to fracture healing, and (v publication in the English language. In the second step, selected articles were reviewed in full text. Eligible trials were all scored independently by two reviewers for methodological reporting quality using the 15-item CLEAR NPT checklist (Checklist to Evaluate the Report of a Nonpharmacological Trial. We identified a total of seventy seven studies, nine of which met our inclusion criteria after the initial screening. Of these nine

  1. Effects of botulinum toxin A injection on healing and tensile strength of ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzuner, Serdar; Özkan, Özlenen; Erin, Nuray; Özkaynak, Sibel; Cinpolat, An; Özkan, Ömer

    2015-04-01

    Tendon lacerations are most commonly managed with surgical repair. Postoperative complications such as adhesions and ruptures often occur with immobilization. Early postoperative mobilization is therefore advised to minimize complications and time required to return to daily life. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) can be used to enhance healing and prevent rupture in mobilized animals with Achilles tenotomy. Twenty-seven rabbits were divided into 3 groups, namely, I, II, and III, after surgical 1-sided Achilles tenotomy and end-to-end repair. The control group for biomechanical comparisons consisted of randomly selected contralateral (unoperated) healthy Achilles tendons. Group I received BoNT-A (4 U/kg) injection into the calf muscles. One week later, electromyographical confirmation was performed to establish the effects of injection. Surgery was then performed. Animals in the second group (n = 9, group II) were immobilized with a cast postoperatively. The third group (n = 9, group III) was mobilized immediately with no cast or BoNT-A. Tendons were harvested and gap formation or ruptures as well as strength of the repaired tendon were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. Achilles tendons healed in all animals injected with BoNT-A, whereas all were ruptured in group III. All Achilles tendons of animals in groups I and II healed. However, group I repaired tendons were biomechanically equivalent to healthy tendons, whereas group II repaired tendons demonstrated significantly decreased tensile strength (P = 0.009). The present study suggests that local injection of BoNT-A can be used for treatment of tendon rupture and may replace the use of cast for immobilization. However, further studies are needed to determine whether BoNT-A injection can have a beneficial effect on the healing of tendon repairs in humans.

  2. Systemic administration of high-molecular weight hyaluronan stimulates wound healing in genetically diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Polito, Francesca; Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; Calò, Margherita; Lo Cascio, Patrizia; Minutoli, Letteria; Barone, Mauro; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2011-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), an essential component of the extracellular matrix, is an efficient space filler that maintains hydration, serves as a substrate for assembly of proteoglycans and is involved in wound healing. Although numerous pieces of evidence demonstrate beneficial effects in promoting wound healing in diabetes, a systemic approach has never been tested. We used an incisional wound healing model in genetically diabetic mice to test the effects of systemic injection of HA. Diabetic (n=56) and normoglycemic (n=56) mice were subjected to incision and randomized (8 groups of 7 animals each) to receive HA at different doses, 7.5, 15 and 30mg/kg/i.p., or vehicle (0.9% NaCl solution) for 12days. At the end of the experiment animals were sacrificed and skin wounds were excised for histological, biochemical and molecular analysis. Histology revealed that the most effective dose to improve wound repair and angiogenesis in diabetic mice was 30mg/kg. Furthermore HA injection (30mg/kg) improved the altered healing pattern in diabetic animals, increased skin remodeling proteins TGF-β and transglutaminase-II and restored the altered expression of cyclin B1/Cdc2 complex. Evaluation of skin from diabetic animals injected with HA revealed also an increase in HA content, suggesting that systemic injection may be able to restore the reduced intracellular HA pool of diabetic mice. Finally HA markedly improved skin mechanical properties. These promising results, if confirmed in a clinical setting, may improve the care and management of diabetic patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of fibrin adhesive material (Tissucol) on alveolar healing in rats under stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Alves-Rezende, Maria C. R. [UNESP; Okamoto, Tetuo [UNESP

    1997-01-01

    The effects of Tissucol on alveolar healing following stress were evaluated histologically, comparing three groups of 28 male albino rats each. Stress was applied and their right upper incisors were extracted. Group A served as an empty control site. In Group B, Tissucol was applied into the alveolar cavity. Group C received local antifibrinolytic treatment (alveolar irrigation with epsilon-aminocaproic acid solution) before implant of Tissucol into the tooth socket. Four animals in each grou...

  4. Beta-Glucan induced immune modulation of wound healing in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Natalia Ivonne Vera; Nielsen, Michael Engelbrecht; Lindenstrøm, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Immune modulators are compounds capable to interact with the immune system and to modify the host response. This interaction enhances non-specific defense mechanisms, improving health and promoting survival. β-glucans are glucose polysaccharides present in sea weed, bacteria, fungi and cereal but not in animals. β-glucans are commonly used as immune modulators, but the mechanisms through which the modulation is achieved remains to be understood. Wound healing and tissue regeneration are essen...

  5. Retention and Healing Outcomes after Intentional Replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sin-Yeon; Lee, Yoon; Shin, Su-Jung; Kim, Euiseong; Jung, Il-Young; Friedman, Shimon; Lee, Seung-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Intentional replantation is an alternative to tooth extraction and prosthetic replacement when conventional endodontic treatment modalities are unfeasible or contraindicated. This study assessed tooth retention and healing after intentional replantation and explored predictors of these outcomes. Data of intentional replantation procedures performed between March 2000 and December 2010 were collected prospectively, excluding teeth with preoperative periodontal and root defects. A cohort of 159 teeth was followed up for 0.5-12 years. Retention and healed status without complications (periapical radiolucency, external root resorption, ankylosis, signs/symptoms, probing ≥6 mm) was recorded and analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard regression model (P regression identified extraoral time ≤15 minutes as predictor of complication-free healing (P < .04; hazard ratio, 2.767; 95% confidence interval, 1.053-7.272). This prospective cohort study of contemporary intentional replantation suggested a cumulative 12-year retention rate of 93% and healed rate of 77% after 3 years. Healing occurred 1.7 times more frequently in teeth replanted within 15 minutes. Although most complications occurred within 1 year after replantation, follow-up should extend for at least 3 years to capture late complications. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Leptin promotes wound healing in the skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Tadokoro

    Full Text Available Leptin, a 16 kDa anti-obesity hormone, exhibits various physiological properties. Interestingly, skin wound healing was proven to delay in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of this phenomenon. In this study, we attempted to elucidate a role of leptin in wound healing of skin.Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to confirm the expression of the leptin receptor (Ob-R in human and mouse skin. Leptin was topically administered to chemical wounds created in mouse back skin along with sustained-release absorbable hydrogel. The process of wound repair was histologically observed and the area of ulceration was measured over time. The effect of leptin on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of human epidermal keratinocytes was investigated.Ob-R was expressed in epidermal cells of human and mouse skin. Topical administration of leptin significantly promoted wound healing. Histological analysis showed more blood vessels in the dermal connective tissues in the leptin-treated group. The proliferation, differentiation/function and migration of human epidermal keratinocytes were enhanced by exogenous leptin.Topically administered leptin was proven to promote wound healing in the skin by accelerating proliferation, differentiation/function and migration of epidermal keratinocytes and enhancing angiogenesis around the wounded area. These results strongly suggest that topical administration of leptin may be useful as a treatment to promote wound healing in the skin.

  7. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rosińczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  8. Alveolar socket healing: what can we learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Mauricio G; Silva, Cléverson O; Misawa, Mônica; Sukekava, Flavia

    2015-06-01

    Tooth extraction induces a series of complex and integrated local changes within the investing hard and soft tissues. These local alterations arise in order to close the socket wound and to restore tissue homeostasis, and are referred to as '"socket healing". The aims of the present report were twofold: first, to describe the socket-healing process; and, second, to discuss what can be learned from the temporal sequence of healing events, in order to improve treatment outcomes. The socket-healing process may be divided into three sequential, and frequently overlapping, phases: inflammatory; proliferative; and modeling/remodeling. Several clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that the socket-healing process promotes up to 50% reduction of the original ridge width, greater bone resorption at the buccal aspect than at the lingual/palatal counterpart and a larger amount of alveolar bone reduction in the molar region. In conclusion, tooth extraction, once a simple and straightforward surgical procedure, should be performed in the knowledge that ridge reduction will follow and that further clinical steps should be considered to compensate for this, when considering future options for tooth replacement. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Giles T S; Mills, Stuart J; Cowin, Allison J; Smith, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  10. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles T. S. Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  11. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health ... Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  12. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & ... Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  13. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  14. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C. [Univ. of Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  15. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C.; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  16. Histomorphometric analysis of rat alveolar wound healing with hydroxyapatite alone or associated to BMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandão Alexandre C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Several materials and techniques have been proposed to improve alveolar wound healing and decrease loss of bone height and thickness that normally follow dental extraction. The objective of this research was the histologic analysis of bone morphogenetic proteins implanted into dental alveoli of rats after extraction. A total of 45 adult male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of 15 animals each: control (no treatment, implanted with pure hydroxyapatite (HA, 3 mg and implanted with hydroxyapatite plus bone morphogenetic proteins (HA/BMPs, 3 mg. Five animals from each group were sacrificed at 7, 21 and 42 days after extraction for the histometric analyses of the osteoconductive potential of hydroxyapatite associated or not with BMPs. After dissection, fixation, decalcification and serial microtomy of 6-mm thick sections, the samples were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for histologic and histometric analyses. Both HA and HA/BMPs caused a delay in wound healing compared to control animals, evaluated by the percentage of bone tissue in the alveoli. The treatment with HA/BMPs had the greatest delay at 21 days, even though it produced values similar to the control group at 42 days. The materials did not improve alveolar repair in the normal period of wound healing and the association of HA/BMPs did not have osteoconductive properties with granulated hydroxyapatite as the vehicle.

  17. Schinus terebinthifolius raddi (Aroeira) and Orbignya phalerata mart. (Babassu) effect in cecorrahphy healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Christian Lamar; Ribas-Filho, Jurandir Marcondes; Czeczko, Nicolau Gregori; Malafaia, Osvaldo; Barboza, Luiz Eduardo Durães; Ribas, Fernanda Marcondes; Wendler, Eduardo; Torres, Orlando; Lovato, Fernanda Christo; Scapini, João Guilherme Seifert

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (aroeira) and Orbignya phalerata Mart. (babassu) in the healing process of cecorrhaphy in rats. : Fifty four rats were used, distributed into three groups randomly: aroeira, babassu and control, which were divided into three subgroups (six animals) according to the time of the deaths (7, 14, 21 days). All underwent the same surgical procedure, cecotomy and cecorrhaphy. The animals in group aroeira and babassu received daily dose of 100 mg/kg of hydroalcoholic extract and 50 mg/kg of aquous extract respectively, by gavage. The control group received only saline solution. The parameters evaluated were: macroscopic changes, ,resistance test to air insufflations and histological changes. : All animals showed good healing without infection. All groups presented adhesions between cecum and neighboring organs. The resistance test insufflating of atmospheric air showed progressive increase of pressure according to the days in the aroeira group, and decrease in babassu group, without significant difference. Microscopy showed significant difference in the polymorphonuclear, hyperemia, angiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation and collagen histological variables in the 14th day. : Hydroalcoholic extract of aroeira and the aqueous extract of babassu favored the healing process in cecorrhaphy in rats.

  18. Histomorphometrical analysis on the effects of two therapeutic ultrasound intensities on fracture healing in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeronimo Rafael Skau

    Full Text Available Introduction Experimental studies conducted in young animals show that therapeutic ultrasound (TUS has been successfully used to shorten the healing time of bone fractures. However, they were not found in the literature, studies comparing the effect of different intensities of UST in aged animals. Objective To test the efficacy of intensity 1.0 W/cm2 and of 0.5 W/cm2 in the consolidation of experimental fracture of the tibia from aged Wistar rats. Materials and methods Three groups of 15 month old rats were submitted to a midshaft osteotomy of the tibia and then, the hind member was immobilized with a metal splint and plaster of Paris, wrapping the knee and ankle joint. One group (L, received ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm2; the other group (I, were exposed to ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2. One control group (C, did not receive the ultrasound. Fifteen animals (five from each group were euthanatized at the end of the first week and fifteen (five from each group at the end of the third week. The progress of the fracture healing was performed for each group by morphometric analysis of histological sections of the fracture region. Results and conclusion The results showed that fractures treated with ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2 healed significantly faster than did the fractures treated with ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm2 and the control.

  19. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Composite transcriptome assembly of RNA-seq data in a sheep model for delayed bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Marten; Ott, Claus-Eric; Grünhagen, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Schell, Hanna; Mundlos, Stefan; Duda, Georg N; Robinson, Peter N; Lienau, Jasmin

    2011-03-24

    The sheep is an important model organism for many types of medically relevant research, but molecular genetic experiments in the sheep have been limited by the lack of knowledge about ovine gene sequences. Prior to our study, mRNA sequences for only 1,556 partial or complete ovine genes were publicly available. Therefore, we developed a composite de novo transcriptome assembly method for next-generation sequence data to combine known ovine mRNA and EST sequences, mRNA sequences from mouse and cow, and sequences assembled de novo from short read RNA-Seq data into a composite reference transcriptome, and identified transcripts from over 12 thousand previously undescribed ovine genes. Gene expression analysis based on these data revealed substantially different expression profiles in standard versus delayed bone healing in an ovine tibial osteotomy model. Hundreds of transcripts were differentially expressed between standard and delayed healing and between the time points of the standard and delayed healing groups. We used the sheep sequences to design quantitative RT-PCR assays with which we validated the differential expression of 26 genes that had been identified by RNA-seq analysis. A number of clusters of characteristic expression profiles could be identified, some of which showed striking differences between the standard and delayed healing groups. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were enriched in terms including extracellular matrix, cartilage development, contractile fiber, and chemokine activity. Our results provide a first atlas of gene expression profiles and differentially expressed genes in standard and delayed bone healing in a large-animal model and provide a number of clues as to the shifts in gene expression that underlie delayed bone healing. In the course of our study, we identified transcripts of 13,987 ovine genes, including 12,431 genes for which no sequence information was previously available. This

  1. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) modulates wound healing through regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Isabel; Diez-Marques, Maria L.; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel [Department of Physiology, University of Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain); Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada [Nephrology Unit, IDIBELL, Hospital de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Garcia del Moral, Raimundo [Department of Pathology, University of Granada (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Dedhar, Shoukat [Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Research Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ruiz-Torres, Maria P., E-mail: mpiedad.ruiz@uah.es [Department of Physiology, University of Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain); Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego [Nephrology Unit, Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an intracellular effector of cell-matrix interactions and regulates many cellular processes, including growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The present work analyzes the role of ILK in wound healing in adult animals using a conditional knock-out of the ILK gene generated with the tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox system (CRE-LOX mice). Results show that ILK deficiency leads to retarded wound closure in skin. Intracellular mechanisms involved in this process were analyzed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) isolated from CRE-LOX mice and revealed that wounding promotes rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ILK. Knockdown of ILK resulted in a retarded wound closure due to a decrease in cellular proliferation and loss of HGF protein expression during the healing process, in vitro and in vivo. Alterations in cell proliferation and wound closure in ILK-deficient MEF or mice could be rescued by exogenous administration of human HGF. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that the activation of PI3K and ILK after skin wounding are critical for HGF-dependent tissue repair and wound healing. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK deletion results in decreased HGF expression and delayed scratch wound repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/ILK/AKT pathway signals through HGF to regulate wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An ILK-dependent increase in HGF expression is responsible for wound healing in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK-KO mice are used to confirm the requirement for ILK function in wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human HGF treatment restores delayed wound closure in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Wound-healing and antimicrobial properties of dichloromethane fraction of Dialium guineense (Wild) fruit coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Nnadi Charles; Udeani, Theophilus Kc; Onyebuchi, Ugwu Linus

    2016-01-01

    This research established the scientific bases for the folkloric use of the neglected Dialium guineense fruit coat in wound and microbial infection management in Nigeria. The phytochemical analysis of the crude extract, fractions and sub-fractions was performed by standard methods. Agar well diffusion protocol was adopted for the antimicrobial assay while the wound healing properties was determined by full thickness skin excision wound model. Phytochemical analysis showed high relative proportion of alkaloids (6.05 ± 0.98 %), saponins (3.91 ± 0.02 %) and tannins (1.86 ± 0.05 %). The only active fraction (DF) and sub-fraction (DF-5) were effective against Gram-positive (inhibition zone diameters, IZDs, 8-10 mm and 11-15 mm) and Gram-negative (IZDs, 15-19 mm and 16-21 mm) bacteria and fungi (6-8 mm) compared with 20-24 mm and 18-19 mm of the standard (ciprofloxacin) respectively. Fifty mg/kg of the DF-5 showed nearly equal percentage wound healing post-surgery days to Cicatrin®. The 50 mg/kg dose of DF and DF-5 showed more than 50 % wound healing at 10(th) day post-surgery, 50 mg/kg crude extract showed 54 % on day 14 while distilled water showed 56 % wound healing on day 17 with no sign of infection in all animal groups. All the treatments were significantly (P<0.01) different from control (distilled water) in wound healing by the 10(th) and 17(th) post-surgery days. The studies revealed that the fruit coat, which hitherto was treated as wastes could be explored for antimicrobial and wound healing properties against the backdrop of continually emerging antibiotic resistant strains of microorganisms.

  3. SDF-1 alpha expression during wound healing in the aged is HIF dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Shang A; Chang, Edward I; Galvez, Michael G; Thangarajah, Hariharan; El-ftesi, Samyra; Vial, Ivan N; Lin, Darius A; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2009-02-01

    Age-related impairments in wound healing are associated with decreased neovascularization, a process that is regulated by hypoxia-responsive cytokines, including stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 alpha. Interleukin-1 beta is an important inflammatory cytokine involved in wound healing and is believed to regulate SDF-1 alpha expression independent of hypoxia signaling. Thus, the authors examined the relative importance of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha on SDF-1 alpha expression in aged wound healing. Young and aged mice (n = 4 per group) were examined for wound healing using a murine excisional wound model. Wounds were harvested at days 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 for histologic analysis, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot. An engineered wild-type and mutated SDF luciferase reporter construct were used to determine HIF transactivation. Aged mice demonstrated significantly impaired wound healing, reduced granulation tissue, and increased epithelial gap compared with young controls. Real-time polymerase chain reaction demonstrated reduced SDF-1 alpha levels in aged wounds that correlated with reduced CD31+ neovessels. Western blots revealed decreased HIF-1 alpha protein in aged wounds. However, both IL-1 beta and macrophage infiltrate were unchanged between young and aged animals. Using the wild-type and mutated SDF luciferase reporter construct in which the hypoxia response element was deleted, only young fibroblasts were able to respond to IL-1 beta stimulation, and this response was abrogated by mutating the HIF-binding sites. This suggests that HIF binding is essential for SDF-1 transactivation in response to both inflammatory and hypoxic stimuli. SDF-1 alpha deficiency observed during aged wound healing is attributable predominantly to decreased HIF-1 alpha levels rather than impaired IL-1 beta expression.

  4. Radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical effects of recombinant canine somatotropin in an unstable ostectomy gap model of bone healing in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millis, D.L.; Wilkens, B.E.; Daniel, G.B.; Hubner, K.; Mathews, A.; Buonomo, F.C.; Patell, K.R.; Weigel, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of recombinant canine somatotropin (STH) on radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing using an unstable ostectomy gap model. Study Design: After an ostectomy of the midshaft radius, bone healing was evaluated over an 8-week period in control dogs (n = 4) and dogs receiving recombinant canine STH (n = 4). Animals Or Sample Population: Eight sexually intact female Beagle dogs, 4 to 5 years old. Methods: Bone healing was evaluated by qualitative and quantitative evaluation of serial radiographs every 2 weeks. Terminal dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending biomechanical testing were also performed. Results: Dogs receiving STH had more advanced radiographic healing of ostectomy sites. Bone area, bone mineral content, and bone density were two to five times greater at the ostectomy sites of treated dogs. Ultimate load at failure and stiffness were three and five times greater in dogs receiving STH. Conclusions: Using the ostectomy gap model, recombinant canine STH enhanced the radiographic, densitometric, and biomechanical aspects of bone healing in dogs. Clinical Relevance: Dogs at risk for delayed healing of fractures may benefit from treatment with recombinant canine STH

  5. A comprehensive review of plants and their active constituents with wound healing activity in traditional Iranian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein Farzaei, Mohammad; Abbasabadi, Zahra; Reza Shams-Ardekani, Mohammad; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2014-07-01

    Wound healing is a complex cascade of events with various cellular and biochemical processes that result in reconstruction and regeneration of damaged tissue. The objective of the current study was to scientifically evaluate the medicinal plants said to produce wound healing activity in traditional Iranian medicine (TIM). Electronic databases were searched for the names of medicinal plants claimed in TIM literature for having wound healing activity. Articles were evaluated to obtain any in vitro, animal, or clinical evidence of their efficacy and possible mechanisms involved in would healing. Mechanisms of action for some of these plants, including Tamarix spp., Rosa spp., Piper betle, Plantago major, Oxalis spp., Olea europaea, Malva spp., Linum usitatissimum, and Tamarindus indica, have not been yet clarified. In contrast, some herbs such as Vitis vinifera, Quercus spp., Punica granatum, Pinus spp., Polygonum spp., Lilium spp., Gentiana lutea, Arnebia euchroma, Aloe spp., and Caesalpinia spp. have various biological and pharmacological mechanisms that have been verified for wound healing activity. Overall, TIM resources have introduced various medicinal plants for wounds with confirmed effectiveness according to current pharmacological studies. These herbal remedies could be considered as future drugs for healing of wounds. Further pharmacological and clinical investigations are recommended for exploring safety, exact mechanisms, and efficacy of these herbal remedies. .

  6. A phytomodulatory hydrogel with enhanced healing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mirele S; Souza, Tamiris F G; Figueiredo, Ingrid S; Sousa, Emília T; Sousa, Felipe D; Moreira, Renato A; Alencar, Nylane M N; Lima-Filho, José V; Ramos, Márcio V

    2018-04-01

    The healing performance of a hydrogel composed of hemicelluloses extracted from seeds of Caesalpinia pulcherrima (Fabaceae) and mixed with phytomodulatory proteins obtained from the latex of Calotropis procera was characterized on excisional wounds. The hydrogel did not induce dermal irritability. When topically used on excisional wounds, the hydrogel enhanced healing by wound contraction. Histology and the measurement of inflammatory mediators (myeloperoxidase, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6) suggested that the inflammatory phase of the healing process was intensified, stimulating fibroplasia and neovascularization (proliferative phase) and tissue remodeling by increasing new collagen fiber deposition. In addition, reduction on levels of malondialdehyde in the groups that the hydrogel was applied suggested that the oxidative stress was reduced. The hydrogel performed better than the reference drug used, as revealed by the extended thickness of the remodeled epithelium. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. SUFI HEALING: TERAPI DALAM LITERATUR TASAWUF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amin Syukur

    2012-12-01

    Kajian ini mengungkap tentang sufi healing, yaitu terapi di dalam literatur tentang sifisme. Kajian ini memfokuskan pada perilaku yang berasosiasi dengan sufi healing atau pencegahan penyakit, baik secara fisik maupun mental, dan kemudian menentukan aspek-aspek yang mendukung sistem terapi rasional dan empirik. Hasil yang diperoleh dari kajian ini adalah penemuan treatment alternatif atau preventif terhadap penyakit secara tepat yang sesuai dengan tuntutan masyarakat saat ini. Ditemukan bahwa sufi healing merupakan bentuk terapi alternatif yang dilakukan dengan menggunakan nilai-nilai sufisme se­bagai cara treatment atau pencegahan. Model ini telah dikenal dalam ma­syarakat sejak Islam dan sufisme berkembang. Rujukan ilmiah dari mengenai sistem kerja peng­obatan­nya dapat ditemukan dalam berbagai teori psikologi transpersonal, di mana kesadaran menjadi fokus kajian. Secara medis, pengobatan ini juga disebut psycho-neurons-endocrine-immunology, yang kesimpulannya adalah adanya hubungan antara fikiran dan tubuh dalam kesehatan manusia,

  8. Modern Christian healing of mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, A R

    1982-06-01

    Healing of mental illness through religious practices was a key element of early Christianity. In the early twentieth century such healing was associated with blue-collar and rural Fundamentalists, but religious healing practices have gained widespread acceptance by many middle-class, conservative Christian groups. "Evil demons" are now equated with envy, pride, avarice, hatred, and obsessions with alcohol and gambling. Many psychotherapeutic techniques of modern Christian healers appear to be rediscoveries of psychoanalytic insights expressed in religious metaphors. Most responsible healers encourage clients to seek medical and psychiatric help, especially for serious mental disorders. Psychiatrists need not share patients' religious beliefs, but for treatment to be effective these beliefs must be understood and respected.

  9. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  10. Dynamics of bone graft healing around implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Venkataraman

    2015-01-01

    A few questions arise pertaining to the use of bone grafts along with implants are whether these are successful in approximation with implant. Do they accelerate bone regeneration? Are all defects ultimately regenerated with new viable bone? Is the bone graft completely resorbed or integrated in new bone? Does the implant surface characteristic positively affect osseointegration when used with a bone graft? What type of graft and implant surface can be used that will have a positive effect on the healing type and time? Finally, what are the dynamics of bone graft healing around an implant? This review discusses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone graft healing in general and in vicinity of another foreign, avascular body, namely the implant surface, and further, the role of bone grafts in osseointegration and/or clinical success of the implants.

  11. Dealing with requests for faith healing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Siddharth; Seshadri, Hiramalini

    2015-01-01

    Faith healing practices are common in the Indian subcontinent, for remedying physical as well as psychiatric disorders. Patients and/ or their family members often resort to such treatment, especially when dissatisfied with the usual medical care or when the patient has a terminal illness. The application of the principles of medical ethics varies across cultures and time, and with the ethical principles to which a society subscribes. This write-up explores the various options available to healthcare professionals faced with patients and/or their family members who express a wish for faith healing services. The options discussed include outright rejection of faith healing practices, maintaining a distance or neutrality, endorsing such practices, and exploring the belief system of the patient and/or the family members. The various options are viewed from the lens of the principles of medical ethics.

  12. Activation of the EPOR-β common receptor complex by cibinetide ameliorates impaired wound healing in mice with genetic diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitto, Alessandra; Irrera, Natasha; Pizzino, Gabriele; Pallio, Giovanni; Mannino, Federica; Vaccaro, Mario; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Aliquò, Federica; Minutoli, Letteria; Colonna, Michele R; Galeano, Maria Rosaria; Brines, Michael; De Ponte, Chiara; Collino, Massimo; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica

    2018-02-01

    Diabetes is characterized by poor wound healing which currently lacks an efficacious treatment. The innate repair receptor (IRR) is a master regulator of tissue protection and repair which is expressed as a response injury or metabolic stress, including in diabetes. Activation of the IRR might provide benefit for diabetic wound healing. A specific IRR agonist cibinetide was administered in an incisional wound healing model performed mice with genetic diabetes (db + /db + ) and compared to the normal wild-type. Animals were treated daily with cibinetide (30μg/kg/s.c.) or vehicle and euthanized 3, 7, and 14days after the injury to quantitate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), malondialdehyde (MAL), phospho-Akt (pAkt), phospho e-NOS (p-eNOS), and nitrite/nitrate content within the wound. Additional evaluations included quantification of skin histological change, angiogenesis, scar strength, and time to complete wound closure. Throughout the wound healing process diabetic animals treated with vehicle exhibited increased wound MAL with reduced VEGF, pAkt, peNOS and nitrite/nitrate, all associated with poor re-epitheliziation, angiogenesis, and wound breaking strength. Cibenitide administration significantly improved these abnormalities. The results suggest that cibinetide-mediated IRR activation may represent an interesting strategy to treat diabetes-associated wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. VEGF and BFGF Expression and Histological Characteristics of the Bone-Tendon Junction during Acute Injury Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone-tendon junction (BTJ injuries are common and may be caused by acute trauma and delayed healing during exercise or work. To understand the nature of the healing process of BTJ injuries would help to prevent injuries and improve treatment. Thirty-three mature female rabbit hindlimbs were assigned to normal control (CON, n = 7 and injury groups (n = 26. The acute injury was established by administering one 7 plum-blossom needle puncture. Specimens were harvested post injury at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks (ND1W, n = 6; ND2W, n = 6; ND4W, n = 7; and ND8W, n = 7. The injury existed in all of the injury groups. Compared with the CON group, all of the animals in the injury group showed poor cell profiles, an unclear or undetectable tide mark, a proteoglycan area and profile changes; the BTJ cell density diminished significantly in the ND1W (p 0.05. The basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF expression in the CON group was significantly less than in the ND1W group (p 0.05. The bFGF and VEGF expression levels indicated that the healing process stopped at 8 weeks post injury or was not activated, although the injury had not healed by histological examination. A repeatable animal model of BTJ acute injury was established in this study, and the results described the BTJ acute injury healing difficult concerned with the repairing stop.

  14. Preliminary investigation of topical nitroglycerin formulations containing natural wound healing agent in diabetes-induced foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotkar, Mukesh S; Avachat, Amelia M; Bhosale, Sagar S; Oswal, Yogesh M

    2015-04-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) is an organic nitrate rapidly denitrated by enzymes to release free radical nitric oxide and shows improved wound healing and tissue protection from oxidative damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether topical application of NTG in the form of gel/ointment along with a natural wound healing agent, aloe vera, would bring about wound healing by using diabetes-induced foot ulcer model and rat excision wound model. All these formulations were evaluated for pH, viscosity, drug content and ex vivo diffusion studies using rat skin. Based on ex vivo permeation studies, the formulation consisting of carbopol 974p as a gelling agent and aloe vera was found to be suitable. The in vivo study used streptozotocin-induced diabetic foot ulcer and rat excision wound models to analyse wound healing activity. The wound size in animals of all treated groups was significantly reduced compared with that of the diabetic control and marketed treated animals. This study showed that the gel formed with carbopol 974p (1%) and aloe vera promotes significant wound healing and closure in diabetic rats compared with the commercial product and provides a promising product to be used in diabetes-induced foot ulcer. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Ethnoveterinary Medicine: The prospects of integrating medicinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal plants products are part of the natural products that have been in use in traditional medicine and also a source of novel drugs. Therefore, the use of medicinal plant products would be a rational alternative to synthetic drugs. Ethnobotanical surveys carried out in many parts of Kenya have revealed a lot of plants ...

  16. Identification of a transcriptional signature for the wound healing continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Matthew A; Caley, Mathew; Giles, Peter J; Wall, Ivan; Enoch, Stuart; Davies, Lindsay C; Kipling, David; Thomas, David W; Stephens, Phil

    2014-01-01

    There is a spectrum/continuum of adult human wound healing outcomes ranging from the enhanced (nearly scarless) healing observed in oral mucosa to scarring within skin and the nonhealing of chronic skin wounds. Central to these outcomes is the role of the fibroblast. Global gene expression profiling utilizing microarrays is starting to give insight into the role of such cells during the healing process, but no studies to date have produced a gene signature for this wound healing continuum. Microarray analysis of adult oral mucosal fibroblast (OMF), normal skin fibroblast (NF), and chronic wound fibroblast (CWF) at 0 and 6 hours post-serum stimulation was performed. Genes whose expression increases following serum exposure in the order OMF healing phenotype (the dysfunctional healing group), whereas genes with the converse pattern are potentially associated with a positive/preferential healing phenotype (the enhanced healing group). Sixty-six genes in the enhanced healing group and 38 genes in the dysfunctional healing group were identified. Overrepresentation analysis revealed pathways directly and indirectly associated with wound healing and aging and additional categories associated with differentiation, development, and morphogenesis. Knowledge of this wound healing continuum gene signature may in turn assist in the therapeutic assessment/treatment of a patient's wounds. © 2014 The Authors. Wound Repair and Regeneration published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Wound Healing Society.

  17. Prayer Healing: A Case Study Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijthoff, Dirk J; van der Kooi, Cornelis; Glas, Gerrit; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-01-01

    Context • Prayer healing is a common practice in many religious communities around the world. Even in the highly secularized Dutch society, cases of prayer healing are occasionally reported in the media, often generating public attention. There is an ongoing debate regarding whether such miraculous cures do actually occur and how to interpret them. Objective • The aim of the article was to present a research protocol for the investigation of reported cases of remarkable and/or unexplained healing after prayer. Design • The research team developed a method to perform a retrospective, case-based study of prayer healing. Reported prayer healings can be investigated systematically in accordance with a step-by-step methodology. The focus is on understanding the healing by studying it from multiple perspectives, using both medical judgment and patients' narratives collected by qualitative methods Setting • The study occurred at Vrije Universiteit (VU) and VU Medical Center (Amsterdam, Netherlands) as well as the general medical practice of the first author. Participants • Potential participants could be any individuals in the Netherlands or neighboring countries who claim to have been healed through prayer. The reports of healing came from multiple sources, including the research team's medical practices and their direct vicinities, newspaper articles, prayer healers, and medical colleagues. Outcome Measures • Medical data were obtained before and after prayer. Subsequently, a member of a research team and of a medical assessment committee made a standardized judgment that evaluated whether a cure was clinically remarkable or scientifically unexplained. The participants' experiences and insider perspectives were studied, using in-depth interviews in accordance with a qualitative research methodology, to gain insight into the perceptions and explanations of the cures that were offered by participants and by the members of the medical assessment committee. The

  18. Is sonic Hedgehog involved in human fracture healing? --a prospective study on local and systemic concentrations of SHH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eipeldauer, Stefan; Thomas, Anita; Hoechtl-Lee, Leonard; Kecht, Mathias; Binder, Harald; Koettstorfer, Julia; Gregori, Markus; Sarahrudi, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is a new signalling pathway in bone repair. Evidence exist that SHH pathway plays a significant role in vasculogenesis and limb development during embryogenesis. Some in vitro and animal studies has already proven its potential for bone regeneration. However, no data on the role of SHH in the human fracture healing have been published so far. Seventy-five patients with long bone fractures were included into the study and divided in 2 groups. First group contained 69 patients with normal fracture healing. Four patients with impaired fracture healing formed the second group. 34 volunteers donated blood samples as control. Serum samples were collected over a period of 1 year following a standardized time schedule. In addition, SHH levels were measured in fracture haematoma and serum of 16 patients with bone fractures. Fracture haematoma and patients serum both contained lower SHH concentrations compared to control serum. The comparison between the patients' serum SHH level and the control serum revealed lower levels for the patients at all measurement time points. Significantly lower concentrations were observed at weeks 1 and 2 after fracture. SHH levels were slightly decreased in patients with impaired fracture healing without statistical significance. This is the first study to report local and systemic concentration of SHH in human fracture healing and SHH serum levels in healthy adults. A significant reduction of the SHH levels during the inflammatory phase of fracture healing was found. SHH concentrations in fracture haematoma and serum were lower than the concentration in control serum for the rest of the healing period. Our findings indicate that there is no relevant involvement of SHH in human fracture healing. Fracture repair process seem to reduce the SHH level in human. Further studies are definitely needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  19. Gastric secretion, proinflammatory cytokines and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the delayed healing of lingual and gastric ulcerations by testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machowska, A; Brzozowski, T; Sliwowski, Z; Pawlik, M; Konturek, P C; Pajdo, R; Szlachcic, A; Drozdowicz, D; Schwarz, M; Stachura, J; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W

    2008-02-01

    Hormonal fluctuations are known to predispose ulceration of the upper gastrointestinal tract, but to date no comparative study of their effects on the healing of pre-existing ulcers in the oral cavity and stomach has been made. We studied the effects of depletion of testosterone and of EGF on the healing of acetic acid-induced ulcers using rats having undergone bilateral orchidectomy and/or salivectomy respectively. We measured alterations in gastric acid secretion and blood flow at ulcer margins, as well as plasma levels of testosterone, gastrin and the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. Testosterone (0.01-10 mg/kg/day i. m.) dose-dependently delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. When applied in an optimal dose of 1 mg/kg/day, this hormone significantly raised gastric acid secretion and plasma IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha levels. Attenuation of plasma testosterone levels via bilateral orchidectomy inhibited gastric acid secretion and accelerated the healing of oral and gastric ulcers, while increasing plasma gastrin levels and these effects were reversed by testosterone. Salivectomy raised plasma testosterone levels, and delayed oral and gastric ulcer healing. Treatment of salivectomised animals with testosterone further inhibited ulcer healing, and this effect was counteracted by EGF. We propose that testosterone delays ulcer healing via a fall in blood flow at the ulcer margin, a rise in plasma levels of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha and, in the case of gastric ulcers, an increase in gastric acid secretion. EGF released from the salivary glands plays an important role in limitation of the deleterious effects of testosterone on ulcer healing.

  20. Healing and Preventing Pain: Complementary and Integrative Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Pain Management Healing and Preventing Pain, Complementary and Integrative Approaches Past ... Pain Management" Articles Putting A Pause In Pain / Healing and Preventing Pain Complementary and Integrative Approaches / Pain ...

  1. The concept of shalom as a constructive bereavement healing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    existence of African traditional healing and biomedical treatment, that is, plurality of health seeking practices. The approach ... The Hebrew concept of shalom, though distinctly salvific, is inclusive of holistic and personalistic healing aspects.

  2. Wire Insulation Incorporating Self-Healing Polymers (WIISP), Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen and Virginia Tech are developing a self-healing material for wire insulation using a class of ionomeric polymers. These ionomers exhibit self-healing...

  3. Moving to different streams of healing praxis: A reformed missionary approach of healing in the African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thinandavha D. Mashau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are different streams of healing praxis in Africa today, namely African traditional healing, biomedical healing and spiritual healing (which includes the more recent �touch your TV screen� healing method among others. These streams offer contemporary African people diverse alternatives with regard to healing. As much as the hegemony of Western biomedicine, as endorsed by missionaries in the past, can no longer serve as a norm in the area of healing, we can also not use the African traditional healing methods and or any other alternative presented to Africa without discernment. This suggests therefore that Reformed mission ecclesiology and missionary practitioners should critically engage the African context, worldview and culture on the matter of healing. It should also engage other forms of spiritual healing methods on offer in the African soil.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: The use of an indigenous knowledge system when coming to healing in the African context, alongside Western biomedicine and other forms of spiritual healing practices, provides African people with diverse alternatives. It also poses a missiological question regarding the acceptability of such a practice within the framework of the Reformed Missionary Paradigm.Keywords: healing; praxis; Reformed; Missionary; Africa

  4. Common cellular events occur during wound healing and organ regeneration in the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Arrarás José E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All animals possess some type of tissue repair mechanism. In some species, the capacity to repair tissues is limited to the healing of wounds. Other species, such as echinoderms, posses a striking repair capability that can include the replacement of entire organs. It has been reported that some mechanisms, namely extracellular matrix remodeling, appear to occur in most repair processes. However, it remains unclear to what extent the process of organ regeneration, particularly in animals where loss and regeneration of complex structures is a programmed natural event, is similar to wound healing. We have now used the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima to address this question. Results Animals were lesioned by making a 3–5 mm transverse incision between one of the longitudinal muscle pairs along the bodywall. Lesioned tissues included muscle, nerve, water canal and dermis. Animals were allowed to heal for up to four weeks (2, 6, 12, 20, and 28 days post-injury before sacrificed. Tissues were sectioned in a cryostat and changes in cellular and tissue elements during repair were evaluated using classical dyes, immmuohistochemistry and phalloidin labeling. In addition, the temporal and spatial distribution of cell proliferation in the animals was assayed using BrdU incorporation. We found that cellular events associated with wound healing in H. glaberrima correspond to those previously shown to occur during intestinal regeneration. These include: (1 an increase in the number of spherule-containing cells, (2 remodeling of the extracellular matrix, (3 formation of spindle-like structures that signal dedifferentiation of muscle cells in the area flanking the lesion site and (4 intense cellular division occurring mainly in the coelomic epithelium after the first week of regeneration. Conclusion Our data indicate that H. glaberrima employs analogous cellular mechanisms during wound healing and organ regeneration. Thus, it is possible

  5. Instrument-assisted cross-fiber massage accelerates knee ligament healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghmani, M Terry; Warden, Stuart J

    2009-07-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To investigate the effects of instrument-assisted cross-fiber massage (IACFM) on tissue-level healing of knee medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries. Ligament injuries are common and significant clinical problems for which there are few established interventions. IACFM represents an intervention that may mediate tissue-level healing following ligament injury. Bilateral knee MCL injuries were created in 51 rodents, while 7 rodents were maintained as ligament-intact, control animals. IACFM was commenced 1 week following injury and introduced 3 sessions per week for 1 minute per session. IACFM was introduced unilaterally (IACFM-treated), with the contralateral, injured MCL serving as an internal control (nontreated). Thirty-one injured animals received 9 ACFM treatments, while the remaining 20 injured animals received 30 treatments. Ligament biomechanical properties and morphology were assessed at either 4 or 12 weeks postinjury. IACFM-treated ligaments were 43.1% stronger (P<.05), 39.7% stiffer (P<.01), and could absorb 57.1% more energy before failure (P<.05) than contralateral, injured, nontreated ligaments at 4 weeks postinjury. On histological and scanning electron microscopy assessment, IACFM-treated ligaments appeared to have improved collagen fiber bundle formation and orientation within the scar region than nontreated ligaments. There were minimal differences between IACFM-treated and contralateral, nontreated ligaments at 12 weeks postinjury, although IACFM-treated ligaments were 15.4% stiffer (P<.05). IACFM-accelerated ligament healing, possibly via favorable effects on collagen formation and organization, but had minimal effect on the final outcome of healing. These findings are clinically interesting, as there are few established interventions for ligament injuries, and IACFM is a simple and practical therapy technique. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2009;39(7):506-514, Epub 24 February 2009. doi:10.2519/jospt.2009.2997.

  6. Effect of Royal Jelly on Sterile Wound Healing in Balb/C Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Shirzad

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Wound healing is the process of repairing following injury to the skin and other soft tissues. Following injury, inflammatory response occurs and the cells below the dermis begin to increase collagen production, later on, the epithelial tissue is regenerated. Royal jelly (RJ is a bee product. There are many reports on pharmacological activity of RJ on experimented animals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of RJ on the induction of wound healing of sterile incision in Balb/C mice. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study which was conducted at Shahr-e-kord University of Medical Sciences in 60 female Balb/C mice (8 weeks old were selected. The mice were anesthetized with ether. The dorsal fur of the animals was shaved and sterilized with alcohol, and then a longitudinal para vertebral full thickness incision of 10mm long was made. The animals were then divided into six equal groups. In group one (negative control, nothing was applied to the wound. Group 2 (positive control was treated with nitrofurazon ointment, group 3 was treated with RJ 200 mg/kg daily, group 4 was treated with RJ 200 mg/kg every two days, group 5 was treated with RJ 300 mg/kg daily, group 6 treated with RJ 300 mg/kg every two days. Royal jelly was topically used on the wounds. The wound length was measured with vernier capilar every two days until the complete healing was occurred. The data were analyzed with SPSS version 11.5 using Kruscal Walis tests. Results: There was a significant difference between groups 1, 2 with the other groups (p0.015. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that daily application of RJ possesses betters wound healing effects than nitrofurazon.

  7. Identification of a transcriptional signature for the wound healing continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Peake, Matthew A; Caley, Mathew; Giles, Peter J; Wall, Ivan; Enoch, Stuart; Davies, Lindsay C; Kipling, David; Thomas, David W; Stephens, Phil

    2014-01-01

    There is a spectrum/continuum of adult human wound healing outcomes ranging from the enhanced (nearly scarless) healing observed in oral mucosa to scarring within skin and the nonhealing of chronic skin wounds. Central to these outcomes is the role of the fibroblast. Global gene expression profiling utilizing microarrays is starting to give insight into the role of such cells during the healing process, but no studies to date have produced a gene signature for this wound healing continuum. Mi...

  8. Effects of long-term administration of carprofen on healing of a tibial osteotomy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Hiroki; Hara, Yasushi; Asou, Yoshinori; Harada, Yasuji; Nezu, Yoshinori; Yogo, Takuya; Shinomiya, Kenichi; Tagawa, Masahiro

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate effects of long-term administration of carprofen on healing of a tibial osteotomy in dogs. 12 healthy female Beagles. A mid-diaphyseal transverse osteotomy (stabilized with an intramedullary pin) of the right tibia was performed in each dog. The carprofen group (n = 6 dogs) received carprofen (2.2 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h) for 120 days; the control group (6) received no treatment. Bone healing and change in callus area were assessed radiographically over time. Dogs were euthanized 120 days after surgery, and tibiae were evaluated biomechanically and histologically. The osteotomy line was not evident in the control group on radiographs obtained 120 days after surgery. In contrast, the osteotomy line was still evident in the carprofen group. Callus area was significantly less in the carprofen group, compared with the area in the control group, at 20, 30, and 60 days after surgery. At 120 days after surgery, stiffness, elastic modulus, and flexural rigidity in the carprofen group were significantly lower than corresponding values in the control group. Furthermore, histologic evaluation revealed that the cartilage area within the callus in the carprofen group was significantly greater than that in the control group. Long-term administration of carprofen appeared to inhibit bone healing in dogs that underwent tibial osteotomy. We recommend caution for carprofen administration when treating fractures that have delays in healing associated with a reduction in osteogenesis as well as fractures associated with diseases that predispose animals to delays of osseous repair.

  9. The effect of recombinant growth hormone on intestinal anastomotic wound healing in rats with obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cağlikülekçi, Mehmet; Ozçay, Necdet; Oruğ, Taner; Aydoğ, Gülden; Renda, Nurten; Atalay, Fuat

    2002-03-01

    Several clinical and experimental studies have shown that obstructive jaundice delays wound healing. Growth hormone may prevent delayed wound healing, since it has effects on the release of mediators in jaundice, as well as increasing the protein synthesis. Forty male Wistar rats were allocated to four groups: Group I (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to normal small bowel, Group II (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to normal small bowel followed by growth hormone therapy (2mg/kg/day, subcutaneously), Group III (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to obstructive jaundice rat's small bowel, Group IV (n=10): intestinal anastomosis to obstructive jaundice rat's small bowel followed by growth hormone therapy at the same dosage The animals were observed for seven days then killed. Intraabdominal adhesions, anastomotic complications and anastomotic bursting pressures were recorded and tissue samples from the anastomotic site were obtained to measure hydroxyproline levels and for histopathologic examination. Growth hormone had a beneficial effect on the healing of intestinal anastomosis in both jaundiced and non-jaundiced rats. This was demonstrated by clinical and mechanical parameters such as a significant increase in anastomotic bursting pressure, hydroxyproline content and histopathological scores. Growth hormone reverses the adverse effects of obstructive jaundice on small bowel anastomotic healing. It can be hypothesized that this effect is due to augmentation of insulin-like growth factors, protection of hepatocytes, enhancement of intestinal epithelization, and reversal of the resultant malnutritional state caused by growth hormone in obstructive jaundice.

  10. Augmentation of tendon healing with butyric acid-impregnated sutures: biomechanical evaluation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, Bryan T; Tasto, James P; Tibor, Lisa M; Healey, Robert M; Freemont, Anthony; Linn, Michael S; Chase, Derek E; Amiel, David

    2012-08-01

    Butyric acid (BA) has been shown to be angiogenic and to enhance transcriptional activity in tissue. These properties of BA have the potential to augment biological healing of a repaired tendon. To evaluate this possibility both biomechanically and histologically in an animal tendon repair model. Controlled laboratory study. A rabbit Achilles tendon healing model was used to evaluate the biomechanical strength and histological properties at 6 and 12 weeks after repair. Unilateral tendon defects were created in the middle bundle of the Achilles tendon of each rabbit, which were repaired equivalently with either Ultrabraid BA-impregnated sutures or control Ultrabraid sutures. After 6 weeks, BA-impregnated suture repairs had a significantly increased (P Tendons repaired with BA-impregnated sutures demonstrated improved biomechanical properties at 6 weeks relative to control sutures, suggesting a neoangiogenic mechanism of enhanced healing through an increased myofibroblast presence. These findings demonstrate that a relatively simple alteration of suture material may augment early tendon healing to create a stronger repair construct during this time.

  11. Exploring the Urtica dioica Leaves Hemostatic and Wound-Healing Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karama Zouari Bouassida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigated the efficiency of Urtica dioica (U. dioica on hemostatic and wound healing activities. U. dioica leaf extracts were evaluated for their antibacterial and antioxidant effects as well as their flavonoid and polyphenol content. The hydroethanolic extract (EtOH-H2OE, showing the most potent antibacterial and antioxidant activities in vitro, thanks to its flavonoid and polyphenol richness, was selected for hemostatic and wound healing evaluation. Twenty-four rats completing full-thickness wounds were split into four groups. The wounds were topically treated with saline solution, glycerol, “CICAFLORA,” and U. dioica EtOH-H2OE (50 µL/mm2 until day 11. The wound healing effect was assessed by macroscopic, histological, and biochemical parameters. Rats treated with EtOH-H2OE showed fast wound closure (92.39% compared to the control animals (60.91% on the 11th day of wounding (P<0.01. Histopathological and biochemical explorations showed full epidermal regeneration and an improvement of the hydroxyproline content in the U. dioica EtOH-H2OE treated rats. Analysis of fatty acids and sterols by GC-MS showed the presence of unsaturated fatty acids and a high concentration of lupeol known for their involvement in reepithelialization. These results prove the efficiency of U. dioica EtOH-H2OE in wound healing and supported its traditional use.

  12. Exploring the Urtica dioica Leaves Hemostatic and Wound-Healing Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari Bouassida, Karama; Bardaa, Sana; Khimiri, Meriem; Rebaii, Tarek; Tounsi, Slim; Jlaiel, Lobna; Trigui, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The present paper investigated the efficiency of Urtica dioica (U. dioica) on hemostatic and wound healing activities. U. dioica leaf extracts were evaluated for their antibacterial and antioxidant effects as well as their flavonoid and polyphenol content. The hydroethanolic extract (EtOH-H 2 OE), showing the most potent antibacterial and antioxidant activities in vitro , thanks to its flavonoid and polyphenol richness, was selected for hemostatic and wound healing evaluation. Twenty-four rats completing full-thickness wounds were split into four groups. The wounds were topically treated with saline solution, glycerol, "CICAFLORA," and U. dioica EtOH-H 2 OE (50  µ L/mm 2 ) until day 11. The wound healing effect was assessed by macroscopic, histological, and biochemical parameters. Rats treated with EtOH-H 2 OE showed fast wound closure (92.39%) compared to the control animals (60.91%) on the 11th day of wounding ( P dioica EtOH-H 2 OE treated rats. Analysis of fatty acids and sterols by GC-MS showed the presence of unsaturated fatty acids and a high concentration of lupeol known for their involvement in reepithelialization. These results prove the efficiency of U. dioica EtOH-H 2 OE in wound healing and supported its traditional use.

  13. Acceleration of skin wound healing with tragacanth (Astragalus) preparation: an experimental pilot study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayazzadeh, Ehsan; Rahimpour, Sina; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohsen; Farzampour, Shahrokh; Sotoudeh Anvari, Maryam; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Ahmadi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Gum tragacanth is a natural complex mixture of polysaccharides and alkaline minerals extracted from species of Astragalus plant, which is found widely in arid regions of the Middle East. In a pilot experimental study we examined the effects of its topical application on wound healing in ten albino adult male rats. Two similar parasagittal elliptical full-thickness wounds (control vs. test samples) were created on the dorsum of each animal. Test group samples were fully covered by a thin layer of gum tragacanth daily. The extent of wound healing was evaluated by planimetric analysis on multiple occasions during the 10-day study period. On the 7th day of the study, the percent of wound closure was significantly higher in gum tragacanth-treated specimens compared to the control samples (87%±2% vs. 70%±4%, Ptragacanth in acceleration of skin wound contraction and healing. More studies are encouraged to identify the implicating agents and precisely understand the mechanism by which they exert their wound healing effects.

  14. [Animal experimentation, animal welfare and scientific research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, H

    2013-10-01

    Hundreds of thousands of laboratory animals are being used every year for scientific experiments held in Israel, mostly mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and a few sheep, cattle, pigs, cats, dogs, and even a few dozen monkeys. In addition to the animals sacrificed to promote scientific research, millions of animals slain every year for other purposes such as meat and fine leather fashion industries. While opening a front against all is an impossible and perhaps an unjustified task, the state of Israel enacted the Animal Welfare (Animal Experimentation) Law (1994). The law aims to regulate scientific animal experiments and to find the appropriate balance between the need to continue to perform animal experiments for the advancement of research and medicine, and at the same time to avoid unnecessary trials and minimize animal suffering. Among other issues the law deals with the phylogenetic scale according to which experimental animals should be selected, experiments for teaching and practicing, and experiments for the cosmetic industry. This article discusses bioethics considerations in animal experiments as well as the criticism on the scientific validity of such experiments. It further deals with the vitality of animal studies and the moral and legal obligation to prevent suffering from laboratory animals.

  15. rhPDGF-BB promotes early healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Ying, Liang; Ehteshami, John R; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2015-05-01

    Tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair occurs by fibrovascular scar tissue formation, which is weaker than a normal tendon-bone insertion site. Growth factors play a role in tissue formation and have the potential to augment soft tissue healing in the perioperative period. Our study aim was to determine if rhPDGF-BB delivery on a collagen scaffold can improve tendon-to-bone healing after supraspinatus tendon repair compared with no growth factor in rats as measured by (1) gross observations; (2) histologic analysis; and (3) biomechanical testing. Ninety-five male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent acute repair of the supraspinatus tendon. Rats were randomized into one of five groups: control (ie, repair only), scaffold only, and three different platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) doses on the collagen scaffold. Animals were euthanized 5 days after surgery to assess cellular proliferation and angiogenesis. The remaining animals were analyzed at 4 weeks to assess repair site integrity by gross visualization, fibrocartilage formation with safranin-O staining, and collagen fiber organization with picrosirius red staining, and to determine the biomechanical properties (ie, load-to-failure testing) of the supraspinatus tendon-bone construct. The repaired supraspinatus tendon was in continuity with the bone in all animals. At 5 days, rhPDGF-BB delivery on a scaffold demonstrated a dose-dependent response in cellular proliferation and angiogenesis compared with the control and scaffold groups. At 28 days, with the numbers available, rhPDGF-BB had no effect on increasing fibrocartilage formation or improving collagen fiber maturity at the tendon-bone insertion site compared with controls. The control group had higher tensile loads to failure and stiffness (35.5 ± 8.8 N and 20.3 ± 4.5 N/mm) than all the groups receiving the scaffold, including the PDGF groups (scaffold: 27 ± 6.4 N, p = 0.021 and 13 ± 5.7 N/mm, p = 0.01; 30 µg/mL PDGF: 26.5 ± 7.5 N, p = 0.014 and 13

  16. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...

  17. The Healing Potential of Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Ryhl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    addressed the question whether architectural design has a healing potential. The objective was to develop a tool that could give an overview of this research for the building clients and decision-makers responsible for the huge investments in future hospitals and healthcare facilities in the coming decade...

  18. Healing Classrooms: Therapeutic Possibilities in Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzer, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article asks us to consider what the process of healing and composition pedagogy have to learn from each other. More specifically, it identifies how the therapeutic potential of writing, which has been largely neglected in the academy in recent years, can influence the ways we teach transferable writing skills. The article considers how…

  19. Pharmacological interventions for improved colonic anastomotic healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oines, Mari Nanna; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2014-01-01

    with the primary purpose of promoting healing of anastomoses made in the colon or rectum under uncomplicated conditions. We excluded studies on adverse events from interventions, nutritional interventions or in situ physical supporting biomaterials. The primary outcome was biomechanical strength or AL. We...

  20. Optimal healing environments for chronic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Debra A; Walizer, Elaine; Vernalis, Marina N

    2004-01-01

    A substantial increase in chronic cardiovascular disease is projected for the next several decades. This is attributable to an aging population and accelerated rates of obesity and diabetes. Despite technological advances that have improved survival for acute events, there is suboptimal translation of research knowledge for prevention and treatment of chronic cardiovascular illness. Beginning with a brief review of the demographics and pathogenesis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, this paper discusses the obstacles and approaches to optimal care of patients with chronic cardiovascular disease. The novel concept of an optimal healing environment (OHE) is defined and explored as a model for integrative cardiac health care. Aspects generally underexamined in cardiac care such as intrapersonal/interpersonal characteristics of the health care provider and patient, mind/body/spirit wholeness and healing versus curing are discussed, as is the impact psychosocial factors may have on atherosclerosis and cardiovascular health. Information from research on the impact of an OHE might renew the healing mission in medicine, reveal new approaches for healing the heart and establish the importance of a heart-mind-body connection.

  1. Growing Healing One Garden at a Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Julann

    2016-01-01

    Evidence exists regarding the effect of horticultural therapy on improving human well-being, including promotion of overall health and quality of life, physical strength, and cardiac function. This article shares how a nurse created a healing garden at Lourdes Hospital, where she works. Resource information about therapeutic gardens is included.

  2. Multifunctional Self-Healing and Morphing Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duenas, T; Bolanos, E; Murphy, E; Mal, A; Wudl, F; Schaffner, C; Wang, Y; Hahn, H. T; Ooi, T. K; Jha, A

    2006-01-01

    .... Proof of concept was demonstrated showing that a low volume-fraction (5-10%) of magnetic particles is sufficient for enabling self-healing of an approximate 150 micron x 5000 micron crack in a mendomer polymer using inductive heating...

  3. Self-Healing Structural Materials for Damage Tolerant Aerospace Vehicles: Mechanoresponsive healing polymers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Materials that are capable of puncture healing upon impact show great promise for space exploration applications wherein an internal breach caused by micrometeoroid...

  4. Wound healing properties of ointment formulations of Ocimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present work evaluated the phyto-constituents and wound healing properties of ointments formulated with the n-hexane crude bark extract of a plant used folklorically in wound healing, Ocimum gratissimum. The excision wound model was employed in the wound healing studies. The air-dried, size-reduced barks were ...

  5. Identification of a transcriptional signature for the wound healing continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Matthew A; Caley, Mathew; Giles, Peter J; Wall, Ivan; Enoch, Stuart; Davies, Lindsay C; Kipling, David; Thomas, David W; Stephens, Phil

    2014-01-01

    There is a spectrum/continuum of adult human wound healing outcomes ranging from the enhanced (nearly scarless) healing observed in oral mucosa to scarring within skin and the nonhealing of chronic skin wounds. Central to these outcomes is the role of the fibroblast. Global gene expression profiling utilizing microarrays is starting to give insight into the role of such cells during the healing process, but no studies to date have produced a gene signature for this wound healing continuum. Microarray analysis of adult oral mucosal fibroblast (OMF), normal skin fibroblast (NF), and chronic wound fibroblast (CWF) at 0 and 6 hours post-serum stimulation was performed. Genes whose expression increases following serum exposure in the order OMF healing phenotype (the dysfunctional healing group), whereas genes with the converse pattern are potentially associated with a positive/preferential healing phenotype (the enhanced healing group). Sixty-six genes in the enhanced healing group and 38 genes in the dysfunctional healing group were identified. Overrepresentation analysis revealed pathways directly and indirectly associated with wound healing and aging and additional categories associated with differentiation, development, and morphogenesis. Knowledge of this wound healing continuum gene signature may in turn assist in the therapeutic assessment/treatment of a patient's wounds. PMID:24844339

  6. The Healing Land : Research Methods in Kalahari Communities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Healing Land (Isaacson, 2001a) is a vivid, experiential account of Rupert Isaacson's journey towards personal and community healing among the Khomani Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert in South Africa. This paper provides a detailed analysis of The Healing Land in relation to Isaacson's research methodology and ...

  7. Self-Healing Corrosion Protective Sol-Gel Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdolah Zadeh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the state of the art and the recent advances in the field of self-healing corrosion protective coatings, the thesis entitled “Self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings” addresses novel routes to self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings via extrinsic and intrinsic

  8. Induction healing of asphalt mixes with steel slag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolidis, P.; Liu, X.; Wang, H.; van de Ven, M.F.C.; Scarpas, Athanasios

    2018-01-01

    Asphaltic mixes are self-healing materials since they have the capacity to close internal microcracks at higher temperatures or under external force. To trigger their self-healing, asphalt mixes modified with inductive agents can be heated and in that way healed through applying alternating magnetic

  9. Holistic Healing Through Herbs: Effectiveness of Aloe Vera on Post Extraction Socket Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimma, Vijaya Lakshmi; Talla, Harsha Vardhan; Bairi, Jaya Krishna; Gopaldas, Madhulatha; Bathula, Haritha; Vangdoth, Sandeep

    2017-03-01

    Advances in the field of alternative medicine has encouraged the use of various natural products for multiple uses in the field of dentistry for treatment of various oral diseases. A natural herbal product is Aloe vera, which has number of benefits with no reported side effects and gaining considerable importance in clinical research. The aim of this cross-sectional randomized interventional study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Aloe vera in the healing of post extraction sockets. A sample size of 40 patients undergoing atraumatic extraction was divided into two groups. Group A-patients were prescribed only analgesics and followed for seven consecutive days and socket healing assessment was done. Group B-Patients were given Aloe vera soaked gel foams, followed up to the third and seventh day by two observers and the socket healing was assessed using the standardized index by Landry, Turnbull and Howley. In addition to healing the common complaint associated with extraction wound, the pain was assessed using numerical rating scale. Data obtained was statistically analysed using Mann-whitney U test, Wilcoxon Signed ranks test and Spearman's rank correlation method. Control group on the third and the seventh day showed healing of 60% and 70% respectively and the Aloe vera group showed a better result having a healing potential of 70% on the third day and 90% on the seventh day which was statistically significant with a (p-valueAloe vera group showed a significant decrease in pain after two hours on the day of extraction followed by second, third and seventh day which was statistically significant (p-valueAloe vera has been proved to have a unique property that is implicated in better healing than other group without any side effects. Aloe vera is economical, effective, powerful nutritional supplement and antioxidant that protects and promotes wound healing.

  10. Holistic Healing Through Herbs: Effectiveness of Aloe Vera on Post Extraction Socket Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talla, Harsha Vardhan; Bairi, Jaya Krishna; Gopaldas, Madhulatha; Bathula, Haritha; Vangdoth, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Advances in the field of alternative medicine has encouraged the use of various natural products for multiple uses in the field of dentistry for treatment of various oral diseases. A natural herbal product is Aloe vera, which has number of benefits with no reported side effects and gaining considerable importance in clinical research. Aim The aim of this cross-sectional randomized interventional study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Aloe vera in the healing of post extraction sockets. Materials and Methods A sample size of 40 patients undergoing atraumatic extraction was divided into two groups. Group A-patients were prescribed only analgesics and followed for seven consecutive days and socket healing assessment was done. Group B-Patients were given Aloe vera soaked gel foams, followed up to the third and seventh day by two observers and the socket healing was assessed using the standardized index by Landry, Turnbull and Howley. In addition to healing the common complaint associated with extraction wound, the pain was assessed using numerical rating scale. Data obtained was statistically analysed using Mann-whitney U test, Wilcoxon Signed ranks test and Spearman’s rank correlation method. Results Control group on the third and the seventh day showed healing of 60% and 70% respectively and the Aloe vera group showed a better result having a healing potential of 70% on the third day and 90% on the seventh day which was statistically significant with a (p-valueAloe vera group showed a significant decrease in pain after two hours on the day of extraction followed by second, third and seventh day which was statistically significant (p-valueAloe vera has been proved to have a unique property that is implicated in better healing than other group without any side effects. Aloe vera is economical, effective, powerful nutritional supplement and antioxidant that protects and promotes wound healing. PMID:28511517

  11. Honey: an immunomodulator in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Honey is a popular natural product that is used in the treatment of burns and a broad spectrum of injuries, in particular chronic wounds. The antibacterial potential of honey has been considered the exclusive criterion for its wound healing properties. The antibacterial activity of honey has recently been fully characterized in medical-grade honeys. Recently, the multifunctional immunomodulatory properties of honey have attracted much attention. The aim of this review is to provide closer insight into the potential immunomodulatory effects of honey in wound healing. Honey and its components are able to either stimulate or inhibit the release of certain cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6) from human monocytes and macrophages, depending on wound condition. Similarly, honey seems to either reduce or activate the production of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils, also depending on the wound microenvironment. The honey-induced activation of both types of immune cells could promote debridement of a wound and speed up the repair process. Similarly, human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cell responses (e.g., cell migration and proliferation, collagen matrix production, chemotaxis) are positively affected in the presence of honey; thus, honey may accelerate reepithelization and wound closure. The immunomodulatory activity of honey is highly complex because of the involvement of multiple quantitatively variable compounds among honeys of different origins. The identification of these individual compounds and their contributions to wound healing is crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind honey-mediated healing of chronic wounds. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  12. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  13. How prayer heals: a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J S

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical model that outlines various possible explanations for the healing effects of prayer. Four classes of mechanisms are defined on the basis of whether healing has naturalistic or supernatural origins and whether it operates locally or nonlocally. Through this framework, most of the currently proposed hypotheses for understanding absent healing and other related phenomena-hypotheses that invoke such concepts as subtle energy, psi, consciousness, morphic fields, and extended mind-are shown to be no less naturalistic than the Newtonian, mechanistic forces of allopathic biomedicine so often derided for their materialism. In proposing that prayer may heal through nonlocal means according to mechanisms and theories proposed by the new physics, Dossey is almost alone among medical scholars in suggesting the possible limitations and inadequacies of hypotheses based on energies, forces, and fields. Yet even such nonlocal effects can be conceived of as naturalistic; that is, they are explained by physical laws that may be unbelievable or unfamiliar to most physicians but that are nonetheless becoming recognized as operant laws of the natural universe. The concept of the supernatural, however, is something altogether different, and is, by definition, outside of or beyond nature. Herein may reside an either wholly or partly transcendent Creator-God who is believed by many to heal through means that transcend the laws of the created universe, both its local and nonlocal elements, and that are thus inherently inaccessible to and unknowable by science. Such an explanation for the effects of prayer merits consideration and, despite its unprovability by medical science, should not be dismissed out of hand.

  14. Biology and Biomarkers for Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Linsey E.; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Pastar, Irena; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-01-01

    Background As the population grows older, the incidence and prevalence of conditions which lead to a predisposition for poor wound healing also increases. Ultimately, this increase in non-healing wounds has led to significant morbidity and mortality with subsequent huge economic ramifications. Therefore, understanding specific molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant wound healing is of great importance. It has, and will continue to be the leading pathway to the discovery of therapeutic targets as well as diagnostic molecular biomarkers. Biomarkers may help identify and stratify subsets of non-healing patients for whom biomarker-guided approaches may aid in healing. Methods A series of literature searches were performed using Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Internet searches. Results Currently, biomarkers are being identified using biomaterials sourced locally, from human wounds and/or systemically using systematic high-throughput “omics” modalities (genomic, proteomic, lipidomic, metabolomic analysis). In this review we highlight the current status of clinically applicable biomarkers and propose multiple steps in validation and implementation spectrum including those measured in tissue specimens e.g. β-catenin and c-myc, wound fluid e.g. MMP’s and interleukins, swabs e.g. wound microbiota and serum e.g. procalcitonin and MMP’s. Conclusions Identification of numerous potential biomarkers utilizing different avenues of sample collection and molecular approaches is currently underway. A focus on simplicity, and consistent implementation of these biomarkers as well as an emphasis on efficacious follow-up therapeutics is necessary for transition of this technology to clinically feasible point-of-care applications. PMID:27556760

  15. Treatment with analgesics after mouse sciatic nerve injury does not alter expression of wound healing-associated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt C Danzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of sciatic nerve injury are commonly used to study neuropathic pain as well as axon regeneration. Administration of post-surgical analgesics is an important consideration for animal welfare, but the actions of the analgesic must not interfere with the scientific goals of the experiment. In this study, we show that treatment with either buprenorphine or acetaminophen following a bilateral sciatic nerve crush surgery does not alter the expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neurons of a panel of genes associated with wound healing. These findings indicate that the post-operative use of buprenorphine or acetaminophen at doses commonly suggested by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees does not change the intrinsic gene expression response of DRG neurons to a sciatic nerve crush injury, for many wound healing-associated genes. Therefore, administration of post-operative analgesics may not confound the results of transcriptomic studies employing this injury model.

  16. Look Up for Healing: Embodiment of the Heal Concept in Looking Upward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N D Leitan

    Full Text Available Conceptual processing may not be restricted to the mind. The heal concept has been metaphorically associated with an "up" bodily posture. Perceptual Symbol Systems (PSS theory suggests that this association is underpinned by bodily states which occur during learning and become instantiated as the concept. Thus the aim of this study was to examine whether processing related to the heal concept is promoted by priming the bodily state of looking upwards.We used a mixed 2x2 priming paradigm in which 58 participants were asked to evaluate words as either related to the heal concept or not after being primed to trigger the concept of looking up versus down (Direction--within subjects. A possible dose-response effect of priming was investigated via allocating participants to two 'strengths' of prime, observing an image of someone whose gaze was upward/downward (low strength and observing an image of someone whose gaze was upward/downward while physically tilting their head upwards or downwards in accord with the image (high strength (Strength--between subjects.Participants responded to words related to heal faster than words unrelated to heal across both "Strength" conditions. There was no evidence that priming was stronger in the high strength condition.The present study found that, consistent with a PSS view of cognition, the heal concept is embodied in looking upward, which has important implications for cognition, general health, health psychology, health promotion and therapy.

  17. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over time, ...

  18. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance More in Antimicrobial ... Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System About NARMS 2015 NARMS Integrated ...

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... CVM) produced a nine-minute animation explaining how antimicrobial resistance both emerges and proliferates among bacteria. Over ...

  20. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & ... back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products

  1. Animal Feeding Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type=”submit” value=”Submit” /> Healthy Water Home Animal Feeding Operations Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) What are Animal Feeding Operations (AFOs)? According to the United States ...

  2. The effects of chronic ketorolac tromethamine (toradol) on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, M J; Kucan, J O; Roth, A C; Suchy, H; Brown, R E

    1996-08-01

    Intramuscular ketorolac is a commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) agent for analgesia in surgical patients. Increasing numbers of surgical patients are chronically taking some form of an NSAI drug. We examined the effects of "chronic" intramuscular ketorolac on the healing of a closed linear surgical wound in the rat. Wistar rats were pretreated with 4 mg per kilogram per day ketorolac intramuscularly prior to receiving dorsal incisional wounds. The ketorolac treatment was continued and after 2 weeks the wounds were excised and separated with a tensiometer to measure mechanical properties. Breaking strength was directly measured, tensile strength was calculated, and collagen concentrations at the wound site were determined. A significant decrease in the mean breaking strength was seen in the ketorolac-treated animals when compared to controls. The ketorolac-treated animals had a mean tensile strength less than the controls, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. The mean collagen concentration of the ketorolac-treated wounds was significantly less than the untreated wounds. Use of ketorolac for just 1 week prior to surgery in rats produced a significant decrease in the breaking strength of their wounds. With the increasing use of ketorolac in surgical patients as well as the increasing use of oral NSAI drugs, more study of this effect is warranted.

  3. Single Dose Toxicity of Chukyu (spine-healing Pharmacopuncture Injection in the Muscle of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hohyun

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the single dose toxicity of Chukyu (spine-healing pharmacopuncture. Methods: All experiments were conducted at the Biotoxtech, an institution authorized to perform non-clinical studies under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP regulations. Sprague-Dawley rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of Chukyu (spine-healing pharmacopuncture, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL, were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution, 1.0 mL, was administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethic Committee. Results: No deaths or abnormalities occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weight, hematological parameters or clinical chemistry between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. To check for abnormalities in organs and tissues, we used microscopy to examine representative histological sections of each specified organ; the results showed no significant differences in any of the organs or tissues except in one case, where interstitial infiltrating macrophages were found in one female rat in the 0.5-mL/animal experimental group. Conclusion: The above findings suggest that treatment with Chukyu (spine-healing pharmacopuncture is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject are needed to yield more concrete evidence.

  4. Evaluation of wound healing activity of atranorin, a lichen secondary metabolite, on rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana S. S. Barreto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the wound healing activity of atranorin cream (Patent requested on excision wounds. Seventy-two male rats were anesthetized and an excisional wound was performed. Then the rats were randomly assigned into three groups: untreated control group; atranorin 1 (group treated with 1% AT ointment; and atranorin 5 (group treated with 5% AT ointment. Six animals of each group were euthanized 3, 7, 14 or 21 days after surgical procedures and the wounded areas were analyzed and removed. Serial histological sections were obtained and stained by histochemical techniques (Hematoxilin-Eosin-HEand Sirius red and immunohistochemical techniques. Topical application of atranorin reduced wound areas, induced earlier granulation tissue formation, increased cell proliferation, improved collagenization and modulated the myofibroblasts differentiation when compared to control animals. It is suggested that atranorin modulates the wound healing process. These data suggest that this formulation based on atranorin extracted from Cladina kalbii AHTI may be a new biotechnological product for wound healing clinical applications.

  5. Effects of anti-osteoporosis medications on fracture healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Schwarz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A number of fractures are complicated by impaired healing. This is prevalent in certain risk groups such as elderly, osteoporotics, postmenopausal women, and in people with malnutrition. At present, no pharmacologic treatments are available. Thus, there is an unmet need for medications that can...... healing. However, more randomized clinical trials documenting the clinical efficacy of PTH as a promoter of fracture healing in the clinical setting are warranted. Also, strontium ranelate seems to have beneficial effects on fracture healing under conditions with impaired healing. However, no clinical...

  6. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  7. Healing of osteotomy sites applying either piezosurgery or two conventional saw blades: a pilot study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Stübinger, Stefan; Liu, Xi Ling; Schneider, Urs A; Lang, Niklaus P

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare bone healing of experimental osteotomies applying either piezosurgery or two different oscillating saw blades in a rabbit model. The 16 rabbits were randomly assigned into four groups to comply with observation periods of one, two, three and five weeks. In all animals, four osteotomy lines were performed on the left and right nasal bone using a conventional saw blade, a novel saw blade and piezosurgery. All three osteotomy techniques revealed an advanced gap healing starting after one week. The most pronounced new bone formation took place between two and three weeks, whereby piezoelectric surgery revealed a tendency to faster bone formation and remodelling. Yet, there were no significant differences between the three modalities. The use of a novel as well as the piezoelectric bone-cutting instrument revealed advanced bone healing with a favourable surgical performance compared to a traditional saw.

  8. The effect of different concentrations of bee propolis on skin wound healing and immune response and survival of Common carp (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nasrin choubkar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics use to increase the immune and wound healing in many animals. But due to the residual effects of a drug, Antibiotics and used to increase the immune response and propolis wound healing is aquadic animals. But due to their residual, researchers are looking to replace them with natural materials. One of these natural materials that has many health benefits is bee propolis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of propolis on wound healing and immune system response in common carp (Cyprinus carpio. Propolis extracts were prepared from Kashan Barij essence with different concentrations of 0 , 2 , 5 and 10% with carrier substances (to dissolve the propolis  in water, and were evaluated on wound healing and immune response and survival  of common carp on a 21 –day cycle of short baths once a day . The results showed that, compared with the control group (0%, the use of bee propolis in concentration of 2% has statistically significant difference on wound healing and immune system response in common carp. The use of higher concentrations of propolis healed wound, but increased the number of blood cells (red blood cells, neutrophils, and eosinophils and increased mortality of fish, so it is better to use lower concentrations of propolis in fish. The use bee propolis as additive in water is effective in low concentrations and stimulates the immune system.

  9. Spiritual healing in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Christensen, Robin; Højgaard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the efficacy of "energy/spiritual healing" in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Eligible patients were women with RA on stable medication. The design was a randomised, blinded, sham-controlled trial; the third group included an external unblinded control of the natural...... course of RA. Participants in both groups received 8 sessions with "perceived healing" over 21 weeks with 8 weeks of follow-up. Active healing (AH) treatment comprised healing with no physical contact, and sham healing (SH) included exactly the same healing with a sham healer. During intervention......, participants wore hearing protectors and were blindfolded. No healing (NH) only had their outcomes assessed. Coprimary outcomes were disease activity score (DAS) for 28 joints and Doppler ultrasound. All 96 patients randomised were handled as the intention-to-treat population, using a baseline-carried forward...

  10. Effects of Aloe Vera and Chitosan Nanoparticle Thin-Film Membranes on Wound Healing in Full Thickness Infected Wounds with Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Yousefi, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    To assess effect of Aleo vera with chitosan nanoparticle biofilm on wound healing in full thickness infected wounds with antibiotic resistant gram positive bacteria. Thirty rats were randomized into five groups of six rats each. Group I: Animals with uninfected wounds treated with 0.9% saline solution. Group II: Animals with infected wounds treated with saline. Group III: Animals with infected wounds were dressed with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes. Group IV: Animals with infected wounds were treated topically with Aloe vera and Group V: Animals with infected wounds were treated topically with Aloe vera and dressed with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes. Wound size was measured on 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21days after surgery. Microbiology, reduction in wound area and hydroxyproline contents indicated that there was significant difference ( p vera with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes had a reproducible wound healing potential and hereby justified its use in practice.

  11. Implement of the Owner Distinction Function for Healing-Type Pet Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Hirose, Sadaki

    In recent years, a robotics technology is extremely progressive, and robots are widely applied in many fields. One of the most typical robots is a pet robot. The pet robot is based on an animal pet, such as a dog or a cat. Also, it is known that an animal pet has a healing effect. Therefore, the study to apply pet robots to Animal Assisted Therapy instead of an animal pet has begun to be investigated. We, also, have investigated a method of an owner distinction for pet robot, to emphasize a healing effect of pet robots. In this paper, taking account of implementation into pet robots, a real-time owner distinction method is proposed. In the concrete, the method provides a real-time matching algorithm and an oblivion mechanism. The real-time matching means that a matching and a data acquisition are processed simultaneously. The oblivion mechanism is deleting features of owners in the database of the pet robots. Additionally, the mechanism enables to reduce matching costs or size of database and it enables to follow a change of owners. Furthermore, effectivity and a practicality of the method are evaluated by experiments.

  12. Is rate of skin wound healing associated with aging or longevity phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2011-12-01

    Wound healing (WH) is a fundamental biological process. Is it associated with a longevity or aging phenotype? In an attempt to answer this question, we compared the established mouse models with genetically modified life span and also an altered rate of WH in the skin. Our analysis showed that the rate of skin WH in advanced ages (but not in the young animals) may be used as a marker for biological age, i.e., to be indicative of the longevity or aging phenotype. The ability to preserve the rate of skin WH up to an old age appears to be associated with a longevity phenotype, whereas a decline in WH-with an aging phenotype. In the young, this relationship is more complex and might even be inversed. While the aging process is likely to cause wounds to heal slowly, an altered WH rate in younger animals could indicate a different cellular proliferation and/or migration capacity, which is likely to affect other major processes such as the onset and progression of cancer. As a point for future studies on WH and longevity, using only young animals might yield confusing or misleading results, and therefore including older animals in the analysis is encouraged.

  13. Seeing the animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harfeld, Jes Lynning; Cornou, Cecile; Kornum, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the notion that the invisibility of the animalness of the animal constitutes a fundamental obstacle to change within current production systems. It is discussed whether housing animals in environments that resemble natural habitats could lead to a re-animalization...... of the animals, a higher appreciation of their moral significance, and thereby higher standards of animal welfare. The basic claim is that experiencing the animals in their evolutionary and environmental context would make it harder to objectify animals as mere bioreactors and production systems. It is argued...... that the historic objectification of animals within intensive animal production can only be reversed if animals are given the chance to express themselves as they are and not as we see them through the tunnel visions of economy and quantifiable welfare assessment parameters....

  14. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, M; Bortolotti, L

    2006-02-01

    Do non-human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non-human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the scientific studies do not by themselves solve the problem of how to map psychological similarities (and differences) between humans and animals onto a distinction between morally relevant and morally irrelevant mental properties. The current limitations of human mindreading-whether scientifically aided or not-have practical consequences for the rational justification of claims about which rights (if any) non-human animals should be accorded.

  15. Polydeoxyribonucleotide stimulates angiogenesis and wound healing in the genetically diabetic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Mariarosaria; Bitto, Alessandra; Altavilla, Domenica; Minutoli, Letteria; Polito, Francesca; Calò, Margherita; Lo Cascio, Patrizia; Stagno d'Alcontres, Francesco; Squadrito, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Healing of diabetic wounds still remains a critical medical problem. Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), a compound having a mixture of deoxyribonucleotide polymers, stimulates the A2 purinergic receptor with no toxic or adverse effect. We studied the effects of PDRN in diabetes-related healing defect using an incisional skin-wound model produced on the back of female diabetic mice (db+/db+) and their normal littermates (db+/+m). Animals were treated daily for 12 days with PDRN (8 mg/kg/ip) or its vehicle (100 muL 0.9%NaCl). Mice were killed 3, 6, and 12 days after skin injury to measure vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression and protein synthesis, to assay angiogenesis and tissue remodeling through histological evaluation, and to study CD31, Angiopoietin-1 and Transglutaminase-II. Furthermore, we measured wound breaking strength at day 12. PDRN injection in diabetic mice resulted in an increased VEGF message (vehicle=1.0+/-0.2 n-fold vs. beta-actin; PDRN=1.5+/-0.09 n-fold vs. beta-actin) and protein wound content on day 6 (vehicle=0.3+/-0.07 pg/wound; PDRN=0.9+/-0.1 pg/wound). PDRN injection improved the impaired wound healing and increased the wound-breaking strength in diabetic mice. PDRN also caused a marked increase in CD31 immunostaining and induced Transglutaminase-II and Angiopoietin-1 expression. Furthermore, the concomitant administration of 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargilxanthine, a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, abolished PDRN positive effects on healing. However, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargilxanthine alone did not affect wound healing in both diabetic mice and normal littermates. These results suggest that PDRN might be useful in wound disorders associated with diabetes.

  16. The Effect of Withania Somnifera Root Extract on Open Wound Healing in the Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ajand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healing cutaneous wounds is regarded as one of the most important issues in the medicine. Different chemical agents have been used in regard with promoting wound healing, most of which unfortunately present some side effects and defects. Since natural combinations have proposed less disadvantages, this study aimed to investigate the effect of Withania Somnifera root extract on cutaneous wound healing in the male rats. Methods: This study was performed on 36 rats weighing 180-220g that were divided into 6 groups (n=6. First, wounds (2x2 were made on the dorsal skin of the animals. The first group was left without treatment (control group, the second was treated with Eucerin(negative control, the third group received 1% of phenytoin cream and in the other groups, different concentrations of hydroalcoholic extract of Withania Somnifera (20%, 40%, 60% w/w combined with Eucerin base were administrated once per day. The area of wounds was measured by Autocad software every day, from the 2nd day to 14th day. The study data were analyzed via SPSS software (ver.16 at the significant level of P<0.05. Results:The reduction of incisional wound area in the all groups treated with root extract of Withania Somnifera  ointment was significantly higher on the 8th  day. Moreover, dose of 60% and 90% revealed better effects (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings of the present study demonstrated that Withania Somnifera root, due to its significant reduction in the healing time as well as wound area, can be used as an effective material in regard with the cutaneous wound healing.

  17. Alveolar bone healing in rats: micro-CT, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Suemi HASSUMI

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alveolar bone healing after upper incisor extraction in rats is a classical model of preclinical studies. The underlying morphometric, cellular and molecular mechanism, however, remains imprecise in a unique study. Objectives The aim of this study was therefore to characterize the alveolar bone healing after upper incisor extraction in rats by micro computed tomographic (Micro-CT, immunohistochemical and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis. Material and Methods Thirty animals (Rattus norvegicus, Albinus Wistar were divided into three groups after upper incisors extraction at 7, 14, and 28 days. Micro-CT was evaluated based on the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, the histological analyses and immunostaining of osteoprotegerin (OPG, receptor activator of nuclear kappa B ligand (RANKL and tartrate resistant acid phosphate (TRAP was performed. In addition, RT-PCR analyses of OPG, RANKL, the runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2, osteocalcin (OC, osteopontin (OPN, osterix (OST and receptor activator of nuclear kappa B (RANK were performed to determine the expression of these proteins in the alveolar bone healing. Results Micro-CT: The morphometric parameters of bone volume and trabecular thickness progressively increased over time. Consequently, a gradual decrease in trabecular separation, trabecular space and total bone porosity was observed. Immunohistochemical: There were no differences statistically significant between the positive labeling for OPG, RANKL and TRAP in the different periods. RT-PCR: At 28 days, there was a significant increase in OPG expression, while RANKL expression and the RANKL/OPG ratio both decreased over time. Conclusion Micro-CT showed the newly formed bone had favorable morphometric characteristics of quality and quantity. Beyond the RUNX2, OC, OPN, OST, and RANK proteins expressed in the alveolar bone healing, OPG and RANKL activity showed to be essential for activation of basic

  18. Wound-healing potential of the fruit extract of Phaleria macrocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Najm Abood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The wound-healing potential of Phaleria macrocarpa was evaluated by monitoring the levels of inflammatory mediators, collagen, and antioxidant enzymes. Experimentally, two-centimeter-wide full-thickness-deep skin excision wounds were created on the posterior neck area of the rats. The wounds were topically treated with gum acacia as a vehicle in the control group, intrasite gel in the reference group, and 100 and 200 mg/mL P. macrocarpa ‎fruit extract in the treatment group. Granulation tissues were excised on the 15th day and were further processed for histological and biochemical analyzes. Wound healing was evaluated by measuring the contractions and protein contents of the wounds. Cellular redistribution and collagen deposition were assessed morphologically using Masson’s trichrome stain. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities, along with malondialdehyde (MDA level were determined in skin tissue homogenates of the dermal wounds. Serum levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α were evaluated in all the animals. A significant decrease in wound area was caused by a significant increase in TGF-β1 level in the treated groups. Decrease in TNF-α level and increase in the collagen formation were also observed in the treated groups. Topical treatment with P. macrocarpa fruit extract increased the SOD and CAT activities in the healing wounds, thereby significantly increasing MDA level. The topical treatment with P. macrocarpa fruit extract showed significant healing effect on excision wounds and demonstrated an important role in the inflammation process by increasing antioxidant enzyme activities, thereby accelerating the wound healing process and reducing tissue injury.

  19. Momordica charantia ointment accelerates diabetic wound healing and enhances transforming growth factor-β expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussan, F; Teoh, S Lin; Muhamad, N; Mazlan, M; Latiff, A A

    2014-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays an important role in wound healing. Delayed wound healing is a consequence of diabetes, leading to high morbidity and poor quality of life. Momordica charantia (MC) fruit possesses anti-diabetic and wound healing properties. This study aimed to explore the changes in TGF-β expression in diabetic wounds treated with topical MC fruit extract. Fifty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a normal control group and five diabetic groups of ten rats each. Intravenous streptozotocin (50mg/kg) was given to induce diabetes in the diabetic groups. Full thickness excision wounds were created on the thoracodorsal region of the animals, and these wounds were then treated with vehicle, MC powder, MC ointment and povidone ointment or ointment base for ten days. Wound healing was determined by the rate of wound closure, total protein content and TGF-β expression in the wounds, and histological observation. Diabetic groups showed delayed wound closure rates compared to the control group. The wound closure rate in the MC ointment group was significantly faster than that of the untreated diabetic group (p<0.05). The MC ointment group also showed intense TGF-β expression and a high level of total protein content. MC ointment has a promising potential for use as an alternative topical medication for diabetic wounds. This work has shown that it accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats, and it is suggested here that this occurs by enhancing TGF-β expression. Further work is recommended to explore this effect.

  20. Promotion of accelerated repair in a radiation impaired wound healing model in murine skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.D.

    2000-02-01

    Surgical resection of many tumours following radiotherapy is well established as the preferred approach to eradicating the disease. However, prior irradiation compromises the healing of surgical wounds in 30-60% of cases, depending on the site of treatment. There is a need therefore, to understand the deficit in the repair process and to develop therapeutic interventions that may help address this problem. To this end, the aims of this thesis were to characterise a wound healing model in irradiated murine skin and to investigate the effects of topical- compounds and therapeutic modalities upon this wound healing model. Full-thickness dorsal skin excisions were made within a pre-irradiated area (20Gy) in male Balb/c mice and wounds were made in a corresponding area in control animals. Biopsies were removed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis, whilst wound closure experiments were used to determine effects of topical compounds and therapeutic modalities (Low Intensity Laser Therapy, Therapeutic Ultrasound and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation) upon the rate of repair. X-ray irradiation (20Gy) caused a significant delay in the rate of wound closure, whilst histological results indicated that prior irradiation delays the influx of inflammatory cells, delays wound reepithelialisation and reduces granulation tissue formation and collagen deposition. Macrophage and endothelial cell numbers were found to be significantly lower in the irradiated wounds when compared to unirradiated control wounds. Furthermore, apoptosis was affected by irradiation. Although results failed to support any claimed stimulatory effects of various therapeutic modalities upon wound healing, topical application of glucans were shown to have a slight beneficial effect upon the rate of repair. In conclusion, the observed cellular effects caused by irradiation may be a result of permanent damage to stem cells and their ability to replicate and reproduce. Furthermore, the

  1. Does longstanding nicotine exposure impair bone healing and osseointegration? An experimental study in rabbits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Klaus; Lindh, Christian H; Berglundh, Tord

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of longstanding nicotine exposure on bone healing and osseointegration of titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 20 female rabbits received either nicotine (n = 10) or saline (n = 10) administered subcutaneously via mini-osmotic pumps...... for 32 weeks. The pump delivered 6 microg/kg/min of nicotine for the animals in the test group. Blood samples were collected and plasma cotinine levels were measured monthly. Six months after the commencement of nicotine or saline administration three osteotomy preparations, one in right, femoral condyle...... increase in RMT between 2 and 4 weeks within each group. The histomorphometric analysis of bone-to-implant contact and bone density in the bone defects revealed no differences between the test and the control group after 2 or 4 weeks of healing. CONCLUSION: Longstanding (6 months) nicotine exposure did...

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cutaneous Wound Healing: Current Evidence and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isakson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is a remarkable organ that sustains insult and injury throughout life. The ability of skin to expeditiously repair wounds is paramount to survival. With an aging global population, coupled with a rise in the prevalence of conditions such as diabetes, chronic wounds represent a significant biomedical burden. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, a progenitor cell population of the mesoderm lineage, have been shown to be significant mediators in inflammatory environments. Preclinical studies of MSC in various animal wound healing models point towards a putative therapy. This review examines the body of evidence suggesting that MSC accelerate wound healing in both clinical and preclinical studies and also the possible mechanisms controlling its efficacy. The delivery of a cellular therapy to the masses presents many challenges from a safety, ethical, and regulatory point of view. Some of the issues surrounding the introduction of MSC as a medicinal product are also delineated in this review.

  3. Wound healing during hibernation by black bears (Ursus americanus) in the wild: elicitation of reduced scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaizzo, Paul A; Laske, Timothy G; Harlow, Henry J; McClay, Carolyn B; Garshelis, David L

    2012-03-01

    Even mildly hypothermic body or limb temperatures can retard healing processes in mammals. Despite this, we observed that hibernating American black bears (Ursus americanus Pallas, 1780) elicit profound abilities in mounting inflammatory responses to infection and/or foreign bodies. In addition, they resolve injuries during hibernation while maintaining mildly hypothermic states (30-35 °C) and without eating, drinking, urinating or defecating. We describe experimental studies on free-ranging bears that document their abilities to completely resolve cutaneous cuts and punctures incurred during or prior to hibernation. We induced small, full-thickness cutaneous wounds (biopsies or incisions) during early denning, and re-biopsied sites 2-3 months later (near the end of denning). Routine histological methods were used to characterize these skin samples. All biopsied sites with respect to secondary intention (open circular biopsies) and primary intention (sutured sites) healed, with evidence of initial eschar (scab) formation, completeness of healed epidermis and dermal layers, dyskeratosis (inclusion cysts), and abilities to produce hair follicles. These healing abilities of hibernating black bears are a clear survival advantage to animals injured before or during denning. Bears are known to have elevated levels of hibernation induction trigger (delta-opioid receptor agonist) and ursodeoxycholic acid (major bile acid within plasma, mostly conjugated with taurine) during hibernation, which may relate to these wound-healing abilities. Further research as to the underlying mechanisms of wound healing during hibernation could have applications in human medicine. Unique approaches may be found to improve healing for malnourished, hypothermic, diabetic and elderly patients or to reduce scarring associated with burns and traumatic injuries. © 2012 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  4. The effect of subcutaneously injected nicotine on achilles tendon healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygulu, Fuat; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Zeybek, N Dilara; Kaymaz, F Figen; Güneş, Tamer

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subcutaneously injected nicotine on transversely transected and sutured achilles tendon healing in an experimental rabbit model. Adult New Zealand rabbits (n=22) weighting 3,000-3,500 g were used in this experimental study. Rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. Achilles tendon was transversely incised and repaired in all animals. In the experiment group subcutaneous injection of Nicotine tartrate 3 mg/kg/day was done. In the control group Serum physiologic injection was done at the same dosage. The injections were made three times a day in equal dosages. Nicotine and SF injections were made until the end of the 8-week, and then all animals were euthanized. Both light microscopic and electron microscopic evaluations were made on 14 animals. In N group light microscopic evaluation showed a visible gap in repair site. The total tendon score represented in N group was less than in SF group. The statistical analysis of the groups was significantly different for total tendon scores (P=0.002). Beside this electron microscopic examination showed inactive and degenerated fibroblasts and irregular collagen fibrils around them as well as collagen synthesis interruption in N group. Biomechanical evaluation was made on eight animals. The average tensile strength values in Group N (139.47+/-44.55 N) were significantly lower than those in Group SF (265.9+/-39.01 N) (z=2.309, P=0.029). Nicotine is the major chemical component common to all cigarettes and previously has been shown to affect wound and fracture healing adversely. The results of this study show that nicotine impairs achilles tendon healing after a surgical repair.

  5. Dynamics of bone healing after osteotomy with piezosurgery or conventional drilling - histomorphometrical, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Jônatas Caldeira; Marcantonio, Elcio; de Souza Faloni, Ana Paula; Rocha, Fernanda Regina Godoy; Marcantonio, Rosemary Adriana; Wilk, Katarzyna; Intini, Giuseppe

    2013-09-23

    Piezosurgery is an osteotomy system used in medical and dental surgery. Many studies have proven clinical advantages of piezosurgery in terms of quality of cut, maneuverability, ease of use, and safety. However, few investigations have tested its superiority over the traditional osteotomy systems in terms of dynamics of bone healing. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of bone healing after osteotomies with piezosurgery and to compare them with those associated to traditional bone drilling. One hundred and ten rats were divided into two groups with 55 animals each. The animals were anesthetized and the tibiae were surgically exposed to create defects 2 mm in diameter by using piezosurgery (Piezo group) and conventional drilling (Drill group). Animals were sacrificed at 3, 7, 14, 30 and 60 days post-surgery. Bone samples were collected and processed for histological, histomorphometrical, immunohistochemical, and molecular analysis. The histological analysis was performed at all time points (n = 8) whereas the histomorphometrical analysis was performed at 7, 14, 30 and 60 days post-surgery (n = 8). The immunolabeling was performed to detect Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Caspase-3 (CAS-3), Osteoprotegerin (OPG), Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kappa-B Ligand (RANKL), and Osteocalcin (OC) at 3, 7, and 14 days (n = 3). For the molecular analysis, animals were sacrificed at 3, 7 and 14 days, total RNA was collected, and quantification of the expression of 21 genes related to BMP signaling, Wnt signaling, inflammation, osteogenenic and apoptotic pathways was performed by qRT-PCR (n = 5). Histologically and histomorphometrically, bone healing was similar in both groups with the exception of a slightly higher amount of newly formed bone observed at 30 days after piezosurgery (p piezosurgery are comparable to those observed with conventional drilling.

  6. The effect of gabapentin and pregabalin on intestinal incision wound healing in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Korkmaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the macroscopic and histologic effects of pregabalin (PG gabapentin (GB on longitudinal intestinal wound healing in New Zealand rabbits. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into three groups randomly; the control group (n=6, PG group (n=6 and GB group (n=6. All animals were premedicated with xylazine HCI, 5 mg/kg i.m. and general anaesthesia was performed by ketamine HCI 50 mg/kg i.m injection. A 4 cm incision in the caecum through median laparotomy was achieved under aseptic surgery. Intestinal wound was closed with double-sutured. All animals were received parenteral antibiotic treatment for 5 days. PG and GB groups were treated by PG (30 mg/kg, oral, daily and GB (30 mg/kg, oral, daily for 10 days respectively. Control group did not receive any treatment. The animals were euthanized on day 10 and the caecum was examined by laparotomy. Adhesion formation was observed, and tissue samples were taken from suture lines for histologic examination. Cellular infiltration (polymorphonuclear white blood cells and mononuclear cells, accumulation of connective tissue, vascularization and extent of necrosis were evaluated and scored separately for each of mucosal, submucosal, muscular and serosal layers of caecum. Results: Adhesions were more severe in the GB group compared to other groups. No statistically significant differences were detected among the three groups about the wound healing. Conclusion: It was suggested that the use of gabapentinoids had no significant effect on wound healing in patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery and further studies with treatment periods longer than 10 days are needed.

  7. Healing of cornea following an electric burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Tanveer Anjum; Shaikh, Farheen; Ahmad, Khabir

    2012-08-01

    Electrical injuries have become a significant health problem in developing countries because of increase in access to electricity in the last few decades and lack of adequate safety measures. Electrical injuries of eyes are relatively uncommon. A case report of a rapid and complete corneal healing accompanied by satisfactory visual recovery after an electric burn event in a 20-year-old male is reported. The patient had accidental exposure to high voltage live wire while he was repairing it, resulting in severe ocular and superficial body burn. He was not wearing any protective equipment at the time of injury. On examination, the best-corrected visual acuity was counting fingers in the left eye with severe corneal epithelial loss and diffuse corneal oedema. The patient was treated medically, with a rapid corneal healing and resolution of oedema over the next few days. Visual acuity in the worse eye (left) improved to 20/25 from counting fingers.

  8. Medicine and the Task of Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Komesaroff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the traditional description of medicine as a practice of healing, it is necessary to examine its relationships with both science and ethics. The “scientific” component of medicine includes an acknowledgment of the influence of social, cultural and environmental factors on the functioning of the organism. The “ethical” component is often presented as merely supplementary but actually provides the conditions of possibility of knowledge. “Healing” then appears as what joins the two together: the site where science is applied in the service of ethics and where ethics encounters science. This perspective allows us to reconsider medicine as a project to healing complex wounds that manifest themselves at the physical, psychological, emotional and cultural levels.

  9. Faith healing and the palliative care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Denise

    2013-01-01

    As the spiritual care needs of patients and their loved ones have become an essential component of palliative care, clinicians are being challenged to develop new ways of addressing the spiritual issues that often arise in the palliative care setting. Recent research has given attention to the communication strategies that are effective with patients or their loved ones who report that they are seeking a miraculous physical healing. However, these strategies often assume a unilateral rather than collaborative view of divine intervention. Communication strategies that are effective with unilateral understandings of divine intervention may be contraindicated with those who hold to a collaborative view of divine intervention. Greater attention to language of human-divine interaction along with approaching faith healing as a third modality of treatment are explored as additional interventions.

  10. Healed corneal ulcer with keloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Alkatan, Hind M.; Al-Arfaj, Khalid M.; Hantera, Mohammed; Al-Kharashi, Soliman

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a 34-year-old Arabic white female patient who presented with a white mass covering her left cornea following multiple ocular surgeries and healed corneal ulcer. The lesion obscured further view of the iris, pupil and lens. The patient underwent penetrating keratoplasty and the histopathologic study of the left corneal button showed epithelial hyperplasia, absent Bowman’s layer and subepithelial fibrovascular proliferation. The histopathologic appearance was suggestive of a co...

  11. Self-Healing, Inflatable, Rigidizable Shelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Andrea; Gosau, Jan-Michael; Dixit, Anshu; Gleeson, Dan

    2012-01-01

    An inflatable, rigidizable shelter system was developed based on Rigi dization on Command (ROC) technology incorporating not only the requ ired low-stowage volume and lightweight character achieved from an i nflatable/rigidizable system, but also a self-healing foam system inc orporated between the rigidizable layers of the final structure to m inimize the damage caused by any punctures to the structure.

  12. Microencapsulation of Self-healing Concrete Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    design and development. Other factors that can affect concrete and its lifespan include shrinkage , design flaws or poor quality of construction...possible shrinkage , design flaws or poor quality of construction materials, reinforced concrete will eventually develop cracks. Inevitable damage to...SELF-HEALING CONCRETE PROPERTIES N00244-l 0-G-0004 Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER James Gilford III

  13. INTRAPSYCHIC CONFLICT, TRANSFERENCE, AND A HEALING RELATIONSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Erskine

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this rejoinder to “Responses to Relational Healing of Early Affect-Confusion: Part 3 of a Case Study Trilogy”, the author defines an Integrative Psychotherapy perspective of transference and addresses the significance of working within a transference-countertransference milieu. Descriptions of how to understand and therapeutically use client’s “idealization” are provided. The concept of avoidant and disorganized attachment is related to a clinical case.

  14. Effect of a cooling gel on pain sensitivity and healing of hot-iron cattle brands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, C B; Mintline, E M; Banuelos, J; Walker, K A; Hoar, B; Drake, D; Weary, D M

    2014-12-01

    Hot-iron branding is painful for cattle, but little is known about how long this pain lasts or effective alleviation methods. Previous work with pigs indicated that cooling burns with a gel (active ingredient: tea tree oil) improved healing compared to untreated wounds. Steers (210±21 kg) were hot-iron branded and allocated to 1 of 3 treatments: control (n=24), 1 gel application immediately after branding (1X; n=12), or 2 gel applications, 1 immediately after branding and one 1 d later (2X; n=12). Pain sensitivity was assessed by applying a known and increasing force with a von Frey anesthesiometer in 5 locations (in the center, at the top of, and 5 and 10 cm above the brand and on the equivalent location on the nonbranded side of the body) until animals showed a behavioral response. Healing was measured with a 6-point scale (1=fresh brand and 6=no scabbing and fully repigmented). Both measures, along with weight gain and surface temperature of the wound, were recorded before and 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 56, and 70 d after branding. The gel cooled the brand, with the most obvious differences on the day it was applied (3.7 to 4.2°C cooler than control; day×gel interaction, P=0.004). All wounds were at least partially repigmented by 70 d, but only 46% of brands were fully healed at this time. The healing process was slowed when a gel was applied twice (e.g., at 21 d, healing score of 2.5±0.1 and 2.7±0.1 vs. 2.0±0.2 for control and 1X vs. 2X, respectively; P=0.001). Brands tended to remain painful throughout the 70 d (in the center of the brand; before vs. d 1-35, P≤0.001; d 56, P=0.058; and d 70, P=0.092). Overall, gel had little effect on pain sensitivity. Weight gain was reduced on d 1 after branding compared to all other time points (Pbranding. In addition, by 70 d after the procedure, hot-iron brands still tended to be more painful than nonbranded tissue and 54% were not fully healed. These results raise additional animal welfare concerns about hot

  15. Effect of Diabetes Condition on Topical Treatment of Binahong Leaf Fraction in Wound Healing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kintoko Kintoko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a metabolic disease which is becoming the first number of health problem in Indonesia, based on the results of the Basic Health Research of Ministry of Health in 2013. One of the diabetes complications affected by high levels of blood glucose is diabetic ulcers wich 85% the number of cases was overed by amputation as the result of improper handling. Herbal treatments could be an alternative treatment of diabetic ulcers, one of them is binahong plant. The results of previous studies have shown the ability of ethanolic extract of binahong leaf in accelerating wound healing in diabetic rats. This study would be a continued study to test five kinds of binahong leaf fractions (FDB with gradual solvent polarity in accelerating wound healing in diabetic ulcer. Wound healing parameters observed were percentage of wound healing from the wound diameter contraction. The test begins with ethanolic extract of binahong leaf fractionation to produce fractions of hexane (FHDB, chloroform (FKDB, ethyl acetate (FEADB, and ethanol (FEDB. Water fraction (FADB was obtained from ethanolic leaf extract residues of binahong leaf extraction. Each fraction activity was tested topically twice daily on dorsal of test animals that created wounds using a punch biopsy 5 mm diameters. Grouping of test animals were divided into 13 groups with normal control group (non diabetes, negative control (diabetes + topical application of biocream®, positive control (diabetes + topical application of madecassol, and 10 diabetes groups with topical application of 5 kinds of binahong leaf fractions with each fractions consist of a concentrations of 5% and 10% with biocream® as a vehicle. Diabetic parameters measured include blood glucose levels (KGD and weight lost percentage (PB% in day 1 and 10 during a 10-day treatment. The results showed the influence of KGD in the condition of diabetes on wound healing rats diabetic ulcers which topically treated with

  16. Animal Production Research Advances

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Production Research Advances is a peer-review journal established expressly to promote the production of all animal species utilized as food. The journal has an international scope and is intended for professionals in animal production and related sciences. We solicit contributions from animal production and ...

  17. Animal Bites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Animal bites: First aid Animal bites: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff These guidelines can help you care for a minor animal bite, such ... 26, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-animal-bites/basics/ART-20056591 . Mayo ...

  18. Ian Ingram: Next Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Ian Ingram: Next Animals is an exhibition catalogue presenting research on the work by Ian Ingram in relation to his exhibition Next Animals at Nikolaj Kunsthal in 2015.......Ian Ingram: Next Animals is an exhibition catalogue presenting research on the work by Ian Ingram in relation to his exhibition Next Animals at Nikolaj Kunsthal in 2015....

  19. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Animal & Veterinary Home Animal & Veterinary Safety & Health Antimicrobial Resistance Animation of ...

  20. First Aid: Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... last rabies vaccination, if known any recent unusual behavior by the animal the animal's location, if known if the animal ... Scratches First Aid: Cuts First Aid: Skin Infections Cat Scratch ... Safe Around Animals Cuts, Scratches, and Abrasions Rabies Cuts, Scratches, and ...

  1. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  2. The effect of biological sealants and adhesive treatments on matrix metalloproteinase expression during renal injury healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Lloris-Carsí

    Full Text Available Renal injuries are relatively common in cases of abdominal trauma. Adhesives and sealants can be used to repair and preserve damaged organs. Using a rat model, this study explores the activity of different matrix metalloproteinases (MMP during the healing of renal injuries treated by two biological adhesives (TachoSil and GelitaSpon and a new synthetic elastic cyanoacrylate (Adhflex.Renal traumatic injuries were experimentally induced in 90 male Wistar rats by a Stiefel Biopsy Punch in the anterior aspect of the left kidney. Animals were divided into five groups: 1, sham non-injured (n = 3; 2, non-treated standard punch injury (n = 6; 3, punch injury treated with TachoSil (n = 27; 4, punch injury treated with GelitaSpon (n = 27; and, 5, punch injury treated with Adhflex (n = 27. Wound healing was evaluated 2, 6, and 18 days after injury by determining the expression of MMPs, and the histopathological evolution of lesions.Histologically, the wound size at 6 days post-injury was larger in Adhflex-treated samples than in the other treatments, but the scarring tissue was similar at 18 days post-injury. Only the MMPs subtypes 1, 2, 8, 9, and 13 were sufficiently expressed to be quantifiable. Both time since injury and treatment type had a significant influence on MMPs expression. Two days after injury, the expression of MMP8 and MMP9 was predominant. MMP2 expression was greater 6 days after injury. The Adhflex-treated group had a significantly higher MMPs expression than the other treatment groups at all healing stages.All three sealant treatments induced almost similar expression of MMPs than untreated animals indicating a physiological healing process. Given that all renal trauma injuries must be considered emergencies, both biological and synthetic adhesives, such as Adhflex, should be considered as a treatment options.

  3. Periodontal and endodontic pathology delays extraction socket healing in a canine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present exploratory study was to evaluate extraction socket healing at sites with a history of periodontal and endodontic pathology. Methods The mandibular 4th premolar teeth in 5 adult beagle dogs served as experimental units. Periodontal and endodontic lesions were induced in 1 premolar site in each animal using wire ligatures and pulpal exposure over 3 months (diseased sites). The contralateral premolar sites served as healthy controls. The mandibular 4th premolar teeth were then extracted with minimal trauma, followed by careful wound debridement. The animals were sacrificed at days 1, 7, 30, 60, and 90 post-extraction for analysis, and the healing patterns at the healthy and diseased extraction sites were compared using radiography, scanning electron microscopy, histology, and histometry. Results During the first 7 days of healing, a significant presence of inflammatory granulation tissue was noted at the diseased sites (day 1), along with a slightly accelerated rate of fibrin clot resolution on day 7. On day 30, the diseased extraction sites showed a greater percentage of persistent fibrous connective tissue, and an absence of bone marrow formation. In contrast, healthy sites showed initial signs of bone marrow formation on day 30, and subsequently a significantly greater proportion of mature bone marrow formation on both days 60 and 90. Radiographs exhibited sclerotic changes adjoining apical endodontic lesions, with scanning electron microscopy showing collapsed Volkmann canals protruding from these regions in the diseased sites. Furthermore, periodontal ligament fibers exhibited a parallel orientation to the alveolar walls of the diseased sites, in contrast to a perpendicular arrangement in the healthy sites. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it appears that a history of periodontal and endodontic pathology may critically affect bone formation and maturation, leading to delayed and compromised extraction socket

  4. Effect of using Falcaria vulgaris on skin wound healing and immune response of common carp (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nasrin Choobkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are generally used to increase the immune response and wound healing of aquatic animals but due to the residual effects of these drugs, researchers are looking to replace them with natural materials such as medicinal plant extract. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of Falcaria vulgaris on wound healing and enhancement of immune system in common carp (Cyprinus carpio.The effect of Falcaria vulgaris at concentrations of 0, 2 and 10% with Lofag foods used on wound healing, immune response, and weight gain and survival of common carp was investigated during a 21 day period with twice per day feeding on the basis of body weight. The results showed that using Falcaria vulgaris at the 10% concentration had the greatest effect on wound healing, stimulation of the immune system by increasing white blood cells, weight gain and survival of carp in comparison with the control group. This herb can be used in wound healing, increasing resistance to disease and weight gain of common carp.

  5. The role of secreted heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) in wound healing - how could it shape future therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiacong; Chang, Cheng; Li, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Defects in tissue repair or wound healing pose a clinical, economic and social problem worldwide. Despite decades of studies, there have been few effective therapeutic treatments. Areas covered: We discuss the possible reasons for why growth factor therapy did not succeed. We point out the lack of human disorder-relevant animal models as another blockade for therapeutic development. We summarize the recent discovery of secreted heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) as a novel wound healing agent. Expert commentary: Wound healing is a highly complex and multistep process that requires participations of many cell types, extracellular matrices and soluble molecules to work together in a spatial and temporal fashion within the wound microenvironment. The time that wounds remain open directly correlates with the clinical mortality associated with wounds. This time urgency makes the healing process impossible to regenerate back to the unwounded stage, rather forces it to take many shortcuts in order to protect life. Therefore, for therapeutic purpose, it is crucial to identify so-called 'driver genes' for the life-saving phase of wound closure. Keratinocyte-secreted Hsp90α was discovered in 2007 and has shown the promise by overcoming several key hurdles that have blocked the effectiveness of growth factors during wound healing.

  6. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An in vivo comparison of commonly used topical antimicrobials on skin graft healing after full-thickness burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ozan L; Borman, Huseyin; Bahar, Taner; Ertaş, Nilgün M; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Topical antimicrobials are frequently used for local control of infections in burn patients. It has been postulated that these agents retard wound healing. There are limited data about the effects of topical antimicrobial agents on skin graft healing. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of nitrofurazone, 1% silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine on skin graft healing. Forty male rats were used in this study. A meshed skin graft, placed on an excised burn wound, was used as a model to compare topical agents with a control group. Skin graft survival rates, closure of meshed graft interstices (based on physical parameters, namely epithelialization and wound contraction), and histological changes were analyzed. Graft take was more than 85% in all groups. There was no difference between the mean values of the percent graft survival for each group (P > .05). Epithelialization occurred significantly earlier in animals in the nitrofurazone group (P .05). There was no histological difference between the biopsy specimens of skin grafts. In specimens obtained from the interstices of the meshed graft, no significant differences were found among the groups regarding the wound healing parameters (P > .05). We found that nitrofurazone, silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine had no negative effect on graft healing and take in noncontaminated burn wounds.

  8. Human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 improved wound healing in diabetes through its anti-apoptotic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Guojuan; Ren, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Jinglu; Huang, Yanrui; Liu, Dan; Luo, Hengcong; Yang, Chuan; Yan, Li

    2017-09-08

    Impaired wound healing accompanies severe cell apoptosis in diabetic patients. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) was known to have effects on promoting growth and anti-apoptosis for cells. We aimed to determine the actual levels of TIMP-1 and cell apoptosis in: (i) the biopsies of diabetic and non-diabetic foot tissue and (ii) the human fibroblasts with or without treatments of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). Next, we aimed to determine the improved levels of cell apoptosis and wound healing after the treatments of either active protein of TIMP-1 or in vivo expression of gene therapy vector-mediated TIMP-1 in both the human fibroblasts and the animal model of diabetic rats. The levels of TIMP-1 were significantly reduced in diabetic skin tissues and in AGEs-treated fibroblasts. Both AGEs-treated cells were effectively protected from apoptosis by active protein of TIMP-1 at appropriate dose level. So did the induced in vivo TIMP-1 expression after gene delivery. Similar effects were also found on the significant improvement of impaired wound healing in diabetic rats. We concluded that TIMP-1 improved wound healing through its anti-apoptotic effect. Treatments with either active protein TIMP-1 or TIMP-1 gene therapy delivered in local wound sites may be used as a strategy for accelerating diabetic wound healing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of amino acids lysine and arginine on fracture healing in rabbits: A radiological and histomorphological analysis

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    Sinha Shivam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amino acids like arginine and lysine have been suggested to hasten the process of fracture healing by improving the local blood supply, supplementing growth factors, and improving collagen synthesis. We studied the role of lysine and arginine in the fracture repair process with regard to the rate of healing, probable mechanisms involved in the process, and mutual synergism between these agents. Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, 40 rabbits were subjected to ulnar osteotomy. They were distributed in control (14 and test groups (26. Twenty-six animals in the test group were fed with a diet rich in lysine and arginine. Both the groups were followed radiologically and histologically till union. Results: There was better healing of osteotomy in terms of better vascularization, callus formation, and mineralization in the test group. The time of healing in the test group was reduced by a period of 2 weeks. Conclusion: We conclude that amino acids like arginine and lysine may hasten fracture healing.

  10. Dual function of active constituents from bark of Ficus racemosa L in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopage, Nisansala Swarnamali; Kamal Bandara Gunaherath, G M; Jayawardena, Kithsiri Hector; Wijeyaratne, Sushila Chandrani; Abeysekera, Ajita Mahendra; Somaratne, Seneviratne

    2018-01-25

    Different parts including the latex of Ficus racemosa L. has been used as a medicine for wound healing in the Ayurveda and in the indigenous system of medicine in Sri Lanka. This plant has been evaluated for its wound healing potential using animal models. The aim of this study was to obtain an insight into the wound healing process and identify the potential wound healing active substance/s present in F. racemosa L. bark using scratch wound assay (SWA) as the in-vitro assay method. Stem bark extracts of F. racemosa were evaluated using scratch wound assay (SWA) on Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK 21) and Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell lines and Kirby Bauer disc diffusion assay on common bacteria and fungi for cell migration enhancing ability and antimicrobial activity respectively. Dichloromethane and hexanes extracts which showed cell migration enhancement activity on SWA were subjected to bioactivity directed fractionation using column chromatography followed by preparative thin layer chromatography to identify the compounds responsible for the cell migration enhancement activity. Dichloromethane and hexanes extracts showed cell migration enhancement activity on both cell lines, while EtOAc and MeOH extracts showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus and Bacillus species and antifungal activity against Saccharomyces spp. and Candida albicans. Lupeol (1) and β-sitosterol (2) were isolated as the potential wound healing active compounds which exhibited significant cell migration enhancement activity on BHK 21 and MDCK cell lines (> 80%) in par with the positive control, asiaticoside at a concentration of 25 μM. The optimum concentration of each compound required for the maximum wound healing has been determined as 30 μM and 35 μM for 1 and 2 respectively on both cell lines. It is also established that lupeol acetate (3) isolated from the hexanes extract act as a pro-drug by undergoing hydrolysis into lupeol in the vicinity of cells. Different

  11. Heat Transfer in Health and Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-10-01

    Our bodies depend on an exquisitely sensitive and refined temperature control system to maintain a state of health and homeostasis. The exceptionally broad range of physical activities that humans engage in and the diverse array of environmental conditions we face require remarkable strategies and mechanisms for regulating internal and external heat transfer processes. On the occasions for which the body suffers trauma, therapeutic temperature modulation is often the approach of choice for reversing injury and inflammation and launching a cascade of healing. The focus of human thermoregulation is maintenance of the body core temperature within a tight range of values, even as internal rates of energy generation may vary over an order of magnitude, environmental convection, and radiation heat loads may undergo large changes in the absence of any significant personal control, surface insulation may be added or removed, all occurring while the body's internal thermostat follows a diurnal circadian cycle that may be altered by illness and anesthetic agents. An advanced level of understanding of the complex physiological function and control of the human body may be combined with skill in heat transfer analysis and design to develop life-saving and injury-healing medical devices. This paper will describe some of the challenges and conquests the author has experienced related to the practice of heat transfer for maintenance of health and enhancement of healing processes.

  12. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine animal carotenoids from natural product chemistry, metabolism, food chain, and chemosystematic viewpoints, and also describe new structural carotenoids isolated from marine animals over the last decade. PMID:21566799

  13. Animal-assisted therapy at Mayo Clinic: The time is now.

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    Creagan, Edward T; Bauer, Brent A; Thomley, Barbara S; Borg, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    The animal-human bond refers to an emotional, almost existential, relationship between animals and people. From the time of antiquity, domestic animals were an important source of economic vitality, but with the changing cultural landscape, the companion animal has become a faithful friend. Overwhelming anecdotal evidence supports the healing power of this relationship. We summarize the emerging literature on the neurobiochemical and cardiovascular benefits of companion pet ownership. We address the peer-reviewed data from myriad journal articles assessing the impact of the companion animal on the quality and often the length of life of select patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor on rotator cuff healing after injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David; Maerz, Tristan; Kurdziel, Michael; Hein, Joel; Doshi, Shashin; Bedi, Asheesh; Anderson, Kyle; Baker, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    The failure rate of tendon-bone healing after repair of rotator cuff tears remains high. A variety of biologic- and cell-based therapies aimed at improving rotator cuff healing have been investigated, and stem cell-based techniques have become increasingly more common. However, most studies have focused on the implantation of exogenous cells, which introduces higher risk and cost. We aimed to improve rotator cuff healing by inducing endogenous stem cell mobilization with systemic administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We asked: (1) Does G-CSF administration increase local cellularity after acute rotator cuff repair? (2) Is there histologic evidence that G-CSF improved organization at the healing enthesis? (3) Does G-CSF administration improve biomechanical properties of the healing supraspinatus tendon-bone complex? (4) Are there micro-MRI-based observations indicating G-CSF-augmented tendon-bone healing? After creation of full-thickness supraspinatus tendon defects with immediate repair, 52 rats were randomized to control or G-CSF-treated groups. G-CSF was administered for 5 days after repair and rats were euthanized at 12 or 19 postoperative days. Shoulders were subjected to micro-MR imaging, stress relaxation, and load-to-failure as well as blinded histologic and histomorphometric analyses. G-CSF-treated animals had significantly higher cellularity composite scores at 12 and 19 days compared with both control (12 days: 7.40 ± 1.14 [confidence interval {CI}, 5.98-8.81] versus 4.50 ± 0.57 [CI, 3.58-5.41], p = 0.038; 19 days: 8.00 ± 1.00 [CI, 6.75-9.24] versus 5.40 ± 0.89 [CI, 4.28-6.51], p = 0.023) and normal animals (12 days: p = 0.029; 19 days: p = 0.019). There was no significant difference between G-CSF-treated animals or control animals in ultimate stress (MPa) and strain, modulus (MPa), or yield stress (MPa) and strain at either 12 days (p = 1.000, p = 0.104, p = 1.000, p = 0.909, and p = 0.483, respectively) or 19 days (p = 0

  15. Prediction of the time course of callus stiffness as a function of mechanical parameters in experimental rat fracture healing studies--a numerical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Wehner

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental fracture healing studies are performed on rats, in which different experimental, mechanical parameters are applied, thereby prohibiting direct comparison between each other. Numerical fracture healing simulation models are able to predict courses of fracture healing and offer support for pre-planning animal experiments and for post-hoc comparison between outcomes of different in vivo studies. The aims of this study are to adapt a pre-existing fracture healing simulation algorithm for sheep and humans to the rat, to corroborate it using the data of numerous different rat experiments, and to provide healing predictions for future rat experiments. First, material properties of different tissue types involved were adjusted by comparing experimentally measured callus stiffness to respective simulated values obtained in three finite element (FE models. This yielded values for Young's moduli of cortical bone, woven bone, cartilage, and connective tissue of 15,750 MPa, 1,000 MPa, 5 MPa, and 1 MPa, respectively. Next, thresholds in the underlying mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation rules were calibrated by modifying model parameters so that predicted fracture callus stiffness matched experimental data from a study that used rigid and flexible fixators. This resulted in strain thresholds at higher magnitudes than in models for sheep and humans. The resulting numerical model was then used to simulate numerous fracture healing scenarios from literature, showing a considerable mismatch in only 6 of 21 cases. Based on this corroborated model, a fit curve function was derived which predicts the increase of callus stiffness dependent on bodyweight, fixation stiffness, and fracture gap size. By mathematically predicting the time course of the healing process prior to the animal studies, the data presented in this work provides support for planning new fracture healing experiments in rats. Furthermore, it allows one to transfer and

  16. Carotenoids in Marine Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Maoka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Marine animals contain various carotenoids that show structural diversity. These marine animals accumulate carotenoids from foods such as algae and other animals and modify them through metabolic reactions. Many of the carotenoids present in marine animals are metabolites of β-carotene, fucoxanthin, peridinin, diatoxanthin, alloxanthin, and astaxanthin, etc. Carotenoids found in these animals provide the food chain as well as metabolic pathways. In the present review, I will describe marine a...

  17. Ethics in Animal Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ergun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Experimental animals are frequently used to obtain information for primarily scientific reasons. In the present review, ethics in animal experimentation is examined. At first, the history of animal experimentation and animal rights is outlined. Thereafter, the terms in relation with the topic are defined. Finally, prominent aspects of 3Rs constituting scientific and ethical basis in animal experimentation are underlined. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(4.000: 220-235

  18. Animal experiments in radiotherapy. II. Large animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Probert, J C; Hughes, D B

    1975-03-01

    A review has been made of factors of importance when using large animals for organ or partial body irradiation research. The problem has been considered from the viewpoint of the clinician. The rabbit, cat, dog, pig and monkey have been examined in detail for suitability as laboratory animals. Dosimetric and volume features have been reviewed.

  19. Dendritic cells modulate burn wound healing by enhancing early proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinish, Monika; Cui, Weihua; Stafford, Eboni; Bae, Leon; Hawkins, Hal; Cox, Robert; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Adequate wound healing is vital for burn patients to reduce the risk of infections and prolonged hospitalization. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells that release cytokines and are central for the activation of innate and acquired immune responses. Studies have showed their presence in human burn wounds; however, their role in burn wound healing remains to be determined. This study investigated the role of DCs in modulating healing responses within the burn wound. A murine model of full-thickness contact burns was used to study wound healing in the absence of DCs (CD11c promoter-driven diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice) and in a DC-rich environment (using fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand, FL- a DC growth factor). Wound closure was significantly delayed in DC-deficient mice and was associated with significant suppression of early cellular proliferation, granulation tissue formation, wound levels of TGFβ1 and formation of CD31+ vessels in healing wounds. In contrast, DC enhancement significantly accelerated early wound closure, associated with increased and accelerated cellular proliferation, granulation tissue formation, and increased TGFβ1 levels and CD31+ vessels in healing wounds. We conclude that DCs play an important role in the acceleration of early wound healing events, likely by secreting factors that trigger the proliferation of cells that mediate wound healing. Therefore, pharmacological enhancement of DCs may provide a therapeutic intervention to facilitate healing of burn wounds. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. Bioengineering methods employed in the study of wound healing of sulphur mustard burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, John S; Schomacker, Kevin T; Glatter, Robert D; Briscoe, Crystal M; Braue, Ernest H; Squibb, Katherine S

    2002-02-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a potent incapacitating chemical warfare agent that remains a threat to war fighters and civilians worldwide. SM lesions may require weeks or months to heal, depending upon their severity. This study was undertaken to find a treatment regimen that promotes speedier healing of deep cutaneous SM burns in a weanling pig model. The principal objective of the study was to compare four treatment regimens and establish which achieved the shortest healing time. Twelve Yorkshire Cross weanling pigs were exposed to SM liquid for 2h, generating six large deep dermal/full thickness burns on the ventrum of each animal. Three additional animals served as sham-exposed controls. Surgical intervention occurred at 48 h postexposure. Treatments included: (i) full-thickness debridement of the burns with a computer controlled, raster scanned continuous wave CO2 laser followed by autologous split-thickness skin grafting; (ii) full-thickness sharp surgical tangential excision followed by skin grafting, the 'Gold Standard' used in human deep dermal/full-thickness thermal burns management; (iii) partial-thickness laser ablation with no grafting; and (iv) partial-thickness sharp surgical excision with no grafting. Several non-invasive bioengineering methods were used to monitor the progress of wound healing throughout a 36-day healing period: reflectance colourimetry, evaporimetry, laser Doppler perfusion imaging and ballistometry. Bioengineering methods indicated that laser debridement followed by autologous split-thickness skin grafting was as efficacious in improving the wound healing of deep SM burns in weanling swine as the 'Gold Standard.' Regardless of the method of debridement, barrier function, skin colour and mechanical properties returned to near-normal levels within 15 days of treatment in the grafted sites. Regardless of surgical approach, blood flux levels remained approximately 50-60% of normal tissue throughout the 36-day postsurgical observation