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Sample records for head-end reprocessing studies

  1. Study of pneumatic hydropulse filter for feed clarification in reprocessing plant head-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, I.A.; Shah, B.V.; Salunke, S.U.; Kumar, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    A Pneumatic Hydropulse (PHP) Filter with sintered stainless steel cartridges was tested for suitability in reprocessing plant head-end filtration. The filter was tested with simulated slurry containing between 25 and 400 ppm of calcium carbonate particulates in the size ranges 45 to 53 micron and 53 to 75 micron at varying flow rates. Procedures were developed for dislodging the layer of solids on the cartidridges and regenerating the filter remotely. Application of 5.4 kg/cm 2 air to the dome of the filter during regenaration was found to be optimum for dislodging the particulate layer on the cartridges. No difficulties due to choking of the filter cartridges were experienced during operation and good regeneration by remote operation was possible. Approach velocity at the filter medium was about 6 cm/min. The efficiency of regeneration was better than 90%. Filtration efficiency was found to be better than 90%. Solid loading capacity was found to increase with increase of particle size and feed concentration. (author). 2 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Studies relating to construction materials to be used in different options for head end treatment in reprocessing of mixed carbide fuel of plutonium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, S.K.; Palamalai, A.; Ravi, T.N.; Sampath, M.; Raman, V.R.; Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed carbide of uranium and plutonium has been chosen as the fuel for the first core of Fast Breeder Test Reactor, installed in the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research. Reprocessing of this fuel is one of the vital steps to prove the viability of the fuel cycle. The head end treatment process introduces constraints in the reprocessing of carbide fuel when compared to the commonly used mixed oxide fuel. Three head end processes, namely direct oxidation, pyrohydrolysis and direct dissolution in nitric acid with oxidation of organic acids were considered for study for exercising the choice. The paper briefly describes the three processes. In each process probable material of construction and related problems are discussed. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  3. Head-end process technology for the new reprocessing plants in France and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudray, D.; Hugelmann, D.; Cho, A.

    1991-01-01

    Major technological innovations brought to the new UP3 and UP2-800 reprocessing plants of COGEMA LA HAGUE and also to the JNFS ROKKASHO plant concern the head-end process. The continuous process designed allows for high throughputs whilst meeting stringent safety requirements. The head-end of each plant includes two lines for each operation in order to guarantee availability. This paper presents the T1 head-end facility of the UP3 plant as well as the few adaptations implemented in the ROKKASHO Reprocessing Plant to fulfill the particular design requirements in Japan

  4. Head-end reprocessing equipment remote maintenance demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.H.; Metz, C.F. III.

    1989-01-01

    Prototype equipment for reprocessing breeder reactor nuclear fuel was installed in the Remote Operation and Maintenance Demonstration (ROMD) area of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in order to evaluate the design of this equipment in a cold mock-up of a remotely maintained hot cell. This equipment included the Remote Disassembly System (RDS) and the Remote Shear System (RSS). These systems were disassembled and reassembled remotely by using the extensive remote handling systems that are installed in this simulated hot-cell environment. 5 refs., 5 figs

  5. Treatment of the off-gas stream from the HTR reprocessing head-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.; Juergens, B.; Vijgen, H.

    1985-01-01

    The AKUT II-facility (nominal throughput 10 m 3 /h, STP) for the clean-up of the burner off-gas has been operated for 20 cold runs in parallel to the JUPITER reprocessing head-end. Two of these runs were continuous operation tests with a duration of 50 and 80 hours, respectively. The facility met or exceeded all design specifications. In a further test series the distillation column alone was run with pure CO 2 and two- and three-component gas mixtures to determine the flooding curves and the stage height (HETP)

  6. Characterization of the head end cells at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, R.F.

    1986-11-01

    The head-end cells at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant are characterized in this report. These cells consist of the Process Mechanical Cell (PMC) where irradiated nuclear fuel was trimmed of excess hardware and sheared into short segments; and the General Purpose Cell (GPC) where the segments were collected and stored prior to dissolution, and leached hulls were packaged for disposal. Between 1966 and 1972, while Nuclear Fuels Services operated the plant, these cells became highly contaminated with radioactive materials. The purpose of this characterization work was to develop technical information as a basis of decontamination and decommissioning planning and engineering. It was accomplished by performing remote in-cell visual examinations, radiation surveys, and sampling. Supplementary information was obtained from available written records, out-of-cell inspections, and interviews with plant personnel

  7. Costs of head-end incineration with respect to Kr separation in the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnert-Wiemer, H.; Boehnert, R.

    1976-07-15

    The C-incinerations and the Kr-separations during head-end incineration in the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements are described. The costs for constructing an operating a head-end incineration of reprocessing capacities with 5,000 to 50,000 MW(e)-HTR power have been determined. The cost estimates are divided into investment and operating costs, further after the fraction of the N/sub 2/-content in the incineration exhaust gas, which strongly affects costs. It appears that, in the case of Kr-separation from the incineration exhaust gas, the investment costs as well as the operating costs of the head-end for N/sub 2/-containing exhaust gas are considerably greater than those for gas without N/sub 2/. The C-incineration of the graphite of the HTR fuel elements should therefore only be performed with influx gas that is free of N/sub 2/.

  8. Head-end iodine removal from a reprocessing plant with a solid sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.; Furrer, J.; Schultes, E.

    1976-01-01

    In the first large-scale reprocessing plant planned in the Federal Republic of Germany a total amount of 580 kg of iodine per annum will be released in the fuel dissolution process for a maximum heavy metal throughput of 1800 tons per year and 40,000 MWd/t of burnup. The main portion of the iodine is formed by the 129 I (T/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10 7 a) isotope of which 82 Ci at the maximum are released every year. With the scheduled fuel element storage time of greater than or equal to 220 d the simultaneous release of 131 I is less than or equal to 12.5 Ci the mass of which does not play any part. According to the computer model presently imposed in the Federal Republic of Germany for treatment of the environmental impact by radioiodine, a total decontamination factor of 340 must be attained. This implies a long-term diffusion factor of 1 x 10 -7 s/m 3 for releases via the stack of the reprocessing plant and a limit value of 50 mrem/a at the maximum for the thyroid dose to the critical group of the population via the ingestion path. The flowsheet for dissolver off-gas cleaning in a reprocessing plant employing solid iodine sorption material and the arrangement of filter components are discussed. The principle of an iodine sorption filter is described which allows exhaustive loading of the iodine sorption material. The removal reactions of different organic iodine compounds and the loading capacity and removal efficiency of the iodine sorption material in the original dissolver off-gases of reprocessing plants are indicated. Studies on the influence of filter poisons are reported.Operating experience gathered with a first iodine sorption filter in operation is discussed; this filter has been used to remove practically all iodine produced in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Pilot Plant (WAK). Direct measurement of 129 I in samples of filter material using a low energy photon spectrometer is briefly reported

  9. Aerosol and iodine removal from the head-end offgas of a reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, J.; Wilhelm, J.C.

    The offgases of a reprocessing facility must be cleaned, removing liquid and solid suspended matter, gaseous iodine and ruthenium (in the form of RuO 4 ), and the noble gases and tritium. Suspended particulates which call for radiation protection are those radioisotopes like the actinides Pu, Am, and Cm, and other radioisotopes such as 134 Cs, 137 Cs, 89 Sr, 90 Sr and 144 Ce

  10. Recent studies related to head-end fuel processing at the Hanford PUREX plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of studies addressing several problems in the head-end processing (decladding, metathesis, and core dissolution) of N Reactor fuel elements in the Hanford PUREX plant. These studies were conducted over 2 years: FY 1986 and FY 1987. The studies were divided into three major areas: 1) differences in head-end behavior of fuels having different histories, 2) suppression of /sup 106/Ru volatilization when the ammonia scrubber solution resulting from decladding is decontaminated by distillation prior to being discharged, and 3) suitability of flocculating agents for lowering the amount of transuranic (TRU) element-containing solids that accompany the decladding solution to waste. 16 refs., 43 figs.

  11. VENUS: cold prototype installation of the head-end of the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements. Activity report, 1 July 1976--31 December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehnert, R.; Walter, C.

    The purpose of the VENUS Project is advance planning for the construction of a cold prototype system to incinerate HTR fuel element graphite. The Venus Project is organized into four phases between advance planning and experimental operation, corresponding to the maturity of the work. It is in the advance planning phase. Status of individual studies is given

  12. VENUS: cold prototype installation of the head-end of the reprocessing of HTR fuel elements. Activity report, 1 July 1976--31 December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnert, R.; Walter, C.

    1977-02-15

    The purpose of the VENUS Project is advance planning for the construction of a cold prototype system to incinerate HTR fuel element graphite. The Venus Project is organized into four phases between advance planning and experimental operation, corresponding to the maturity of the work. It is in the advance planning phase. Status of individual studies is given. (LK)

  13. Contribution in reprocessing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, P.G.V. de.

    1973-01-01

    Gamma radiation effect on extraction coefficient of ruthenium by pure TBP is studied. Samples of ruthenium in different concentrations of HNO 3 were irradiated. Extraction coefficient is found by measuring gamma activity of 498 keV of 103 Ru from organic and aqueous phases. Extraction coefficient in such conditions depends on the radiation doses. There is an increase in the coefficient of the acid. However the saturation velocity is proportional to HNO 3 concentration. The variations of the extraction coefficient due to HNO 3 radiolysis which gives HNO 2 as a result is presented [pt

  14. Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, J.; Rougeau, J.-P.

    1987-01-01

    The course of development of a comprehensive nuclear power industry has its own pace which implies the timely progressive and consistent mastery of each industrial step. In the nuclear fuel it is not surprising that the back-end services have lastly reached the industrial stage. In France, we have now fully completed the industrial demonstration of the closed fuel cycle. Our experience covers all necessary steps : transportation of spent fuel, storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, recovered uranium recycling, plutonium recycling in thermal MOX fuels, plutonium-based fuel for FBR. While FBR development is a long term target, recycling of fissile materials in present LWR reactors appears to be a source of noticable savings. In the meantime rational management of waste material is the key for increased safety and better environment protection. Reprocessing activity is certainly the major achievement of the back-end strategy. The proven efficiency of this technique as it is implemented at La Hague facility gives the full assurance of a smooth operation of the under completion UP3 unit. The base-load management system which applies during the first ten years of its operation will make possible a noticable reduction of the commercial price for reprocessing services by the end of the century. Industrial maturity being confirmed, economic maturity is now the outstanding merit of the reprocessing and recycling strategy. It is a permanent challenge, to which the response is definitely positive in the sense of reducing the nuclear KWh production cost. (author)

  15. Technical study report on reprocessing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kawamura, Fumio

    2000-07-01

    The feasibility studies on commercialized fast breeder reactor (FBR) recycle system, in which reactor system and recycle technologies are related on consideration, are performed considering the attainable perspectives for the followings: ensuring safety, economic competitiveness to future LWRs, efficient utilization of resources, reduction of environmental burden, and enhancement of nuclear non-proliferation. In the studies of Reprocessing system of FBR, evaluation was made for the non-aqueous reprocessing of pyrochemical and fluoride volatility process and also for the aqueous reprocessing with a view to streamlining. As a result, it was estimated that each system has prospects of coming into practical use in terms of technique. In the economical efficiency assessment, it was estimated to have economic competitiveness to future LWRs. And the technical research items of each system are picked out. Hereafter, more detail design study will be performed for each system. (author)

  16. Reprocessing of ''fast'' fuel in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauteron, J.; Bourgeois, M.; Le Bouhellec, J.; Miquel, P.

    1976-05-01

    The results of laboratory studies as well as pilot testing (AT-I La Hague, Marcoule, Fontenay-aux-Roses) in reprocessing of fast breeder reactor fuels are described. The paper covers all steps: head end, aqueous and fluoride volatility processes, and waste treatment. In conclusion, it is demonstrated why it is still too early to define a strategy of industrial reprocessing for this reactor type

  17. Selected studies in HTGR reprocessing development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1976-03-01

    Recent work at ORNL on hot cell studies, off-gas cleanup, and waste handling is reviewed. The work includes small-scale burning tests with irradiated fuels to study fission product release, development of the KALC process for the removal of 85 Kr from a CO 2 stream, preliminary work on a nonfluidized bed burner, solvent extraction studies including computer modeling, characterization of reprocessing wastes, and initiation of a development program for the fixation of 14 C as CaCO 3

  18. A Preliminary Shielding Study on the Integrated Operation Verification System in the Head-End Hot-Cell of the Pyro-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinhwam; Kim, Yewon; Park, Se-Hwan; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Cho, Gyuseong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear power accounts for more than 30 percent of power production in Korea. Its significance has annually been increased. Disposal spent fuel containing uranium, transuranic elements, and fission products is unavoidable byproduct of nuclear power production. it is recognized that finding appropriate sites for interim storage of disposal spent fuel is not easy because isolated sites should be required. Pyro-processing technology, Pyro-processing should be operated under high radiation environment in hot-cell structures. Because of this reason, all workers should be unauthorized to access inside the hot-cell areas under any circumstances except for acceptable dose verification and a normal operation should be remotely manipulated. For the reliable normal operation of pyroprocessing, it is noted that an evaluation of the space dose distribution in the hot-cell environments is necessary in advance in order to determine which technologies or instruments can be utilized on or near the process as the Integrated Operation Verification System (IOVS) is measured. Not like the electroreduction and electro-refining hot-cells, the head-end hot-cell equips Camera Radiation Detector (CRD) in which plutonium is securely measured and monitored for the safeguard of the pyro-processing. Results have been obtained using F2 surface tally in order to observe the magnitude of the gamma-ray and neutron flux which pass through the surface of the process cell. Furthermore, T-mesh tally has also been used to obtain the space dose distribution in the headend hot-cell. The hot-cell was divided into 7,668 cells in which each dimension was 1 x 1 x 1m for the T-mesh tally. To determine the position of the CRD and the surveillance camera, divergent approaches were required. Because the purpose of the CRD which contains a gamma-ray detector and a neutron detector is to identify the material composition as the process proceeds, the position in which detectable flux is exposed is required, whereas

  19. Study of assessing aqueous reprocessing process for the pipeless reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Masatoshi; Morioka, Nobuo; Fumoto, Hiromichi; Nishimura, Kenji; Chikazawa, Takahiro

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of new reprocessing process for the purpose of introducing pipeless plant concept, where aqueous separation methods other than solvent extraction method are adopted in order to develop more economical FBR fuel (MOX fuel) reprocessing process. At it's first stage, literature survey on precipitation method, crystallization method and ion-exchange method was performed. Based on the results, following processes were candidated for pipeless reprocessing plant. (1) The process adopting crystallization method and peroxide precipitation method (2) The process adopting oxalate precipitation method (3) The process under mild aqueous conditions (crystallization method and precipitation method) (4) The process adopting crystallization method and ion-exchange method (5) The process adopting crystallization method and solvent extraction method. The processes (1)-(5) were compared with each others in terms of competitiveness to the conventional reference process, and merits and demerits were evaluated from the viewpoint of applicability to pipeless reprocessing plant, safety, economy, Efficiencies in consumption of Resources, non-proliferation, and, Operation and Maintenance. As a result, (1) The process adopting crystallization method and peroxide precipitation method was selected as the most reasonable process to pipeless plant. Preliminary criticality safety analyses, main process chemical flowsheet, main equipment list and layout of mobile vessels and stations were reported for the (1) process. (author)

  20. Study on remain actinides recovery in pyro reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharto, Bambang

    1996-01-01

    The spent fuel reprocessing by dry process called pyro reprocessing have been studied. Most of U, Pu and MA (minor actinides) from the spent fuel will be recovered and be fed back to the reactor as new fuel. Accumulation of remain actinides will be separated by extraction process with liquid cadmium solvent. The research was conducted by computer simulation to calculate the stage number required. The calculation's results showed on the 20 stages extractor more than 99% actinides can be separated. (author)

  1. Waste Minimization Study on Pyrochemical Reprocessing Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussier, H.; Conocar, O.; Lacquement, J.

    2006-01-01

    Ideally a new pyro-process should not generate more waste, and should be at least as safe and cost effective as the hydrometallurgical processes currently implemented at industrial scale. This paper describes the thought process, the methodology and some results obtained by process integration studies to devise potential pyro-processes and to assess their capability of achieving this challenging objective. As example the assessment of a process based on salt/metal reductive extraction, designed for the reprocessing of Generation IV carbide spent fuels, is developed. Salt/metal reductive extraction uses the capability of some metals, aluminum in this case, to selectively reduce actinide fluorides previously dissolved in a fluoride salt bath. The reduced actinides enter the metal phase from which they are subsequently recovered; the fission products remain in the salt phase. In fact, the process is not so simple, as it requires upstream and downstream subsidiary steps. All these process steps generate secondary waste flows representing sources of actinide leakage and/or FP discharge. In aqueous processes the main solvent (nitric acid solution) has a low boiling point and evaporate easily or can be removed by distillation, thereby leaving limited flow containing the dissolved substance behind to be incorporated in a confinement matrix. From the point of view of waste generation, one main handicap of molten salt processes, is that the saline phase (fluoride in our case) used as solvent is of same nature than the solutes (radionuclides fluorides) and has a quite high boiling point. So it is not so easy, than it is with aqueous solutions, to separate solvent and solutes in order to confine only radioactive material and limit the final waste flows. Starting from the initial block diagram devised two years ago, the paper shows how process integration studies were able to propose process fittings which lead to a reduction of the waste variety and flows leading at an 'ideal

  2. Solvent distillations studies for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1989-01-01

    The substantial amounts of solvent used in large reprocessing plants are such that considerable care must be paid to solvent management to limit the production of organic wastes. The installation of intensive treatment by chemical regeneration serves to increase the service life of the solvent. General solvent management, combined with a distillation unit under reduced pressure also helps to recycle the two components of the solvent at a low activity level. Distillation also serves to remove the heavy degradation products that are generally responsible for poor hydraulic behavior and for the holdup of radioactive products such as plutonium, zirconium and ruthenium. From the safety standpoint, the flashpoint of the distilled diluent tends to rise. It can therefore be recycled without risk

  3. Research and development of FBR fuel reprocessing in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, T.

    1976-05-01

    The research program of the PNC for FBR fuel reprocessing in Japan is discussed. The general characteristics of FBR fuel reprocessing are pointed out and a comparison with LWR fuel is made. The R and D program is based on reprocessing using the aqueous Purex process. So far, some preliminary steps of the research program have been carried out, these include solvent extraction test, off-gas treatment test, voloxidation process study, solidification test of high-level liquid waste, and study of the dissolution behaviour of irradiated mixed oxide fuel. By the end of the 1980s, a pilot plant for FBR fuel reprocessing will be completed. For the design of the pilot plant, further research will be carried out in the following fields: head-end techniques; voloxidation process; dissolution and extraction techniques; waste treatment techniques. A time schedule for the different steps of the program is included

  4. Report of the study grou: Data Processing in Reprocessing Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A study group to examine Data Processing in Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plants was created at the request of the Head of Productions and entrusted to the Director of the La Hague Centre. The groupe was made up of engineers working in different fields: piloting, architecture, building outfits, services etc. To begin with the group examined the solutions proposed by the La Hague Centre for the replacement of data processing units in service at the time but too old and unreliable to meet the safety rules laid down. Secondly, as a contribution towards France's heritage in the fuel reprocessing field, the group investigated systems and configurations for possible application to the equipment of future plants. The results of these studies were submitted in January 1974 [fr

  5. Spent fuel reprocessing system availability definition by process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Haldy, B.B.; Jonzen, M.

    1978-05-01

    To examine nuclear fuel reprocessing plant operating parameters such as maintainability, reliability, availability, equipment redundancy, and surge storage requirements and their effect on plant throughput, a computer simulation model of integrated HTGR fuel reprocessing plant operations is being developed at General Atomic Company (GA). The simulation methodology and the status of the computer programming completed on reprocessing head end systems is reported

  6. General Atomic reprocessing pilot plant: description and results of initial testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    In June 1976 General Atomic completed the construction of a reprocessing head-end cold pilot plant. In the year since then, each system within the head end has been used for experiments which have qualified the designs. This report describes the equipment in the plant and summarizes the results of the initial phase of reprocessing testing

  7. The need to study of bounding accident in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Satoshi; Fujita, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear consensus that the severe accident corresponds to the core damage accident for power reactors. On the other hand, for FCFs, there is no clear consensus on what is the accident to assess the safety in the region of beyond design basis, or what is the accident which has very low probability but large consequence. The need to examine a bounding consequence of each type of accident is explained to advance the rationality of safety management and regulation and, as a result, to reinforce the safety of a reprocessing plant. The likelihood of occurrence of an accident causing a bounding consequence should correspond to that of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant. The bounding consequence will be derived using the deterministic method and sound engineering judgment supplemented by the probabilistic method. Once an agreement on such a concept is reached among regulators, operators and related experts it will help to provide a solid basis to ensure the safety of a reprocessing plant independent of that of a nuclear power plant. In this paper, we show a preliminary risk profile of RRP calculated by QSA (Quantitative Safety Assessment) which JNFL developed. The profile shows that bounding consequences of various accidents in a range of occurrence frequency corresponding to a severe accident at a nuclear power plant. And we find that the bounding consequence of high-level liquid waste boiling is the largest among all in this range. Therefore, the risk of this event is shown in this paper as an example. To build a common consensus about bounding accidents among concerned parties will encourage regulatory body to introduce such an idea for more effective regulation with scientific rationality. Additionally the study of bounding accidents can contribute to substantial development for accident management strategy as reprocessing operators. (authors)

  8. Consolidated Reprocessing Progam. Quarterly progress report ending February 28, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This publication continues the quarterly series presenting results of work performed under the Consolidated Reprocessing Program at General Atomic Company. Results of work on this program prior to June 1974 were included in a quarterly series on the HTGR Base Program. The work reported includes the development of unit processes and equipment for reprocessing of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) fuel, the design and development of an integrated pilot line to demonstrate the head end of HTGR reprocessing using unirradiated fuel materials, and design work in support of Hot Engineering Tests (HET). Work is also described on trade-off studies concerning the required design of facilities and equipment for the large-scale recycle of HTGR fuels in order to guide the development activities for HTGR fuel recycle

  9. Mechanical splicing of superelastic Cu–Al–Mn alloy bars with headed ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, S.; Mohebbi, A.; Saiidi, M. S.; Omori, T.; Kainuma, R.; Shrestha, K. C.; Araki, Y.

    2018-06-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of mechanical splicing using a steel coupler to connect headed ends of superelastic Cu–Al–Mn alloy (Camalloy) bars and steel reinforcing bars to be used in concrete structures. Although threading of Camalloy is as easy as that of steel, mechanical splicing using threaded ends requires machining of Camalloy bars into dog-bone shape to avoid brittle fracture at the threaded ends. The machining process requires significant time and cost and wastes substantial amount of the material. This paper attempts to resolve this issue by applying mechanical splicing using steel couplers to connect headed ends of Camalloy and steel reinforcing bars. To study its feasibility, we prepare 3 specimens wherein both ends of each Camalloy bar (13 mm diameter and 300 mm length) are connected to steel reinforcing bars. The specimens are tested under monotonic, single-cycle, and full-cycle tension loading conditions. From these tests, we observed (1) excellent superelasticity with recoverable strain of around 6% and (2) large ductility with fracture strain of over 19%. It should be emphasized here that, in all the specimens, ductile fracture occurred at the locations apart from the headed ends. This is in sharp contrast with brittle fracture of headed superelastic Ni–Ti SMA bars, most of which took place around the headed ends. From the results of the microstructural analysis, we identified the following reasons for avoiding brittle fracture at the headed ends: (1) Precipitation hardening increases the strength around the boundary between the straight and headed (tapered) portions, where stress concentration takes place. (2) The strength of the straight portion does not increase significantly up to the ductile fracture if its grain orientation is close to 〈0 0 1〉.

  10. Feasibility study for adapting ITREC plant to reprocessing LMFBR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moccia, A.; Rolandi, G.

    1976-05-01

    The report evaluates the feasibility of adapting ITREC plant to the reprocessing LMFBR fuels, with the double purpose of: 1) recovering valuable Pu contained in these fuels and recycling it to the fabrication plant; 2) trying, on a pilot scale, the chemical process technology to be applied in a future industrial plant for reprocessing the fuel elements discharged from fast breeder power reactors

  11. Fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing R and D: technological development for a commercial plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, J.; Saudray, D.; Coste, J.A.; Roux, J.P.; Jouan, A.

    1987-01-01

    The technological developments undertaken by the CEA are applied to a plant project of a 50 t/y capacity, having to reprocess in particular the SUPERPHENIX 1 reactor fuel. French experience on fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing is presented, then the 50 t/y capacity plant project and the research and development installations. The R and D programs are described, concerning: head-end operations, solvent extractions, Pu02 conversion and storage, out-of-specification Pu02 redissolution, fission products solution vitrification, conditioning of stainless steel hulls by melting, development of remote operation equipments, study of corrosion and analytical problems

  12. Studies on application on airlift in fuel reprocessing engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.; Balasubramanian, G.R.; Ranganathan, K.

    1977-01-01

    The experiments have been conducted to study the possibility of using airlift for: (1) metering the radioactive fluids by metering the prime air used and (2) transport of these fluids. It is found that airlift can be used for metering directly or a part of a metering system. It can transport radioactive fluids e.g. concentrated plutonium solutions. It can be adopted to transfer completely solutions between tanks at the same level. The problem of entrainment of liquid by air can be sufficiently reduced by introducing suitable de-entrainers. The major advantage is the absence of any moving parts and its wider flow rate ranges. It is, thus, a valuable tool for a fuel reprocessing engineer. (M.G.B.)

  13. Engineering study: Fast Flux Test Facility fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beary, M.M.; Raab, G.J.; Reynolds, W.R. Jr.; Yoder, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    Several alternatives were studied for reprocessing FFTF fuels at Hanford. Alternative I would be to decontaminate and trim the fuel at T Plant and electrolytically dissolve the fuel at Purex. Alternative II would be to decontaminate and shear leach the fuels in a new facility near Purex. Alternative III would be to decontaminate and store fuel elements indefinitely at T Plant for subsequent offsite shipment. Alternative I, 8 to 10 M$ and 13 quarter-years; for Alternative II, 24 to 28 M$ and 20 quarter-years; for Alternative III, 3 to 4 M$ and 8 quarter-years. Unless there is considerable slippage in the FFTF shipping schedule, it would not be possible to build a new facility as described in Alternative II in time without building temporary storage facilities at T Plant, as described in Alternative III

  14. The life prediction study of Rokkasho reprocessing plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Yano, M.; Takizawa, M.; Shibata, S.

    1998-01-01

    The life prediction study of major equipment materials used in heavily corrosive nitric acid solutions of the RRP was carried out. The nitric acid recovery made of type 304ULC austenitic steel and the dissolver made of type 705 metallic zirconium are selected on the present study. This study is composed of major three programs, namely, the mock-up tests by small-sized equipments simulated to the practical design, laboratory tests for examining corrosion controlling factors by small specimens and to establish the data base system for the life prediction. Important parameters on this study was extracted with analyzing the past data of the life prediction on the Tokai reprocessing equipments. The mock-ups design was made by considering the quantitative evaluation of the most important parts on objective equipments, namely, heat conducting tubes in an acid recovery evaporator and a thermal jacket in a dissolver. From pre-examinations, the effects of radioactive species, nitric acid solution chemistry, the corrosion mechanisms were elucidated. Mock-up testing conditions corrosion monitoring methods and a data base concept for the the life prediction were selected from pre-examination data by referencing the plant operation planning. (author)

  15. Reprocessing decision: a study in policymaking under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The U.S. reprocessing decision is examined in this thesis. Decision analysis is applied to develop a rational framework for the assessment of policy alternatives. Benefits and costs for each alternative are evaluated and compared in dollar terms to determine the optimal decision. A fuel cycle simulation model is constructed to assess the economic value of reprocessing light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and recycling plutonium. In addition, a dynamic fuel substitution model is used to estimate the economic effects of the reprocessing decision's influence on the introduction date of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Risks estimated in dollar terms for comparison with the economic values include those related to health, the environment and safety, nuclear theft and sabotage, and nuclear proliferation

  16. Pyrochemical head-end treatment for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A program based upon thermodynamic values and scouting experiments at Argonne National Laboratory is proposed for development of a pyrochemical head-end treatment of spent nuclear fuels to replace the proposed chopping and leaching operation in the Purex process. The treatment consists of separation of the cladding from the oxide fuel by dissolution into liquid zinc; oxide reduction of uranium and plutonium and dissolution into a zinc--magnesium alloy; separation of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products into a molten salt; and, finally, separation and recovery of the plutonium and uranium in the alloy. Uranium and plutonium would be separated from the fuel cladding and selected fission products in a form readily dissolvable in nitric acid. The head-end process could be developed eventually into an optimum method for recovering uranium, plutonium, and selected fission products and for minimizing wastes as compact, stable solids. Developmental expenses are not known clearly, but the potential advantages of the process are impressive

  17. Coupled study of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor core physics and its associated reprocessing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doligez, X.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Allibert, M.; Ghetta, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The limit on the reprocessing is due to the redox potential control. • Alkali and Earth-alkaline elements do not have to be extracted. • Criticality risks have to be studied in the reprocessing unit. • The neutronics properties are not sensitive to chemical data. • The reprocessing chemistry, from a pure numerical point of view, is an issue. - Abstract: Molten Salt Reactors (MSRs) are liquid-fuel reactors, in which the fuel is also the coolant and flows through the core. A particular configuration presented in this paper called the Molten Salt Fast Reactor consists in a Molten Salt Reactor with no moderator inside the core and a salt composition that leads to a fast neutron spectrum. Previous studies showed that this concept (previously called Thorium Molten Salt Reactor – Nonmoderated) has very promising characteristics. The liquid fuel implies a special reprocessing. Each day a small amount of the fuel salt is extracted from the core for on-site reprocessing. To study such a reactor, the materials evolution within the core has to be coupled to the reprocessing unit, since the latter cleans the salt quasi continuously and feeds the reactor. This paper details the issues associated to the numerical coupling of the core and the reprocessing. It presents how the chemistry is introduced inside the classical Bateman equation (evolution of nuclei within a neutron flux) in order to carry a numerical coupled study. To achieve this goal, the chemistry has to be modeled numerically and integrated to the equations of evolution. This paper presents how is it possible to describe the whole concept (reactor + reprocessing unit) by a system of equations that can be numerically solved. Our program is a connection between MCNP and a homemade evolution code called REM. Thanks to this tool; constraints on the fuel reprocessing were identified. Limits are specified to preserve the good neutronics properties of the MSFR. In this paper, we show that the limit

  18. Solvent distillation studies for a purex reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1990-01-01

    A distillation system has been developed for regeneration of Purex solvent and will be implemented for the first time in a reprocessing plant. The results are described and analyzed, with emphasis on laboratory experiments which were made with a radioactive plant solvent. Particularly the distillation provides a good separation of solvent degradation products, which was verified by measurements of interfacial tension and plutonium or ruthenium retention. 16 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Why reprocess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of whether to reprocess spent nuclear fuel elements has been studied already in the early days of the commercial utilization of nuclear power and has been answered positively. This also, and in particular, applies to the United States. Under the new American nuclear policy reprocessing is rejected only for reasons of non-proliferation. Although these are valid reasons, the effectiveness of a ban on reprocessing, as fas as the non-profileration of nuclear weapons is concerned, is not accepted worldwide because the necessary knowledge either already exists in many countries or can be obtained. Only if there had been a realistic chance to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons, also the other industrialized countries would have seconded the policy of the United States. A country like the Federal Republic of Germany, with a substantial long-term nuclear power program based initially on light water reactors, subsequently on advanced reactor systems, cannot do without a complete nuclear fuel cycle. This reasoning is outlined in the light of economic and radioecological aspects. Extensive experience on a technical scale is available in the reprocessing sector. The technical problems associated with this activity have been solved in principle and have largely been demonstrated to function in practice. (orig.) [de

  20. Economic feasibility study of regional centers for nuclear fuel reprocessing in the developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakeshloo, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel cycle costs for the following three different economic alternatives were studied: (1) Reprocessing in an industrialized country (such as the U.S.); (2) Reprocessing in the individual developing country; (3) Reprocessing in a regional center. The nuclear fuel cycle cost for the ''Throw-away'' fuel cycle was evaluated. Among the six regions which were considered in this study, region one (South America including Mexico) was selected for the economic analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle for the above three alternatives. For evaluation of the cases where the fuel is reprocessed in a regional center or in an individual developing country, a unit reprocessing cost equation was developed. An economic evaluation was developed to estimate the least expensive method for transporting radioactive nuclear material by either leased or purchased shipping casks. The necessary equations were also developed for estimating plutonium transportation and the safeguard costs. On the basis of nuclear material and services requirements and unit costs for each component, the levelized nuclear fuel cycle costs for each alternative were estimated. Finally, by a comparison of cost, among these three alternatives plus the ''Throw-away'' case,it was found that it is not at all economical to build individual reprocessing plants inside the developing countries in region one. However, it also was found that the economic advantage of a regional center with respect to the first alternative is less than a 4% difference between their total fuel cycle costs. It is concluded that there is no great economic advantage in any developing countries to seek to process their fuel in one of the advanced countries. Construction of regional reprocessing centers is an economically viable concept

  1. Conceptual design study on advanced aqueous reprocessing system for fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takata, Takeshi; Koma, Yoshikazu; Sato, Koji; Kamiya, Masayoshi; Shibata, Atsuhiro; Nomura, Kazunori; Ogino, Hideki; Koyama, Tomozo; Aose, Shin-ichi

    2003-01-01

    As a feasibility study on commercialized fast reactor cycle system, a conceptual design study is being progressed for the aqueous and pyrochemical processes from the viewpoint of economical competitiveness, efficient utilization of resources, decreasing environmental impact and proliferation resistance in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). In order to meet above-mentioned requirements, the survey on a range of reprocessing technologies and the evaluation of conceptual plant designs against targets for the future fast reactor cycle system have been implemented as the fist phase of the feasibility study. For an aqueous reprocessing process, modification of the conventional PUREX process (a solvent extraction process with purification of U/Pu, with nor recovery of minor actinides (MA)) and investigation of alternatives for the PUREX process has been carried out and design study of advanced aqueous reprocessing system and its alternatives has been conducted. The conceptual design of the advanced aqueous reprocessing system has been updated and evaluated by the latest R and D results of the key technologies such as crystallization, single-cycle extraction, centrifugal contactors, recovery of Am/Cm and waste processing. In this paper, the outline of the design study and the current status of development for advanced aqueous reprocessing system, NEXT process, are mentioned. (author)

  2. Reprocessing in breeder fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Groenier, W.S.

    1982-01-01

    Over the past decade, the United States has developed plans and carried out programs directed toward the demonstration of breeder fuel reprocessing in connection with the first breeder demonstration reactor. A renewed commitment to moving forward with the construction of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) has been made, with startup anticipated near the end of this decade. While plans for the CRBR and its associated fuel cycle are still being firmed up, the basic research and development programs required to carry out the demonstrations have continued. This paper updates the status of the reprocessing plans and programs. Policies call for breeder recycle to begin in the early to mid-1990's. Contents of this paper are: (1) evolving plans for breeder reprocessing (demonstration reprocessing plant, reprocessing head-end colocated at an existing facility); (2) relationship to LWR reprocessing; (3) integrated equipment test (IET) facility and related hardware development activities (mechanical considerations in shearing and dissolving, remote operations and maintenance demonstration phase of IET, integrated process demonstration phase of IET, separate component development activities); and (4) supporting process R and D

  3. Multi-purpose simulator 'MR TRIOS' for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    MHI(Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.) has developed MR TRIOS(Mitsubishi Reprocessing plant TRansient simulator of Integrated process for Operation Support), the realtime dynamic simulator, for multipurpose use to support the Reprocessing Plant operation in various aspects. MR TRIOS integrates the simulation models of the unit process in reprocessing plant, including shearing, dissolution, NO x absorption, accountability and adjustment and co-decontamination process, where each simulation model has two kinds of models, one is Process and the other is Control System. MR TRIOS can simulate the process behavior of the above listed unit process in an integrated manner as well as independently. It is realized by MR CONTROL, the simulator control program developed by MHI. We can get from MR TRIOS the real-time process values, such as temperature, pressure, density, flow rate and concentration of eminent nuclides etc. enabling the evaluation of the process dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. MR TRIOS has been proved to be an effective tool for the comprehensive study of the process and system dynamics, for operation technique improvements and for training. In this report we will show the introductory outline of multi-purpose simulator 'MR TRIOS' for reprocessing plant and also show the possibility to clarify the fundamental technical requirement to realize the effective material accountancy measure for Head-end Area. (author)

  4. Pyrochemical head-end treatment for fast reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avogadro, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents the R and D work performed at Ispra and Mol during the period 1965-1975 in order to find a way to overcome technical and economical difficulties arising when the conventional reprocessing is applied to fast reactor fuel elements. The work had been directed towards 3 specific topics: a) liquid-metal decladding of spent stainless steel - clad fuels (solinox process). b) oxidative pulverisation by fused salts and extraction of volatile fission products (satex process). c) Pyrochemical separation of plutonium from the bulk of the fuel

  5. Demonstration and development of safeguards techniques in the PNC reprocessing plant. Part of a coordinated programme on the use of installed instrumentation in fuel reprocessing facilities for safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, H.

    1979-04-01

    A hull-monitoring system in the Head-End facility and systems for surveillance and containment in the spent fuel receiving and storage facility at Tokai Reprocessing Plant are described. Operating experience on them is analyzed

  6. Status of reprocessing technology in the HTGR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, G.; Merz, E.; Zimmer, E.

    1977-01-01

    For more than ten years extensive R and D work has been carried out in the Federal Republic of Germany in order to develop the technology necessary for closing the fuel cycle of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The efforts are concentrated primarily on fuel elements having either highly enriched 235 U or recycled 233 U as the fissile and thorium as the fertile material embedded in a graphite matrix. They include the development of processes and equipment for reprocessing and remote preparation of coated microspheres from the recovered uranium. The paper reviews the issues and problems associated with the requirements to deal with high burn-up fuel from HTGR's of different design and composition. It is anticipated that a grind-burn-leach head-end treatment and a modified THOREX-type chemical processing are the optimum choice for the flowsheet. An overview of the present status achieved in construction of a small reprocessing facility, called JUPITER, is presented. It includes a discussion of problems which have already been solved and which have still to be solved like the treatment of feed/breed particle systems and for minimizing environmental impacts envisaged with a HTGR fuel cycle technology. Also discussed is the present status of remote fuel kernel fabrication and coating technology. Additional activities include the design of a mock-up prototype burning head-end facility, called VENUS, with a throughput equivalent to about 6000 MW installed electrical power, as well as a preliminary study for the utilisation of the Karlsruhe LWR prototype reprocessing plant (WAK) to handle HTGR fuel after remodelling of the installations. The paper concludes with an outlook of projects for the future

  7. Why reprocess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, T.

    1977-01-01

    Prospective costs of reprocessing, waste management, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication have risen so much that the costs of U/P recycle and of spent fuel storage are nearly equal. This paper reviews the current state of the reprocessing industry, with a list of facilities all over the world, and examines the incentives and disincentives other than short-term economics that will affect the decision of states to acquire their own reprocessing facilities. Finally, it examines the possibility of avoiding a widespread commercial reprocessing industry

  8. Study of the chemical behaviour of technetium during irradiated fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelverte, A.

    1988-04-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of the lower oxidation states +III +IV and +V of technetium in nitric acid and its behaviour during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels (PUREX process). The first part of this work is a bibliographical study of this element in solution without any strong ligand. By chemical and electrochemical technics, pentavalent, tetravalent and trivalent technetium species, were prepared in nitric acid. The following chemical reactions are studied: - trivalent and tetravalent technetium oxidation by nitrate ion. - hydrazine and tetravalent uranium oxidation catalysed by technetium: in those reactions, we point out unequivocally the prominent part of trivalent and tetravalent technetium, - technetium behaviour towards hydroxylamine. Technetium should not cause any disturbance in the steps where hydroxylamine is employed to destroy nitrous acid and hydrazine replacement by hydroxylamine in uranium-plutonium partition could contribute to a best reprocessing of nuclear fuels [fr

  9. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-12-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  10. Design study on advanced nuclear fuel recycling system by pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Yoshimitsu; Kakehi, Isao; Moro, Satoshi; Tobe, Kenji; Kawamura, Fumio; Higashi, Tatsuhiro; Yonezawa, Shigeaki; Yoshiuji, Takahiro

    1998-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute is conducting research and development on the nuclear fuel recycling system, which will improve the economy, safety, and environmental impact of the nuclear fuel recycling system in the age of the FBR. The System Engineering Division in the O-arai Engineering Center has conducted a design study on an advanced nuclear fuel recycling system for FBRs by using pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology. The system is an economical and compact module-type system, and can be used for reprocessing oxide fuel and also new types of fuel (metal fuel and nitride fuel). This report describes the concept of this system and results of the design study. (author)

  11. The Role and Reprocessing of Attitudes in Fostering Employee Work Happiness: An Intervention Study

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Paige; Kern, Margaret L.; Waters, Lea

    2017-01-01

    This intervention study examines the iterative reprocessing of explicit and implicit attitudes as the process underlying associations between positive employee attitudes (PsyCap), perception of positive organization culture (organizational virtuousness, OV), and work happiness. Using a quasi-experimental design, a group of school staff (N = 69) completed surveys at three time points. After the first assessment, the treatment group (n = 51) completed a positive psychology training intervention...

  12. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Michael F.; Law, Jack D.

    2010-01-01

    This is a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. Nuclear reprocessing is the chemical treatment of spent fuel involving separation of its various constituents. Principally, it is used to recover useful actinides from the spent fuel. Radioactive waste that cannot be re-used is separated into streams for consolidation into waste forms. The first known application of nuclear reprocessing was within the Manhattan Project to recover material for nuclear weapons. Currently, reprocessing has a peaceful application in the nuclear fuel cycle. A variety of chemical methods have been proposed and demonstrated for reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The two most widely investigated and implemented methods are generally referred to as aqueous reprocessing and pyroprocessing. Each of these technologies is described in detail in Section 3 with numerous references to published articles. Reprocessing of nuclear fuel as part of a fuel cycle can be used both to recover fissionable actinides and to stabilize radioactive fission products into durable waste forms. It can also be used as part of a breeder reactor fuel cycle that could result in a 14-fold or higher increase in energy utilization per unit of natural uranium. Reprocessing can also impact the need for geologic repositories for spent fuel. The volume of waste that needs to be sent to such a repository can be reduced by first subjecting the spent fuel to reprocessing. The extent to which volume reduction can occur is currently under study by the United States Department of Energy via research at various national laboratories and universities. Reprocessing can also separate fissile and non-fissile radioactive elements for transmutation.

  13. Discrete harmony search algorithm for scheduling and rescheduling the reprocessing problems in remanufacturing: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kaizhou; Wang, Ling; Luo, Jianping; Jiang, Hua; Sadollah, Ali; Pan, Quanke

    2018-06-01

    In this article, scheduling and rescheduling problems with increasing processing time and new job insertion are studied for reprocessing problems in the remanufacturing process. To handle the unpredictability of reprocessing time, an experience-based strategy is used. Rescheduling strategies are applied for considering the effect of increasing reprocessing time and the new subassembly insertion. To optimize the scheduling and rescheduling objective, a discrete harmony search (DHS) algorithm is proposed. To speed up the convergence rate, a local search method is designed. The DHS is applied to two real-life cases for minimizing the maximum completion time and the mean of earliness and tardiness (E/T). These two objectives are also considered together as a bi-objective problem. Computational optimization results and comparisons show that the proposed DHS is able to solve the scheduling and rescheduling problems effectively and productively. Using the proposed approach, satisfactory optimization results can be achieved for scheduling and rescheduling on a real-life shop floor.

  14. Direct Cost of Reprocessing Cotton-woven Surgical Drapes: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fexina Tomé

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identify the direct cost of reprocessing double and single cotton-woven drapes of the surgical LAP package. METHOD A quantitative, exploratory and descriptive case study, performed at a teaching hospital. The direct cost of reprocessing cotton-woven surgical drapes was calculated by multiplying the time spent by professionals involved in reprocessing the unit with the direct cost of labor, adding to the cost of materials. The Brazilian currency (R$ originally used for the calculations was converted to US currency at the rate of US$0.42/R$. RESULTS The average total cost for surgical LAP package was US$9.72, with the predominance being in the cost of materials (US$8.70 or 89.65%. It is noteworthy that the average total cost of materials was mostly impacted by the cost of the cotton-woven drapes (US$7.99 or 91.90%. CONCLUSION The knowledge gained will subsidize discussions about replacing reusable cotton-woven surgical drapes for disposable ones, favoring arguments regarding the advantages and disadvantages of this possibility considering human resources, materials, as well as structural, environmental and financial resources.

  15. A study of pulse columns for thorium fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumoto, H.

    1982-03-01

    Two 5 m pulse columns with the same cartridge geometries are installed to investigate the performance. The characteristic differences of the aqueous continous and the organic continuous columns were investigated experimentally. A ternary system of 30% TBP in dodecane-acetic acid-water was adopted for the mass-transfer study. It was concluded that the overall mass-transfer coefficient was independent of whether the mass-transfer is from the dispersed to the continuous phase or from the continuous to the dispersed phase. Thorium nitrate was extracted and reextracted using both modes of operation. Both HETS and HTU were obtained. The aqueous continuous column gave much shorter HTU than the organic continuous column. In reextraction the organic continuous column gave shorter HTU. The Thorex-processes for uranium and thorium co-extraction, co-stripping, and partitioning were studied. Both acid feed solution and acid deficiend feed solution were investigated. The concentration profiles along the column height were obtained. The data were analysed with McCABE-THIELE diagrams to evaluate HETS. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Thoria/thoria-urania dissolution studies for reprocessing application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, C.; Yalmali, Vrunda; Pente, A.S.; Wattal, P.K.; Misra, S.D.

    2012-06-01

    Thoria dissolution is normally conducted in 13M nitric acid in the presence of 0.03M sodium fluoride or HF as catalyst and 0.1M aluminium nitrate for mitigation of fluoride related corrosion of SS 304L dissolver vessel. Addition of aluminium nitrate in such high concentrations has undesirable consequences in the downstream high level radioactive liquid waste vitrification process at 900-1000 degC. Besides, because of the highly corrosive nature of fluoride ion, lowering its concentration in the dissolution reaction is advantageous in reducing the corrosion of dissolver and other downstream equipments. The present work was done with twin objectives of avoiding aluminium nitrate addition and lowering the fluoride ion concentration during dissolution reaction. High temperature sintered thoria and thoria-4 weight% urania dissolution reactions were investigated in the absence of aluminium nitrate and at reduced fluoride concentrations. Corrosion rates of SS 304L zircaloy in various dissolvent mixtures were studied by weight loss method. These studies clearly showed that aluminium nitrate addition for control of fluoride related corrosion of SS 304L can be avoided when zircaloy-clad thoria/thoria-urania pellets are dissolved. Dissolved zirconium ion was observed to be as effective as aluminium ion. Moreover, dissolution could be achieved with reasonable reaction rates at reduced fluoride concentration of 0.005-0.01M instead of 0.03M by changing the method of addition of the fluoride catalyst. (author)

  17. Analysis and study of spent fuel reprocessing technology from birth to present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Keizo

    2006-01-01

    As for the nuclear fuel reprocessing of the spent fuel, although there was argument of pros and cons, it was decided to start Rokkasho reprocessing project further at the Japan Atomic Energy Commission of ''Long-Term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy'' in year 2004. The operation of Tokai Reprocessing is going steadily to reprocess spent fuel more than 1,100 tons. In this paper, history, present status and future of reprocessing technology is discussed focusing from military Pu production, Magnox fuel reprocessing to oxide fuel reprocessing. Amount of reprocessed fuel are estimated based on fuel type. Then, history of reprocessing, US, UK, France, Germany, Russian, Belgian and Japan is presented and compared on technology, national character, development organization, environmental protection, and high active waste vitrification. Technical requirements are increased from Pu production fuel, Magnox fuel and oxide fuel mainly because of higher burnup. Reprocessing technology is synthetic of engineering and accumulation of operational experience. The lessons learned from the operational experience of the world will be helpful for establishment of nuclear fuel reprocessing technology in Japan. (author)

  18. The role of errors in the measurements performed at the reprocessing plant head-end for material accountancy purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foggi, C.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Petraglia, E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the most common procedures used in determining the amount of nuclear material contained in solutions consists of first measuring the volume and the density of the solution, and then determining the concentrations of this material. This presentation will focus on errors generated at the process lime in the measurement of volume and density. These errors and their associated uncertainties can be grouped into distinct categories depending on their origin: those attributable to measuring instruments; those attributable to operational procedures; variability in measurement conditions; errors in the analysis and interpretation of results. Possible errors sources, their relative magnitudes, and an error propagation rationale are discussed, with emphasis placed on bases and errors of the last three types called systematic errors [ru

  19. Separation of tritium from reprocessing effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, A.; Doyen, W.; Harnie, R.; Leysen, R.; Meynendonckx, L.; Monsecour, M.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Baetsle, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    For several years tritium retention has been studied at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK/CEN; initially attention was focused on the removal of tritium from gaseous reprocessing effluents. If tritium can be released from the spent fuel into the gaseous phase before any aqueous operation, adsorption on molecular sieves after some isotopic dilution with hydrogen and after complete conversion to (tritiated) water is the most practical collection method. A once-through 15 m 3 .h -1 oxidation-adsorption unit with a closed regeneration system and with a decontamination factor of 1000 at total (tritiated) hydrogen and water inlet concentrations down to 1000 vpm (parts per million by volume) has been constructed and tested at SCK/CEN and it is described in the text. If no special head-end treatment is used an appropriate liquid management inside the reprocessing plant restricts the volume of tritiated aqueous effluents to about 3 m 3 per tonne of LWR fuel processed. However, for further reduction an isotope separation process becomes necessary. SCK/CEN is developing the ELEX process, which is a combination of water ELectrolysis and tritium EXchange between hydrogen and water, the exchange being promoted by a hydrophobic catalyst. For electrolysis under normal conditions an elementary tritium separation factor of 11.6 with a standard deviation of 6% was obtained. As concerns the exchange step a hydrophobic catalyst has been developed which yields for the flow rates used at atmospheric pressure and at 20 0 C an overall exchange rate constant of 9 mol.s -1 .m -3 in a countercurrent trickle-bed reactor. At present an integrated bench scale de-tritiation unit is being built for further tests and for a dynamic demonstration of the ELEX process

  20. Reprocessing decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The United States must decide whether to permit, delay, or prohibit the reprocessing and recycling of nuclear spent fuel. To permit reprocessing would allow recycle as early as 1985; to delay the decision for a later administration to deal with means spent fuel would mount up at nuclear reactor sites; to prohibit would eliminate recycling and mandate permanent storage. Bayesian decision analysis was used to examine reprocessing costs associated with risks and economic benefits. Three distinct categories of risk that are important in the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. These are: health, environment, and safety risks; nuclear theft and sabotage; and nuclear weapons proliferation risks. Results are discussed from comparing nine routes to weapons-usuable mterial available to nonweapons states that desire a nuclear capability. These are: production reactor and military reporcessor; research reacotr and military reprocessor; power plant plus military reprocessor or commercial reprocessor; enrichment (centrifuge, gaseous diffusion, electromagnetic separation, or aerodynamic jet cascade); and accelerator. It was found that the commercial power reactor-commercial reprocessor route is comparatively unattractive to a nonweapons state. In summary, allowing nuclear fuel reprocessing to go forward in the United States can be expected to increase the costs to society by a maximum $360 million a year. This is approximately one-seventh of the expected benefit (reduced electricity bills) to be dderived by society from closing the fuel cycle. It appears that the permitting reprocessing now is logically preferable to delaying or prohibiting the technology, the author concludes

  1. HTGR fuel reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, L.H.; Heath, C.A.; Shefcik, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The following aspects of HTGR reprocessing technology are discussed: characteristics of HTGR fuels, criteria for a fuel reprocessing flowsheet; selection of a reference reprocessing flowsheet, and waste treatment

  2. Accident analysis of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, E.

    1983-01-01

    The following subjects are studied in detail: Criticality in the dissolver, in HA-column or due to accidental transfer into components of that are not criticality-safe solvent fires in the 1st extraction cycle and 3rd Pu cycle; Red-oil explosions in waste and Pu conditioning; fires of Zy scraps and cans in the head-end; formation of explosive gases by radiolysis. The Zy-fire seems to be the most important risk factor. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Study of the stability of organic ligands usable for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draye, Micheline

    1994-01-01

    The first part of this research thesis on the stability of organic ligands in radioactive environment, reports the study of the stability of the dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) in radioactive environment by using several analytical techniques (nuclear magnetic resonance or NMR, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy or FTIR, gas chromatography or GC, and coupled gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy). The seven main radiolysis products of DCH18C6 are identified and then synthesised to be tested in radioactive environment. These products are soluble in nitric medium, and partially precipitate plutonium, but cannot in any case disturb the reprocessing process based on a continuous extraction system. Chemical yields are computed and DCH18C6 appears to be a serious candidate for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The second part reports the study of the stability of the poly(4-vinylpyridine) or P4VP in radioactive environment. It appears that gamma radiations produce radicals in the P4VP which recombine in function of the irradiation dose. However, this material is very stable in acid environment and radioactive environment [fr

  4. Study on safety of crystallization method applied to dissolver solution in fast breeder reactor reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Fujine, Yukio; Asakura, Toshihide; Murazaki, Minoru; Koyama, Tomozo; Sakakibara, Tetsuro; Shibata, Atsuhiro

    1999-03-01

    The crystallization method is proposed to apply for recovery of uranium from dissolution liquid, enabling to reduce handling materials in later stages of reprocessing used fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuels. This report studies possible safety problems accompanied by the proposed method. Crystallization process was first defined in the whole reprocessing process, and the quantity and the kind of treated fuel were specified. Possible problems, such as criticality, shielding, fire/explosion, and confinement, were then investigated; and the events that might induce accidental incidents were discussed. Criticality, above all the incidents, was further studied by considering exampled criticality control of the crystallization process. For crystallization equipment, in particular, evaluation models were set up in normal and accidental operation conditions. Related data were selected out from the nuclear criticality safety handbooks. The theoretical densities of plutonium nitrates, which give basic and important information, were estimated in this report based on the crystal structure data. The criticality limit of crystallization equipment was calculated based on the above information. (author)

  5. Study of the application of near-real-time materials accountancy to safeguards for reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, Koji; Ihara, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Hideo; Hirata, Mitsuho; Sakuragi, Hirotaka; Ido, Masaru.

    1983-09-01

    This report describes the results of TASTEX task F, the basic purpose of which was to investigate the feasibility of applying the basic concepts of near-real-time materials accountancy to small or medium-sized spent fuel reprocessing facilities, using the PNC-Tokai facility as a model. The background of Task-F and the proposed IAEA requirements on reprocessing plant safeguards are briefly shown. A model of near-real-time materials accountancy based on weekly material balances covering the entire process MBA is outlined, and the effectiveness of this model is evaluated based on simulation and analysis procedures developed for the study. The results show that the proposed materials accountancy model should provide sufficient information to satisfy IAEA guidelines for detection goals. Field testing of the model began in 1980, and the preliminary evaluation of this field test data shows that weekly in-process physical inventories are possible without affecting process operations. This report also describes studies related to IAEA verification procedures, and identifies necessary further work. (author)

  6. A spectrophotometric study of cerium IV and chromium VI species in nuclear fuel reprocessing process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickson, I D; Boxall, C; Jackson, A; Whillock, G O H

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing schemes such as PUREX and UREX utilise HNO 3 media. An understanding of the corrosion of process engineering materials such as stainless steel in such media is a major concern for the nuclear industry. Two key species are cerium and chromium which, as Ce(IV), Cr(VI), may act as corrosion accelerants. An on-line analytical technique for these quantities would be useful for determining the relationship between corrosion rate and [Ce(IV)] and [Cr(VI)]. Consequently, a strategy for simultaneous quantification of Ce(IV), Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in the presence of other ions found in average burn-up Magnox / PWR fuel reprocessing stream (Fe, Mg, Nd, Al) is being developed. This involves simultaneous UV-vis absorbance measurement at 620, 540, 450 nm, wavelengths where Ce and Cr absorb but other ions do not. Mixed solutions of Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) are found to present higher absorbance values at 540 nm than those predicted from absorbances recorded from single component solutions of those ions. This is attributed to the formation of a 3:1 Cr(VI)-Ce(IV) complex and we report on the complexation and UV-visible spectrophotometric characteristics of this species. To the best of our knowledge this is the first experimental study of this complex in aqueous nitric acid solution systems.

  7. Contribution to the study of the degradation of the solvent used in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goasmat, F.

    1984-01-01

    The degradation of a mixed solvent (tributylphosphate - hydrocarbons) in a fuel reprocessing plant (UP 2 at La Hague, France) is studied in this thesis. Laboratory studies on degradation mechanisms, decomposition products and regeneration processes are reviewed in a bibliographic synthesis. Solvent degradation is investigated on a real solvent from a reprocessing plant. Influence of degradation on solvent performance is shown and regeneration processes should be improved. Many regeneration processes are tested on solvent from the plant and results are discussed. Separation and analysis of degradation products show the polyfunctional structure of compounds formed [fr

  8. Technological study of electrochemical uranium fuel reprocessing in fused chloride bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Damaris

    2002-01-01

    This study is applied to metallic fuels recycling, concerning advanced reactor concept, which was proposed and tested in LMR type reactors. Conditions for electrochemical non-irradiated uranium fuel reprocessing in fused chloride bath in laboratory scale were established. Experimental procedures and parameters for dehydration treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic mixture and for electrochemical study of U 3+ /U system in LiCl-KCl were developed and optimized. In the voltammetric studies many working electrodes were tested. As auxiliary electrodes, graphite and stainless steels crucibles were verified, with no significant impurities inclusions in the system. Ag/AgCl in Al 2 O 3 with 1 w% in AgCl were used as reference electrode. The experimental set up developed for electrolyte treatment as well as for the study of the system U 3+ /U in LiCl-KCl showed to be adequate and efficient. Thermogravimetric Techniques, Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and cyclic voltametry showed an efficient dehydration method by using HCl gas and than argon flux for 12 h. Scanning Electron Microscopy, with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry detected the presence of uranium in the cadmium phase. X-ray Diffraction and also Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry were used for uranium detection in the salt phase. The obtained results for the system U 3+ /U in LiCl-KCl showed the viability of the electrochemical reprocessing process based on the IFR advanced fuel cycle. (author)

  9. The Role and Reprocessing of Attitudes in Fostering Employee Work Happiness: An Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paige; Kern, Margaret L; Waters, Lea

    2017-01-01

    This intervention study examines the iterative reprocessing of explicit and implicit attitudes as the process underlying associations between positive employee attitudes (PsyCap), perception of positive organization culture (organizational virtuousness, OV), and work happiness. Using a quasi-experimental design, a group of school staff ( N = 69) completed surveys at three time points. After the first assessment, the treatment group ( n = 51) completed a positive psychology training intervention. Results suggest that employee PsyCap, OV, and work happiness are associated with one another through both implicit and explicit attitudes. Further, the Iterative-Reprocessing Model of attitudes (IRM) provides some insights into the processes underlying these associations. By examining the role and processes through which explicit and implicit attitudes relate to wellbeing at work, the study integrates theories on attitudes, positive organizational scholarship, positive organizational behavior and positive education. It is one of the first studies to apply the theory of the IRM to explain associations amongst PsyCap, OV and work happiness, and to test the IRM theory in a field-based setting. In applying attitude theory to wellbeing research, this study provides insights to mechanisms underlying workplace wellbeing that have not been previously examined and in doing so responds to calls for researchers to learn more about the mechanisms underlying wellbeing interventions. Further, it highlights the need to understand subconscious processes in future wellbeing research and to include implicit measures in positive psychology interventions measurement programs. Practically, this research calls attention to the importance of developing both the positive attitudes of employees and the organizational culture in developing employee work happiness.

  10. UP3 plant first reprocessing campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leudet, A.; Hugelmann, D.; Fournier, W.; Dalverny, G.

    1991-01-01

    The UP3 plant start up has been achieved in two successive steps. The first one, from November 89 to April 90, involved all the facilities but T1, the head-end facility. During that period, shearing, dissolution and the first cycle extraction operations were performed in UP2 plant. 100 tons of fuel have been reprocessed that way. The second step began in August 1990, with the T1 facility start-up and the reprocessing of the resulting active solutions in the rest of the plant. This second phase involving the entire UP3 plant continued until the end of January 1991. At that time, 160 tons of fuel have been completely treated in UP3 plant

  11. Corrosion studies on materials of construction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion studies on specimens of commercial Type 304L stainless steel (SS), nuclear grade type 304L SS, extra low-carbon nitric acid grade (NAG) Uranus-16 SS, NAG Uranus-65 SS, Ti, Ti-5% Ta, Ti-0.25% Pd, Zircaloy-2, weldments of Ti and of Ti-5% Ta, and surface-modified (thermally oxidised and anodised) Ti were carried out to assess their corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. The results indicated that Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta, Uranus-16 SS and Uranus-65 SS have excellent corrosion resistance in boiling nitric acid solution. Specimens of Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta and thermally-oxidised Ti showed excellent corrosion resistance also in a simulated uranium-containing reprocessing medium in a concentrated nitric acid solution. SEM and XRD analyses were carried out on the tested specimens to examine the scale morphology and phases present on the surface. (orig.)

  12. Radioecological studies on plutonium and iodine-129 in the surroundings of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettelkopf, H.; Pimpl, M.

    1982-01-01

    Plutonium and 129 I are emitted from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) together with exhaust air and liquid effluents. Plutonium dispersion in the environment was used to calculate the dispersion factors, to determine the rates of deposition on grass and of the total deposition rates, to measure the distribution at depth of plutonium in the soil and to evaluate the contamination of plants and animals in the environment of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant. The plutonium emissions with the liquid effluents were studied to deepen understanding of the process of sedimentation in a river system. Sediments, water samples, aerosols and living organisms from the Altrhein were examined. Factors of transfer to various organisms living in the Altrhein were measured. Most of the 129 I release from WAK goes via the exhaust air: this even applies after installation of an iodine filter into the exhaust air stack. The 129 I contamination of the environmental air, the soil, thyroids and milk was measured. Regarding the milk/air concentration ratio, a mean value of 210 was determined with a scattering range of 50 to 1480. Soil contamination was studied very thoroughly. Iodine-129 is transported into lower soil layers at a very slow rate only, if at all. The contamination of the soil with 129 I remained largely constant during the three years of investigations. The low rates of deposition of 0.02 to 0.05 cm/s indicate that 129 I is released to the environmental air again from plants undergoing the process of rotting. (author)

  13. Safeguarding a future industrial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper is submitted to Working Group 5, Sub-Group B for information. It is being submitted to Working Group 4 for discussion at their meeting in January 1979 and shows that by a combination of accountancy, surveillance and containment a reliable safeguards system can be designed for the reprocessing of fuels of the BWR and PWR type. Its arguments can, in general terms, be applied to plants for reprocessing LMFBR fuels, with due allowance for future advances which should improve our overall knowledge of the reliability of safeguards systems. In the reprocessing of fast reactor (LMFBR) fuels, as compared with LWR fuels, the main differences are the higher plutonium concentration and lower heavy metal throughput in the early stages of the reprocessing operations. At later stages in the process (after plutonium/uranium separation) the plants could be similar and have similar safeguarding problems. Plants for reprocessing LMFBR on a commercial scale will not be in operation for a number of years. In these plants greater attention may have to be paid to safeguards at the early stages, especially to waste/raffinate streams, than in the PWR/BWR reprocessing plant. The actual balance between containment, surveillance and accountancy adopted will depend on the status of the technology of safeguards and reprocessing. It can be anticipated that improvements to measurement systems will be made which may allow greater reliance on actual measurement. Treatment and recycle of solid wastes will advance and could therefore lead to improvements in accountancy in, for example, the ''head-end''

  14. A quantitative approach to design of material accounting system for a complex facility. Study at the PNC reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, K.

    1994-01-01

    An approach to a design of nuclear materials accounting sysyem for a complex facility in Japan is discussed. Near-real-time materials accountancy model studied at the PNC reprocessing plant is described. Main features of the computerized nuclear materials accounting system are considered as well as the PROMAC - C code algorithm for statistical data processing is presented. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  15. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    A survey of electrochemical methods applications in fuel reprocessing was completed. A dummy fuel assembly shroud was cut using the remotely operated laser disassembly equipment. Operations and engineering efforts have continued to correct equipment operating, software, and procedural problems experienced during the previous uranium compaigns. Fuel cycle options were examined for the liquid metal reactor fuel cycle. In high temperature gas cooled reactor spent fuel studies, preconceptual designs were completed for the concrete storage cask and open field drywell storage concept. These and other tasks operating under the consolidated fuel reprocessing program are examined.

  16. Technical study report on reprocessing systems. The report of the feasibility study on commercialized FR cycle systems (phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Fumio; Kakehi, Isao

    2001-04-01

    As a part of the feasibility study (FS) on commercialized fast reactor (FR) cycle systems started on July 1999, the design studies and the technical assessments for various advanced reprocessing systems have been carried out. In this study, plant design for the advanced aqueous system and the three non-aqueous systems (oxide electrowinning method, metal electrorefining method, and fluoride volatility method) has been carried out, and each system has been evaluated mainly from the viewpoint of economics. The future R and D issues on the processes and systems have been also clarified. This report describes the results of the study for two years as final report of FS phase I. (1) The advanced aqueous system, based on the simplified PUREX process, has been shown to be much more economical than the conventional PUREX. The 200 tHM/y plant achieves the target of economics, but the 50 tHM/y plant can not achieve the target. (2) The promising alternative systems replaced for advanced aqueous are the supercritical fluid direct extraction method and amine extraction method from the economical viewpoint. The ion exchange method is promising as the process for minor actinide recovery. (3) For reprocessing MOX fuel, all non-aqueous plants with a capacity of 200 tHM/y achieve the economical target. For such a small capacity as 50 tHM/y, further rationalization of the process is required for the oxide electrowinning method and metal electrorefining method to attain the target, though they are more economical than the advanced aqueous system. (4) For metallic and nitride fuel reprocessing, a metal electrorefining system has been shown to be advantageous. (author)

  17. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  18. Fuel reprocessing/fabrication interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benistan, G.; Blanchon, T.; Galimberti, M.; Mignot, E.

    1987-01-01

    EDF has conducted a major research, development and experimental programme concerning the recycling of plutonium and reprocessed uranium in pressurized water reactors, in collaboration with its major partners in the nuclear fuel cycle industry. Studies already conducted have demonstrated the technical and economic advantages of this recycling, as also its feasibility with due observance of the safety and reliability criteria constantly applied throughout the industrial development of the nuclear power sector in France. Data feedback from actual experience will make it possible to control the specific technical characteristics of MOX and reprocessed uranium fuels to a higher degree, as also management, viewed from the economic standpoint, of irradiated fuels and materials recovered from reprocessing. The next step will be to examine the reprocessing of MOX for reprocessed uranium fuels, either for secondary recycling in the PWR units, or, looking further ahead, in the fast breeders or later generation PWR units, after a storage period of a few years

  19. Theoretical study of trivalent element complexes for the nuclear waste reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, L.

    2007-10-01

    Current energetic and environmental concerns have made the nuclear waste reprocessing to be a major issue in numerous countries. One avenue to treat nuclear spent fuel requires separating selectively trivalent minor actinides An (Am 3+ , Cm 3+ ) from lanthanides Ln. In this regard, nitrogen extractants are under study. Their selectivity toward actinides is still unclear, but could be the result of enhanced covalency effects with trivalent minor actinides with respect to lanthanides (III). In this thesis, we have performed DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory) to study covalency effects within the actinide-ligand bond, following three main axes of research: advanced study of the nature of the chemical bonding, spectroscopic characterization of covalency, and preliminary tests of ab initio molecular dynamics for future calculations in solvent. Methods that are not regularly applied to trivalent actinides complexes have been used: topological methods, TDDFT, LDDFT, ab initio molecular dynamics. We have managed to show that the selectivity of the BTP ligand - the most effective An/Ln extractant to date - comes at least for a part from stronger covalency effects within the An-BTP bond with respect to the Ln-BTP bond, which has never been proved before. (author)

  20. TOA Radiation Balance Study through Reprocessed ERBS WFOV Nonscanner data from 1985 to 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, A. K.; Kato, S.; Wong, T.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Doelling, D. R.; Loughman, R. P.

    2017-12-01

    Wide-field-of-view (WFOV) nonscanner instrument onboard Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) provided broadband irradiances at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) from 1985 to 1999. However, earlier studies show that the uncertainty in this TOA radiation dataset is significantly higher during the period after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption and battery issue in 1991. In addition, the difference between daytime and nighttime longwave irradiance drifts with time throughout the lifetime of the instrument. We re-processed ERBS WFOV data using the algorithm similar to the one used in the CERES project and calibrated it with CERES-derived irradiances. In addition, the spatial coverage of ERBS irradiances is extended to global from near-global (60°N to 60°S latitudes) using CERES climatological ratio of the near-global to global mean irradiances. The near-global standard deviation of deseasonalized shortwave anomalies computed with Ed4 decreases to 3.2 Wm-2 from 8.0 Wm-2, computed with previous version. In addition, the drift of day-minus-night longwave irradiance is reduced by one third. Similar to the previous version, however, the Ed4 global shortwave irradiance averaged over the 1994 to 1997 period (second period) is smaller by 2.2 Wm-2 compared to that averaged over the 1985 to 1989 period (first period). In addition, the global longwave irradiance in the second period is larger by 0.7 Wm-2 compared to that averaged over the first period. When the difference of two periods is computed (second period minus first period) with the DEEP-C data product (Allan et al. 2014), the difference is 0.5 (-0.3) Wm-2 for shortwave (longwave). The global net imbalance at the TOA computed with ERBS and DEEP-C data sets are, respectively, 0.45 (1.89) Wm-2 and 0.17 (0.96) Wm-2 for the first (second) period. The net imbalance for the CERES period in the 2000s is 0.65 Wm-2. In this presentation, we will further compare Ed4 ERBS-derived TOA net imbalance with ocean heating rates. Re-processed ERBS

  1. Synthesis and study of lipophilic crown ethers and thia-ligands. Application to nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyon, Vincent

    1992-01-01

    In the field of metal extraction from the solutions of nuclear fuel reprocessing, new specific complexing agents that are more efficient than tributyl phosphate must possess a high lipophilic character. The use of lipophilic crown ethers and thia-ligands has eliminated the problem related to their loss in the aqueous media. Moreover, it has made their complexes more soluble in organic solvents. The increase of lipophilic character of monocyclic polyethers has been realized with the addition of an alkyl chain and the development of a new process has made possible the separation of cis-syn-cis and cis-anti-cis isomers of dicyclohexano 18 crown 6 on an industrial scale. The creation of a rapid NMR method of analysis has permitted to study the extracting capacity of those crown ethers in relation to monovalent and divalent cations in nitric acid media and also to demonstrate the influence brought by different substituents. Some new lipophilic thia-ligands (macrocycles and podands) have also been prepared and the study of palladium extraction in nitric acid media by these compounds has led to a better understanding of the relation between the structure and the extracting capacity. Of easy access, some podands have an extracting selectivity and an extracting kinetic for this metal which are highly superior than those of dialkyl sulphides actually employed in the industry. This makes their use possible in the nuclear area. (author) [fr

  2. An outcome of nuclear safety research in JAERI. Case study for LOCA, FP, criticality and reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Ito, Keishiro; Kawashima, Kei; Katsuki, Chisato; Shirabe, Masashi

    2009-09-01

    An outcome of nuclear safety research done by JAERI was case studied by the bibliometric method. (1) For LOCA (loss-of-coolant accident) a domestic share of JAERI in monoclinic research paper was 63% at the past (20) 1978-1982 but was decreased to 40% at the present 1998-2002. For co-authored papers a domestic share between JAERI and PS (public sectors) is almost zero at past (20) but increased to 4% at the present. Research cooperation is active between Tokyo University and JAERI or between JAERI and Nagoya University. (2) Project-type research is to have a large monopolization in papers and that of basic-type research is to have a large development of research networking (DRN). (3) For FP, a share of co-authored paper is high due to an enhanced cooperation among JAERI-PO (Public Organization)-PS. For criticality, research activity was enhanced after JCO accident, especially at NUCEF. (4) For reprocessing, PS had a monopolistic position with a domestic share of 71% and a share of JAERI was about 20%. (5) LOCA and RIA outputs born by NSR-JAERI coincided partly to those of the Safety Licensing Guidelines but a share of contribution done by JAERI was ambiguous due to the lack of necessary information. (author)

  3. Study on the abnormal reaction in an evaporator at a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Takashi; Sugikawa, Susumu; Ohsaki, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The calculation code was constructed in order to evaluate a self-accelerated reaction in an evaporator in a fuel reprocessing plant due to organic-nitric acid reactions. This report describes the model of the calculation code and the result of the trial calculation. (author)

  4. Partitioning of actinide from simulated high level wastes arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuels: counter current extraction studies using CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshingkar, D.S.; Chitnis, R.R.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Nair, M.K.T.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Rao, M.K.; Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Iyer, R.H.; Badheka, L.P.; Banerji, A.

    1994-01-01

    High level wastes (HLW) arising from reprocessing of pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) fuels contain actinides like neptunium, americium and cerium which are not extracted in the Purex process. They also contain small quantities of uranium and plutonium in addition to fission products. Removal of these actinides prior to vitrification of HLW can effectively reduce the active surveillance period of final waste form. Counter current studies using indigenously synthesised octyl (phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) were taken up as a follow-up of successful runs with simulated sulphate bearing low acid HLW solutions. The simulated HLW arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuel was prepared based on presumed burnup of 6500 MWd/Te of uranium, 3 years cooling period and 800 litres of waste generation per tonne of fuel reprocessed. The alpha activity of the HLW raffinate after extraction with the CMPO-TBP mixture could be brought down to near background level. (author). 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs

  5. Partitioning of actinide from simulated high level wastes arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuels: counter current extraction studies using CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshingkar, D S; Chitnis, R R; Wattal, P K; Theyyunni, T K; Nair, M K.T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Process Engineering and Systems Development Div.; Ramanujam, A; Dhami, P S; Gopalakrishnan, V; Rao, M K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Fuel Reprocessing Group; Mathur, J N; Murali, M S; Iyer, R H [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Badheka, L P; Banerji, A [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Bio-organic Div.

    1994-12-31

    High level wastes (HLW) arising from reprocessing of pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) fuels contain actinides like neptunium, americium and cerium which are not extracted in the Purex process. They also contain small quantities of uranium and plutonium in addition to fission products. Removal of these actinides prior to vitrification of HLW can effectively reduce the active surveillance period of final waste form. Counter current studies using indigenously synthesised octyl (phenyl)-N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) were taken up as a follow-up of successful runs with simulated sulphate bearing low acid HLW solutions. The simulated HLW arising from reprocessing of PHWR fuel was prepared based on presumed burnup of 6500 MWd/Te of uranium, 3 years cooling period and 800 litres of waste generation per tonne of fuel reprocessed. The alpha activity of the HLW raffinate after extraction with the CMPO-TBP mixture could be brought down to near background level. (author). 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  6. Simulation study of near-real-time accounting in a generic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, C.A.; Whiteson, R.; Zardecki, A.

    1992-01-01

    Our simulation program FacSim has been used to estimate balance closure variances for a number of real proposed nuclear material processing facilities that rely primarily on item measurements. We are enhancing the program so that it can be applied to facilities such as reprocessing plants that handle bulk materials ad primarily perform bulk and flow measurements. The extended simulation program can apply any of several types of sequential statistical tests to near-real-time accounting information to evaluate the capability of the facility accounting system to detect material and operational anomalies in a timely fashion. The program allows facility designers and operators to evaluate measurement and anomaly detection strategies before system implementation and to demonstrate facility's capability for maintaining accurate inventory information during plant operation. These features are illustrated by application to a generic reprocessing plant

  7. Contributions to a shallow aquifer study by reprocessed seismic sections from petroleum exploration surveys, eastern Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Drilling Company of Abu Dhabi, is conducting a 4-year study of the fresh and slightly saline groundwater resources of the eastern Abu Dhabi Emirate. Most of this water occurs in a shallow aquifer, generally less than 150 m deep, in the Al Ain area. A critical part of the Al Ain area coincides with a former petroleum concession area where about 2780 km of vibroseis data were collected along 94 seismic lines during 1981-1983. Field methods, acquistion parameters, and section processing were originally designed to enhance reflections expected at depths ranging from 5000 to 6000 m, and subsurface features directly associated with the shallow aquifer system were deleted from the original seismic sections. The original field tapes from the vibroseis survey were reprocessed in an attempt to extract shallow subsurface information (depths less than 550 m) for investigating the shallow aquifer. A unique sequence of reproccessing parameters was established after reviewing the results from many experimental tests. Many enhancements to the resolution of shallow seismic reflections resulted from: (1) application of a 20-Hz, low-cut filter; (2) recomputation of static corrections to a datum nearer the land surface; (3) intensive velocity analyses; and (4) near-trace muting analyses. The number, resolution, and lateral continuity of shallow reflections were greatly enhanced on the reprocessed sections, as was the delineation of shallow, major faults. Reflections on a synthetic seismogram, created from a borehole drilled to a depth of 786 m on seismic line IQS-11, matcheddprecisely with shallow reflections on the reprocessed section. The 33 reprocessed sections were instrumental in preparing a map showing the major structural features that affect the shallow aquifer system. Analysis of the map provides a better understanding of the effect of these shallow features on the regional occurrence, movement, and quality of

  8. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Marra, J.

    2010-09-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a series of ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) and Cesium/Lanthanide/Transition Metal (CS/LN/TM) waste streams anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores, zirconolite, and other minor metal titanate phases. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. XRD and SEM/EDS results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD, and had phase assemblages that were closer to the initial targets. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms. Initial studies of radiation damage tolerance using ion beam irradiation at Los

  9. Study on reprocessing plant during transition period from LWR to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Takashi; Matsui, Minefumi; Nishimura, Masashi; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Mori, Yukihide; Kuroda, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We have proposed a concept of a reprocessing plant suitable for the transition period from the light water reactors (LWRs) to the fast breeder reactors (FBRs) by making comparison of two plant concepts: (1) Independent Plant which processes LWR fuel and FBR fuel in separately constructed lines and (2) Modularized Plant which processes LWR fuel and FBR fuel in a same line. We made construction plans based on the reference power generation plan, and evaluated the Pu supply capability using the power generation plan as an indicator of plant operation flexibility. In general, a margin of processing capacity increases the Pu supply capability. The margin of the Modularized Plant necessary to obtain equivalent Pu supply capability is smaller than that of the Independent Plant. Also the margin of the Independent Plant results in decrease in the plant utilization factor. But the margin of the Modularized Plant results in little decrease in the plant utilization factor, because the Modularized Plant can address the types of reprocessing fuel to adjust to Pu demand and processing capacity. Therefore, the Modularized Plant has a greater potential for the reprocessing plants during transition period. (author)

  10. Use of curium neutron flux from head-end pyroprocessing subsystems for the High Reliability Safeguards methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, R.A., E-mail: r.angelo.borrelli@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    The deployment of nuclear energy systems (NESs) is expanding around the world. Nations are investing in NESs as a means to establish energy independence, grow national economies, and address climate change. Transitioning to the advanced nuclear fuel cycle can meet growing energy demands and ensure resource sustainability. However, nuclear facilities in all phases of the advanced fuel cycle must be ‘safeguardable,’ where safety, safeguards, and security are integrated into a practical design strategy. To this end, the High Reliability Safeguards (HRS) approach is a continually developing safeguardability methodology that applies intrinsic design features and employs a risk-informed approach for systems assessment that is safeguards-motivated. Currently, a commercial pyroprocessing facility is used as the example system. This paper presents a modeling study that investigates the neutron flux associated with processed materials. The intent of these studies is to determine if the neutron flux will affect facility design, and subsequently, safeguardability. The results presented in this paper are for the head-end subsystems in a pyroprocessing facility. The collective results from these studies will then be used to further develop the HRS methodology.

  11. Absorption column working study for iodine formed in spent fuel reprocessing plant gaseous effluents: hydrodynamic and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignau, B.

    1986-09-01

    The hydrodynamic and matter transfer parameters has been studied on absorption columns destined to trap iodine issued of spent fuel reprocessing plants. These columns have different packing - Raschig rings (glass, ceramic, PVC, steel) - Berl saddles (ceramic) - Weaved metallic thread (steel). The effect of dimension and of packing structure on gas pressure drop and on liquid holdup has been evaluated. The partial transfer coefficients of I 2 -Air-NaOH system has been the object of an experimental study. This system can be simulated by CO 2 -Air-NaOH system [fr

  12. Research on advanced aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel: literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hecke, K.; Goethals, P.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the partitioning and transmutation strategy is to reduce the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel to the level of natural uranium in a short period of time (about 1000 years) and thus the required containment period of radioactive material in a repository. Furthermore, it aims to reduce the volume of waste requiring deep geological disposal and hence the associated space requirements and costs. Several aqueous as well as pyrochemical separation processes have been developed for the partitioning of the long-lived radionuclides from the remaining of the spent fuel. This report aims to describe and compare advanced aqueous reprocessing methods.

  13. Study on reprocessing of uranium-thorium fuel with solvent extraction for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Rongzhou; He Peijun; Liu Bingren; Zhu Yongjun

    1992-08-01

    A single cycle process by solvent extraction with acid feed solution is suggested. The purpose is to reprocess uranium-thorium fuel elements which are of high burn-up and rich of 232 U from HTGR (high temperature gas cooled reactor). The extraction cascade tests have been completed. The recovery of uranium and thorium is greater than 99.6%. By this method, the requirement, under remote control to re-fabricate fuel elements, of decontamination factors for Cs, Sr, Zr-Nb and Ru has been reached

  14. Research on advanced aqueous reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel: literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hecke, K.; Goethals, P.

    2006-07-15

    The goal of the partitioning and transmutation strategy is to reduce the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel to the level of natural uranium in a short period of time (about 1000 years) and thus the required containment period of radioactive material in a repository. Furthermore, it aims to reduce the volume of waste requiring deep geological disposal and hence the associated space requirements and costs. Several aqueous as well as pyrochemical separation processes have been developed for the partitioning of the long-lived radionuclides from the remaining of the spent fuel. This report aims to describe and compare advanced aqueous reprocessing methods.

  15. Development of a simulation program to study error propagation in the reprocessing input accountancy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanfilippo, L.

    1987-01-01

    A physical model and a computer program have been developed to simulate all the measurement operations involved with the Isotopic Dilution Analysis technique currently applied in the Volume - Concentration method for the Reprocessing Input Accountancy, together with their errors or uncertainties. The simulator is apt to easily solve a number of problems related to the measurement sctivities of the plant operator and the inspector. The program, written in Fortran 77, is based on a particular Montecarlo technique named ''Random Sampling''; a full description of the code is reported

  16. Studies in the dissolver off-gas system for a spent FBR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, E.; Huefner, R.; Weirich, F.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations of possible modifications of the process steps of a dissolver off-gas (DOG) system for a spent FBR fuel reprocessing plant are reported. The following operations are discussed: iodine removal from the fuel solution; behaviour of NOsub(x) and iodine in nitric acid off-gas scrubbers at different temperatures and nitric acid concentrations; iodine desorption from the scrub acid; selective absorption of noble gases in refrigerant-12; cold traps. The combination of suitable procedures to produce a total DOG system is described. (U.K.)

  17. Studies in biological excretion of inhaled plutonium in the case of a few occupational workers in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedge, A.G.; Chandramouli, S.; Iyer, R.S.; Bhat, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    A power reactor fuel reprocessing plant is in operation at Tarapur. The various processes involved in the plant are: fuel rod cutting, dissolution in nitric acid, separation of plutonium, and handling of separated plutonium. The chemical form of plutonium could be nitrate, TBP complex, or oxide depending upon the nature of the process involved. Possible internal exposure to plant personnel occurs mainly by inhalation and occasionally through a contaminated wound. Occupational workers are regularly monitored for internal contamination by urinary excretion analysis as well as by in-vivo lung counting. This paper presents a follow-up study of plutonium elimination in four inhalation exposure cases. (author) 8 refs.; 6 figs

  18. A study on graded approach for risk assessment of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Tatsuro; Kohata, Yuuji; Takebe, Kazumi; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Kazuya; Kurosu, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    In a reprocessing plant, radioactive materials exist in several chemical processes and storage facilities, therefore we should evaluate risks of many events with various types, scenarios, frequencies and consequences in order to assess total risk of the plant. In order to assess risks of many events efficiently and effectively, the 'Graded Approach' should be applied to the assessment method taking account of importance of the consequence, complexity of scenarios and necessitated uncertainty. Therefore, we have developed a simplified quantitative method, so-called the 'improved risk index method', based on the 'risk index method' recommended by US NRC as qualitative risk evaluation method for 'Integrated safety analysis (ISA)' of fuel cycle facilities, to enhance quantitability, consistency and traceability in evaluation. The results of the 'improved risk index method' well agree with the detailed PSA in spite of the simplification. We will use this method in combination with the detailed PSA method, and will use the results for risk-informed management/regulation of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. (author)

  19. Summary of plutonium terrestrial research studies in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L.; Andriano, D.C.; Pinder, J.F.; McLeod, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports plutonium concentrations of wheat, soybeans, and corn grown (a) on a field adjacent to one of the nuclear reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), (b) in a glasshouse, and (c) offsite. The crops on SRP were grown on a field that has been receiving both fallout plutonium and plutonium emitted at low chronic levels from an air exhaust stack since 1955. The crops grown in the glasshouse were raised on soil from the onsite agricultural field. The offsite field has received only fallout plutonium. The crop data indicate that the dose to an individual from ingesting grain grown on the field, although higher than from ingesting grain grown offsite, is still small (the 70-year dose-to-bone from eating 2 X 10 5 g (440 lb) of wheat in a year would be less than one mrem). Crop data from the field and the glasshouse experiment indicate that less than 10% of the total contamination of field-grown crops adjacent to a reprocessing facility was contributed by root uptake, the remainder by deposition on the plant surfaces. The plutonium content of the grain was generally 10 to 100 times less than that of the vegetation, again suggesting that deposition from stack emissions vegetation, again suggesting that deposition from stack emissions on the vegetation increased the plutonium content; whereas the grain, particularly corn and soybeans, was protected by thehusk or pod and contained principally plutonium from the root uptake pathway

  20. The development of automated fuel dismantling equipment for a future head-end plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haberlin, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    For future reprocessing plants, practicable methods for dismantling fuel elements are being examined at Springfields Nuclear Power Development Laboratories which would meet the requirements of a high throughput facility. This paper contains the initial results of an experimental programme undertaken to develop and evaluate an automated high speed single/multiple pin extraction unit. Concomitant parts of the programme include the design and evaluation of single and multi-pin extraction chucks. Dummy fuel elements, a 325 pin gridded LMFBR assembly and a 17 x 17 pin gridded LWR assembly were used to assess process efficacy

  1. General Atomic Reprocessing Pilot Plant: engineering-scale dissolution system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, H.H.

    1979-04-01

    In February 1978, a dissolver-centrifuge system was added to the cold reprocessing pilot plant at General Atomic Company, which completed the installation of an HTGR fuel head-end reprocessing pilot plant. This report describes the engineering-scale equipment in the pilot plant and summarizes the design features derived from development work performed in the last few years. The dissolver operating cycles for both thorium containing BISO and uranium containinng WAR fissile fuels are included. A continuous vertical centrifuge is used to clarify the resultant dissolver product solution. Process instrumentation and controls for the system reflect design philosophy suitable for remote operation

  2. Initiating events study of the first extraction cycle process in a model reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renze; Zhang, Jian Gang; Zhuang, Dajie; Feng, Zong Yang [China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Definition and grouping of initiating events (IEs) are important basics for probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). An IE in a spent fuel reprocessing plant (SFRP) is an event that probably leads to the release of dangerous material to jeopardize workers, public and environment. The main difference between SFRPs and nuclear power plants (NPPs) is that hazard materials spread diffusely in a SFRP and radioactive material is just one kind of hazard material. Since the research on IEs for NPPs is in-depth around the world, there are several general methods to identify IEs: reference of lists in existence, review of experience feedback, qualitative analysis method, and deductive analysis method. While failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is an important qualitative analysis method, master logic diagram (MLD) method is the deductive analysis method. IE identification in SFRPs should be consulted with the experience of NPPs, however the differences between SFRPs and NPPs should be considered seriously. The plutonium uranium reduction extraction (Purex) process is adopted by the technics in a model reprocessing plant. The first extraction cycle (FEC) is the pivotal process in the Purex process. Whether the FEC can function safely and steadily would directly influence the production process of the whole plant-production quality. Important facilities of the FEC are installed in the equipment cells (ECs). In this work, IEs in the FEC process were identified and categorized by FMEA and MLD two methods, based on the fact that ECs are containments in the plant. The results show that only two ECs in the FEC do not need to be concerned particularly with safety problems, and criticality, fire and red oil explosion are IEs which should be emphatically analyzed. The results are accordant with the references.

  3. A study of safeguards approach for the area of plutonium evaporator in a large scale reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hirotada; Ikawa, Koji

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary study on a safeguards approach for the chemical processing area in a large scale reprocessing plant has been carried out. In this approach, plutonium inventory at the plutonium evaporator will not be taken, but containment and surveillance (C/S) measures will be applied to ensure the integrity of an area specifically defined to include the plutonium evaporator. The plutonium evaporator area consists of the evaporator itself and two accounting points, i.e., one before the plutonium evaporator and the other after the plutonium evaporator. For newly defined accounting points, two alternative measurement methods, i.e., accounting vessels with high accuracy and flow meters, were examined. Conditions to provide the integrity of the plutonium evaporator area were also examined as well as other technical aspects associated with this approach. The results showed that an appropriate combination of NRTA and C/S measures would be essential to realize a cost effective safeguards approach to be applied for a large scale reprocessing plant. (author)

  4. A study of statistical tests for near-real-time materials accountancy using field test data of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Hideo; Ikawa, Koji; Miura, Nobuyuki; Iwanaga, Masayuki; Kusano, Toshitsugu.

    1988-03-01

    An Near-Real-Time Materials Accountancy(NRTA) system had been developed as an advanced safeguards measure for PNC Tokai Reprocessing Plant; a minicomputer system for NRTA data processing was designed and constructed. A full scale field test was carried out as a JASPAS(Japan Support Program for Agency Safeguards) project with the Agency's participation and the NRTA data processing system was used. Using this field test data, investigation of the detection power of a statistical test under real circumstances was carried out for five statistical tests, i.e., a significance test of MUF, CUMUF test, average loss test, MUF residual test and Page's test on MUF residuals. The result shows that the CUMUF test, average loss test, MUF residual test and the Page's test on MUF residual test are useful to detect a significant loss or diversion. An unmeasured inventory estimation model for the PNC reprocessing plant was developed in this study. Using this model, the field test data from the C-1 to 85 - 2 campaigns were re-analyzed. (author)

  5. The refurbishment of the D1206 fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, G.

    1988-01-01

    The term decommissioning can be applied not only to reactors but to any nuclear plant, laboratory, building or part of a building that may have been associated with radioactive material and needs to be restored to clean conditions. In this case the decommissioning and reconstruction of the Dounreay Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing plant, so that plutonium oxide could be reprocessed as well as enriched uranium fuel, is described. The work included improving containment and shielding, building a new head-end treatment cave for the more complex and larger fuel elements, improving the ventilation and constructing a new dissolver. In this paper the breakdown cave and dissolver cell are described and compared and the work done explained. (U.K.)

  6. Chemical engineering in fuel reprocessing. The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.; Sombret, C.; Bernard, C.; Miquel, P.; Moulin, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reprocessing is the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, designed to recover valuable fissile materials, especially plutonium, and to condition safely all the wastes ready for disposal. For its new commercial reprocessing plants (UP 3 and UP 2 800) COGEMA decided to include many engineering innovations as well as new processes and key-components developed by CEA. UP 3 is a complete new plant with a capacity of 800 t/y which was put in operation in August 1990. UP 2 800 is an extension of the existing UP 2 facility, designed to achieve the same annual capacity of 800 t/y, to be put in operation at the end of 1993 by the commissioning of a new head-end and highly active chemical process facilities

  7. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, D.

    1985-01-01

    How should the decision in favour of reprocessing and against alternative waste management concepts be judged from an economic standpoint. Reprocessing is not imperative neither for resource-economic reasons nor for nuclear energy strategy reasons. On the contrary, the development of an ultimate storage concept representing a real alternative promising to close, within a short period of time, the nuclear fuel cycle at low cost. At least, this is the result of an extensive economic efficiency study recently submitted by the Energy Economics Institute which investigated all waste management concepts relevant for the Federal Republic of Germany in the long run, i.e. direct ultimate storage of spent fuel elements (''Other waste disposal technologies'' - AE) as well as reprocessing of spent fuel elements where re-usable plutonium and uranium are recovered and radioactive waste goes to ultimate storage (''Integrated disposal'' - IE). Despite such fairly evident results, the government of the Federal Republic of Germany has favoured the construction of a reprocessing plant. From an economic point of view there is no final answer to the question whether or not the argumentation is sufficient to justify the decision to construct a reprocessing plant. This is true for both the question of technical feasibility and issues of overriding significance of a political nature. (orig./HSCH) [de

  8. Pilot studies of an extraction process for reprocessing of spent fuel from fast reactors: Hardware and process details of extractor selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, V.I.; Pavlovich, V.B.; Smetanin, E.Ya.; Glazunov, N.V.; Shklyar, L.I.; Dubrovskii, V.G.; Serov, A.V.; Zakharkin, B.S.; Konorchenko, V.D.; Korotkov, I.A.; Neumoev, N.V.; Renard, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    While acknowledging the bold and persistent efforts of U.S. and Russian specialists to develop the concept of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from fast reactors on remote-controlled equipment for removal of actinides from the fission products one should recognize that the tasks of reprocessing such fuel can be handled only by using water-extraction technology, especially since the known Purex process continues to be improved to the point that a single-cycle scheme may be developed. This article presents results of pilot studies conducted in hot cells using multistage extractors in continuous counterflow operation; data on various extractor types used in reprocessing spent mixed oxide nuclear fuel; advantages and disadvantages of centrifugal and pulsed column extractor; comparison of column-type and centrifugal extractors; and extraction process

  9. Review of recent ORNL studies in solvent cleanup and diluent degradation. Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1982-01-01

    Testing of solvent cleanup methods to replace the use of sodium carbonate in the Purex process has been ongoing for several years in order to reduce the quantity of waste sodium nitrate generated and to improve phase separation. Alternate solvent cleanup methods include the use of packed columns of base-treated silica gel or solvent scrubbing with hydrazine oxalate. Degradation of the diluent was shown to generate long-chain organic acids which appear to be the major culprits in the phase separation problems encountered in sodium carbonate scrubbers. Solvent scrubbing with hydrazine oxalate gives improved phase separations. Solvent cleanup in columns packed with base-treated silica gel avoids the phase separation problem since a dispersable aqueous phase is not present. Removals of TBP degradation products and metal-ion complexes by sodium carbonate, hydrazine salts, or by packed beds of base-treated silica gel are all satisfactory. Solvent scrubbing by hydrazine oxalate solutions is the prime candidate for solvent cleanup in fuel reprocessing plants

  10. Study on applicability of highly corrosion-resistant amorphous coating techniques to components of reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Makoto; Okuyama, Gen; Chiba, Shigeru; Matsunaga, Tsunebumi

    1991-01-01

    In view of the growing need for prolongation of lives of reprocessing plant installations, we recently investigated the applicability of highly corrosion-resistant amorphous coating techniques to such plant components as to be subjected to a badly corrosive environment created by high temperatures, boiling nitric acid (HNO 3 ), etc. As the result, giving a preference to the Ta-based amorphous alloys exhibiting high corrosion-resistance in HNO 3 solutions, we made specimens of stainless steel plates coated with the above amorphous alloys through the sputtering process thereof. To our satisfaction, these specimens successfully passed various HNO 3 corrosion tests as described later on. Ta-based amorphous films give cathodic protection to 310 Nb stainless steel plates, and that with extremely low corrosion rates of themselves as protecting agents. For these reasons, we are confident that there will be no practical problems at all, in case we adopt stainless steel plates partially coated with such amorphous alloys for use in a nitric-acid environment. In this paper, we explain the comparative tests for various amorphous alloys with different compositions, referring also to the thus-selected Ta-based amorphous alloy along with several kinds of corrosion tests specially arranged for the same alloy. (author)

  11. Tritium in reprocessing plants: a study of the inventory, behavior, and the possibilities of separation of the tritium isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnez, H.; Laser, M.; Merz, E.

    The path followed by tritium in reprocessing plants is described in quantitative terms based on the Purex and Thorex processes. Flowsheets are given for the Purex process which are on the one hand based on the present state of technology, but make provision at the same time for a recycling of the aqueous phase and a tritium separation. As an alternative approach the technical and economic aspects have been examined of a prior separation of the tritium after reduction of the fuel elements, followed by separation from the aqueous phase. The ultimate storage and transport of the separated tritium were included in the cost determination. The conclusion is reached as a result of the study that tritium separation is possible on scientific and technical grounds. The estimates made show the financial outlay to be less than 10 DM/GWh, but may on occasion be substantially higher, since no practical or industrial experience of the process is yet available

  12. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1964-12-01

    This volume contains the following reports: Experimental facility for testing and development of pulsed columns and auxiliary devices; Chemical-technology study of the modified 'Purex' process; Chemical and radiometric control analyses; Chromatographic separation of rare earth elements on paper treated by di-n butylphosphate; Preliminary study of some organic nitrogen extracts significant in fuel reprocessing

  13. Present status of foreign reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otagaki, Takao; Ishikawa, Yasusi; Mori, Jyunichi

    2000-03-01

    In considering extensively and evaluating advanced nuclear fuel recycle technologies then selecting credible one among those technology options and establishing practicable plan of future fast reactor fuel recycle technology, it is important to investigate foreign reprocessing information extensively and minutely as much as possible then to know trends of reprocessing technology development in the world and present technology level of each country. This report is intending to present information of the status and the technology of operating, constructing and closed foreign reprocessing facilities in the world, including, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel reprocessing technology. The conceptual study of 'Foreign Reprocessing Technology Database' was also performed in order to add or revise the information easily. The eight countries, France, The U.K., Russia, The U.S., Germany, Belgium, India and China, were studied regarding outline of the facilities, operation status, future plan, technical information of process flow sheet, primary components, maintenance system etc, construction and operating costs, accidents or troubles, decommissioning status. (author)

  14. Alternative reprocessing schemes evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper reviews the parameters which determine the inaccessibility of the plutonium in reprocessing plants. Among the various parameters, the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials, the various processing schemes and the confinement are considered. The emphasis is placed on that latter parameter, and the advantages of an increased confinement in the socalled PIPEX reprocessing plant type are presented

  15. Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in a child and an adolescent with mild to borderline intellectual disability: A multiple baseline across subjects study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mevissen, E.H.M.; Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Jongh, A. de

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study explored the effectiveness of eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in persons with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) using a multiple baseline across subjects design. METHODS: One child and one

  16. Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in a Child and an Adolescent with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability: A Multiple Baseline across Subjects Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevissen, Liesbeth; Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; de Jongh, Ad

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study explored the effectiveness of eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in persons with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) using a multiple baseline across subjects design. Methods: One child and one adolescent with MBID, who met diagnostic criteria…

  17. Eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in a child and an adolescent with mild to borderline intellectual disability : A multiple baseline across subjects study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mevissen, L.; Didden, R.; Korzilius, H.; de Jongh, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study explored the effectiveness of eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in persons with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) using a multiple baseline across subjects design. Methods: One child and one

  18. Comparative Case Study of Diffusion of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing in Two Clinical Settings: Empirically Supported Treatment Status Is Not Enough

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, Joan M.; Biyanova, Tatyana; Coyne, James C.

    2009-01-01

    An in-depth comparative case study was conducted of two attempts at diffusion of an empirically supported, but controversial, psychotherapy: eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). One Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treatment setting in which there was substantial uptake was

  19. The implementation of a burnup credit based criticality safety assessment in the THORP head end plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, J.; Edge, J.A.; Gracey, J.; Harris, N.

    2003-01-01

    A new criticality safety assessment based on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit has been developed to cover operations in BNFL's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP). Reduction of the gadolinium concentration leads to significant reduction in active waste volumes. Detailed description of the methodology was presented at ICNC 1999 and the basic components of the approved safety case have remained unchanged from those proposed then. This paper presents a brief summary of the new methodology, and describes further analyses carried out to quantify additional safety margins. These additional margins are not credited in the derivation of the operating limits, but provide further evidence of the fault tolerance inherent in the new regime. As part of the arrangements to monitor the overall performance of the plant and instrumentation under the new regime, various analyses of plant data are made, including 'on-line' cross checks of measured versus expected fuel parameters (i.e. in addition to the checks on Residual Enrichment). Statistical analyses of data are made and compared with similar data from earlier batches. A summary of analyses made on some of the early fuel batches is presented here. A summary of the likely further development in the Burnup Credit methodology is given in this paper. (author)

  20. Status and prospects for reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossney, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    Following the formation of United Reprocessors (U.R.G.) in 1976 by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (B.N.F.L.) in the United Kingdom, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (C.E.A.) in France and K.E.W.A. Kernbrennstoff-Wiederaufarbeitungs-Gesellschaft MBH (K.E.W.A.) in Germany, collaboration is now well established for the marketing of their reprocessing services for irradiated oxide fuel from thermal reactors. In addition collaboration in the continued evolution of the technology has progressed and an extensive research and development programme has been established, the results of which are exchanged between the shareholders. During 1976 the U.K. Government has given approval to B.N.F.L. to sign further contracts with foreign customers, subject to certain conditions. In France, the fuel cycle activities of the C.E.A. have been vested in a new company (Compagnie Generale Des Matieres Nucleaires (C.O.G.E.M.A.)) and their La Hague plant has commenced reprocessing operations on irradiated oxide fuel. In Germany, an agreement has been signed between K.E.W.A. and P.W.K. for the pre-project study for the proposed German plant. Against this background this paper reviews the present status of reprocessing by the shareholders of U.R.G. and the prospects for reprocessing

  1. Gloves Reprocessing: Does It Really Save Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pankaj; Kumari, Santosh; Sodhi, Jitender; Talati, Shweta; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Gloves are reprocessed and reused in health-care facilities in resource-limited settings to reduce the cost of availability of gloves. The study was done with the aim to compute the cost of reprocessing of gloves so that an economically rationale decision can be taken. A retrospective record-based cross-sectional study was undertaken in a central sterile supply department where different steps during reprocessing of gloves were identified and the cost involved in reprocessing per pair of gloves was calculated. The cost of material and manpower was calculated to arrive at the cost of reprocessing per pair of gloves. The cost of a reprocessed pair of surgical gloves was calculated to be Indian Rupee (INR) 14.33 which was greater than the cost of a new pair of disposable surgical gloves (INR 9.90) as the cost of sterilization of one pair of gloves itself came out to  be INR 10.97. The current study showed that the purchase of sterile disposable single-use gloves is cheaper than the process of recycling. Reprocessing of gloves is not economical on tangible terms even in resource-limited settings, and from the perspective of better infection control as well as health-care worker safety, it further justifies the use of disposable gloves.

  2. Environmental evaluation of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This paper addresses two specific points. (a) The means by which it is established that reprocessing is carried out within the basic standards for radiological protection set by the ICRP. (b) A summary of the products, wastes and effluents of reprocessing together with the energy and water resources required. It is concluded that reprocessing of spent thermal reactor fuel can be undertaken whilst conforming to the basic standards set by ICRP. For domestic reasons of public acceptability some countries adopt very strict limits. Any attempt at comparisons between limits set by individual countries could lead to misunderstandings if account is not taken of these additional factors which may in turn influence the cost of reprocessing

  3. Wastes from fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschrich, H.

    1976-01-01

    Handling, treatment, and interim storage of radioactive waste, problems confronted with during the reprocessing of spent fuel elements from LWR's according to the Purex-type process, are dealt with in detail. (HR/LN) [de

  4. History and current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funasaka, Hideyuki; Nagai, Toshihisa; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2008-01-01

    History and present state of fast breeder reactor was reviewed in series. As a history and current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, this ninth lecture presented the progress of the FBR fuel reprocessing technology and advanced reprocessing processes. FBR fuel reprocessing technology had been developed to construct the reprocessing equipment test facilities (RETF) based on PUREX process technologies. With economics, reduction of environmental burdens and proliferation resistance taken into consideration, advanced aqueous method for nuclear fuel cycle activities has been promoted as the government's basic policy. Innovative technologies on mechanical disassembly, continuous rotary dissolver, crystallizer, solvent extraction and actinides recovery have been mainly studied. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Discharges from a fast reactor reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the environmental impact of the calculated routine discharges from a fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant. These assessments have been carried out during the early stages of an evolving in-depth study which culminated in the design for a European demonstration reprocessing plant (EDRP). This plant would be capable of reprocessing irradiated fuel from a series of European fast reactors. Cost-benefit analysis has then been used to assess whether further reductions in the currently predicted routine discharges would be economically justified

  6. World-wide redistribution of 129Iodine from nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities: Results from meteoric, river, and seawater tracer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, J.E.; Oktay, S.; Santschi, P.H.; Schink, D.R.; Fehn, U.; Snyder, G.

    1999-01-01

    Releases of the long-lived radioisotope of iodine, 129 I, from commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities in England and France have surpassed natural, and even bomb test inventories. 129 I/ 127 I ratios measured in a variety of environmental matrices from Europe, North America and the southern hemisphere show the influence of fuel reprocessing-derived 129 I, which is transported globally via the atmosphere. Transport and cycling of I and 129 I in the hydrosphere and in soils are described based on a spatial survey of 129 I in freshwater. (author)

  7. Spent fuel reprocessing options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide an update on the latest developments in nuclear reprocessing technologies in the light of new developments on the global nuclear scene. The background information on spent fuel reprocessing is provided in Section One. Substantial global growth of nuclear electricity generation is expected to occur during this century, in response to environmental issues and to assure the sustainability of the electrical energy supply in both industrial and less-developed countries. This growth carries with it an increasing responsibility to ensure that nuclear fuel cycle technologies are used only for peaceful purposes. In Section Two, an overview of the options for spent fuel reprocessing and their level of development are provided. A number of options exist for the treatment of spent fuel. Some, including those that avoid separation of a pure plutonium stream, are at an advanced level of technological maturity. These could be deployed in the next generation of industrial-scale reprocessing plants, while others (such as dry methods) are at a pilot scale, laboratory scale or conceptual stage of development. In Section Three, research and development in support of advanced reprocessing options is described. Next-generation spent fuel reprocessing plants are likely to be based on aqueous extraction processes that can be designed to a country specific set of spent fuel partitioning criteria for recycling of fissile materials to advanced light water reactors or fast spectrum reactors. The physical design of these plants must incorporate effective means for materials accountancy, safeguards and physical protection. Section four deals with issues and challenges related to spent fuel reprocessing. The spent fuel reprocessing options assessment of economics, proliferation resistance, and environmental impact are discussed. The importance of public acceptance for a reprocessing strategy is discussed. A review of modelling tools to support the

  8. Studies on inorganic ion-exchangers. Part I : application of polyantimonic acid for the polishing of uranium product of reprocessing stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, T.S.; Ananthakrishnan, M.; Mayan Kutty, P.C.; Mani, V.V.S.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic study has been initiated to investigate the feasibility of applying various inorganic exchangers to specific problems in nuclear fuel reprocessing industry and related spheres of activity. An investigation has been carried out to select a suitable exchanger for the polishing of tail-end uranium product of reprocessing stream free of residual plutonium activity. It includes determination of distribution ratios of uranium and plutonium on the exchangers like zirconium phosphate (ZrP), ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP), ammonium phosphotungstate (APW), polyantimonic acid (PA), polyphosphoantimonic acid (PPA) and breakthrough capacities of plutonium on some of these exchangers. The inhibition studies of sodium on plutonium uptake on polyantimonic acid and the effective decontamination factors achieved using uranium tanker solution from the plant for recycling work have been described. These results indicated the usefulness of the polyantimonic acid exchanger for this purpose. (author)

  9. French experience and prospects in the reprocessing of fast breeder reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.

    1983-06-01

    Experience acquired in France in the field of reprocessing spent fuels from fast breeder reactors is recalled. Emphasis is put on characteristics and quantities of spent fuels reprocessed in La Hague and Marcoule facilities. Then reprocessing developments with the realisation of the new pilot plant TOR at Marcoule, new equipments and study of industrial reprocessing units are reviewed [fr

  10. Modular design of a reprocessing plant dissolver off-gas system. Variations, flexibility and stage of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Huefner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Simple and economic control of the volatile radionuclides in a reprocessing plant requires two equally important prerequisites: suitable processing in the plant head-end and reliable operation of the dissolver off-gas (DOG) purification system. A small number of DOG purification modules was selected from various alternatives. The major selection criteria are removal efficiency, simplicity, convenient operating conditions and flexibility that provide compatibility with other off-gas treatment steps, subsequent waste treatment and different processing modes in the head-end. The behaviour of noxious materials was investigated in nitric acid off-gas scrubbers of different design and for a wide range of operating modes and conditions. A concentration range of nitric acid from very dilute to hyperazeotropic concentrations and a temperature range from -55 deg. C to above room temperature as well as the use of hydrogen peroxide were studied on an engineering scale. Nitrous gases and iodine can be removed to the trace level at special operating modes. Aerosol and iodine filters are discussed briefly. A selective absorption process using CF 2 Cl 2 solvent for noble gas and 14 C removal was developed on a laboratory scale. It operates at low temperatures and atmospheric pressure. Xe and Kr were separated using two absorption columns. Pilot-plant scale noble gas scrubbers are under construction and are being integrated into the existing test facility. A series of process steps has been chosen for integrated process demonstration runs on an engineering scale. The integrated DOG system consists of several scrubbers and filters operating at atmospheric pressure. The temperature decreases stepwise, without producing large changes in the opposite direction, providing compatibility within the process train

  11. Operating experience in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, reprocessing has accumulated 180 years of operating experience in ten plants, six of them with 41 years of operation in reprocessing oxide fuel from light water reactors. After abortive, premature attempts at what is called commercial reprocessing, which had been oriented towards the market value of recoverable uranium and plutonium, non-military reprocessing technologies have proved their technical feasibility, since 1966 on a pilot scale and since 1976 on an industrial scale. Reprocessing experience obtained on uranium metal fuel with low and medium burnups can now certainly be extrapolated to oxide fuel with high burnup and from pilot plants to industrial scale plants using the same technologies. The perspectives of waste management of the nuclear power plants operated in the Federal Republic of Germany should be viewed realistically. The technical problems still to be solved are in a balanced relationship to the benefit arising to the national economy out of nuclear power generation and can be solved in time, provided there are clearcut political boundary conditions. (orig.) [de

  12. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  13. Development of remote fuel pushing system in Reprocessing Plant, Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Munish; Coelho, G.; Kodilkar, S.S.; Mishra, A.K.; Bajpai, D.D.; Nair, M.K.T.

    1990-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (PREFRE), Tarapur has been processing spent fuel arising from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors for quite some time. The process adopted in the plant is purex process with chopleach head end treatment. The head end treatment involves loading of ten spent fuel bundles in the charging cask at a time in the fuel bay and aligning the cask with the transfer port and subsequently pushing all the ten bundles together into the fuel magazine. At present the fuel is pushed into the magazine manually. Since the ten bundles weigh approximately 200 Kg. and involves pushing of 9.4 meters length, the operation is carried out using stainless steel screwed pipes, in steps of five lengths. The entire operation requires a large number of trained skilled workers and is found to be tedious. To solve this problem a hydraulic cum pneumatic fuel pushing system has been designed, fabricated, tested and is in the process of installation in the fuel handling area. This paper describes various requirements, constraints and dimensional details arising in the incorporation of such a system to be back fitted in an existing plant, though many of these constraints can be avoided in future plants. Further, complete sequence of operations, technical specifications regarding the telescopic hydraulic power pack and associated controls incorporated in the system are highlighted. (author). 2 figs

  14. Study of kinetics of extraction of actinides in processes of reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamotte, Claude

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis reports a bibliographical study on extraction kinetics. After some generalities on solvent-based extraction, and on the chemistry of actinides in solution, on the methods of kinetics study which are generally used and their mathematical treatments, the author compares the published results for the extraction kinetics of nitric acid, uranium VI, uranium IV, neptunium IV and plutonium IV [fr

  15. Basic design study on plutonium electro-refining facility of oxide fuel pyroelectrochemical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kenji; Kondo, Naruhito; Kamoshida, Hiroshi; Omori, Takashi

    2001-02-01

    The test facility basic design, utility necessity and estimation cost of the Oxide Fuel Pyro-process for the use of Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) of JNC have been studied with the information of the previous year concept study and the additional conditions. Drastic down sizing design change or the building reconstruction is necessary to place the Oxide Fuel Pyro-process Facility in the laboratory ''C'', because it is not possible to reserve enough maintenance space and the weight of the facility is over the acceptable limit of the building. A further study such as facility down sizing, apparatus detail design and experiment detail process treatment has to be planned. (author)

  16. Reprocessing in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossney, G [United Reprocessors G.m.b.H., Karlsruhe (F.R. Germany)

    1976-04-01

    The status of reprocessing activities within the member organizations of United Reprocessors is reviewed. The U.K. government has approved overseas deals by BNFL which will help to pay for their planned plant of 1000 te U p.a. at Windscale. In Germany KEWA has selected a site at Aschenburg as a fuel cycle centre where they plan to build a utility financed reprocessing plant of 1500 te U p.a. France has formed a new fuel cycle corporation, Cogema, which hopes to participate in the large volume of Japanese business negotiated by BNFL. United Reprocessors have agreed to pool their technology which may be available to organisations wishing to construct reprocessing plants in their own countries.

  17. Economic evaluation of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the Final Working Group 4 report, considers the economics of the four basic options available in nuclear programmes namely: the once-through cycle; reprocessing with uranium recycle and plutonium storage; reprocessing with both uranium and plutonium recycle; and the fast reactor. These options are represented by four separate areas on a ''phase diagram'' showing the relationship between relative generating costs and uranium ore price. The basic algebra defining each component of electricity cost is given for each option. The diagram can take different forms depending upon the relative magnitudes of the costs of reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication and whether the once-through fuel cycle is acceptable or not on grounds other than strictly economic, i.e. environmental grounds. The shortcomings of this form of presentation are also identified

  18. Behavior of molybdenum in pyrochemical reprocessing: A spectroscopic study of the chlorination of molybdenum and its oxides in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovicha, Vladimir A.; Griffiths, Trevor R.; Thied, Robert C.; Lewin, Bob

    2003-01-01

    The high temperature reactions of molybdenum and its oxides with chlorine and hydrogen chloride in molten alkali metal chlorides were investigated between 400 and 700 deg. C. The melts studied were LiCl-KCl, NaCl-CsCl and NaCl-KCl and the reactions were followed by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy measurements. In these melts Mo reacts with Cl 2 and initially produces MoCl 6 2- and then a mixture of Mo(III) and Mo(V) chlorocomplexes, the final proportion depending on the reaction conditions. The Mo(V) content can be removed as MoCl 5 from the melt under vacuum or be reduced to Mo(III) by Mo metal. The reaction of Mo when HCl gas is bubbled into alkali chloride melts yields only MoCl 6 3- . MoO 2 reacts in these melts with chlorine to form soluble MoOCl 5 2- and volatile MoO 2 Cl 2 . MoO 3 is soluble in chloride melts and then decomposes into the oxychloride MoO 2 Cl 2 , which sublimes or can be sparged from the melt, and molybdate. Pyrochemical reprocessing can thus be employed for molybdenum since, after various intermediates, the end-products are chloride melts containing chloro and oxychloro anions of molybdenum plus molybdate, and volatile chlorides and oxychlorides that can be readily separated off. The reactions were fastest in the NaCl-KCl melt. The X-ray diffraction pattern of MoO 2 Cl 2 is reported for the first time

  19. Application of curium measurements for safeguarding at reprocessing plants. Study 1: High-level liquid waste and Study 2: Spent fuel assemblies and leached hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinard, P.M.; Menlove, H.O.

    1996-03-01

    In large-scale reprocessing plants for spent fuel assemblies, the quantity of plutonium in the waste streams each year is large enough to be important for nuclear safeguards. The wastes are drums of leached hulls and cylinders of vitrified high-level liquid waste. The plutonium amounts in these wastes cannot be measured directly by a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique because the gamma rays emitted by plutonium are obscured by gamma rays from fission products, and the neutrons from spontaneous fissions are obscured by those from curium. The most practical NDA signal from the waste is the neutron emission from curium. A diversion of waste for its plutonium would also take a detectable amount of curium, so if the amount of curium in a waste stream is reduced, it can be inferred that there is also a reduced amount of plutonium. This report studies the feasibility of tracking the curium through a reprocessing plant with neutron measurements at key locations: spent fuel assemblies prior to shearing, the accountability tank after dissolution, drums of leached hulls after dissolution, and canisters of vitrified high-level waste after separation. Existing pertinent measurement techniques are reviewed, improvements are suggested, and new measurements are proposed. The authors integrate these curium measurements into a safeguards system

  20. Economic Study of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage and Reprocessing Practices in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Miley, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a study of nuclear power economics in Russia. It addresses political and institutional background factors which constrain Russia's energy choices in the short and intermediate run. In the approach developed here, political and institutional factors might dominate short-term decisions, but the comparative costs of Russia's fuel-cycle options are likely to constrain her long-term energy strategy. To this end, the authors have also formulated a set of policy questions which should be addressed using a quantitative decision modeling which analyzes economic costs for all major components of different fuel cycle options, including the evolution of uranium prices

  1. Economic Study of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage and Reprocessing Practices in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Singer; G. H. Miley

    1997-10-01

    This report describes a study of nuclear power economics in Russia. It addresses political and institutional background factors which constrain Russia's energy choices in the short and intermediate run. In the approach developed here, political and institutional factors might dominate short-term decisions, but the comparative costs of Russia's fuel-cycle options are likely to constrain her long-term energy strategy. To this end, the authors have also formulated a set of policy questions which should be addressed using a quantitative decision modeling which analyzes economic costs for all major components of different fuel cycle options, including the evolution of uranium prices.

  2. Reprocessing the truth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, E.; Bunyard, P.; Hildyard, N.

    1978-01-01

    Comments are made on the Report by the Inspector, Mr. Justice Parker, after the public inquiry into the application by British Nuclear Fuels Limited for permission to construct and operate a thermal oxide reprocessing plant at their Windscale works. Particular questions raised include: corrosion or storage of spent fuel, vitrification of radioactive waste; radiation effects, and permissible levels; radioactive emissions, critical groups and critical pathways; risks; reprocessing economics; commitment to the FBR; sociological aspects, including employment, nuclear weapon proliferation and terrorism, and Britain's moral responsibilities. (U.K.)

  3. Reprocessability of PHB in extrusion: ATR-FTIR, tensile tests and thermal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fábio Rivas

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanical recycling of biodegradable plastics has to be encouraged, since the consumption of energy and raw materials can be reduced towards a sustainable development in plastics materials. In this study, the evolution of thermal and mechanical properties, as well as structural changes of poly(hydroxybutyrate (PHB up to three extrusion cycles were investigated. Results indicated a significant reduction in mechanical properties already at the second extrusion cycle, with a reduction above 50% in the third cycle. An increase in the crystallinity index was observed due to chemicrystallization process during degradation by chain scission. On the other hand, significant changes in the chemical structure or in thermal stability of PHB cannot be detected by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analyses (TGA, respectively.

  4. Application of non-reductive partial partitioning in FBR fuel reprocessing: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhar Kumar; Koganti, S.B.

    2002-06-01

    The observed performance of conventional partitioning contactor in the Purex process in the Purex process is seldom satisfactory due to over-consumption of reductant and poor U-Pu decontamination factors. Contemporary trends indicate gradually move-over to MOX fuels for FBRs. In this scenario, it is not necessary to separate uranium and plutonium completely. By controlling the acid concentration and flow rates, it is possible to selectively strip essentially all the plutonium and part of the uranium in the aqueous stream. Therefore, a mixed product enriched in plutonium is obtained which can be precipitated and denitrated. Alternatively direct denitration by microwave heating can be used. The idea is particularly attractive for the flowsheet meant for the first core of FBTR where Pu/(U+Pu) ratio of 0.7 (in the discharged fuel) is diluted by addition of uranium to 0.3. By partial partitioning in the 2B contactor, a product enriched in plutonium (Pu/(U+Pu) ratio ∼0.6) can be obtained. After a minor uranium addition, this product will be suitable for the direct fabrication of II core of FBTR where a Pu/(U+Pu) ratio of 0.55 will be required. In a similar fashion, the enriched product can be used for multiple core zones of proposed PFBR by selective additions of uranium for each zone. To explore the feasibility of such partial partitioning step, an exhaustive simulation study was made using the in-house developed computer code SIMPSEX. 1300 simulations runs were completed for different combinations of parameters and results were analyzed. In this report, the results of this study and a possible flowsheet step have been discussed. Simultaneous variation in the flow rates has been considered and safe operating limits for the partial partitioning step have been established. (author)

  5. Technical aspects of fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenier, W.S.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief description of fuel reprocessing and some present developments which show the reliability of nuclear energy as a long-term supply. The following topics are discussed: technical reasons for reprocessing; economic reasons for reprocessing; past experience; justification for advanced reprocessing R and D; technical aspects of current reprocessing development. The present developments are mainly directed at the reprocessing of breeder reactor fuels but there are also many applications to light-water reactor fuel reprocessing. These new developments involve totally remote operation, and maintenance. To demonstrate this advanced reprocessing concept, pilot-scale demonstration facilities are planned with commercial application occurring sometime after the year 2000

  6. A study on adsorption onto TODGA resin after electrolytic reduction in ERIX process for reprocessing spent FBR-MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Harutaka; Arai, Tsuyoshi; Wei, Yuezhou; Kumagai, Mikio; Asakura, Toshihide; Morita, Yasuji

    2005-01-01

    For reprocessing spent FBR-MOX fuel, an advanced aqueous reprocessing process ''ERIX process'' has been developed. In this system, hydrazine is used as reduction holding reagent for the valance adjustment of U by electrolytic reduction in nitric acid solution. Therefore, hydrazine is contained in high level liquid waste after separation of U, Pu and Np. Effect of hydrazine on adsorption of FP onto TODGA resin was examined. When hydrazine concentration was less than 0.3 M, effect on the distribution coefficient was negligibly small. After electrolytic reduction, some elements exist as lower valence state. Ru and Tc are most difficult elements to control their behavior in aqueous process. The distribution coefficient of both Ru and Tc onto TODGA decreased after electrolytic reduction, because they are reduced to lower valence. Hence, it is difficult for Ru or Tc to diffuse to allover the process and separation of MA from Tc and Ru was enhanced by electrolytic reduction. (author)

  7. Neural processing of emotions in traumatized children treated with eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy: a hdEEG study

    OpenAIRE

    Trentini, C; Pagani, M; Fania, P; Speranza, AM; Nicolais, G; Sibilia, A; Inguscio, L; Verardo, AR; Fernandez, I; Ammaniti, M

    2015-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has been proven efficacious in restoring affective regulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. However, its effectiveness on emotion processing in children with complex trauma has yet to be explored. High density electroencephalography (hdEEG) was used to investigate the effects of EMDR on brain responses to adults’ emotions on children with histories of early maltreatment. Ten school-aged children were examined be...

  8. HTGR fuel reprocessing pilot plant: results of the sequential equipment operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.B.; Fields, D.E.; Kergis, C.A.

    1979-05-01

    The second sequential operation of the HTGR fuel reprocessing cold-dry head-end pilot plant equipment has been successfully completed. Twenty standard LHGTR fuel elements were crushed to a size suitable for combustion in a fluid bed burner. The graphite was combusted leaving a product of fissile and fertile fuel particles. These particles were separated in a pneumatic classifier. The fissile particles were fractured and reburned in a fluid bed to remove the inner carbon coatings. The remaining products are ready for dissolution and solvent extraction fuel recovery

  9. Worldwide reprocessing supply and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, S.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to broadly examine the current situation in the LWR fuel reprocessing services market on a worldwide basis through 2010. The main factors influencing this market (nuclear programs, fuel discharges, reprocessing capacities, buyer philosophies, etc.) are identified in the paper and the most important are highlighted and discussed in more detail. Emphasis has been placed on the situation with respect to reprocessing in those countries having a significant influence on the reprocessing market

  10. Reprocessing: experience and future outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapin, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that reprocessing is the best way to cope with irradiated fuels since it provides an optimized waste conditioning for long term storage, the possibility to recycle fissile material and the reduction of Pu diversion risk. The reprocessing constraints are discussed from political, technical, safety, public acceptance, and economical points of view. The French reprocessing programme (thermal reactor fuel fast breeder fuels) is presented together with a short review of the reprocessing experience and outlooks out of France [fr

  11. Future trends in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouyer, H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper about future trends in reprocessing essentially reflects French experience and points of view as an example of countries which, like England and Japan, consider that reprocessing is the best solution for the back end of the fuel cycle. In order to know what the future will be, it is necessary to look back at the past and try to find what have been the main reasons for evolution in that period. For reprocessing, it appears that these motivations have been 'safety and economics'. They will remain the motivations for the future. In addition, new motivations for development are starting to appear which are still imprecise but can be expressed as follows: 'which guarantees will public opinion require in order to be convinced that solutions for waste management, proposed by specialists shall ensure that a healthy environment is preserved for the use of future generations'. Consequently the paper examines successively the evolution of reprocessing in the recent past, what the immediate future could be and finally what should be necessary in the long term. (Author)

  12. Reprocessing of spent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierini, G.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for removing helium and other impurities from a mixture containing deuterium and tritium, a deuterium/tritium mixture when purified in accordance with such a process and, more particularly, to a process for the reprocessing of spent plasma removed from a thermofusion reactor. (U.K.)

  13. Importance of nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: world energy requirements; energy conservation and the economics of recycle environmental considerations and the timescale of reprocessing; and problems associated with reprocessing. The conclusion is reached that reprocessing is essential to the conservation of the world's energy resources and is an environmentally, and probably an economically, more acceptable option to the ''throw away'' alternative

  14. Preliminary study of the 129I distribution in environment of La Hague reprocessing plant with the help of a terrestrial moss: Homalotecium sericeum. Study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary study of the 129 I distribution has allowed to underline the limits of use of a Homalotecium sericeum type terrestrial moss as biological indicator. However, this preliminary study allowed all the same to give a spatial distribution of this radioelement around La Hague reprocessing plant (source term) that underlines the existence of four geographic areas in function of collected activities. The levels are generally under 99 Bq/kg dry. It is recommended to improve the knowledge that we can have of transfers and quantity of iodine 129 from the marine environment to the terrestrial environment, but also, the one that we can have of factors able to modify the spatial distribution of this radionuclide. (N.C.)

  15. Development of Head-end Pyrochemical Reduction Process for Advanced Oxide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B. H.; Seo, C. S.; Hur, J. M.; Jeong, S. M.; Hong, S. S.; Choi, I. K.; Choung, W. M.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, I. W.

    2008-12-01

    The development of an electrolytic reduction technology for spent fuels in the form of oxide is of essence to introduce LWR SFs to a pyroprocessing. In this research, the technology was investigated to scale a reactor up, the electrochemical behaviors of FPs were studied to understand the process and a reaction rate data by using U 3 O 8 was obtained with a bench scale reactor. In a scale of 20 kgHM/batch reactor, U 3 O 8 and Simfuel were successfully reduced into metals. Electrochemical characteristics of LiBr, LiI and Li 2 Se were measured in a bench scale reactor and an electrolytic reduction cell was modeled by a computational tool

  16. Development of Head-end Pyrochemical Reduction Process for Advanced Oxide Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, B. H.; Seo, C. S.; Hur, J. M.; Jeong, S. M.; Hong, S. S.; Choi, I. K.; Choung, W. M.; Kwon, K. C.; Lee, I. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The development of an electrolytic reduction technology for spent fuels in the form of oxide is of essence to introduce LWR SFs to a pyroprocessing. In this research, the technology was investigated to scale a reactor up, the electrochemical behaviors of FPs were studied to understand the process and a reaction rate data by using U{sub 3}O{sub 8} was obtained with a bench scale reactor. In a scale of 20 kgHM/batch reactor, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Simfuel were successfully reduced into metals. Electrochemical characteristics of LiBr, LiI and Li{sub 2}Se were measured in a bench scale reactor and an electrolytic reduction cell was modeled by a computational tool.

  17. Characteristics of radioactive waste streams generated in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a study concerned with identification and characterization of radioactive waste streams from an HTGR fuel reprocessing plant. Approximate quantities of individual waste streams as well as pertinent characteristics of selected streams have been estimated. Most of the waste streams are unique to HTGR fuel reprocessing. However, waste streams from the solvent extraction system and from the plant facilities do not differ greatly from the corresponding LWR fuel reprocessing wastes

  18. Structural damage and chemical contaminants on reprocessed arthroscopic shaver blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    In response to socioeconomic pressure to cut budgets in medicine, single-use surgical instruments are often reprocessed despite potential biological hazard. To evaluate the quality and contaminants of reprocessed shaver blades. Reprocessed shaver blades have mechanical damage and chemical contamination. Controlled laboratory study. Seven blades and 3 abraders were reprocessed 1 time or 3 times and then were assessed. In the first part of the study, structural damage on the blades after 3 reprocessings was compared to that after 1 reprocessing using optical microscopy. In the second part, surface damage was observed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy; elemental and chemical analyses of contaminants found by the microscopy were performed using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Optical microscopic examination revealed abrasion on the surface of the inner blade and cracks on the inner tube after 1 reprocessing. These changes were more evident after 3 reprocessings. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of the inner cutter of the blade reprocessed once showed contaminants containing calcium, carbon, oxygen, and silicon, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy demonstrated biological protein consisting mainly of collagen, some type of salts, and polycarbonate used in plastic molding. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy of the inner cutter of the reprocessed abrader revealed contaminants containing carbon, calcium, phosphorous, and oxygen, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed H2O, hydroxyapatite, and hydroxyl proteins. Scanning Auger microscopy showed that the tin-nickel plating on the moving blade and abrader was missing in some locations. This is the first study to evaluate both mechanical damage and chemical contaminants containing collagen, hydroxyapatite, and salts

  19. Potential testing of reprocessing procedures by real-time polymerase chain reaction: A multicenter study of colonoscopy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriani, Federica; Agodi, Antonella; Casini, Beatrice; Cristina, Maria Luisa; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Gianfranceschi, Gianluca; Liguori, Giorgio; Liguori, Renato; Mucci, Nicolina; Mura, Ida; Pasquarella, Cesira; Piana, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Privitera, Gaetano; Protano, Carmela; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Ripabelli, Giancarlo; Rossini, Angelo; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tamburro, Manuela; Tardivo, Stefano; Veronesi, Licia; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2018-02-01

    Reprocessing of endoscopes is key to preventing cross-infection after colonoscopy. Culture-based methods are recommended for monitoring, but alternative and rapid approaches are needed to improve surveillance and reduce turnover times. A molecular strategy based on detection of residual traces from gut microbiota was developed and tested using a multicenter survey. A simplified sampling and DNA extraction protocol using nylon-tipped flocked swabs was optimized. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was developed that targeted 6 bacteria genes that were amplified in 3 mixes. The method was validated by interlaboratory tests involving 5 reference laboratories. Colonoscopy devices (n = 111) were sampled in 10 Italian hospitals. Culture-based microbiology and metagenomic tests were performed to verify PCR data. The sampling method was easily applied in all 10 endoscopy units and the optimized DNA extraction and amplification protocol was successfully performed by all of the involved laboratories. This PCR-based method allowed identification of both contaminated (n = 59) and fully reprocessed endoscopes (n = 52) with high sensibility (98%) and specificity (98%), within 3-4 hours, in contrast to the 24-72 hours needed for a classic microbiology test. Results were confirmed by next-generation sequencing and classic microbiology. A novel approach for monitoring reprocessing of colonoscopy devices was developed and successfully applied in a multicenter survey. The general principle of tracing biological fluids through microflora DNA amplification was successfully applied and may represent a promising approach for hospital hygiene. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Study on the combustion behavior of radiolytically generated hydrogen explosion in small scale annular vessels at the reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Tatsuya; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Arai, Nobuyuki; Dai, Wenbin; Sakaihara, Motohiro; Kanehira, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water, etc. in process vessels in reprocessing plant. Usually, the hydrogen is scavenged by compressed air into vessels to prevent hydrogen explosion. When an earthquake beyond design based occurs, for example, the compressed air may stop and the hydrogen starts accumulating in the vessels, and under this condition, an ignition source might set off hydrogen explosion. Therefore, the explosion derived by the radiolytically generated hydrogen is designated as one of severe accidents on Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in new regulatory requirements. It is important to understand the combustion behavior of hydrogen explosion inside a vessel for consideration of safety measures against the severe accident, because the influences of detonation are not considered in the design basis of vessels. Especially, the investigations about the combustion behavior which considered influence of interior obstacles inside the vessel are not performed yet. In order to investigate the combustion behavior comprehensively, explosion experiment, combustion analysis and structural analysis are carried out using the representative vessels (small scale annular vessel, small scale plate vessel, large scale annular vessel and large scale cylindrical vessel) selected from Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. In this paper, the results of experiments and analysis of small scale annular vessel (as one of representative vessel, imitated a pulsed column in the reprocessing plant) are reported. As imitated vessels, three vessels are manufactured with different interior obstacle arrangements as follows, A) cylindrical obstacles are faithfully reproduced and are arranged based on the actual vessel, B) cylindrical obstacles are arranged more densely than the actual vessel, and C) there are no obstacles inside the vessel. Experiments of hydrogen explosion are performed under condition of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ratio (premixed hydrogen-air is used). As a result of

  1. Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

    2013-09-01

    Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

  2. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.P.; Noakes, M.W.; Bradley, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller or master, and the control system. The ASM is a remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program of (CFRP). This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, and reliability. It uses an all-gear force transmission system. The master arms were designed as a kinematic replica of ASM and use cable force transmission. Special digital control algorithms were developed to improve the system performance. The system is presently operational and undergoing evaluation. Preliminary testing has been completed and is reported. The system is now undergoing commercialization by transferring the technology to the private sector

  3. Reprocessing plants safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, A.G.; Leighton, C.; Millington, D.

    1989-01-01

    The reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel at British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) Sellafield site consists of a number of relatively self-contained activities carried out in separate plants across the site. The physical conditions and time scales applied in reprocessing and storage make it relatively benign. The potential for minor releases of radioactivity under fault conditioning is minimised by plant design definition of control procedures, training and supervision. The risks to both the general public and workforce are shown to be low with all the safety criteria being met. Normal operating conditions also have the potential for some occupational radiation exposure and the plant and workers are monitored continuously. Exposure levels have been reduced steadily and will continue to fall with plant improvements. (U.K.)

  4. The international reprocessing situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sornein, J.

    1976-01-01

    It is investigated what volume and availability of reprocessing capacity is needed for LWR (and AGR) fuel elements for Western Europe, USA, and Japan during the period from 1980 to 1990. Taking into account the technical, financial, and licensing difficulties, an optimistic and pessimistic assessment is made especially for Western Europe, and from the findings conclusions are drawn for spent fuel element storage and nuclear power plant construction. (HR/LN) [de

  5. Reprocessing input data validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.; Bucher, R.G.; Pond, R.B.; Cornella, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), in conjunction with the gravimetric (Pu/U ratio) method for mass determination, provides an independent verification of the input accountancy at the dissolver or accountancy stage of the reprocessing plant. The Isotope Correlation Technique has been applied to many classes of domestic and international reactor systems (light-water, heavy-water, graphite, and liquid-metal) operating in a variety of modes (power, research, production, and breeder), and for a variety of reprocessing fuel cycle management strategies. Analysis of reprocessing operations data based on isotopic correlations derived for assemblies in a PWR environment and fuel management scheme, yielded differences between the measurement-derived and ICT-derived plutonium mass determinations of (-0.02 ± 0.23)% for the measured U-235 and (+0.50 ± 0.31)% for the measured Pu-239, for a core campaign. The ICT analyses has been implemented for the plutonium isotopics in a depleted uranium assembly in a heavy-water, enriched uranium system and for the uranium isotopes in the fuel assemblies in light-water, highly-enriched systems. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Predicting the behaviour or neptunium during nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    Behaviour of Np and its distribution over reprocessing flowsheet is studied due to the necessity of improvement of reprocessing methods of wastes formed during purex-process. Valency states of Np in solutions of reprocessing cycles, Np distribution in organic and acid phases, Np(5) oxidation by nitric acid at the stage of extraction, effect of U and Pu presence on Np behaviour, are considered. Calculation and experimental data are compared; the possibility of Np behaviour forecasting in the process of nuclear fuel reprocessing, provided initial data vay, is shown. 7 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Reprocessing and fuel fabrication systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, F.R.; Tooper, F.E.

    1978-01-01

    The study of alternative fuel cycles was initiated to identify a fuel cycle with inherent technical resistance to proliferation; however, other key features such as resource use, cost, and development status are major elements in a sound fuel cycle strategy if there is no significant difference in proliferation resistance. Special fuel reprocessing techniques such as coprocessing or spiking provide limited resistance to diversion. The nuclear fuel cycle system that will be most effective may be more dependent on the institutional agreements that can be implemented to supplement the technical controls of fuel cycle materials

  8. Integrated Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Post-traumatic Stress and Psychotic Symptoms: A Case-Series Study Using Imaginal Reprocessing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Keen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite high rates of trauma in individuals with psychotic symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms are frequently overlooked in clinical practice. There is also reluctance to treat post-traumatic symptoms in case the therapeutic procedure of reprocessing the trauma exacerbates psychotic symptoms. Recent evidence demonstrates that it is safe to use reprocessing strategies in this population. However, most published studies have been based on treating post-traumatic symptoms in isolation from psychotic symptoms. The aims of the current case series were to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary effectiveness of integrating cognitive-behavioural approaches for post-traumatic stress and psychotic symptoms into a single protocol. Nine participants reporting distressing psychotic and post-traumatic symptoms were recruited from a specialist psychological therapies service for psychosis. Clients were assessed at five time points (baseline, pre, mid, end of therapy, and at 6+ months of follow-up by an independent assessor on measures of current symptoms of psychosis, post-traumatic stress, emotional problems, and well-being. Therapy was formulation based and individualised, depending on presenting symptoms and trauma type. It consisted of five broad, flexible phases, and included imaginal reprocessing strategies (reliving and/or rescripting. The intervention was well received, with positive post-therapy feedback and satisfaction ratings. Unusually for this population, no-one dropped out of therapy. Post therapy, all but one (88% of participants achieved a reliable improvement compared to pre-therapy on at least one outcome measure: post-traumatic symptoms (63%, voices (25%, delusions (50%, depression (50%, anxiety (36%, and well-being (40%. Follow-up assessments were completed by 78% (n = 7 of whom 86% (n = 6 maintained at least one reliable improvement. Rates of improvements following therapy (average of 44% across measures post

  9. Spent fuel management in France: Reprocessing, conditioning, recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Montalembert, J.A. de

    1994-01-01

    The French energy policy has been based for 20 years on the development of nuclear power. The some 75% share of nuclear in the total electricity generation, representing an annual production of 317 TWh requires full fuel cycle control from the head-end to the waste management. This paper presents the RCR concept (Reprocessing, Conditioning, Recycling) with its industrial implementation. The long lasting experience acquired in reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication leads to a comprehensive industrial organization with minimized impact on the environment and waste generation. Each 900 MWe PWR loaded with MOX fuel avoids piling up 2,500 m 3 per year of mine tailings. By the year 2000, less than 500 m 3 of high-level and long-lived waste will be annually produced at La Hague for the French program. The fuel cycle facilities and the associated MOX loading programs are ramping-up according to schedule. Thus, the RCR concept is a reality as well as a policy adopted in several countries. Last but not least, RCR represents a strong commitment to non-proliferation as it is the way to fully control and master the plutonium inventory

  10. Problems of nuclear fuel reprocessing in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Naojiro

    1974-01-01

    The reprocessing capacity of the plant No. 1 of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, which is scheduled to start operation in fiscal year 1975, will be insufficient after fiscal year 1978 for the estimated demand for reprocessing based on Japanese nuclear energy development program. Taking into consideration the results examined by JAIF's study team to Europe and the U.S., it is necessary that Japan builds 2nd reprocessing plant. But there will be a gap from 1978 to 1984 during which Japan must rely on overseas reprocessing services. The establishment of a reprocessing system is a task of national scale, and there are many problems to be solved before it can be done. These include the problems of site and environment, the problem of treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, the raising of huge required funds and so on. Therefore, even if a private enterprise is allowed to undertake the task, it will be impossible to achieve the aim without the cooperation and assistance of the government. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Case outsourcing medical device reprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Deborah

    2004-04-01

    IN THE INTEREST OF SAVING MONEY, many hospitals are considering extending the life of some single-use medical devices by using medical device reprocessing programs. FACILITIES OFTEN LACK the resources required to meet the US Food and Drug Administration's tough quality assurance standards. BY OUTSOURCING, hospitals can reap the benefits of medical device reprocessing without assuming additional staffing and compliance burdens. OUTSOURCING enables hospitals to implement a medical device reprocessing program quickly, with no capital investment and minimal effort.

  12. Leaching studies of natural and synthetic titanite, a potential host for wastes from the reprocessing of Canadian nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.; Doern, F.E.; Cecchetto, E.V.; Mitchell, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    Glass ceramics (i.e., glasses subjected to controlled crystallization) with synthetic titanite as the major crystalline phase are being considered as potential hosts for the radioactive wastes arising from possible future reprocessing of nuclear fuel in Canada. In order to assess the stability of titanite in the anticipated environment of a disposal vault sited 500-1000 m deep within a granitic pluton in the Canadian Shield, leaching experiments have been performed with natural and synthetic titanite, using a synthetic groundwater whose composition is based on findings from a recent borehole-survey. The results are in qualitative agreement with calculations of solution equilibria for titanite and its main alteration products, and indicate that titanite should be stable and suffer no net leaching under anticipated conditions in the vault

  13. MOX fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the reprocessing of MOX fuel in UP2-800 plant at La Hague, and to the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling. 1. MOX fuel reprocessing. In a first step, the necessary modifications in UP2-800 to reprocess MOX fuel are set out. Early in the UP2-800 project, actions have been taken to reprocess MOX fuel without penalty. They consist in measures regarding: Dissolution; Radiological shieldings; Nuclear instrumentation; Criticality. 2. Mox successive reprocessing and recycling. The plutonium recycling in the LWR is now a reality and, as said before, the MOX fuel reprocessing is possible in UP2-800 plant at La Hague. The following actions in this field consist in verifying the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling possibilities. After irradiation, the fissile plutonium content of irradiated MOX fuel is decreased and, in this case, the re-use of plutonium in the LWR need an important increase of initial Pu enrichment inconsistent with the Safety reactor constraints. Cogema opted for reprocessing irradiated MOX fuel in dilution with the standard UO2 fuel in appropriate proportions (1 MOX for 4 UO2 fuel for instance) in order to save a fissile plutonium content compatible with MOX successive recycling (at least 3 recyclings) in LWR. (author). 2 figs

  14. Economic evaluation of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This discussion paper first identifies the main factors which influence the economic assessment of reprocessing. It proposes the use of a diagram - the so-called ''phase diagram'' - which plots the fast reactor premium against the price of uranium. The diagram delineates areas where the once-through fuel cycle, thermal recycle and fast reactor will be the preferred choice from micro-economic considerations. The paper then goes on to consider the circumstances under which a country may or may not wish to introduce thermal recycle or fast reactors. Finally, a procedure for further discussion on economic considerations with WG4 is proposed

  15. Economic evaluation of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper presents a progress report of work undertaken relevant to the economic evaluation of reprocessing. It sets out the assumptions to be made for the preparation of the economic ''phase diagram'' - a plot of fast reactor premium against uranium (U 3 O 8 ) price. The paper discusses the assumptions to be made in respect of present worth methodology, LWR fuel logistics, U 3 O 8 price, enrichment tails, plutonium values, fast reactor premium and proposes a set of reference costs to be used for the preparation of the phase diagram

  16. Study on the possibility of supercritical fluid extraction for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Wuhua; Zhu Liyang; Zhu Yongjun; Xu Jingming

    2011-01-01

    International interest in high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) has been increasing in recent years. It is important to study on reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from HTGR for recovery of nuclear resource and reduction of nuclear waste. Treatment of UO 2 pellets for preparing fuel elements of the 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) using supercritical fluid extraction was investigated. UO 2 pellets are difficult to be directly dissolved and extracted with TBP-HNO 3 complex in supercritical CO 2 (SC-CO 2 ), and the extraction efficiency is only about 7% under experimental conditions. UO 2 pellets are also difficult to be converted completely into nitrate with N 2 O 4 . When UO 2 pellets break spontaneously into U 3 O 8 powders with particle size below 100 μm under O 2 flow and 600degc, the extraction efficiency of U 3 O 8 powders with TBP-HNO 3 complex in SC-CO 2 can reach more than 98%. U 3 O 8 powders are easy to be completely converted into nitrate with N 2 O 4 . The extraction efficiency of the nitrate product with TBP in SC-CO 2 can reach more than 99%. So it has a potential prospect that application of supercritical fluid extraction in reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from HTGR. (author)

  17. Reprocessing process simulation network; PRONET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, T.; Takada, H.; Kamishima, N.; Tsukamoto, T.; Harada, N.; Fujita, N.; Gonda, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of simulation technology and its wide application to nuclear fuel reprocessing plants has been recognized recently. The principal aim of applying simulation is to predict the process behavior accurately based on the quantitative relations among substances in physical and chemical phenomena. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. has engaged positively in the development and the application study of this technology. All the software products of its recent activities were summarized in the integrated form named 'PRONET'. The PRONET is classified into two independent software groups from the viewpoint of computer system. One is off-line Process Simulation Group, and the other is Dynamic Real-time Simulator Group. The former is called 'PRONET System', and the latter is called 'PRONET Simulator'. These have several subsystems with the prefix 'MR' meaning Mitsubishi Reprocessing Plant. Each MR subsystem is explained in this report. The technical background, the objective of the PRONET, the system and the function of the PRONET, and the future application to an on-line real-time simulator and the development of MR EXPERT are described. (K.I.)

  18. Tritium control in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goumondy, J.P.; Miquel, P.

    1977-01-01

    There is a danger that the T which is formed in water reactors will prove detrimental to the environment over the next few years, and studies have been undertaken to develop techniques to contain and process it where possible. In order to retain T, which is present largely in the fuel and on the possible to adapt for use in the conventional design of reprocessing plant. In this process T is maintained in the form of an aqueous solution in the high-active area of the plant. Control is achieved by restricting as far as possible the ingress of non-tritiated water into this area, and by setting up a tritiated water barrier at the first U and Pu extraction stage, stripping the tritium-containing solvent at that point with ordinary water. In this way the T can be extracted in a small volume of water with a view to intermediate storage, disposal at sea additional processing to remove the T from the water. Experiments carried out so far have demonstrated the effectiveness of the T barrier and have shown what equipment would be required for the application of the process in new reprocessing plants. (orig.) [de

  19. Status of ANSI standards on decommissioning of nuclear reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    A definition of decommissioning is given, and the preparation of ANSI Standard, ''General Design Criteria for Nuclear Reprocessing Facilities'' (N101.3) is discussed. A Eurochemic report, entitled ''The Shutdown of Reprocessing Facilities--Results of Preliminary Studies on the Installations Belonging to Eurochemic,'' was used in the preparation of this standard. (U.S.)

  20. Italian experience with pilot reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, S.; Dworschak, H.; Rolandi, G.; Simonetta, R.

    1977-01-01

    Problems and difficulties recently experienced in the reprocessing technology of high burnup power reactor fuel elements have shown the importance of pilot plant experiments to optimize the separation processes and to test advanced equipment on a representative scale. The CNEN Eurex plant, in Saluggia (Vercelli), with a 50 kg/d thruput, in operation since '71, has completed several reprocessing campaigns on MTR type fuel elements. Two different chemical flowsheets based respectively on TBP and tertiary amines were thoroughly tested and compared: a concise comparative evaluation of the results obtained with the two schemes is given. Extensive modifications have then been introduced (namely a new headend cell equipped with a shear) to make the plant suitable to reprocess power reactor fuels. The experimental program of the plant includes a joint CNEN-AECL reprocessing experiment on CANDU (Pickering) type fuel elements to demonstrate a two cycle, amine based recovery of the plutonium. Later, a stock of high burnup fuel elements from the PWR Trino power station will be reprocessed to recover Pu and U with a Purex type flowsheet. ITREC, the second CNEN experimental reprocessing plant located at Trisaia Nuclear Center (Matera), started active operation two years ago. In the first campaign Th-U mixed oxide fuel elements irradiated in the Elk River reactor were processed. Results of this experiment are reported. ITREC special design features confer a high degree of versability to the plant allowing for substantial equipment modification under remote control conditions. For this reason the plant will be principally devoted in the near future to advanced equipment testing. Along this line high speed centrifugal contactor of a new type developed in Poland will be tested in the plant in the frame of a joint experiment between CNEN and the Polish AEC. Later on the plant program will include experimental campaign on fast reactor fuels; a detailed study on this program is in

  1. Advances in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Guais, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In a comprehensive nuclear energy program based on Light Water Reactor, closing the nuclear fuel cycle by reprocessing the spent fuel and recycling the recovered fissile materials is a key activity which is now fully mastered at the industrial level. In France a large, modern commercial reprocessing plant called UP3 is operating at La Hague since 18 months in excellent conditions regarding products quality, plant availability, safety and waste management. At the same time, industrial capacities for plutonium recycling by MOX fuel fabrication are under operation and larger units are in construction in France and in Europe. Our customers, the utilities which are engaged in a complete closed fuel cycle in Japan, in Germany, Switzerland, Belgium, the Netherlands, and in France, are having a comprehensive industrial system available for their spent fuel management. Three main objectives are being met by this system: (1) saving natural resources by recycling energetic material: plutonium and uranium; (2) solving the waste management question by a segregating the waste according to their characteristics for a proper conditioning, in particular with vitrification for HLW; and (3) preparing the future developments of nuclear power generation with advanced reactors, and best Pu use, and keeping open progresses in long lived waste processing and disposal

  2. Effectiveness of reprocessing for flexible bronchoscopes and endobronchial ultrasound bronchoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofstead, Cori L; Quick, Mariah R; Wetzler, Harry P; Eiland, John E; Heymann, Otis L; Sonetti, David A; Ferguson, J Scott

    2018-05-30

    Infections have been linked to inadequately-reprocessed flexible bronchoscopes, and recent investigations determined that pathogen transmission occurred even when bronchoscope cleaning and disinfection practices aligned with current guidelines. This multisite, prospective study evaluated the effectiveness of real-world bronchoscope reprocessing methods using a systematic approach. This study involved direct observation of reprocessing methods for flexible bronchoscopes, multifaceted evaluations performed after manual cleaning and after high-level disinfection, and assessments of storage conditions. Visual inspections of ports and channels were performed using lighted magnification and borescopes. Contamination was detected using microbial cultures and tests for protein, hemoglobin, and adenosine triphosphate. Researchers assessed reprocessing practices, and storage cabinet cleanliness was evaluated by visual inspection and adenosine triphosphate tests. Researchers examined 24 clinically used bronchoscopes. After manual cleaning, 100% of bronchoscopes had residual contamination. Microbial growth was found in 14 (58%) fully-reprocessed bronchoscopes, including mold, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Escherichia coli/Shigella spp. Visible irregularities were observed in 100% of bronchoscopes, including retained fluid; brown, red, or oily residue; scratches; damaged insertion tubes and distal ends; and filamentous debris in channels. Reprocessing practices were substandard at two of three sites. Damaged and contaminated bronchoscopes were in use at all sites. Inadequate reprocessing practices may have contributed to bioburden found on bronchoscopes. However, even when guidelines were followed, high-level disinfection was not effective. A shift toward the use of sterilized bronchoscopes is recommended. In the meantime, quality management programs and updated reprocessing guidelines are needed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Japanese national reference reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This paper gives a general description of the proposed Japanese national reprocessing plant and of the design philosophy. The plant is in most respects similar to the base case reprocessing plant, with an annual throughput of 100-1500 tU. The plant would be co-located with a fuel fabrication facility

  4. Reprocessing of nonoptimally exposed holograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, G.S.; Robertson, C.E.; Tamashiro, F.M.

    1980-01-01

    Two reprocessing techniques have been investigated that are capable of correcting the effects of nonoptimum optical density of photographic amplitude holograms recorded on Agfa-Gevaert type 10E75 plates. In some cases a reprocessed hologram will exhibit a diffraction efficiency even higher than that obtainable from a hologram exposed and processed to the optimum density. The SNR of the reprocessed holograms is much higher than that of the same holograms belached with cupric bromide. In some cases the SNR approaches the optimum value for a properly exposed amplitude hologram. Subjective image quality and resolution of reprocessed hologram reconstructins appear to be no different than for normal single-development holograms. Repeated reprocessing is feasible and in some cases desirable as a means of increasing diffraction efficiency

  5. Irradiated uranium reprocessing; Prerada ozracenog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorijaza visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products.

  6. Neural processing of emotions in traumatized children treated with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy: A hdEEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eTrentini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR therapy has been proven efficacious in restoring affective regulation in Post–Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD patients. However, its effectiveness on emotion processing in children with complex trauma has yet to be explored. High density Electroencephalography (hdEEG was used to investigate the effects of EMDR on brain responses to adults’ emotions on children with histories of early maltreatment. Ten school–aged children were examined before (T0 and within one month after the conclusion of EMDR (T1. hdEEGs were recorded while children passively viewed angry, afraid, happy, and neutral faces. Clinical scales were administered at the same time. Correlation analyses were performed to detect brain regions whose activity was linked to children’s traumatic symptom–related and emotional–adaptive problem scores. In all four conditions, hdEEG showed similar significantly higher activity on the right medial prefrontal and fronto–temporal limbic regions at T0, shifting towards the left medial and superior temporal regions at T1. Moreover, significant correlations were found between clinical scales and the same regions whose activity significantly differed between pre– and post–treatment. These preliminary results demonstrate that, after EMDR, children suffering from complex trauma show increased activity in areas implicated in high–order cognitive processing when passively viewing pictures of emotional expressions. These changes are associated with the decrease of depressive and traumatic symptoms, and with the improvement of emotional–adaptive functioning over time.

  7. Neural processing of emotions in traumatized children treated with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy: a hdEEG study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentini, Cristina; Pagani, Marco; Fania, Piercarlo; Speranza, Anna Maria; Nicolais, Giampaolo; Sibilia, Alessandra; Inguscio, Lucio; Verardo, Anna Rita; Fernandez, Isabel; Ammaniti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has been proven efficacious in restoring affective regulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. However, its effectiveness on emotion processing in children with complex trauma has yet to be explored. High density electroencephalography (hdEEG) was used to investigate the effects of EMDR on brain responses to adults’ emotions on children with histories of early maltreatment. Ten school-aged children were examined before (T0) and within one month after the conclusion of EMDR (T1). hdEEGs were recorded while children passively viewed angry, afraid, happy, and neutral faces. Clinical scales were administered at the same time. Correlation analyses were performed to detect brain regions whose activity was linked to children’s traumatic symptom-related and emotional-adaptive problem scores. In all four conditions, hdEEG showed similar significantly higher activity on the right medial prefrontal and fronto-temporal limbic regions at T0, shifting toward the left medial and superior temporal regions at T1. Moreover, significant correlations were found between clinical scales and the same regions whose activity significantly differed between pre- and post-treatment. These preliminary results demonstrate that, after EMDR, children suffering from complex trauma show increased activity in areas implicated in high-order cognitive processing when passively viewing pictures of emotional expressions. These changes are associated with the decrease of depressive and traumatic symptoms, and with the improvement of emotional-adaptive functioning over time. PMID:26594183

  8. Thorex reprocessing characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to bring together, in highly condensed form, information which would need to be considered in planning a commercial reprocessing plant for recovering 233 U-Th reactor fuel. This report does not include a discussion of process modifications which would be required for thorium-base fuels that contain plutonium (such as would be required for thorium fuels containing 235 U or 233 U denatured with 238 U). It is the intent of this paper to address only the basic Thorex process for treating 233 U-Th fuels. As will be pointed out, the degree of development of the various proposed operations varies widely, from preliminary laboratory experiments for the dissolution of Zircaloy-clad thoria to engineering scale demonstration of the recovery of moderately irradiated thorium by a solvent extraction process (Thorex)

  9. Aqueous reprocessing - some dreams!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, T.G.

    2015-01-01

    India has been pursuing a aqueous reprocessing based closed fuel cycle for both thermal and fast reactor fuels employing the PUREX process. Though the country has more than six decades of experience, the dreams or wish lists such as, a highly efficient process with textbook specifications of 99.9% recovery of U and Pu, a DF of more than 10 7 for both U and Pu from the fission products, operating with name plate capacity with high safety, low waste generation, recovery of useful fission products and minor actinides from high level waste are never ceasing and ever growing. The talk will cover safety precautions and actions to be taken in the steps listed below, to ensure a safe and successful process

  10. Technological study of electrochemical uranium fuel reprocessing in fused chloride bath; Estudo tecnologico do reprocessamento eletroquimico de combustiveis de uranio em meio de cloretos fundidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Damaris

    2002-07-01

    This study is applied to metallic fuels recycling, concerning advanced reactor concept, which was proposed and tested in LMR type reactors. Conditions for electrochemical non-irradiated uranium fuel reprocessing in fused chloride bath in laboratory scale were established. Experimental procedures and parameters for dehydration treatment of LiCl-KCl eutectic mixture and for electrochemical study of U{sup 3+}/U system in LiCl-KCl were developed and optimized. In the voltammetric studies many working electrodes were tested. As auxiliary electrodes, graphite and stainless steels crucibles were verified, with no significant impurities inclusions in the system. Ag/AgCl in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with 1 w% in AgCl were used as reference electrode. The experimental set up developed for electrolyte treatment as well as for the study of the system U{sup 3+}/U in LiCl-KCl showed to be adequate and efficient. Thermogravimetric Techniques, Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and cyclic voltametry showed an efficient dehydration method by using HCl gas and than argon flux for 12 h. Scanning Electron Microscopy, with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry and Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry detected the presence of uranium in the cadmium phase. X-ray Diffraction and also Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrometry and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry were used for uranium detection in the salt phase. The obtained results for the system U{sup 3+}/U in LiCl-KCl showed the viability of the electrochemical reprocessing process based on the IFR advanced fuel cycle. (author)

  11. Outline of center for research and development in Rokkasho reprocessing plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, S.; Kanatsugu, K.; Shakutsui, M.

    1998-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd.(JNFL) is now constructing a commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Rokkasho Mura, introducing French Technology on the main processes of it. In October 1995 prior to the reprocessing plant operation, JNFL established the CENTER FOR RESEARCH and DEVELOPMENT (Center for R and D) inside the plant site to perform various tests which are intended to improve the safety, availability and reliability of the reprocessing plant. The test facility of the center was constructed from 1991 to 1995, and now many tests have been being performed in the center. A full-scale mock-up of the Head end process components based on French Technology, which consist of a tilting crane, shearing machine, dissolver, hull rinser, end piece rinser and maintenance equipment, was moved into a new building from the Head End Demonstration Test facility in Kobe (reported in RECOD '91). Functional tests and system performance tests are carried out under cold conditions (non radioactive). As equipment and piping layout in the cell and working area layout outside of the cell are simulated to the reprocessing plant design, it is possible to test remote maintainability and repairability under the same condition as the reprocessing plant except radioactive condition. A full-scale mock-up of the Centrifugal clarifier based on French Technology, which can clarify the dissolution solution is operated to confirm clarification performance under various cold conditions and is tested for the maintainability and the repairability. A sampling bench imported from France is the same one planed to be operated in the reprocessing plant which samples for various analysis from each process. The sampling bench is tested to confirm operability, maintainability and reliability. Also the sampling piping and pneumatic piping are going to be install to the sampling bench for a system test of sampling system. Two types of MERC (Mobile Equipment Replacement Cask), which replace worn parts remotely

  12. An experimental study of molten salt electrorefining of uranium using solid iron cathode and liquid cadmium cathode for development of pyrometallurgical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tadafumi; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Shoji, Yuichi; Fujita, Reiko; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki.

    1997-01-01

    Electrorefining of uranium was studied for developing pyrometallurgical reprocessing technology of metal fuel cycle. After concentration dependence of polarization curve was measured, uranium was electrodeposited either on solid iron cathode or in liquid cadmium cathode. Design and operational conditions of the cathode were improved for obtaining much greater quantity of deposit, resulting in recovery of 732g of dendritic uranium on a single solid cathode, and of 232g of uranium in 2,344g of a liquid cadmium cathode. The behaviors of electro-codeposition of rare earth elements with uranium were observed for liquid cadmium cathode, and were found to follow the local equilibrium between salt electrolyte and cathode. The decontamination factors of FP simulating elements from uranium were tentatively determined as >2,000 for deposition to solid cathode and as >7 for deposition to liquid cadmium cathode, respectively. (author)

  13. Contribution to the study of degradation products of spent fuel reprocessing solvents using mass spectroscopy, its different linkages and by the use of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesage, Denis

    1995-01-01

    Tributylphosphate (TBP) is used as an extraction solvent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The presence of uranium fission products leads to the formation of a large variety of organic compounds resulting from radiolytic degradation of TBP. Some of these compounds can complex metallic cations, and as a result, to decrease nuclear fuel extraction yields. In this work we have studied by tandem mass spectrometry the fragmentation mechanisms of different TBP and their dimers. These molecules are interesting because of the similarity of their structures to other more complex molecules formed by irradiation (functionalized TBP and TBP dimers). This work allowed to identify mixtures of degradation products and relate their structures to radiolytic mechanisms. Ail these results, including structure determination and formation mechanisms, have been validated by using specifically labeled compounds (deuterium, oxygen 18, nitrogen 15). (author) [fr

  14. Studies and developments for the analysis of products of nuclear reprocessing plants with the help of the X-ray fluorescence analysis on totally reflecting sample holders (TXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, H.; Eggers, I.; Gibau, F.; Haarich, M.; Hastenteufel, S.; Haurand, M.; Knoechel, A.; Salow, H.

    1990-01-01

    Studies with inactive and active simulates of products of nuclear reprocessing plants show the suitability of the X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis on Totally Reflecting Sample Holders (TXRF), to detect the available elements simultaneously by direct measurements of specially prepared thin samples. High dilution enables in the most cases, to avoid working in hot cells and to carry out the analysis in glove boxes. The analysis of uranium products and great amounts of matrix elements containing solutions like LAW and MAW demands the separation of the matrix elements before TXRF measurement. Procedures for this task have been developed. The potential of the new analytical procedure was demonstrated by the analysis of two samples of highly diluted high active wastes. (orig.) With 65 refs., 20 tabs., 81 figs [de

  15. Advanced reprocessing developments in Europe contribution of European projects ACSEPT and ACTINET-I3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, S.; Poinssot, C. [CEA DEN, Nuclear Energy Div., RadioChemistry and Processes Dept., F-30207Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Geist, A. [KIT-INE (Germany); Cassayre, L. [CIEMAT (Spain); Rhodes, C. [NNL-UK (United Kingdom); Ekberg, C. [CHALMERS (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear energy has more than ever to demonstrate that it can contribute safely and on a sustainable way to answer the international increase in energy needs. Actually, in addition to an increased safety of the reactors themselves, its acceptance is still closely associated to our capability to reduce the lifetime of the nuclear waste, to manage them safely and to propose options for a better use of the natural resources. Spent fuel reprocessing can help to reach these objectives. But this cannot be achieved only by optimizing industrial processes through engineering studies. It is of a primary importance to increase our fundamental knowledge in actinide sciences in order to build the future of nuclear energy on reliable and scientifically-founded results, and therefore meet the needs of the future fuel cycles in terms of fabrication and performance of fuels, reprocessing and waste management. At the European level, both the collaborative project ACSEPT and the Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3 work together to improve our knowledge in actinides chemistry and therefore develop advanced separation processes. These tools are complementary and work in close connection on some specific issues such as the understanding of the selectivity of extracting organic ligands. By offering trans-national access to the main nuclear research facility in Europe, ACTINET-I3 aims at increasing the knowledge in actinide sciences by gathering all the expertise available in European nuclear research institutes or university and giving them the opportunity to come and work in hot-labs (ITU, Atalante...) or beamlines (ESFR, ANKA, PSI) ACSEPT is focused on the development of advanced separation processes, both aqueous and pyrochemical. Head-end steps, fuel re-fabrication, solvent treatment, waste management are also taken into account. In aqueous process development, the SANEX and innovative SANEX flowsheets demonstration were successfully achieved. Chemical systems were

  16. Radioactive Semivolatiles in Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strachan, D. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, B. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Soelberg, N. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing, various radioactive elements enter the gas phase from the unit operations found in the reprocessing facility. In previous reports, the pathways and required removal were discussed for four radionuclides known to be volatile, 14C, 3H, 129I, and 85Kr. Other, less volatile isotopes can also report to the off-gas streams in a reprocessing facility. These were reported to be isotopes of Cs, Cd, Ru, Sb, Tc, and Te. In this report, an effort is made to determine which, if any, of 24 semivolatile radionuclides could be released from a reprocessing plant and, if so, what would be the likely quantities released. As part of this study of semivolatile elements, the amount of each generated during fission is included as part of the assessment for the need to control their emission. Also included in this study is the assessment of the cooling time (time out of reactor) before the fuel is processed. This aspect is important for the short-lived isotopes shown in the list, especially for cooling times approaching 10 y. The approach taken in this study was to determine if semivolatile radionuclides need to be included in a list of gas-phase radionuclides that might need to be removed to meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. A list of possible elements was developed through a literature search and through knowledge and literature on the chemical processes in typical aqueous processing of nuclear fuels. A long list of possible radionuclides present in irradiated fuel was generated and then trimmed by considering isotope half-life and calculating the dose from each to a maximum exposed individual with the US EPA airborne radiological dispersion and risk assessment code CAP88 (Rosnick 1992) to yield a short list of elements that actually need to be considered for control because they require high decontamination factors to meet a reasonable fraction of the regulated release. Each of these elements is

  17. Optimization of the sizes and dates of starting up of reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Kikusaburo

    1977-01-01

    It is desirable to complete the nuclear fuel cycle domestically for promoting nuclear power generation in Japan, and the reprocessing of spent fuel is indispensable. However, the capacity of the reprocessing plant in PNC and the reprocessing by the commissioning to foreign countries will be insufficient by the latter half of 1980s. In the planning of the second reprocessing plant in Japan, the following problems remain yet to be solved. The international regulation and the laws in Japan regarding the storage and transport of spent fuel, the disposal of radioactive wastes, and the recycling of plutonium must be established. The consensus of the public on the necessity and the safety of fuel reprocessing must be obtained. The technical investigation about fuel reprocessing and related business must be carried out sufficiently, including the necessity of introducing the technology from abroad. The economy and various conditions for industrializing fuel reprocessing must be studied. The economy of fuel reprocessing plants, the reprocessing cost taking escalation into account, mean reprocessing cost, the optimization of the time of starting full operation and the time of starting-up, the rise of reprocessing cost due to the escalation of operational cost are explained. Numerical calculation was carried out about the second reprocessing plant in Japan, and the results are examined. (Kako, I.)

  18. EOS Data Products Latency and Reprocessing Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Wanchoo, L.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) program has been processing, archiving, and distributing EOS data since the launch of Terra platform in 1999. The EOSDIS Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and Science-Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPSs) are generating over 5000 unique products with a daily average volume of 1.7 Petabytes. Initially EOSDIS had requirements to make process data products within 24 hours of receiving all inputs needed for generating them. Thus, generally, the latency would be slightly over 24 and 48 hours after satellite data acquisition, respectively, for Level 1 and Level 2 products. Due to budgetary constraints these requirements were relaxed, with the requirement being to avoid a growing backlog of unprocessed data. However, the data providers have been generating these products in as timely a manner as possible. The reduction in costs of computing hardware has helped considerably. It is of interest to analyze the actual latencies achieved over the past several years in processing and inserting the data products into the EOSDIS archives for the users to support various scientific studies such as land processes, oceanography, hydrology, atmospheric science, cryospheric science, etc. The instrument science teams have continuously evaluated the data products since the launches of EOS satellites and improved the science algorithms to provide high quality products. Data providers have periodically reprocessed the previously acquired data with these improved algorithms. The reprocessing campaigns run for an extended time period in parallel with forward processing, since all data starting from the beginning of the mission need to be reprocessed. Each reprocessing activity involves more data than the previous reprocessing. The historical record of the reprocessing times would be of interest to future missions, especially those involving large volumes of data and/or computational loads due to

  19. Radiological considerations in the design of Reprocessing Uranium Plant (RUP) of Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF), Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    A Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF) being planned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam is an integrated facility with head end and back end of fuel cycle plants co-located in a single place, to meet the refuelling needs of the prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR). Reprocessed uranium oxide plant (RUP) is one such plant in FRFCF to built to meet annual requirements of UO 2 for fabrication of fuel sub-assemblies (FSAs) and radial blanket sub-assemblies (RSAs) for PFBR. RUP receives reprocessed uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 ) from fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) of FRFCF. Unlike natural uranium oxide plant, RUP has to handle reprocessed uranium oxide which is likely to have residual fission products activity in addition to traces of plutonium. As the fuel used for PFBR is recycled within these plants, formation of higher actinides in the case of plutonium and formation of higher levels of 232 U in the uranium product would be a radiological problem to be reckoned with. The paper discussed the impact of handling of multi-recycled reprocessed uranium in RUP and the radiological considerations

  20. A multi-site randomized study to compare the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) added to TAU versus TAU to reduce craving and drinking behavior in alcohol dependent outpatients: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Markus, W.; Weert-van Oene, G.H. de; Becker, E.S.; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background Addiction constitutes a major public health problem, and despite treatment, relapse rates remain very high. Preliminary findings suggest that Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), an evidence-based treatment for PTSD, may also reduce craving and relapse rates when applied in substance abuse. This study aims to determine the feasibility, efficacy and effectiveness of EMDR when added to treatment as usual (TAU) for addiction in alcohol dependent outpatients, compared ...

  1. Use of risk information to safety regulation. Reprocessing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    A procedure of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) for a reprocessing facility has been under the development aiming to utilize risk information for safety regulations in this project. Activities in the fiscal year 2012 are summarized in the paper. A major activity is a fundamental study on a concept of serious accidents, requirements of serious accident management, and a policy of utilizing risk information for fabrication and reprocessing facilities. Other than the activity a study on release and transport of aerial radioactive materials at a serious accident in a reprocessing facility has been conducted. The outline and results are provided in the chapter 1 and 2 respectively. (author)

  2. Experience and prospects in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.-P.

    1997-01-01

    Reprocessing nuclear fuels is a long and successful industrial story. For decades, commercial reprocessing plants have been operating in France, the United Kingdom and Japan. The industrial outcome is clear and widely recognized: thousand tons of spent fuels have been reprocessed in these plants. Over the years, these facilities have been adapted to new types of fuel. Thus, the nuclear industry has fully demonstrated its ability to cope with technological change and its capacity to adapt itself to improvements. For decades, technical capability has been stressed and emphasized by nuclear industrial leaders as the most important point. This is no longer the case. Today the industry has to face a new commercial reality and to find the most adaptable answer to the utilities' requirements. This paper presents the current achievements and medium and long-term trends of the nuclear reprocessing activity, the ongoing commercial changes and gives an outlook for future evolutions. International political factors will also be examined. (author)

  3. Present state of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The operation of several reprocessing plants - industrial size and pilot plants - has made it possible to build up substantial experience in the processing of irradiated fuels. More than 28,000 tons of fuels from gas-graphite reactors were processed on an industrial basis in Britain and France. For the treatment of both metallic fuels and high burn-up UO 2 -fuels, a solvent extraction process is applied which is based on the Purex process with a TBP kerosene mixture as extractant. A shear-leach technique is used for the break-down of the bundle elements and dissolution of the uranium oxide in nitric acid. Mechanically agitated extractors and pulsed columns have proved to be reliable equipment. The products are uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate. Process chemicals are recycled to minimize the volume of radioactive waste and precautions are taken to prevent uncontrolled escape of radioactivity. The technical status will be described as well as experience from pilot operation. (orig.) [de

  4. Base case industrial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper briefly describes an industrial scale plant for reprocessing thermal oxide fuel. This description was used as a base case by the Group for their later assessments and for comparing actual national plans for reprocessing plants. The plant described uses the Purex process and assumes an annual throughput of 1000 t/U. The maintenance, safety and safeguards philosophy is described. An indication of the construction schedule and capital and operating costs is also given

  5. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, S.

    2008-01-01

    The closed fuel cycle is the most sustainable approach for nuclear energy, as it reduces recourse to natural uranium resources and optimises waste management. The advantages and disadvantages of used nuclear fuel reprocessing have been debated since the dawn of the nuclear era. There is a range of issues involved, notably the sound management of wastes, the conservation of resources, economics, hazards of radioactive materials and potential proliferation of nuclear weapons. In recent years, the reprocessing advocates win, demonstrated by the apparent change in position of the USA under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. A great deal of reprocessing has been going on since the fourties, originally for military purposes, to recover plutonium for weapons. So far, some 80000 tonnes of used fuel from commercial power reactors has been reprocessed. The article indicates the reprocessing activities and plants in the United Kigdom, France, India, Russia and USA. The aspect of plutonium that raises the ire of nuclear opponents is its alleged proliferation risk. Opponents of the use of MOX fuels state that such fuels represent a proliferation risk because the plutonium in the fuel is said to be 'weapon-use-able'. The reprocessing of used fuel should not give rise to any particular public concern and offers a number of potential benefits in terms of optimising both the use of natural resources and waste management.

  6. UK regulatory perspective on the application of burn-up credit to the BNFL thorp head end plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simister, D.N.; Clemson, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    In the UK the Health and Safety Executive, which incorporates the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), is responsible for regulation of safety on nuclear sites. This paper reports progress made in the application and development of a UK regulatory position for assessing licensee's plant safety caes which invoke the use of Burn-up Credit for criticality applications. The NII's principles and strategy for the assessment of this technical area have been developed over a period of time following expressions of interest from UK industry and subsequent involvement in the international collaborations and debate in this area. This experience has now been applied to the first main plant safety case application claiming Burn-up Credit. This case covers the BNFL Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) dissolver at Sellafield, where dissolved gadolinium neutron poison is used as a criticality control. The case argues for a reduction in gadolinium content by taking credit for the burn-up of input fuel. The UK regulatory process, assessment principles and criteria are briefly outlined, showing the regulatory framework used to review the case. These issues include the fundamental requirement in UK Health and Safety law to demonstrate that risks have been reduced to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP), the impact on safety margins, compliance and operability procedures, and the need for continuing review. Novel features of methodology, using a ''Residual Enrichment'' and ''Domain Boundary'' approach, were considered and accepted. The underlying validation, both of criticality methodology and isotopic determination, was also reviewed. Compliance was seen to rely heavily on local in-situ measurements of spent fuel used to determine ''Residual Enrichment'' and other parameters, requiring review of the development and basis of the correlations used to underpin the measurement process. Overall, it was concluded that the case as presented was adequate. Gadolinium reduction

  7. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatfield, G.W.

    1960-11-01

    One of the persistent ideas concerning nuclear power is that the fuel costs are negligible. This, of course, is incorrect and, in fact, one of the major problems in the development of economic nuclear power is to get the cost of the fuel cycles down to an acceptable level. The irradiated fuel removed from the nuclear power reactors must be returned as fresh fuel into the system. Aside from the problems of handling and shipping involved in the reprocessing cycles, the two major steps are the chemical separation and the refabrication. The chemical separation covers the processing of the spent fuel to separate and recover the unburned fuel as well as the new fuel produced in the reactor. This includes the decontamination of these materials from other radioactive fission products formed in the reactor. Refabrication involves the working and sheathing of recycled fuel into the shapes and forms required by reactor design and the economics of the fabrication problem determines to a large extent the quality of the material required from the chemical treatment. At present there appear to be enough separating facilities in the United States and the United Kingdom to handle the recycling of fuel from power reactors for the next few years. However, we understand the costs of recycling fuel in these facilities will be high or low depend ing on whether or not the capital costs of the plant are included in the processing cost. Also, the present plants may not be well adapted to carry out the chemical processing of the very wide variety of power reactor fuel elements which are being considered and will continue to be considered over the years to come. (author)

  8. A study on items necessary to develop the requirements for the management of serious accidents postulated in fuel fabrication, enrichment and reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, Mitsuhiro; Yamate, Kazuki; Asada, Kazuo; Yamada, Takashi; Endo, Shigeki

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to supply the points to discuss on new rules of fuel fabrication, enrichment and reprocessing facilities (hereinafter referred to as 'fuel cycle facilities') conducted by Nuclear Regulation Authority. Requirements for management of serious accidents in the fuel cycle facilities were summarized in this study. Taking into account the lessons learned from the accident of TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Mar. 2011, Act for the Regulation of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors was amended in June 2012. The main items of the amendment were as follows: Preparation for the management of serious accidents, Introduction of evaluation system for safety improvement, Application of new standards to existing nuclear facilities (back-fitting). Japan Nuclear Energy Safety organization (JNES) conducted a fundamental study on serious accidents and their management in the fuel cycle facilities and made a report. In the report, the concept of Defense in Depth and the definition of serious accidents for the fuel cycle facilities were discussed. Those discussions were conducted by reference to new regulation rules (draft) for power reactors and from the view of features of the fuel cycle facilities. However, further detailed studies are necessary in order to clarify some issues in it. It was also reflected opinions from experts in JNES technical meetings on accident management of the fuel cycle facilities to brush up this report. (author)

  9. Integrated international safeguards concepts for fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Whitty, W.J.; Camp, A.L.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Ellwein, L.B.

    1981-12-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of efforts by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to identify problems and propose solutions for international safeguarding of light-water reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plants. Problem areas for international safeguards were identified in a previous Problem Statement (LA-7551-MS/SAND79-0108). Accounting concepts that could be verified internationally were presented in a subsequent study (LA-8042). Concepts for containment/surveillance were presented, conceptual designs were developed, and the effectiveness of these designs was evaluated in a companion study (SAND80-0160). The report discusses the coordination of nuclear materials accounting and containment/surveillance concepts in an effort to define an effective integrated safeguards system. The Allied-General Nuclear Services fuels reprocessing plant at Barnwell, South Carolina, was used as the reference facility

  10. Theoretical study of trivalent element complexes for the nuclear waste reprocessing; Etude theorique de complexes d'elements f trivalents pour le retraitement des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, L

    2007-10-15

    Current energetic and environmental concerns have made the nuclear waste reprocessing to be a major issue in numerous countries. One avenue to treat nuclear spent fuel requires separating selectively trivalent minor actinides An (Am{sup 3+}, Cm{sup 3+}) from lanthanides Ln. In this regard, nitrogen extractants are under study. Their selectivity toward actinides is still unclear, but could be the result of enhanced covalency effects with trivalent minor actinides with respect to lanthanides (III). In this thesis, we have performed DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory) to study covalency effects within the actinide-ligand bond, following three main axes of research: advanced study of the nature of the chemical bonding, spectroscopic characterization of covalency, and preliminary tests of ab initio molecular dynamics for future calculations in solvent. Methods that are not regularly applied to trivalent actinides complexes have been used: topological methods, TDDFT, LDDFT, ab initio molecular dynamics. We have managed to show that the selectivity of the BTP ligand - the most effective An/Ln extractant to date - comes at least for a part from stronger covalency effects within the An-BTP bond with respect to the Ln-BTP bond, which has never been proved before. (author)

  11. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adults with intellectual disabilities: A case study review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Sally; Karatzias, Thanos; Brown, Michael; Grieve, Alan; Paterson, Douglas; Walley, Robert

    2016-11-01

    People with intellectual disabilities may be at a greater risk for exposure to traumatic events and consequently develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an established treatment for PTSD in the general population, research on people with intellectual disabilities is limited. This review aims to critically appraise for the 1st time case studies published in this area, because no controlled investigations are available at present. An in-depth literature review was conducted, and 6 case studies were identified from peer-reviewed journals describing EMDR therapy for psychological trauma in 14 adults with a mild to severe intellectual disability. These case studies were reviewed in terms of methods of assessing PTSD and trauma histories and delivery of EMDR therapy in order to establish the usefulness and acceptability of this intervention for people with intellectual disabilities. All cases demonstrated improvement in symptoms following EMDR therapy, with around half of the cases stating no disturbance at posttreatment and at follow-up assessments. No adverse effects were reported, demonstrating that EMDR is well tolerated by people with intellectual disabilities. EMDR is a safe and acceptable intervention for people with intellectual disabilities, and there is now sufficient evidence to conduct a randomized control trial to establish its effectiveness for DSM-5 PTSD in this population group. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Solvent management in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, B.; Germain, M.; Puyou, M.; Rouyer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent management in large capacity reprocessing plant is studied to limit production of organic wastes. Chemical processing increases life time of solvent. Low pressure distillation allows the recycling of TBP and diluent at a low activity level. Besides heavy degradation products are eliminated. For the safety the flash point of distillated diluent increases slightly. Tests on an industrial scale started in 1985 and since more than 500 cubic meters were treated [fr

  13. Indian experience in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.; Kumar, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    Plant scale experience in fuel reprocessing in India was started with the successful design, execution and commissioning of the Trombay plant in 1964 to reprocess aluminium clad metallic uranium fuel from the 40 MWt research reactor. The plant has helped in generating expertise and trained manpower for future reprocessing plants. With the Trombay experience, a larger plant of capacity 100 tonnes U/year to reprocess spent oxide fuels from the Tarapur (BWR) and Rajasthan (PHWR) power reactors has been built at Tarapur which is undergoing precommissioning trial runs. Some of the details of this plant are dealt with in this paper. In view of the highly corrosive chemical attack the equipment and piping are subjected to in a fuel reprocessing plant, some of them require replacement during their service if the plant life has to be extended. This calls for extensive decontamination for bringing the radiation levels low enough to establish direct accesss to such equipment. For making modifications in the plant to extend its life and also to enable expansion of capacity, the Trombay plant has been successfully decontaminated and partially decommissioned. Some aspects of thi decontamination campaign are presented in this paper

  14. International safeguards for reprocessing plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, M.; Scheinman, L.; Sievering, N.; Wonder, E.; Lipman, D.; Immerman, W.; Elliott, J.M.; Crane, F.

    1981-04-01

    Proliferation risks inherent in reprocessing show the need to employ technically effective safeguards which can detect, with a high degree of assurance and on a timely basis, the diversion of significant quantities of fissionable material. A balance must be struck between what is technically feasible and effective and what is institutionally acceptable. Purpose of this report is to examine the several technical approaches to safeguards in light of their prospective acceptability. This study defines the economic, political and institutional nature of the safeguards problem; surveys generically alternative technical approaches to international safeguards including their effectiveness and relative development; characterizes the institutional implications and uncertainties associated with the acceptance and implementation of each technical alternative; and integrates these assessments into a set of overall judgments on feasible directions for reprocessing plant safeguards systems.

  15. Management of spent solvents of reprocessing origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, S.; Srinivas, C.; Vincent, T.; Wattal, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Spent solvents of reprocessing origin constitute a major portion of radioactive liquid organic wastes arising from nuclear activity. An in-depth study of this waste stream has led to the evolution of a complete management option, which addresses not only the concern of radioactivity but also its organic nature. This is based on alkaline hydrolysis of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), which converts it into aqueous soluble products, viz. sodium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid and butanol. During the process of alkaline hydrolysis almost all the activity associated with the waste gets transferred into the aqueous phase. The recovered diluent virtually free of activity and TBP can be recycled, and in case of it not meeting reprocessing standards, can be incinerated. The process generated aqueous waste is found compatible with cement and can be immobilized in cement matrix. (author)

  16. Reprocessing in Sweden: History and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Oesterlund, C.G.

    1990-10-01

    Against the background of nuclear power development and installation in Sweden an overview is presented of the parallel domestic development of the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The original selection of the natural uranium - heavy water reactor in the 1950s included spent fuel reprocessing and recycle, and process and plant studies were performed to that end. The switch to light water reactors in the 1960s did not change the planning to recycle; however, the participation in the Eurochemic undertaking, and the delay in the nuclear programme stopped further domestic development work. A number of governmental committee investigations in the 1970s on the radioactive waste issue and, above all, the decision to phase out nuclear power by 2010, after a referendum following the TMI-accident, finally resulted in a decision to plan only for direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This policy still prevails. (42 refs.)

  17. International safeguards for reprocessing plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzer, M.; Scheinman, L.; Sievering, N.; Wonder, E.; Lipman, D.; Immerman, W.; Elliott, J.M.; Crane, F.

    1981-04-01

    Proliferation risks inherent in reprocessing show the need to employ technically effective safeguards which can detect, with a high degree of assurance and on a timely basis, the diversion of significant quantities of fissionable material. A balance must be struck between what is technically feasible and effective and what is institutionally acceptable. Purpose of this report is to examine the several technical approaches to safeguards in light of their prospective acceptability. This study defines the economic, political and institutional nature of the safeguards problem; surveys generically alternative technical approaches to international safeguards including their effectiveness and relative development; characterizes the institutional implications and uncertainties associated with the acceptance and implementation of each technical alternative; and integrates these assessments into a set of overall judgments on feasible directions for reprocessing plant safeguards systems

  18. Open problems in reprocessing of a molten salt reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, Vladimir; Vocka, Radim

    2000-01-01

    The study of fuel cycle in a molten salt reactor (MSR) needs deeper understanding of chemical methods used for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and preparation of MSR fuel, as well as of the methods employed for reprocessing of MSR fuel itself. Assuming that all the reprocessing is done on the basis of electrorefining, we formulate some open questions that should be answered before a flow sheet diagram of the reactor is designed. Most of the questions concern phenomena taking place in the vicinity of an electrode, which influence the efficiency of the reprocessing and sensibility of element separation. Answer to these questions would be an important step forward in reactor set out. (Authors)

  19. Capability of minor nuclide confinement in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Sachio; Uchiyama, Gunzo; Mineo, Hideaki; Kihara, Takehiro; Asakura, Toshihide

    1999-01-01

    Experiment with spent fuels has started with the small scale reprocessing facility in NUCEF-BECKY αγ cell. Primary purpose of the experiment is to study the capability of long-lived nuclide confinement both in the PUREX flow sheet applied to the large scale reprocessing plant and also in the PARC (Partitioning Conundrum key process) flow sheet which is our proposal as a simplified reprocessing of one cycle extraction system. Our interests in the experiment are the behaviors of minor long-lived nuclides and the behaviors of the heterogeneous substances, such as sedimentation in the dissolver, organic cruds in the extraction banks. The significance of those behaviors will be assessed from the standpoint of the process safety of reprocessing for high burn-up fuels and MOX fuels. (author)

  20. Evaluation of retention and disposal options for tritium in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, W.R.; Hampson, D.C.; Larkin, D.J.; Skolrud, J.O.; Benjamin, R.W.

    1982-08-01

    Five options were evaluated as means of retaining tritium released from light-water reactor or fast breeder reactor fuel during the head-end steps of a typical Purex reprocessing scheme. Cost estimates for these options were compared with a base case in which no retention of tritium within the facility was obtained. Costs were also estimated for a variety of disposal methods of the retained tritium. The disposal costs were combined with the retention costs to yield total costs (capital plus operating) for retention and disposal of tritium under the conditions envisioned. The above costs were converted to an annual basis and to a dollars per curie retained basis. This then was used to estimate the cost in dollars per man-rem saved by retaining the tritium. Only the options that used the least expensive disposal costs could approach the $1000/man-rem cost used as a guide by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  1. Radioactive wastes from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture deals with definition, quantity and type of radioactive waste products occurring in a fuel reprocessing plant. Solid, liquid and gaseous fission and activation products are formed during the dissolution of the fuel and during the extraction process, and they must be separated from the fissionalble uranium and plutonium not spent. The chemical behaviour of these products (Zr, Ru, Np, gaseous substances, radiolysis products), which is sometimes very problematic, necessitates careful process control. However, the lifetime of nuclides is just as important for the conditions of the reprocessing procedure. The types of waste obtained after reprocessing are classified according to their state of aggregation and level of activity and - on the basis of the operational data of a prototype plant - they are quantitatively extrapolated for the operation of a large-scale facility of 1,400 tons of fuel annually. (RB) [de

  2. Fuel reprocessing and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippone, R.L.; Kaiser, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Because of different economic, social and political factors, there has been a tendency to compartmentalize the commercial nuclear power industry into separate power and fuel cycle operations to a greater degree in some countries compared to other countries. The purpose of this paper is to describe how actions in one part of the industry can affect the other parts and recommend an overall systems engineering approach which incorporates more cooperation and coordination between individual parts of the fuel cycle. Descriptions are given of the fuel cycle segments and examples are presented of how a systems engineering approach has benefitted the fuel cycle. Descriptions of fuel reprocessing methods and the waste forms generated are given. Illustrations are presented describing how reprocessing options affect waste management operations and how waste management decisions affect reprocessing

  3. The recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannegrace, J.-P.

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 update to the Uranium Institute's report ''Uranium Market Issues'', presented to this Symposium last year (1990) stated that the impact of recycled reprocessing products on uranium demand would be limited in the near future to that due to MOX fuel fabrication. The report stated that the recycling of reprocessed uranium was still at an early discussion stage, rather than being a short-term prospect. This paper will set out to challenge this assertion, on the basis both of facts and of economic and environmental incentives. (author)

  4. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring at reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery in Iraq after the Gulf War of the existence of a large clandestine nuclear-weapon program has led to an across-the-board international effort, dubbed Programme 93+2, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. One particularly significant potential change is the introduction of environmental monitoring (EM) techniques as an adjunct to traditional safeguards methods. Monitoring of stable noble gas (Kr, Xe) isotopic abundances at reprocessing plant stacks appears to be able to yield information on the burnup and type of the fuel being processed. To estimate the size of these signals, model calculations of the production of stable Kr, Xe nuclides in reactor fuel and the subsequent dilution of these nuclides in the plant stack are carried out for two case studies: reprocessing of PWR fuel with a burnup of 35 GWd/tU, and reprocessing of CAND fuel with a burnup of 1 GWd/tU. For each case, a maximum-likelihood analysis is used to determine the fuel burnup and type from the isotopic data

  5. Multipurpose simulator ''MR TRIOS'' for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Takeshi; Uehara, Shigeru; Takata, Hideo; Kamishima, Naoyuki

    1993-01-01

    MHI (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries) has developed MR TRIOS (Mitsubishi Reprocessing plant TRansient simulation code for Integrated process for Operation Support), the realtime dynamic simulator, for multipurpose use to support the Reprocessing Plant operation in various aspects. MR TRIOS integrates the Simulation Models of the unit process in a Reprocessing Plant, including Shearing, Dissolution, NOx absorption, Accountability and Adjustment and Co-decontamination process, where each Simulation Model has two kinds of models: Process and Control System. MR TRIOS can simulate the process behavior of the unit process in an integrated manner as well as independently. It is supported by MR CONTROL, the simulator control program developed by MHI. From MR TRIOS one can obtain real-time process values, such as temperature, pressure, density, flow rate, and concentration of nuclides, enabling the evaluation of the process dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. MR TRIOS has proved to be an effective tool for the comprehensive study of the process and system dynamics, for operation technique improvements and for training

  6. Material control for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundquist, D.; Bray, G.; Donelson, S.; Glancy, J.; Gozani, T.; Harris, L.; McNamera, R.; Pence, D.; Ringham, M.

    1976-01-01

    Adequate control of special nuclear material (SNM) implies a basic knowledge of the quantities of SNM processed through or contained within a fuels processing facility with sufficient accuracy that diversion of the SNM for deleterious purposes can be detected in a timely manner. This report to the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) describes the primary process streams containing plutonium that are handled routinely within a spent fuel reprocessing plant and conversion facility. As an aid in implementing the objectives of the accountability system in a realistic situation, the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) reprocessing plant now under construction near Barnwell, South Carolina, was chosen as the study model. The AGNS plant processes are discussed in detail emphasizing those portions of the process that contain significant quantities of plutonium. The unit processes within the separations plant, nitrate storage, plutonium product facility and the analytical laboratory are described with regard to the SNM control system currently planned for use in the facilities. A general discussion of laboratory techniques, nondestructive assay and process instrumentation for plutonium process and product material from a reprocessing plant is included. A comprehensive discussion is given of holdup measurements in plutonium recycle facilities. A brief preliminary overview is presented of alternative processing strategies for LWR fuel. An extensive review and summary of modeling efforts for liquid-liquid extraction cycles is included. A comprehensive bibliography of previous modeling efforts is covered

  7. Aerosols released in accidents in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.; Hashimoto, K.; Nishio, G.; Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1987-01-01

    For analyzing the thermodynamic and radiological consequences of solvent fire accidents in reprocessing plants, intensive investigations on burning contaminated condensible liquids were performed at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In small- and large-scale tests, KfK studied the behavior of kerosene, tributyl phosphate, HNO 3 mixture fires in open air and closed containments. The particle release from uranium-contaminated pool fires was investigated. Different filter devices were tested. For analyzing fires, PNL has developed the FIRIN computer code and has generated small-scale fire data in support of that code. The results of the experiments in which contaminated combustible liquids were burned demonstrate the use of the FIRIN code in simulating a solvent fire in a nuclear reprocessing plant. To demonstrate the safety evaluation of a postulated solvent fire in an extraction process of a reprocessing pant, JAERI conducted large-scale fire tests. Behavior of solvent fires in a cell and the integrity of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters due to smoke plugging were investigated. To evaluate confinement of radioactive materials released from the solvent fire, the ventilation systems with HEPA filters were tested under postulated fire conditions

  8. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  9. Effect of repeated tracheostomy tube reprocessing on biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Jennifer; Ojano-Dirain, Carolyn P; Antonelli, Patrick J; Silva, Rodrigo C

    2016-04-01

    To determine the effect of repeated reprocessing of pediatric tracheostomy tubes (TTs) on biofilm formation. In vitro microbiological study. Pediatric, uncuffed, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) TTs from two different manufacturers (Tracoe Mini and Shiley) were reprocessed mechanically with household detergent and soaked in sodium hypochlorite (bleach). Two TTs of each brand were reprocessed 0 (control), 10, or 20 times. Twenty 2-mm coupons were then obtained from each TT, immersed in human mucus, and cultured with either Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biofilm formation was evaluated with bacterial counts. Bacterial counts of S. aureus for both brands were significantly higher on the TTs that were reprocessed 20 times compared to those that were not reprocessed (Tracoe: P = .040, Shiley: P  attachment. Further investigation is needed to determine the optimal technique and limits of reprocessing TTs in clinical practice. NA. Laryngoscope published by Wiley on behalf of the American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc, “The Triological Society” and American Laryngological Association (the “Owner”).

  10. Radiation protection experience during active commissioning of the Thorp reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spour, K.; Hutton, E.

    1996-01-01

    BNFL's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (Thorp) reprocesses uranium oxide fuel assemblies which have been irradiated in thermal reactors in the UK and overseas. Plans for the plant were first announced in 1974. Application for planning permission was submitted in 1977, and government permission to construct the plant was granted after the Windscale inquiry in 1977. The plant was given the license to start active commissioning in head end in early 1994, and then in chemical plants in late 1994. Presently the whole of the process is being challenged in a planned commissioning strategy which will last into 1996. Thorp is designed to reprocess the spent oxide fuel into uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) and plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ). The Thorp complex can be essentially broken down into three distinct areas: Thorp receipt and storage provides pond storage for fuel awaiting reprocessing in Thorp. Head end fuel is transferred from receipt and storage into the feed pond where it is monitored to check fissile content, burn up and cooling time. The individual fuel assemblies for LWR fuel, or cans in the case of AGR fuel, are transferred onto the shear elevator and carried up to the shear cave. The fuel is sheared into small lengths to optimize the dissolution of the fuel inside the cladding. The sheared fuel and cladding debris is directed via a chute into one of three dissolvers, each with a nominal 1.8 teU capacity and dissolved in 8M nitric acid for approximately 16 hours. The cladding hulls are retained in a removable basket and sent for encapsulation. Insoluble fission products and fine particles of cladding are removed by centrifugation. Clarified dissolver solution is then accounted for by measurements taken for volume, mass and isotopic composition. Following this, the solution is transferred to buffer storage tarns and fed onto the chemical separation area. The liquor is transferred to the chemical separation area where it undergoes first cycle separation in pulsed columns

  11. Development, experience and innovation in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delange, M.

    1985-01-01

    The author describes landmarks in the development of the reprocessing industry in France and then presents objectives for the future (extension of reprocessing of fuel from breeder reactors) together with the technological resources deployed to attain them [fr

  12. Nuclear fuel reprocessing is challenged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a brief discussion of litigation to determine if the Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) in the United Kingdom will be allowed to operate. Litigants (including Greenpeace) contend that the government's December approval of discharge permits for the plant was unlawful without a public hearing. A description of the THORP process is also provided in this article

  13. Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy versus supportive therapy in affective relapse prevention in bipolar patients with a history of trauma: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Radua, Joaquim; Landín-Romero, Ramon; Blanco, Laura; Madre, Mercè; Reinares, Maria; Comes, Mercè; Jiménez, Esther; Crespo, Jose Manuel; Vieta, Eduard; Pérez, Victor; Novo, Patricia; Doñate, Marta; Cortizo, Romina; Valiente-Gómez, Alicia; Lupo, Walter; McKenna, Peter J; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Amann, Benedikt L

    2017-04-04

    Up to 60% of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a history of traumatic events, which is associated with greater episode severity, higher risk of comorbidity and higher relapse rates. Trauma-focused treatment strategies for BD are thus necessary but studies are currently scarce. The aim of this study is to examine whether Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy focusing on adherence, insight, de-idealisation of manic symptoms, prodromal symptoms and mood stabilization can reduce episode severity and relapse rates and increase cognitive performance and functioning in patients with BD. This is a single-blind, randomized controlled, multicentre trial in which 82 patients with BD and a history of traumatic events will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of two treatment arms: EMDR therapy or supportive therapy. Patients in both groups will receive 20 psychotherapeutic sessions, 60 min each, during 6 months. The primary outcome is a reduction of affective episodes after 12 and 24 months in favour of the EMDR group. As secondary outcome we postulate a greater reduction in affective symptoms in the EMDR group (as measured by the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Clinical Global Impression Scale modified for BD), and a better performance in cognitive state, social cognition and functioning (as measured by the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry, The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and the Functioning Assessment Short Test, respectively). Traumatic events will be evaluated by The Holmes-Rahe Life Stress Inventory, the Clinician-administered PTSD Scale and the Impact of Event Scale. The results of this study will provide evidence whether a specific EMDR protocol for patients with BD is effective in reducing affective episodes, affective symptoms and functional, cognitive and trauma symptoms. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT02634372 . Registered on

  14. Fuel reprocessing and environmental problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Ryushi

    1977-01-01

    The radioactive nuclides which are released from the reprocessing plants of nuclear fuel are 137 Cs, 106 Ru, 95 Zr and 3 H in waste water and 85 Kr in the atmosphere. This release affects the environment for example, the reprocessing plant of the Nuclear Fuel Service Co in the USA releases about 2 x 10 5 Ci/y of 85 Kr, which is evaluated as about 0.025 mr/y as external exposure dose. The radioactivity in milk around this plant was measured as less than 10 pCi/lit of 129sup(I. The radioactive concentration in the sea, especially in fish and shellfish, was measured near the reprocessing plant of Windscale in UK. The radioactive release rate from this plants more than 10)5sup( Ci/y as the total amount of )137sup(Cs, )3sup(H, )106sup(Ru, )95sup(Zr, )95sup(Nb, )90sup(Sr, )144sup(Ce, etc., and the radioactivity in seaweeds near Windscale is about 400 pCi/g as the maximum value, and the mayonnaise which was made of this seaweeds contained about 1 pCi/g of )106sup(Ru, which is estimated as about 7 mr/y for the digestive organ if 100 g is eaten every day. On the other hand, the experimental result is presented for the reprocessing plant of La Hague in France, in which the radioactive release rate from this plant is about 10)4sup( Ci/y, and the radioactivity in sea water and shellfish is about 4 pCi/l of )106sup(Ru and about 400 pCi/kg of )137 Cs, respectively, near this plant. The philosophy of ALAP (as low as practicable) is also applied to reprocessing plants. (Nakai, Y.)

  15. Studies on the separation and purification of strontium from the highly radioactive waste flow of fuel element reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerker, A.

    1989-10-01

    The quantity of spent fuel elements is increasing due to the extended peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Of the numerous fission products, strontium has an interesting application potential as a radiation or energy source for utilization in various industrial fields. A necessary condition for its use is its isolation in high radiochemical purity from the highly radioactive waste flow of the Purex process. In the present study, precipitation and coprecipitation reactions, and in particular ion exchange reactions, were chosen from among the various possible chemical and physical separation methods and examined with respect to their suitability for a selective separation of strontium from the other fission products. In selecting separation materials, particularly with respect to radiation resistance, thermal stability and selectivity, polyantimonic acid proved to be the best absorbent (even in a very acid medium) for strontium. Furthermore, the behaviour of the most important radionuclides was studied with respect to the denitration reaction from a 5 molar nitric acid solution. On the basis of the high demands made on the purity of the product, a method was developed by combining lead sulphate carrier precipitation with an ion exchange reaction on polyantimonic acid and is shown in a flow chart. (orig.) [de

  16. Reprocessing of LEU silicide fuel at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.

    1996-01-01

    UKAEA have recently reprocessed two LEU silicide fuel elements in their MTR fuel reprocessing plant at Dounreay. The reprocessing was undertaken to demonstrate UKAEA's commitment to the world-wide research reactor communities future needs. Reprocessing of LEU silicide fuel is seen as a waste treatment process, resulting in the production of a liquid feed suitable for conditioning in a stable form of disposal. The uranium product from the reprocessing can be used as a blending feed with the HEU to produce LEU for use in the MTR cycle. (author)

  17. Reprocessing and waste management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogg, C.S.; Howarth, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the progress in irradiated fuel reprocessing and waste management at the Sellafield site. Magnox fuel reprocessing is reviewed and oxide fuel reprocessing, due to commence in the early 1990s, is compared with existing practices. The article describes how magnox fuel reprocessing will be sustained by recent additions of new plant and shows how waste management downstream of reprocessing will be integrated across the Sellafield site. This article was first presented as a paper at the Waste Management '87 (1-5 March, Tucson, Arizona) conference. (author)

  18. Simulation study for purification, recovery of plutonium and uranium from plant streams of Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukumar, S.; Siva Kumar, P.; Radhika, R.; Subbuthai, S.; Mohan, S.V.; Subha Rao, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    A method for removal of plutonium from the lean organic streams obtained after co-stripping of uranium -plutonium was developed. Plutonium from lean organic phase was stripped using U 4+ /hydrazine as the stripping agent. The effect of concentrations of stripping agent U 4+ and feed Pu concentration in the lean organic phase was studied. Lean organic phases having higher plutonium concentration require three stages of stripping to bring plutonium concentration 4+ stabilized by hydrazine reduces Pu (IV) to Pu (III) thereby stripping plutonium from the organic phase. The non-extractability of Pu (III) by TBP was utilized for development of flow sheet for obtaining a uranium product lean of plutonium for ease of handling. (author)

  19. Fuel salt reprocessing influence on the MSFR behavior and on its associated reprocessing unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doligez, X.

    2010-10-01

    In order to face with the growing of the energy demand, the nuclear industry has to reach the fourth generation technology. Among those concept, molten salt reactor, and especially the fast neutron spectrum configuration, seems very promising: indeed breeding is achievable while the feedback coefficient are still negative. However, the reprocessing salt scheme is not totally set down yet. A lot of uncertainties remain on chemical properties of the salt. Thanks to numerical simulation we studied the behavior of the molten Salt Fast Reactor coupled to a nominal reprocessing unit. We are now able to determine heat transfer and radiation in each elementary step of the unit and, by this way determine those that need special study for radioprotection. We also studied which elements are fundamental to extract for the reactor operation. Finally, we present a sensibility analysis of the chemical uncertainties to few relevant properties of the reactor behavior. (author)

  20. Trends in fuel reprocessing safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujino, Takeshi

    1981-01-01

    With the operation of a fuel reprocessing plant in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and the plan for a second fuel reprocessing plant, the research on fuel reprocessing safety, along with the reprocessing technology itself, has become increasingly important. As compared with the case of LWR power plants, the safety research in this field still lags behind. In the safety of fuel reprocessing, there are the aspects of keeping radiation exposure as low as possible in both personnel and local people, the high reliability of the plant operation and the securing of public safety in accidents. Safety research is then required to establish the safety standards and to raise the rate of plant operation associated with safety. The following matters are described: basic ideas for the safety design, safety features in fuel reprocessing, safety guideline and standards, and safety research for fuel reprocessing. (J.P.N.)

  1. The environmental impact of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummery, P.W.; Howells, H.; Scriven, A.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; basis of hazard assessment (dose limits - ICRP recommendations; biological radiation effects); comparison of standards and practice in the UK and USA in the limitation of exposure of the public as a consequence of discharges of radioactive effluent to the environment; nature of reprocessing operations (Thermal Oxide Fuel Reprocessing Plant (THORP); storage ponds; fuel shearing; leaching; clarification; solvent extraction; finishing); waste management (liquids, solids, gases); waste discharges; environmental impact of normal operations (identification of the critical groups; exposure of critical groups; risks and exposures, occupational and collective); environmental impact of accidents (risk - probability multiplied by consequence of the event; types of accident considered); conclusion. (U.K.)

  2. Waste management in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortreuil, M.

    1982-01-01

    This lecture will give a survey of the French policy for the management of wastes in reprocessing plants. In consideration of their radioactivity, they must be immobilized in matrix in such a manner that they are stored under optimal safety conditions. A general review on the nature, nucleide content and quantity of the various wastes arising from thermal nuclear fuel reprocessing is given in the light of the French plants UP1 at Marcoule and UP2 at La Hague. The procedures of treatment of such wastes and their conditioning into inert packages suitable for temporary or terminal storage are presented, especially concerning the continuous vitrification process carried out for fission product solutions. The requirements of each option are discussed and possible alternative solutions are exposed. (orig./RW)

  3. Chemical problems associated with reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesne, A.

    1981-09-01

    This paper is an attempt to pinpoint the chemical problems raised by the reprocessing of oxide base fuels. Taking the reprocessing of slightly irradiated metallic fuels as a reference, for which long experience has been gained, a review is made of the various stages of the Purex process, in which the increase in mass and activity of the actinides and fission products engenders constraints related to the recovery of fissile materials, their purification, the release rate and, in general, the operation of the installations. The following subjects are discussed: dissolution from the standpoint of dissolution residues and iodine trapping, extraction cycles with respect to the behavior of ruthenium, neptunium, plutonium, technetium and palladium, the recycling of medium activity wastes

  4. Green light for Japanese reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patermann, C.

    1981-01-01

    In the last few years, international discussions of peaceful nuclear energy use and non-proliferation have been greatly influenced by the attitude of the US Government. Since the mid-Seventies, in the Carter area, this attitude has changed due to the fear that world-wide use of so-called sensitive technologies, i.e. uranium enrichment, reprocessing, and fast breeder development may increase the hazard of misuse for the production of nuclear weapons. (orig.) [de

  5. Remote handling in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streiff, G.

    1984-01-01

    Remote control will be the rule for maintenance in hot cells of future spent fuel reprocessing plants because of the radioactivity level. New handling equipments will be developed and intervention principles defined. Existing materials, recommendations for use and new manipulators are found in the PMDS' documentation. It is also a help in the choice and use of intervention means and a guide for the user [fr

  6. Reprocessing business in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, W L

    1985-01-01

    The development of the process for separating uranium, plutonium and fission products from irradiated fuel began in Britain in late 1940s, and the first separation plant was operated at Sellafield in 1952. This plant was operated very well for more than 12 years with the overall availability over 95%. The second separation plant to meet the needs of the growing nuclear power program became operational in 1964. This plant has been extremely successful, but the significant improvement was made to extend the operating life of the key items. In mid 1970s, by the introduction of uranium oxide fuel reactors, significant reprocessing capacity became to be required. Therefore, it was decided to embark upon the development of a thermal oxide reprocessing plant (THORP) to complement the existing facilities at Sellafield. The THORP is a very large complex of plants. The first duty for the THORP is to reprocess 6,000 t U of oxide fuel in 10 years. But the plant is designed for the life of 25 years. The plant has the capacity of 1200 tes/year. The scope covered by the THORP, the plant processes and the wastes produced from the THORP are described. (Kako, I.).

  7. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: reprocessing of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel containing U-233 and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1976-05-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel reprocessing plant and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in defining the term as low as reasonably achievable as it applies to this nuclear facility. The base case is representative of conceptual, developing technology of head-end graphite-burning operations and of extensions of solvent-extraction technology of current designs for light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing plants. The model plant has an annual capacity of 450 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM, where heavy metal is uranium plus thorium), as charged to about fifty 1000-MW(e) HTGRs. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The capital and annual costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding reductions in dose commitments are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, the cost/benefit of each case, calculated as additional cost of radwaste system divided by the reduction in dose commitment, is tabulated or the dose commitment is plotted with cost as the variable. The status of each of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed

  8. Quantitative analysis of residual protein contamination of podiatry instruments reprocessed through local and central decontamination units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramage Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cleaning stage of the instrument decontamination process has come under increased scrutiny due to the increasing complexity of surgical instruments and the adverse affects of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments. Instruments used in the podiatry field have a complex surface topography and are exposed to a wide range of biological contamination. Currently, podiatry instruments are reprocessed locally within surgeries while national strategies are favouring a move toward reprocessing in central facilities. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of local and central reprocessing on podiatry instruments by measuring residual protein contamination of instruments reprocessed by both methods. Methods The residual protein of 189 instruments reprocessed centrally and 189 instruments reprocessed locally was determined using a fluorescent assay based on the reaction of proteins with o-phthaldialdehyde/sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate. Results Residual protein was detected on 72% (n = 136 of instruments reprocessed centrally and 90% (n = 170 of instruments reprocessed locally. Significantly less protein (p Conclusions Overall, the results show the superiority of central reprocessing for complex podiatry instruments when protein contamination is considered, though no significant difference was found in residual protein between local decontamination unit and central decontamination unit processes for Blacks files. Further research is needed to undertake qualitative identification of protein contamination to identify any cross contamination risks and a standard for acceptable residual protein contamination applicable to different instruments and specialities should be considered as a matter of urgency.

  9. Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.A.; Deinert, M.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Austin TX (United States); Cady, K.B. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca NY (United States)

    2009-09-15

    The US Department of Energy is actively seeking ways in which to delay or obviate the need for additional nuclear waste repositories beyond Yucca Mountain. All of the realistic approaches require the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. However, the US currently lacks the infrastructure to do this and the costs of building and operating the required facilities are poorly established. Recent studies have also suggested that there is a financial advantage to delaying the deployment of such facilities. We consider a system of government owned reprocessing plants, each with a 40 year service life, that would reprocess spent nuclear fuel generated between 2010 and 2100. Using published data for the component costs, and a social discount rate appropriate for intergenerational analyses, we establish the unit cost for reprocessing and show that it increases slightly if deployment of infrastructure is delayed by a decade. The analysis indicates that achieving higher spent fuel discharge burnup is the most important pathway to reducing the overall cost of reprocessing. The analysis also suggests that a nuclear power production fee would be a way for the US government to recover the costs in a manner that is relatively insensitive to discount and nuclear power growth rates. (author)

  10. Nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.; Harris, D.; Mills, A.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out on an industrial scale in the United Kingdom since 1952. Two large reprocessing plants have been constructed and operated at Windscale, Cumbria and two smaller specialized plants have been constructed and operated at Dounreay, Northern Scotland. At the present time, the second of the two Windscale plants is operating, and Government permission has been given for a third reprocessing plant to be built on that site. At Dounreay, one of the plants is operating in its original form, whilst the second is now operating in a modified form, reprocessing fuel from the prototype fast reactor. This chapter describes the development of nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK, commencing with the research carried out in Canada immediately after the Second World War. A general explanation of the techniques of nuclear fuel reprocessing and of the equipment used is given. This is followed by a detailed description of the plants and processes installed and operated in the UK

  11. Report of the LASCAR forum: Large scale reprocessing plant safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information on the studies which were carried out from 1988 to 1992 under the auspices of the multinational forum known as Large Scale Reprocessing Plant Safeguards (LASCAR) on safeguards for four large scale reprocessing plants operated or planned to be operated in the 1990s. The report summarizes all of the essential results of these studies. The participants in LASCAR were from France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, the Commission of the European Communities - Euratom, and the International Atomic Energy Agency

  12. Commercial Nuclear Reprocessing in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherrill, Charles Leland [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    The short presentation outline: Reprocessing Overview; Events leading up to Carter’s Policy; Results of the decision; Policy since Nuclear Nonproliferation Act. Conclusions reached: Reprocessing ban has become an easy and visible fix to the public concern about proliferation, but has not completely stopped proliferation; and, Reprocessing needs to become detached from political considerations, so technical research can continue, regardless of the policy decisions we decide to take.

  13. The importance of nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allday, C.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following main headings: introduction; world energy requirement; energy conservation and the economics of recycle; environmental considerations and the timescale of reprocessing; and problems associated with reprocessing. It is concluded that reprocessing is essential to the conservation of the world's energy resources and is an environmentally and probably an economically more acceptable option to the 'throw away' alternative. The associated problems of proliferation and terrorism, although of the utmost importance, can and will be solved. (U.K.)

  14. Studies and research concerning BNFP: converting reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage area to an away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, J.E.; Shallo, F.A.; Musselwhite, E.L.; Wiedemann, G.F.; Young, M.

    1979-09-01

    Converting a reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage station into an Away-From-Reactor storage facility is evaluated in this report. An engineering analysis is developed which includes (1) equipment modifications to the facility including the physical protection system, (2) planning schedules for licensing-related activities, and (3) cost estimates for implementing such a facility conversion. Storage capacities are evaluated using the presently available pools of the existing Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant-Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model

  15. Studies and research concerning BNFP: converting reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage area to an away-from-reactor (AFR) storage facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cottrell, Jim E.; Shallo, Frank A.; Musselwhite, E Larry; Wiedemann, George F.; Young, Moylen

    1979-09-01

    Converting a reprocessing plant's fuel receiving and storage station into an Away-From-Reactor storage facility is evaluated in this report. An engineering analysis is developed which includes (1) equipment modifications to the facility including the physical protection system, (2) planning schedules for licensing-related activities, and (3) cost estimates for implementing such a facility conversion. Storage capacities are evaluated using the presently available pools of the existing Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant-Fuel Receiving and Storage Station (BNFP-FRSS) as a model.

  16. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program. Developments for the future in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    The future reprocessing developments focus on three major areas: (1) the retention of gaseous fission products to reduce off-site doses to very low values; (2) the initial steps of breakdown, shearing, and dissolution of breeder fuels; and (3) advanced facility and equipment concepts, which are expected to lead to a reliable, cost-effective, totally remotely operated and maintained plant. Work in the first area - removal of fission gases (the most important of which is 85 Kr) - is largely completed through tracer and bench-scale engineering equipment. Efforts are now mainly devoted to breeder fuels and advanced remote concepts. A facility, the Integrated Equipment Test Facility, which will be used to carry out much of this work, is nearing completion in Oak Ridge. In it a large, simulated, remote reprocessing cell will house a disassembly-shear machine for either breeder or LWR fuels, a rotary continuous dissolver, a solvent extraction cycle utilizing a new generation of centrifugal contactors, and related equipment

  17. ERDA activities related to reprocessing and plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgeon, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    ERDA has redirected its program in support of the LWR fuel cycle from one emphasizing the commercialization of existing fuel cycle technology to a broader based assessment of alternative fuel cycle concepts with the emphasis on safeguardability and avoidance of proliferation risks. As part of this program, ERDA will evaluate a number of possible technical and institutional options to reduce proliferation risks. ERDA will continue its current program of LWR fuel reprocessing R and D with added emphasis on improved safeguards capability as well as the applicability of conventional reprocessing technology to large multinational plants. These activities and supporting design studies will provide the basis for a decision regarding the design of an optimized system for the management of spent LWR fuel. Such a system would provide a model for the development of future domestic and foreign facilities and programs. A recently completed ERDA study of the benefits of LWR reprocessing and recycle would also be expected to be factored into such a decision. The study concluded that based on currently available data, recycle of uranium and plutonium in LWR's is attractive from the standpoint of economics and resource utilization relative to the discarding of spent fuel. The LWR reprocessing/recycle picture today is clouded by several unresolved policy issues. These include the need for adequate spent fuel storage capacity for both domestic and foreign reactors; the possibility of foreign reprocessing of U.S. produced fuel; the possibility of the disposal of foreign fuel in the U.S.; the possible need to dispose of wastes generated by multinational reprocessing plants; and finally, determination of the optimum balance between recycling recovered plutonium and saving it for the breeder

  18. Statement on the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has chosen the following objectives for future reprocessing plant design: reduced radiation exposure to workers; minimal environmental impact; improved plant operation and maintenance; improved accountability; no plutonium diversion; and reduced overall capital and operating cost. These objectives lead to a plant with totally remote operation. The Breeder Reactor Engineering Test (BRET) has been designed to perform a key role in demonstrating advanced reprocessing technology. It has been scheduled to be available to reprocess spent fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility. The principal features of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and of the BRET facility are appropriate for all reactor types

  19. Nuclear fuel reprocessing expansion strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of an effort to apply the techniques of operations research and energy system modeling to the problem of determination of cost-effective strategies for capacity expansion of the domestic nuclear fuel reprocessing industry for the 1975 to 2000 time period. The research also determines cost disadvantages associated with alternative strategies that may be attractive for political, social, or ecological reasons. The sensitivity of results to changes in cost assumptions was investigated at some length. Reactor fuel types covered by the analysis include the Light Water Reactor (LWR), High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), and the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR)

  20. Waste streams from reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Ericsson, A.-M.

    1978-03-01

    The three main products from reprocessing operations are uranium, plutonium and vitrified high-level-waste. The purpose of this report is to identify and quantify additional waste streams containing radioactive isotops. Special emphasis is laid on Sr, Cs and the actinides. The main part, more than 99 % of both the fission-products and the transuranic elements are contained in the HLW-stream. Small quantities sometimes contaminate the U- and Pu-streams and the rest is found in the medium-level-waste

  1. Simplified probabilistic risk assessment in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    An evaluation was made to determine if a backup mass tracking computer would significantly reduce the probability of criticality in the fuel reprocessing of the Integral Fast Reactor. Often tradeoff studies, such as this, must be made that would greatly benefit from a Probably Risk Assessment (PRA). The major benefits of a complete PRA can often be accrued with a Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment (SPRA). An SPRA was performed by selecting a representative fuel reprocessing operation (moving a piece of fuel) for analysis. It showed that the benefit of adding parallel computers was small compared to the benefit which could be obtained by adding parallelism to two computer input steps and two of the weighing operations. The probability of an incorrect material moves with the basic process is estimated to be 4 out of 100 moves. The actual values of the probability numbers are considered accurate to within an order of magnitude. The most useful result of developing the fault trees accrue from the ability to determine where significant improvements in the process can be made. By including the above mentioned parallelism, the error move rate can be reduced to 1 out of 1000

  2. Hydroxylamine as a potential reagent for dissolution off gas scrubbing in spent fuel reprocessing: kinetics of the iodine reduction. An example of similarity between the studies on the chemistry of iodine in reactor safety and in spent fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C; Devisme, F [Commissariat a l` Energie Atomique, CE/VRH, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Vargas, S; Chopin-Dumas, J [Laboratoire d` Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine, which can be released inside the containment building when an accident occurs, can be traced, in normal operating conditions, at the back end of the fuel cycle. Hydroxylamine has been selected as a reagent of potential interest to trap iodine in the dissolution off gas treatment. The kinetics of the reaction between hydroxylamine and iodine has been studied in a narrow range of pH (1-2), with hydroxylamine in excess (ratios of hydroxylamine to iodine initial concentrations varying from 2 to 40), at constant temperature (30{sup o}C) and ionic strength (0.1 mol/L). Spectrophotometry and voltametry have been coupled for analytical investigation. The problem of the rapid mixing of the reactants has been solved using a continuous reactor. Triiodide has been shown non reactive towards hydroxylamine. An initial rate law has been proposed, pointing out the first order of the reaction with respect to hydroxylamine and iodine, and the inhibitory effect of iodide and hydrogen ions. Nitrous acid has been identified as a transitory product. Nitrous oxide and nitrogen monoxide have been detected by gas chromatography, the ratio of the amounts of products formed depending on acidity. The complexity of the overall reaction has been ascribed to the competition of four reactions as previously proposed in the literature. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs.

  3. Hydroxylamine as a potential reagent for dissolution off gas scrubbing in spent fuel reprocessing: kinetics of the iodine reduction. An example of similarity between the studies on the chemistry of iodine in reactor safety and in spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Devisme, F.; Vargas, S.; Chopin-Dumas, J.

    1996-01-01

    Iodine, which can be released inside the containment building when an accident occurs, can be traced, in normal operating conditions, at the back end of the fuel cycle. Hydroxylamine has been selected as a reagent of potential interest to trap iodine in the dissolution off gas treatment. The kinetics of the reaction between hydroxylamine and iodine has been studied in a narrow range of pH (1-2), with hydroxylamine in excess (ratios of hydroxylamine to iodine initial concentrations varying from 2 to 40), at constant temperature (30 o C) and ionic strength (0.1 mol/L). Spectrophotometry and voltametry have been coupled for analytical investigation. The problem of the rapid mixing of the reactants has been solved using a continuous reactor. Triiodide has been shown non reactive towards hydroxylamine. An initial rate law has been proposed, pointing out the first order of the reaction with respect to hydroxylamine and iodine, and the inhibitory effect of iodide and hydrogen ions. Nitrous acid has been identified as a transitory product. Nitrous oxide and nitrogen monoxide have been detected by gas chromatography, the ratio of the amounts of products formed depending on acidity. The complexity of the overall reaction has been ascribed to the competition of four reactions as previously proposed in the literature. (author) 8 figs., 1 tab., 13 refs

  4. Transformative monitoring approaches for reprocessing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2011-09-01

    The future of reprocessing in the United States is strongly driven by plant economics. With increasing safeguards, security, and safety requirements, future plant monitoring systems must be able to demonstrate more efficient operations while improving the current state of the art. The goal of this work was to design and examine the incorporation of advanced plant monitoring technologies into safeguards systems with attention to the burden on the operator. The technologies examined include micro-fluidic sampling for more rapid analytical measurements and spectroscopy-based techniques for on-line process monitoring. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model was used to design the layout and test the effect of adding these technologies to reprocessing. The results here show that both technologies fill key gaps in existing materials accountability that provide detection of diversion events that may not be detected in a timely manner in existing plants. The plant architecture and results under diversion scenarios are described. As a tangent to this work, both the AMUSE and SEPHIS solvent extraction codes were examined for integration in the model to improve the reality of diversion scenarios. The AMUSE integration was found to be the most successful and provided useful results. The SEPHIS integration is still a work in progress and may provide an alternative option.

  5. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel; Prerada isluzenog nuklearnog goriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za hemiju visoke aktivnosti, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-12-15

    This volume contains the following reports: Experimental facility for testing and development of pulsed columns and auxiliary devices; Chemical-technology study of the modified 'Purex' process; Chemical and radiometric control analyses; Chromatographic separation of rare earth elements on paper treated by di-n butylphosphate; Preliminary study of some organic nitrogen extracts significant in fuel reprocessing.

  6. Combined orbits and clocks from IGS second reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Jake

    2018-05-01

    The Analysis Centers (ACs) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) have reprocessed a large global network of GPS tracking data from 1994.0 until 2014.0 or later. Each AC product time series was extended uniformly till early 2015 using their weekly operational IGS contributions so that the complete combined product set covers GPS weeks 730 through 1831. Three ACs also included GLONASS data from as early as 2002 but that was insufficient to permit combined GLONASS products. The reprocessed terrestrial frame combination procedures and results have been reported already, and those were incorporated into the ITRF2014 multi-technique global frame released in 2016. This paper describes the orbit and clock submissions and their multi-AC combinations and assessments. These were released to users in early 2017 in time for the adoption of IGS14 for generating the operational IGS products. While the reprocessing goal was to enable homogeneous modeling, consistent with the current operational procedures, to be applied retrospectively to the full history of observation data in order to achieve a more suitable reference for geophysical studies, that objective has only been partially achieved. Ongoing AC analysis changes and a lack of full participation limit the consistency and precision of the finished IG2 products. Quantitative internal measures indicate that the reprocessed orbits are somewhat less precise than current operational orbits or even the later orbits from the first IGS reprocessing campaign. That is even more apparent for the clocks where a lack of robust AC participation means that it was only possible to form combined 5-min clocks but not the 30-s satellite clocks published operationally. Therefore, retrospective precise point positioning solutions by users are not recommended using the orbits and clocks. Nevertheless, the orbits do support long-term stable user solutions when used with network processing with either double differencing or explicit clock

  7. Transport and reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    1981-01-01

    This contribution deals with transport and packaging of oxide fuel from and to the Cogema reprocessing plant at La Hague (France). After a general discussion of nuclear fuel and the fuel cycle, the main aspects of transport and reprocessing of oxide fuel are analysed. (Auth.)

  8. THORP and the economics of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkhout, F.; Walker, W.

    1990-11-01

    This Report compares the costs of reprocessing spent fuels at the new THORP reprocessing plant at Sellafield with the alternative of storing them prior to final disposal. It finds that even when the cost of constructing THORP is treated as a sunk cost, reprocessing has no decisive economic advantage over spent fuel storage. Electric utilities in Western Europe and Japan have already largely paid for the construction of the new British and French reprocessing plants. Today, their economic judgements therefore depend on the future costs of operating and eventually decommissioning the plants, and of dealing with the resulting wastes and separated products. The costs attached to reprocessing have risen mainly due to the higher estimated costs of waste management and decommissioning, and to the costs of coping with unwanted plutonium. Most of these costs are passed directly on to utilities and thus electricity consumers under the terms of cost-plus contracts. Using cost estimates favourable to the reprocessing option, the total future undiscounted liabilities arising from the first ten years of THORP reprocessing come to Pound 2.4-3.7 billion at today's prices. This compares with the more predictable although still burdensome fuel storage, conditioning and disposal costs of Pound 3.0-3.8 billion. If disposal is not anticipated, the economic advantage shifts decisively in favour of spent fuel storage: Pound 0.9-1.3 billion against Pound 1.4-2.4 billion for reprocessing. (author)

  9. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels - status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper gives a survey on reprocessing plants at present under construction, in operation, and planned, as well as on the most important process steps such as receipt, storage, conversion, the extraction process, purification of the end products, gaseous waste treatment and waste treatment, and repair and maintenance of reprocessing plants. An outline on operational experience with WAK follows. (HR/LN) [de

  10. New rules set for uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The Australian Government policy regarding the reprocessing of Australian uranium overseas is outlined. Buyer nations will be required to sign an agreement that the uranium will be reprocessed only for energy uses and that approved waste management standards will be met

  11. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing. An Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) envisioned the introduction of Plutonium fuelled fast reactors as the intermediate stage, between Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors and Thorium-Uranium-233 based reactors for the Indian Nuclear Power Programme. This necessitated the closing of the fast reactor fuel cycle with Plutonium rich fuel. Aiming to develop a Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (FRFR) technology with low out of pile inventory, the DAE, with over four decades of operating experience in Thermal Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (TRFR), had set up at the India Gandhi Center for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, R and D facilities for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. After two decades of R and D in all the facets, a Pilot Plant for demonstrating FRFR had been set up for reprocessing the FBTR (Fast Breeder Test Reactor) spent mixed carbide fuel. Recently in this plant, mixed carbide fuel with 100 GWd/t burnup fuel with short cooling period had been successfully reprocessed for the first time in the world. All the challenging problems encountered had been successfully overcome. This experience helped in fine tuning the designs of various equipments and processes for the future plants which are under construction and design, namely, the DFRP (Demonstration Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant) and the FRP (Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant). In this paper, a comprehensive review of the experiences in reprocessing the fast reactor fuel of different burnup is presented. Also a brief account of the various developmental activities and strategies for the DFRP and FRP are given. (author)

  12. Management of radioactive waste from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanwar Raj

    2010-01-01

    Reprocessing and recycling of both fissile and fertile components back into appropriate reactor systems is an integral part of three stage nuclear energy programme of India. Different steps involved in processing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are decladding, dissolution and recovery of fissile and fertile materials. Reprocessing of SNF is a complex process involving handling of large quantity of radioactive materials and processing chemicals. There are three reprocessing plants in operation in the country at Trombay, Tarapur and Kalpakkam. Out of these plants, Trombay reprocessing plant is engaged in reprocessing of SNF from research reactors and other two plants are processing of SNF from PHWRs. A facility is being built for reprocessing of thorium based spent fuel at BARC, Trombay based on the experience of pilot plant scale. Like other industrial activities of nuclear fuel cycle, fuel reprocessing facilities too generate various types of radioactive waste streams. These are generated in all the three physical forms namely solid, liquid and gas. These waste streams are primarily categorized on the basis of concentration of radionuclides, their half lives and toxicity. Management of these wastes aims at (a) recovery and recycle of useful materials, (b) concentration and confinement of radioactivity in inert and stable matrices, (c) minimization of final waste volume for disposal, (d) decontamination of effluents following ALARA principle and (e) minimization of radioactive discharge to the environment. The present paper outlines the salient features of management of different types of radioactive waste generated in reprocessing plants handling SNF from research reactors and PHWR

  13. Quantitative analysis of residual protein contamination of podiatry instruments reprocessed through local and central decontamination units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gordon Wg; Goldie, Frank; Long, Steven; Lappin, David F; Ramage, Gordon; Smith, Andrew J

    2011-01-10

    The cleaning stage of the instrument decontamination process has come under increased scrutiny due to the increasing complexity of surgical instruments and the adverse affects of residual protein contamination on surgical instruments. Instruments used in the podiatry field have a complex surface topography and are exposed to a wide range of biological contamination. Currently, podiatry instruments are reprocessed locally within surgeries while national strategies are favouring a move toward reprocessing in central facilities. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of local and central reprocessing on podiatry instruments by measuring residual protein contamination of instruments reprocessed by both methods. The residual protein of 189 instruments reprocessed centrally and 189 instruments reprocessed locally was determined using a fluorescent assay based on the reaction of proteins with o-phthaldialdehyde/sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate. Residual protein was detected on 72% (n = 136) of instruments reprocessed centrally and 90% (n = 170) of instruments reprocessed locally. Significantly less protein (p podiatry instruments when protein contamination is considered, though no significant difference was found in residual protein between local decontamination unit and central decontamination unit processes for Blacks files. Further research is needed to undertake qualitative identification of protein contamination to identify any cross contamination risks and a standard for acceptable residual protein contamination applicable to different instruments and specialities should be considered as a matter of urgency.

  14. Reprocessing of MTR fuel at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, N.

    1997-01-01

    UKAEA at Dounreay has been reprocessing MTR fuel for over 30 years. During that time considerable experience has been gained in the reprocessing of traditional HEU alloy fuel and more recently with dispersed fuel. Latterly a reprocessing route for silicide fuel has been demonstrated. Reprocessing of the fuel results in a recycled uranium product of either high or low enrichment and a liquid waste stream which is suitable for conditioning in a stable form for disposal. A plant to provide this conditioning, the Dounreay Cementation Plant is currently undergoing active commissioning. This paper details the plant at Dounreay involved in the reprocessing of MTR fuel and the treatment and conditioning of the liquid stream. (author)

  15. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel; Prerada isluzenog nuklearnog goriva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    This report covers: chemical-technology investigation of modified purex process for reprocessing of spent fuel; implementation of the procedure for obtaining plutonium peroxide and oxalate; research in the field of uranium, plutonium, and fission products separation by inorganic ion exchangers and extraction by organic solutions; study of the fission products in the heavy water RA reactor.

  16. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01

    The first volume of this report summarizes the results and conclusions for this study of conventional and advanced nuclear materials accounting systems applicable for both large (1500 MTHM/y) and small (210 MTHM/y) spent-fuel reprocessing facilities subject to international verification

  17. Development of some operations in technological flowsheet for spent VVER fuel reprocessing at a pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, L.N.; Galkin, B.Ya; Lyubtsev, R.I.; Romanovskii, V.N.; Velikhov, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The fuel reprocessing pilot plants for high active materials would permit the study and development or particular processing steps and flowsheet variations; in some cases, these experimental installations realize on a small scale practically all technological chains of large reprocessing plants. Such a fuel reprocessing pilot plant with capacity of 3 kg U/d has been built at V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The pilot plant is installed in the hot cell of radiochemical compartment, and is composed of the equipments for fuel element cutting and dissolving, the preparation of feed solution (clarification, correction), extraction reprocessing and the production of uranium, plutonium and neptunium concentrates, the complex processing of liquid and solid wastes and a special unit for gas purification and analysis. In the last few years, a series of experiments have been carried out on the reprocessing of spent VVER fuel. (J.P.N.)

  18. Electrochemical reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Sartorelli, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel which is particularly suitable for use with fuel from fast reactors and has the advantage of being a dry process in which there is no danger of radiation damage to a solvent medium as in a wet process. It comprises the steps of dissolving the fuel in a salt melt under such conditions that uranium and plutonium therein are converted to sulphate form. The plutonium sulphate may then be thermally decomposed to PuO 2 and removed. The salt melt is then subjected to electrolysis conditions to achieve cathodic deposition of UO 2 (and possibly PuO 2 ). The salt melt can then be recycled or conditioned for final disposal. (author)

  19. Ecological problems of fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of the effects of a reprocessing plant to its environment lies in the amount of the handled radioactivity and its longerity. According to the toxicity of the nuclides extensive measures for retainings and filtering are necessary, in order to keep the resulting radiation load in the surrounding within justified limits. The experiences with the WAK prove, that they managed to reduce that radiation load to values that are negligible compared with the natural one. The expected adaptation of the radiation protection legislation to the latest recommendations of the ICRP will in addition help to do more realistic estimations as to the radiotoxicity of certain nuclides (Kr-85, J-129), which means at lower levels than up to now. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Status of project design work for a German reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Zuehlke, P.

    1976-01-01

    A reprocessing plant will be built within the framework of a comprehensive waste management center planned by the Federal Government to treat the fuel elements unloaded from German nuclear power stations. On the basis of an annual throughput of 1,400 te of uranium averaged over the life of the plant, the center will be able to serve between 45,000 and 50,000 MWe of installed nuclear generating capacity. A comprehensive conceptual design study of the reprocessing plant to be built has been completed on the basis of the operating experience accumulated at the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant and the development work carried out by the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and in the light also of an intensive exchange of experience with British and French reprocessing companies within the framework of United Reprocessors GmbH. This conceptual design study is the foundation for the preliminary project to be carried out on a collaborative basis by KEWA and PWK. (orig.) [de

  1. Enhancement of safety for reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    The adequacy of the safety measures for utility loss accidents in nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities which have been formulated by the nuclear enterprises is investigated in JNES which organizes an advanced committee to specifically study this problem. The results are reviewed in the present report including the case of such severe accidents as in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The report also represents a tentative proposal for examination standards of such unimaginable severe accidents as 'station blackout,' urgent safety measures necessary for reoperation of nuclear power plants and requested by nuclear and industrial safety agency, and pointing out and clarification of the potential weakness from the safety point of view, and collective and composite evaluation of safety of the relevant facilities. Furthermore, the definition of accident management is given as of controlled condition and the authorized way of thinking for the cases of plural events happening at the same time and the cases when risks exist radioactivity emits with explosion. (S. Ohno)

  2. Flowsheet development for HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, B.; Benedict, G.E.; Zimmerman, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    Development studies to date indicate that the HTGR fuel blocks can be effectively crushed with two stages of eccentric jaw crushing, followed by a double-roll crusher, a screener and an eccentrically mounted single-roll crusher for oversize particles. Burner development results indicate successful long-term operation of both the primary and secondary fluidized-bed combustion systems can be performed with the equipment developed in this program. Aqueous separation development activities have centered on adapting known Acid-Thorex processing technology to the HTGR reprocessing task. Significant progress has been made on dissolution of burner ash, solvent extraction feed preparation, slurry transfer, solids drying and solvent extraction equipment and flowsheet requirements

  3. Development of centrifugal contactor for FBR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washiya, Tadahiro; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Suganuma, Takashi; Aose, Shinichi; Ogino, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    In the Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems, the aqueous reprocessing technology is nominated as a candidate for future reprocessing system, which supposes to apply a centrifugal contactor in the extraction process. For the reprocessing plant, the centrifugal contactor has great advantages such as reducing solvent degradation, improving of equipment utilization rate, compact designing of equipment layout and critical safety domination. From these advantages, the centrifugal contactor is crucial equipment in the aqueous reprocessing process. Since 1985, JNC has been developing the centrifugal contactor. The single unit development has been accomplished and basic characteristics such as extraction performance, fluidic performance and remote maintenance performance have been determined. A durability test has been conducted for high longevity, with consideration given to the nitric acid mist and estimation of the equipment lifetime. System test equipment with centrifugal contactors of engineering scale was installed, and uranium test was conducted. Up to now, a standard flow sheet test in the extraction process and mal-operation test assuming the one stage shutdown condition have been performed. (author)

  4. Reprocessing of spent fuel and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Ryukichi

    1977-01-01

    The public acceptance has to be considered regarding whole atomic power rather than the reprocessing of nuclear fuel separately, and the problems concerned are as follows; the release of radioactive materials in the normal and abnormal operations of reprocessing plants, the disposal of wastes with high level radioactivity, the transportation of high level radioactive material, the relation to the economic activity near nuclear plants, the environmental effect of 85 Kr. and 3 H, etc., and the physical protection for reprocessing facility itself, the special handling of the materials of very high radioactivity level such as fission products and plutonium, the radiation exposure of operators, and the demonstration of reprocessing techniques of commercial base, etc., as a part of the nuclear fuel cycle, and the relation between atomic power and other technologies in energy supply, the evalution of atomic power as the symbol of huge scale science, and the energy problem within the confrontation of economic development and the preservation of environment and resources regarding whole nuclear energy. The situations of fuel reprocessing in USA, UK, France, Germany and Japan are explained from the viewpoint of the history. The general background for the needs of nuclear energy in Japan, the image of nuclear energy and fuel reprocessing entertained by the general public, and the special feature of reprocessing techniques are described. (Nakai, Y.)

  5. Fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, M.; Le Bouhellec, J.; Eymery, R.; Viala, M.

    1984-08-01

    Simultaneous with the effort on fast breeder reactors launched several years ago in France, equivalent investigations have been conducted on the fuel cycle, and in particular on reprocessing, which is an indispensable operation for this reactor. The Rapsodie experimental reactor was associated with the La Hague reprocessing plant AT1 (1 kg/day), which has reprocessed about one ton of fuel. The fuel from the Phenix demonstration reactor is reprocessed partly at the La Hague UP2 plant and partly at the Marcoule pilot facility, undergoing transformation to reprocess all the fuel (TOR project, 5 t/y). The fuel from the Creys Malville prototype power plant will be reprocessed in a specific plant, which is in the design stage. The preliminary project, named MAR 600 (50 t/y), will mobilize a growing share of the CEA's R and D resources, as the engineering needs of the UP3 ''light water'' plant begins to decline. Nearly 20 tonnes of heavy metals irradiated in fast breeder reactors have been processed in France, 17 of which came from Phenix. The plutonium recovered during this reprocessing allowed the power plant cycle to be closed. This power plant now contains approximately 140 fuel asemblies made up with recycled plutonium, that is, more than 75% of the fuel assemblies in the Phenix core

  6. Remote maintenance in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herndon, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    Remote maintenance techniques applied in large-scale nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are reviewed with particular attention to the three major maintenance philosophy groupings: contact, remote crane canyon, and remote/contact. Examples are given, and the relative success of each type is discussed. Probable future directions for large-scale reprocessing plant maintenance are described along with advanced manipulation systems for application in the plants. The remote maintenance development program within the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is also described. 19 refs., 19 figs

  7. Corrosion control in nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    This article looks in detail at tribology-related hazards of corrosion in irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and tries to identify and minimize problems which could contribute to disaster. First, the corrosion process is explained. Then the corrosion aspects at each of four stages in reprocessing are examined, with particular reference to oxide fuel reprocessing. The four stages are fuel receipt and storage, fuel breakdown and dissolution, solvent extraction and product concentration and waste management. Results from laboratory and plant corrosion trails are used at the plant design stage to prevent corrosion problems arising. Operational procedures which minimize corrosion if it cannot be prevented at the design stage, are used. (UK)

  8. Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels in OECD countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report deals with the adequacy of projected reprocessing capacity, the short-term measures proposed in view of the lack of sufficient reprocessing capacity, the longer term measures proposed in view of the lack of sufficient reprocessing capacity, the alternatives to reprocessing and the cooperative arrangements

  9. Refurbishment of the BNFL Magnox reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, V.M.; Edgar, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Magnox Reprocessing Plant was commissioned in 1964. Since then it has reprocessed more than 35,000 t of irradiated uranium metal fuel. The plant is subject to routine shutdowns to allow maintenance and project work to be undertaken. During the 1997 shutdown the opportunity was taken to replace several life limiting parts of the plant to ensure Magnox reprocessing capability well beyond the year 2010. This shutdown was the largest and most complex undertaken by Magnox Reprocessing, with a total committed value of 130 million UK pounds, 17.5 million UK pounds committed in the shutdown itself and the balance on installation, design and procurement preparing for the shutdown. The work was completed within safety targets, to programme and within budget. The lessons learned and experience gained have been fed into the methodologies and procedures for planning future project and shutdown work within BNFL. This report is part of the output from this process of continually improving performance. (author)

  10. Conditions for Australian consent to reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This article contains the text of the statement by the Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs to the House of Representatives, Noember 1980, on conditions for Australian consent to the reprocessing of nuclear material of Australian origin

  11. Storage and Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Addressing the problem of waste, especially high-level waste (HLW), is a requirement of the nuclear fuel cycle that cannot be ignored. We explore the two options employed currently, long-term storage and reprocessing.

  12. Reprocessing considerations for a developing country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes some of the alternatives for dealing with spent fuel that face a developing country. It then discusses the considerations that affect decisions on the size and siting of reprocessing plants, and shows how small plants may be suitable in countries without the means to transport spent fuel easily. The paper also outlines the reasons for reprocessing in India, and describes the development of India's reprocessing capability. It shows how the economic conditions in India, such as low skilled labour costs, make reprocessing plants of 100 to 200 tonnes U/yr capacity economic, and includes a table giving technical data on a 100 t U/yr national plant for inclusion in the reference cases used by INFCE Working Group 4

  13. Spent fuel management: reprocessing or storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de

    1986-01-01

    A review of the spent fuel management concepts generally adopted in several countries is presented, including an analysis of the brazilian situation. The alternatives are the reprocessing, the interim storage and the final disposal in a repository after appropriate conditioning. The commercial operating reprocessing facilities in the Western World are located in France and in the United Kingdom. In the USA the anti-reprocessing policy from 1977 changed in 1981, when the government supported the resumption of commercial reprocessing and designated the private sector as responsible for providing these services. Small scale facilities are operating in India, Italy, Japan and West Germany. Pilot plants for LWR fuel are being planned by Spain, Pakistan and Argentina. (Author) [pt

  14. Spent fuel management: reprocessing or storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Soares, M.L. de; Oliveira Lopes, M.J. de.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the spent fuel management concepts generally adopted in several countries is presented, including an analysis of the brazilian situation. The alternatives are the reprocessing, the interim storage and the final disposal in a repository after appropriate conditioning. The commercial operating reprocessing facilities in the Western World are located in France and in the United Kingdom. In the USA the anti-reprocessing policy from 1977 changed in 1981, when the Government supported the resumption of commercial reprocessing and designated the private sector as responsible for providing these services. Small scale facilities are operating in India, Italy, Japan and West Germany. Pilot plant for LWR fuel are being planned by Spain, Pakistan and Argentina. (Author) [pt

  15. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.; Williams, J.; Buck, C.

    1977-01-01

    Enriched uranium metal fuel irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been reprocessed and refabricated in plants specifically designed for the purpose in the U.K. since 1961. Efficient and reliable fuel recycle is essential to the development of a plutonium based fast reactor system and the importance of establishing at an early stage fast reactor fuel reprocessing has been reinforced by current world difficulties in reprocessing high burn-up thermal reactor oxide fuel. In consequence, the U.K. has decided to reprocess irradiated fuel from the 250 MW(E) Prototype Fast Reactor as an integral part of the fast reactor development programme. Flowsheet and equipment development work for the small scale fully active demonstration plant have been carried out over the past 5 years and the plant will be commissioned and ready for active operation during 1977. In parallel, a comprehensive waste management system has been developed and installed. Based on this development work and the information which will arise from active operation of the plant a parallel development programme has been initiated to provide the basis for the design of a large scale fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant to come into operation in the late 1980s to support the projected U.K. fast reactor installation programme. The paper identifies the important differences between fast reactor and thermal reactor fuel reprocessing technologies and describes some of the development work carried out in these areas for the small scale P.F.R. fuel reprocessing operation. In addition, the development programme in aid of the design of a larger scale fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant is outlined and the current design philosophy is discussed

  16. Simulation of nuclear fuel reprocessing for safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canty, M.J.; Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Spannagel, G.

    1983-11-01

    For safeguarding the chemical process area of future reprocessing plants the near-real-time material accountancy (NRTMA) method might be applied. Experimental data are not yet available for testing the capability of the NRTMA method but can be simulated using a digital computer. This report describes the mathematical modeling of the Pu-bearing components of reprocessing plants and presents first results obtained by simulation models. (orig.) [de

  17. Nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.; Harris, D.W.; Mills, A.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out on an industrial scale in the United Kingdom since 1952. Two large reprocessing plants have been constructed and operated at Windscale, Cumbria and two smaller specialized plants have been constructed and operated at Dounreay, Northern Scotland. At the present time, the second of the two Windscale plants is operating, and Government permission has been given for a third reprocessing plant to be built on that site. At Dounreay, one of the plants is operating in its original form, whilst the second is now operating in a modified form, reprocessing fuel from the prototype fast reactor. This chapter describes the development of nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK, commencing with the research carried out in Canada immediately after the Second World War. A general explanation of the techniques of nuclear fuel reprocessing and of the equipment used is given. This is followed by a detailed description of the plants and processes installed and operated in the UK. (author)

  18. The thermal oxide reprocessing plant at Sellafield: three years of active operation in the chemical separation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant at British Nuclear Fuels' Sellafield site started operating in March 1994 with the shearing of its first irradiated fuel. In January 1995 the Chemical Separation part of the plant commenced processing the irradiated fuel feed solution that had been produced in the previous year by the Head End plant. By the Spring of 1998 over 1400 t of irradiated fuel has been reprocessed in Thorp, and the plant is being steadily and successfully ramped up to its normal operating throughput. The performance of the Thorp Chemical Separation Plant has been excellent, with the solvent extraction contactors performing as predicted by the extensive development programme. In particular the uranium-plutonium separation stage, which received intensive development to deal with the effects of the fission product technetium, has given an overall separation performance well in excess of the minimum flowsheet requirement. Decontamination of the uranium and plutonium products from fission products has in general been better than flowsheet requirements and the solvent extraction equipment has operated stably under the automatic controls developed during the R and D programme. Discharges of contaminants to waste streams have generally been in line with, or better than, expectation. This paper compares with flowsheet predictions a range of the key fission product and transuranic decontamination factors achieved in Thorp, shows how waste stream discharges are a small fraction of Sellafield Site discharge limits, demonstrates how uranium - plutonium separation performance has compared with expectation and summarises the overall performance of the Chemical Separation Plant. (author)

  19. On-line reprocessing of a molten salt reactor: a simulation tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Nicole; Gastaldi, Olivier; Penit, Thomas; Cohin, Olivier; Campion, Pierre-Yves

    2008-01-01

    The molten salt reactor (MSR) is one of the concepts studied in the frame of GEN IV road-map. Due to the specific features of its liquid fuel, the reprocessing unit may be directly connected to the reactor. A modelling of this unit is presented. The final objective is to create a flexible computer reprocessing code which can use data from neutron calculations and can be coupled to a neutron code. Such a code allows the description of the whole behaviour of MSR, including, in a coupled manner, both the design of the core and the optimised reprocessing scheme effects. (authors)

  20. Studies on the fission products behavior during dissolution process of BWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Nakai, E.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1987-01-01

    In order to obtain basic data on fission products behavior in connection with the head end process of fuel reprocessing, especially to obtain better understanding on undissolved residues, small scale dissolution studies were performed by using BWR spent fuel rods which were irradiated as monitoring fuel rods under the monitoring program for LWR fuel assembly performance entitled PROVING TEST ON RELIABILITY OF FUEL ASSEMBLY . The Zircaloy-2 claddings and the fuel pellets were subjected individually to the following studies on 1) release of fission products during dissolution process, 2) characterization of undissolved residues, and 3) analysis of the claddings. This paper presents comprehensive descriptions of the fission products behavior during dissolution process, based on detailed and through PIE conducted by JNFS under the sponsorship of MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry)

  1. Study of the 60Co speciation in the aqueous radioactive waste of the la Hague nuclear reprocessing plant; environmental behaviour after discharges in the waters of the channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudaire, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    60 Co is produced as an activation product and is present in the low-level aqueous radioactive waste released from the La Hague plant. At present, the concentration in the sea (non filtered at 0.45 μm) at the Goury site are close to or even below, the detection limit: 0.2 mBq.l -1 . The 60 Co speciation depends on the type of effluent considered: in the effluent A ('active'), the cobalt is in the form of a stable trivalent complex; in the effluent V (to be checked), the cobalt is in majority (50% of the activity release) in the form of particles (>0.45 μm), and then in the form of two soluble species: ionic divalent (Co 2+ ) and some stable complexes. The evolution of the reprocessing techniques used does not affect the speciation. So, since the nuclear reprocessing plant started at the La Hague plant in 1966, the chemical species discharged in the sea shows time variation related to the evolution of the type of effluent discharged. Thus, since 1994, the particles of cobalt are the main species discharged in the Channel (the V effluents represent more than 85% of the total 60 Co activity released). The effect of instantaneous dilution into the marine conditions involving a variation of pH, oxido-reduction, ionic strength, a gradient of salinity, does not interfere with the evolution of the chemical species discharged. Nevertheless, during the discharge of the V effluent, the main constituents of the sea water (Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ) go through a precipitation. This comes with the coprecipitation of the ion Co 2+ and with the particles of cobalt (complexes are not affected), and it can be responsible for an increase in the concentration in the particles. The chemical behaviour of the cobalt in the Channel is different from those of conservative element such as antimony. The ionic cobalt and the particles have a small dispersion in the water (cobalt has a very high particle/dissolved distribution factor, it is a non-conservative radionuclide). This sedimentary stock can

  2. Seismic analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Service Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York: documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Davito, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    This material was generated as part of a seismic case review of the NFS Reprocessing Plant. This study is documented in UCRL-52266. The material is divided into two parts: mathematical model information, and ultimate load calculations and comparisons

  3. 2-22 Study of Oxidation/reduction Volatilization Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan; Cunmin[1; Cao; Shiwei[1; Tian; Yuan[1; Qin; Zhi[1

    2015-01-01

    As an advanced dry head-end processing of spent fuel reprocessing, the oxidation-reduction volatilization technology will use for pulverizing uranium oxide ceramic pellets, decladding, and removal of most of volatile and semi-volatile fission elements, 3H, 14C, Kr, Xe, I, Cs, Ru and Tc, from fuel prior to main treatment process. The AIROX and ORIOX process, including circulation of oxidation in oxygen atmosphere and reduction in hydrogen atmosphere, researched on international at present, is considered to be the first choice for head-end processing.

  4. Continuous chemical cold traps for reprocessing off-gas purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Bauder, U.; Steinhardt, H.J.; Bumiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Absorption of nitrogen oxides and iodine from simulated reprocessing plant off-gas streams has been studied using nitric acid and nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixtures at low temperatures. The experiments were carried out at the laboratory and on the engineering scale. The pilot plant scale column has 0.8 m diameter and 16 absorption plates at 0.2 m spacing. Cooling coils on the plates allow operating temperatures down to -60 0 C. The NO concentration in the feed gas usually has been 1% by volume and the flow rate 4-32 m 3 (STP) per hour. The iodine behavior has been studied using I-123 tracer. Results of the study are presented. The chemistry of the processes and the advantages and disadvantages in correlation to the various applications for an off-gas purification in a reprocessing plant are compared and discussed. The processes are compatible with the PUREX process and do not produce additional waste

  5. BNFL's application of computer aided engineering to 'THORP' thermal oxide reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall-Wilton, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    BNFL are currently constructing facilities at Sellafield, Cumbria to reprocess thermal oxide fuel for U.K., European and Japanese utilities. Faced with a 3.5bn pound capital program to provide new facilities at Sellafield, BNFL took the opportunity to embrace the new computer aided engineering technologies then emerging in 1981. To give some idea of the commitment made by BNFL to the above many millions of pounds has been invested in hardware, and more on software and people. The 'THORP' (Head End and Chemical Separation Plant) project represents 1.5bn pounds. The introduction of computer aided engineering has provided a clash free design with full assurance that all materials and components used are compatible. Planning in the design offices in conjunction with an experienced construction management team enables the sequence of piping installation to be determined long before the construction teams enter the work area. This planning aspect has been significantly improved by using EVS (Enhanced Visualisation System). The use of supercomputing graphics facilities is stimulating demands from areas of engineering who have previously not sought to use magnetic data from a variety of sources. The result is mainly due to the data being easily accessible to users who have very little computing experience. (N.K.)

  6. Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-2, Tarapur: a benchmark in Indian PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sanjay; Dubey, K.; Qureshi, F.T.; Lokeswar, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-2 (PREFRE-2) is latest operating spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in India. This plant has improved design based on latest technology and feedback provided by the earlier plants. The design of PREFRE-2 plant is in five cycles of solvent extraction using TBP as extractant. The plant is commissioned in year 2011 after regulatory clearances

  7. Nuclear fuel reprocessing and high level waste disposal: informational hearings. Volume V. Reprocessing. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-03-08

    Testimony was presented by a four member panel on the commercial future of reprocessing. Testimony was given on the status of nuclear fuel reprocessing in the United States. The supplemental testimony and materials submitted for the record are included in this report. (LK)

  8. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F.

    2004-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high βγ activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO 4 in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO 3+ solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO 2 ,xH 2 O and Ru 0 in nitric acid media. (authors)

  9. Status of the development on simulation technology for pyrochemical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Kazuo; Kawabe, Akihiro; Fujita, Reiko; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Sato, Yuzuru; Goto, Takuya; Minato, Kazuo; Tosaka, Ikuo; Amano, Osamu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2005-01-01

    The computerized simulation technique of element behaviors in pyrochemical reprocessing is largely useful to raise the efficiency in development of pyrochemical reprocessing technique and moreover to operate reasonably practical plans in the near future. The simulation code SPR1.0 has currently been developed, which can simultaneously analyze the electrochemical and chemical reactions and can deal generally also with many elements of study. It was found from some trial calculations that this code can analyze an electrolytic behavior of MOX. The present study was performed by Toshiba Co., Ltd. together with Tohoku University. and Kyoto University as entrusted from Japan Atomic Power Company Co., Ltd. in cooperation with JAERI, Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc. and Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (M.H.)

  10. A multi-site randomized study to compare the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) added to TAU versus TAU to reduce craving and drinking behavior in alcohol dependent outpatients: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus, Wiebren; de Weert-van Oene, Gerdien H; Becker, Eni S; DeJong, Cor A J

    2015-03-18

    Addiction constitutes a major public health problem, and despite treatment, relapse rates remain very high. Preliminary findings suggest that Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), an evidence-based treatment for PTSD, may also reduce craving and relapse rates when applied in substance abuse. This study aims to determine the feasibility, efficacy and effectiveness of EMDR when added to treatment as usual (TAU) for addiction in alcohol dependent outpatients, compared to TAU only. A single blinded study in which 100 adult patients with a primary DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of alcohol dependence or abuse receiving treatment in one of six Dutch outpatient addiction care facility sites, will be enrolled. After baseline assessment participants will be allocated to one of two treatment conditions (allocation ratio of 1:1) using a stratified (per site, per care pathway), blocked randomization procedure. The intervention consists of EMDR (seven weekly 90 minute sessions) + TAU or TAU only. Assessments are scheduled pre-treatment (t0), post-treatment (t0 + eight weeks), and one and six months post treatment. The effects of both treatment arms are compared on indices of (a) drinking behavior, (b) mediators, moderators and predictors of treatment outcome, (c) quality of life and d) safety, acceptability and feasibility of treatment. Repeated measures ANOVA's will be conducted using an intention-to-treat and per-protocol approach. Multiple imputation will be used to deal with missing values when possible. This study adapts and extends the standard EMDR treatment for traumatized patients for use with patients with alcohol use disorders without psychological trauma. ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01828866.

  11. Methods for separating actinides from reprocessing and refabrication plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedder, D.W.; Finney, B.C.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Chemical processing flowsheets have been developed to partition actinides from all actinide-bearing LWR fuel reprocessing and refabrication plant wastes. These wastes include high-activity-level liquids, scrap recovery liquors, HEPA filters and incinerator ashes, and chemical salt wastes such as sodium carbonate scrub solutions, detergent cleanup streams, and alkaline off-gas scrubber liquors. The separations processes that were adopted for this study are based on solvent extraction, cation exchange chromatography, and leaching with Ce 4+ -HNO 3 solution

  12. Existing reflection seismic data re-processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinaka, Motonori; Sano, Yukiko; Kozawa, Takeshi

    2005-08-01

    This document is to report the results of existing seismic data re-processing around Horonobe town, Hokkaido, Japan, which is a part of the Horonobe Underground Research Project. The main purpose of this re-processing is to recognize the subsurface structure of Omagari Fault and fold system around Omagari Fault. The seismic lines for re-processing are TYHR-A3 line and SHRB-2 line, which JAPEX surveyed in 1975. Applying weathering static correction using refraction analysis and noise suppression procedure, we have much enhanced seismic profile. Following information was obtained from seismic re-processing results. TYHR-A3 line: There are strong reflections, dipping to the west. These reflections are corresponding western limb of anticline to the west side of Omagari Fault. SHRB-2 line: There are strong reflections, dipping to the west, at CDP 60-140, while there are reflections, dipping to the east, to the east side of CDP 140. These reflections correspond to the western limb and the eastern limb of the anticline, which is parallel to Omagari FAULT. This seismic re-processing provides some useful information to know the geological structure around Omagari Fault. (author)

  13. Status of development on simulation technology for pyrochemical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arie, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Koji; Fujita, Reiko

    2004-01-01

    Simulation techniques for the elemental behaviors in the pyrochemical reprocessing process of spent nuclear fuels are important for fuel reprocessing and future power station development. The authors developed a simulation code SPR1.0 which can analyze co-occurring electrochemical and chemical reactions simultaneously and which is applicable to know the behavior of any element in the system. The present report describes the status of the code development, the database for fundamental electrochemical reactions, and verification of the code. The code employs TRIAS code for electrochemical reactions and SOLGASMIX-PV for chemical reactions. Electrolytic process for MOX (mixed oxide) fuels with different Pu redox ratios were simulated using the present code and the effect of introducing iron ions was studied. The prospect of future development is also described. (S. Ohno)

  14. The measurement of neptunium in fast reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.; Kyffin, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    Analytical techniques have been developed to measure neptunium in the feed, waste and product streams of a fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant. The estimated level of one microgram per milligram of plutonium in some solutions presented severe separation and measurement problems. An initial separation stage was essential, and both ion exchange and solvent extraction using thenoyltrifluoroacetone were studied. The redox chemistry of neptunium necessary to achieve good separation is considered. Spectrophotometry measurement of the stable neptunium/arsenazo III complex was selected for the final neptunium determination with additional analysis by radiometric methods. Incomplete recovery of neptunium during the separation stages necessitated yield measurements, using either neptunium-237 as an internal standard or the short lived gamma active neptunium-239 isotope as a tracer. The distribution of neptunium between the waste and product streams is discussed, in relation to the chemistry of neptunium in the reprocessing plant. (author)

  15. Reprocessing seismic data: better results below diabase sills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makler, Marisa [Halliburton Servicos Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pellizzon, Marcela

    2008-07-01

    The effect of the diabase sills in the seismic data processing has been studied in the last twenty years. These rocks strongly influence the exploratory activities in a basin, because the diabase disturbs the sign and generates multiple and spherical divergence, increasing the exploratory risk in these areas. In the present work a method of 2D seismic reprocessing will be presented using Prestack Kirchhoff Time Migration in an older seismic data of Solimoes basin. The objective of this paper is to show the high results on the reprocessing seismic data below the diabase sills. The 2D lines processed give relevant improvement of the quality of signal, showing better the faults zones and preserving the geological structures than the older data. (author)

  16. R and D status of oxide electro-refining reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myochin, Munetaka

    2005-01-01

    The oxide electro-refining pyrochemical reprocessing is excellent in the resistivity against nuclear material diversion and in the suitability for oxide fuel cycle and has an excellent affinity for the technology of fuel production using the vibropac method. The oxide electro-refining pyrochemical reprocessing system has therefore been examined as a part of studies of commercialization of FBR cycle. This report outlines the examination results of fundamental data acquired for the system design. (M.H.)

  17. Enhancement of safety for reprocessing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    After the accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, eight emergency projects taking into account the accident were newly launched in JNES. This project for a reprocessing facility was one of them. Major items conducted in the project were as follows. (1) Researches, studies and evaluations etc. on various events under a total AC (alternating current) power loss condition Under this condition following subjects of the events were performed. a) An equipment with a removing function of decay heat and a time to reach a certain critical condition, e.g. a solution boiling, b) An equipment with a preventing function of accumulation of hydrogen gas and a time to reach a concentration of hydrogen gas to that of the lowest limit of combustion, c) Specifications of an alternative electric source and how to supply power. (2) Researches, studies and evaluations etc. on beyond design basis events. Following subjects on these events were performed. a) An event progression scenario, a consequence, a time period between an initiating event and a resultant accident or a certain critical condition, and draft inspection criteria, b) Draft inspection criteria for a stress test. (author)

  18. Occupational dose at Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, F.; Taguchi, R.; Kano, M.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2008-01-01

    In Japan, Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is going to start the operation in service as the first large-scale commercial reprocessing plant of spent fuels that has annual reprocessing quantity of 800tU pr in maximum. The occupational external exposure is controlled for the purpose of keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable, and it is monitored by the personal dosimeter. On the other hand, the occupational internal exposure is controlled for the purpose of preventing, and it is monitored by the periodical evaluation of internal dose from the radioactive concentration in air of workplace. The individual doses of radiation workers are less than the dose limits in the statute and our lower management values enough. Dose data will be stored continuously and the rational management method will be examined. (author)

  19. EURATOM safeguards. Safeguards verifications in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heppleston, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a brief historical view of the legal basis for EURATOM. The specific application of safeguards to large scale reprocessing plants, from the theoretical model to the practical application of inspection is considered. The challenge to adequately safeguard major commercial reprocessing facilities has led to many novel approaches being developed. These lessons will also benefit other safeguard projects as a result. Good cooperation between the operator and regulator is essential for the satisfactory installation of adequate safeguard controls. The use of modern data processing technology combined with other diverse monitoring techniques has shown that a major industrial scale reprocessing plant can be controlled under international safeguards to provide a high level of assurance [ru

  20. Review of thorium fuel reprocessing experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksbank, R.E.; McDuffee, W.T.; Rainey, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    The review reveals that experience in the reprocessing of irradiated thorium materials is limited. Plants that have processed thorium-based fuels were not optimized for the operations. Previous demonstrations of several viable flowsheets provide a sound technological base for the development of optimum reprocessing methods and facilities. In addition to the resource benefit by using thorium, recent nonproliferation thrusts have rejuvenated an interest in thorium reprocessing. Extensive radiation is generated as the result of 232 U-contamination produced in the 233 U, resulting in the remote operation and fabrication operations and increased fuel cycle costs. Development of the denatured thorium flowsheet, which is currently of interest because of nonproliferation concerns, represents a difficult technological challenge

  1. Inventory estimation for nuclear fuel reprocessing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyerlein, A.L.; Geldard, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of nuclear material accounting methods for nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities is limited by nuclear material inventory variations in the solvent extraction contactors, which affect the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium. Since in-line methods for measuring contactor inventory are not available, simple inventory estimation models are being developed for mixer-settler contactors operating at steady state with a view toward improving the accuracy of nuclear material accounting methods for reprocessing facilities. The authors investigated the following items: (1) improvements in the utility of the inventory estimation models, (2) extension of improvements to inventory estimation for transient nonsteady-state conditions during, for example, process upset or throughput variations, and (3) development of simple inventory estimation models for reprocessing systems using pulsed columns

  2. Pyro-electrochemical reprocessing of irradiated MOX fast reactor fuel, testing of the reprocessing process with direct MOX fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kormilitzyn, M.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Tselichshev, I.V

    2000-07-01

    One of the advanced technologies for fast reactor fuel recycle is pyro-electrochemical molten salt technology. In 1998 we began to study the next phase of the irradiated oxide fuel reprocessing new process MOX {yields} MOX. This process involves the following steps: - Dissolution of irradiated fuel in molten alkaline metal chlorides, - Purification of melt from fission products that are co-deposited with uranium and plutonium oxides, - Electrochemical co-deposition of uranium and plutonium oxides under the controlled cathode potential, - Production of granulated MOX (crushing,salt separation and sizing), and - Purification of melt from fission products by phosphate precipitation. In 1998 a series of experiments were prepared and carried out in order to validate this process. It was shown that the proposed reprocessing flowsheet of irradiated MOX fuel verified the feasibility of its decontamination from most of its fission products (rare earths, cesium) and minor-actinides (americium, curium)

  3. Pyro-electrochemical reprocessing of irradiated MOX fast reactor fuel, testing of the reprocessing process with direct MOX fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormilitzyn, M.V.; Vavilov, S.K.; Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Chistyakov, V.M.; Tselichshev, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    One of the advanced technologies for fast reactor fuel recycle is pyro-electrochemical molten salt technology. In 1998 we began to study the next phase of the irradiated oxide fuel reprocessing new process MOX → MOX. This process involves the following steps: - Dissolution of irradiated fuel in molten alkaline metal chlorides, - Purification of melt from fission products that are co-deposited with uranium and plutonium oxides, - Electrochemical co-deposition of uranium and plutonium oxides under the controlled cathode potential, - Production of granulated MOX (crushing,salt separation and sizing), and - Purification of melt from fission products by phosphate precipitation. In 1998 a series of experiments were prepared and carried out in order to validate this process. It was shown that the proposed reprocessing flowsheet of irradiated MOX fuel verified the feasibility of its decontamination from most of its fission products (rare earths, cesium) and minor-actinides (americium, curium)

  4. Economic evaluation of reprocessing - Indicative Canadian position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the final Working Group 4 report, forms part of the overall economic evaluation of reprocessing. The indicative national position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for Canada is presented. Three fuel cycles are considered. (1) CANDU operating on the natural uranium, once-through fuel cycle. (2) CANDU operating with low enrichment (1.2%) once-through fuel cycle. (3) CANDU operating with recycle of plutonium and depleted uranium which has been extracted from spent CANDU natural uranium fuel. The diagrams show that reprocessing and recycle of fuel can be used to reduce further the sensitivity of CANDU fuelling costs to increasing uranium ore price

  5. TIGA Tide Gauge Data Reprocessing at GFZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiguo; Schöne, Tilo; Gendt, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    To analyse the tide gauge measurements for the purpose of global long-term sea level change research a well-defined absolute reference frame is required by oceanographic community. To create such frame the data from a global GNSS network located at or near tide gauges are processed. For analyzing the GNSS data on a preferably continuous basis the International GNSS Service (IGS) Tide Gauge Benchmark Monitoring Working Group (TIGA-WG) is responsible. As one of the TIGA Analysis Centers the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) is contributing to the IGS TIGA Reprocessing Campaign. The solutions of the TIGA Reprocessing Campaign will also contribute to 2nd IGS Data Reprocessing Campaign with GFZ IGS reprocessing solution. After the first IGS reprocessing finished in 2010 some improvements were implemented into the latest GFZ software version EPOS.P8: reference frame IGb08 based on ITRF2008, antenna calibration igs08.atx, geopotential model (EGM2008), higher-order ionospheric effects, new a priori meteorological model (GPT2), VMF mapping function, and other minor improvements. GPS data of the globally distributed tracking network of 794 stations for the time span from 1994 until end of 2012 are used for the TIGA reprocessing. To handle such large network a new processing strategy is developed and described in detail. In the TIGA reprocessing the GPS@TIGA data are processed in precise point positioning (PPP) mode to clean data using the IGS reprocessing orbit and clock products. To validate the quality of the PPP coordinate results the rates of 80 GPS@TIGA station vertical movement are estimated from the PPP results using Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) method. The rates are compared with the solution of University of LaRochelle Consortium (ULR) (named ULR5). 56 of the 80 stations have a difference of the vertical velocities below 1 mm/yr. The error bars of PPP rates are significant larger than those of ULR5, which indicates large time correlated noise in

  6. Light water reactor fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This document was originally intended to provide the basis for an environmental impact statement to assist ERDA in making decisions with respect to possible LWR fuel reprocessing and recycling programs. Since the Administration has recently made a decision to indefinitely defer reprocessing, this environmental impact statement is no longer needed. Nevertheless, this document is issued as a report to assist the public in its consideration of nuclear power issues. The statement compares the various alternatives for the LWR fuel cycle. Costs and environmental effects are compared. Safeguards for plutonium from sabotage and theft are analyzed

  7. Radiation risk assessment of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, Hugo R.; Perez, Aldo E.; Luna, Manuel F.; Becerra, Fabian A.

    1999-01-01

    Reprocessed uranium contains 232 U, which is not found in nature, as well as 234 U which is present in higher proportion than in natural uranium. Both isotopes modify the radiological properties of the material. The paper evaluates the increase of the internal and external radiation risk on the base of experimental data and theoretical calculations. It also suggests measures to be taken in the production of fuel elements with slightly enriched uranium.The radiation risk of reprocessed uranium is directly proportional to the content of 232 U and 234 U as well as to the aging time of the material

  8. Contamination of incinerator at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mutsuo

    1994-01-01

    Originally, at Tokai Reprocessing Plant an incinerator was provided in the auxiliary active facility(waste treatment building). This incinerator had treated low level solid wastes generated every facilities in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant since 1974 and stopped the operation in March 1992 because of degeneration. The radioactivity inventory and distribution was evaluated to break up incinerator, auxiliary apparatuses(bag filter, air scrubbing tower, etc.), connecting pipes and off-gas ducts. This report deals with the results of contamination survey of incinerator and auxiliary apparatuses. (author)

  9. Nondestructive assay measurements applied to reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, Wayne D.; Lee, R. Stephen; Ottmar, Herbert; Guardini, Sergio

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive assay for reprocessing plants relies on passive gamma-ray spectrometry for plutonium isotopic and plutonium mass values of medium-to-low-density samples and holdup deposits; on active x-ray fluorescence and densitometry techniques for uranium and plutonium concentrations in solutions; on calorimetry for plutonium mass in product; and passive neutron techniques for plutonium mass in spent fuel, product, and waste. This paper will describe the radiation-based nondestructive assay techniques used to perform materials accounting measurements. The paper will also discuss nondestructive assay measurements used in inspections of reprocessing plants [ru

  10. PYRO, a system for modeling fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Compact, on-site fuel reprocessing and waste management for the Integral Fast Reactor are based on the pyrochemical reprocessing of metal fuel. In that process, uranium and plutonium in spent fuel are separated from fission products in an electrorefiner using liquid cadmium and molten salt solvents. Quantitative estimates of the distribution of the chemical elements among the metal and salt phases are essential for development of both individual pyrochemical process steps and the complete process. This paper describes the PYRO system of programs used to generate reliable mass flows and compositions

  11. Criticality safety evaluation in Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Nobutoshi; Nakajima, Masayoshi; Takaya, Akikazu; Ohnuma, Hideyuki; Shirouzu, Hidetomo; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Yoshikawa, Koji; Suto, Toshiyuki

    2000-04-01

    Criticality limits for equipments in Tokai Reprocessing Plant which handle fissile material solution and are under shape and dimension control were reevaluated based on the guideline No.10 'Criticality safety of single unit' in the regulatory guide for reprocessing plant safety. This report presents criticality safety evaluation of each equipment as single unit. Criticality safety of multiple units in a cell or a room was also evaluated. The evaluated equipments were ones in dissolution, separation, purification, denitration, Pu product storage, and Pu conversion processes. As a result, it was reconfirmed that the equipments were safe enough from a view point of criticality safety of single unit and multiple units. (author)

  12. Industrial experience of irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delange, M.

    1981-01-01

    At the moment and during the next following years, France and La Hague plant particularly, own the greatest amount of industrial experience in the field of reprocessing, since this experience is referred to three types of reactors, either broadly spread all through the world (GCR and LWR) or ready to be greatly developed in the next future (FBR). Then, the description of processes and technologies used now in France, and the examination of the results obtained, on the production or on the security points of view, are a good approach of the actual industrial experience in the field of spent fuel reprocessing. (author)

  13. Working conditions in nuclear reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    In the context of the project, the working conditions of workers in reprocessing plants and associated plant of the fuel circuit were thoroughly examined. The project design and course of the project are a good example of a precautionary technical assessment necessary for social policy reasons, which is in the public interest and is required by the Trade Unions. By working conditions, one means the whole set of scientific/technical, medical, legal, economic and political conditions for the permanent employment of workers in reprocessing plants including the associated parts of the fuel circuit. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile radionuclides generated during used nuclear fuel reprocessing in the US is almost certain to be necessary for the licensing of a reprocessing facility in the US. Various control technologies have been developed, tested, or used over the past 50 years for control of volatile radionuclide emissions from used fuel reprocessing plants. The US DOE has sponsored, since 2009, an Off-gas Sigma Team to perform research and development focused on the most pressing volatile radionuclide control and immobilization problems. In this paper, we focus on the control requirements and methodologies for 85Kr and 129I. Numerous candidate technologies have been studied and developed at laboratory and pilot-plant scales in an effort to meet the need for high iodine control efficiency and to advance alternatives to cryogenic separations for krypton control. Several of these show promising results. Iodine decontamination factors as high as 105, iodine loading capacities, and other adsorption parameters including adsorption rates have been demonstrated under some conditions for both silver zeolite (AgZ and Ag-functionalized aerogel. Sorbents, including an engineered form of AgZ and selected metal organic framework materials (MOFs, have been successfully demonstrated to capture Kr and Xe without the need for separations at cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Nitrogen oxide closed system in the future reprocessing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, S.; Takaoku, Y.; Sumida, Y.; Moriya, T.; Araya, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: The aqueous reprocessing process for the future type reactor like as Fast Breeder Reactor(FBR) is being developed in many institutes, while the existence of sodium nitrate as the secondary waste is considered as problematic due to an enormous quantity of sodium nitrate generated and the difficulty in its handling for disposal. As a means for solving the problem, a complete recycle of nitric acid and salt free system is considered, but it become a constraint in the process constitution. We have devised the alternative system, which shall approve the generation of sodium nitrate, and make the choice of a wide reprocessing process. Under this system nitric acid within sodium nitrate shall be reduced and made into harmless gas, while at the same time, the remaining sodium compound shall be re-used in a suitable form. In order to prevent the accumulation of radioactivity by re-use, we propose to use a part of remaining sodium compound as substitution of the fresh sodium within the glass material used for the vitrified solid waste. As a result of using this system, the waste originating from sodium nitrate can be reduced to 'zero'. We have studied a typical application case for the future reprocessing process, and got a good result at an economical point of view

  16. Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-1: a stepping stone in Indian PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sanjay; Dubey, K.; Qureshi, F.T.; Lokeswar, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    India has low reserves of uranium and high reserves of thorium. In order to optimize resource utilization India has adopted a closed fuel cycle to ensure long-term energy security. The optimum resource utilization is feasible only by adopting reprocessing, conditioning and recycle options. It is very much imperative to view spent fuel as a vital resource material and not a waste to be disposed off. Thus, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing forms an integral part of the Indian Nuclear Energy Programme. Aqueous reprocessing based on PUREX technology is in use for more than 50 years and has reached a matured status

  17. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

    1984-11-01

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied

  18. Overview of technologies to reprocess ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrish, V.M.; Chernikova, N.P.; Ivanets, V.G.

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with overview of technologies for reprocessing of ion-exchange resins and determining the most optimal solutions for Ukraine. The technologies for cementations, thermal reprocessing, bituminization and deep decontamination are considered.

  19. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels: economical, ecological and technical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1994-01-01

    The report deals with the questions on reprocessing and final storage of spent fuel elements from the point of view of the Swiss. The contractual obligations were discussed, of the present situation of reprocessing and their assessment. 1 fig

  20. Study of physico-chemical release of uranium and plutonium oxides during the combustion of polycarbonate and of ruthenium during the combustion of solvents used in the reprocessing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouilloux, L.

    1998-01-01

    The level of consequences concerning a fire in a nuclear facility is in part estimated by the quantities and the physico-chemical forms of radioactive compounds that may be emitted out of the facility. It is therefore necessary to study the contaminant release from the fire. Because of the multiplicity of the scenarios, two research subjects were retained. The first one concerns the study of the uranium or plutonium oxides chemical release during the combustion of the polycarbonate glove box sides. The second one is about the physico chemical characterisation of the ruthenium release during the combustion of an organic solvent mixture (tributyl phosphate-dodecane) used for the nuclear fuel reprocessing. Concerning the two research subjects, the chemical release, i.e. means the generation of contaminant compounds gaseous in the fire, was modelled using thermodynamical simulations. Experiments were done in order to determine the ruthenium release factor during solvent combustion. A cone calorimeter was used for small scale experiments. These results were then validated by large scale tests under conditions close to the industrial process. Thermodynamical simulations, for the two scenarios studied. Furthermore, the experiments on solvent combustion allowed the determination of a suitable ruthenium release factor. Finally, the mechanism responsible of the ruthenium release has been found. (author)

  1. International cooperation in the field of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busekist, O. von

    1983-01-01

    Following a definition of the concept of international cooperation, this paper discusses existing and possible legal and institutional arrangements in the reprocessing field, with particular reference to the legal framework set up for the European Company for the Chemical Processing of Irradiated Fuels (Eurochemic). (NEA) [fr

  2. Plutonium, proliferation, and the price of reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilinsky, V.

    1978-01-01

    France and Britain disagree with the US on whether deferring fuel reprocessing that provides plutonium for export can help contain proliferation. The US has veto power over reprocessing of US-supplied fuels for non-EURATOM countries, but exceptions will be made for movement within the EURATOM community. Political issues will be influenced by the magnitude of the financial investments, however, and commercial considerations have until recently dominated and complicated international safeguards. The author notes that US policy was reversed by the gradual acknowledgment that the same international inspection of plutonium stockpiles would not work as it had for low-enriched fuel and that economic interests must have a lower priority to avoiding proliferation. He cites the combination of sudden policy shifts, failure to prove that present reactors are best, and long-term distrust of US economic motives as failing to persuade either the French or British, who feel the best safeguard is provided by their high-security reprocessing facilities. Still to be resolved are the conditions under which plutonium must be returned to its owners, a problem that must determine safe international transport and storage and international management. Technical fixes, such as the CIVEX process, cannot contribute to the solution for several decades, while reprocessing is no longer considered a first step in waste disposal and would be more expensive and complicated than present waste disposal procedures. The author concedes merit in President Carter's requirement of separating ''the legitimate and necessary use of uranium'' and nuclear fuels that are also explosives

  3. Simulation of solvent extraction in reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shekhar; Koganti, S B [Reprocessing Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1994-06-01

    A SIMulation Program for Solvent EXtraction (SIMPSEX) has been developed for simulation of PUREX process used in nuclear fuel reprocessing. This computer program is written in double precision structured FORTRAN77 and at present it is used in DOS environment on a PC386. There is a plan to port it to ND supermini computers in future. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Economic evaluation of reprocessing - Indicative Belgian position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the final Working Group 4 report, forms part of the overall economic evaluation of reprocessing. The indicative national position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for Belgium is presented. Other factors which influence the Belgian viewpoint and which are not included on the phase diagram are given

  5. reprocesser gennem struktureret refleksion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, Christian; Hansen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Udgangspunktet for "Læreprocesser Gennem strukturerede refleksion" er spørgsmålet om, hvordan strukturering af refleksion kan bidrage til at sikre (det nærmeste umulige) at eleverne lærer, det tilsigtede i (boldspil-)undervisningen. Forfatterne Christian Engell og Torben Hansen viser, hvordan beg...

  6. Fuel reprocessing: Citizens' questions and experts' answers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    In connection with the intention of DWK to erect a fuel reprocessing plant in the Oberpfalz, citizens have asked a great number of questions which are of interest to the general public. They have been collected, grouped into subject categories and answered by experts. (orig./HSCH) [de

  7. Optimizing near real time accountability for reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.

    2010-01-01

    Near Real Time Accountability (NRTA) of actinides at high precision in reprocessing plants has been a long sought-after goal in the safeguards community. Achieving this goal is hampered by the difficulty of making precision measurements in the reprocessing environment, equipment cost, and impact to plant operations. Thus the design of future reprocessing plants requires an optimization of different approaches. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was used to evaluate a number of NRTA strategies in a UREX+ reprocessing plant. Strategies examined include the incorporation of additional actinide measurements of internal plant vessels, more use of process monitoring data, and the option of periodic draining of inventory to key tanks. Preliminary results show that the addition of measurement technologies can increase the overall measurement uncertainty due to additional error propagation, so care must be taken when designing an advanced system. Initial results also show that relying on a combination of different NRTA techniques will likely be the best option. The model provides a platform for integrating all the data. The modeling results for the different NRTA options under various material loss conditions will be presented.

  8. Future of the reprocessing business at the RT-1 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharin, O.

    1995-01-01

    Economic viability of reprocessing operations at the RT-1 plant is provided by the contracts with nuclear utilities from Finland and Hungary. Finland will stop sending fuel to Mayak for reprocessing after 1996. Hungary will be capable to resolve the problem of spent fuel domestically some time in the future. This increases vulnerability of the reprocessing business at Mayak to future political uncertainties. (author)

  9. The 4th technological meeting of Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Tohru; Maki, Akira; Shibata, Satomi; Yatogi, Hideo; Nyui, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Takakazu; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Ohzeki, Tatsuya

    2001-11-01

    ''The 4th technological meeting of Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP)'' was held in JNFL Rokkasho site on October 11 th , 2001. The report contains the proceedings, transparencies and questionnaires of the meeting. This time, we reported about ''Maintenance and repair results of Tokai Reprocessing Plant'' based on technology and knowledge accumulated in Tokai Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  10. Direction of reprocessing technology development based on 30 years operation of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, S; Tanaka, T.; Ohshima, H.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Recent global interest focuses the possibility of recycling of spent fuel with advanced fast reactor fuel cycle system. Goal of closed fuel cycle is to achieve the maximum use of uranium resources and minimum disposal of waste by multi recycle of TRU as a competitive nuclear energy system. The future reprocessing and fuel fabrication system should be synchronized completely with the advanced reactor system and waste treatment and disposal back-end system to complete closed fuel cycle. To realize such system, current reprocessing system should be changed to handle Pu-U-Minor Actinide with more reductions in the cost and less waste volume, as well as an inherent proliferation resistance. For the successful industrialization of advanced reprocessing technology, it is necessary to combine three key elements of R and D efforts, engineering base demonstration and experiences of plant operation. Tokai Reprocessing Facilities licensed a maximum capacity of 0.7tHM/day began a hot operation in 1977 and reprocessed l,100tHM U02 spent fuel and 20tHM ATR-MOX with a continuous technological improvements under IAEA full scope safeguards. With 30 years experience, candidate of key technologies proposed for realizing the next advanced reprocessing are as follows: 1) Simplified co-extraction process of Pu-Np-U by using multistage centrifugal extractors in stead of pulsed columns; 2) Corrosion free components in acid condition by using corrosion resistant refractory alloys and ceramics; 3) Co-conversion technology to MA containing MOX powder by micro-wave heating method for a short process for MA containing MOX pellets fabrication; 4) Advanced verification of high level radioactive liquid waste combining separation technology of TRU and LLFP elements; 5) Advanced chemical analysis and monitoring system for TRU elements in a plant. These advanced reprocessing technologies will be applied mainly to reprocess the LWR spent fuel accumulated past and future

  11. Fuel reprocessing: safety analysis of extraction cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, B.; Mauborgne, B.; Baron, P.; Mercier, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    An essential part of the safety analysis related to the extraction cycles of reprocessing plants, is the analysis of their behaviour during steady-state and transient operations, by means of simulation codes. These codes are based on the chemical properties of the main species involved (distribution coefficient and kinetics) and the hydrodynamics inside the contactors (mixer-settlers and pulsed columns). These codes have been consolidated by comparison of calculations with experimental results. The safety analysis is essentially performed in two steps. The first step is a parametric sensitivity analysis of the chemical flowsheet operated: the effect of a misadjustment (flowrate of feed, solvent, etc) is evaluated by successive steady-state calculations. These calculations help the identification of the sensitive parameters for the risk of plutonium accumulation, while indicating the permissible level of misadjustment. These calculations also serve to identify the parameters which should be measured during plant operation. The second step is the study of transient regimes, for the most sensitive parameters related to plutonium accumulation risk. The aim is to confirm the conclusions of the first step and to check that the characteristic process parameters chosen effectively allow, the early and reliable detection of any drift towards a plutonium accumulating regime. The procedures to drive the process backwards to a specified convenient steady-state regime from a drifting-state are also verified. The identification of the sensitive parameters, the process status parameters and the process transient analysis, allow a good control of process operation. This procedure, applied to the first purification cycle of COGEMA's UP3-A La Hague plant has demonstrated the total safety of facility operations

  12. Safety guide data on radiation shielding in a reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Noboru; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1986-04-01

    In a reprocessing facility, various radiation sources are handled and have many geometrical conditions. To aim drawing up a safety guidebook on radiation shielding in order to evaluate shielding safety in a reprocessing facility with high reliability and reasonableness, JAERI trusted investigation on safety evaluation techniques of radiation shielding in a reprocessing facility to Nuclear Safety Research Association. This report is the collection of investigation results, and describes concept of shielding safety design principle, radiation sources in reprocessing facility and estimation of its strength, techniques of shielding calculations, and definite examples of shielding calculation in reprocessing facility. (author)

  13. Status and trends in spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    The management of spent fuel arising from nuclear power production is a crucial issue for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. The IAEA has issued several publications in the past that provide technical information on the global status and trends in spent fuel reprocessing and associated topics, and one reason for this present publication is to provide an update of this information which has mostly focused on the conventional technology applied in the industry. However, the scope of this publication has been significantly expanded in an attempt to make it more comprehensive and by including a section on emerging technologies applicable to future innovative nuclear systems, as are being addressed in such international initiatives as INPRO, Gen IV and MICANET. In an effort to be informative, this publication attempts to provide a state-of-the-art review of these technologies, and to identify major issues associated with reprocessing as an option for spent fuel management. It does not, however, provide any detailed information on some of the related issues such as safety or safeguards, which are addressed in other relevant publications. This report provides an overview of the status of reprocessing technology and its future prospects in terms of various criteria in Section 2. Section 3 provides a review of emerging technologies which have been attracting the interest of Member States, especially in the international initiatives for future development of innovative nuclear systems. A historical review of IAEA activities associated with spent fuel reprocessing, traceable back to the mid-1970s, is provided in Section 4, and conclusions in Section 5. A list of references is provided at the end the main text for readers interested in further information on the related topics. Annex I summarizes the current status of reprocessing facilities around the world, including the civil operational statistics of Purex-based plants, progress with decommissioning and

  14. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhami, P.S; Yadav, J.S; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    Exploitation of the abundant thorium resources to meet sustained energy demand forms the basis of the Indian nuclear energy programme. To gain reprocessing experience in thorium fuel cycle, thoria was irradiated in research reactor CIRUS in early sixties. Later in eighties, thoria bundles were used for initial flux flattening in some of the pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The research reactor irradiated thoria contained small content (∼ 2-3ppm) of "2"3"2U in "2"3"3U product, which did not pose any significant radiological problems during processing in Uranium Thorium Separation Facility (UTSF), Trombay. Thoria irradiated in PHWRs on discharge contained (∼ 0.5-1.5% "2"3"3U with significant "2"3"2U content (100-500 ppm) requiring special radiological attention. Based on the experience from UTSF, a new facility viz. Power Reactor Thoria Reprocessing Facility (PRTRF), Trombay was built which was hot commissioned in the year 2015

  15. Reprocessing technology for present water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, P.R.

    1977-01-01

    The basic Purex solvent extraction technology developed and applied in the U.S. in the 1950's provides a well-demonstrated and efficient process for recovering uranium and plutonium for fuel recycle and separating the wastes for further treatment and packaging. The technologies for confinement of radioactive effluents have been developed but have had limited utilization in the processing of commercial light water reactor fuels. Technologies for solidification and packaging of radioactive wastes have not yet been demonstrated but significant experience has been gained in laboratory and engineering scale experiments with simulated commercial reprocessing wastes and intermediate level wastes. Commercial scale experience with combined operations of all the required processes and equipment are needed to demonstrate reliable reprocessing centers

  16. An improved sampling system installed for reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finsterwalder, L.; Zeh, H.

    1979-03-01

    Sampling devices are needed for taking representative samples from individual process containers during the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. The aqueous process stream in a reprocessing plant frequently contains, in addition to the dissolved radioactive materials, more or less small quantities of solid matter fraction of fuel material still remaining undissolved, insoluble fission-, corrosion-, or degradation products as well, in exceptional cases, ion exchange resin or silica gel. The solid matter is deposited partly on the upper surfaces of the sampling system and the radiation due to this makes maintenance and repair of the sampler more difficult. The purpose of the development work was to reduce the chance of accident and the maintenance costs and to lower the radiation exposure of the personnel. A new sampling system was developed and is described. (author)

  17. Reprocessing: A reasonable way of waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E.

    1986-01-01

    Reprocessing is the only way to recover the valuable substances contained in the burnt fuel elements and to make them utilizable for energy generation again. It is easier to adapt a national solution to the special domestic needs than a waste management plant which is operated on an international basis and is therefore simpler to be implemented. It guarantees independence, stands for the meeting of requirements resulting from the Non-Proliferation Treaty and creates safe jobs. Furthermore, it offers more liberty in applying optimized recycling strategies. A national reprocessing industry leads to an improved competitive position in the nuclear business, due to technological development and demonstration. A country like the Federal Republic of Germany, which depends on exports, does need top-level technologies. (HSCH) [de

  18. Economic evaluation of reprocessing. Indicative Netherlands position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    The paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the final Working Group 4 report, forms part of the overall economic evaluation of reprocessing. The indicative national position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for the Netherlands is presented. Two alternative scenarios have been assumed for the variation of uranium price in the future; a 2% per annum price rise and a 5% per annum price rise

  19. Fuel fabrication and reprocessing at UKAEA Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Dounreay fuel plants, which are the most flexible anywhere in the world, will continue to carry out work for foreign commercial customers. A number of German companies are important customers of UKAEA and examples of the wide variety of the work currently being carried out for them in the Dounreay plants is given (reprocessing and fabrication of fuel elements from and for research reactors). (orig./HP) [de

  20. Reprocessing on the whole fuel cycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megy, J.

    1983-11-01

    Spent fuel reprocessing, in France, is become an industrial reality which takes an importance place in several fields: place surely essential in the fuel cycle from the energetic material economy and waste management point of view; place priority in the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) research and development programs; place in the industry where it is an important activity sector with the realizations in progress [fr

  1. Nuclear safety in fuel-reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.; Koerting, K.

    1976-01-01

    The danger potential of nuclear power and fuel reprocessing plants in normal operation is compared. It becomes obvious that there are no basic differences. The analysis of possible accidents - blow-up of an evaporator for highly active wastes, zircaloy burning, cooling failure in self-heating process solutions, burning of a charged solvent, criticality accidents - shows that they are kept under control by the plant layout. (HP) [de

  2. Legal problems of nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossnagel, A.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions in this book are intended to exemplify the legal situation in connection with the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel from the point of view of constitutional law, administrative law, and international law. Outline solutions are presented with regard to ensuring health, personal freedom, democratic rights and other rights, and are discussed. The author Rossnagel investigates whether the principle of essential matter can guarantee a parliamentary prerogative concerning this field of large-scale technology. The author Schmidt shows that there is no legal obligation of commitment to a reprocessing technology that would exclude research for or application of a less hazardous technology. The contribution by Baumann explains the problems presented by a technology not yet developed to maturity with regard to the outline approval of the technological concept, which is a prerequisite of any partial licence to be issued. The final contribution by Guendling investigates the duties under international law, as for instance transfrontier information, consultation, and legal protection, and how these duties can be better put into practice in order to comply the seriousness of the hazards involved in nuclear fuel reprocessing. (orig./HP) [de

  3. In-line analytical instrumentation in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.K.; Bhargava, V.K.; Marathe, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing plants where uranium and plutonium are separated from highly radioactive fission products, continuous monitoring of these constituents is helpful in many ways. Apart from quick detection of possible process malfunctions, in-line monitoring protects operating personnel from radiation hazards, reduces the cost of laboratory analysis and increases the overall efficiency of the process. A review of a proqramme of work on the design, fabrication and testing of some in-line instruments viz. gamma absorptiometer for uranium, neutron monitor for plutonium, acidity monitor for scrub nitric acid etc., their feasibility studies in the laboratory as well as in the pilot plant is presented. (auth.)

  4. Behavior of Nb fission product during nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gue, J.P.

    1977-02-01

    Investigations on niobium fission product behavior in nitric acid and tributyl phosphate media have been carried out in order to explain the difficulties encountered in separating this element from fissile materials during spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The studies have shown that in nitric acid solution, pentavalent niobium has a colloidal hydroxide form. The so-obtained sols were characterized by light scattering, electronic microscopy, electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation methods. In heterogeneous extracting media containing tributyl phosphate and dibutyl phosphoric acid the niobium hydroxide sols could be flocculated by low dibutyl phosphoric acid concentration or extracted into the organic phase containing an excess of dibutyl phosphoric acid [fr

  5. Airborne effluent control for LMFBR fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbro, O.O.; Groenier, W.S.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    A significant part of the LMFBR fuel reprocessing development program has been devoted to the development of efficient removal systems for the volatile fission products, including 131 I, krypton, tritium, 129 I, and most recently 14 C. Flowsheet studies have indicated that very significant reductions of radioactive effluents can be achieved by integrating advanced effluent control systems with new concepts of containment and ventilation; however, the feasibility of such has not yet been established, nor have the economics been examined. This paper presents a flowsheet for the application of advanced containment systems to the processing of LMFBR fuels and summarizes the status and applicability of specific fission product removal systems

  6. Progress on the treatment of radioactive waste from reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, H.

    With the opening of large-scale reprocessing plants, waste treatment will have to be dealt with on a new order of magnitude. Fundamental solutions to the waste problems are visible in the current lectures. Many procedures are still under study at the laboratory scale or somewhat above; much, therefore, remains to be done in order to bring such procedures to the requisite large scale magnitude in the available short time. Much also remains to be accomplished in the way of improving processes which are barely adequate, and rendering them completely satisfactory for an effective waste disposal system

  7. Removal of actinides from high-level wastes generated in the reprocessing of commercial fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Leuze, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    Progress is reported on a technical feasibility study of removing the very long-lived actinides (uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) from high-level wastes generated in the commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The study was directed primarily at wastes from the reprocessing of light water reactor (LWR) fuels and specifically to developing satisfactory methods for reducing the actinide content of these wastes to values that would make 1000-year-decayed waste comparable in radiological toxicity to natural uranium ore deposits. Although studies are not complete, results thus far indicate the most promising concept for actinide removal includes both improved recovery of actinides in conventional fuel reprocessing and secondary processing of the high-level wastes. Secondary processing will be necessary for the removal of americium and curium and perhaps some residual plutonium. Laboratory-scale studies of separations methods that appear most promising are reported and conceptual flowsheets are discussed. (U.S.)

  8. Development of a dry-mechanical graphite separation process and elimination of the separated carbon for the reprocessing of spherical HTR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronschnabel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Due to the C-14 distribution the separation of the particle-free outer region of the spherical HTR fuel element with subsequent solidification of the separated carbon makes it possible to reduce by half the remaining C-14 inventory in the inner particle region to be further treated. Separation of the particle-free outer region by a newly developed sphere-peeling milling machine, conditioning the graphite into compacts and in-situ cementation into a salt-mine are the basic elements of this head-end process variation. An annual cavern volume of approx. 2000 m 3 will be needed to ultimately store the graphite of the particle-free outer region, which corresponds to a reprocessing capacity of 50 GWsub(e) installed HTR power. The brush-disintegration of the remaining inner particle region and the resulting peel-brush-preparation are capable of separating 95% of the graphite without any heavy metal losses. With the mentioned reprocessing capacity an annual cavern volume of approx. 16.500 m 3 is required. (orig.) [de

  9. A Green Approach to SNF Reprocessing: Are Common Household Reagents the Answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peper, Shane M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Douglas, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    It has been discovered that UO2, the principal component of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), can efficiently be dissolved at room temperature using a combination of common household reagents, namely hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and ammonia. This rather serendipitous discovery opens up the possibility, for the first time, of considering a non-acidic process for recycling U from SNF. Albeit at the early stages of development, our unconventional dissolution approach possesses many attractive features that could make it a reality in the future. With dissolution byproducts of water and oxygen, our approach poses a minimal threat to the environment. Moreover, the use of common household reagents to afford actinide oxide dissolution suggests a certain degree of economic favorability. With the use of a ''closed'' digestion vessel as a reaction chamber, our approach has substantial versatility with the option of using either aqueous or gaseous reactant feeds or a combination of both. Our approach distinguishes itself from all existing reprocessing technologies in two important ways. First and foremost, it is an alkaline rather than an acidic process, using mild non-corrosive chemicals under ambient conditions to effect actinide separations. Secondly, it does not dissolve the entire SNF matrix, but rather selectively solubilizes U and other light actinides for subsequent separation, resulting in potentially faster head-end dissolution and fewer downstream separation steps. From a safeguards perspective, the use of oxidizing alkaline solutions to effect actinide separations also potentially offers a degree of inherent proliferation resistance, by allowing the U to be selectively removed from the remaining dissolver solution while keeping Pu grouped with the other minor actinides and fission products. This paper will describe the design and general experimental setup of a 'closed' digestion vessel for performing uranium oxide dissolutions under alkaline conditions using gaseous

  10. A Green Approach to SNF Reprocessing: Are Common Household Reagents the Answer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peper, Shane M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Douglas, Matthew

    2008-04-03

    It has been discovered that UO2, the principal component of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), can efficiently be dissolved at room temperature using a combination of common household reagents, namely hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and ammonia. This rather serendipitous discovery opens up the possibility, for the first time, of considering a non-acidic process for recycling U from SNF. Albeit at the early stages of development, our unconventional dissolution approach possesses many attractive features that could make it a reality in the future. With dissolution byproducts of water and oxygen, our approach poses a minimal threat to the environment. Moreover, the use of common household reagents to afford actinide oxide dissolution suggests a certain degree of economic favorability. With the use of a “closed” digestion vessel as a reaction chamber, our approach has substantial versatility with the option of using either aqueous or gaseous reactant feeds or a combination of both. Our approach distinguishes itself from all existing reprocessing technologies in two important ways. First and foremost, it is an alkaline rather than an acidic process, using mild non-corrosive chemicals under ambient conditions to effect actinide separations. Secondly, it does not dissolve the entire SNF matrix, but rather selectively solubilizes U and other light actinides for subsequent separation, resulting in potentially faster head-end dissolution and fewer downstream separation steps. From a safeguards perspective, the use of oxidizing alkaline solutions to effect actinide separations also potentially offers a degree of inherent proliferation resistance, by allowing the U to be selectively removed from the remaining dissolver solution while keeping Pu grouped with the other minor actinides and fission products. This paper will describe the design and general experimental setup of a “closed” digestion vessel for performing uranium oxide dissolutions under alkaline conditions using

  11. The regulations concerning the reprocessing business of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This rule is stipulated under the provisions of reprocessing business in the law concerning regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and nuclear reactors and to execute them. Basic terms are defined, such as exposure radiation dose, cumulative dose, control area, security area, surrounding monitoring area, worker, radioactive waste and facility for discharging into the sea. The application for the designation for reprocessing business under the law shall include the maximum reprocessing capacities per day and per year of each kind of spent fuel, to be reprocessed and the location, structure and equipment of reprocessing facilities as specified in the regulation. Records shall be made in each works or enterprise on the inspection, operation and maintenance of reprocessing facilities, radiation control, accidents and weather, and kept for particular periods respectively. Reprocessing enterprisers shall set up control area, security area and surrounding monitoring area to restrict entrance, etc. Specified measures shall be taken by these enterprisers concerning the exposure radiation doses of workers. Reprocessing facilities shall be inspected and examined more than once a day. The regular self-inspection and operation of reprocessing facilities, the transport and storage of nuclear fuel materials, the disposal of radioactive wastes in works or enterprises where reprocessing facilities are located, and security rules are defined in detail, respectively. (Okada, K.)

  12. Estudo do reprocessamento de polietileno de baixa densidade (PEBD reciclado do processamento de extrusão de filmes tubulares Study of the reprocessing of low density polyethylene (LDPE recycled from extruded blown films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Pistor

    2010-01-01

    a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. From the analysis of the oscillatory rheometry, relaxation and retardation spectra were obtained upon applying a non-linear adjustment using a computational program (NLREG, while the kinetics parameters were estimated from the results of the first DSC heating using the Avrami and Freeman-Carroll methods. From the rheological study we inferred that the samples reprocessed more than four times had an increase in complex viscosity, storage and loss moduli, also displaying wider relaxation and retardation phenomena. However, the DSC thermograms and the melt kinetic parameters showed that the LDPE studied maintained their thermal stability, regardless of the modification in their viscoelastic properties.

  13. Materials and coating technology for pyrochemical reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, T.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2013-01-01

    Metallic fuelled fast breeder reactors with co-located pyrochemical reprocessing plants have been proposed as the best option in order to increase the breeding gain, reduce the doubling time of the fuel and reprocess short cooled and high burnup fuel. To establish the pyrochemical reprocessing plants with various unit operations, it is necessary to identify, develop and qualify reliable corrosion resistant materials and coatings for service in molten LiCI-KCI salt and molten uranium environment operating at 773 to 1573 K. Towards materials and coating technology development and testing for molten salt environment a high temperature corrosion testing laboratory was established and studies were initiated. Molten salt test assembly for testing materials and coatings in molten LiCI-KCI salt under controlled ultra high pure (UHP) argon environment at high temperatures has been designed, fabricated, commissioned and tests were carried out on various candidate materials and coatings. Electro-formed (EF) Ni, Ni with Ni-W coating, coatings of ZrN, TiN, HfN and Ti-Si-N on high density (HD) graphite, candidate materials like 2.25Cr-1Mo steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel, 316L stainless steel, Ni base alloys (INCONEL 600, 625 and 690), HD graphite, pyrolytic graphite (PyG), and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and alumina-40wt% titania thermal barrier coatings were tested for their suitability for molten salt applications. Corrosion studies indicated that YSZ and PyG showed superior corrosion resistance in molten LiCI-KCI salt at 873 K up to 2000 h exposure. Surface modification techniques like annealing, laser remelting and laser shock processing were pursued to consolidate the coatings and improve their high temperature performance. Coating integrity using dielectric electrochemical system and thermal cycling furnace established that, compared to plain 9Cr-1Mo steel YSZ coated 9Cr-1Mo steel performed better from 473 K to 1223 K. The presentation highlights the results of the

  14. Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) bij verkeersslachtoffers met chronische whiplash-klachten: een exploratieve studie naar het verzachten van traumasymptomen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, M.; Winkel, F.W.

    1999-01-01

    Dit onderzoek bij verkeersslachtoffers met whiplash-klachten maakte deel uit van een omvangrijker studie naar de kwaliteit van hulpverlening aan slachtoffers van verkeersongevallen, in het kader van het Achmea-project ‘Kwaliteit Slachtofferhulp’. Gerapporteerd wordt een viertal gevalsbeschrijvingen

  15. The case for reprocessing: the operational experience of a modern reprocessing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Kelly, W.

    1993-01-01

    Reprocessing is a high-tech industry that works. An impressive effort of R and D, industrial deployment and operational experience has been accumulated by COGEMA and BNFL, leading these companies to offer a commercial service which is the only proper management of spent fuel and waste that is both technically demonstrated and qualified by the safety authorities of European and overseas countries. Reprocessing, as every technology-based industry will continue to progress in the future. Recycling the fissile materials reclaimed from spent fuel: uranium and plutonium, is the complementary and indispensable last link to effectively close the fuel cycle and control in particular the production of plutonium and other long-lived actinides. This paper will describe the state of development attained in France and Great Britain and will underline the main advantages of the reprocessing/recycling strategy

  16. Effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing(EMDR to Reduce the Severity of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Stuttering With Psychological Origin(Case Study in Child with Four Years Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Hashemian Moghadam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The present research aimed to measure the effectiveness of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR on reducing the severity of symptoms of post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD and Stuttering in a four-year-old child post-traumatic stress disorder in children is one of the disorders relating to trauma and stressful factors, also, stutterring or word fluency disorder is a nerve growth disorder. Materials and Methods: This research design was conducted as a case study with a multiple baseline design. Participant in this research was a four-year- old child with Diagnostic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Psychogenic Stuttering. He had been placed under the intervention with EMDR at Shahid Birjand Counseling Center. The instruments used for this research included demographic researcher-made questionnaire, the third edition of stuttering severity test, the scale of parents’ report of post-traumatic Symptoms and child’s report of posttraumatic Symptoms. Data analysis was done through graphic and descriptive analysis. The data was collected as base line and during the treatment as well as after the treatment and follow-up (in terms of 3 and 24 months. Results: Means percentage improvement (MPI to reducing the severity of post-traumatic symptoms was achieved as %74.66 and it was %56.06 for reduction of the severity of stuttering and they continued to maintain in the follow-up period. Conclusion: Results showed that EMDR method had affected on reduction of the severity of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and stuttering intensity.

  17. Structure-properties relationships in melt reprocessed PLA/hydrotalcites nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Scaffaro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the effect of multiple reprocessing was studied on molecular structure, morphology and properties of poly(lactic acid/hydrotalcites (PLA/HT nanocomposites compared to neat PLA. In addition, the influence of two different kinds of HT – organically modified (OM-HT and unmodified (U-HT – was evaluated. Thermo-mechanical degradation was induced by means of five subsequent extrusion cycles. The performance of the recycled materials was investigated by mechanical and rheological tests, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, intrinsic viscosity measurements and SEM observation. The results indicated that the best morphology was achieved in the systems incorporating OM-HT. On increasing the extrusion reprocessing cycles, the properties showed behavior due to two opposite effects: i chain scission due to thermo-mechanical degradation and ii filler dispersion effect resulting from multiple processing. In particular, at low reprocessing cycles, both tensile and rheological properties seem to be mainly affected by HT dispersion, especially when OM-HT was added. After five reprocessing cycles, on the contrary, chain scission, i.e. thermo-mechanical degradation, dominated. As regards the effect of the presence of organic modifier in HT, the results indicated that this variable apparently did not affect the macroscopic performance of the nanocomposites, especially at high reprocessing cycles.

  18. Prospective microbiologic evaluation of the forceps elevator in closed-channel duodenoscopes after reprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Helga; Tribl, Barbara; Presterl, Elisabeth; Diab-El Schahawi, Magda

    2017-02-01

    Endoscopes are well-known sources of bacterial transmission in health care facilities offering endoscopy services. The association between multidrug-resistant bacterial infections in patients who had undergone an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure with reprocessed duodenoscopes has been much discussed. Bacterial contamination of duodenoscopes has been attributed to difficulties with reprocessing these devices, specifically the distal end of the scope, which features a movable forceps elevator. In light of a recent Food and Drug Administration warning letter to Olympus regarding their closed-channel duodenoscope model TJF-Q180V, the aim of our study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of our current reprocessing procedures with regard to the TJF-Q180V duodenoscope models used in our hospital. From August 2015-March 2016, we prospectively collected microbiologic surveillance samples from 6 TJF-Q180V model duodenoscopes in routine use at the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology using the ESwab collection system (COPAN Diagnostics Inc, Murrieta, CA). A total of 237 microbiologic samples from the forceps elevator were obtained during the survey period. None of the samples yielded microorganism growth. These findings suggest that when following a diligent and validated reprocessing standard in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations, closed-channel endoscope models can still be used. Nevertheless, validated adaptions of current closed-channel duodenoscope models are needed to allow for simple and safe reprocessing. Furthermore, comprehensive postmarket surveillance needs to be established. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Thorium utilization program progress report for January 1, 1974--June 30, 1975. [Reprocessing; refabrication; recycle fuel irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Kasten, P.R.

    1976-05-01

    Work was carried out on the following: HTGR reprocessing development and pilot plant, refabrication development and pilot plant, recycle fuel irradiations, engineering and economic studies, and conceptual design of a commercial recycle plant. (DLC)

  20. Chemistry of materials relevant to aqueous reprocessing and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, T.G.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear energy option will be an inevitable one with the fossil fuels depleting fast and present coal and oil based thermal power generation resulting in unwanted green house gas emission. The utilisation of the fissile resources will be more effective with closed fuel cycle option wherein the spent reactor fuel is reprocessed and the unused uranium and plutonium formed during the reactor operation is recovered and re-used. Of the aqueous and non-aqueous routes available to reprocess the spent nuclear fuels, aqueous reprocessing method of recovering the valuable uranium and plutonium by the PUREX process is in vogue for the past six decades. The process involves chopping the fuel into small lengths, leaching uranium and plutonium with concentrated nitric acid under reflux, conditioning the dissolver solution with respect to acidity and valency of U and Pu, solvent extraction with 30%TBP/n-DD to selectively extract U(VI) and Pu(IV) leaving most of the fission products into the raffinate, partitioning plutonium from uranium and reconversion of U and Pu into oxide forms after further purification. Many reagents are used to achieve near quantitative recovery of both uranium and plutonium (>99.9%) and with high decontamination factors (>10 7 ) from highly radioactive fission products. Nevertheless, the chemistry of several reagents used and the chemical processes that take place during the entire course of reprocessing and waste management operations are yet to be fully understood and gives a lot of scope for further improvements. Some examples where research requires concerted efforts are, 1) development of new extractants conforming to CHON principle, with acceptable physical properties, high stability, selectivity and resistance to third phase formation, 2) new partitioning reagents and processes which offer good efficiency and kinetics for uranium/plutonium reduction, 3) understanding the chemistry of troublesome fission products such as Tc, Ru and Zr, 4

  1. Development of Tokai reprocessing plant maintenance support system (TORMASS) in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Tsuneo; Sakai, Katsumi

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance work of many equipments such as mechanical, electrical and instrumentations installed in Tokai reprocessing plant has been performed more then 10,000 times per year and about 90% of maintenances were preventive work. For the maintenance management, optimization of maintenance information is required. Therefore, Tokai Reprocessing Plant Maintenance Support System (TORMASS) was developed from 1985 to 1992 as the aim of construction for suitable maintenance management system. About 24,000 equipments of specifications and about 261,000 maintenance detail were registered in this system. TORMASS has been used for the repair, inspection and replacement of equipment since 1992. (author)

  2. Prospect of spent fuel reprocessing and back-end cycling in China in 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Youzhi; Wang Rengtao

    1987-01-01

    According to the CHinese Program of nuclear energy in 1990's, the amount of spent fuel by the year 2000 is estimated in this paper. Reprocessing is considered as an important link in the back-end fuel cycle. A pilot plant is scheduled for hot start up in 1996. The main goal of the study is LWR spent fuel reprocessing. We will use the experience gained from reprocessing of production reactor fuel and last research results. The advanced foreign technigue and experience will be introduced. The study emphasizes on the test of technology, equipments, instrumentation and automation, development of remote maintenance and decontamination. China will start to demonstrate the way for fuel cycle. (author)

  3. Input measurements in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trincherini, P.R.; Facchetti, S.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a review of the methods and the problems encountered in measurements in 'input accountability tanks' of irradiated fuel treatment plants. This study was prompted by the conviction that more and more precise techniques and methods should be at the service of safeguards organizations and that ever greater efforts should be directed towards promoting knowledge of them among operators and all those general area of interest includes the nuclear fuel cycle. The overall intent is to show the necessity of selecting methods which produce measurements which are not only more precise but are absolutely reliable both for routine plant operation and for safety checks in the input area. A description and a critical evaluation of the most common physical and chemical methods are provided, together with an estimate of the precision and accuracy obtained in real operating conditions

  4. An open RNA-Seq data analysis pipeline tutorial with an example of reprocessing data from a recent Zika virus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zichen; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    RNA-seq analysis is becoming a standard method for global gene expression profiling. However, open and standard pipelines to perform RNA-seq analysis by non-experts remain challenging due to the large size of the raw data files and the hardware requirements for running the alignment step. Here we introduce a reproducible open source RNA-seq pipeline delivered as an IPython notebook and a Docker image. The pipeline uses state-of-the-art tools and can run on various platforms with minimal configuration overhead. The pipeline enables the extraction of knowledge from typical RNA-seq studies by generating interactive principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering (HC) plots, performing enrichment analyses against over 90 gene set libraries, and obtaining lists of small molecules that are predicted to either mimic or reverse the observed changes in mRNA expression. We apply the pipeline to a recently published RNA-seq dataset collected from human neuronal progenitors infected with the Zika virus (ZIKV). In addition to confirming the presence of cell cycle genes among the genes that are downregulated by ZIKV, our analysis uncovers significant overlap with upregulated genes that when knocked out in mice induce defects in brain morphology. This result potentially points to the molecular processes associated with the microcephaly phenotype observed in newborns from pregnant mothers infected with the virus. In addition, our analysis predicts small molecules that can either mimic or reverse the expression changes induced by ZIKV. The IPython notebook and Docker image are freely available at:  http://nbviewer.jupyter.org/github/maayanlab/Zika-RNAseq-Pipeline/blob/master/Zika.ipynb and  https://hub.docker.com/r/maayanlab/zika/.

  5. An open RNA-Seq data analysis pipeline tutorial with an example of reprocessing data from a recent Zika virus study [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zichen Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA-seq analysis is becoming a standard method for global gene expression profiling. However, open and standard pipelines to perform RNA-seq analysis by non-experts remain challenging due to the large size of the raw data files and the hardware requirements for running the alignment step. Here we introduce a reproducible open source RNA-seq pipeline delivered as an IPython notebook and a Docker image. The pipeline uses state-of-the-art tools and can run on various platforms with minimal configuration overhead. The pipeline enables the extraction of knowledge from typical RNA-seq studies by generating interactive principal component analysis (PCA and hierarchical clustering (HC plots, performing enrichment analyses against over 90 gene set libraries, and obtaining lists of small molecules that are predicted to either mimic or reverse the observed changes in mRNA expression. We apply the pipeline to a recently published RNA-seq dataset collected from human neuronal progenitors infected with the Zika virus (ZIKV. In addition to confirming the presence of cell cycle genes among the genes that are downregulated by ZIKV, our analysis uncovers significant overlap with upregulated genes that when knocked out in mice induce defects in brain morphology. This result potentially points to the molecular processes associated with the microcephaly phenotype observed in newborns from pregnant mothers infected with the virus. In addition, our analysis predicts small molecules that can either mimic or reverse the expression changes induced by ZIKV. The IPython notebook and Docker image are freely available at: http://nbviewer.jupyter.org/github/maayanlab/Zika-RNAseq-Pipeline/blob/master/Zika.ipynb and https://hub.docker.com/r/maayanlab/zika/.

  6. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; and others

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  7. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO 2 fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  8. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki (ed.) [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  9. Evaluation on maintenance technology developed in Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) has been processing 1,140 tons of spent fuels, including 29tons of Fugen MOX fuels, since the beginning of its active operation in Sept.1977. For 30 years operation of TRP, many technological problems have been overcome to obtain the stable and reliable operation. This knowledge of maintenance technology could contribute to the safety and stable operation of Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP), as well as to the design and construction of the next reprocessing plant. (author)

  10. Safeguards for reprocessing and enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Agency safeguards are entering a new phase with the coming under active safeguards for the first time of reprocessing plants in several regions of the world. This is taking place at a time when not only the safeguards aspect itself is coming under international scrutiny, but also at a time when the necessity of reprocessing plants is being called into question. Attracting less attention at the moment, but potentially of equal significance, are the enrichment plants that soon will be coming under Agency safeguards. It is not unreasonable in view of the present controversies to ask what is the significance of these reprocessing and enrichment plants, what are the problems concerning safeguards that appear to have given rise to the controversies, and how these problems are to be solved. The question of significance is an easy one to answer. The output of these plants is material which some people consider can be used directly for military purposes, whereas the output from other plants, for instance, reactors, would require long and extensive processing before it could be used for military purposes. Like most short answers, this one is an over-simplification which requires some elaboration to make it strictly accurate. For example, the material output of a power reactor is in the form of irradiate assemblies containing plutonium which is potentially of military use if the irradiation had been within a certain range. However, to utilize this plutonium under clandestine conditions, the highly radioactive material would have to be secretly transported to a reprocessing plant and there would have to be simultaneous falsification of the reactor material accounts and the plant records. Such falsification would be difficult to conceal. The total time required to obtain usable plutonium would be many months. Diversion of material from a uranium fabrication plant making fuel for power reactors would be easier physically but strategically it would be of little value. The

  11. Access control system for two person rule at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Sawako; Ino, Munekazu; Yamada, Noriyuki; Oota, Hiroto; Iwasaki, Mitsuaki; Kodani, Yoshiki; Iwamoto, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Following the amendment and enforcement of Regulation of Reprocessing Activity on March 29th 2012, two person rule has become compulsory for the specific rooms to counter and prevent the sabotage or theft of nuclear materials by the insiders at reprocessing plant in Japan. The rooms will include those which contains cooling systems for decay heat removal from spent fuels and so on, scavenging systems to prevent the hydrogen accumulation, and those which contains nuclear material. To ensure the two person rule at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, JNFL has recently, after comprehensive study, introduced efficient and effective access control system for the rooms mentioned above. The system is composed of bio-attestation devices, surveillance cameras and electronic locks to establish access control system. This report outlines the access control system for two person rule and introduces the operation. (author)

  12. The regulations concerning the reprocessing business of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The office ordinance is established under the provisions related to reprocessing businesses of the law concerning regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors, to enforce the provisions. The basic terms are defined, such as exposure radiation dose; accumulated dose; controlled area; maintenance area; surrounding watch area; employee; radioactive waste; the facilities for discharge to sea. An application for the designation of reprocessing businesses shall be filed, listing the following matters: the maximum daily and yearly reprocessing capacities for each kind of spent fuel; the location and general structure of reprocessing facilities; the structures of buildings; the structure and equipments of main reprocessing facilities, the storage facilities for products and the disposal facilities for radioactive wastes; the equipments of measuring and control system facilities and radiation control facilities, etc. Records shall be made on the inspection of reprocessing facilities, radiation control, operation, maintenance, the accidents of reprocessing facilities and weather, and kept for the period from one to ten years, respectively. Any person engaging in reprocessing businesses shall set up control, maintenance and surrounding watch areas, and take specified measures to restrict the entrance of persons. The measures to be taken against exposure radiation dose, the inspection, regular independent examination and operation of reprocessing facilities and other related matters are stipulated in detail. (Okada, K.)

  13. Fuel reprocessing at a loss to prove its justification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traube, K.

    1986-01-01

    Commercial utilization of nuclear energy is possible with or without fuel reprocessing of spent fuel elements. Demands on terminal storage are about equal in both cases. There is no reason - excluding the military one - to decide in favour of fuel reprocessing instead of direct terminal storage, for neither does fuel reprocessing offer advantages in regard of the safety of nuclear waste disposal, nor is it necessary to produce plutonium for the breeder reactor. Fuel reprocessing is analyzed considering those changed aspects with a view to scarcer uranium resources, juridical motives, and what is termed the development deficit. (DG) [de

  14. The regulations concerning the reprocessing business of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Regulations specified here cover application for such matters as designation of reprocessing undertaking, permission of construction of reprocessing facilities, permission and approval of alteration (of plan for reprocessing facilities), etc. The regulations also cover application for prior inspection, execution of prior inspection, technical standards concerning performance of reprocessing facilities, certificate of prior inspection, reprocessing facilities subject to welding inspection, application for welding inspection, execution of welding inspection, facilities not subject to welding inspection, approval of welding method, welding inspection for imported equipment, certificate of welding inspection, reprocessing facilities subject to regular inspection, application for regular inspection, technical standards for regular inspection, operation plan, application for approval of joint management, record keeping, restriction on access to areas under management, measures concerning exposure to radioactive rays, patrol and checking in reprocessing facilities, operation of reprocessing facilities, self-imposed regular inspection of reprocessing facilities, transportation within plant or operation premises, storage, waste disposal within plant or operation premises, safety rules, notice of disassembly, measures for emergency, notice of abolition of business, notice of disorganization, measures concerning cancellation of designation, submission of report, etc. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Legal questions concerning the termination of spent fuel element reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Michele

    2005-01-01

    The thesis on legal aspects of the terminated spent fuel reprocessing in Germany is based on the legislation, jurisdiction and literature until January 2004. The five chapters cover the following topics: description of the problem; reprocessing of spent fuel elements in foreign countries - practical and legal aspects; operators' responsibilities according to the atomic law with respect to the reprocessing of Geman spent fuel elements in foreign countries; compatibility of the prohibition of Geman spent fuel element reprocessing in foreign countries with international law, European law and German constitutional law; results of the evaluation

  16. Economic evaluation of reprocessing - Indicative German position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the final Working Group 4 report, forms part of the overall economic assessment of reprocessing. The indicative national position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for the Federal Republic of Germany is presented. Advantages to be gained from the recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors are identified and it is concluded that many of these are not explicitly taken into account in the ''phase diagram''. Under the conditions pertaining in the Federal Republic of Germany thermal recycle will be economic under present day uranium prices. On the other hand the fast breeder reactor might become commercially economic around the year 2000

  17. Reprocessing in the thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, E.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the authors personal view is presented on open questions in regard to still required research and development work for the thorium fuel cycle before its application in a technical-industrial scale may be tackled. For a better understanding, all stations of the back-end of the thorium fuel cycle are briefly illustrated and their special features discussed. They include storage and transportation measures, all steps of reprocessing, as well as the entire radioactive waste treatment. Knowledge gaps are, as far as they are obvious, identified and proposals put forward for additional worthwile investigations. (orig.) [de

  18. Radiological prevention in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenta, G.

    1983-01-01

    Prevention has received a peculiar conceptual formulation in working activities with radiation risk. In order to point out the operative aspects of this formulation the authors relates here the considerations, the criteria an the precautionary measures which have guided the choice or that have been actuated to reduce the risk for the workers of the EUREX reprocessing plant. The general aspect of this formulationa has a philosophical and doctrinarian course, peculiar in the probabilistic safety approach and in radioprotection methodology. The authors quotes here some concepts and some specific application of both but he shows above all the medical aspects of the radioprotection

  19. Economic evaluation of reprocessing. Indicative UK position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the final Working Group 4 report, forms part of the overall economic assessment of reprocessing. The indicative national position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for the United Kingdom is presented. Under conditions pertaining in the United Kingdom the diagram suggests that: if uranium prices rise rapidly the fast reactor would become economic in the decade 1990-2000, if uranium prices rise more slowly, the fast reactor would become economic in the decade 2000-2010

  20. Application of probabilistic risk assessment to reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory uses probabilistic methods of risk assessment in safety analyses of reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant. This method uses both the probability of an accident and its consequence to calculate the risks from radiological, chemical, and industrial hazards. The three principal steps in such an assesment are identification of accidents, calculation of frequencies, and consequence quantification. The tools used at SRL include several databanks, logic tree methods, and computer-assisted methods for calculating both frequencies and consequences. 5 figures

  1. Process information systems in nuclear reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Keller, H.; Orth, H.

    1987-01-01

    On a production management level, a process information system in a nuclear reprocessing plant (NRP) has to fulfill conventional operating functions and functions for nuclear material surveillance (safeguards). Based on today's state of the art of on-line process control technology, the progress in hardware and software technology allows to introduce more process-specific intelligence into process information systems. Exemplified by an expert-system-aided laboratory management system as component of a NRP process information system, the paper demonstrates that these technologies can be applied already. (DG) [de

  2. Nuclear fuel cycle: reprocessing. A bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.B.

    1982-12-01

    This bibliography contains information on the reprocessing portion of the nuclear fuel cycle included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from January 1981 through November 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  3. The fuel reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, M.

    1986-01-01

    For a more systematic discussion about the fuel reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf, the colloquium tried to cover the most important questions put forward in the controversies: economic efficiency and energy-political needs; safety and ecological repercussions; inner safety and consequences for basic rights and the regional economic structure; majority decisions and participation of the population of the region. Elements of evaluation are the conservation of resources, health, economic efficiency, and citizens' rights of liberty. The related basic ethical questions are considered. The 18 contributions are individually recorded in the data base. (DG) [de

  4. Reprocessing of irradiated fuel: pros and cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, O.G.; Novikov, V.M.

    1991-01-01

    The acceptable-safety nuclear reactors (APWR, LMFBR, MSBR, MSCR) can be provided by the enrichment industry and by plutonium reserves. But steady accumulation of spent fuel will inevitably make to return to the problems of fuel recycle. PUREX-processing increases a danger of radionuclides spreading due to the presence of large buffer tanks. Using of compact fluoride - volatility process will sharply reduce a nuclide leakage likewise permit to reprocess a fuel with a burnup as high as possible. Success of a powerful robots development give an opportunity to design a fluoride-volatility plant twice cheaper than PUREX. (author)

  5. Nuclear fuel reprocessing: A time for decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, A.J.; Sandbery, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Availability of adequate supplies of energy at an affordable cost is essential to continued growth of the world's economics. The tie between economic growth and electricity usage is particularly strong and the pervasive wordwide trend toward increasing electrification shows no signs of abating. Very few viable alternatives are available for supplying the projected increase in baseload electric generating capacity in the next several decades, and most industrialized nations have chosen nuclear power to play a major role. Sustained growth of nuclear power can only be achieved, however, by reprocessing spent fuel to recover and utilize the residual uranium and plutonium energy values

  6. Morphology of reprocessing: a case for regional utility planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    The change in entrepreneurial climate in reprocessing and recycle, which has taken place in the last few years, is reviewed. The climatic change, which has reached the point where the economic benefits of that fuel cycle segment are being questioned, is characterized. The author outlines the reasons he feels the benefits are positive. Some of the principal risks facing the entrepreneur are outlined and the suggestion is made that participation by the utility customers for a major project throughout its planning process is critical. In this context, the logic for a regional organization of such utilities, customers, drawing heavily from a study conducted by a group of utilities in the western United States during 1975, is outlined. The paper concludes with some general observations in support of the thesis that new structural forms are likely required for reprocessing facilities, as well as those for other major segments of the fuel cycle, if utilities are to be able to view with confidence the prospect of having such facilities in place in a timely fashion

  7. Modeling for thermodynamic activities of components in simulated reprocessing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahira, Akira; Hoshikawa, Tadahiro; Kawamura, Fumio

    1992-01-01

    Analyses of chemical reactions have been widely carried out for soluble fission products encountered in nuclear fuel reprocessing. For detailed analyses of reactions, a prediction of the activity or activity coefficient for nitric acid, water, and several nitrates of fission products is needed. An idea for the predicted nitric acid activity was presented earlier. The model, designated the hydration model, does not predict the nitrate activity. It did, however, suggest that the activity of water would be a function of nitric acid activity but not the molar fraction of water. If the activities of nitric acid and water are accurately predicted, the activity of the last component, nitrate, can be calculated using the Gibbs-Duhem relation for chemical potentials. Therefore, in this study, the earlier hydration model was modified to evaluate the water activity more accurately. The modified model was experimentally examined in stimulated reprocessing solutions. It is concluded that the modified model was suitable for water activity, but further improvement was needed for the activity evaluation of nitric acid in order to calculate the nitrate activity

  8. Economic analysis of waste management alternatives for reprocessing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.W.; Clark, L.L.; Daling, P.M.; Nesbitt, J.F.; Swanson, J.L.

    1984-02-01

    This study describes the results of a cost analysis of a broad range of alternatives for management of reprocessing wastes that would require geologic repository disposal. The intent was to identify cost-effective alternatives and the costs of potential repository performance requirements. Four integrated treatment facility alternatives for transuranic (TRU) wastes are described and compared. These include no treatment, compaction, incineration, and hulls melting. The advantages of reducing high-level wastes (HLW) volume are also evaluated as are waste transportation alternatives and several performance-related alternatives for emplacing waste in a basalt repository. Results show (1) that system costs for disposal of reprocessing waste are likely to be higher than those for disposal of spent fuel; (2) that volume reduction is cost-effective for both remote-handled (RH) TRU wastes and HLW, and that rail transport for HLW is more cost-effective than truck transport; (3) that coemplacement of RH-TRU wastes with HLW does not have a large cost advantage in a basalt repository; and (4) that, relative to performance requirements, the cost impact for elimination of combustibles is about 5%, long-lived containers for RH-TRU wastes can increase repository costs 10% to 20%, and immediate backfill compared to delayed backfill (bentonite/basalt) around the HLW canisters would increase repository costs up to 10% or overall system costs up to about 5%. 13 references, 4 figures, 12 tables

  9. International safeguards for a light-water reactor fuels reprocessing plant: containment and surveillance concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.

    1980-12-01

    Concepts for containment/surveillance for reprocessing plants are described, conceptual designs are developed, and their effectiveness is evaluated. A technical approach to design of containment/surveillance systems is presented, and design considerations are discussed. This is the second in a series of reports. The first described the basis for the study of international safeguards for reprocessing plants. In this second report, only containment/surveillance is discussed. The third report will discuss the integration of concepts for containment/surveillance and material accountancy

  10. 66. The safety engineering at reprocessing of raw material from 'zero' mark and 'slaked lime'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The safety engineering at reprocessing of raw material from 'zero' mark and 'slaked lime' was studied. All operational conditions at reprocessing of raw material from 'zero' mark and 'slaked lime' were discussed.

  11. Experimental research subject and renovation of chemical processing facility (CPF) for advanced fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Tomozo; Shinozaki, Tadahiro; Nomura, Kazunori; Koma, Yoshikazu; Miyachi, Shigehiko; Ichige, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki; Nemoto, Shin-ichi

    2002-01-01

    In order to enhance economical efficiency, environmental impact and nuclear nonproliferation resistance, the Advanced Reprocessing Technology, such as simplification and optimization of process, and applicability evaluation of the innovative technology that was not adopted up to now, has been developed for the reprocessing of the irradiated fuel taken out from a fast reactor. Renovation of the hot cell interior equipments, establishment and updating of glove boxes, installation of various analytical equipments, etc. in the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was done to utilize the CPF more positivity which is the center of the experimental field, where actual fuel can be used, for research and development towards establishment of the Advanced Reprocessing Technology development. The hot trials using the irradiated fuel pins of the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' for studies on improved aqueous reprocessing technology, MA separation technology, dry process technology, etc. are scheduled to be carried out with these new equipments. (author)

  12. Safety problems in fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaury, P.; Jouannaud, C.; Niezborala, F.

    1979-01-01

    The document first situates the reprocessing in the fuel cycle as a whole. It shows that a large reprocessing plant serves a significant number of reactors (50 for a plant of 1500 tonnes per annum). It then assesses the potential risks with respect to the environment as well as with respect to the operating personnel. The amounts of radioactive matter handled are very significant and their easily dispersible physical form represents very important risks. But the low potential energy likely to bring about this dispersion and the very severe and plentiful confinement arrangements are such that the radioactive risks are very small, both with respect to the environment and the operating personnel. The problems of the interventions for maintenance or repairs are mentioned. The intervention techniques in a radioactive environment are perfected, but they represent the main causes of operating personnel irradiation. The design principle applied in the new plants take this fact into account, involving a very significant effort to improve the reliability of the equipment and ensuring the provision of devices enabling the failing components to be replaced without causing irradiation of the personnel [fr

  13. Deactivating a major nuclear fuels reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes three key processes used in deactivating the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, a large, complex nuclear reprocessing facility, 15 months ahead of schedule and $77 million under budget. The organization was reengineered to refine its business processes and more effectively organize around the deactivation work scope. Multi-disciplined work teams were formed to be self-sufficient and empowered to make decisions and perform work. A number of benefits were realized by reengineering. A comprehensive process to develop end points which clearly identified specific results and the post-project facility configuration was developed so all areas of a facility were addressed. Clear and specific end points allowed teams to focus on completing deactivation activities and helped ensure there were no unfulfilled end-of-project expectations. The RCRA regulations require closure of permitted facilities within 180 days after cessation of operations which may essentially necessitate decommissioning. A more cost effective approach was adopted which significantly reduced risk to human health and the environment by taking the facility to a passive, safe, inexpensive-to-maintain surveillance and maintenance condition (deactivation) prior to disposition. PUREX thus became the first large reprocessing facility with active TSD [treatment, storage, and disposal] units to be deactivated under the RCRA regulations

  14. Nuclear fuel re-processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yuko; Honda, Takashi; Shoji, Saburo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Furuya, Yasumasa

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel re-processing plant, high Si series stainless steels not always have sufficient corrosion resistance in a solution containing only nitric acid at medium or high concentration. Further, a method of blowing NOx gases may possibly promote the corrosion of equipment constituent materials remarkably. In view of the above, the corrosion promoting effect of nuclear fission products is suppressed without depositing corrosive metal ions as metals in the nitric acid solution. That is, a reducing atmosphere is formed by generating NOx by electrolytic reduction thereby preventing increase in the surface potential of stainless steels. Further, an anode is disposed in the nitric acid solution containing oxidative metal ions to establish an electrical conduction and separate them by way of partition membranes and a constant potential or constant current is applied while maintaining an ionic state so as not to deposit metals. Thus, equipments of re-processing facility can be protected from corrosion with no particular treatment for wastes as radioactive materials. (K.M.)

  15. To reprocess to recycle. The nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    After a summary of fundamental notions of radioactivity and nuclear safety, the first part of this work is devoted to the organisation in France to provide the nuclear facilities safety. The second part related to the fuel cycle describes the big steps of this cycle and particularly the stakes and objectives of the reprocessing -recycling as well as the valorization of reusable matters such plutonium and uranium. The risks identification, means to control them, in conception, realisation and operation are described in the third, fourth and fifth parts. In this last part the managements of accidental situations is treated. The sixth and last part is devoted to the environment protection, treats the control of waste release of reprocessing -recycling facilities, of these waste management that is to say every disposition made by Cogema to limit the impact of its installations on environment. In this last part are also described the safety of nuclear and radioactive matters transport, and the definitive breakdown of installations. (N.C.)

  16. The Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Procedure Prevents Defensive Processing in Health Persuasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; van Asten, Regine

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the method of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is studied to understand and prevent defensive reactions with regard to a negatively framed message advocating fruit and vegetable consumption. EMDR has been shown to tax the working memory. Participants from a

  17. Feasibility study on commercialization of fast breeder reactor cycle systems interim report of phase II. Technical study report for nuclear fuel cycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Koji; Amamoto, Ippei; Inoue, Akira

    2004-06-01

    combines the oxide electrowinning reprocessing and the vibropacking fuel fabrication process has the possibility of economical improvement if simplification of the process can be achieved. However this system has several primary problems which affect the technical feasibility of the MA recovery process etc. In the system which combines the metal electrorefining reprocessing and the metal casting fuel fabrication process for metal fuels, high economical efficiency is generally expected of small-scale facilities, although verification of the TRU recovery process by spent fuel is required. The development of the head-end process (reduction technology of oxide to metal) is required for introducing the metal fuel cycle. As for nitride fuels, specific technical developments of N-15 enrichment, recycling, and nitride conversion to the nitride fuel, etc. are required as the main technology, although the advanced aqueous reprocessing or the metal electrorefining reprocessing can be applied fundamentally. Besides technical developments of the fuel fabrication, assembly setting, dismantling, and decladding, etc. are required for coated particle fuels. For economical efficiency, less than 0.8 yen/kWh which is the demand value (total of the reprocessing expense and the fuel fabrication expense) of the fuel cycle expense of phase II satisfied each combination case at 200 tHM/y scale provisionally set for large-scale facilities. On the other hand, only the metal fuel cycle almost satisfied the demand value in the combination case with a high breeder reactor core at 50 tHM/y scale provisionally set for small-scale facilities. The combination case with a low breeder reactor core has satisfied the demand value, with improvement of the average burnup by the radial direction blanket fuel deletion contributing to the decrease of the fuel cycle expense. (author)

  18. Management of reprocessed uranium. Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    There is worldwide interest in developing advanced and innovative technologies for nuclear fuel cycles, minimizing waste and environmental impacts. As of the beginning of 2003, about 171000 tonnes heavy metal spent nuclear fuel is in storage, while smaller amounts have been reprocessed. In several countries, including France, India, Japan and the Russian Federation, spent fuel has been viewed as a national energy resource. Some countries hold reprocessed uranium as the result of their commercial reprocessing service contracts for reprocessing the spent fuel of others. Reprocessed uranium has a potential value for recycling either directly or after appropriate treatment. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in the management of reprocessed uranium. It includes the technical issues involved in managing reprocessed uranium which are RepU arisings, storage, chemical conversion, re-enrichment, fuel fabrication, transport, reactor irradiation, subsequent reprocessing and disposal options, as well as assessment of holistic environmental impacts. The objective of this document is to overview the information on the current status and future trends in the management of RepU and to identify major issues to be considered for future projects

  19. Sterilization and reprocessing of materials and medical devices--reusability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, M

    1995-07-01

    Problems associated with reprocessing of disposable medical devices such as hemodialysers with resterilization for reuse and changes in material properties with resterilization of polymeric (PVC, polypropylene, polyester, polycarbonate) materials intended for development of disposable devices are reviewed. Reprocessing of hospital supplies, polystyrene microtiter plate and angiographic catheter for reuse is also discussed.

  20. Reliability engineering analysis of ATLAS data reprocessing campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniachine, A; Golubkov, D; Karpenko, D

    2014-01-01

    During three years of LHC data taking, the ATLAS collaboration completed three petascale data reprocessing campaigns on the Grid, with up to 2 PB of data being reprocessed every year. In reprocessing on the Grid, failures can occur for a variety of reasons, while Grid heterogeneity makes failures hard to diagnose and repair quickly. As a result, Big Data processing on the Grid must tolerate a continuous stream of failures, errors and faults. While ATLAS fault-tolerance mechanisms improve the reliability of Big Data processing in the Grid, their benefits come at costs and result in delays making the performance prediction difficult. Reliability Engineering provides a framework for fundamental understanding of the Big Data processing on the Grid, which is not a desirable enhancement but a necessary requirement. In ATLAS, cost monitoring and performance prediction became critical for the success of the reprocessing campaigns conducted in preparation for the major physics conferences. In addition, our Reliability Engineering approach supported continuous improvements in data reprocessing throughput during LHC data taking. The throughput doubled in 2011 vs. 2010 reprocessing, then quadrupled in 2012 vs. 2011 reprocessing. We present the Reliability Engineering analysis of ATLAS data reprocessing campaigns providing the foundation needed to scale up the Big Data processing technologies beyond the petascale.

  1. Mechanism of 232U production in MTR fuel evolution of activity in reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbonnier, G.; Lelievre, B.; Fanjas, Y.; Naccache, S.J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The use of reprocessed uranium for research reactor fuel fabrication implies to keep operators safe from the hard gamma rays emitted by 232 U daughter products. CERCA has carried out, with the help of French CEA and COGEMA, a detailed study to determine the evolution of the radiation dose rate associated with the use of this material. (author)

  2. Trends for minimization of radioactive waste arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.S.; Koltunov, V.S.; Marchenko, V.I.; Ilozhev, A.P.; Mukhin, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    Research and development of technologies for radioactive waste (RAW) minimization arising from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing are discussed. Novel reductants of Pu and Np ions, reagents of purification recycled extractant, possibility of the electrochemical methods are studied. The partitioning of high activity level waste are considered. Examples of microbiological methods decomposition of radioactive waste presented. (authors)

  3. Extraction of Uranium Using Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Dioxide for Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayo Sawada; Daisuke Hirabayashi; Youichi Enokida [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    For the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a new method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. Uranium extraction from broken pieces, whose average grain size was 5 mm, of uranium dioxide pellet with nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was demonstrated in the present study. (authors)

  4. Density and volume measurements of reprocessing plant feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzer, R.; Carrier, M.; Neuilly, M.; Dedaldechamp, P.

    1985-05-01

    A theoretical study of the phenomenon of gas bubbles formation within a liquid led to an adaptation of the differential pressure bubbling technique for the measurement of liquid levels and densities in tanks. Experiments, carried out on a 800 liters tank with water and uranyl nitrate solutions had the double aim to study the precision attainable on volume and density measurements and to design a method for corrections of influencing factors. In parallel, procedures for transfer of known volumes through the use of siphons and for tank calibration by liquid level measurement are also investigated. The paper presents the first results obtained so far and the conclusions to be drawn for the elaboration of calibration and exploitation procedures suitables for use in reprocessing plants. The demonstration to transfer mass of solution with an accuracy of 0.1% is made [fr

  5. Dynamic response of high speed centrifuge for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, Gaurav; Satish Kumar, V.; Selvaraj, T.; Ananda Rao, S.M.; Ravisankar, A.

    2012-01-01

    The standard for balancing the rotating bowl describes only the details about the selection of balance quality grade and the permissible residual unbalance for different operating speeds. This paper presents the effects of unbalance on the rotating bowl of high speed centrifuge used in reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In this study, the residual unbalance is evaluated for different recommended balancing grades in accordance with the ISO 1940. This unbalance mass generates dynamic force which acts on the rotor. The dynamic response of the rotor like displacements and stresses under this dynamic force are studied by numerical simulation. Finally, the effect of residual unbalance on the rotating bowl performance for different balancing grades is discussed. The experimental measurements are also carried out for the case of G 1.0 grade balanced rotating bowl to validate the resonance frequency as well as vibration amplitudes. (author)

  6. Origin, development, and evolution of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Marín

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR has led to a great number of studies since its appearance in 1989. The aim of this article is to describe EMDR development and evolution to the present day. With this purpose a search was carried out on MEDLINE and PsycINFO with the entry "eye movement desensitization". After revising the resulting 797 articles, those that because of their relevance explained best the development and evolution of the technique were chosen and shaped into a lifeline graphically representing the history of EMDR. Despite the fact that during the first years the focus of research was on the validation of the technique for post-traumatic disorder (PTSD, it was soon applied to other areas. Only 14% of the articles found account for controlled studies. Up to date, in spite of the effectiveness of EMDR for the treatment of PTSD that has been proven, many different explanatory hypotheses are still up for discussion.

  7. Method of reprocessing radioactive asphalt solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Iwao; Murakami, Tadashi; Miyake, Takafumi; Inagaki, Yuzo.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain heat-stable solidification products and decrease the total volume thereof by modifying the solidified form by the reprocessing of existent radioactive asphalt solidification products. Method: Radioactive asphalt solidification products are heated into a fluidized state. Then, incombustible solvents such as perchloroethylene or trichloroethylene are added to a dissolving tank to gradually dissolve the radioactive asphalt solidification products. Thus, organic materials such as asphalts are transferred into the solvent layer, while inorganic materials containing radioactive materials remain as they are in the separation tank. Then, the inorganic materials containing the radioactive materials are taken out and then solidified, for example, by converting them into a rock or glass form. (Kawakami, Y.)

  8. Natural uranium utilization without enrichment and reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimoto, H.; Toshinsky, V.; Ryu, K. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    2001-07-01

    Two types of fast reactor are investigated to utilize the natural uranium without enrichment and reprocessing in an equilibrium state. The first trial is SFPR. Its fuel-shuffling pattern is optimized. An obtained result gives its peak fuel burnup of 22,5%, power peaking factor of 1.5 and peak excess reactivity of 2,15%. The second trial is CANDLE burnup scheme, where distribution shapes of neutron flux and nuclide densities are constant but move in axial direction with a constant velocity. A feasible solution gives the speed of burning region of 4,1 cm/year, k{sub eff} of 1,02 and average spent fuel burnup of 41%. (author)

  9. Criticality management of Tokai reprocessing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojiri, Ichiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    In fuel cycle centers a number of equipment and vessels of various types and of complex design are used in several processes, i.e. dissolution of spent fuels, separation and storage of uranium and plutonium from fission products and transuranium elements. For each processes, Monte Carlo codes are frequently applied to manage the fuel criticality. Safety design depends largely on specific features of each facilities. The present report describes status of criticality management for main processes in Tokai Reprocessing Facility, JNC, and the criticality conditions specifically existing there. The guiding principle throughout consists of mass control, volume control, design (form) control, concentration control, and control due to employment of neutron poisons. (S. Ohno)

  10. Operations monitoring concept. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    Operations monitoring is a safeguards concept which could be applied in future fuel cycle facilities to significantly enhance the effectiveness of an integrated safeguards system. In general, a variety of operations monitoring techniques could be developed for both international and domestic safeguards application. The goal of this presentation is to describe specific examples of operations monitoring techniques as may be applied in a fuel reprocessing facility. The operations monitoring concept involves monitoring certain in-plant equipment, personnel, and materials to detect conditions indicative of the diversion of nuclear material. An operations monitoring subsystem should be designed to monitor operations only to the extent necessary to achieve specified safeguards objectives; there is no intent to monitor all operations in the facility. The objectives of the operations monitoring subsystem include: verification of reported data; detection of undeclared uses of equipment; and alerting the inspector to potential diversion activities. 1 fig

  11. Pyroelectrochemical process for reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Sartorelli, A.

    1982-01-01

    A pyroelectrochemical process for reprocessing irradiated fast reactor mixed oxide or carbide fuels is described. The fuel is dissolved in a bath of molten alkali metal sulfates. The Pu(SO 4 ) 2 formed in the bath is thermally decomposed, leaving crystalline PuO 2 on the bottom of the reaction vessel. Electrodes are then introduced into the bath, and UO 2 is deposited on the cathode. Alternatively, both UO 2 and PuO 2 may be electrodeposited. The molten salts, after decontamination by precipitating the fission products dissolved in the bath by introducing basic agents such as oxides, carbonates, or hydroxides, may be recycled. Since it is not possible to remove cesium from the molten salt bath, periodic disposal and partial renewal with fresh salts is necessary. The melted salts that contain the fission products are conditioned for disposal by embedding them in a metallic matrix

  12. Steel construction in the nuclear reprocessing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) has pursued a large capital expenditure programme at Sellafield in Cumbria. This has used large quantities of structural steelwork. For example, Thorp plant for reprocessing spend AGR and LWR fuels, due for completion in 1992, has 20,000 tonnes. The design of these plants has been entrusted to BNFL Engineering based at Risley near Warrington, England. These safety-related structures are designed, as required by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, to withstand the effects of environmental hazards such as extremes of earthquake, wind, temperature, ice, snow, flooding, and lightning strikes. In some cases they may be subjected to impact loading from possible mishandling of lifted loads such as fuel transportation flasks. Design criteria for these structures have been developed by BNFL Engineering. Some examples are mentioned. (author)

  13. Enhancements in the thorp reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakem, M.J.; Brownridge, M. [Thorp Technical Dept. and Research and Technology, BNFL plc, Sellafield, seascale, Cumbria, CA (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    A number of successful enhancements have been made to the process at the Thorp reprocessing plant at Sellafield. After a long and detailed Research and Development programme followed by an intensive design/construction project, Thorp was inactively commissioned with first active shear in March 1994. The plant has now reached a mature stage in its development, following successful active commissioning demonstrating flowsheet or better performance in the solvent extraction cycles. Enhancements are now sought to achieve a range of objectives. Against a background of ever tighter regulatory control both in terms of safety and environmental discharge, BNFL are continuing to invest in further improvements with short, medium and longer term objectives to improve plant throughput; expand the range of feed fuels; reduce environmental discharges and reduce running costs. This paper describes a few of these enhancements. (authors)

  14. Enhancements in the thorp reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakem, M.J.; Brownridge, M.

    2000-01-01

    A number of successful enhancements have been made to the process at the Thorp reprocessing plant at Sellafield. After a long and detailed Research and Development programme followed by an intensive design/construction project, Thorp was inactively commissioned with first active shear in March 1994. The plant has now reached a mature stage in its development, following successful active commissioning demonstrating flowsheet or better performance in the solvent extraction cycles. Enhancements are now sought to achieve a range of objectives. Against a background of ever tighter regulatory control both in terms of safety and environmental discharge, BNFL are continuing to invest in further improvements with short, medium and longer term objectives to improve plant throughput; expand the range of feed fuels; reduce environmental discharges and reduce running costs. This paper describes a few of these enhancements. (authors)

  15. Method of reprocessing spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Tadashi; Miyashiro, Hajime.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the storage management for the wastes resulting from reprocessing by chemically separating transuranium elements such as actionoid elements together with uranium and plutonium. Method: Spent fuels from a nuclear reactor are separated into two groups, that is, a mixture of uranium, plutonium and transuranium elements and cesium, strontium and other nuclear fission products. Virgin uranium is mixed to adjust the mixture of uranium, plutonium and transuranium elements in the first group, which is used as the fuels for the nuclear reactor. After separating to recover useful metals such as cesium and strontium are separated from short half-decay nuclear fission products of the second group, other nuclear fission products are stored and managed. This enables to shorten the storage period and safety storage and management for the wastes. (Takahashi, M.)

  16. Safeguards implementation in UP3 reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, J.P.; Regnier, J.; Talbourdet, Y.; De Jong, P.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of safeguards in a large size reprocessing plant is a challenge, considering the high throughput of nuclear material and the sophisticated automation of such facilities. In the case of UP3, a pragmatic and realistic approach has been devised and is applied through an efficient cooperation between the safeguards organizations, the french national authorities and the operator. In essence, they consist in verification of every significant inputs and outputs, in timely analysis by NDA (e.g. solutions of dissolution through an on site k-edge equipment), in monitoring selected parts of the inprocess inventory and in specific containment/surveillance systems for the spent fuel storage ponds and the PuO2 storage. (author)

  17. Economic evaluation of reprocessing. Indicative US position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    This paper, which also appears as an Appendix to the final Working Group 4 report, forms part of the overall economic assessment of reprocessing. The indicative national position and illustrative ''phase diagram'' for the United States is presented. The prospective costs of nuclear power are given for four equilibrium modes of LWR operation: once-through, 15% and 25% improved once-through and thermal recycle. For a particular representative choice of fuel cycle parameters the economic cross over at which thermal recycle becomes economic relative to a 15% improved once-through cycle is above 100/lb U 3 O 8 . Thus the US believes that for the next several decades there is no economic incentive for thermal recycle. As a planning guide the US considers that the fast reactor will not become commercialised in the US before the year 2020

  18. Analytical developments in reprocessing at the CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffereau, M.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical developments in reprocessing, which are based on extensive basic research, are aimed at fulfilling current requirements of R and D laboratories, pilot plants and industrial plants. They are also intended to propose and provide new opportunities. On-line measurements are a long term goal. One must be confident of their outcome. New equipment and procedures must be tested and their specifications determined, first at the laboratory level, and then in a pilot plant. In this respect we are considering equipment which will be in operation in the ATALANTE laboratories. And APM is also both a necessary and useful resource. However, many measurements must still be done and will continue to have to be done in analytical laboratories. Along with the improvement of accuracy the main developments aim at reducing manpower requirements and effluents and waste releases

  19. Brief description of the Wackersdorf Reprocessing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The DWK is now planning the construction and operation of a facility for the reprocessing of spent fuel elements and the fabrication of mixed-oxide fuel elements which will initially have an average daily throughput of 2 tons (t) of nuclear fuel. The application required by the Atomic Law was submitted to the Bavarian State Ministry for State Development and Environmental Matters on October 28, 1982. According to Par. 3, Section 1, No. 1 of the Atomic Law Procedural Ordinance such an application for permission in accordance with par. 7 AtL must explicitly be accompanied by a safety report which shall make it possible for third parties to make a judgment whether the impacts associated with the facility and its operation could damage their rights. The safety report is intended to present and explain the concept of the facility, the safety-technological design bases, and the operation of the plant, including its operation and safety systems and the impacts and proposed preventive measures. In addition to the detailed presentations in the safety report, Par. 3 of the Atomic Law Procedural Ordinance also requires a brief description of the plant designed for general public understanding, suitable for the design, which will also explain the expected impacts on the general environment and the surrounding area. Hence the brief description presents and explains the following matters: the site; the technology and state of the art for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel; the structure and function of the proposed facility; safety provisions of the proposed facility and the management of perturbations in operation; the impacts of the facility and its operation on the environment; measures to be taken for dealing with the radioactive wastes; and provisions for ultimate shut-down of the facility

  20. Workshop on instrumentation and analyses for a nuclear fuel reprocessing hot pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, S.M.; Feldman, M.J.; Wymer, R.G.; Hoffman, D.

    1980-05-01

    In order to assist in the study of instrumentation and analytical needs for reprocessing plants, a workshop addressing these needs was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from May 5 to 7, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to incorporate the knowledge of chemistry and of advanced measurement techniques held by the nuclear and radiochemical community into ideas for improved and new plant designs for both process control and inventory and safeguards measurements. The workshop was athended by experts in nuclear and radiochemistry, in fuel recycle plant design, and in instrumentation and analysis. ORNL was a particularly appropriate place to hold the workshop since the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is centered there. Requirements for safeguarding the special nuclear materials involved in reprocessing, and for their timely measurement within the process, within the reprocessing facility, and at the facility boundaries are being studied. Because these requirements are becoming more numerous and stringent, attention is also being paid to the analytical requirements for these special nuclear materials and to methods for measuring the physical parameters of the systems containing them. In order to provide a focus for the consideration of the workshop participants, the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) being designed conceptually by the CFRP was used as a basis for consideration and discussions

  1. Effects of reuse and bleach/formaldehyde reprocessing on polysulfone and polyamide hemodialyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Rena M; McClung, W Glenn; Barre, Paul; Esguerra, Fe; Brash, John L

    2002-01-01

    The surface features, morphology, and blood interactions of fibers from pristine, bleach/formaldehyde reprocessed, and reused Fresenius Polysulfone High Flux (Hemoflow F80B) hemodialyzers and Gambro Polyflux 21S Polyamide hemodialyzers have been studied. SEM images of fibers from both hemodialyzer types revealed a dense skin layer on the inner surface and a relatively thick porous layer on the outer surface. The 21S polyamide support layer consisted of interconnected highly porous structures. Environmental scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images of both membrane types showed alterations in morphology due to reprocessing and reuse; however the changes were more marked for the 21S polyamide dialyzers. Fluorescence microscopy images showed only minimal fluorescence associated with the fibers after patient use and reprocessing, suggesting that blood derived deposits were removed by processing. The protein layers formed on pristine and reused hemodialyzer membranes during clinical use were studied using SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. Before bleach/formaldehyde treatment, protein layers of considerable amount and complexity were found on the blood side of singly and multiply used dialyzers. Proteins adsorbed on the dialysate side were predominantly in the molecular mass region below 30 kDa. However, some higher molecular mass proteins were detected on the dialysate side of the 21 S polyamide dialyzers. Very little protein was detected on dialyzers that were treated with bleach/formaldehyde after dialysis, regardless of whether they had been used/reprocessed once or 12 times.

  2. Acceptance criteria for reprocessed AcuNav catheters: comparison between functionality testing and clinical image assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Alan J; Berry, James M; Wilson, Robert F; Lester, Bruce R

    2009-03-01

    The AcuNav-catheter is a vector-phased array ultrasound catheter that has shown great utility for both diagnosis and electrophysiological interventions. To test the feasibility of limited catheter reuse and to ensure that reprocessed catheters would produce acceptable clinical images, the present study compared the 2-D and Doppler image quality, as determined by clinical assessment, with the catheter's functional status as determined by the FirstCall 2000 transducer tester. Reprocessed catheters from four functional categories, two acceptable and two unacceptable, were used to collect images, 2-D and Doppler, from a porcine heart. The images were blinded and then rated by clinical evaluation. The study found that catheter images from all functional categories were found to be clinically acceptable except for those from the lowest unacceptable category. In addition, examination of tip deflection characteristics showed no significant difference between new and reprocessed catheters. We conclude that reprocessed AcuNav catheters that pass functional tests are able to produce clinical images, 2-D and Doppler, which are equivalent to their new counterparts.

  3. Evaluation of methods for seismic analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, F.J.; Murray, R.C.; Arthur, D.F.; Feng, W.W.; Wight, L.H.; Zaslawsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Currently, no guidelines exist for choosing methods of structural analysis to evaluate the seismic hazard of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. This study examines available methods and their applicability to fuel reprocessing plant structures. The results of this study should provide a basis for establishing guidelines recommending methods of seismic analysis for evaluating future fuel reprocessing plants. The approach taken is: (1) to identify critical plant structures and place them in four categories (structures at or near grade; deeply embedded structures; fully buried structures; equipment/vessels/attachments/piping), (2) to select a representative structure in each of the first three categories and perform static and dynamic analysis on each, and (3) to evaluate and recommend method(s) of analysis for structures within each category. The Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant is selected as representative of future commercial reprocessing plants. The effect of site characteristics on the structural response is also examined. The response spectra method of analysis combined with the finite element model for each category is recommended. For structures founded near or at grade, the lumped mass model could also be used. If a time history response is required, a time-history analysis is necessary. (U.S.)

  4. Estimation of the risk of radiation-induced leukaemia among young people in the vicinity of the La Hague reprocessing plant. Results from the nord-cotentin radioecological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rommens, C.; Laurier, D.; Merle-Szeremeta, A.; Sugier, A.; Drombry-Ringeard, C.

    2000-01-01

    A radioecological study has been performed around the La-Hague nuclear reprocessing plant (Nord-Cotentin, France). The Working Group included nuclear operators, authorities, international experts and members of environmental organisations and was supported by IPSN. The study aimed to reconstruct radiation doses received by members of the public aged 0 to 24 years and living in the area, with a view to estimate the associated risk of leukaemia between 1978 and 1996. The assessment involved three steps: 1. reconstruction of a cohort of people aged 0 to 24 years, using local birth rates for the years 1954 to 1996 and taking into account the additional migrations of young people in the area. 2. estimation of doses to the red bone marrow received from all source of radiation (natural, medical, local nuclear industries and Chernobyl and weapons testing). Concentrations of radionuclides in the environment were estimated with a combination of two approaches: the modelling of the transfer of the releases in the environment and the use of environmental measurements. The dose computation takes into account the life style of the local population. ICRP dose coefficients to the red bone marrow were used. 3. derivation of leukaemia risk from a dose response model recommended by the UNSCEAR committee. The reconstructed population includes 6656 people born between 1954 and 1996, who inhabited the study area for at least one year between 1978 and 1996 before the age of 25. The number of person-years between 1978 and 1996 is 69308. The total collective dose to the red bone marrow due to local nuclear installations is 0.5 man.Sv. For the sake of comparison, the collective dose due to all sources of exposure is 241 man.Sv: The estimated number of leukaemia due to all exposure sources is 0.835. 74% are due to natural exposures, 24% to medical ones and 2% to the Chemobyl accident and nuclear arm testing. Nuclear facilities of Nord-Cotentin contribute only for 0.1% (between 0.0009 and 0

  5. Sludge behavior in centrifugal contactor operation for nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Sano, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Okamura, Nobuo; Koizumi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been developing the centrifugal contactor for spent fuel reprocessing. In this study, we investigated the sludge behavior in centrifugal contactors at three different scales. The operational conditions (the flow rate and rotor speed) were varied. Most insoluble particles such as sludge remained in the rotor via centrifugal force. The capture ratio of sludge in the contactor was measured as a function of particle size at various flow rates, rotor speeds, and contactor scales. The sludge adhered and accumulated inside the rotor as the operational time increased, and the operational conditions influenced the capture ratio of the sludge; a lower flow rate and higher rotor speed increased the capture ratio. The results confirmed that Stokes' law can be applied to estimate the experimental result on the behavior of the capture ratio for centrifugal contactors with different scales. (author)

  6. Remote repair of the dissolvers in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yosikuni

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai fuel reprocessing plant, there occurred failures (pinholes) in two dissolver tanks successively in 1982 and 1983. These dissolvers are set under high radiation field, not permitting access of the personnel. So, repair works were carried out after development of the remotely operated repair system. For repair of the failed dissolver tanks, after tests and studies, the means was employed of grinding off the wall surface to small depth and then forming over it a corrosion resistant sealing layer by padding welding. The repair system which enabled the repair and the inspection in the cell by remote operation consisted of six devices including polishing, welding, dye penetration test, etc. Repair works on the dissolvers took two months and a half from September 1983. (Mori, K.)

  7. Management of radioactive waste from reprocessing including disposal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malherbe, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on a hypothetical scenario including a reactor park of 20 GWe consisting of Pressurised-Water-Reactors with a resulting annual production of 600 tonnes of heavy metal of spent fuel, all aspects of management of resulting wastes are studied. Waste streams from reprocessing include gaseous and liquid effluents, and a number of solid conditioned waste types. Disposal of waste is supposed to be performed either in a near-surface engineered repository, as long as the content of alpha-emitting radionuclides is low enough, and in a deep geological granite formation. After having estimated quantities, cost and radiological consequences, the sensitivity of results to modification in reactor park size, burn-up and the introduction of mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) is evaluated

  8. Research and development of safeguards measures for the large scale reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Sato, Yuji; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Isao; Uchikoshi, Seiji; Tsutaki, Yasuhiro; Nidaira, Kazuo [Nuclear Material Control Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    The Government of Japan agreed on the safeguards concepts of commercial size reprocessing plant under the bilateral agreement for cooperation between the Japan and the United States. In addition, the LASCAR, that is the forum of large scale reprocessing plant safeguards, could obtain the fruitful results in the spring of 1992. The research and development of safeguards measures for the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant should be progressed with every regard to the concepts described in both documents. Basically, the material accountancy and monitoring system should be established, based on the NRTA and other measures in order to obtain the timeliness goal for plutonium, and the un-attended mode inspection approach based on the integrated containment/surveillance system coupled with radiation monitoring in order to reduce the inspection efforts. NMCC has been studying on the following measures for a large scale reprocessing plant safeguards (1) A radiation gate monitor and integrated surveillance system (2) A near real time Shipper and Receiver Difference monitoring (3) A near real time material accountancy system operated for the bulk handling area (4) A volume measurement technique in a large scale input accountancy vessel (5) An in-process inventory estimation technique applied to the process equipment such as the pulse column and evaporator (6) Solution transfer monitoring approach applied to buffer tanks in the chemical process (7) A timely analysis technique such as a hybrid K edge densitometer operated in the on-site laboratory (J.P.N.).

  9. Reprocessing and interpretation, seismic reflection data: Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, south central Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkman, E.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to reprocess, evaluate, and reinterpret 14 line miles of seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site. Regional and area-specific geology has been reviewed, the data acquisition parameters as they relate to the limitations inherent in the data have been discussed, and the reprocessing procedures have been described in detail along with an evaluation of the original processing. After initial testing, the focus of the reprocessing was placed on resolution of the geologic horizons at and near the top of the basalt. The reprocessed seismic data shows significant improvement over the original processing. The improvement is the result of the integrated processing and interpretation approach where each processing step has been tested in sequence and the intermediate results examined carefully in accordance with the project goals. The interpretation procedure placed strong reliance upon synthetic seismograms and models calculated based upon the physical parameters of the subsurface materials, and upon associated geophysical (reflection, gravity, magnetic) data. The final interpretation of the seismic data is in agreement with the structural contour maps based primarily on borehole information. The seismic interpretation has added important detail concerning areas which should be considered for further study. 60 figs., 1 tab

  10. The regulations concerning the reprocessing business of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The regulations are defined under provisions concerning the reprocessing business in the law for the regulations of nuclear source materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors. The basic concepts and terms are explained, such as: exposure dose; accumulative dose; controlled area; safeguarded area; inspected surrounding area; employee; radioactive waste and marine discharging facilities. Any person who gets permission for design of reprocessing facilities and method of the construction shall file an application, listing name and address of the person and the works or the place of enterprise where reprocessing facilities are to be set up, design of such facilities and method of the construction, in and out-put chart of nuclear fuel materials in reprocessing course, etc. Records shall be made and kept for particularly periods in each works or enterprise on inspection of reprocessing facilities, control of dose, operation, maintenance, accident of reprocessing facilities and weather. Detailed prescriptions are settled on entrance limitation to controlled area, exposure dose, inspection and check, regular independent examination and operation of reprocessing facilities, transportation in the works or the enterprise, storage, disposal, safeguard and measures in dangerous situations, etc. Reports shall be filed on exposure dose of employees and other specified matters in the forms attached and in the case otherwise defined. (Okada, K.)

  11. Used mixed oxide fuel reprocessing at RT-1 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolupaev, D.; Logunov, M.; Mashkin, A.; Bugrov, K.; Korchenkin, K. [FSUE PA ' Mayak' , 30, Lenins str, Ozersk, 460065 (Russian Federation); Shadrin, A.; Dvoeglazov, K. [ITCP ' PRORYV' , 2/8 Malaya Krasmoselskay str, Moscow, 107140 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Reprocessing of the mixed uranium-plutonium spent nuclear fuel of the BN-600 reactor was performed at the RT-1 plant twice, in 2012 and 2014. In total, 8 fuel assemblies with a burn-up from 73 to 89 GW day/t and the cooling time from 17 to 21 years were reprocessed. The reprocessing included the stages of dissolution, clarification, extraction separation of U and Pu with purification from the fission products, refining of uranium and plutonium at the relevant refining cycles. Dissolution of the fuel composition of MOX used nuclear fuel (UNF) in nitric acid solutions in the presence of fluoride ion has occurred with the full transfer of actinides into solution. Due to the high content of Pu extraction separation of U and Pu was carried out on a nuclear-safe equipment designed for the reprocessing of highly enriched U spent nuclear fuel and Pu refining. Technological processes of extraction, separation and refining of actinides proceeded without deviations from the normal mode. The output flow of the extraction outlets in their compositions corresponded to the regulatory norms and remained at the level of the compositions of the streams resulting from the reprocessing of fuel types typical for the RT-1 plant. No increased losses of Pu into waste have been registered during the reprocessing of BN-600 MOX UNF an compare with VVER-440 uranium UNF reprocessing. (authors)

  12. International and institutional aspects of reprocessing and plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Various institutional alternatives applicable to reprocessing, plutonium management and recycle are considered, not as a definitive analysis but rather as a basis for identifying the institutional approaches and measures which the Working Group might wish to examine more thoroughly. Seven alternatives arrangements for reprocessing are presented. These range from suspending the operation of existing reprocessing plants through placing national facilities under safeguards to limiting reprocessing to a few large facilities subject to plutonium management, multinational or international control. Finally, the comprehensive alternative of an International Nuclear Fuel Authority with worldwide responsibility for reprocessing and plutonium management is considered. Plutonium management alternatives to complement the reprocessing options, are then outlined. These include national discretion on the separation and disposition of plutonium under safeguards, an agreed Code of Practice for plutonium management at national facilities and the international storage of plutonium. The advantages and disadvantages of the alternative are discussed tentatively. It is recognised that the alternatives are presented in a simplified form and that their elements can be combined or separated in many ways. Although strengthening the institutions relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy is imperative and can contribute to non-proliferation, such arrangements might open other proliferation risks through the spread of sensitive materials, facilities and technology. While there are risks with any fuel cycle, where plutonium in quantity is separated these risks are of a high order. Although these can be mitigated, they will have to be set against the energy and economic case for reprocessing and alternatives other than plutonium considered

  13. Flory-Stockmayer analysis on reprocessable polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingqiao; Chen, Xi; Jin, Kailong; Torkelson, John

    Reprocessable polymer networks can undergo structure rearrangement through dynamic chemistries under proper conditions, making them a promising candidate for recyclable crosslinked materials, e.g. tires. This research field has been focusing on various chemistries. However, there has been lacking of an essential physical theory explaining the relationship between abundancy of dynamic linkages and reprocessability. Based on the classical Flory-Stockmayer analysis on network gelation, we developed a similar analysis on reprocessable polymer networks to quantitatively predict the critical condition for reprocessability. Our theory indicates that it is unnecessary for all bonds to be dynamic to make the resulting network reprocessable. As long as there is no percolated permanent network in the system, the material can fully rearrange. To experimentally validate our theory, we used a thiol-epoxy network model system with various dynamic linkage compositions. The stress relaxation behavior of resulting materials supports our theoretical prediction: only 50 % of linkages between crosslinks need to be dynamic for a tri-arm network to be reprocessable. Therefore, this analysis provides the first fundamental theoretical platform for designing and evaluating reprocessable polymer networks. We thank McCormick Research Catalyst Award Fund and ISEN cluster fellowship (L. L.) for funding support.

  14. Reprocessing of research reactor fuel the Dounreay option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartwright, P.

    1997-08-01

    Reprocessing is a proven process for the treatment of spent U/Al Research Reactor fuel. At Dounreay 12679 elements have been reprocessed during the past 30 years. For reactors converting to LEU fuel the uranium recovered in reprocessing can be blended down to less than 20% U{sub 235}, enrichment and be fabricated into new elements. For reactors already converted to LEU it is technically possible to reprocess spent silicide fuel to reduce the U{sub 235} burden and present to a repository only stable conditioned waste. The main waste stream from reprocessing which contains the Fission products is collected in underground storage tanks where it is kept for a period of at least five years before being converted to a stable solid form for return to the country of origin for subsequent storage/disposal. Discharges to the environment from reprocessing are low and are limited to the radioactive gases contained in the spent fuel and a low level liquid waste steam. Both of these discharges are independently monitored, and controlled within strict discharge limits set by the UK Government`s Scottish Office. Transportation of spent fuel to Dounreay has been undertaken using many routes from mainland Europe and has utilised over the past few years both chartered and scheduled vessel services. Several different transport containers have been handled and are currently licensed in the UK. This paper provides a short history of MTR reprocessing at Dounreay, and provides information to show reprocessing can satisfy the needs of MTR operators, showing that reprocessing is a valuable asset in non-proliferation terms, offers a complete solution and is environmentally acceptable.

  15. Fuel reprocessing experience in India: Technological and economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.; Kumar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach to the reprocessing of irradiated fuel from power reactors in India is conditioned by the non-availability of highly enriched uranium with the consequent need for plutonium for the fast-reactor programme. With this in view, the fuel reprocessing programme in India is developing in stages matching the nuclear power programme. The first plant was set up in Trombay to reprocess the metallic uranium fuel from the research reactor CIRUS. The experience gained in the construction and operation of this plant, and in its subsequent decommissioning and reconstruction, has not only provided the know-how for the design of subsequent plants but has indicated the fruitful areas of research and development for efficient utilization of limited resources. The Trombay plant also handled successfully, on a pilot scale, the reprocessing of irradiated thorium fuel to separate uranium-233. The second plant at Tarapur has been built for reprocessing spent fuels from the power reactors at Tarapur (BWR) and Rajasthan (PHWR). The third plant, at present under design, will reprocess the spent fuels from the power reactors (PHWR) and the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) located at Kalpakkam. Through the above approach experience has been acquired which will be useful in the design and construction of even larger plants which will become necessary in the future as the nuclear power programme grows. The strategies considered for the sizing and siting of reprocessing plants extend from the idea of small plants, located at nuclear power station sites, to a large-size central plant, located at an independent site, serving many stations. The paper discusses briefly the experience in reprocessing uranium and thorium fuels and also in decommissioning. An attempt is made to outline the technological and economic aspects which are relevant under different circumstances and which influence the size and siting of the fuel reprocessing plants and the expected lead times for construction

  16. Reprocessing flowsheet and material balance for MEU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, L.

    1978-10-01

    In response to nonproliferation concerns, the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) Fuel Recycle Development Program is investigating the processing requirements for a denatured medium-enriched uranium--thorium (MEU/Th) fuel cycle. Prior work emphasized the processing requirements for a high-enriched uranium--thorium (HEU/Th) fuel cycle. This report presents reprocessing flowsheets for an HTGR/MEU fuel recycle base case. Material balance data have been calculated for reprocessing of spent MEU and recycle fuels in the HTGR Recycle Reference Facility (HRRF). Flowsheet and mass flow effects in MEU-cycle reprocessing are discussed in comparison with prior HEU-cycle flowsheets

  17. The influence of size of plant upon reprocessing costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    This paper reviews recent published estimates for capital and operating costs of reprocessing plants in an attempt to establish a relative variation of unit reprocessing costs with plant design capacity and load factor. It is concluded that capital costs follow the well established ''rule of thumb'' for chemical plants in being proportional to (design capacity)sup(2/3). Operating costs vary significantly with variation in labour costs. Unit reprocessing costs are presented as a function of plant design capacity, load factor and method of financing

  18. Nuclear fuel cycle: (5) reprocessing of irradiated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.A.

    1977-09-01

    The evolution of the reprocessing of irradiated fuel and the recovery of plutonium from it is traced out, starting by following the Manhatten project up to the present time. A brief description of the plant and processes used for reprocessing is given, while the Purex process, which is used in all plants today, is given special attention. Some of the important safety problems of reprocessing plants are considered, together with the solutions which have been adopted. Some examples of the more important safety aspects are the control of activity, criticality control, and the environmental impact. The related topic of irradiated fuel transport is briefly discussed.

  19. Economic assessment factors relating to spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is in two parts. Part I discusses the factors to be applied in an economic assessment of reprocessing. It sets forth three basic cost components, namely capital costs, operating costs and the cost of capital utilization. It lists the various components of each cost area. Part II proposes a relationship between these respective cost areas, tabulates a range of costs and then develops unit costs for reprocessing operations. Finally, an addendum to the paper gives a more detailed breakdown of the capital costs of a reprocessing plant

  20. Gas chromatographic analysis of extractive solvent in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlet, B.

    1984-01-01

    Operation of a reprocessing plant using the Purex process is recalled and analytical controls for optimum performance are specified. The aim of this thesis is the development of analytical methods using gas chromatography required to follow the evolution of the extraction solvent during spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent at different concentrations, is analysed along the reprocessing lines in organic or aqueous phases. Solvent degradation interferes with extraction and decomposition products are analysed. The solvent becomes less and less efficient, also it is distilled and quality is checked. Traces of solvent should also be checked in waste water. Analysis are made as simple as possible to facilitate handling of radioactive samples [fr

  1. Design verification for large reprocessing plants (Proposed procedures)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolandi, G.

    1988-07-01

    In the 1990s, four large commercial reprocessing plants will progressively come into operation: If an effective and efficient safeguards system is to be applied to these large and complex plants, several important factors have to be considered. One of these factors, addressed in the present report, concerns plant design verification. Design verification provides an overall assurance on plant measurement data. To this end design verification, although limited to the safeguards aspects of the plant, must be a systematic activity, which starts during the design phase, continues during the construction phase and is particularly performed during the various steps of the plant's commissioning phase. The detailed procedures for design information verification on commercial reprocessing plants must be defined within the frame of the general provisions set forth in INFCIRC/153 for any type of safeguards related activities and specifically for design verification. The present report is intended as a preliminary contribution on a purely technical level, and focusses on the problems within the Agency. For the purpose of the present study the most complex case was assumed: i.e. a safeguards system based on conventional materials accountancy, accompanied both by special input and output verification and by some form of near-real-time accountancy involving in-process inventory taking, based on authenticated operator's measurement data. C/S measures are also foreseen, where necessary to supplement the accountancy data. A complete ''design verification'' strategy comprehends: informing the Agency of any changes in the plant system which are defined as ''safeguards relevant''; ''reverifying by the Agency upon receiving notice from the Operator on any changes, on ''design information''. 13 refs

  2. Assessment of proliferation resistances of aqueous reprocessing techniques using the TOPS methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Åberg Lindell, M.; Grape, S.; Håkansson, A.; Jacobsson Svärd, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Proliferation resistances of three possible LFR fuel cycles are assessed. • The TOPS methodology has been chosen for the PR assessment. • Reactor operation, reprocessing and fuel fabrication are examined. • Purex, Ganex, and a combination of Purex, Diamex and Sanex, are compared. • The safeguards analysis speaks in favor of Ganex as opposed to the Purex process. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to assess and compare the proliferation resistances (PR) of three possible Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor fuel cycles, involving the reprocessing techniques Purex, Ganex and a combination of Purex, Diamex and Sanex, respectively. The examined fuel cycle stages are reactor operation, reprocessing and fuel fabrication. The TOPS methodology has been chosen for the PR assessment, and the only threat studied is the case where a technically advanced state diverts nuclear material covertly. According to the TOPS methodology, the facilities have been divided into segments, here roughly representing the different forms of nuclear material occurring in each examined fuel cycle stage. For each segment, various proliferation barriers have been assessed. The results make it possible to pinpoint where the facilities can be improved. The results show that the proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle involving recycling of minor actinides is higher than for the traditional Purex reprocessing cycle. Furthermore, for the purpose of nuclear safeguards, group actinide extraction should be preferred over reprocessing options where pure plutonium streams occur. This is due to the fact that a solution containing minor actinides is less attractive to a proliferator than a pure Pu solution. Thus, the safeguards analysis speaks in favor of Ganex as opposed to the Purex process

  3. Determination of zirconium 93 and molybdenum 93 in reprocessing nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puech, P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to find new determination methods of zirconium 93 and molybdenum 93 (two long-lived radioelements) contained in reprocessing nuclear waste. 93 Zr has a very long period: 1.5 * 10 6 years. The measurement of this isotope is more performing by the ICP-MS method than by the classical radiochemical measurement methods. 93 Mo disintegrates with a radioactive period of 4000 years and can be detected by radiochemical measurement in particular by X spectrometry. But these radioelements cannot be directly measured on the reprocessing nuclear waste; they require a preliminary chemical separation (removing the radioelements able to interfere and those responsible of the radioactivity of the nuclear waste). The separation is implemented with very potentially selective techniques, using Mo and Zr specific extracting molecules: solvent extraction, emulsified liquid membrane extraction and liquid chromatography extraction (on a resin impregnated by solvent). Studies carried out in CEA/Cadarache, on a synthetic solution simulating a reprocessing nuclear waste, have allowed to show the selective properties of the L'-benzoinoxime for extracting Mo and of TBP for extracting Zr for the three studied techniques. The optimal extraction and separation conditions have been reached with a methodology including experiment plans. At last, the methods have been tested on real reprocessing nuclear waste at Cogema/La Hague. 93 Zr and 93 Mo have been measured in a dissolution solution and in a fission product solution. The obtained values are 2 * 10 6 Bq/l and 10 7 Bq/l for 93 Zr and 500 Bq/l for 93 Mo in a dissolution solution. These methods have allowed to determine too the isotopic compositions for Mo and Zr elements contained in reprocessing nuclear waste. The results are in accordance with those obtained with the Cesar code. (O.M.)

  4. Safety aspects of a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, J.K.; Charlesworth, F.R.; Fairbairn, A.

    1977-01-01

    decommissioning and demolition procedures must be anticipated and suitable provision made. Application of these principles is illustrated by experience gained in the surveillance of reprocessing plants. United Kingdom regulatory procedures for the licensing and inspection of reprocessing plant, and statutory requirements influencing safety in design, construction and operation are reviewed. Recent developments in safety legislation including the Health and Safety at Work Act, 1974, are discussed

  5. Simulations of Atmospheric Krypton-85 to Assess the Detectability of Clandestine Nuclear Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, O.; Ahlswede, J.; Annewandter, R.; Kalinowski, M.B.; Rast, S.; Schluenzen, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    The results of this study were achieved in the project 'Simulation of Atmospheric Noble Gas Concentrations to Assess Sampling Procedures for the Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Reprocessing' (IAEA GER 1643) in the joint programme of IAEA and Federal Government of Germany. In the first year of the project the detectability of additional krypton-85 sources was investigated using atmospheric transport modelling. Krypton-85 is released into the air during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel rods. Therefore the krypton-85 signature can possibly be used for the detection of undeclared plutonium separation. First, the global krypton-85 background produced by known reprocessing facilities from 1971 until 2006 was simulated with the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 using annual emission data. The model results were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection. Of particular interest for an assessment of the detectability of unknown sources is the background variability. The variability of concentrations is very high over central Europe, where the large reprocessing plants La Hague and Sellafield are located, and it is very low on the Southern Hemisphere, where no nuclear reprocessing takes place. The analysis of concentration time series on various time scales allows partly a distinction between fluctuations caused by the variability of the sources from variations due to atmospheric dynamics. Furthermore the detection sensitivity to a set of arbitrarily specified source locations is analysed with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model. This, in combination with the location specific background variability, is giving first benchmarks on the capability of using krypton-85 for IAEA Safeguards based on the Additional Protocols foreseeing environmental sampling. (author)

  6. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Reprocessed DOQQ Aerial Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to reprocess existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  7. Reprocessing yields and material throughput: HTGR recycle demonstration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Abraham, L.

    1977-08-01

    Recovery and reuse of residual U-235 and bred U-233 from the HTGR thorium-uranium fuel cycle will contribute significantly to HTGR fuel cycle economics and to uranium resource conservation. The Thorium Utilization National Program Plan for HTGR Fuel Recycle Development includes the demonstration, on a production scale, of reprocessing and refabrication processes in an HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF). This report addresses process yields and material throughput that may be typically expected in the reprocessing of highly enriched uranium fuels in the HRDF. Material flows will serve as guidance in conceptual design of the reprocessing portion of the HRDF. In addition, uranium loss projections, particle breakage limits, and decontamination factor requirements are identified to serve as guidance to the HTGR fuel reprocessing development program

  8. Safety aspects of solvent nitration in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbourn, R.G.

    1977-06-01

    Reprocessing of HTGR fuels requires evaporative concentration of uranium and thorium nitrate solutions. The results of a bench-scale test program conducted to assess the safety aspects of planned concentrator operations are reported

  9. Effect of Reprocessing and Excipient Characteristics on Ibuprofen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The effect of excipient type, technology and reprocessing on flow, compressibility and compactibility was ... granulation technology is used, the ... powders improve particle size distribution, .... 8.04 (Stat-Easy Inc., Minneapolis, USA).

  10. Application of electrochemical techniques in fuel reprocessing- an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, M K; Bajpai, D D; Singh, R K [Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant, Tarapur (India)

    1994-06-01

    The operating experience and development work over the past several years have considerably improved the wet chemical fuel reprocessing PUREX process and have brought the reprocessing to a stage where it is ready to adopt the introduction of electrochemical technology. Electrochemical processes offer advantages like simplification of reprocessing operation, improved performance of the plant and reduction in waste volume. At Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing plant, Tarapur, work on development and application of electrochemical processes has been carried out in stages. To achieve plant scale application of these developments, a new electrochemical cycle is being added to PUREX process at PREFRE. This paper describes the electrochemical and membrane cell development activities carried out at PREFRE and their current status. (author). 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Reliability Engineering Analysis of ATLAS Data Reprocessing Campaigns

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Karpenko, D

    2013-01-01

    During three years of LHC data taking, the ATLAS collaboration completed three petascale data reprocessing campaigns on the Grid, with up to 2 PB of data being reprocessed every year. In reprocessing on the Grid, failures can occur for a variety of reasons, while Grid heterogeneity makes failures hard to diagnose and repair quickly. As a result, Big Data processing on the Grid must tolerate a continuous stream of failures, errors and faults. While ATLAS fault-tolerance mechanisms improve the reliability of Big Data processing in the Grid, their benefits come at costs and result in delays making the performance prediction difficult. Reliability Engineering provides a framework for fundamental understanding of the Big Data processing on the Grid, which is not a desirable enhancement but a necessary requirement. In ATLAS, cost monitoring and performance prediction became critical for the success of the reprocessing campaigns conducted in preparation for the major physics conferences. In addition, our Reliability...

  12. Reliability Engineering Analysis of ATLAS Data Reprocessing Campaigns

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Karpenko, D

    2014-01-01

    During three years of LHC data taking, the ATLAS collaboration completed three petascale data reprocessing campaigns on the Grid, with up to 2 PB of data being reprocessed every year. In reprocessing on the Grid, failures can occur for a variety of reasons, while Grid heterogeneity makes failures hard to diagnose and repair quickly. As a result, Big Data processing on the Grid must tolerate a continuous stream of failures, errors and faults. While ATLAS fault-tolerance mechanisms improve the reliability of Big Data processing in the Grid, their benefits come at costs and result in delays making the performance prediction difficult. Reliability Engineering provides a framework for fundamental understanding of the Big Data processing on the Grid, which is not a desirable enhancement but a necessary requirement. In ATLAS, cost monitoring and performance prediction became critical for the success of the reprocessing campaigns conducted in preparation for the major physics conferences. In addition, our Reliability...

  13. Evironmental assessment factors relating to reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    This document is in two parts. Part I presents the criteria and evaluation factors, based primarily on US experience, which may be used to carry out an environmental assessment of spent fuel reprocessing. The concept of As Low as is Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is introduced in limiting radiation exposure. The factors influencing both occupational and general public radiation exposure are reviewed. Part II provides information on occupational and general public radiation exposure in relation to reprocessing taken from various sources including UNSCEAR and GESMO. Some information is provided in relation to potential accidents at reprocessing or MOX fuel refabrication plants. The magnitude of the services, energy, land use and non-radiological effluents for the reference design of reprocessing plant are also presented

  14. Simulation of spent fuel reprocessing processes: Realizations and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.

    1986-12-01

    The separation of uranium and plutonium in the Purex process is very complex and for the extension of reprocessing plants optimization of the process requires mathematical modelling. The development of this model is reviewed [fr

  15. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruecher, H.; Hartmann, K.

    1983-01-01

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.) [de

  16. PSA application on the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Michihiko; Nakano, Takafumi; Morimoto, Kazuyuki; Nojiri, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    The Periodic Safety Review (PSR) of the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) has been carrying out to obtain an overall view of actual plant safety. As a part of the PSR, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methodology has been applied to evaluate the relative importance of safety functions that prevent the progress of events causing to postulated accidents. Based on the results of the safety reassessments of the TRP that was carried out in 1999, event trees were developed to model sequences of postulated accidents. Event trees were quantified by using the results of fault tree analysis and human reliability analysis. In the quantification, the reliability data generally used in PSA of nuclear power plants were mainly used. Operating experiences of the TRP were also utilized to evaluated both component/system reliability and human reliability. The relative importance of safety functions was evaluated by using two major importance measures, Fussell-Vesely and Risk Achievement Worth both generally used in PSA of nuclear power plants. Through these evaluations, some useful insights into the safety of the TRP have been obtained. The results of the relative importance measures would be utilized to qualify TRP component/equipment important to the safety. (author)

  17. Fast-reactor fuel reprocessing in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.; Buck, C.; Williams, J.

    1977-01-01

    Enriched uranium metal fuel irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor has been reprocessed and refabricated in plants specifically designed for the purpose in the United Kingdom since 1961. Efficient and reliable fuel recycle is essential to the development of a plutonium-based fast-reactor system, and the importance of establishing at an early stage fast-reactor fuel reprocessing has been reinforced by current world difficulties in reprocessing high-burnup thermal-reactor oxide fuel. The United Kingdom therefore decided to reprocess irradiated fuel from the 250MW(e) Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) as an integral part of the fast reactor development programme. Flowsheet and equipment development work for the small-scale fully active demonstration plant has been carried out since 1972, and the plant will be commissioned and ready for active operation during 1977. In parallel, a comprehensive waste-management system has been developed and installed. Based on this development work and the information which will arise from active operation of the plant, a parallel development programme has been initiated to provide the basis for the design of a large-scale fast-reactor fuel-reprocessing plant to come into operation in the late 1980s to support the projected UK fast-reactor installation programme. The paper identifies the important differences between fast-reactor and thermal-reactor fuel-reprocessing technologies and describes some of the development work carried out in these areas for the small-scale PFR fuel-reprocessing operation. In addition, the development programme in aid of the design of a larger scale fast-reactor fuel-reprocessing plant is outlined and the current design philosophy discussed. (author)

  18. Benefit analysis of reprocessing and recycling light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The macro-economic impact of reprocessing and recycling fuel for nuclear power reactors is examined, and the impact of reprocessing on the conservation of natural uranium resources is assessed. The LWR fuel recycle is compared with a throwaway cycle, and it is concluded that fuel recycle is favorable on the basis of economics, as well as being highly desirable from the standpoint of utilization of uranium resources

  19. Example of material accounting and verification of reprocessing input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, L.; Schoof, S.

    1981-01-01

    An example is described in this paper of material accounting at the reprocessing input point. Knowledge of the fuel history and chemical analyses of the spent fuel permitted concepts to be tested which have been developed for the determination of the input by the operator and for its verification by nuclear material safeguards with the intention of detecting a protracted as well as an abrupt diversion. Accuracies obtained for a material balance of a PWR fuel reprocessing campaign are given. 6 refs

  20. Management and disposal of used nuclear fuel and reprocessing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in chapters, entitled: introduction (general statement of problem); policy framework (criteria for waste management policy); waste management and disposal, as practised and planned (general; initial storage; reprocessing and conditioning of reprocessing wastes; intermediate storage; transportation; packaging; disposal); international co-operation. Details of the situation in each country concerned (Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Federal Republic of Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom) are included as annexes. (U.K.)

  1. Containment/surveillance concepts for international safeguards in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleck, M.E.; Cameron, C.P.; Camp, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the potential role of advanced containment/surveillance instrumentation systems for international safeguards in reprocessing plants. Several conceptual systems for the surveillance of containment boundary penetrations in a reference reprocessing plant are described and evaluated. The results of the evaluation aid in understanding the potential capabilities and limitations of containment/surveillance as an international safeguards concept in this type of facility

  2. Reprocessing and reuse of urological armamentarium: How correct are we!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutik Vipulbhai Raval

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare is expensive for a large proportion of the population in spite of high per capita income and good health insurance penetration. In an effort to reduce cost of the procedure, reprocessing of devices was started in the late 1970s. Reprocessing practice includes various measures such as proper cleaning, disinfection, and sterilization procedures. As reprocessing is aimed at reducing cost, there is a potential risk of compromising patient safety due to cross contamination after inadequate sterilization. There is also risk of performance alteration of urological reprocessed devices during sterilization/disinfection processing. Therefore, there is a need for formulating proper guidelines to decide methods of reprocessing for various urological equipment. There is also need to discuss the problematic areas that urologists face and to find their solutions. A PubMed search was made in September 2016, using key words “reprocessing of medical devices,” “Single Use Devices,” “methods of reprocessing of devices in clinical practice,” “use of formalin chamber,” “urological disposable sterilization,” etc., After excluding duplicates, all English articles were reviewed by title and abstract. Full texts of selected articles were obtained, and these articles were cross-referenced to find any other related articles. All the articles were reviewed. A product can be reused if it can be economically reprocessed with validated protocols with preservation of its function. There is no reason to discard it after one use. This practice is useful for controlling economics of a urological case and to reduce the financial burden. Current Food and Drug Administration guidelines are stringent. The contamination described to test the sterilization process in the suggested guidelines actually does never exist in clinical practice. Therefore, new guidelines considering the clinical practice scenario are desirable.

  3. The search for advanced remote technology in fast reactor reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.D.; Herndon, J.N.; Stradley, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Research and development in fast reactor reprocessing has been under way about 20 years in several countries throughout the world. During the past decade in France and the United Kingdom, active development programs have been carried out in breeder reprocessing. Actual fuels from their demonstration reactors have been reprocessed in small-scale facilities. Early US work in breeder reprocessing was carried out at the EBR-II facilities with the early metal fuels, and interest has renewed recently in metal fuels. A major, comprehensive program, focused on oxide fuels, has been carried out in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1974. Germany and Japan have also carried out development programs in breeder reprocessing, and Japan appears committed to major demonstration of breeder reactors and their fuel cycles. While much of the effort in all of these programs addressed process chemistry and process hardware, a significant element of many of these programs, particularly the CFRP, has been on advancements in facility concepts and remote maintenance features. This paper will focus principally on the search for improved facility concepts and better maintenance systems in the CFRP and, in turn, on how developments at ORNL have influenced the technology elsewhere

  4. Processes for the control of 14CO2 during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Holladay, D.W.; Forsberg, C.W.; Haag, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The fixation of 14 CO 2 may be required at some future time because of the significant fractional contribution of 14 C, via the ingestion pathway, to the total population dose from the nuclear fuel cycle, even though the actual quantity of this dose is very small when compared to natural background. The work described here was done in support of fuel reprocessing development, of both graphite fuel (HTGRs) and metal-clad fuel (LWRs and LMFBRs), and was directed to the control of 14 CO 2 released during reprocessing operations. However, portions of this work are also applicable to the control of 14 CO 2 released during reactor operation. The work described falls in three major areas: (1) The application of liquid-slurry fixation with Ca(OH) 2 , which converts the CO 2 to CaCO 3 , carried out after treatment of the CO 2 -containing stream to remove other gaseous radioactive components, mainly 85 Kr. This approach is primarily for application to HTGR fuel reprocessing. (2) The above process for CO 2 fixation, but used ahead of Kr removal, and followed by a molecular sieve process to take out the 85 Kr. This approach was developed for use with HTGR reprocessing, but certain aspects also have application to metal-clad fuel reprocessing and to reactor operation. (3) The use of solid Ba(OH) 2 hydrate reacting directly with the gaseous phase. This process is generally applicable to both reprocessing and to reactor operation

  5. Current status of development in dry pyro-electrochemical technology of SNF reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.; Skiba, O.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.

    2004-01-01

    The technology of SNF management in molten salts currently developed by a group of institutes headed by RIAR has had several stages of development: - basic research of uranium, plutonium and main FP properties (investigation and reprocessing of different kinds of SNF in 1960 - 1970); - development of the equipment and implementation of the pyro-electrochemical technology of granulated UPu fuel production. Development of the vibro-packing method and in-pile testing of vibro-packed fuel pins with granulated fuel as the most 'logical' continuation of reprocessing: implementation of the technology for BOR-60 and BN-600 (1980 - 1990); - development of closed fuel cycle elements. Checking of the technology using batches of SNF. In-pile tests. Feasibility study of the closed fuel cycle (CFC). Study of application of the technology to other objects (transmutation; nitride, cermet and other fuels) (1980 - 1990). The current status of the research is the following: - Basic research. Properties of uranium, plutonium, thorium, and neptunium in chloride melts have been studied in much detail. The data on physical chemistry and electrochemistry of the main FP is enough for understanding the processes. Detailed studies of americium, curium, and technetium chemistry are the essential investigation directions; - Engineering development. The technology and equipment bases have been developed for the processes of oxide fuel reprocessing and fabrication. The technology was checked using 5500 kg of pure fuel from different reactors and 20 kg of irradiated BN-350 and BOR-60 fuel. The bases of the technology have been provided and the feasibility study has been carried out for a full-scale plant of BN-800 CFC; - Industrial application: Since the technology is highly prepared, the activities on industrial application of U-Pu fuel are now underway. The BOR-60 reactor uses fuel obtained by the dry method, the design of the facility for implementation of CFC reactors is being developed. 9

  6. The economic influence of reprocessing strategy in the early stages of a commercial breeder programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounder, F.

    1982-01-01

    The effect on reprocessing cost of constructing fast reactors in nuclear parks is examined and compared with carrying out reprocessing for a range of installation programmes of fast reactor in central reprocessing facilities. Consideration is also given to the economics of storing irradiated fuel to improve the load factor of reprocessing plants and to reprocessing both thermal reactor and fast reactor fuel in a common plant. (author)

  7. Treatment and separation of radioactive fission products tritium, rare gases and iodine in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnez, H.

    1975-07-15

    Rare gases must be separated from the process off-gases of the head-end of the Purex and Thorex processes. To achieve high decontamination factors, the quantity of off-gas should be kept as low as possible. For rare gas separation, there are two possible methods of routing the off-gas: (a) the open flushing gas circuit, in which the purified off-gas (generally air) is passed off via the stack and (b) the closed circuit in which the off-gas (nitrogen or rare gases) is recycled to the dissolver after purification. Tritium must not be entrained into the second extraction cycle or be emitted with off-gases in the form of water vapor (HTO) or HT, but must remain completely in the aqueous phase. Most of the process water is recycled, as a result of which the tritium becomes concentrated in it. This tritiated water is then subjected to tritium rectification at a suitable point in the process. Iodine is very difficult to isolate to a small number of process stages. Present aim is to release the iodine in the dissolver stage into the off-gas, so as to prevent it being entrained into the extraction part. By the injection of hot nitrogen or water vapor into the dissolver or into iodine-containing condensates, all of the iodine is passed into the gaseous phase. Scrubbers can also be used together with iodine-containing condensates to adjust the scrubbing solution. Capital cost of separation plants account for 1 to 10 percent of the total cost of the reprocessing installation, and even more if a sophisticated tritium separation system is required. (DLC)

  8. Risk assessment approach for Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootou, Y.; Tamauchi, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Takebe, K.; Miyata, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: It is desirable that the operation and maintenance of Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) be established and conducted with maximum effectiveness and efficiency, making the best use of risk information to help the plant achieve further enhanced safety. Risk assessment is applied for RRP, and upgraded risk information is established. In the basic design phase, the potential incidents and accidents that might occur in the plant were identified systematically and exhaustively adopting the HAZOP method. After screening the potential for occurrence, the design basis accidents (DBAs) were identified and it was confirmed that the plant would not put the general public at risk of significant radiation exposure in the case of such accidents, even when assuming the single failure of dynamic apparatus in the prevention and mitigation systems. To support the deterministic safety assessment mentioned above, the risk assessment was conducted during the basic design phase. Of the DBAs and out-of-design basis accidents excluded from DBAs because of extremely rare occurrence possibilities, the risk assessment was conducted for such accidents which might cause relatively high consequence for the general public. The risk assessment was conducted using the PSA method generally used for nuclear power plants. After that, a review of the occurrence frequency assessment for some of the accidents was made, taking into account information relating to detailed design and operation procedures. Typical examples are a loss of the hydrogen scavenging function in the plutonium solution tank and a loss of cooling capability in the high-active liquid waste storage tank. The occurrence frequency for a loss of the hydrogen scavenging function was less than 10 -5 /year. The occurrence frequency for a loss of cooling capability was less than 10 -7 /year. In addition, an importance assessment (FV index, Risk Achievement Worth) was conducted, such as a contribution to the occurrence frequency

  9. Institutional arrangements for a multinational reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.B.; Chayes, A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper lists some of the major issues that would have to be faced in negotiating the institutional structure of a multinational nuclear-fuel center. None of the organization problems is inherently insoluble. Difficulties are exacerbated by the large number of questions, their interrelations, and the complexity of the assumed structure. However, the assumptions posed the most difficult case. A reduction in membership and in the ambitious scope of the enterprise, at least at the outset, would greatly reduce the complexity of the organizational structure and the difficulty of negotiations. The analysis suggests that multinational fuel-cycle activities should start out more modestly, perhaps only with joint appraisal by a relatively few countries with existing geographic or economic connections. If operations are contemplated it would seem that the first step should be joint arrangements for spent-fuel storage, with the decision to go forward to more elaborate activities deferred. This approach would not only be simpler and permit the parties to gain experience working together, but it would have the virtue of delaying reprocessing until it was clear that there was a real need for it. Even on this reduced basis, the negotiating task would not be easy. The key, of course, to overcoming difficult technical problems of institutional structure is politial will--the genuine commitment of the participants to the aims and values of the enterprise. This suggests that any effort to cajole--not to say coerce--participation in a multinational fuel-cycle enterprise would be wholly misplaced. A reluctant partner would have available an infinitude of points and issues to create plausible, irritating, and ultimately defeating delay and complication in the negotiating process. Only assent freely given in the perception that the enterprise really serves the interest of the countries involved will be able to surmount the many institutional problems that will inevitably arise

  10. Optimal installation program for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokawa, Toshihiko; Kiyose, Ryohei

    1976-01-01

    Optimization of the program of installation of reprocessing plants is mathematically formulated as problem of mixed integer programming, which is numerically solved by the branch-and-bound method. A new concept of quasi-penalty is used to obviate the difficulties associated with dual degeneracy. The finiteness of the useful life of the plant is also taken into consideration. It is shown that an analogous formulation is possible for the cases in which the demand forecasts and expected plant lives cannot be predicted with certainty. The scale of the problem is found to have kN binary variables, (k+2)N continuous variables, and (k+3)N constraint conditions, where k is the number of intervals used in the piece-wise linear approximation of a nonlinear objective function, and N the overall duration of the period covered by the installation program. Calculations are made for N=24 yr and k=3, with the assumption that the plant life is 15 yr, the plant scale factor 0.5, and the maximum plant capacity 900 (t/yr). The results are calculated and discussed for four different demand forecasts. The difference of net profit between optimal and non-optimal installation programs is found to be in the range of 50 -- 100 M$. The pay-off matrix is calculated, and the optimal choice of action when the demand cannot be forecast with certainty is determined by applying Bayes' theory. The optimal installation program under such conditions of uncertainty is obtained also with a stochastic mixed integer programming model. (auth.)

  11. Savannah River Laboratory data banks for risk assessment of fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, W.S.

    1981-10-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory maintains a series of computerized data banks primarily as an aid in probabilistic risk assessment studies in the fuel reprocessing facilities. These include component failure rates, generic incidents, and reports of specific deviations from normal operating conditions. In addition to providing data for probability studies, these banks, have served as a valuable aid in trend analysis, equipment histories, process hazards analysis, consequence assessments, incident audit, process problem solving, and training

  12. The Planning of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeborg, T U; Haeffner, E; Hultgren, Aa

    1963-10-15

    A shielded volume (42 m{sup 3}) in the hot laboratory at Kjeller, Norway, has been used for the installation of a small pilot plant intended for studies on nuclear fuel reprocessing. During the first period of operation (1963) a plutonium separation method (the Silex process) developed at AB Atomenergi will be studied. This document is a description of the project during the stage of technical planning and chemical process development.

  13. Proceedings of the 4th status report of the Reprocessing and Waste Management Project (PWA) of November 5th, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The lectures presented to this meeting deal with the concept of waste disposal in the Federal Republic of Germany, the current state and results of the development work within the project 'Reprocessing and Waste Management'. The main efforts and technological programmes are described as well. Further lectures have been held on problems relating to a fuel reprocessing plant (dissolver-off-gas treatment, tritium separation, hydraulic studies on pulsating columns, electroreduction in the PUREX process, analytical procedures for process analyses). Moreover, materials problems have been discussed and the monitor development for criticality control, work for improving remote handling devices, and the reprocessing of a KNK II reactor mixed oxide fuel in the laboratory test plant MILLI. (RB) [de

  14. Research on solvent extraction process for reprocessing of Th-U fuel from HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Borong; Wang Gaodong; Qian Jun

    1992-05-01

    The unique properties of spent fuel from HTGR (high temperature gas cooled reactor) have been analysed. The single solvent extraction process using 30% TBP for separation and purification of Th-U fuel has been studied. In addition, the solvent extraction process for second uranium purification is also investigated to meet different needs of reprocessing and reproduction of Th-U spent fuel from HTGR

  15. Development and demonstration of near-real-time accounting systems for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Hakkila, E.A.; Dayem, H.A.; Shipley, J.P.; Baker, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A program to develop and demonstrate near-real-time accounting systems for reprocessing plants has been active at Los Alamos since 1976. The technology has been developed through modeling and simulation of process operation and measurement systems and evaluation of these data using decision analysis techniques. Aspects of near-real-time systems have been demonstrated successfully at the AGNS reprocessng plant as part of a joint study of near-real-time accounting

  16. Interim guidance for the safe transport of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Increasingly reprocessed uranium is being used for the fabrication of nuclear fuel elements. Different intermediate reprocessing steps are carried out at different locations. Therefore, transportation of uranium material is necessary. Due to the difference in isotope composition of reprocessed uranium then unirradiated uranium a doubt is casted on the presumption that packages used for the transport of unirradiated uranium are automatically suitable for reprocessed uranium compounds. The Standing Advisory Group on the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (SAGSTRAM) recommended that the issue be reviewed by consultants and that a document be developed that would give guidance to users of the Regulations. This TECDOC is the result of the endeavors of the experts convened at two Consultants Services meetings. It contains guidance on the provisions in the current Regulations as well as proposals for changes to the new Revised Edition whose publication is planned for 1996. This document demonstrates that under the present Transport Regulations it is possible in most cases to ship reprocessed uranium compounds in the same packages as unirradiated uranium compounds. In few cases a more stringent package type is required. 8 refs, 22 figs, 19 tabs

  17. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.; Drain, F.; David, A.

    2001-01-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for the back-end management of their spent fuel. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  18. Technology development of fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2009-01-01

    India is committed to the large scale induction of fast breeder reactors beginning with the construction of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor, PFBR. Closed fuel cycle is a prerequisite for the success of the fast reactors to reduce the external dependence of the fuel. In the Indian context, spent fuel reprocessing, with as low as possible out of pile fissile inventory, is another important requirement for increasing the share in power generation through nuclear route as early as possible. The development of this complex technology is being carried out in four phases, the first phase being the developmental phase, in which major R and D issues are addressed, while the second phase is the design, construction and operation of a pilot plant, called CORAL (COmpact Reprocessing facility for Advanced fuels in Lead shielded cell. The third phase is the construction and operation of Demonstration of Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (DFRP) which will provide experience in fast reactor fuel reprocessing with high availability factors and plant throughput. The design, construction and operation of the commercial plant (FRP) for reprocessing of PFBR fuel is the fourth phase, which will provide the requisite confidence for the large scale induction of fast reactors

  19. Radiological impact of emissions from reprocessing plants during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Gruendler, D.; Hesel, D.; Muenster, M.; Schmidtlein, P.; Suender, B.

    1977-01-01

    When comparing the expected radiation exposure due to emissions from reprocessing plants with those from nuclear power plants it can be seen that the emissions from reprocessing plants contribute much more to the radiation exposure of the population than those from nuclear power plants. In the vicinity of reprocessing plants the highest contributions to the radiation exposure of the population are delivered by the following radionuclides: T, C 14 , Kr 85 , Sr 90 , Ru 106 , I 129 , Cs 134 , Cs 137 and Ce 144 as will as the Pu- and Cm-isotopes. Among these nuclides T, C 14 , Kr 85 und I 129 are globally distributed. While for T the contribution to the collective dose due to globally distributed T is small in comparison with the first pass exposure, the global contribution predominates for C 14 and Kr 85 . If an integration time of less than 10 5 years is considered, the contribution due to first pass exposure predominates for I 129 . When taking the radiation protection of the population into consideration, it seems sensible to retain 10% of T, 80 to 90% of C 14 , 90% of Kr 85 and 99,5% of I 129 in reprocessing plants and dispose of this material in a controlled manner. The fraction of the aerosols released should be about 10 -9 . Considering the global effects and the increasing number of nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants, an international agreement should be reached on these matters. (orig.) [de

  20. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, J. [Cogema, F-78140 Velizy (France); Drain, F.; David, A. [SGN, F-78182 Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2001-07-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for the back-end management of their spent fuel. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)