WorldWideScience

Sample records for hazardous materials final

  1. Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, P.M.

    1997-03-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

  2. Hazardous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause cancer. Know how to use the material and how to store it or throw it away when you are done. Other tips include: Never enter an area where radiation ... materials from one area to another. Check bottles, containers, ...

  3. Hazardous Materials Hazard Analysis, Portland, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    ACCIDENTS IN OREGON, 1976-1979 INJURY RATE FATALITY RATE (per 100 million nilles ) (per 100 million miles) Injuries Fatalities 100 - 94. 8 80 75 - - 6...commercial vehicle Involved. Driver fault--icy road conditions caused truck to jack -knIfe and skid. Resulted in hazardous material spill and relase and...Wheel gem tanks retrieved her body. Huerta Mayor Jack Pirog said Mobil Chemi- Corp. i Mendota. She distributed the revived after emergency treatment at

  4. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  5. Hazardous Material Packaging and Transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-04

    This is a student training course. Some course objectives are to: recognize and use standard international and US customary units to describe activities and exposure rates associated with radioactive material; determine whether a quantity of a single radionuclide meets the definition of a class 7 (radioactive) material; determine, for a given single radionuclide, the shipping quantity activity limits per 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 173.435; determine the appropriate radioactive material hazard class proper shipping name for a given material; determine when a single radionuclide meets the DOT definition of a hazardous substance; determine the appropriate packaging required for a given radioactive material; identify the markings to be placed on a package of radioactive material; determine the label(s) to apply to a given radioactive material package; identify the entry requirements for radioactive material labels; determine the proper placement for radioactive material label(s); identify the shipping paper entry requirements for radioactive material; select the appropriate placards for a given radioactive material shipment or vehicle load; and identify allowable transport limits and unacceptable transport conditions for radioactive material.

  6. Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-02-28

    This report documents the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (THM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). This hazards assessment is intended to identify and analyze those transportation hazards significant enough to warrant consideration in the SRS Emergency Management Program.

  7. NASA LaRC Hazardous Material Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquenet, Remy

    1995-01-01

    In 1993-1994 the Office of Environmental Engineering contracted SAIC to develop NASA Langley's Pollution Prevention (P2) Program. One of the priority projects identified in this contract was the development of a hazardous waste minimization (HAZMIN)/hazardous materials reutilization (HAZMART) program in the form of a Hazardous Materials Pharmacy. A hazardous materials pharmacy is designed to reduce hazardous material procurement costs and hazardous waste disposal costs. This is accomplished through the collection and reissue of excess hazardous material. Currently, a rarely used hazardous material may be stored in a shop area, unused, until it passes its expiration date. The material is then usually disposed of as a hazardous waste, often at a greater expense than the original cost of the material. While this material was on the shelf expiring, other shop areas may have ordered new supplies of the same material. The hazardous material pharmacy would act as a clearinghouse for such materials. Material that is not going to be used would be turned in to the pharmacy. Other users could then be issued this material free of charge, thereby reducing procurement costs. The use of this material by another shop prevents it from expiring, thereby reducing hazardous waste disposal costs.

  8. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Volpentest Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Federal Training Center is a safety and emergency response training center that offers...

  9. Fact Sheet About the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    October 28, 2016, EPA finalized a rule that revises the hazardous waste generator regulations by making them easier to understand and providing greater flexibility in how hazardous waste is managed to better fit today's business operations.

  10. Hazard index for underground toxic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.; McKone, T.E.

    1980-06-01

    To adequately define the problem of waste management, quantitative measures of hazard must be used. This study reviews past work in the area of hazard indices and proposes a geotoxicity hazard index for use in characterizing the hazard of toxic material buried underground. Factors included in this index are: an intrinsic toxicity factor, formulated as the volume of water required for dilution to public drinking-water levels; a persistence factor to characterize the longevity of the material, ranging from unity for stable materials to smaller values for shorter-lived materials; an availability factor that relates the transport potential for the particular material to a reference value for its naturally occurring analog; and a correction factor to accommodate the buildup of decay progeny, resulting in increased toxicity.

  11. 46 CFR 151.03-30 - Hazardous material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous material. 151.03-30 Section 151.03-30 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-30 Hazardous material. In this part hazardous material means a liquid material or substance that is— (a) Flammable or combustible; (b...

  12. Instrumentation for Detecting Hazardous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Oi -4 -6 - 0 0 0L0 Ln Q m U 0) U) 4 0) L. ’ 01 0 0-l LO .0 0V 0 C 0 0 ONU ’ 0 00 ’ 0 0D ini- in (04D (0( V)( C)( in-j iC .0~ C. Cin Cf C) C. ccl U (fi... organo - Color chlorine materials, thiophosphates, Sulfate and phenol Phosphate Alcohol tests a-monia Nitrogen Chloride Fluoride 161 ,ś. C-1 .V- I ~c’ 14

  13. Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

  14. Frequent Questions about the Hazardous Waste Generator Improvements Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAQs including What are the benefits of these revisions to the generator regulations? What changed in the final regulations since proposal? How and why will the hazardous waste generator regulations be reorganized? When will this rule become effective?

  15. Hazardous Waste Sites not making the final EPA National Priority List of Hazardous Waste Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — These are sites from EPA CERCLIS list that are not final National-Priority-List Hazardous Waste sites. The data was obtained from EPA's LandView CDs.

  16. US Hazardous Materials Routes, Geographic WGS84, BTS (2006) [hazardous_material_routes_BTS_2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Hazardous Material Routes were developed using the 2004 First Edition TIGER/Line files. The routes are...

  17. Hazardous materials sensing: An electrical metamaterial approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawat, Vaishali; Kitture, Rohini [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DIAT), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Kumari, Dimple [Department of Applied Chemistry, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DIAT), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Rajesh, Harsh [Society for Applied Microwave Electronics Engineering and Research (SAMEER), IIT-Bombay Campus, Powai, Mumbai (India); Banerjee, Shaibal [Department of Applied Chemistry, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DIAT), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India); Kale, S.N., E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advanced Technology (DIAT), Girinagar, Pune 411025 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials are recently emerging materials exhibiting amazing properties such as extremely miniaturized antennas, waveguides, optical couplers, multiplexers and filters. Such structures also respond to the variation in their ambient conditions when exposed to toxic and hazardous materials, which are especially hazardous to human health. Through this manuscript, we document our studies on three different high energy materials; namely 2- bromo-2nitropropane-1,3-diol (BNP), bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) malonate (AM) and bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) glutarate (AG). A Complementary Split Ring Resonator has been fabricated at resonant frequency of 4.48 GHz using copper on FR4 substrate. The energetic materials were exposed to the sensor and results were monitored using Vector Network Analyzer. The volume of liquids was varied from 0.5 µL to 3 µL. Prominent and explicit shifts in the transmission resonant frequency and amplitude was seen as a signature of each energetic material. The signatures were not only sensitive to the specific toxic group in the material but also to the volume of the liquid subjected to this sensor. The results are correlated with the simulation results, basic chemistry of the materials and permittivity measurements. The ultra-fast reversibility and repeatability, with good sensitivity and specificity of these devices project their applications in sensitive locations, particularly to combat for human security and health issues.

  18. Hazardous materials sensing: An electrical metamaterial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Vaishali; Kitture, Rohini; Kumari, Dimple; Rajesh, Harsh; Banerjee, Shaibal; Kale, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials are recently emerging materials exhibiting amazing properties such as extremely miniaturized antennas, waveguides, optical couplers, multiplexers and filters. Such structures also respond to the variation in their ambient conditions when exposed to toxic and hazardous materials, which are especially hazardous to human health. Through this manuscript, we document our studies on three different high energy materials; namely 2- bromo-2nitropropane-1,3-diol (BNP), bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) malonate (AM) and bis (1,3-diazido prop-2-yl) glutarate (AG). A Complementary Split Ring Resonator has been fabricated at resonant frequency of 4.48 GHz using copper on FR4 substrate. The energetic materials were exposed to the sensor and results were monitored using Vector Network Analyzer. The volume of liquids was varied from 0.5 μL to 3 μL. Prominent and explicit shifts in the transmission resonant frequency and amplitude was seen as a signature of each energetic material. The signatures were not only sensitive to the specific toxic group in the material but also to the volume of the liquid subjected to this sensor. The results are correlated with the simulation results, basic chemistry of the materials and permittivity measurements. The ultra-fast reversibility and repeatability, with good sensitivity and specificity of these devices project their applications in sensitive locations, particularly to combat for human security and health issues.

  19. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - Commercial Hazardous Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Commercial Hazardous Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Hazardous Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to...

  20. 75 FR 51678 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ...; Final Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Environmental... Software (DRAS), EPA has concluded that the petitioned waste is not hazardous waste. This exclusion applies.... What are the limits of this exclusion? D. How will OxyChem manage the waste if it is delisted? E....

  1. 14 CFR 135.507 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 135.507 Section 135.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.507 Hazardous materials training records. (a) General...

  2. 14 CFR 135.503 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 135.503 Section 135.503 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.503 Hazardous materials training: General. (a) Each...

  3. 14 CFR 135.505 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 135.505 Section 135.505 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Hazardous Materials Training Program § 135.505 Hazardous materials training required. (a)...

  4. 75 FR 17111 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... materials, and require a shipper to communicate the material's hazards through use of shipping papers... reclassification of materials that meet the definition of a hazardous substance or hazardous waste and, thus, meet... which the liquid will continue to burn after ignition) greater than 100 C (212 F); and liquids with a...

  5. 77 FR 37961 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporating Rail Special Permits Into the Hazardous Materials Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] Vol. 77 Monday, No. 122 June 25, 2012 Part II Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... ``conceal the presence of high value cargoes that might be the target of piracy or hijacking...

  6. Preparedness of hazardous materials emergencies in railyards: Guidance for railroads and adjacent communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Railroads are a key part of the distribution system for hazardous materials and, thus, much hazardous material passes through railyards en route to intermediate or final consumers. While the vast majority of these materials are shipped without incident, both the number of shipments and the nature of the materials themselves dictate that railyards and surrounding communities be prepared to respond quickly and effectively to emergencies. This report contains information on 11 emergency preparedness functions and 150 guidance recommendations.

  7. Environmental Radiation Hazards of Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal A. Nasser

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, the importance of studying the environmental impact of building material properties grew. The main focus was to study physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of building materials. Buildings are the environment that a human spend about 80% of his life. Human exposure to radiation doses emerging from natural and manufactured building materials caused serious diseases. The hazard of radiation doses on human body, especially Radon, was discovered. Radon is produced of the radioactive decay of Uranium and Thorium series. It is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. It inters human body by breathing and produces harmful radioactive elements. It has become a goal to know the limits of safety for building materials and to establish green buildings. Health and environmental risks have to take first command in the construction field to take proper precautions to ward off risks. Radon emission was investigated. The radioactive concentration of indoor air may be decreased under the permissible doses by the building geometry variation and other ways as reviewed in this investigation.

  8. 77 FR 65314 - Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Missouri: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste..., Missouri received final authorization to implement its hazardous waste management program effective...

  9. Waste explosives and other hazardous materials--hazard potential and remedial measures: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R K; Asthana, S N; Bhattacharya, B; Tiwari, Ila; Ghole, V S

    2007-07-01

    A large amount of energetic materials including propellants, high explosives, pyrotechnics are subjected to disposal either due to expiry of their useful life or rejection in the manufacturing process. The environmental regulations do not allow the hazardous materials for open burning / detonation in view of the health hazard involved in these operations. The present paper describes the hazard potential of energetic materials and associated hazardous chemicals. It also deals with global technological status for remedial measures of hazardous chemicals along with their merits and demerits.

  10. Standards Applicable to Generators of Hazardous Waste; Alternative Requirements for Hazardous Waste Determination and Accumulation of Unwanted Material at Laboratories Owned by Colleges and Universities and Other Eligible Academic Entities Formally Affiliated With Colleges and Universities. Final Rule. Federal Register, Environmental Protection Agency. 40 CFR Parts 261 and 262. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is finalizing an alternative set of generator requirements applicable to laboratories owned by eligible academic entities, as defined in this final rule. The rule provides a flexible and protective set of regulations that address the specific nature of hazardous waste generation and…

  11. 49 CFR 383.121 - Requirements for hazardous materials endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hazardous materials accidents; and (10) Tunnels and railroad crossings. (b) Hazardous materials handling...; (7) Routes; (8) Cargo Tanks; and (9) “Safe Havens.” (c) Operation of emergency equipment including... materials laden motor vehicle; and (4) Use of emergency equipment for tank vehicles. (d) Emergency...

  12. Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F.; Brown, B.G.

    1997-03-01

    This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Hazardous materials transportation: a risk-analysis-based routing methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonelli, P; Bonvicini, S; Spadoni, G

    2000-01-07

    This paper introduces a new methodology based on risk analysis for the selection of the best route for the transport of a hazardous substance. In order to perform this optimisation, the network is considered as a graph composed by nodes and arcs; each arc is assigned a cost per unit vehicle travelling on it and a vehicle capacity. After short discussion about risk measures suitable for linear risk sources, the arc capacities are introduced by comparison between the societal and individual risk measures of each arc with hazardous materials transportation risk criteria; then arc costs are defined in order to take into account both transportation out-of-pocket expenses and risk-related costs. The optimisation problem can thus be formulated as a 'minimum cost flow problem', which consists of determining for a specific hazardous substance the cheapest flow distribution, honouring the arc capacities, from the origin nodes to the destination nodes. The main features of the optimisation procedure, implemented on the computer code OPTIPATH, are presented. Test results about shipments of ammonia are discussed and finally further research developments are proposed.

  14. 14 CFR 121.1007 - Hazardous materials training records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training records. 121.1007 Section 121.1007 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  15. 14 CFR 121.1003 - Hazardous materials training: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training: General. 121.1003 Section 121.1003 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  16. 14 CFR 121.1005 - Hazardous materials training required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials training required. 121.1005 Section 121.1005 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Hazardous Materials Training...

  17. 14 CFR 91.1085 - Hazardous materials recognition training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous materials recognition training. 91.1085 Section 91.1085 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1085 Hazardous materials recognition training. No...

  18. 75 FR 9147 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ...-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... associated with the air transport of lithium cells and batteries. PHMSA and FAA will hold a public meeting on... they will be attending the Lithium Battery Public Meeting and wait to be escorted to the...

  19. 78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the.... Therefore, we grant Oklahoma Final authorization to operate its hazardous waste program with the changes...

  20. 77 FR 60919 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... has applied to EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... Tennessee final authorization to operate its hazardous waste program with the changes described in the...

  1. 78 FR 35766 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Carolina has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the... final complete program revision application, seeking authorization of changes to its hazardous waste...

  2. 77 FR 69788 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to the EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The EPA proposes to grant final authorization to the hazardous waste...

  3. 76 FR 37021 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... has applied to the EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... opportunity to apply for final authorization to operate all aspects of their hazardous waste management...

  4. 77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... established by RCRA. Therefore, we grant Oklahoma Final authorization to operate its hazardous waste program...

  5. 77 FR 13200 - Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Texas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision... has applied to the EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the... established by RCRA. Therefore, we grant the State of Texas Final Authorization to operate its hazardous waste...

  6. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  7. Hazardous materials and waste management a guide for the professional hazards manager

    CERN Document Server

    Cheremisinoff, Nicholas P

    1995-01-01

    The management of hazardous materials and industrial wastes is complex, requiring a high degree of knowledge over very broad technical and legal subject areas. Hazardous wastes and materials are diverse, with compositions and properties that not only vary significantly between industries, but within industries, and indeed within the complexity of single facilities. Proper management not only requires an understanding of the numerous and complex regulations governing hazardous materials and waste streams, but an understanding and knowledge of the treatment, post-treatment, and waste minimizatio

  8. European Command Hazardous Material Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    system (preparation of hazardous/ clinical waste for movement and disposal), or IAEA rules for hazard class 7 items UNCLASSIFIED United States European...ninguna otra vía>. H302: Harmful if swallowed; ES: Nocivo en caso de ingestión. H317: May cause allergic skin reaction; ES: Puede provocar una reacción...demostrado concluyentemente que el peligro no se produce por ninguna otra vía>. H302: Harmful if swallowed; ES: Nocivo en caso de ingestión. H317: May

  9. Composite Material Hazard Assessment at Crash Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    wing tip areas and around cockpit, and the A-7D landing gear bushings Lithium thionyl chloride Soft, silvery highly reactive metallic...per the NIOSH Method 7400 fiber counting method. Pre-weighed 37-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) filters captured total particulate concentrations...computer batteries Pressurized tanks and aircraft parts Compressed liquids and gases (oxygen); tires Physical and chemical hazards from

  10. 78 FR 25579 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ...-.07(1). Treatment Exemptions for 10/04/05......... Hazardous Waste Mixtures (``Headworks exemptions... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions... to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  11. Health and safety information program for hazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, M.P.; Fallon, N.J.; Kuehner, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    The system is used as a management tool in several safety and health programs. It is used to: trace the use of hazardous materials and to determine monitoring needs; inform the occupational physician of the potential health problems associated with materials ordered by a given individual; inform the fire and rescue group of hazardous materials in a given building; provide waste disposal recommendations to the hazardous waste management group; assist the hazardous materials shipping coordinator in identifying materials which are regulated by the Department of Transportation; and guide management decisions in the area of recognizing and rectifying unsafe conditions. The information system has been expanded from a manual effort to provide a brief description of health hazards of chemicals used at the lab to a computerized health and safety information system which serves the needs of all personnel who may encounter the material in the course of their work. The system has been designed to provide information needed to control the potential problems associated with a hazardous material up to the time that it is consumed in a given operation or is sent to the waste disposal facility.

  12. 49 CFR 174.81 - Segregation of hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transportation, commingling of hazardous materials would not occur. Notwithstanding the methods of separation... no explosive substances are carried in the same rail car. (h) Except as provided in paragraph (i)...

  13. 76 FR 45332 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... Subpart E; permit to authorize an Packaging (Former 173.118; 173.244; additional mode of Grantee All-Pak...

  14. Buried waste containment system materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, J.R.; Shaw, P.G.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the results of a test program to validate the application of a latex-modified cement formulation for use with the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS) process during a proof of principle (POP) demonstration. The test program included three objectives. One objective was to validate the barrier material mix formulation to be used with the BWCS equipment. A basic mix formula for initial trials was supplied by the cement and latex vendors. The suitability of the material for BWCS application was verified by laboratory testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A second objective was to determine if the POP BWCS material emplacement process adversely affected the barrier material properties. This objective was met by measuring and comparing properties of material prepared in the INEEL Materials Testing Laboratory (MTL) with identical properties of material produced by the BWCS field tests. These measurements included hydraulic conductivity to determine if the material met the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements for barriers used for hazardous waste sites, petrographic analysis to allow an assessment of barrier material separation and segregation during emplacement, and a set of mechanical property tests typical of concrete characterization. The third objective was to measure the hydraulic properties of barrier material containing a stop-start joint to determine if such a feature would meet the EPA requirements for hazardous waste site barriers.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  16. 77 FR 39662 - Hazardous Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... Materials; Reverse Logistics (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA... materials in the ``reverse logistics'' supply chain. Reverse logistics is the process that is initiated when... will propose to simplify the regulations for reverse logistics shipments and provide avenue means for...

  17. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  18. 75 FR 50932 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts applied to EPA for final ] authorization of certain changes to its hazardous waste program under...

  19. 75 FR 43478 - Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Rhode Island: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Island has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Rhode Island...

  20. 77 FR 38566 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Louisiana has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  1. 77 FR 15343 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Oklahoma has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  2. 76 FR 6564 - Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Immediate final rule. SUMMARY: Florida has applied to EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource...

  3. 75 FR 58328 - Nebraska: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Nebraska: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste... final authorization for these revisions to its Federally-authorized hazardous waste program, along with...

  4. 77 FR 47797 - Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Arkansas: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Arkansas has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  5. 76 FR 37048 - Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana; Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Louisiana has applied to EPA for Final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant Final authorization to the State of...

  6. 77 FR 38530 - Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Louisiana: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Immediate final rule. SUMMARY: Louisiana has applied to the EPA for final authorization of the changes to its hazardous waste program under the...

  7. 78 FR 15338 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Solid Waste... proposes to grant final authorization to New York for these changes, with limited exceptions. EPA has...

  8. 77 FR 69765 - Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Colorado: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Solid Waste... established by RCRA. Therefore, we grant Colorado Final Authorization to operate its hazardous waste program...

  9. 78 FR 70255 - West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... applied to EPA for final authorization of revisions to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to West Virginia. In the...

  10. 75 FR 35720 - Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Massachusetts: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program... Massachusetts has applied to EPA for final authorization of changes to its hazardous waste program under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). EPA proposes to grant final authorization to Massachusetts...

  11. Final Report: Seismic Hazard Assessment at the PGDP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhinmeng [KY Geological Survey, Univ of KY

    2007-06-01

    Selecting a level of seismic hazard at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant for policy considerations and engineering design is not an easy task because it not only depends on seismic hazard, but also on seismic risk and other related environmental, social, and economic issues. Seismic hazard is the main focus. There is no question that there are seismic hazards at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant because of its proximity to several known seismic zones, particularly the New Madrid Seismic Zone. The issues in estimating seismic hazard are (1) the methods being used and (2) difficulty in characterizing the uncertainties of seismic sources, earthquake occurrence frequencies, and ground-motion attenuation relationships. This report summarizes how input data were derived, which methodologies were used, and what the hazard estimates at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant are.

  12. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

    2007-09-10

    This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

  13. 75 FR 9345 - Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... necessary to assure that all hazardous waste generated is designated for treatment, storage, or disposal in...'' enclosed treatment facility''. deleted and words ``of a hazardous waste'' added. MAC R 299.9108(k) 6/21... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 271 Michigan: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision...

  14. Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

  15. Simplified training for hazardous materials management in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braithwaite, J. [Breeze International Environmental, Clayton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    There are thousands of dangerous situations happening daily in developing countries around the world involving untrained workers and hazardous materials. There are very few if any agencies in developing countries that are charged with ensuring safe and healthful working conditions. In addition to the problem of regulation and enforcement, there are potential training problems due to the level of literacy and degree of scientific background of these workers. Many of these workers are refugees from poorly developed countries who are willing to work no matter what the conditions. Training methods (standards) accepted as state of the art in the United States and other developed countries may not work well under the conditions found in developing countries. Because these methods may not be appropriate, new and novel ways to train workers quickly, precisely and economically in hazardous materials management should be developed. One approach is to develop training programs that use easily recognizable graphics with minimal verbal instruction, programs similar to the type used to teach universal international driving regulations and safety. The program as outlined in this paper could be tailored to any sized plant and any hazardous material handling or exposure situation. The situation in many developing countries is critical, development of simplified training methods for workers exposed to hazardous materials hold valuable market potential and are an opportunity for many underdeveloped countries to develop indigenous expertise in hazardous materials management.

  16. Smoldering combustion hazards of thermal insulation materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlemiller, T.J.; Rogers, F.E.

    1980-07-01

    Work on the smolder ignitability in cellulosic insulation and on thermal analytical characterization of the oxidation of this material is presented. Thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) shows that both retarded and unretarded cellulosic insulation oxidizes in two overall stages, both of which are exothermic. The second stage (oxidation of the char left as a residue of the first stage) is much more energetic on a unit mass basis than the first. However, kinetics and a sufficient exothermicity make the first stage responsible for ignition in most realistic circumstances. Existing smolder retardants such as boric acid have their major effect on the kinetics of the second oxidation stage and thus produce only a rather small (20/sup 0/C) increase in smolder ignition temperature. Several simplified analogs of attic insulations have been tested to determine the variability of minimum smolder ignition temperature. These employed planar or tubular constant temperature heat sources in a thermal environment quite similar to a realistic attic application. Go/no-go tests provided the borderline (minimum) ignition temperature for each configuration. The wide range (150/sup 0/C) of minimum ignition temperatures confirmed the predominant dependence of smolder ignition on heat flow geometry. Other factors (bulk density, retardants) produced much less effect on ignitability.

  17. Sustainable Materials Management: Non-Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the non-hazardous materials and waste management hierarchy in recognition that no single waste management approach is suitable for managing all materials and waste streams in all circumstances.

  18. Frequent Questions about the Hazardous Waste Export-Import Revisions Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Answers questions such as: What new requirements did EPA finalize in the Hazardous Waste Export-Import Revisions Final Rule? Why did EPA implement these changes now? What are the benefits of the final rule? What are the compliance dates for the final rule?

  19. 76 FR 75950 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Restriction/Prohibition Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Realm Industries facility on December 15, 2008. A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for TyLar describes... hazard when concentration exceeds 5.2% in the atmosphere. The MSDS states that TyLar is capable of self... explosive mixture when combined with other gases, and creates a strong sonic shock upon ignition. The MSDS...

  20. 76 FR 11569 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Authority Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Parcel Service (UPS) suggests a change in the definition as follows: ``A material of any kind, including...-service order. DGAC suggests that the definition of ``Emergency order'' include the term ``written'' to be... out-of-service orders) to address unsafe conditions or practices posing an imminent hazard;...

  1. 78 FR 23503 - Hazardous Materials; Temporary Reduction of Registration Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... Preparedness (HMEP) Grants, Supplemental Public Sector Training (SPST) Grants, and Hazardous Materials... curriculum for training public sector emergency response and preparedness teams, under 49 U.S.C 5115; $625... intended outcome of this effort is to increase the impact of PHMSA grant funding on local...

  2. 78 FR 42998 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477). Robert C. Lauby, Deputy Associate Administrator for Regulatory..., Washington, DC 20590, (202) 493-6050, Kurt.Eichenlaub@dot.gov ; or Mr. Karl Alexy, Staff Director, Hazardous... Karl.Alexy@dot.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Secretary of Transportation (Secretary)...

  3. Hazards Response of Energetic Materials - Initiation Mechanisms, Experimental Characterization, and Development of Predictive Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maienschein, J; Nichols III, A; Reaugh, J; McClelland, M; Hsu, P C

    2005-04-15

    We present our approach to develop a predictive capability for hazards -- thermal and non-shock impact -- response of energetic material systems based on: (A) identification of relevant processes; (B) characterization of the relevant properties; (C) application of property data to predictive models; and (D) application of the models into predictive simulation. This paper focuses on the first two elements above, while a companion paper by Nichols et al focuses on the final two elements. We outline the underlying mechanisms of hazards response and their interactions, and present our experimental work to characterize the necessary material parameters, including thermal ignition, thermal and mechanical properties, fracture/fragmentation behavior, deflagration rates, and the effect of material damage. We also describe our validation test, the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment. Finally, we integrate the entire collection of data into a qualitative understanding that is useful until such time as the predictive models become available.

  4. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  5. 75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... exclude (or delist) a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) sludge filter cake (called sludge hereinafter... to the petition submitted by Tokusen, to delist the WWTP sludge. After careful analysis and use of... waste. This exclusion applies to 2,000 cubic yards per year of the WWTP sludge with Hazardous Waste...

  6. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites. The report provides an overview of an approach for assessing risk to ...

  7. Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final report, Evaluating Ecological Risk to Invertebrate Receptors from PAHs in Sediments at Hazardous Waste Sites. The report provides an overview of an approach for assessing risk to ...

  8. Performance-oriented packagings for hazardous materials: Resource guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This document provides recommendations to US Department of Energy (DOE) shippers regarding packaging that meet performance-oriented packaging requirements implemented by US Department of Transportation (DOT) in rulemaking HM-181 (December 21, 1990) and subsequent actions. The packaging described in this document are certified by their vendor to comply with requirements for Packing Group I, II, or III hazardous materials packaging. The intent of this document is to share information between DOE and contractors and at all DOE facilities.

  9. 75 FR 5375 - Hazardous Material; Miscellaneous Packaging Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... plastic bags, plastic film bags, textile bags, and paper bags. The purpose was to eliminate uncertainty in... in This Final Rule A. Definitions B. Plastic Packagings Used To Transport Poison Materials C... provisions to require plastic single and composite non-bulk packagings containing Division 6.1 material to...

  10. Technology assessment of solar-energy systems. Materials resource and hazardous materials impacts of solar deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffman, Y.M.; Tahami, J.E.

    1982-04-01

    The materials-resource and hazardous-materials impacts were determined by examining the type and quantity of materials used in the manufacture, construction, installation, operation and maintenance of solar systems. The materials requirements were compared with US materials supply-and-demand data to determine if potential problems exist in terms of future availability of domestic supply and increased dependence on foreign sources of supply. Hazardous materials were evaluated in terms of public and occupational health hazards and explosive and fire hazards. It is concluded that: (1) although large amounts of materials would be required, the US had sufficient industrial capacity to produce those materials; (2) the postulated growth in solar technology deployment during the period 1995-2000 could cause some production shortfalls in the steel and copper industry; (3) the U.S. could increase its import reliance for certain materials such as silver, iron ore, and copper; (4) however, shifts to other materials such as aluminum and polyvinylchloride could alleviate some of these problems.

  11. Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M. Falco

    2012-09-13

    This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

  12. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  13. Management of hazardous waste or materials. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the management of hazardous waste and materials. Citations discuss the assessments and findings at hazardous waste sites as well as the prevention of pollution. Also included are guidelines and methods for controlling and managing hazardous waste and materials.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. 76 FR 10771 - Hazardous Materials: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ...: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... materials as defined in this section. b. Section 383.5 indicates that an electronic device includes, but is... involving hazardous materials when CMV drivers are distracted by electronic devices. Accordingly, the...

  15. Improved radiant burner material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewski, J.V.; Shoultz, R.A.; Bourque, M.M.; Milewski, E.B. [and others

    1998-01-01

    Under DOE/ERIP funds were made available to Superkinetic, Inc. for the development of an improved radiant burner material. Three single crystal ceramic fibers were produced and two fiber materials were made into felt for testing as radiant burner screens. The materials were alpha alumina and alpha silicon nitride. These fibers were bonded with a high temperature ceramic and made into a structurally sound trusswork like screen composed of million psi fiber members. These screens were about 5% solid for 95 porosity as needed to permit the flow of combustable natural gas and air mixture. Combustion test proved that they performed very satisfactory and better than the current state of art screen and showed no visable degrade after testing. It is recommended that more time and money be put into expanding this technology and test these new materials for their maximum temperature and durability for production applications that require better burner material.

  16. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. McLachlan

    2003-12-01

    In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial

  17. Energy Materials Center at Cornell: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abruña, Héctor [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Mutolo, Paul F [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-01-02

    The mission of the Energy Materials Center at Cornell (emc2) was to achieve a detailed understanding, via a combination of synthesis of new materials, experimental and computational approaches, of how the nature, structure, and dynamics of nanostructured interfaces affect energy conversion and storage with emphasis on fuel cells, batteries and supercapacitors. Our research on these systems was organized around a full system strategy for; the development and improved performance of materials for both electrodes at which storage or conversion occurs; understanding their internal interfaces, such as SEI layers in batteries and electrocatalyst supports in fuel cells, and methods for structuring them to enable high mass transport as well as high ionic and electronic conductivity; development of ion-conducting electrolytes for batteries and fuel cells (separately) and other separator components, as needed; and development of methods for the characterization of these systems under operating conditions (operando methods) Generally, our work took industry and DOE report findings of current materials as a point of departure to focus on novel material sets for improved performance. In addition, some of our work focused on studying existing materials, for example observing battery solvent degradation, fuel cell catalyst coarsening or monitoring lithium dendrite growth, employing in operando methods developed within the center.

  18. 49 CFR 172.202 - Description of hazardous material on shipping papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... papers. 172.202 Section 172.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... INFORMATION, TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Shipping Papers § 172.202 Description of hazardous material on shipping papers. (a) The shipping description of a hazardous material on the shipping...

  19. 49 CFR 176.76 - Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transport vehicles, freight containers, and... TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.76 Transport... paragraphs (b) through (f) of this section, hazardous materials authorized to be transported by vessel may...

  20. 49 CFR 171.1 - Applicability of Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) to persons and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Movement of a hazardous material by rail car, aircraft, motor vehicle, or vessel (except as delegated by... of a rail car on private track. (4) Rail and motor vehicle movements of a hazardous material... marking, or other medium, or, in the case of a rail car, until the car is delivered to a private track...

  1. 77 FR 31274 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... 2137-AE83 Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport... Goods Regulations (TDG Regulations), and the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of... hazardous materials internationally, to, from, and within the United States. In this notice of...

  2. 78 FR 16044 - Hazardous Materials Packaging-Composite Cylinder Standards; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-13

    ... reinforced plastic (DOT-FRP) or fully wrapped carbon-fiber reinforced aluminum lined cylinders (DOT- CFFC... TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Hazardous Materials Packaging--Composite... the manufacture, marking, sale and use of non-DOT specification composite cylinders. The...

  3. 49 CFR 173.230 - Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) For fuel cell cartridges contained in equipment, fuel cell systems must not charge batteries during... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material... Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.230 Fuel cell cartridges containing hazardous material. (a)...

  4. 49 CFR 176.74 - On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials... CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General Handling and Stowage § 176.74 On deck stowage of break-bulk hazardous materials... within a horizontal distance of 25 feet of an operating or embarkation point of a lifeboat. (g)...

  5. 75 FR 52069 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations, International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    .... Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations, International Maritime Dangerous... Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations, International Maritime Dangerous Goods... the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air, and the United Nations Recommendations on the...

  6. 49 CFR 171.16 - Detailed hazardous materials incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... at the reporting person's principal place of business. If the written or electronic Hazardous... Safety Administration, Department of Transportation, Washington, DC 20590-0001, or an electronic... incident involving transportation by aircraft, submit a written or electronic copy of the...

  7. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States. Volume 1: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, R.K.; Veneziano, D.; Toro, G.; O' Hara, T.; Drake, L.; Patwardhan, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Kenney, R.; Winkler, R.; Coppersmith, K.

    1986-07-01

    A methodology to estimate the hazard of earthquake ground motion at a site has been developed. The methodology consists of systematic procedures to characterize earthquake sources, the seismicity parameters of those sources, and functions for the attenuation of seismic energy, incorporating multiple input interpretations by earth scientists. Uncertainties reflecting permissible alternative inperpretations are quantified by use of probability logic trees and are propagated through the hazard results. The methodology is flexible and permits, for example, interpretations of seismic sources that are consistent with earth-science practice in the need to depict complexity and to accommodate alternative hypotheses. This flexibility is achieved by means of a tectonic framework interpretation from which alternative seismic sources are derived. To estimate rates of earthquake recurrence, maximum use is made of the historical earthquake database in establishing a uniform measure of earthquake size, in identifying independent events, and in detemining the completeness of the earthquake record in time, space, and magnitude. Procedures developed as part of the methodology permit relaxation of the usual assumption of homogeneous seismicity within a source and provide unbiased estimates of recurrence parameters. The methodology incorporates the Poisson-exponential earthquake recurrence model and an extensive assessment of its applicability is provided. Finally, the methodology includes procedures to aggregate hazard results from a number of separate input interpretations to obtain a best-estimate value of hazard, together with its uncertainty, at a site.

  8. Structural engineering, mechanics and materials: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report on structural engineering, mechanics and materials is divided into three parts: a discussion on using Lanczos vectors and Ritz vectors for computing dynamic responses: solution of viscously damped linear systems using a finite element displacement formulation; and vibration analysis of fluid-solid systems using a finite element displacement formulation. (JF)

  9. Packaging Materials Outgassing Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. A. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2006-09-26

    An outgassing study was conducted on two polyurethane packaging foams, two polymer bottles (polytetrafluoroethylene and polyethylene), and two polymer lids. The purpose was to measure the volume of gases that diffuse from these packaging materials at a maximum of 400-degrees F when stored in ambient air within sealed containers.

  10. Quantum Materials at the Nanoscale - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Stephen Lance [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-01-11

    The central aim of the Quantum Materials at the Nanoscale (QMN) cluster was to understand and control collective behavior involving the interplay of spins, orbitals, and charges, which governs many scientifically interesting and technologically important phenomena in numerous complex materials. Because these phenomena involve various competing interactions, and influence properties on many different length and energy scales in complex materials, tackling this important area of study motivated a collaborative effort that combined the diverse capabilities of QMN cluster experimentalists, the essential theoretical analysis provided by QMN cluster theorists, and the outstanding facilities and staff of the FSMRL. During the funding period 2007-2014, the DOE cluster grant for the Quantum Materials at the Nanoscale (QMN) cluster supported, at various times, 15 different faculty members (14 in Physics and 1 in Materials Science and Engineering), 7 postdoctoral research associates, and 57 physics and materials science PhD students. 41 of these PhD students have since graduated and have gone on to a variety of advanced technical positions at universities, industries, and national labs: 25 obtained postdoctoral positions at universities (14), industrial labs (2 at IBM), DOE national facilities (3 at Argonne National Laboratory, 1 at Brookhaven National Lab, 1 at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and 1 at Sandia National Lab), and other federal facilities (2 at NIST); 13 took various industrial positions, including positions at Intel (5), Quantum Design (1), Lasque Industries (1), Amazon (1), Bloomberg (1), and J.P. Morgan (1). Thus, the QMN grant provided the essential support for training a large number of technically advanced personnel who have now entered key national facilities, industries, and institutions. Additionally, during the period 2007-2015, the QMN cluster produced 159 publications (see pages 14-23), including 23 papers published in Physical Review Letters; 16

  11. Evaluation of advanced materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, I.G.; Clauer, A.H.; Shetty, D.K.; Tucker, T.R.; Stropki, J.T.

    1982-11-18

    Cemented tungsten carbides with a binder level in the range of 5 to 6 percent exhibited the best resistance to erosion for this class of materials. Other practical cermet meterials were diamond - Si/SiC, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-B/sub 4/C-Cr, and B/sub 4/C-Co. SiAlON exhibited erosion resistance equivalent to the best WC-cermet. The only coating system to show promise of improved erosion resistance was CVD TiB/sub 2/ on cemented TiB/sub 2/-Ni. Cracking and/or spalling of a TiC coating and a proprietary TMT coating occurred in the standard slurry erosion test. Ranking of cemented tungsten carbide materials in the laboratory erosion test was the same as that found in service in the Wilsonville pilot plant. Specimens from the Fort Lewis pilot plant which performed well in service exhibited low erosion in the laboratory test. A substitute slurry, was found to be 2 to 4 times more erosive than the coal-derived slurry 8 wt% solids. Ranking of materials in the substitute slurry was nearly identical to that in the coal-derived slurry. Three modes of erosion were: ductile cutting; elastic-plastic indentation and fracture; and intergranular fracture. Erosion of a given material was closely related to its microstructure. In the substitute slurry, the angle-dependence of erosion of two forms of SiC, hot-pressed and sintered, were similar, but the sintered material eroded slower. Laser fusing of preplaced powder mixtures can produce cermet-like structures with potential for erosive and sliding wear resistance. TiC particles in Stellite 6 matrix proved less prone to cracking than WC particles in the same matrix. 74 figures, 14 tables.

  12. A compendium on mobile robots used in hazardous environments: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meieran, H.B.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents a compendium of information regarding specific mobile robotic/teleoperated vehicles which are employed in a spectrum of hazardous environments, including the nuclear industry. These devices can be used to inspect, locate, identify, manipulate, and/or maintain components and items in the hazardous environment as well as act as mobile surveillance/sensing/reconnaissance platforms while monitoring the various constituents in the hazardous atmospheres. Furthermore, they can be used as transporters of tools, equipment, and material to and from the hazardous environment. This initial compendium is restricted to those devices which are able to maneuver on the surface of floors and other terrain features in both out-of-water and shallow water situations; subsequent compendiums will present information regarding underwater devices which can be used in the nuclear/fossil fueled/hydraulic based electric power generating and other utility industries and information updates for the initial volume. This compendium excludes those devices which are being considered for applications in outer space. 17 refs.

  13. Material for Point Design (final summary of DIME material)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-02-25

    These slides summarize the motivation of the Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) project, the “point design” of the Polar Direct Drive (PDD) version of the NIF separated reactant capsule, the experimental requirements, technical achievements, and some useful backup material. These slides are intended to provide much basic material in one convenient location and will hopefully be of some use for subsequent experimental projects.

  14. 49 CFR 173.423 - Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Class 7 (radioactive) materials. 173.423 Section 173.423 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.423 Requirements for multiple hazard limited quantity Class 7 (radioactive) materials....

  15. 78 FR 987 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... following organizations and individuals: 3M Company (3M) Airline Pilots Association, International (ALPA... Hazardous Articles (COSTHA) Dangerous Goods Advisory Council (DGAC) Dow Chemical Company (Dow) Fuel Cell... and packaging and segregation requirements. PHMSA received one comment on this proposal from 3M in...

  16. 76 FR 73011 - Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... commerce of i) and anhydrous hydrogen 173.244(a)(2). fluoride in a DOT 112S5001 car with a minimum shell... Leasing, Inc. 106, 107, and transportation in dba Brim 171-180. commerce of certain Aviation, hazardous... Terminals, is requesting a LLC, Special Permit to Cincinnati, OH. allow tank cars, containing...

  17. Environmental Assessment of the Demolition of Building 78 and Construction of New Hazardous Materials and Hazardous Waste Storage Buildings, Los Angeles Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    hazardous wastes and the scope of its operations. 3.10.4 Asbestos-Containing Material Asbestos-containing material ( ACM ) is any material containing more...transported by a registered hazardous waste hauler to a permitted hazardous waste disposal facility. ACM is assumed or known to be present in all older...LAAFB buildings and in some Fort MacArthur buildings, given bui lding age and the results of limited asbestos surveys completed in the past. ACM is

  18. Fuzzy multi-objective chance-constrained programming model for hazardous materials transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiaoman; Yu, Lean; Li, Xiang

    2016-04-01

    Hazardous materials transportation is an important and hot issue of public safety. Based on the shortest path model, this paper presents a fuzzy multi-objective programming model that minimizes the transportation risk to life, travel time and fuel consumption. First, we present the risk model, travel time model and fuel consumption model. Furthermore, we formulate a chance-constrained programming model within the framework of credibility theory, in which the lengths of arcs in the transportation network are assumed to be fuzzy variables. A hybrid intelligent algorithm integrating fuzzy simulation and genetic algorithm is designed for finding a satisfactory solution. Finally, some numerical examples are given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model and algorithm.

  19. Screening tests for hazard classification of complex waste materials - Selection of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltens, R., E-mail: reinhilde.weltens@vito.be [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Vanermen, G.; Tirez, K. [VITO Flemish Institute for Technological Research, Boeretang 200, B 2400 Mol (Belgium); Robbens, J. [University of Antwerp - Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Deprez, K.; Michiels, L. [University of Hasselt - Biomedical Research Institute, University Hasselt, Campus Diepenbeek, Agoralaan A, B3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    In this study we describe the development of an alternative methodology for hazard characterization of waste materials. Such an alternative methodology for hazard assessment of complex waste materials is urgently needed, because the lack of a validated instrument leads to arbitrary hazard classification of such complex waste materials. False classification can lead to human and environmental health risks and also has important financial consequences for the waste owner. The Hazardous Waste Directive (HWD) describes the methodology for hazard classification of waste materials. For mirror entries the HWD classification is based upon the hazardous properties (H1-15) of the waste which can be assessed from the hazardous properties of individual identified waste compounds or - if not all compounds are identified - from test results of hazard assessment tests performed on the waste material itself. For the latter the HWD recommends toxicity tests that were initially designed for risk assessment of chemicals in consumer products (pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biocides, food, etc.). These tests (often using mammals) are not designed nor suitable for the hazard characterization of waste materials. With the present study we want to contribute to the development of an alternative and transparent test strategy for hazard assessment of complex wastes that is in line with the HWD principles for waste classification. It is necessary to cope with this important shortcoming in hazardous waste classification and to demonstrate that alternative methods are available that can be used for hazard assessment of waste materials. Next, by describing the pros and cons of the available methods, and by identifying the needs for additional or further development of test methods, we hope to stimulate research efforts and development in this direction. In this paper we describe promising techniques and argument on the test selection for the pilot study that we have performed on different types of

  20. Proposal of the confinement strategy of radioactive and hazardous materials for the European DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X. Z.; Carloni, D.; Stieglitz, R.; Ciattaglia, S.; Johnston, J.; Taylor, N.

    2017-04-01

    Confinement of radioactive and hazardous materials is one of the fundamental safety functions in a nuclear fusion facility, which has to limit the mobilisation and dispersion of sources and hazards during normal, abnormal and accidental situations. In a first step energy sources and radioactive source have been assessed for a conceptual DEMO configuration. The confinement study for the European DEMO has been investigated for the main systems at the plant breakdown structure (PBS) level 1 taking a bottom-up approach. Based on the identification of the systems possessing a confinement function, a confinement strategy has been proposed, in which DEMO confinement systems and barriers have been defined. In addition, confinement for the maintenance has been issued as well. The assignment of confinement barriers to the identified sources under abnormal and accidental conditions has been performed, and the DEMO main safety systems have been proposed as well. Finally, confinement related open issues have been pointed out, which need to be resolved in parallel with DEMO development.

  1. 76 FR 32867 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... preemptive effect of Federal hazardous materials transportation law is triggered. The commenter expresses... recommends that PHMSA ask FMCSA to strike 397.5(d)(3) and replace the condition for state and...

  2. 75 FR 42364 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Certain Cargo Tank Special Permits Into Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    .... Congress expressly authorized DOT to issue these variances in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act of... dissolving into the water as ammonium hydroxide while simultaneously boiling into the atmosphere as gaseous...

  3. 77 FR 76602 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Actions on Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... additional modes of operation. New Special Permit Granted 15558-N......... 3M Company, St. 49 CFR 173.212, To... Nemours and 12(c). transportation in Company, commerce of Wilmington, DE. hazardous material in tank cars...

  4. Hazardous materials management using a Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldgaard, E.; Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Freshour, N.; Hammond, B.; Bray, O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hollingsworth, M. [Ogden Environmental & Energy Services Co., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous materials management includes interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, and processes of various groups within a DOE site`s environmental, safety & health (ES&H) and line organizations. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information it requires must be gathered into a coherent set of common data for accurate and consistent hazardous material management and regulatory reporting. It is these common data requirements which the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. CGTIS collects information at the point at which a process begins or a material enters a facility, and maintains that information, for hazards management and regulatory reporting, throughout the entire life-cycle by providing direct on-line links to a site`s multitude of data bases to bring information together into one common data model.

  5. 76 FR 82163 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous... United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods: Model Regulations (UN Model... and from the United States. In this document, PHMSA responds to administrative appeals,...

  6. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office`s program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  7. An OSHA based approach to safety analysis for nonradiological hazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurconic, M.

    1992-08-01

    The PNL method for chemical hazard classification defines major hazards by means of a list of hazardous substances (or chemical groups) with associated trigger quantities. In addition, the functional characteristics of the facility being classified is also be factored into the classification. In this way, installations defined as major hazard will only be those which have the potential for causing very serious incidents both on and off site. Because of the diversity of operations involving chemicals, it may not be possible to restrict major hazard facilities to certain types of operations. However, this hazard classification method recognizes that in the industrial sector major hazards are most commonly associated with activities involving very large quantities of chemicals and inherently energetic processes. These include operations like petrochemical plants, chemical production, LPG storage, explosives manufacturing, and facilities which use chlorine, ammonia, or other highly toxic gases in bulk quantities. The basis for this methodology is derived from concepts used by OSHA in its proposed chemical process safety standard, the Dow Fire and Explosion Index Hazard Classification Guide, and the International Labor Office's program on chemical safety. For the purpose of identifying major hazard facilities, this method uses two sorting criteria, (1) facility function and processes and (2) quantity of substances to identify facilities requiringclassification. Then, a measure of chemical energy potential (material factor) is used to identify high hazard class facilities.

  8. 77 FR 30976 - Hazardous Materials: Miscellaneous Petitions for Rulemaking (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... the limited quantity exception for Self- reactive solid, Type F materials, consistent with... and solid material as limited quantities in accordance with the type and quantity of substances... Self-reactive liquids, Types B through F materials to be excepted from labeling and...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  10. 75 FR 59197 - Hazardous Materials: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ...: Limiting the Use of Electronic Devices by Highway AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) proposes to prohibit texting on electronic devices by drivers during... materials community to the dangers associated with the use of mobile phones and electronic devices...

  11. 77 FR 64450 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Certain Special Permits and Competent Authorities Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... alcohol. Transportation of solid coal tar pitch compounds. Transportation of certain ammonia solutions in... developing new materials and technologies and innovative ways of moving materials. Special permits enable the hazardous materials industry to quickly, effectively, and safely integrate new products and technologies...

  12. Transport of hazardous materials in the Amazon area; Transporte de produtos perigosos na regiao Amazonica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Wallace de Castro [FURNAS Centrais Eletricas S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Fernandes, Elton; Nassi, Carlos David [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE)

    2008-07-01

    Amongst several exploratory sources of the subject 'hazardous materials transport', it is distinguished: 'the threat to the environment'. This paper presents an exploratory investigation of this subject line in the Amazon region. In view of the diversity of 'existing hazardous materials' and the raised dimension of the oil transport and its derivatives in this context, this paper focused in these products. Regarding to the geographic region, the approach was given to the State of Amazon, considering the amplitude of this State in the Amazon region and the availability of data. Therefore, this work explores and analyzes macro aspects inherent to the State of Amazon pertinent to the oil transport and its derivatives. In the macro context, it is observed the necessity of a higher control in the transport of hazardous materials in the region. The absence of registered data and the unfamiliarity on the risks related to the transport of hazardous materials by authorities and transporters indicate a relative absence of qualification in the region to deal with the monitoring of the transport of hazardous materials. So far, it is not possible up till now to make any evaluation of the environment threats of accidents with transport of hazardous materials in the Amazon region.(author)

  13. MATERIALS FOR THE FINAL COVER OF SANITARY LANDFILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Kovačić

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the selection of materials for the sea¬ling layer in the final cover of sanitary landfills. The sealing la¬yer is the most critical component of the final cover. Its role is to minimize percolation of water through the final cover. Ma¬terials used for the construction of the sealing layer are either of mineral origin (compacted clay or geosynthetic (geomem¬brane. They are most often used in combination creating com¬posite liners. Recently alternative materials are also used like paper mill sludge or discarded swelling clay.

  14. 78 FR 15303 - Hazardous Materials; Miscellaneous Amendments (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... burdens and maintain flexibility and freedom of choice for the public. Finally, federal agencies were... comments that strongly oppose the proposed amendment. AAR states its belief that the TSI guidance...

  15. 76 FR 36879 - Minnesota: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ..., September 16, 1992 (57 FR 42832) Standards Applicable to Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment... Characteristic Wastes Whose Treatment Standards Were Vacated, Checklist 124, May 24, 1993 (58 FR 29860) Hazardous... State Hazardous Waste Programs, Checklist 153, July 1, 1996 (61 FR 34252) Hazardous Waste Treatment...

  16. 78 FR 42457 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Fireworks Regulations (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... certification process to expedite shipments are difficult to quantify. However, we know that any rational... NPRM is also rooted in their belief that the proposals in the NPRM will add a financial burden and that... need to reject an application. Implementation Time Finally, NFA states their belief that `` stablishing...

  17. 77 FR 49167 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization with International Standards (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-15

    ... of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO Technical Instructions), Amendment 36-12 to the International... Regulations, the IMDG Code, and the ICAO Technical Instructions. If adopted in a final rule, the amendments..., and international modal regulations, including the IMDG Code and the ICAO Technical...

  18. Bi-Objective Modelling for Hazardous Materials Road-Rail Multimodal Routing Problem with Railway Schedule-Based Space-Time Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Lang, Maoxiang; Wang, Danzhu

    2016-07-28

    The transportation of hazardous materials is always accompanied by considerable risk that will impact public and environment security. As an efficient and reliable transportation organization, a multimodal service should participate in the transportation of hazardous materials. In this study, we focus on transporting hazardous materials through the multimodal service network and explore the hazardous materials multimodal routing problem from the operational level of network planning. To formulate this problem more practicably, minimizing the total generalized costs of transporting the hazardous materials and the social risk along the planned routes are set as the optimization objectives. Meanwhile, the following formulation characteristics will be comprehensively modelled: (1) specific customer demands; (2) multiple hazardous material flows; (3) capacitated schedule-based rail service and uncapacitated time-flexible road service; and (4) environmental risk constraint. A bi-objective mixed integer nonlinear programming model is first built to formulate the routing problem that combines the formulation characteristics above. Then linear reformations are developed to linearize and improve the initial model so that it can be effectively solved by exact solution algorithms on standard mathematical programming software. By utilizing the normalized weighted sum method, we can generate the Pareto solutions to the bi-objective optimization problem for a specific case. Finally, a large-scale empirical case study from the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region in China is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed methods in dealing with the practical problem. Various scenarios are also discussed in the case study.

  19. Bi-Objective Modelling for Hazardous Materials Road–Rail Multimodal Routing Problem with Railway Schedule-Based Space–Time Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Lang, Maoxiang; Wang, Danzhu

    2016-01-01

    The transportation of hazardous materials is always accompanied by considerable risk that will impact public and environment security. As an efficient and reliable transportation organization, a multimodal service should participate in the transportation of hazardous materials. In this study, we focus on transporting hazardous materials through the multimodal service network and explore the hazardous materials multimodal routing problem from the operational level of network planning. To formulate this problem more practicably, minimizing the total generalized costs of transporting the hazardous materials and the social risk along the planned routes are set as the optimization objectives. Meanwhile, the following formulation characteristics will be comprehensively modelled: (1) specific customer demands; (2) multiple hazardous material flows; (3) capacitated schedule-based rail service and uncapacitated time-flexible road service; and (4) environmental risk constraint. A bi-objective mixed integer nonlinear programming model is first built to formulate the routing problem that combines the formulation characteristics above. Then linear reformations are developed to linearize and improve the initial model so that it can be effectively solved by exact solution algorithms on standard mathematical programming software. By utilizing the normalized weighted sum method, we can generate the Pareto solutions to the bi-objective optimization problem for a specific case. Finally, a large-scale empirical case study from the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei Region in China is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed methods in dealing with the practical problem. Various scenarios are also discussed in the case study. PMID:27483294

  20. Ultraviolet reflector materials for solar detoxification of hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G.; Govindarajan, R.

    1991-07-01

    Organic waste detoxification requires cleavage of carbon bonds. Such reactions can be photo-driven by light that is energetic enough to disrupt such bonds. Alternately, light can be used to activate catalyst materials, which in turn can break organic bonds. In either case, photons with wavelengths less than 400 nm are required. Because the terrestrial solar resource below 400 nm is so small (roughly 3% of the available spectrum), highly efficient optical concentrators are needed that can withstand outdoor service conditions. In the past, optical elements for solar application have been designed to prevent ultraviolet (uv) radiation from reaching the reflective layer to avoid the potentially harmful effects of such light on the collector materials themselves. This effectively forfeits the uv part of the spectrum in return for some measure of protection against optical degradation. To optimize the cost/performance benefit of photochemical reaction systems, optical materials must be developed that are not only highly efficient but also inherently stable against the radiation they are designed to concentrate. The requirements of uv optical elements in terms of appropriate spectral bands and level of reflectance are established based upon the needs of photochemical applications. Relevant literature on uv reflector materials is reviewed which, along with discussions with industrial contacts, allows the establishment of a data base of currently available materials. Although a number of related technologies exist that require uv reflectors, to date little attention has been paid to achieving outdoor durability required for solar applications. 49 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Analysis of hazardous biological material by MALDI mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KL Wahl; KH Jarman; NB Valentine; MT Kingsley; CE Petersen; ST Cebula; AJ Saenz

    2000-03-21

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has become a valuable tool for analyzing microorganisms. The speed with which data can be obtained from MALDI-MS makes this a potentially important tool for biological health hazard monitoring and forensic applications. The excitement in the mass spectrometry community in this potential field of application is evident by the expanding list of research laboratories pursuing development of MALDI-MS for bacterial identification. Numerous research groups have demonstrated the ability to obtain unique MALDI-MS spectra from intact bacterial cells and bacterial cell extracts. The ability to differentiate strains of the same species has been investigated. Reproducibility of MALDI-MS spectra from bacterial species under carefully controlled experimental conditions has also been demonstrated. Wang et al. have reported on interlaboratory reproducibility of the MALDI-MS analysis of several bacterial species. However, there are still issues that need to be addressed, including the careful control of experimental parameters for reproducible spectra and selection of optimal experimental parameters such as solvent and matrix.

  2. Hydrolysis of aluminum dross material to achieve zero hazardous waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, E; Kopac, J

    2012-03-30

    A simple method with high efficiency for generating high pure hydrogen by hydrolysis in tap water of highly activated aluminum dross is established. Aluminum dross is activated by mechanically milling to particles of about 45 μm. This leads to removal of surface layer of the aluminum particles and creation of a fresh chemically active metal surface. In contact with water the hydrolysis reaction takes place and hydrogen is released. In this process a Zero Waste concept is achieved because the other product of reaction is aluminum oxide hydroxide (AlOOH), which is nature-friendly and can be used to make high quality refractory or calcium aluminate cement. For comparison we also used pure aluminum powder and alkaline tap water solution (NaOH, KOH) at a ratio similar to that of aluminum dross content. The rates of hydrogen generated in hydrolysis reaction of pure aluminum and aluminum dross have been found to be similar. As a result of the experimental setup, a hydrogen generator was designed and assembled. Hydrogen volume generated by hydrolysis reaction was measured. The experimental results obtained reveal that aluminum dross could be economically recycled by hydrolysis process with achieving zero hazardous aluminum dross waste and hydrogen generation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-02-27

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  5. 77 FR 31815 - Hazardous Materials Regulations: Combustible Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    .... DGAC estimates that export shipments are delayed for an average of three days awaiting removal of HMR... states that the most widely-used commercial explosive product in the U.S. is ammonium nitrate/fuel oil... nitrate/fuel oil materials (``ANFO''), of blends of the two directly into boreholes, which are equipped...

  6. DoD Hazardous Materials Information System Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    points to obtain a ILA assigned code. Since water is the most commonly used solvent and since it is not assigned a NIOSH code the following locally...cf* various materials, with its length greater than its other dimensions, e.g., solder. Not applicable to items such as soap, beeswax , buffing

  7. Reduction of Fire Hazard in Materials for Irrigators and Water Collectors in Cooling Towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, N. V.; Konstantinova, N. I., E-mail: konstantinova-n@inbox.ru [FGBU VNIIPO of EMERCOM of Russia (All-Russian Scientific-research Institute of Fire Protection) (Russian Federation); Gordon, E. P. [Research and Production Center “Kaustik” (Russian Federation); Poedintsev, E. A. [FGBU VNIIPO of EMERCOM of Russia (All-Russian Scientific-research Institute of Fire Protection) (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    A way of reducing the fire hazard of PVC film used to make cooling-tower irrigators and water collectors is examined. A new generation of fire retardant, nanostructured magnesium hydroxide, is used to impart fire retardant properties. The fabrication technology is optimized with a roller-calendering manufacturing technique, and the permissible ranges of fire hazard indicators for materials in irrigators and water collectors are determined.

  8. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Federal Register Notice: Final Rule Listing as Hazardous Wastes Certain Dioxin Containing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is amending the regulations for hazardous waste management under the RCRA by listing as hazardous wastes certain wastes containing particular chlorinated dioxins, -dibenzofurans, and -phenols, and by specifying a engagement standards for these wastes.

  10. Hydrolysis of aluminum dross material to achieve zero hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, E., E-mail: david@icsi.ro [National Institute for Research and Development for Cryogenic and Isotopic Technologies, P.O Raureni, P.O. Box 7, 240050 Rm. Valcea (Romania); Kopac, J., E-mail: Janez.Kopac@fs.uni-lj.si [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Askerceva 6, P.O. Box 394, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrolysis of aluminum dross in tap water generates pure hydrogen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum particles from dross are activated by mechanically milling technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process is completely greenhouse gases free and is cleanly to environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrolysis process leads to recycling of waste aluminum by hydrogen production. - Abstract: A simple method with high efficiency for generating high pure hydrogen by hydrolysis in tap water of highly activated aluminum dross is established. Aluminum dross is activated by mechanically milling to particles of about 45 {mu}m. This leads to removal of surface layer of the aluminum particles and creation of a fresh chemically active metal surface. In contact with water the hydrolysis reaction takes place and hydrogen is released. In this process a Zero Waste concept is achieved because the other product of reaction is aluminum oxide hydroxide (AlOOH), which is nature-friendly and can be used to make high quality refractory or calcium aluminate cement. For comparison we also used pure aluminum powder and alkaline tap water solution (NaOH, KOH) at a ratio similar to that of aluminum dross content. The rates of hydrogen generated in hydrolysis reaction of pure aluminum and aluminum dross have been found to be similar. As a result of the experimental setup, a hydrogen generator was designed and assembled. Hydrogen volume generated by hydrolysis reaction was measured. The experimental results obtained reveal that aluminum dross could be economically recycled by hydrolysis process with achieving zero hazardous aluminum dross waste and hydrogen generation.

  11. Intra-aortic filtration is effective in collecting hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Bernabeu, Eduardo; Fernández, Claudio; Colli, Andrea; Josa, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations are mostly due to particle embolization. This case illustrates the embolic potential of any material. A 77-year-old lady underwent re-operation for homograft aortic regurgitation and mitral valve replacement. Intra-aortic filtration was used. After cardiopulmonary bypass the filter was found to have captured a pledget from a suture used to secure the mitral replacement device.

  12. Materials for Shielding Astronauts from the Hazards of Space Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.; Shinn, J. L.; Thibeault, S. A.; Singleterry, R. C.; Simonsen, L. C.; Kim, M. H.

    1997-01-01

    One major obstacle to human space exploration is the possible limitations imposed by the adverse effects of long-term exposure to the space environment. Even before human spaceflight began, the potentially brief exposure of astronauts to the very intense random solar energetic particle (SEP) events was of great concern. A new challenge appears in deep space exploration from exposure to the low-intensity heavy-ion flux of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) since the missions are of long duration and the accumulated exposures can be high. Because cancer induction rates increase behind low to rather large thickness of aluminum shielding according to available biological data on mammalian exposures to GCR like ions, the shield requirements for a Mars mission are prohibitively expensive in terms of mission launch costs. Preliminary studies indicate that materials with high hydrogen content and low atomic number constituents are most efficient in protecting the astronauts. This occurs for two reasons: the hydrogen is efficient in breaking up the heavy GCR ions into smaller less damaging fragments and the light constituents produce few secondary radiations (especially few biologically damaging neutrons). An overview of the materials related issues and their impact on human space exploration will be given.

  13. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Ludowise

    2009-06-17

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site. A material at risk calculation was performed that determined the radiological inventory for each burial ground to be Hazard Category 3.

  14. Terrorism and hazardous material trucking: promoting perceived collective efficacy for terrorism prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Hazardous-material trucking has recently been identified as an area of high potential risk for terrorism. Some recent theory and case study papers have argued for the importance of collective efficacy to disaster-response, terrorism prevention, and other rare-but-risky events. Therefore, a study based on the collective efficacy literature was done to test an intervention for increasing perceived collective efficacy for terrorism prevention among Canadian hazardous-material truck drivers. Results supported the impact of the intervention in increasing perceived efficacy for terrorism prevention. Implications for theory, research, and application are discussed.

  15. Integrating Hazardous Materials Characterization and Assessment Tools to Guide Pollution Prevention in Electronic Products and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Carl

    Due to technology proliferation, the environmental burden attributed to the production, use, and disposal of hazardous materials in electronics have become a worldwide concern. The major theme of this dissertation is to develop and apply hazardous materials assessment tools to systematically guide pollution prevention opportunities in the context of electronic product design, manufacturing and end-of-life waste management. To this extent, a comprehensive review is first provided on describing hazard traits and current assessment methods to evaluate hazardous materials. As a case study at the manufacturing level, life cycle impact assessment (LCIA)-based and risk-based screening methods are used to quantify chemical and geographic environmental impacts in the U.S. printed wiring board (PWB) industry. Results from this industrial assessment clarify priority waste streams and States to most effectively mitigate impact. With further knowledge of PWB manufacturing processes, select alternative chemical processes (e.g., spent copper etchant recovery) and material options (e.g., lead-free etch resist) are discussed. In addition, an investigation on technology transition effects for computers and televisions in the U.S. market is performed by linking dynamic materials flow and environmental assessment models. The analysis forecasts quantities of waste units generated and maps shifts in environmental impact potentials associated with metal composition changes due to product substitutions. This insight is important to understand the timing and waste quantities expected and the emerging toxic elements needed to be addressed as a consequence of technology transition. At the product level, electronic utility meter devices are evaluated to eliminate hazardous materials within product components. Development and application of a component Toxic Potential Indicator (TPI) assessment methodology highlights priority components requiring material alternatives. Alternative

  16. Radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials and end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viruthagiri, G; Rajamannan, B; Suresh Jawahar, K

    2013-12-01

    Studies have been planned to obtain activity and associated radiation hazards in ceramic raw materials (quartz, feldspar, clay, zircon, kaolin, grog, alumina bauxite, baddeleyite, masse, dolomite and red mud) and end products (ceramic brick, glazed ceramic wall and floor tiles) as the activity concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium vary from material to material. The primordial radionuclides in ceramic raw materials and end products are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the activity level in these materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in ceramic raw materials and end products. The activity of these materials has been measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry, which contains an NaI(Tl) detector connected to multichannel analyser (MCA). Radium equivalent activity, alpha-gamma indices and radiation hazard indices associated with the natural radionuclides are calculated to assess the radiological aspects of the use of the ceramic end products as decorative or covering materials in construction sector. Results obtained were examined in the light of the relevant international legislation and guidance and compared with the results of similar studies reported in different countries. The results suggest that the use of ceramic end product samples examined in the construction of dwellings, workplace and industrial buildings is unlikely to give rise to any significant radiation exposure to the occupants.

  17. Approaches and practices related to hazardous waste management, processing and final disposal in germany and Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos, J.A.L.; Pereira, F.A.; Tomich, S. [CETREL S.A., Camacari, BA (Brazil)

    1993-12-31

    A general overview of the existing management and processing of hazardous wastes technologies in Germany and Brazil is presented in this work. Emphasis has been given to the new technologies and practices adopted in both countries, including a comparison of the legislation, standards and natural trends. Two case studies of large industrial hazardous waste sites are described. 9 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. 75 FR 65432 - New Mexico: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... relevant) authority 1. Zinc Fertilizer Rule. 67 FR 48393-48415, New Mexico Statute (Checklist 200). July 24... Contaminated October 7, 2002. Annotated (NMSA) Batteries. (Checklist 201). 1978, Section 74- 4-1. Hazardous... November 3, 2008, effective March 1, 2009. 3. Hazardous Air Pollutant 67 FR 77687-77692, New Mexico...

  19. 76 FR 5107 - Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials From the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 260 and 261 RIN-2050-AE78 Regulation of Oil-Bearing Hazardous Secondary Materials..., Earthjustice, 21 Ocean Avenue, Marblehead, MA 01945. Dear Ms. Evans: This is in response to the petition for... slagging inorganic feed at temperatures above 2,000 degrees C. (Petition at pg. 10) (3) You assert that the...

  20. Probability analysis of multiple-tank-car release incidents in railway hazardous materials transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Saat, Mohd Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-07-15

    Railroads play a key role in the transportation of hazardous materials in North America. Rail transport differs from highway transport in several aspects, an important one being that rail transport involves trains in which many railcars carrying hazardous materials travel together. By contrast to truck accidents, it is possible that a train accident may involve multiple hazardous materials cars derailing and releasing contents with consequently greater potential impact on human health, property and the environment. In this paper, a probabilistic model is developed to estimate the probability distribution of the number of tank cars releasing contents in a train derailment. Principal operational characteristics considered include train length, derailment speed, accident cause, position of the first car derailed, number and placement of tank cars in a train and tank car safety design. The effect of train speed, tank car safety design and tank car positions in a train were evaluated regarding the number of cars that release their contents in a derailment. This research provides insights regarding the circumstances affecting multiple-tank-car release incidents and potential strategies to reduce their occurrences. The model can be incorporated into a larger risk management framework to enable better local, regional and national safety management of hazardous materials transportation by rail. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 78 FR 54849 - Hazardous Materials: Rail Petitions and Recommendations To Improve the Safety of Railroad Tank...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... existing general service tank cars authorized for transportation of denatured fuel ethanol and crude oil in... standard for tank cars used to transport crude oil, denatured alcohol and ethanol/gasoline mixtures as well... Railroad Tank Car Transportation (RRR) AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  2. Probability analysis of multiple-tank-car release incidents in railway hazardous materials transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang, E-mail: liu94@illinois.edu; Saat, Mohd Rapik, E-mail: mohdsaat@illinois.edu; Barkan, Christopher P.L., E-mail: cbarkan@illinois.edu

    2014-07-15

    Railroads play a key role in the transportation of hazardous materials in North America. Rail transport differs from highway transport in several aspects, an important one being that rail transport involves trains in which many railcars carrying hazardous materials travel together. By contrast to truck accidents, it is possible that a train accident may involve multiple hazardous materials cars derailing and releasing contents with consequently greater potential impact on human health, property and the environment. In this paper, a probabilistic model is developed to estimate the probability distribution of the number of tank cars releasing contents in a train derailment. Principal operational characteristics considered include train length, derailment speed, accident cause, position of the first car derailed, number and placement of tank cars in a train and tank car safety design. The effect of train speed, tank car safety design and tank car positions in a train were evaluated regarding the number of cars that release their contents in a derailment. This research provides insights regarding the circumstances affecting multiple-tank-car release incidents and potential strategies to reduce their occurrences. The model can be incorporated into a larger risk management framework to enable better local, regional and national safety management of hazardous materials transportation by rail.

  3. Human biological monitoring for exposure assessment in response to an incident involving hazardous materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Brederode, N.E. van; Bos, P.M.J.; Nijhuis, N.J.; Weerdt, R.H. van de; Woude, I. van der; Eggens, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Biological monitoring in humans (HBM) is widely used in the field of occupational and environmental health. In the situation of an unexpected release of hazardous materials HBM may contribute to the medical support and treatment of exposed individuals from the general population or of emergency

  4. 78 FR 1101 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... 178 RIN 2137-AE83 Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations on the... Regulations), and the United Nations Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods: Model Regulations... a Department of Transportation (DOT) or United Nations (UN) standard packaging. Most...

  5. 75 FR 45195 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... hazardous materials, packaging design changes, additional mode of transportation, etc.) are described in... compressed oxygen without rigid outer packaging when no other means of transportation exist. 14860-M Alaska... authorizing the transportation in commerce of compressed oxygen without rigid outer packaging when no other...

  6. Chemical stability of salt cake in the presence of organic materials. [Detonation hazard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    High-level waste stored as salt cake is principally NaNO/sub 3/. Some organic material is known to have been added to the waste tanks. It has been suggested that some of this organic material may have become nitrated and transformed to a detonable state. Arguments are presented to discount the presence of nitrated organics in the waste tanks. Nitrated organics generated accidentally usually explode at the time of formation. Detonation tests show that salt cake and ''worst-case'' organic mixtures are not detonable. Organic mixtures with salt cake are compared with black powder, a related exothermic reactant. Black-powder mixtures of widely varying composition can and do burn explosively; ignition temperatures are 300-450/sup 0/C. However, black-powder-type mixes cannot be ignited by radiation and are shock-insensitive. Temperatures generated by radionuclide decay in the salt are below 175/sup 0/C and would be incapable of igniting any of these mixtures. The expected effect of radiation on organics in the waste tanks is a slow dehydrogenation and depolymerization along with a slight increase in sensitivity to oxidation. The greatest explosion hazard, if any exists, is a hydrogen--oxygen explosion from water radiolysis, but the hydrogen must first be generated and then trapped so that the concentration of hydrogen can rise above 4 vol percent. This is impossible in salt cake. Final confirmation of the safety against organic-related explosive reactions in the salt cake will be based upon analytical determinations of organic concentrations. 12 tables, 5 fig. (DLC)

  7. Packaging performance evaluation and performance oriented packaging standards for large packages for poison inhalation hazard materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griego, N.R.; Mills, G.S.; McClure, J.D. [and others

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation Research & Special Programs Administration (DOT-RSPA) has sponsored a project at Sandia National Laboratories to evaluate the protection provided by current packagings used for truck and rail transport of materials that have been classified as Poison Inhalation Hazards (PIH) and to recommend performance standards for these PIH packagings. Hazardous materials span a wide range of toxicity and there are many parameters used to characterize toxicity; for any given hazardous material, data are not available for all of the possible toxicity parameters. Therefore, it was necessary to select a toxicity criterion to characterize all of the PIH compounds (a value of the criterion was derived from other parameters in many cases) and to calculate their dispersion in the event of a release resulting from a transportation accident. Methodologies which account for material toxicity and dispersal characteristics were developed as a major portion of this project and applied to 72 PIH materials. This report presents details of the PIH material toxicity comparisons, calculation of their dispersion, and their classification into five severity categories. 16 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Assessment of natural radioactivity and radiological hazards in building materials used in Yan'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Caifeng

    2013-03-01

    The concentration of natural radionuclides in commonly used building materials collected from Yan'an, China, was determined using gamma ray spectroscopy with a NaI(Tl) detector. The activity concentration of ²²⁶Ra, ²³²Th, and ⁴⁰K in the studied building materials ranges from 9.4-73.1, 11.5-86.9, and 258.9-1,055.1 Bq kg⁻¹, respectively. The concentrations for these natural radionuclides were compared with the reported data of other countries and the world mean values for soil. The radium equivalent activity (Raeq), external hazard index (Hex), internal hazard index (Hin), indoor air absorbed dose rate, and annual effective dose rate due to natural radionuclides in samples were estimated to assess radiological hazards for people living in dwellings made of the studied building materials. The calculated Raeq values of all building materials (75.7-222.1 Bq kg⁻¹) are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg⁻¹. The values of Hex and Hin are less than unity. The mean values of indoor air absorbed dose rates of all building materials (101.0 ± 14.1-177.0 ± 6.8 nGy h⁻¹) are higher than the world population-weighted average of 84 nGy h⁻¹, while the mean values of annual effective dose range from 0.50 ± 0.07-0.87 ± 0.03 mSv y⁻¹, which are lower than the recommended limit of 1 mSv y⁻¹. It is found that these materials may be used safely as construction materials and do not pose significant radiation hazards to inhabitants.

  9. Final recommendations for reference materials in black carbon analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Skjemstad, Jan O.

    Last summer, a symposium was held to discuss aspects of global biogeochemical cycles, including organic matter cycling in soils, rivers, and marine environments; black carbon particle fluxes and the biological pump; dissolved organic matter; and organic matter preservation. Seventy scientists from various disciplines, including oceanography, soil science, geology, and chemistry attended the 3-day meeting at the Friday Harbor Laboratories, a research station of the University of Washington.“New Approaches in Marine Organic Biogeochemistry” commemorated the life and science of a colleague and friend, John I. Hedges, who was also involved in several groups developing chemical reference materials. Part of this symposium included a workshop on chemical reference materials, where final recommendations of the Steering Committee for Black Carbon Reference Materials were presented.

  10. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  11. 76 FR 62303 - California: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... and Mineral Processing Wastes; (7) Hazardous Soils Treatment Standards and Exclusions; (8... Compliance Date for Characteristic Slags; (11) Treatment Standards for Spent Potliners from Primary Aluminum... for PCBs in Soil; and (14) Certain Land Disposal Restrictions Technical Corrections and...

  12. 49 CFR 1572.201 - Transportation of hazardous materials via commercial motor vehicle from Canada or Mexico to and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transportation of hazardous materials via commercial motor vehicle from Canada or Mexico to and within the United States. 1572.201 Section 1572.201... Land Modes § 1572.201 Transportation of hazardous materials via commercial motor vehicle from Canada...

  13. Double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for versatile hazardous materials detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)], E-mail: jennifer.gottfried@arl.army.mil; De Lucia, Frank C.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    We have developed a double-pulse standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (ST-LIBS) system capable of detecting a variety of hazardous materials at tens of meters. The use of a double-pulse laser improves the sensitivity and selectivity of ST-LIBS, especially for the detection of energetic materials. In addition to various metallic and plastic materials, the system has been used to detect bulk explosives RDX and Composition-B, explosive residues, biological species such as the anthrax surrogate Bacillus subtilis, and chemical warfare simulants at 20 m. We have also demonstrated the discrimination of explosive residues from various interferents on an aluminum substrate.

  14. 75 FR 38168 - Hazardous Materials: International Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1); Draft Revision Available for Comment AGENCY... International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ``Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' (TS-R... Radioactive Material (TS-R-1), to promote the safe and secure transportation of radioactive material. The...

  15. Truck shipment risks for assessing hazardous materials - a new paradigm incorporating safety and security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, A.; McSweeney, T.; Allen, J.; Lepofsky, M. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Abkowitz, M. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Recent terrorist events, most notably September 11, 2001, have taught us that transportation risk management must be performed with a different lens to accommodate terrorism scenarios that would have previously been considered unlikely to warrant serious attention. Given these circumstances, a new paradigm is needed for managing the risks associated with highway transport of hazardous materials. In particular, this paradigm must: 1) more explicitly consider security threat and vulnerability, and 2) integrate security considerations into an overall framework for addressing natural and man-made disasters, be they accidental or planned. This paper summarizes the results of a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration for the purpose of exploring how a paradigm might evolve in which both safety and security risks can be evaluated as a systematic, integrated process. The work was directed at developing a methodology for assessing the impacts of hazardous materials safety and security incident consequences when transported by highway. This included consideration of the manner in which these materials could be involved in initiating events as well as potential outcomes under a variety of release conditions. The methodology is subsequently applied to various classes of hazardous materials to establish an economic profile of the impacts that might be expected if a major release were to occur. The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings and implications associated with this effort.

  16. Seismic hazard methodology for the Central and Eastern United States: Volume 1: Part 2, Methodology (Revision 1): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, R.K.; Veneziano, D.; Van Dyck, J.; Toro, G.; O' Hara, T.; Drake, L.; Patwardhan, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Keeney, R.; Winkler, R.

    1988-11-01

    Aided by its consultant, the US Geologic Survey (USGS), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed ''Seismic Hazard Methodology for the Central and Eastern United States.'' This topical report was submitted jointly by the Seismicity Owners Group (SOG) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in July 1986 and was revised in February 1987. The NRC staff concludes that SOG/EPRI Seismic Hazard Methodology as documented in the topical report and associated submittals, is an acceptable methodology for use in calculating seismic hazard in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS). These calculations will be based upon the data and information documented in the material that was submitted as the SOG/EPRI topical report and ancillary submittals. However, as part of the review process the staff conditions its approval by noting areas in which problems may arise unless precautions detailed in the report are observed. 23 refs.

  17. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  18. Model and Method for Multiobjective Time-Dependent Hazardous Material Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most of the hazardous material transportation problems, risk factors are assumed to be constant, which ignores the fact that they can vary with time throughout the day. In this paper, we deal with a novel time-dependent hazardous material transportation problem via lane reservation, in which the dynamic nature of transportation risk in the real-life traffic environment is taken into account. We first develop a multiobjective mixed integer programming (MIP model with two conflicting objectives: minimizing the impact on the normal traffic resulting from lane reservation and minimizing the total transportation risk. We then present a cut-and-solve based ε-constraint method to solve this model. Computational results indicate that our method outperforms the ε-constraint method based on optimization software package CPLEX.

  19. Recommended Hazard Classification Procedures for In-Process Propellant and Explosive Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    Test Impingement Test Rubbing Friction Test Local Thermal Test Regional Thermal Test Standard Test for Hazard Detection of Chemicals...a-9 Heater winding 33 a-10 Cover plates and heater terminals 34 a-11 Local thermal test , sample data sheet 35 a-11.1 Typical DTA - DSC curve with...mm LOCAL THERMAL TEST Purpose Inprocess explosive and propellant materials may be susceptible to initiation from localized hot spots from such

  20. Defense Transportation: DOD Needs to Take Actions to Improve the Transportation of Hazardous Material Shipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Air Force, the Navy, and the Marine Corps; and DOT’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. See appendix I for more information on...is a viable microorganism or its toxin that causes, or may cause, human disease. 31DOD guidance for safeguarding biological select agents and...Defense for Transportation Policy; the Defense Logistics Agency; the Army, the Air Force, the Navy, the Marine Corps; and DOT’s Pipeline and

  1. Emergency response network design for hazardous materials transportation with uncertain demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Shahanaghi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of hazardous materials play an essential role on keeping a friendly environment. Every day, a substantial amount of hazardous materials (hazmats, such as flammable liquids and poisonous gases, need to be transferred prior to consumption or disposal. Such transportation may result in unsuitable events for people and environment. Emergency response network is designed for this reason where specialist responding teams resolve any issue as quickly as possible. This study proposes a new multi-objective model to locate emergency response centers for transporting the hazardous materials. Since many real-world applications are faced with uncertainty in input parameters, the proposed model of this paper also assumes that reference and demand to such centre is subject to uncertainty, where demand is fuzzy random. The resulted problem formulation is modelled as nonlinear non-convex mixed integer programming and we used NSGAII method to solve the resulted problem. The performance of the proposed model is examined with several examples using various probability distribution and they are compared with the performance of other existing method.

  2. A New Approach to Inventorying Army Hazardous Materials, A Study Done for the Eighth U.S. Army, Korea. Volume 2. Hazardous Material Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    W807M8 GL 30 30 2 WT4WTE W807M8 GL 300 100 Total: 460 210 6840006646610 DEODORANT ,GENERAL P CI 3 W80ADH W807M8 CO 8 8 6840006877904 DISINFECTANT DETERG...RQSTD DLVRD Code DOOAAC DODAAC Total Total b6650110,55623 ALARM CHiEMICAL AGENT FX 1 W80ADH W81FFM EA 9 9 683DC6646610 DEODORANT ,GENERAL P CI 3 W8OADH...BEESWAX TECHNICAL 2 3 WT4WTQ W807M8 CK 1 1 9160002638757 TALLOW , INEDIBLE 3 WT4WTQ W807M8 CN 2 6 A128 Table AS5-* (Cant’I d) FY90 Hazardous Material

  3. 78 FR 15299 - New York: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ..., additional testing, reporting and emergency procedures, and closure requirements: 374-2.5(a)(5) introductory.... New York regulates used oil containing greater than 50 ppm of PCB wastes as hazardous waste, unless... wastes under the Federal RCRA program. PCB wastes are regulated under the Federal Toxic...

  4. 78 FR 70225 - West Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... significant economic impact on a substantial number of small entities under the Regulatory Flexibility Act (5... Waste Management System'' (33 CSR 20), effective June 16, 2011; and Title 45, Series 25 ``Control of Air Pollution from Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities'' (45 CSR 25), effective June 16...

  5. 78 FR 54178 - Virginia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... limitations of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). New Federal requirements and... Processed in a Gasification System to Produce Synthetic Gas, Revision Checklist 216. National Emission... FR 77954, 9 VAC Sec. Sec. 20- Fuel Exclusion, Revision December 19, 60-18, 20-60-261. Checklist...

  6. Criticality analysis for hazardous materials transportation; Classificacao da criticidade das rotas do transporte rodoviario de produtos perigosos da BRASKEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Katia; Brady, Mariana [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Diniz, Americo [BRASKEM S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The bad conditions of Brazilians roads drive the companies to be more exigent with the transportation of hazardous materials to avoid accidents or materials releases with actions to contain the releases to community and water sources. To minimize this situation, DNV and BRASKEM developed a methodology for risk analysis called Criticality Analysis for Hazardous Materials Transportation. The objective of this methodology is identifying the most critical points of routes to make actions to avoid accidents. (author)

  7. New Materials for Electric Drive Vehicles - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-18

    This project was sponsored by the US DOE Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention. The object was for Ukrainian and US partners, including Argonne, AETC, and Dontech to develop special carbon materials and factory production equipment with the goal of making better car batteries to achieve DOE's goals for all-electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Carbon materials are used in designs for lithium-ion batteries and metal-air batteries, both leading contenders for future electric cars. Specifically, the collaborators planned to use the equipment derived from this project to develop a rechargeable battery system that will use the carbon materials produced by the innovative factory process equipment. The final outcome of the project was that the Ukrainian participants consisting of the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT), the Institute of Gas of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Materials Research Center, Ltd. designed, built, tested and delivered 14 pieces of processing equipment for pilot scale carbon production lines at the AETC, Arlington Heights facilities. The pilot scale equipment will be used to process materials such as activated carbon, thermally expanded graphite and carbon coated nano-particles. The equipment was shipped from Ukraine to the United States and received by AETC on December 3, 2013. The equipment is on loan from Argonne, control # 6140. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and all-electric vehicles have already demostrated success in the U.S. as they begin to share the market with older hybrid electric designs. When the project was conceived, PHEV battery systems provided a ~40 mile driving range (2011 figures). DOE R&D targets increased this to >100 miles at reduced cost less than $250/kWh (2011 figures.) A 2016 Tesla model S has boasted 270 miles. The project object was to develop pilot-production line equipment for advanced hybrid battery system that achieves cycle life of 1000, an energy

  8. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, Hazardous Waste Material Storage Sites at Maryland Transit Administrations Washington Boulevard Facility e.g. Crusher, Universal Waste Battery, Published in 2008, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Maryland Transit Administration.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information...

  9. 49 CFR 173.133 - Assignment of packing group and hazard zones for Division 6.1 materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment of packing group and hazard zones for... REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing... Assignment of packing group and hazard zones for Division 6.1 materials. (a) The packing group of Division...

  10. Standard practice for labeling ceramic art materials for chronic adverse health hazards

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes a procedure for developing precautionary labels for ceramic art materials and provides hazard and precautionary statements based upon knowledge that exists in the scientific and medical communities. This practice concerns those chronic adverse health hazards known to be associated with a product or product component(s), when the component(s) is present in a physical form, volume, or concentration that in the opinion of a toxicologist has the potential to produce a chronic adverse health effect(s). 1.2 This practice is intended to apply exclusively to ceramic art materials which are packaged in sizes intended for use by artists or crafts people, either individually, or in a small group or class. 1.3 This practice applies to developing precautionary labeling for ceramic art materials intended for adult usage. Conformance to this practice does not imply that ceramic art materials will necessarily be labeled adequately or safe for use by children. Labeling determinations should conside...

  11. Decision Support for Environmental Management of Industrial Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials: New Analytical Methods Combined with Simulation and Optimization Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-hazardous solid materials from industrial processes, once regarded as waste and disposed in landfills, offer numerous environmental and economic advantages when put to beneficial uses (BUs). Proper management of these industrial non-hazardous secondary materials (INSM) requir...

  12. 76 FR 6561 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, The Sam Nunn Federal... to Otis Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch... and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, The Sam Nunn...

  13. 78 FR 35837 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Gleaton, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division... Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Atlanta... CONTACT: Gwendolyn Gleaton, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management...

  14. 77 FR 60963 - Tennessee: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Otis Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA... Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Atlanta... CONTACT: Otis Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch...

  15. 76 FR 6594 - Florida: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division... Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, The Sam Nunn Federal... Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, The Sam Nunn...

  16. 78 FR 25678 - Georgia: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Atlanta Federal Center, 61... State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental...: Gwendolyn Gleaton, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA...

  17. 76 FR 6594 - North Carolina: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... Johnson, Permits and State Programs Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division... Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, The Sam Nunn... Section, RCRA Programs and Materials Management Branch, RCRA Division, U.S. Environmental Protection...

  18. Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mecham

    2010-08-01

    This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

  19. Development of Neutron Probes for Characterization of Hazardous Materials in the Sub-surface Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, Raymond Patrick; McGrath, Christopher Andrew; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2002-08-01

    Neutron probes are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the detection, identification and quantification of hazardous materials in the ground. Such materials include plutonium, uranium, americium, chlorine and fluorine. Both a Neutron Gamma (NG) probe and a Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) probe are being developed. The NG probe is used primarily for nuclide identification and quantification measurements. The PFN is used mostly for the detection and measurement of fissile material, but also for the determination of thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross sections of the various elements comprising the ground matrix. Calibration of these probes will be carried out at the INEEL using an indoor facility that has been designed for this activity.

  20. Development of Neutron Probes for Characterization of Hazardous Materials in the Sub-surface Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, R.P.; McGrath, C.A.; Lopez, J.C.

    2002-05-15

    Neutron probes are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the detection, identification and quantification of hazardous materials in the ground. Such materials include plutonium, uranium, americium, chlorine and fluorine. Both a Neutron Gamma (NG) probe and a Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) probe are being developed. The NG probe is used primarily for nuclide identification and quantification measurements. The PFN is used mostly for the detection and measurement of fissile material, but also for the determination of thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross sections of the various elements comprising the ground matrix. Calibration of these probes will be carried out at the INEEL using an indoor facility that has been designed for this activity.

  1. Materials released from spill incidents reported to Iowa DNR and tracked in the Hazardous Substance Incident database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Materials released from spill incidents reported to Iowa DNR and tracked in the Hazardous Substance Incident database. These Emergency Release Notifications are...

  2. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  3. Materials, Strands, and Cables for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumption, Mike D. [Ohio State University, Columbia, OH (United States); Collings, Edward W. [Ohio State University, Columbia, OH (United States)

    2014-09-19

    This report focuses on Materials, Strands and Cables for High Energy Physics Particle accelerators. In the materials area, work has included studies of basic reactions, diffusion, transformations, and phase assemblage of Nb3Sn. These materials science aspects have been married to results, in the form of flux pinning, Bc2, Birr, and transport Jc, with an emphasis on obtaining the needed Jc for HEP needs. Attention has also been paid to the “intermediate-temperature superconductor”, magnesium diboride emphasis being placed on (i) irreversibility field enhancement, (ii) critical current density and flux pinning, and (iii) connectivity. We also report on studies of Bi-2212. The second area of the program has been in the area of “Strands” in which, aside from the materials aspect of the conductor, its physical properties and their influence on performance have been studied. Much of this work has been in the area of magnetization estimation and flux jump calculation and control. One of the areas of this work was strand instabilities in high-performance Nb3Sn conductors due to combined fields and currents. Additionally, we investigated quench and thermal propagation in YBCO coated conductors at low temperatures and high fields. The last section, “Cables”, focussed on interstrand contact resistance, ICR, it origins, control, and implications. Following on from earlier work in NbTi, the present work in Nb3Sn has aimed to make ICR intermediate between the two extremes of too little contact (no current sharing) and too much (large and unacceptable magnetization and associated beam de-focussing). Interstrand contact and current sharing measurements are being made on YBCO based Roebel cables using transport current methods. Finally, quench was investigated for YBCO cables and the magnets wound from them, presently with a focus on 50 T solenoids for muon collider applications.

  4. Detection of explosives, shielded nuclear materials and other hazardous substances in cargo containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey; Evsenin, Alexey; Vakhtin, Dmitry; Gorshkov, Igor; Osetrov, Oleg; Kalinin, Valery

    2006-05-01

    Nanosecond Neutron Analysis / Associated Particles Technique (NNA/APT) has been used to create devices for detection of explosives, radioactive and heavily shielded nuclear materials in cargo containers. Explosives and other hazardous materials are detected by analyzing secondary high-energy gamma-rays form reactions of fast neutrons with the materials inside the container. Depending on the dimensions of the inspected containers, the detecting system consists of one or several detection modules, each of which contains a small neutron generator with built-in position sensitive detector of associated alpha-particles and several scintillator-based gamma-ray detectors. The same gamma-ray detectors are used to detect unshielded radioactive and nuclear materials. Array of several detectors of fast neutrons is used to detect neutrons from spontaneous and induced fission of nuclear materials. These neutrons can penetrate thick layers of lead shielding, which can be used to conceal gamma-radioactivity from nuclear materials. Coincidence and timing analysis allows one to discriminate between fission neutrons and scattered probing neutrons. Mathematical modeling by MCNP5 code was used to estimate the sensitivity of the device and its optimal configuration. Capability of the device to detect 1 kg of explosive imitator inside container filled with suitcases and other baggage items has been confirmed experimentally. First experiments with heavily shielded nuclear materials have been carried out.

  5. Identification and prioritization of hazardous material transportation strategies using DEA method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Esmaeili

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of industries needs expansion of public transportation and, consequently, heavy transportation increases hazardous and dangerous transportation too. Therefore, we need to consider some strategies to reduce bad effects of transportation of hazardous materials such as road accidents. Strength, Weakness, Opportunity and Treats (SWOT analysis is an applicable method for designing strategies in this area. However, SWOT analysis does not provide specific strategies and it does not consider the efficiency and performance of each strategy. Applying a hybrid method of analyzing the strategies and their performance evaluation help decision makers select the best strategies based on the current limitations. In this paper, different strategies for hazardous transportation risk reduction are designed and relative efficiencies of all alternatives are compared using DEA method. The proposed model of this paper uses three inputs including implementation costs, operation and maintenance cost and operational and four outputs including accident rate reduction, fuel consumption reduction, employment rate increment and deaths number reduction. The results of the implementation using seven different strategies have yielded two important strategies including continuous improvement of vehicle standards, driving skills, transportation system quality, and loading methods and expansion of petroleum pipe network.

  6. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision

  7. 10 CFR 51.97 - Final environmental impact statement-materials license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final environmental impact statement-materials license. 51...-Regulations Implementing Section 102(2) Final Environmental Impact Statements-Materials Licenses § 51.97 Final environmental impact statement—materials license. (a) Independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI...

  8. Subtask 1.11 -- Spectroscopic field screening of hazardous waste and toxic spills. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisanti, A.A.

    1997-10-01

    Techniques for the field characterization of soil contamination due to spillage of hazardous waste or toxic chemicals are time-consuming and expensive. Thus more economical, less time-intensive methods are needed to facilitate rapid field screening of contaminated sites. The overall objective of this project is to study the feasibility of using an evanescent field absorbance sensor Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic sensor coupled with cone penetrometry as a field screening method. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: design an accessory for use with FT-IR that interfaces the spectrometer to a cone penetrometer; characterize the response of the FT-IR accessory to selected hydrocarbons in a laboratory-simulated field environment; and determine the ability of the FT-IR-CPT instrument to measure hydrocarbon contamination in soil by direct comparison with a reference method (e.g., Soxhlet extraction followed by gas chromatography) to quantify hydrocarbons from the same soil.

  9. Portable sensor for hazardous waste. Final report, March 31, 1995--May 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, L.G.; Hunter, A.J.R.; Fraser, M.E.; Davis, S.H.; Finson, M.L.

    1997-12-31

    This report summarizes accomplishments for the second phase of a 5-year program designed to develop a portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection. The approach is to excite atomic fluorescence by the technique of Spark-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (SIBS). The principal goals for this second phase of the program were to demonstrate sensitive detection of additional species, both RCRA metals (Sb, Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, As, Hg) and radionuclides (U, Th, Tc); to identify potential applications and develop instrument component processes, including, sample collection and excitation, measurement and test procedures, and calibration procedures; and to design a prototype instrument. Successful completion of these task results in being able to fabricate and field test a prototype of the instrument during the program`s third phase.

  10. The environmental and medical geochemistry of potentially hazardous materials produced by disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Meeker, G.P.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Wolf, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Many natural or human-caused disasters release potentially hazardous materials (HM) that may pose threats to the environment and health of exposed humans, wildlife, and livestock. This chapter summarizes the environmentally and toxicologically significant physical, mineralogical, and geochemical characteristics of materials produced by a wide variety of recent disasters, such as volcanic eruptions, hurricanes and extreme storms, spills of mining/mineral-processing wastes or coal extraction by-products, and the 2001 attacks on and collapse of the World Trade Center towers. In describing these characteristics, this chapter also illustrates the important roles that geochemists and other earth scientists can play in environmental disaster response and preparedness. In addition to characterizing in detail the physical, chemical, and microbial makeup of HM generated by the disasters, these roles also include (1) identifying and discriminating potential multiple sources of the materials; (2) monitoring, mapping, and modeling dispersal and evolution of the materials in the environment; (3) understanding how the materials are modified by environmental processes; (4) identifying key characteristics and processes that influence the materials' toxicity to exposed humans and ecosystems; (5) estimating shifts away from predisaster environmental baseline conditions; and (6) using geochemical insights learned from past disasters to help estimate, prepare for, and increase societal resilience to the environmental and related health impacts of future disasters.

  11. 76 FR 56708 - Ohio: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... February 16, 2009. From Production of Dyes, Pigments, and Food, Drug and Cosmetic Colorants; Mass Loadings...; 3745-51-30; 3745- From Production of Dyes, 51-32; 3745-270-20; 3745-270-40; Effective Pigments, and Food, Drug and February 16, 2009. Cosmetic Colorants; Mass Loadings-Based Listing; Final...

  12. Two Chaotic Patterns of Dynamic Risk Definition for Solving Hazardous Materials Routing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Mahmoudabadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the case of determining routes for hazardous material transportation, risk is considered as a main attribute. Transport risk, which is usually combined with other attributes such as cost or travel time, plays a significant role in determining paths for hazardous materials transportation. Since, risk is chaotically affected by road incidents, decision makers are dealing with selecting a method for defining chaotic risk factors in hazmat transportation. In this paper, transport risk has been defined as a chaotic variable using two different methods of generating chaotic patterns. In an experimental road network, which consists of eighty-nine nodes and one hundred and one two-way links, two different methods of generating chaotic variables have been used for applying the proposed procedure. In addition, results for different amounts of risk and cost have also been analyzed in case study. Results revealed that different cost and risk priorities change the frequencies of selected paths determined for hazmat transportation, but the route convergence of the route to chaos method is better than that of the logistic map equation.

  13. Use of bioassays to assess hazard of food contact material extracts: State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, Isabelle; Souton, Emilie; Dahbi, Laurence; Chagnon, Marie Christine

    2017-07-01

    This review focuses on the use of in vitro bioassays for the hazard assessment of food contact materials (FCM) as a relevant strategy, in complement to analytical methods. FCM may transfer constituents to foods, not always detected by analytical chemistry, resulting in low but measurable human exposures. Testing FCM extracts with bioassays represents the biological response of a combination of substances, able to be released from the finished materials. Furthermore, this approach is particularly useful regarding the current risk assessment challenges with unpredicted/unidentified non-intentionally added substances (NIAS) that can be leached from the FCM in the food. Bioassays applied to assess hazard of different FCM types are described for, to date, the toxicological endpoints able to be expressed at low levels; cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and endocrine disruption potential. The bioassay strengths and relative key points needed to correctly use and improve the performance of bioassays for an additional FCM risk assessment is developed. This review compiles studies showing that combining both chemical and toxicological analyses presents a very promising and pragmatic tool for identifying new undesirable NIAS (not predicted) which can represent a great part of the migrating substances and/or "cocktail effect". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Musculoskeletal symptoms and ergonomic hazards among material handlers in grocery retail industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrull Abdol Rahman, Mohd; Zuhaidi, Muhammad Fareez Ahmad

    2017-08-01

    Grocery retail work can be physically demanding as material handler’s tasks involve manual lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing and pulling loads. The nature of this work puts them at a risk for serious low back pain, shoulder pain and other musculoskeletal injuries. This study was conducted by using two different types of tools which were Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ) as a survey and Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA) Checklist as a direct observation method. Among 46 males and 14 females material handlers were involved throughout this study. For NMQ, the highest body part trouble in the last 12 months was low back pain (88.3%), followed by upper back (68.3%), neck (55.3%) and shoulder (36.7%). While for WISHA Checklist, most of them experienced hazard level involving awkward posture and high hand force. From the research conducted, musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and ergonomic risk factors (ERFs) do related as it showed that musculoskeletal disorders may arise if the workers ignored the safety in ergonomic hazards.

  15. Selecting the minimum risk route in the transportation of hazardous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Žura

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The transportation of hazardous materials is a broad and complex topic. Percent and iveight of accidents of vehicles carrying dangerous goods are growing fast. Modern computer based information system for dangerous materials management is becoming more and more important. In this paper I present an interactive software system for minimum risk route selection based on the PC ARC/INFO. The model computes optimal path based on accident probability is computed from traffic accident rates, highway operational speed, traffic volume and technical characteristic of the roadwidth, radius and slope. Dangerous goods are classified into nine classes according to their impact to different sensible environment elements. Those sensible elements are drinking water resourses, natural heritage, forestry, agricultural areas, cultural heritage, urban areas and tourist resorts. Some results of system implementation on Slovenia road network are be presented.

  16. Radioactive and hazardous materials transportation: What local officials are telling us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J. A.; Ruberg, G. E. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Management Systems Labs.; Denny, S. H. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs, Washington, DC (USA). Transportation Management Div.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a 1989 interactive meeting of US Department of Energy (DOE) representatives with over twenty local government officials from cities and counties around the country. Management Systems Laboratories of Virginia Tech, in coordination with the Energy Task Force Management Corporation (now called the Urban Energy Transportation Corporation), designed and facilitated the meeting with these goals: Share information that local government officials can apply to their own communities; exchange experiences and ideas applicable to other emergency management programs; and identify areas of productive action for DOE and local government to address issues of mutual concern. The highlight of the meeting was a Program Planning Exercise. The participants, playing the roles of federal managers in DOE, developed programs to address the concerns of local governments on the subjects of transportation of hazardous and nuclear materials, and emergency preparedness related to incidents involving shipments of those materials.

  17. Hazardous properties and environmental effects of materials used in solar heating and cooling (SHAC) technologies: interim handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searcy, J.Q.

    1978-12-01

    General background informaion related to SHAC systems, how a particular material was chosen for this handbook, and codes and standards are given. Materials are categorized according to their functional use in SHAC systems as follows: (1) heat transfer fluids and fluid treatment chemicals, (2) insulation materials, (3) seals and sealant materials, (4) glazing materials, (5) collector materials, and (6) storage media. The informaion is presented under: general properties, chemical composition, thermal degradation products, and thermoxidative products of some commercial materials; toxic properties and other potential health effects; fire hazard properties; and environmental effects of and disposal methods for SHAC materials. (MHR)

  18. 76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). New Federal requirements and prohibitions imposed by... generated by pipelines, bulk fuel sales terminals and certain tank farms, as well as underground storage... January Oklahoma Statutes Secondary Materials 2, 2008.. Title 27A Section 2- Processed in a Gasification...

  19. Device for Detection of Explosives, Nuclear and Other Hazardous Materials in Luggage and Cargo Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey; Evsenin, Alexey; Gorshkov, Igor; Osetrov, Oleg; Vakhtin, Dmitry

    2009-12-01

    Device for detection of explosives, radioactive and heavily shielded nuclear materials in luggage and cargo containers based on Nanosecond Neutron Analysis/Associated Particles Technique (NNA/APT) is under construction. Detection module consists of a small neutron generator with built-in position-sensitive detector of associated alpha-particles, and several scintillator-based gamma-ray detectors. Explosives and other hazardous chemicals are detected by analyzing secondary high-energy gamma-rays from reactions of fast neutrons with materials inside a container. The same gamma-ray detectors are used to detect unshielded radioactive and nuclear materials. An array of several neutron detectors is used to detect fast neutrons from induced fission of nuclear materials. Coincidence and timing analysis allows one to discriminate between fission neutrons and scattered probing neutrons. Mathematical modeling by MCNP5 and MCNP-PoliMi codes was used to estimate the sensitivity of the device and its optimal configuration. Comparison of the features of three gamma detector types—based on BGO, NaI and LaBr3 crystals is presented.

  20. Electroceramic functional gradient materials. Final report 1995 - 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toft Soerensen, O. [ed.

    1999-10-01

    In this programme the research and development is focused on electroceramic materials, which are of direct interest for the Danish producers of electronic components (AMP Danmark) and ceramic gas sensors (PBI-Dansensor) as well as companies involved in development of fuel cells (Haldor Topsoee). The R and D work has been focused on strategic materials research, both application oriented and more basic research, and on development of new techniques for fabrication of EFGM (Electroceramic Functional Gradient Materials) of three types: LC circuit materials (electronic noise filters), oxides for electrochemical reactors and solid oxide fuel cell applications (SOFC) and materials (semiconductors, oxygen ion conductors) for oxygen sensors. This work has been carried out in five projects: 1) Integrated filter components; 2) Electrochemical reactor materials; 3) Oxygen sensors based on semiconductors and oxygen ion conductors; 4) Interface models - synthesis and characterisation; 5) Suppression of cracking in multilayered ceramic materials. (EHS)

  1. The cost and risk impacts of rerouting railroad shipments of hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Theodore S; Erkut, Erhan; Zschocke, Mark S

    2007-09-01

    Rail shipments of hazardous materials expose the population near the routes to the possibility of an accident resulting in a spill. Rail routes are determined by economic concerns such as route length and the revenue generated for the originating carrier. In this paper we consider an alternate routing strategy that takes accident risks into account. We employ a model to quantify rail transport risk and then use a weighted combination of cost and risk and generate alternate routes. In some cases the alternate routes achieve significantly lower risk values than the practical routes at a small incremental cost. While there are generally fewer rerouting alternatives for rail than for road transport, considering the possible consequences of a train derailment we argue that risk should be taken into account when selecting rail routes and that the cost-risk tradeoffs should be evaluated.

  2. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  3. Optimizing Route for Hazardous Materials Logistics Based on Hybrid Ant Colony Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing Route for Hazardous Materials Logistics (ORHML belongs to a class of problems referred to as NP-Hard, and a strict constraint of it makes it harder to solve. In order to dealing with ORHML, an improved hybrid ant colony algorithm (HACA was devised. To achieve the purpose of balancing risk and cost for route based on the principle of ACA that used to solve TSP, the improved HACA was designed. Considering the capacity of road network and the maximum expected risk limits, a route optimization model to minimize the total cost is established based on network flow theory. Improvement on route construction rule and pheromone updating rule was adopted on the basis of the former algorithm. An example was analyzed to demonstrate the correctness of the application. It is proved that improved HACA is efficient and feasible in solving ORHML.

  4. Analysis of Flood Hazards for the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, Richard; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Waichler, Scott R.; Kim, Taeyun; Ward, Duane L.

    2010-11-01

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a flood hazard analysis for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. The general approach for the analysis was to determine the maximum water elevation levels associated with the design-basis flood (DBFL) and compare them to the floor elevations at critical building locations. Two DBFLs for the MFC site were developed using different precipitation inputs: probable maximum precipitation (PMP) and 10,000 year recurrence interval precipitation. Both precipitation inputs were used to drive a watershed runoff model for the surrounding upland basins and the MFC site. Outflows modeled with the Hydrologic Engineering Centers Hydrologic Modeling System were input to the Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydrodynamic flood routing model.

  5. 226Ra, 232Th and 40K ACTIVITY CONCENTRATIONS AND RADIOLOGICAL HAZARDS OF BUILDING MATERIALS IN MUGLA, TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Eren Belgin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The activity concentrations of natural gamma-emitting radionuclides in commonly used building materials were measured by using high purity germanium (HPGe detector coupled with a high resolution multichannel analyser. The results associated radiation hazards due to  40K, 226Ra and 232Th have been determined in samples collected randomly from southwest part of Turkey. When the building materials such as clay brick, marble, cement etc. originating from soil and rocks are used in constructions they cause direct ionizing radiation exposure at varying intensities. Different criterion formulas as radium equivalent activity, the external/internal hazard indices, the alpha/gamma indexes and the absorbed dose rate in indoor air were determined to assess the radiation hazards arising due to the use of materials studied for people living in the construction of dwellings made of the these materials. Although indoor absorbed dose rate is relatively higher than the world population-weighted average value and international limit for studied brick and cement samples they could be used safely as building materials because radium equivalent activity, alpha/gamma indices and hazard indices of those materials have been found to be within the recommended limits. All the values for all criterion formulas for marble samples are found to be well below the safety limits recommended by UNSCEAR. It can be concluded that examined materials can be used for construction of buildings for interior and external works.

  6. Organic materials for second harmonic generation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twieg, R.J. (comp.)

    1985-03-31

    Materials were chosen by screening the Cambridge Crystallographic Index for new noncentrosymmetric crystalline compounds, by screening commercially available materials or by synthesis of unique new substances. Measurements were then made on the powder form of these materials. Langmuir-Blodgett films were deposited and studied. In addition to the above studies, a computer program was developed to calculate (hyper) polarizabilities of organic molecules and thus aid in the selection of materials for testing. The nonlinear molecules have been divided into three classes according to absorption cutoff: 400 to 500 nm, 300 to 400 nm, and 200 to 300 nm. 108 refs., 7 tabs. (WRF)

  7. Assessment of radiological hazards of naturally occurring radioactive materials in cement industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad; Gul, Rahmat; Ara, Tauseef; Hussain, Manzur

    2012-09-01

    A study on the radiological hazard in Portland cement due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials is being carried out. The Portland cement manufactured in the Islamabad/Rawalpindi region of Pakistan, intermediate products (clinker) and the various raw materials which compose the product have been analysed for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K using a gamma spectrometry system with a N-type high-purity germanium detector of 80 % relative efficiency. From the measured gamma ray spectra, specific activities were determined. The mean values of the total specific activity of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K are 34.2±11.9, 29.1±3.6 and 295.1±66.9 Bq kg(-1), respectively in Portland cement, 28.4±8.7, 11.3±1.7 and 63.1±17.3 Bq kg(-1), respectively in lime stone, 8.2±1.9, 16.2±3.9 and 187.7±53.2 Bq kg(-1), respectively in gypsum, 34.7±13.1, 41.2±6.7 and 187.6±17.2 Bq kg(-1), respectively in clay, 41.1±11.8, 39.3±6.9 and 195.1±29.2 Bq kg(-1), respectively in latrite and 51.1±18.2, 23.2±1.2 and 258.4±15.3 Bq kg(-1), respectively in clinker. The radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), external hazard index (H(ex)), internal hazard index (H(in)), absorbed dose rate in air (D) and annual effective dose rate (E(eff)) were also determined. The measured activity concentrations for these radio nuclides and radiological indices were compared with the reported national and international data. All these measured values are comparable with the worldwide data reported in UNSCEAR publications.

  8. Armed Services Materials Conversion. A Documentation. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization and Human Resources Development Associates, Inc., Austin, TX.

    This report discusses Phase 1 of a project to convert armed services dental and medical curriculum materials into separate curricula for dental and physician assistant for civilian education use. The first two sections focus on project tasks and acquisition of existing military materials in dental and physician assistant training. Samples of…

  9. Nanostructured materials: A novel approach to enhanced performance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korth, G.E.; Froes, F.H.; Suryanarayana, C. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Nanostuctured materials are an emerging class of materials that can exhibit physical and mechanical characteristics often exceeding those exhibited by conventional course grained materials. A number of different techniques can be employed to produce these materials. In this program, the synthesis methods were (a) mechanical alloying , (b) physical vapor deposition, and (c) plasma processing. The physical vapor deposition and plasma processing were discontinued after initial testing with subsequent efforts focused on mechanical alloying. The major emphasis of the program was on the synthesis, consolidation, and characterization of nanostructured Al-Fe, Ti-Al, Ti-Al-Nb, and Fe-Al by alloying intermetallics with a view to increase their ductilities. The major findings of this project are reported.

  10. Materials Technology Support for Radioisotope Power Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Kramer; Chadwick D. Barklay

    2008-10-07

    Over the period of this sponsored research, UDRI performed a number of materials related tasks that helped to facilitate increased understanding of the properties and applications of a number of candidate program related materials including; effects of neutron irradiation on tantalum alloys using a 500kW reactor, thermodynamic based modeling of the chemical species in weld pools, and the application of candidate coatings for increased oxidation resistance of FWPF (Fine Weave Pierced Fabric) modules.

  11. A hazardous waste from secondary aluminium metallurgy as a new raw material for calcium aluminate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Delgado, Aurora; Tayibi, Hanan; Pérez, Carlos; Alguacil, Francisco José; López, Félix Antonio

    2009-06-15

    A solid waste coming from the secondary aluminium industry was successfully vitrified in the ternary CaO-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2) system at 1500 degrees C. This waste is a complex material which is considered hazardous because of its behaviour in the presence of water or moisture. In these conditions, the dust can generate gases such as H(2), NH(3), CH(4), H(2)S, along with heat and potential aluminothermy. Only silica sand and calcium carbonate were added as external raw materials to complete the glasses formula. Different nominal compositions of glasses, with Al(2)O(3) ranging between 20% and 54%, were studied to determine the glass forming area. The glasses obtained allow the immobilisation of up to 75% of waste in a multicomponent oxide system in which all the components of the waste are incorporated. The microhardness Hv values varied between 6.05 and 6.62GPa and the linear thermal expansion coefficient, alpha, varied between (62 and 139)x10(-7)K(-1). Several glasses showed a high hydrolytic resistance in deionised water at 98 degrees C.

  12. Application of supercritical and subcritical fluids for the extraction of hazardous materials from soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skorupan Dara

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcritical and supercritical extractions are novel, non destructive techniques which can be applied for the removal of hazardous compounds from contaminated soil without any changes of the soil composition and structure. The aim of the presented review paper is to give information on up-to day results of this method commonly applied by several institutions worldwide. Interest in the application of SC CO2 has been more expressed in the last two decades, which may be related to its favorable characteristics (non-toxic, non-flammable, increase diffusion into small pores, low viscosity under SC conditions, low price and others. However, interest in wet oxidation (WO and especially in SCWO (the application of water under supercritical conditions with air has also increased in the last few years. Interest in H2O as a SC fluid, as well as in extraction with water under subcritical conditions may also be related to specific characteristics and the enhanced rate of extraction. Moreover, the solubility of some specific compounds present in soil can be easily changed by adjusting the pressure and temperature of extraction. The high price of the units designed to operate safely at a pressure and temperature much higher than the a critical one of the applied fluids is the main reason why, at present, there is no more broader application of such techniques for the removal hazardous materials from contaminated soil. In the present paper, among many literature citations and their overall review, some specific details related to the development of specific analytical methods under SC conditions are also considered.

  13. Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2013-02-01

    An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

  14. Relationships between fracture toughness and other material properties. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perra, M.; Finnie, I.

    1974-01-01

    The key experimental and analytical studies which have led to our present understanding of the mechanisms of ductile fracture are reviewed. It is concluded that insufficient progress has been made in the quantitative description of ductile separation mechanisms on a microscale to allow the realistic prediction of fracture toughness from material properties and microstructure. An experimental study of ductile fracture is underway which has the aim of determining the growth rate of voids in known plastic deformation fields as a function of triaxiality of stress and material work-hardening. Novel specimens of particularly well characterized microstructure are utilized.

  15. Three-dimensional material identification and hazard detection with shortwave infrared supercontinuum based spectral ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents new experimental results from a prototype Spectral LADAR, which combines active multispectral and 3D time-of-flight point cloud imaging. The physical domain unification of these imaging modalities based on a pulse modulated supercontinuum source enables substantially higher fidelity images of obscured targets compared to the data domain fusion of passive hyperspectral cameras and conventional LADAR imagers. Spectral LADAR produces 3D spectral point clouds with unambiguously associated 3D image points and spectral vectors, promoting improved object classification performance in cluttered scenes. The 3D shape and material spectral signature of objects may be acquired in daylight or darkness, behind common glass, and behind obscurants such as foliage and camouflage. These capabilities are demonstrated by data obtained from test scenes. These scenes include plastic mine-like objects obscured by foliage, distinction of hazardous explosives inside plastic containers versus innocuous decoy materials, and 3D spectral imaging behind ordinary glass windows. These scenes, at effective ranges of approximately 40 meters, are imaged with nanosecond-regime optical pulses spanning 1.08 μm to 1.62 μm divided into 25 independently ranged spectral bands. The resultant point cloud is spectrally classified according to material type. In contrast to other active spectral imaging techniques, Spectral LADAR is well suited to operate at high pixel and frame rates and at considerable stand-off distances. A combination of favorable attributes, including eye safe wavelengths, relatively small apertures, and very short (single pulse) receiver integration time, bear the potential for this technique to be used on robotic platforms for on-the-move imaging and high area coverage rates.

  16. Detecting river sediments to assess hazardous materials at volcanic lake using advanced remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saepuloh, Asep; Fitrianingtyas, Chintya

    2016-05-01

    The Toba Caldera formed from large depression of Quaternary volcanism is a remarkable feature at the Earth surface. The last Toba super eruptions were recorded around 73 ka and produced the Youngest Toba Tuff about 2,800 km3. Since then, there is no record of significant volcanic seismicity at Toba Volcanic Complex (TVC). However, the hydrothermal activities are still on going as presented by the existence of hot springs and alteration zones at the northwest caldera. The hydrothermal fluids probably containing some chemical compositions mixed with surficial water pollutant and contaminated the Toba Lake. Therefore, an environmental issues related to the existence of chemical composition and degradation of water clearness in the lake had been raised in the local community. The pollutant sources are debatable between natural and anthropogenic influences because some human activities grow rapidly at and around the lake such as hotels, tourisms, husbandry, aquaculture, as well as urbanization. Therefore, obtaining correct information about the source materials floating at the surface of the Toba Lake is crucial for environmental and hazard mitigation purposes. Overcoming the problem, we presented this paper to assess the source possibility of floating materials at Toba Lake, especially from natural sources such as hydrothermal activities of TVC and river stream sediments. The Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) techniques using atmospherically corrected of Landsat-8 and colour composite of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) were used to map the distribution of floating materials. The seven ground truth points were used to confirm the correctness of proposed method. Based on the SAM and PolSAR techniques, we could detect the interface of hydrothermal fluid at the lake surfaces. Various distributions of stream sediment were also detected from the river mouth to the lake. The influence possibilities of the upwelling process from the bottom floor of Toba Lake were also

  17. Textbooks and Learning Materials Program: Zambia. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Mississippi Consortium for International Development's (MCID's) intervention involved the development, publication and distribution of an Integrated Foundations of Learning Kit, focused on numeracy. This intervention was aligned with Zambia's priorities and strategies and matched the requirements of the Textbooks and Learning Materials Program…

  18. Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, C.M. [ed.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

  19. 40 CFR 260.43 - Legitimate recycling of hazardous secondary materials regulated under § 260.34, § 261.2(a)(2)(ii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Legitimate recycling of hazardous... (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.43 Legitimate recycling of... demonstrate that the recycling is legitimate. Hazardous secondary material that is not legitimately...

  20. 49 CFR 173.211 - Non-bulk packagings for solid hazardous materials in Packing Group I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group I. 173.211 Section 173.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group I. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a solid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I...

  1. 49 CFR 173.213 - Non-bulk packagings for solid hazardous materials in Packing Group III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group III. 173.213 Section 173.213 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group III. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a solid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I, II or...

  2. 49 CFR 173.201 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group I. 173.201 Section 173.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group I. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I...

  3. 49 CFR 173.202 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group II. 173.202 Section 173.202 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I or...

  4. 49 CFR 173.212 - Non-bulk packagings for solid hazardous materials in Packing Group II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group II. 173.212 Section 173.212 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group II. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a solid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I or...

  5. 49 CFR 173.203 - Non-bulk packagings for liquid hazardous materials in Packing Group III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... in Packing Group III. 173.203 Section 173.203 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... materials in Packing Group III. (a) When § 172.101 of this subchapter specifies that a liquid hazardous... of part 173, to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I, II or...

  6. 76 FR 11191 - Hazardous Materials: Adoption of ASME Code Section XII and the National Board Inspection Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... Hazardous Materials: Adoption of ASME Code Section XII and the National Board Inspection Code AGENCY... Pressure Vessel Code, Section XII (2010 Edition) and the National Board of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Inspectors' National Board Inspection Code (2007 Edition). Further, PHMSA is extending the comment period...

  7. Assessment of natural radioactivity and associated radiation hazards in some building materials used in Kilpenathur, Tiruvannamalai dist, Tamilnadu, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghu, Y. [Department of Physics, AarupadaiVeedu Institute of Technology, Paiyanoor, Chennai 603 104, Tamilnadu (India); Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R., E-mail: ravisankarphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Tiruvannamalai 606603, Tamilnadu (India); Chandrasekaran, A. [Departement of physics, SSN College of Engineering, Chennai- 603110, Tamilnadu India (India)

    2015-08-28

    The present study aimed to measure the radioactivity concentration of naturally occuring radionuclides in the locally used building materials from Kilpenthaur, Tiruvannmalai Dist, Tamilnadu, India. This study will also evaluate the radiation hazard arising due to the use of these materials in the construction of dwellings. The concentrations of natural radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in five types of building materials have been measured by gamma spectrometry using NaI (Tl) 3” x 3”detector. The estimated radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), indoor absorbed gamma dose rate (D{sub R}), annual effective dose rate (H{sub R}) and the external hazard indexes(H{sub ex}) were lower than the recommended safe limit and are comparable with results from similar studies conducted in other countries. Therefore, the use of these building material samples under investigation in the construction of dwellings is considered to be safe for inhabitants.

  8. Energetic Materials Hazard Initiation: DoD Assessment Team Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-05

    a aluminized, plasticized hydroxy-terminated ( HTPB ) or carboxyl-terminated polybutadiene (CTPB) propellant grains. Because of this, Kent and Rat (1982...330, Vol. 1, pp. 105-130. Cantey, D. (1964), " Solid Propellant Structural Integrity Investigations. Dynamic Response and Failure Mechanics ," RPL-TDR...oversimplify the issues of mechanical I properties and/or crystal imperfections (from Butcher et al. as cited by Bernecker, 1984) ................... 19 vi I 8

  9. Construction of a naturally occurring radioactive material project in the BeAAT hazardous waste facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuahmad, H

    2015-06-01

    This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is produced during exploration and production operations of subsidiaries of the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) in the United Arab Emirates, and accumulates in drilling tubulars, plant equipment, and components. These NORM hazardous wastes need to be managed in such a way that they do not damage human health and the environment. The primary radionuclides of concern in the oil and gas industries are radium-226 and radium-228. These radioisotopes are the decay products of uranium and thorium isotopes that are present in subsurface formations from which hydrocarbons are produced. While uranium and thorium are largely immobile, radium is slightly more soluble and may become mobilised in the fluid phases of the formation (International Association of Oil & Gas Producers, 2008). In order to treat and dispose of NORM waste products safely, ADNOC's subsidiary 'TAKREER' is developing a new facility, on behalf of all ADNOC subsidiaries, within the existing Central Environmental Protection Facilities (BeAAT) in Ruwais city. The NORM plant is envisaged to treat, handle, and dispose of NORM waste in the forms of scale, sludge, and contaminated equipment. The NORM treatment facility will cover activities such as decontamination, volume reduction, NORM handling, and concrete immobilisation of NORM waste into packages for designated landfilling. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Variable neighborhood search to solve the vehicle routing problem for hazardous materials transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bula, Gustavo Alfredo; Prodhon, Caroline; Gonzalez, Fabio Augusto; Afsar, H Murat; Velasco, Nubia

    2017-02-15

    This work focuses on the Heterogeneous Fleet Vehicle Routing problem (HFVRP) in the context of hazardous materials (HazMat) transportation. The objective is to determine a set of routes that minimizes the total expected routing risk. This is a nonlinear function, and it depends on the vehicle load and the population exposed when an incident occurs. Thus, a piecewise linear approximation is used to estimate it. For solving the problem, a variant of the Variable Neighborhood Search (VNS) algorithm is employed. To improve its performance, a post-optimization procedure is implemented via a Set Partitioning (SP) problem. The SP is solved on a pool of routes obtained from executions of the local search procedure embedded on the VNS. The algorithm is tested on two sets of HFVRP instances based on literature with up to 100 nodes, these instances are modified to include vehicle and arc risk parameters. The results are competitive in terms of computational efficiency and quality attested by a comparison with Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) previously proposed.

  11. Analysis on Topological Properties of Dalian Hazardous Materials Road Transportation Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the topological properties of hazardous materials road transportation network (HMRTN, this paper proposed two different ways to construct the cyberspace of HMRTN and constructed their complex network models, respectively. One was the physical network model of HMRTN based on the primal approach and the other was the service network model of HMRTN based on neighboring nodes. The two complex network models were built by using the case of Dalian HMRTN. The physical network model contained 154 nodes and 238 edges, and the statistical analysis results showed that (1 the cumulative node degree of physical network was subjected to exponential distribution, showing the network properties of random network and that (2 the HMRTN had small characteristic path length and large network clustering coefficient, which was a typical small-world network. The service network model contained 569 nodes and 1318 edges, and the statistical analysis results showed that (1 the cumulative node degree of service network was subjected to power-law distribution, showing the network properties of scale-free network and that (2 the relationship between nodes strength and their descending order ordinal and the relationship between nodes strength and cumulative nodes strength were both subjected to power-law distribution, also showing the network properties of scale-free network.

  12. Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean M. McDeavitt

    2010-04-14

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle requires reprocessing spent fuel to recover the long-lived components that still have useful energy content while immobilizing the remnant waste fission products in stable forms. At the genesis of this project, next generation spent fuel reprocessing methods were being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. One of these processes was focused on solvent extraction schemes to isolate cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent nuclear fuel. Isolating these isotopes for short-term decay storage eases the design requirements for long-term repository disposal; a significant amount of the radiation and decay heat in fission product waste comes from Cs-137 and Sr-90. For the purposes of this project, the Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is being considered to be the baseline extraction method. The objective of this project was to evaluate the nature and behavior of candidate materials for cesium and strontium immobilization; this will include assessments with minor additions of yttrium, barium, and rubidium in these materials. More specifically, the proposed research achieved the following objectives (as stated in the original proposal): (1) Synthesize simulated storage ceramics for Cs and Sr using an existing labscale steam reformer at Purdue University. The simulated storage materials will include aluminosilicates, zirconates and other stable ceramics with the potential for high Cs and Sr loading. (2) Characterize the immobilization performance, phase structure, thermal properties and stability of the simulated storage ceramics. The ceramic products will be stable oxide powders and will be characterized to quantify their leach resistance, phase structure, and thermophysical properties. The research progressed in two stages. First, a steam reforming process was used to generate candidate Cs/Sr storage materials for characterization. This portion of the research was carried out at

  13. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  14. Novel High Efficient Organic Photovoltaic Materials: Final Summary of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sam

    2002-07-01

    The objectives and goals of this project were to investigate and develop high efficient, lightweight, and cost effective materials for potential photovoltaic applications, such as solar energy conversion or photo detector devices. Specifically, as described in the original project proposal, the target material to be developed was a block copolymer system containing an electron donating (or p-type) conjugated polymer block coupled to an electron withdrawing (or n-type) conjugated polymer block through a non-conjugated bridge unit. Due to several special requirements of the targeted block copolymer systems, such as electron donating and withdrawing substituents, conjugated block structures, processing requirement, stability requirement, size controllability, phase separation and self ordering requirement, etc., many traditional or commonly used block copolymer synthetic schemes are not suitable for this system. Therefore, the investigation and development of applicable and effective synthetic protocols became the most critical and challenging part of this project. During the entire project period, and despite the lack of a proposed synthetic polymer postdoctoral research associate due to severe shortage of qualified personnel in the field, several important accomplishments were achieved in this project and are briefly listed and elaborated. A more detailed research and experimental data is listed in the Appendix.

  15. Anodic materials for the electrolysis of water. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiori, G.; Mari, C.M.; Perra, B.; Vago, L.; Vitali, P.

    1980-01-01

    Research was conducted in two areas: preparation and characterization of various catalytic materials, similar to NiLa/sub 2/O/sub 4/, in order to verify the possibility of improving the catalytic activity; and optimization of the catalytic film deposition conditions on a cheap substrate and tests at high temperature (110 to 120/sup 0/C) and high current densities (1 A/cm/sup 2/). The modified catalytic materials can be classified in three different groups: NiLa/sub 2/O/sub 4/ mixed oxides doped with different low quantities of cations of various valencies (Li/sup +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/); mixed oxides in which Ni has been replaced totally or partially with Co; and NiLa/sub 2/O/sub 3/ mixed oxides in which some sulfur has been substituted for reticular oxygen. The best electrode tested is the mixed Ni-Co non-stoichiometric oxide deposited on Ni. This electrode at 110/sup 0/C and 1 A/cm/sup 2/ shows an E/sub rhe/ potential lower than 1.45 v after more than 400 hr of uninterrupted work as anode in the water decomposition reaction.

  16. 76 FR 3307 - Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations, International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... communicate the hazards of hydrogen sulfide in the workplace. They supported other means of hazard... (FedEx); (9) Saft America, Inc. (Saft); (10) People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA); (11.... marking provides no additional value * * * because many people in the United States system will have no...

  17. NASA Hazard Analysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, George

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews The NASA Hazard Analysis process. The contents include: 1) Significant Incidents and Close Calls in Human Spaceflight; 2) Subsystem Safety Engineering Through the Project Life Cycle; 3) The Risk Informed Design Process; 4) Types of NASA Hazard Analysis; 5) Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA); 6) Hazard Analysis Process; 7) Identify Hazardous Conditions; 8) Consider All Interfaces; 9) Work a Preliminary Hazard List; 10) NASA Generic Hazards List; and 11) Final Thoughts

  18. Final Report: Nanoscale Dynamical Heterogeneity in Complex Magnetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevan, Stephen [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2016-05-27

    A magnetic object can be demagnetized by dropping it on a hard surface, but what does ‘demagnetized’ actually mean? In 1919 Heinrich Barkhausen proved the existence of magnetic domains, which are regions of uniform magnetization that are much larger than atoms but much smaller than a macroscopic object. A material is fully magnetized when domain magnetizations are aligned, while it is demagnetized when the domain magnetizations are randomly oriented and the net magnetization is zero. The heterogeneity of a demagnetized object leads to interesting questions. Magnets are unstable when their poles align, and stable when their poles anti-align, so why is the magnetized state ever stable? What do domains look like? What is the structure of a domain wall? How does the magnetized state transform to the demagnetized state? How do domains appear and disappear? What are the statistical properties of domains and how do these vary as the domain pattern evolves? Some of these questions remain the focus of intense study nearly a century after Barkhausen’s discovery. For example, just a few years ago a new kind of magnetic texture called a skyrmion was discovered. A skyrmion is a magnetic domain that is a nanometer-scale, topologically protected vortex. ‘Topologically protected’ means that skyrmions are hard to destroy and so are stable for extended periods. Skyrmions are characterized by integral quantum numbers and are observed to move with little dissipation and so could store and process information with very low power input. Our research project uses soft x-rays, which offer very high magnetic contrast, to probe magnetic heterogeneity and to measure how it evolves in time under external influences. We will condition a soft x-ray beam so that the wave fronts will be coherent, that is, they will be smooth and well-defined. When coherent soft x-ray beam interacts with a magnetic material, the magnetic heterogeneity is imprinted onto the wave fronts and projected into

  19. Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L. [and others

    1998-07-01

    The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

  20. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  1. Final disposal of low- and medium-level radioactive materials; Endlagerung von schwach- und mittelradioaktiven Stoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-12-15

    The contribution on the final disposal of low- and medium-level radioactive materials describes the responsibilities according to the atomic law and the mining law, the licensing requirements and the licensing procedures. The costs for the final disposal have to be financed by the waste producer, 40% are publicly owned institutions. The licensed final repository Konrad for low- and medium-level radioactive materials is described in detail. The research mine Asse is obviously not appropriate for final disposal, the stored containers with low- and medium-level radioactive materials have to be retrieved, supposedly after 2033. The final repository for low- and medium-level radioactive materials was installed by the former DDR, in 1998 the repository was closed.Germany has decided to dispose the radioactive waste in deep geological facilities, other countries have near-surface repositories.

  2. Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K. [and others

    1995-04-03

    The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

  3. Alternate electrode materials for the SP100 reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randich, E.

    1992-05-01

    This work was performed in response to a request by the Astro-Space Division of the General Electric Co. to develop alternate electrodes materials for the electrodes of the PD2 modules to be used in the SP100 thermoelectric power conversion system. Initially, the project consisted of four tasks: (1) development of a ZrB{sub 2} (C) CVD coating on SiMo substrates, (2) development of a ZrB{sub 2} (C) CVD coating on SiGe substrates, (3) development of CVI W for porous graphite electrodes, and (4) technology transfer of pertinent developed processes. The project evolved initially into developing only ZrB{sub 2} coatings on SiGe and graphite substrates, and later into developing ZrB{sub 2} coatings only on graphite substrates. Several sizes of graphite and pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite substrates were coated with ZrB{sub 2} during the project. For budgetary reasons, the project was terminated after half the allotted time had passed. Apart from the production of coated specimens for evaluation, the major accomplishment of the project was the development of the CVD processing to produce the desired coatings.

  4. New capability for hazardous materials ID within sealed containers using a portable spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Robert J.; Bailey, Mike; Bonthron, Stuart; Stone, Thomas; Maskall, Guy; Presly, Oliver; Roy, Eric; Tombling, Craig; Loeffen, Paul W.

    2016-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy allows the acquisition of molecularly specific signatures of pure compounds and mixtures making it a popular method for material identification applications. In hazardous materials, security and counter terrorism applications, conventional handheld Raman systems are typically limited to operation by line-of-sight or through relatively transparent plastic bags / clear glass vials. If materials are concealed behind thicker, coloured or opaque barriers it can be necessary to open and take a sample. Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS)[1] is a novel variant of Raman spectroscopy whereby multiple measurements at differing positions are used to separate the spectrum arising from the sub layers of a sample from the spectrum at the surface. For the first time, a handheld system based on SORS has been developed and applied to hazardous materials identification. The system - "Resolve" - enables new capabilities in the rapid identification of materials concealed by a wide variety of non-metallic sealed containers such as; coloured and opaque plastics, paper, card, sacks, fabric and glass. The range of potential target materials includes toxic industrial chemicals, explosives, narcotics, chemical warfare agents and biological materials. Resolve has the potential to improve the safety, efficiency and critical decision making in incident management, search operations, policing and ports and border operations. The operator is able to obtain a positive identification of a potentially hazardous material without opening or disturbing the container - to gain access to take a sample - thus improving safety. The technique is fast and simple thus suit and breathing gear time is used more efficiently. SORS also allows Raman to be deployed at an earlier stage in an event before more intrusive techniques are used. Evidential information is preserved and the chain of custody protected. Examples of detection capability for a number of materials and barrier types are

  5. The recent trends and perspectives for final refusing of the hazardous waste in the Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Krstev, Boris; Lazarov, Aleksandar; Krstev, Aleksandar; Danevski, Tome; Trajkova, Sofce; Golomeov, Blagoj; Golomeova, Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the developments of industrial production and increased consumption with produced hazardous waste, although in the last two to three decades technological processes has been reported, the amounts of hazardous waste has been significantly increased, which is a worrying problem for today's civilization. The current state of treatment of waste can qualify as irregular and chaotic. This unfavorable situation is result to lack of a system for integrated management of the waste ...

  6. Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

    2009-11-01

    The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of

  7. Materializing Exposure: Developing an Indexical Method to Visualize Health Hazards Related to Fossil Fuel Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Wylie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available How can STS researchers collaborate with communities to design environmental monitoring devices that more effectively express their experiences and address gaps in regulation? This paper describes and shows the results of a novel method of visualizing environmental emissions of corrosive gases such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S exposure using photographic paper. H2S is a neurotoxic and flammable gas that smells like rotten eggs and is frequently associated with oil and natural gas extraction. Communities living with oil and gas development in Wyoming report odors of rotten eggs and describe symptoms of H2S exposure. H2S is recognized as an acute and chronic threat to human and environmental health and oil and gas companies are required to have plans in place to prevent and respond to accidental, high concentration releases of H2S. They are not, however, required to monitor, report or prevent routine daily emissions. Yet 15-25% of the oil and gas wells in the US are predicted to contain H2S, and some communities surrounded by multiple wells report chronic, routine exposure. Chronic exposure is difficult to represent with current tools for monitoring H2S because they are designed to measure acute workplace exposure. Informed by STS theories of black boxes and regimes of imperceptibility that focus on the need to revise not only regulations but also material tools of science, this paper describes the development of an indexical approach to visualizing this hazard. In indexical design, the reactive sensing element of a scientific instrument is brought to the foreground. The silver in the photopaper is an index as it tarnishes with H2S exposure. Discolored tests strips can be arranged together to form data-rich maps of the exposure landscape where this discoloration both represents how the gas spreads through a space and is a physical trace of the gas. Preliminary results in the form of data-rich maps show that regulating H2S emissions as primarily

  8. Final evaluation of PETC coal conversion solid and hazardous wastes. Final report, September 15, 1977-November 30, 1979. [PETC's own operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, R.D.; Shapiro, M.; Bern, J.

    1979-08-01

    Hazards and pollutional impacts from residuals generated at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center are explained in the context of hazardous waste regulations proposed by the federal government (RCRA). Nine hazard characteristics are defined and an overview of their significance to PETC is presented. Pollutional impacts on air, water and land are discussed in the energy research perspective. Legislative and statutory relationships between the Center and local, county, state and federal enforcement agencies are listed and analyzed. Expected liability resting on the Center in this framework is outlined. One hundred seven different chemical and indeterminate wastes were reported in an inventory conducted as an earlier task of this project. All of these are tabulated, classified in accordance with the latest proposed federal regulations, with recommended treatment and disposal methodologies included. The existing residuals management system is described to establish baseline conditions in preparing the recommended system. Management policies as they are presently practiced are included in the presentation. A recommended residuals management plan is offered for consideration. It includes the organizational arrangement of PETC personnel, a description of authority and responsibilities of the various human elements of the plan, an information network with detailed data sheets and installation of a mandatory manifest system, a carefully designed hazardous chemical storage area, and short as well as long term choices.

  9. 36 CFR 1206.86 - What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional materials must I submit with the final narrative report? 1206.86 Section 1206.86 Parks, Forests, and Public... narrative report? You must submit the materials determined by the Commission as found in the NHPRC...

  10. Application of pristine and doped SnO2 nanoparticles as a matrix for agro-hazardous material (organophosphate) detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naushad; Athar, Taimur; Fouad, H.; Umar, Ahmad; Ansari, Z. A.; Ansari, S. G.

    2017-02-01

    With an increasing focus on applied research, series of single/composite materials are being investigated for device development to detect several hazardous, dangerous, and toxic molecules. Here, we report a preliminary attempt of an electrochemical sensor fabricated using pristine Ni and Cr–doped nano tin oxide material (SnO2) as a tool to detect agro-hazardous material, i.e. Organophosphate (OP, chlorpyrifos). The nanomaterial was synthesized using the solution method. Nickel and chromium were used as dopant during synthesis. The synthesized material was calcined at 1000 °C and characterized for morphological, structural, and elemental analysis that showed the formation of agglomerated nanosized particles of crystalline nature. Screen-printed films of powder obtained were used as a matrix for working electrodes in a cyclic voltammogram (CV) at various concentrations of organophosphates (0.01 to 100 ppm). The CV curves were obtained before and after the immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on the nanomaterial matrix. An interference study was also conducted with hydroquinone to ascertain the selectivity. The preliminary study indicated that such material can be used as suitable matrix for a device that can easily detect OP to a level of 10 ppb and thus contributes to progress in terms of desired device technology for the food and agricultural-industries.

  11. Application of pristine and doped SnO2 nanoparticles as a matrix for agro-hazardous material (organophosphate) detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naushad; Athar, Taimur; Fouad, H.; Umar, Ahmad; Ansari, Z. A.; Ansari, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing focus on applied research, series of single/composite materials are being investigated for device development to detect several hazardous, dangerous, and toxic molecules. Here, we report a preliminary attempt of an electrochemical sensor fabricated using pristine Ni and Cr–doped nano tin oxide material (SnO2) as a tool to detect agro-hazardous material, i.e. Organophosphate (OP, chlorpyrifos). The nanomaterial was synthesized using the solution method. Nickel and chromium were used as dopant during synthesis. The synthesized material was calcined at 1000 °C and characterized for morphological, structural, and elemental analysis that showed the formation of agglomerated nanosized particles of crystalline nature. Screen-printed films of powder obtained were used as a matrix for working electrodes in a cyclic voltammogram (CV) at various concentrations of organophosphates (0.01 to 100 ppm). The CV curves were obtained before and after the immobilization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on the nanomaterial matrix. An interference study was also conducted with hydroquinone to ascertain the selectivity. The preliminary study indicated that such material can be used as suitable matrix for a device that can easily detect OP to a level of 10 ppb and thus contributes to progress in terms of desired device technology for the food and agricultural-industries. PMID:28195202

  12. Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laul, Jagdish C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-04-19

    TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

  13. Final Report: Laser-Material Interactions Relevant to Analytic Spectroscopy of Wide Band Gap Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickinson, J. T. [Washington State University

    2014-04-05

    We summarize our studies aimed at developing an understanding of the underlying physics and chemistry in terms of laser materials interactions relevant to laser-based sampling and chemical analysis of wide bandgap materials. This work focused on the determination of mechanisms for the emission of electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules from laser irradiation of surfaces. We determined the important role of defects on these emissions, the thermal, chemical, and physical interactions responsible for matrix effects and mass-dependent transport/detection. This work supported development of new techniques and technology for the determination of trace elements contained such as nuclear waste materials.

  14. Advanced 3D Characterization and Reconstruction of Reactor Materials FY16 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fromm, Bradley [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hauch, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    A coordinated effort to link advanced materials characterization methods and computational modeling approaches is critical to future success for understanding and predicting the behavior of reactor materials that operate at extreme conditions. The difficulty and expense of working with nuclear materials have inhibited the use of modern characterization techniques on this class of materials. Likewise, mesoscale simulation efforts have been impeded due to insufficient experimental data necessary for initialization and validation of the computer models. The objective of this research is to develop methods to integrate advanced materials characterization techniques developed for reactor materials with state-of-the-art mesoscale modeling and simulation tools. Research to develop broad-ion beam sample preparation, high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction, and digital microstructure reconstruction techniques; and methods for integration of these techniques into mesoscale modeling tools are detailed. Results for both irradiated and un-irradiated reactor materials are presented for FY14 - FY16 and final remarks are provided.

  15. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, Tier II Reporting locations, Published in 2005, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Iredell County GIS.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information...

  16. Congressional Testimony: Statement of Wade T. Najjum Before the Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statement of Wade T. Najjum Assistant Inspector General for Program Evaluation Office of Inspector General U.S. EPA Before the Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials Committee on Energy and Commerce U.S. House of Representatives

  17. Hazardous Material / Waste Site Assessment: US 701 Bridge Replacement Project Over the Great Pee Dee River, Pee Dee River Overflow, and Lake Yauhannah Horry & Georgetown Counties, South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record is an unpublished report evaluating the hazardous material / waste management impacts of a future bridge replacement project on highway 701 at Yauhannah...

  18. Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghani, A.

    1994-06-01

    Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

  19. 75 FR 63 - Hazardous Materials: Revision to Requirements for the Transportation of Batteries and Battery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... Batteries and Battery-Powered Devices; and Harmonization With the United Nations Recommendations... safe transportation of batteries and battery-powered devices. This final rule corrects several errors... clarifications addressing the safe transportation of batteries and battery-powered devices. This final rule...

  20. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

  1. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This report describes and summarizes a probabilistic evaluation of ground motions for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this evaluation is to provide a basis for updating the seismic design criteria for the INEL. In this study, site-specific seismic hazard curves were developed for seven facility sites as prescribed by DOE Standards 1022-93 and 1023-96. These sites include the: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL); Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP or CPP); Power Burst Facility (PBF); Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC); Naval Reactor Facility (NRF); and Test Area North (TAN). The results, probabilistic peak ground accelerations and uniform hazard spectra, contained in this report are not to be used for purposes of seismic design at INEL. A subsequent study will be performed to translate the results of this probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to site-specific seismic design values for the INEL as per the requirements of DOE Standard 1020-94. These site-specific seismic design values will be incorporated into the INEL Architectural and Engineering Standards.

  2. Design finalization and material qualification towards procurement of the ITER vacuum vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioki, K., E-mail: Kimihiro.Ioki@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance CEDEX (France); Barabash, V.; Bachmann, C.; Chappuis, P.; Choi, C.H.; Cordier, J-J.; Giraud, B.; Gribov, Y. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance CEDEX (France); Heitzenroeder, Ph. [PPPL MS41, Princeton University, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Her, N.; Johnson, G. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance CEDEX (France); Jones, L. [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019, Barcelona (Spain); Jun, C. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance CEDEX (France); Kim, B.C. [NFRI, 52 Yeoeundong Yuseonggu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kuzmin, E. [NTC ' Sintez' , Efremov Inst., 189631 Metallostroy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Loesser, D. [PPPL MS41, Princeton University, PO Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Martin, A.; Merola, M. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance CEDEX (France); Pathak, H. [IPR, Near Indira Bridge, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India); Readman, P. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance CEDEX (France)

    2011-10-01

    Procurement arrangements for ITER key components including the vacuum vessel (VV) have been signed and the ITER activities are now fully devoted towards construction. Final design reviews have been carried out for the main vessel and ports. One of the design review topics is the selection of materials, material procurement, and assessment of material performance during operation. The width of the inner shell splice plates was increased from 120 mm to 160 mm to minimize risk during the assembly of the Thermal shields and the VV. Instead of facet shaping, 3D shaping was introduced for the outboard inner shell. The material qualification procedures have been started for VV structural materials such as 316L(N) IG for licensing as a nuclear pressure equipment component. In accordance with the regulatory requirements and quality requirements for operation, common material specifications have been prepared in collaboration with the domestic agencies.

  3. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-28

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders.

  4. 77 FR 23713 - Pesticides; Final Guidance on Material Safety Data Sheets as Pesticide Labeling; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... relationship between EPA-approved labels for pesticides registered under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide... AGENCY Pesticides; Final Guidance on Material Safety Data Sheets as Pesticide Labeling; Request for.... SUMMARY: The Agency is announcing the availability of a Pesticide Registration Notice (PR Notice)...

  5. Metamaterials as a Platform for the Development of Novel Materials for Energy Applications. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, Willie [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States)

    2016-02-11

    Final report detailing the work performed on DESC0005240 at Boston College. Report details research into metamaterial absorber theory, thermophotovoltaics a dynamic 3 state material capable of switching between transmissive, reflective, and absorptive states. Also high temperature NIR metamaterials are explored.

  6. Synchrotron Studies of Quantum Emergence in Non-Low Dimensional Materials Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Allen

    2011-08-26

    This document is the final report of research performed under U.S. DOE Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46379, entitled Synchrotron Studies of Quantum Emergence in Non-Low Dimensional Materials. It covers the full period of the award, from June 1, 2007 through May 31, 2011.

  7. Characterization of post-disaster environmental management for Hazardous Materials Incidents: Lessons learnt from the Tianjin warehouse explosion, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Duan, Huabo; Zuo, Jian; Song, MingWei; Zhang, Yukui; Yang, Bo; Niu, Yongning

    2017-09-01

    Hazardous Materials Incidents (HMIs) have attracted a growing public concern worldwide. The health risks and environmental implications associated with HMIs are almost invariably severe, and underscore the urgency for sound management. Hazardous Materials Explosion incidents (HMEIs) belong to a category of extremely serious HMIs. Existing studies placed focuses predominately on the promptness and efficiency of emergency responses to HMIs and HMEIs. By contrast, post-disaster environmental management has been largely overlooked. Very few studies attempted to examine the post-disaster environmental management plan particularly its effectiveness and sufficiency. In the event of the Tianjin warehouse explosion (TWE), apart from the immediate emergency response, the post-disaster environmental management systems (P-EMSs) have been reported to be effective and sufficient in dealing with the environmental concerns. Therefore, this study aims to critically investigate the P-EMSs for the TWE, and consequently to propose a framework and procedures for P-EMSs in general for HMIs, particularly for HMEIs. These findings provide a useful reference to develop P-EMSs for HMIs in the future, not only in China but also other countries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. 75 FR 34573 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Bulk MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet NCB National Cargo Bureau NEPA National Environmental Policy Act... material safety data sheet (MSDS) address some portions of proposed Sec. 148.60. We agree with the comment... in the form of an MSDS. e. One comment observed that, as proposed in the 1994 NPRM, Sec. 148.60(d...

  9. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Janeczek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved four composite restorative materials, one lining material and a dentine bonding agent. The polymerization was conducted with the use of a diode light-curing unit. The measurements of the external surface temperature of the samples were carried out using the Thermovision®550 thermal camera. Results. The examined materials significantly differed in terms of the maximum temperatures values they reached, as well as the time required for reaching the temperatures. A statistically significant positive correlation of the maximum temperature and the sample weight was observed. Conclusions. In clinical practice, it is crucial to bear in mind the risk of thermal damage involved in the application of light-cured materials. It can be reduced by using thin increments of composite materials.

  10. 75 FR 10973 - Hazardous Materials: Risk-Based Adjustment of Transportation Security Plan Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Any quantity of Organic None. peroxide, Type B, liquid peroxide, Type B, liquid or solid, temperature... or suspensions or gels in a large bulk quantity. 5.2 Any quantity of Organic peroxide, Type B, liquid... materials; 2.3 poison gases; 4.3 dangerous when wet material; 5.2 Type B organic peroxides, liquid or...

  11. 75 FR 31843 - Identification of Non-Hazardous Secondary Materials That Are Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... avoided extraction and processing emissions 0.006 MTCO 2 E/ MMBtu for coal, the total avoided GHG is 0.019.../MMBtu of PM associated with extraction and processing of the coal. Please see the Materials... (fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag); foundry sand; silica fume; and secondary glass material....

  12. Optimization for Hazardous Material Road Transportation Based on Multi-objective Method%危险品的多目标运输路径优化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧怡

    2013-01-01

    由于危险品运输的特殊性质,在危险品运输路径选择过程中,需要考虑更多的因素,因此提出基于多目标的路径优化模型,通过运输风险、危险平均后果及总后果全面考虑运输中的危险,并将风险、运距及费用目标抽象得到类似广义费用的综合表达形式,使得影响因素影响程度的确定具有更强的灵活性以及适用性;对于综合目标模型采用Dijkstra算法求解,该方法简便易算具有很强操作性,最后用算例验证了方法的科学可行性.%As for hazardous material road transportation,due to its special quality and susceptible to be affected by more factors,this paper propose a model based on multi-objective optimization.By weighting each objective to get a similar generalized cost expression,makes the function of influencing factors more flexibility and applicability; and by applying global optimization algorithm to optimize the path,this method is simple and easy to be calculated,which will provide a more operable model for the optimization problem of hazardous material road transportation.Finally,the feasibility of the method is proved by the given example.

  13. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  14. Investigation of lithium-thionyl chloride battery safety hazards. Final report 28 Sep 81-31 Dec 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, A.I.; Gabriel, K.A.; Burns, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    In the ten years since the feasibility of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell was first recognized (1) remarkable progress has been made in hardware development. Cells as large as 16,000 Ah (2) and batteries of 10.8 MWh (3) have been demonstrated. In a low rate configuration, energy densities of 500 to 600 Wh/kg are easily achieved. Even in the absence of reported explosions, safety would be a concern for such a dense energetic package; the energy density of a lithium-thionyl chloride cell is approaching that of dynamite (924 Wh/kg). In fact explosions have occurred. In general the hazards associated with lithium-thionyl chloride batteries may be divided into four categories: Explosions as a result of an error in battery design. Very large cells were in prototype development prior to a full appreciation of the hazards of the system. It is possible that some of the remaining safety issues are related to cell design; Explosions as a result of external physical abuse such as cell incineration and puncture; Explosions due to short circuiting which could lead to thermal runaway reactions. These problems appear to have been solved by changes in the battery design (4); and Expolsions due to abnormal electrical operation (i.e., charging (5) and overdischarging (6) and in partially or fully discharged cells on storage (7 and 8).

  15. Transport and Reactivity of Decontaminants to Provide Hazard Mitigation of Chemical Warfare Agents from Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    of Additives and Impurities from Polymeric Materials; EPA 560/5-85-015; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticides and Toxic...performance, a penetrating decontaminant may cause damage to the material, such as the swelling of polymers caused by solvents or any active...Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation Products. Environ . Health Perspect. 1999, 107 (12), 933–974. 5. Kim, K.; Tsay, O.G.; Atwood, D.A.; Churchill, D.G

  16. 77 FR 22504 - Hazardous Materials; Packages Intended for Transport by Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... comprehensive review of air packaging standards as appropriate. In this review, data will be collected on the... 8. Lonnie Jaycox 9. European Chemistry Industry Council (CEFIC) A. Secondary Means of Closure Three... Coordination with Indian Tribal Governments''). Because this final rule does not have tribal implications...

  17. 76 FR 44496 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures; Response to Appeals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    .... Bierlein objects to the requirement for applicants to use a failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA... not required to use a FMEA, they are only required to prove with data or test results that they will.... Additionally, a FMEA was provided in the final rule as an example of how to meet this requirement. Mr....

  18. Pectina: da matéria-prima ao produto final Pectin: from raw material to the final product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria H. G. Canteri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A pectina, provavelmente a mais complexa macromolécula natural, é um heteropolissacarídeo contendo predominantemente resíduos de ácido galacturônico. Este polímero, do grupo das fibras dietéticas, é amplamente utilizado como geleificante e estabilizante na indústria de alimentos. O principal processo industrial para obtenção de pectina está baseado na solubilização da protopectina do bagaço de maçã e casca de frutos cítricos, realizada em condições levemente ácidas sob aquecimento. Estudos recentes têm reportado a extração de pectina de novas matérias-primas sob diferentes condições, com influência sobre a qualidade e sobre o rendimento do produto final, para aumentar sua qualidade reológica. Esta revisão descreve a estrutura, as fontes, as aplicações, o processo de extração industrial assim como as principais técnicas de caracterização da pectina.Pectin, probably the most complex macromolecule in nature is a hetero-polysaccharide containing predominantly residues of galacturonic acid (GalA. This polymer, which belongs to a group of dietary fibers, is widely used as a gelling agent and stabilizer in the food industry. The main industrial processing to obtain pectin is based on the solubilization of protopectin from apple pomace and citrus peels, which is done under low acidity and heated conditions. Recent studies have reported the extraction of pectin from new raw materials and using different extraction conditions, which influence the yield and quality of the final product, and may improve the rheological properties. This review describes the structure, sources, applications and industrial extraction processes, as well as the analysis methods of physicochemical characterization of pectin.

  19. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  20. Chemical risk assessment for storage of hazardous materials in the context of Land Use Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Ozunu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Historical technological accidents caused in numerous occasions the major environmentalpollution and the loss of many human lives. Lessons learned from these accidents contributedsignificantly to the development of technological safety in two ways: technological and legislative. Afterthree years from the adherence of Romania to EU, a coherent legislation for land-use planning is stillmissing in the context of Article 12 of Seveso Directive. Nowadays there are more than 200 Seveso-typeeconomical operators in Romania, most of them with major risk, located close to areas highly vulnerablefor population or environment. The elaboration of risk assessment studies for the technological accidentsprevention, land-use planning and emergency planning is necessary and essential for these sites. Basedon these studies the population can be informed, instructed and prepared for accidents, thus savingmany lives. In this paper the development of a risk assessment methodology for land-use andemergency planning is proposed for Seveso-type sites, where large quantities of dangerous, explosive,flammable or toxic substances are stored, handled or processed. Three case studies were consideredwhile elaborating this methodology. These case studies include technological accident scenarios for thestorage of common hazardous substances: propane, chlorine and ammonium nitrate. Severalmethodologies applied in the EU member states were approached and the proposed methodology isbased on the results of this research.

  1. The first stage of BFS integrated system for nuclear materials control and accounting. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The BFS computerized accounting system is a network-based one. It runs in a client/server mode. The equipment used in the system includes a computer network consisting of: One server computer system, including peripheral hardware and three client computer systems. The server is located near the control room of the BFS-2 facility outside of the `stone sack` to ensure access during operation of the critical assemblies. Two of the client computer systems are located near the assembly tables of the BFS-1 and BFS-2 facilities while the third one being the Fissile Material Storage. This final report details the following topics: Computerized nuclear material accounting methods; The portal monitoring system; Test and evaluation of item control technology; Test and evaluation of radiation based nuclear material measurement equipment; and The integrated demonstration of nuclear material control and accounting methods.

  2. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... perform safety and security route analysis 5,000 to 10,000 Factors to consider are the size of the... analysis; failure to complete a component of the route analysis 5,000 —Compilation of security-sensitive... route used by the carrier to transport security-sensitive materials —Safety and security route analysis...

  3. 77 FR 76601 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... transporting Division 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3 materials. (modes 1, 2, 4) 15765-N Delphi Automotive 49 CFR 49 CFR To authorize the Systems, LLC, 173.185(a), 49 CFR transportation in Warren, OH. 107.105, IMDG COde commerce...

  4. 78 FR 60745 - Hazardous Materials: Minor Editorial Corrections and Clarifications (RRR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ... when a proper shipping name includes a concentration or concentration range. While the HMR permits the... containing internal combustion engines, battery-powered equipment or machinery, and fuel cell-powered...) describes the type, size and service pressure of specification 4BW cylinders and not the type of material...

  5. 76 FR 37887 - Office of Hazardous Materials Safety; Notice of Application for Special Permits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-28

    ... quantities when the amount of material exceeds 30 ml. (modes 1, 4, 5, 6). 15372-N Takata de Mexico, 49 CFR 173.301(a), To authorize the S.A. de C.V. 173.302(a), manufacture, marking, Ciudad Frontera, 178.65(f...

  6. 77 FR 43141 - Air Carrier Hazardous Materials Passenger Notification Requirements: Acceptable Means of Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Organization Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air (ICAO Technical... * * *'' Thus, it appears the ICAO Technical Instructions places the responsibility to notify passengers in... additional materials forbidden beyond those covered in the general language? The ICAO Technical...

  7. 76 FR 5483 - Hazardous Materials: Incorporation of Certain Cargo Tank Special Permits Into Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... products and technologies into the production and transportation stream, thereby providing a mechanism for... continue to be used in anhydrous ammonia service under specified conditions. The decision to consider the... community is particularly strong at developing new technologies and pioneering ways of moving materials...

  8. Chapter C. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Fire, Police, Transportation and Hazardous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Anne, Craig; Scawthorn, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    The papers in this chapter discuss some of the failures and successes that resulted from the societal response by a multitude of agencies to the Loma Prieta earthquake. Some of the lessons learned were old ones relearned. Other lessons were obvious ones which had gone unnoticed. Still, knowledge gained from past earthquakes spawned planning and mitigation efforts which proved to be successful in limiting the aftermath effects of the Loma Prieta event. At least four major areas of response are presented in this chapter: the Oakland Police Department response to the challenge of controlled access to the Cypress freeway collapse area without inhibiting relief and recovery efforts; search and rescue of the freeway collapse and the monumental crisis management problem that accompanied it; the short- and long-term impact on transbay transportation systems to move a large work force from home to business; and the handling of hazardous material releases throughout the Bay Area.

  9. Assessment of industrial hazardous waste practices, storage and primary batteries industries. Final report, Apr--Sep 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCandless, L.C.; Wetzel, R.; Casana, J.; Slimak, K.

    1975-01-01

    This report, which covers battery manufacturing operations, is one of a series of several studies which examine land-destined wastes from selected industries. The battery industry is divided into two groups by the Bureau of Census: Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 3691 Storage Batteries (such as lead--acid automobile batteries) and SIC 3692 Primary Batteries (such as carbon--zinc flashlight batteries). The battery industry was studied because heavy metals such as mercury, cadmium, zinc, and lead are used in some of its manufacturing processes. These metals can be toxic in certain concentrations and forms. The potentially hazardous wastes destined for land disposal from the battery industry consist of industrial processing wastes, reject cells, and sludges from water pollution control devices. The amount of sludges destined for land disposal is expected to experience a large short term increase as water effluent guidelines are implemented. The impact of water effluent guidelines on land disposal of wastes is the largest single factor in determining future trends for this industry.

  10. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  11. Investigation of Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Battery Safety Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    LITHIUM - THIONYL CHLORIDE BATTERY SAFETY HAZARDS(U) GOULD RESEARCH CENTER ROLLING MEADOWS IL MATERIALS LAB A I ATTIA ET...838-012 7 ontract No. 60921-81-C-0363 6// Investigation of Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Battery Safety Hazards AD A 1 T 2 , Alan I. Attia Gould Research...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Investigation of Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Final Report Battery Safety Hazards 9/28/81 - 12/31/82 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  12. Standoff detection of hazardous materials using a novel dual-laser pulse technique: theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Alan; Waterbury, Robert D.; Rose, Jeremy; Dottery, Edwin L.

    2009-05-01

    The present work focuses on a new variant of double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) called Townsend effect plasma spectroscopy (TEPS) for standoff applications. In the TEPS technique, the atomic and molecular emission lines are enhanced by a factor on the order of 25 to 300 times over LIBS, depending upon the emission lines observed. As a result, it is possible to extend the range of laser induced plasma techniques beyond LIBS and DP-LIBS for the detection of CBRNE materials at distances of several meters.

  13. ASSET RECOVERY OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS BENEFICIAL REUSE OF RADIOLOGICALLY ENCUMBERED LEAD STOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, E.R.; Meehan, R.W.

    2003-02-27

    Underutilized and surplus lead stocks and leaded components are a common legacy environmental problem across much of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. While seeking to dispose of these items through its Environmental Management Program, DOE operational programs continue to pursue contemporary mission requirements such as managing and/or storing radioactive isotopes that require lead materials for shielding. This paradox was identified in late 1999 when DOE's policies for managing scrap metal were assessed. In January 2000, the Secretary of Energy directed the National Center of Excellence for Materials Recycle (NMR) to develop and implement a comprehensive lead reuse program for all of DOE. Fluor Hanford, contractor for DOE Richland Operations, subsequently contacted NMR to pilot lead reclamation and reuse at the Hanford Site. This relationship resulted in the development of a beneficial reuse pathway for lead reclaimed from spent fuel transport railcars being stored at Hanford. The 1.3 million pounds of lead in the railcars is considered radiologically encumbered due to its prior use. Further, the material was considered a mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) low-level radioactive waste that would require expensive storage or macro encapsulation to meet land disposal restrictions prior to burial. Working closely with Flour Hanford and the Office of Air, Water, and Radiation (EH-412), NMR developed a directed reuse pathway for this and other radiologically encumbered lead. When derived supplemental release limits were used, the lead recovered from these railcars became eligible for reuse in shielding products to support DOE and commercial nuclear industry operations. Using this disposition pathway has saved Hanford one third of the cost of disposing of the lead and the cost of acquiring additional lead for nuclear shielding applications. Furthermore, the environmental costs associated with mining and producing new lead for shielding

  14. Estimation of radioactivity level and associated radiological hazards of limestone and gypsum used as raw building materials in Rawalpindi/Islamabad region of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rahmat; Ali, Safdar; Hussain, Manzur

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to asses the radioactivity level of limestone and gypsum and its associated radiological hazard due to the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials. Representative samples of limestone and gypsum were collected from cement factories located in the Rawalpindi/Islamabad region of Pakistan and were analysed by using an N-type high-purity germanium detector of 80 % relative efficiency. The average activity concentration of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th were 60.22±3.47, 29.25±5.23 and 4.07±3.31 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in limestone and 70.86±4.1, 5.01±2.10 and 4.49±3.1 Bq kg(-1), respectively, in gypsum. The radiological hazard parameters radium equivalent activities, absorbed dose rate in air, external hazard index, internal hazard index, annual effective dose equivalent, gamma index and alpha index were computed. The results of the average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th and radiological hazard parameters were within the range of the reported average worldwide/United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation values. It is concluded that limestone and gypsum used in the Rawalpindi/Islamabad region does not pose any excessive radiological health hazard as a building raw materials and in industrial uses.

  15. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  16. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  17. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

  18. Evaluation of the dependence of radiation hazard indices on the physical characteristics of phosphogypsum-based building materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maduar, M.F.; Mazzilli, B.P.; Nisti, M.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Phosphogypsum, a waste by-product derived from the production of phosphoric acid, is being worldwide stockpiled, posing concerns about the environmental problems originating from this practice. Considerations about the viability of the safe reuse of this material have been raised, among them its potential use in civil construction. However, as phosphogypsum can contain natural radionuclides in significant concentrations, using it as a building material has radiological implications, which presently prevent such application. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using phosphogypsum in the manufacturing of building elements such as bricks and plates, a comprehensive research is underway at IPEN, Brazil, following a multiple approach. This research includes studies related to: a) phosphogypsum characterization; b) experimental determination of radon exhalation rates; c) application of theoretical models to forecast both radon exhalation and external doses. In this paper, a case study is performed, using the physical parameters of Brazilian phosphogypsum from different origins, already characterized in previous works, including radionuclides concentration, apparent density and radon exhalation rates. The data are applied to well established methodologies for evaluating the radiation hazard indices and the influence of each physical parameter is also studied. This work will contribute to the national regulatory authority in the definition of constraints for using phosphogypsum in civil construction. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  19. A real-time tracking system for monitoring shipments of hazardous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Phillip; Paschal, Jon; Hopper, Lindsay; Pinson, Dudley; Schultz, Frederick; Whitfield Humphrey, Melinda

    2007-04-01

    Due to the ever increasing use of radioactive materials in day to day living from the treatment of cancer patients and irradiation of food for preservation to industrial radiography to check for defects in the welding of pipelines and buildings there is a growing concern over the tracking and monitoring of these sources in transit prior to use as well as the waste produced by such use. The prevention of lost sealed sources is important in reducing the environmental and health risk posed by direct exposure, co-mingling in the metal recycling stream, use in contaminated consumer products, and use in terrorist activities. Northwest Nuclear, LLC (NWN) and the Applied Physics Institute (API) at Western Kentucky University have developed a tracking technology using active radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. This system provides location information by measuring the time of arrival of packets from a set of RFID tags to a set of location receivers. The system can track and graphically display the location on maps, drawings or photographs of tagged items on any 802.11- compliant device (PDAs, laptops, computers, WiFi telephones) situated both outside and inside structures. This location information would be vital for tracking the location of high level radiological sources while in transit. RFID technology would reduce the number of lost sources by tracking them from origination to destination. Special tags which indicate tampering or sudden movement have also been developed.

  20. Potential explosion hazard of carbonaceous nanoparticles: Explosion parameters of selected materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkevich, Leonid A; Dastidar, Ashok G; Hachmeister, Zachary; Lim, Michael

    2015-09-15

    Following a previous explosion screening study, we have conducted concentration and ignition energy scans on several carbonaceous nanopowders: fullerene, SWCNT, carbon black, MWCNT, graphene, CNF, and graphite. We have measured minimum explosive concentration (MEC), minimum ignition energy (MIE), and minimum ignition temperature (MITcloud) for these materials. The nanocarbons exhibit MEC ~10(1)-10(2) g/m(3), comparable to the MEC for coals and for fine particle carbon blacks and graphites. The nanocarbons are confirmed mainly to be in the St-1 explosion class, with fullerene, at K(St) ~200 bar-m/s, borderline St-1/St-2. We estimate MIE ~ 10(2)-10(3) J, an order of magnitude higher than the MIE for coals but an order of magnitude lower than the MIE for fine particle graphites. While the explosion severity of the nanocarbons is comparable to that of the coals, their explosion susceptibility (ease of ignition) is significantly less (i.e., the nanocarbons have higher MIEs than do the coals); by contrast, the nanocarbons exhibit similar explosion severity to the graphites but enhanced explosion susceptibility (i.e., the nanocarbons have lower MIEs than do the graphites). MIT(cloud) > 550 °C, comparable to that of the coals and carbon blacks.

  1. Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

  2. Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

  3. Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

  4. Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

  5. Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

  6. Design of Construction Plan of Hazardous Material Supply Chain Laboratory%危险品供应链实验室建设方案设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆洲艳; 钱华

    2012-01-01

    指出了危险品供应链实验室的建设目的,指导思想及总体规划,并从危险品仓储管理实验,危险品追塑系统实验等6方面介绍了基于物联网技术的危险品供应链实验室方案设计内容,最后详细介绍了实验手段与环境设计内容及相关实验设备配置情况.%In this paper, we pointed out the objective, guideline and general planning of the construction of hazardous material supply chain laboratory, introduced from six aspects the content of the laboratory solution design based on IOT technology, and finally studied in detail the experiment means, content of environmental design and the configuration of relevant experimental devices.

  7. Effect of the Freshness of Starting Material on the Final Product Quality of Dried Salted Shark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnerassery Sukumaran Sudheesh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the relationship between the freshness of the starting raw material (fish and the final product quality in experimentally dried shark fish. Sharks were stored at room temperature (25ºC for 0, 24 and 48 h and then salted, processed and sun dried at ambient temperatures ranging from 35 to 42ºC. There was marked difference in sensory and microbiological quality of fresh fish stored to different time periods, but, after drying, the quality difference was negligible. The results of this study show that storage of fish up to 48 h under experimental conditions at room temperature does not affect major microbiological quality and proximate composition of the final dried product.

  8. Final Hazard Categorization and Auditable Safety Analysis for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the initial hazard categorization, final hazard categorization and auditable safety analysis for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  9. Pre Conference Hazardous Materials Workshop, West/East Coast Safety Conference, held 3-4 October/31 October - 1 November 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    the date of plata , the enactment of the Used Oil Rc.,clirig Act of 1980 "(2) The plan shall, in accordance with section may be amended, at the option...D.C. 20036 Hilo , Hawaii Ph: (202) 797-5425 Honolulu, Hawaii R REFERENCE DATA SI DATA SOURCES HAZARDOUS MATERIALS I1. ASSOCIATIONS AND GOVERNMENT

  10. ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

  11. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    CERN Document Server

    Grams, W H

    2000-01-01

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from t...

  12. Assessment of natural radioactivity and radiological hazards in building materials used in the Tiruvannamalai District, Tamilnadu, India, using a statistical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Raghu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One-hundred-fifty-one samples of six types of building materials were collected from different locations of the Tiruvannamalai District, Tamilnadu, and were analyzed using a gamma ray spectroscopy system. From the results, the highest values observed in the specific activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were 116.1 (soil 106.67 (sand and 527.533 (tiles in Bq kg−1, while the lowest values observed in the specific activities of the same radionuclides were 35.73, 37.75 and 159.83 for cement in Bq kg−1, respectively. The potential radiological hazards were assessed by calculating the radium equivalent activity (Raeq, the indoor absorbed gamma dose rate (DR, the annual effective dose rate (HR, the activity utilization index (I, the alpha index (Iα, the gamma index (Iγ, and the external hazard (Hex and internal hazard (Hin indices. The estimated mean value of the absorbed dose rate of 148.35 nGy h−1 is slightly higher than the world average value of 84 nGy h−1, and the annual effective dose in the studied samples is 0.1824 mSv y−1, which is lower than the recommended limit. Multivariate statistical methods are applied to determine the existing relationship between radionuclides and radiological health hazard parameters and to identify the maximum contribution of radionuclide in radioactivity. The values of the hazard indices were below the recommended levels; therefore, it is concluded that the buildings constructed from such materials are safe for the inhabitants. The findings from this research will be useful to assess the radiation hazards of building materials in humans.

  13. 49 CFR 173.227 - Materials poisonous by inhalation, Division 6.1, Packing Group I, Hazard Zone B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Packing Group I, Hazard Zone B. 173.227 Section 173.227 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to..., Packing Group I, Hazard Zone B. (a) In packagings as authorized in § 173.226 and seamless and welded... conform to the performance test requirements of subpart M of part 178 of this subchapter at the...

  14. 49 CFR 173.226 - Materials poisonous by inhalation, Division 6.1, Packing Group I, Hazard Zone A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Packing Group I, Hazard Zone A. 173.226 Section 173.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to..., Packing Group I, Hazard Zone A. Division 6.1, Packing Group I, Zone A poisonous by inhalation (see § 173... performance test requirements of subpart M of part 178 of this subchapter at the Packing Group I...

  15. Final Report: Photo-Directed Molecular Assembly of Multifunctional Inorganic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.G. Potter, Jr.

    2010-10-15

    This final report details results, conclusions, and opportunities for future effort derived from the study. The work involved combining the molecular engineering of photoactive Ti-alkoxide systems and the optical excitation of hydrolysis and condensation reactions to influence the development of the metal-oxygen-metal network at the onset of material formation. Selective excitation of the heteroleptic alkoxides, coupled with control of alkoxide local chemical environment, enabled network connectivity to be influenced and formed the basis for direct deposition and patterning of Ti-oxide-based materials. The research provided new insights into the intrinsic photoresponse and assembly of these complex, alkoxide molecules. Using a suite of electronic, vibrational, and nuclear spectroscopic probes, coupled with quantum chemical computation, the excitation wavelength and fluence dependence of molecular photoresponse and the nature of subsequent hydrolysis and condensation processes were probed in pyridine-carbinol-based Ti-alkoxides with varied counter ligand groups. Several methods for the patterning of oxide material formation were demonstrated, including the integration of this photoprocessing approach with conventional, dip-coating methodologies.

  16. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzemer, Michael J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hart, Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  17. Fissile and Non-Fissile Material Detection using Nuclear Acoustic Resonance Signatures: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J; Maxwell, R; Tittmann, B R; Lenahan, P M; Yerkes, S; Jayaraman, S B

    2006-11-02

    This is final report on NA-22 project LL251DP, where the goal was to develop a novel technique, Nuclear Acoustic Resonance (NAR), for remote, non-destructive, nonradiation-based detection of materials of interest to Nonproliferation Programs, including {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. In short, we have developed a magnetic shield chamber and magnetic field, develop a digital lock-in amplifier computer to integrate both the ultrasound radiation with the detector, developed strain measurements, and begun to perform initial measurements to obtain a NAR signal from aluminum at room temperature and near the earth's magnetic field. Since our funding was cut in FY06, I will discuss where this project can go in the future with this technology.

  18. Environmental Assessment For the Proposed Construction of A Hazardous Materials Issue Facility and a Hazardous Wastes Storage Facility at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    BAFB was also listed as a leaking underground storage tank site and in the Spills Database for the Department of Public Health and Environment...Protection Agency USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service UST underground storage tank SECTION 8.0 ACRONYMS/ABBREVIATIONS FINAL Environmental...TEXAS VIRGINIA NEVADA FLORIDA TENNESSEE NEW MEXICO 550 East 15th Street Plano, Texas 75074-5708 25 March 2004 Richard & Bonnie Rader 71

  19. Hazard and socioenvironmental weakness: radioactive waste final disposal in the perception of the Abadia de Goias residents, GO, Brazil; Risco e vulnerabilidade socioambiental: o deposito definitivo de rejeitos radioativos na percepcao dos moradores de Abadia de Goias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Elaine Campos

    2005-07-01

    The work searches into the hazard and the weakness which involves the community around the radioactive waste final disposal, localized in Abadia de Goias municipality, Goias state, Brazil. In order to obtain a deep knowledge on the characteristic hazards of the modernity, the sociological aspects under discussion has been researched in the Anthony Giddens and Ulrich Beck works. The phenomenon was analyzed based on the the subjective experiences of the residents, which live there for approximately 16 years. This temporal analysis is related to the social impact suffered by the residents due to the radioactive wastes originated from the radiation accident with 137 cesium in Goiania, GO, Brazil, in 1987. In spite of the local security, they identified the disposal as a hazard source, although the longer time residents have been better adaptation. The weakness of the local is significant by the proximity of residences near the area of the radioactive waste final disposal. (author)

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.1101 - Federal supply classification (FSC) groups and classes which contain hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... device. 2520 Vehicular power transmission components Items containing asbestos. 2530 Vehicular brake... metallic sodium. Group 29 Engine accessories Engine valves containing metallic sodium. Group 30 Mechanical power transmission equipment Equipment containing hazardous hydraulic fluids including PCBs. Group...

  1. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2007-04-12

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  2. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-20

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  3. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-12-06

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  4. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  5. Toxicology and occupational hazards of new materials and processes in metal surface treatment, powder metallurgy, technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtgård, U; Jelnes, J E

    1991-12-01

    Many new materials and processes are about to find their way from the research laboratory into industry. The present paper describes some of these processes and provides an overview of possible occupational hazards and a list of chemicals used or produced in the processes. The technological areas that are considered are metal surface treatment (ion implantation, physical and chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying), powder metallurgy, advanced technical ceramics, and fiber-reinforced plastics.

  6. Simulation of the Press Hardening Process and Prediction of the Final Mechanical Material Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochholdinger, Bernd; Hora, Pavel; Grass, Hannes; Lipp, Arnulf

    2011-08-01

    Press hardening is a well-established production process in the automotive industry today. The actual trend of this process technology points towards the manufacturing of parts with tailored properties. Since the knowledge of the mechanical properties of a structural part after forming and quenching is essential for the evaluation of for example the crash performance, an accurate as possible virtual assessment of the production process is more than ever necessary. In order to achieve this, the definition of reliable input parameters and boundary conditions for the thermo-mechanically coupled simulation of the process steps is required. One of the most important input parameters, especially regarding the final properties of the quenched material, is the contact heat transfer coefficient (IHTC). The CHTC depends on the effective pressure or the gap distance between part and tool. The CHTC at different contact pressures and gap distances is determined through inverse parameter identification. Furthermore a simulation strategy for the subsequent steps of the press hardening process as well as adequate modeling approaches for part and tools are discussed. For the prediction of the yield curves of the material after press hardening a phenomenological model is presented. This model requires the knowledge of the microstructure within the part. By post processing the nodal temperature history with a CCT diagram the quantitative distribution of the phase fractions martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite after press hardening is determined. The model itself is based on a Hockett-Sherby approach with the Hockett-Sherby parameters being defined in function of the phase fractions and a characteristic cooling rate.

  7. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Final subcontract report, 16 January 1990--15 January 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion

    1993-08-01

    This report describes results and conclusions of the final phase (III) of a three-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film heterojunction solar cells. The research consisted of the investigation of the relationships between processing, materials properties, and device performance. This relationship was quantified by device modeling and analysis. The analysis of thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells explains how minority-carrier recombination at the metallurgical interface and at grain boundaries can be greatly reduced by the proper doping of the window and absorber layers. Additional analysis and measurements show that the present solar cells are limited by the magnitude of the diode current, which appears to be caused by recombination in the space charge region. Developing an efficient commercial-scale process for fabricating large-area polycrystalline, thin-film solar cells from a research process requires a detailed understanding of the individual steps in making the solar cell, and their relationship to device performance and reliability. The complexities involved in characterizing a process are demonstrated with results from our research program on CuInSe{sub 2}, and CdTe processes.

  8. Exploiting Novel Radiation-Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    semiconductors ) or optical photons ( scintillators ) resulting from ionization events occurring in the materials. The requirement of co-located detector material...low coercivity oxide magnets, spin glass magnets, core- shell nanoparticles, and magnetic semiconductor chalcogenide materials. Working in parallel...resonator testing. Commercial materials were obtained spanning obvious materials classes for consideration: semiconductors (high resistivity Si

  9. Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

  10. Study of non aqueous reprocessing methods. Final progress report. [Container materials for pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitel, R. J.; Luderer, J. E.; Henderson, T. M.

    1978-11-17

    The problems associated with container materials for selected pyrochemical processes and process containment conditions are reviewed. A rationale for container materials selection is developed. Candidate process container materials are presented, and areas warranting further development are identified. 14 tables.

  11. Development of switchable hygroscopic materials. Final technical report FY 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The following are covered: current considerations in desiccant dehumidification materials, switchable desiccant theory, candidate materials, test methods, test results, product design considerations, and future research.

  12. 29 CFR 1917.153 - Spray painting (See also § 1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... under construction, major repair or rebuilding of terminal structures, or portable spraying apparatus..., splices or connections. (iv) Portable electric lights shall not be used during spraying operations. Lights... thereafter to exhaust hazardous vapor concentrations. (7) Rotating fan elements shall be nonsparking or...

  13. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

  14. Hazardous Waste: Learn the Basics of Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page on hazardous waste transportation . Top of Page Hazardous Waste Recycling, Treatment, Storage and Disposal To the extent possible, EPA ... Disposal Facilities (TSDFs) provide temporary storage and final treatment or disposal for hazardous wastes. Since they manage large volumes of waste and ...

  15. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-08-01

    This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

  16. 77 FR 17573 - Hazard Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ..., 1915 and 1926 Hazard Communication; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 58 / Monday... Administration 29 CFR Parts 1910, 1915, and 1926 RIN 1218-AC20 Hazard Communication AGENCY: Occupational Safety... modifying its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform to the United Nations' Globally Harmonized...

  17. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites, DSHWPOPermittedUsedOilFacilities-Location in Utah of all Used Oil Facilities: Marketers, Porcessoors, Transfer, Transport and Off-specification Permitted by UDEQ Division of Hazardous Waste (DSHW) - Used Oil Section. Federal Fiscal Year 2006. Dataset Upda, Published in 2006, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, State of Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information...

  18. 基于三维视角的危险品运输风险管理机制研究%Management Mechanism of Transport Risk for Hazardous Materials Based on Three-Dimensional Viewpoints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙彦明; 赵鲁华; 周勇

    2015-01-01

    优化危险品运输风险管理机制,能够降低运输风险,同时兼顾企业成本需求,为政府决策提供参考。通过对我国近些年发生的诸多危险品运输事故进行调查研究,分析了危险品运输应急预案和风险应对方面存在的薄弱问题,同时基于系统论的研究方法,构建了三维分析视角的风险分析逻辑架构。基于风险管理的主体、客体及过程三个维度,通过对危险品运输风险因素的全面分析,进行运输风险的危害性分析以及风险事件与诱因之间的关联性评估,最后提出风险危害削减和控制的应对措施:建立全方位的监管责任制度,确保“有人管理”;健全全面的风险信息反馈机制,确保“管理全面”;通过路径优化和HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point,危害分析的临界控制点)控制方法,从源头开始,实现危险品运输“全程可控”。研究指出:三维视角下的风险识别、风险评估和风险应对构成一个相互联系、相互作用的系统,形成全面的风险管理机制。%The optimization of risk management mechanism of hazardous materials transportation can reduce the transportation risk and meanwhile take into account the cost of enterprise, which provides ref⁃erences for the government decision.By investigating lots of traffic accidents of transportation for hazard⁃ous materials in recent years, the problems in emergency plan and risk response were analyzed. Based on systematic research method, the logical framework on risk analysis of the three-dimensional perspec⁃tive was built. According to the subject, object and process of risk management, some risk factors of haz⁃ardous materials transportation were comprehensively analyzed. Then, hazard analysis on transportation risk was put forward and relevance between risk events and its causes was evaluated. Finally, measures on reduction and controlling of risks were

  19. Electrostatic hazards

    CERN Document Server

    Luttgens, Günter; Luttgens, Gnter; Luttgens, G Nter

    1997-01-01

    In the US, UK and Europe there is in excess of one notifiable dust or electrostatic explosion every day of the year. This clearly makes the hazards associated with the handling of materials subject to either cause or react to electrostatic discharge of vital importance to anyone associated with their handling or industrial bulk use. This book provides a comprehensive guide to the dangers of static electricity and how to avoid them. It will prove invaluable to safety managers and professionals, as well as all personnel involved in the activities concerned, in the chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical and petrochemical process industries. The book makes extended use of case studies to illustrate the principles being expounded, thereby making it far more open, accessible and attractive to the practitioner in industry than the highly theoretical texts which are also available. The authors have many years' experience in the area behind them, including the professional teaching of the content provided here. Günte...

  20. Improving the design of higher-capacity railway tank cars for hazardous materials transport: optimizing the trade-off between weight and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Christopher P L

    2008-12-15

    As with many aspects of modern industrial society, decision-makers face trade-offs in considering hazardous materials transportation equipment and practices. Tank cars used for transport of hazardous materials can be made more resistant to damage in accidents through use of a thicker steel tank and other protective features. However, the additional weight of these features reduces the car's capacity and thus its efficiency as a transportation vehicle. In this paper the problem of tank car safety versus weight is developed as a multi-attribute decision problem. North American railroads recently developed specifications for higher capacity tank cars for transportation of hazardous materials including enhanced safety design features. A group of tank car safety design features or "risk reduction options" (RROs) were analyzed with regard to their effect on the conditional probability of release in an accident, and their incremental effect on tank car weight. All possible combinations of these RROs were then analyzed in terms of the reduced release probability per unit of weight increase and the Pareto optimal set of options identified. This set included the combinations of RROs that provided the greatest improvement in safety with the least amount of additional weight for any desired level of tank car weight increase. The analysis was conducted for both non-insulated and insulated tank cars and used two objective functions, minimization of conditional probability of release, and minimization of expected quantity lost, given that a car was derailed in an accident. Sensitivity analyses of the effect of tank car size and use of different objective functions were conducted and the optimality results were found to be robust. The results of this analysis were used by the Association of American Railroads Tank Car Committee to develop new specifications for higher capacity non-insulated and insulated, non-pressure tank cars resulting in an estimated 32% and 24% respective

  1. Preliminary assessment of hazardous-waste pretreatment as an air-pollution-control technique. Final report, 25 July 1983-31 July 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivey, J.J.; Allen, C.C.; Green, D.A.; Wood, J.P.; Stallings, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    The report evaluates twelve commercially available treatment techniques for their use in removing volatile constituents from hazardous and potentially hazardous waste streams. A case study of the cost of waste treatment is also provided for each technique. The results show that air stripping or evaporation coupled with carbon adsorption of the off gases; steam stripping; and batch distillation are the most widely applicable pretreatment techniques. The cost-effectiveness of pretreatment varies widely with waste-stream characteristics and type of pretreatment, with typical values being between $55 and $1,800 per megagram of volatile removed.

  2. Identifying Sources and Assessing Potential Risk of Exposure to Heavy Metals and Hazardous Materials in Mining Areas: The Case Study of Panasqueira Mine (Central Portugal as an Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Candeias

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sn-W Panasqueira mine, in activity since the mid-1890s, is one of the most important economic deposits in the world. Arsenopyrite is the main mineral present as well as rejected waste sulphide. The long history is testified by the presence of a huge amount of tailings, which release considerable quantities of heavy metal(loids into the environment. This work assesses soil contamination and evaluates the ecological and human health risks due to exposure to hazardous materials. The metal assemblage identified in soil (Ag-As-Bi-Cd-Cu-W-Zn; potentially toxic elements (PTEs reflects the influence of the tailings, due to several agents including aerial dispersion. PTEs and pH display a positive correlation confirming that heavy metal mobility is directly related to pH and, therefore, affects their availability. The estimated contamination factor classified 92.6% of soil samples as moderately to ultra-highly polluted. The spatial distribution of the potential ecological risk index classified the topsoil as being of a very high ecological risk, consistent with wind direction. Non-carcinogenic hazard of topsoil, for children (1–6 years, showed that for As the non-carcinogenic hazard represents a high health risk. The carcinogenic risks, both for children and adult alike, reveal a very high cancer risk mostly due to As ingestion.

  3. Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrella, R.

    1994-10-01

    Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

  4. Health hazard evaluation/toxicity determination report 73-73-143, Inland Manufacturing Co. , General Motors Corporation, Dayton, Ohio. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhe, R.L.

    1974-10-01

    NIOSH conducted a health hazard survey in a boiler room of a steam plant to evaluate worker exposure to coal dust containing silica and fly ash during the boiler clean-up operation. Based on these environmental measurements and on employee interviews, it was determined that the silica containing dusts were not toxic at the concentrations found on this survey. (GRA)

  5. Analysis of hazardous organic residues from sodium hydrosulfite industry and utilization as raw materials in a novel solid lubricant production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jiwu [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Yihe, E-mail: zyh@cugb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Zhou, Fengshan; Lv, Fengzhu; Han, Feng; Lu, Jinbo; Meng, Xianghai [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Ye, Zhengfang [Department of Environmental Engineering, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences of the Ministry of Education, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xing, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, National Laboratory of Mineral Materials, School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are analyzed and the main compounds are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2 Prime -dithiodiethanol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the homemade solid lubricant is observed to have good lubricity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The clean process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution. - Abstract: The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are demonstrated to be convertible into a novel solid lubricant. Identification and isolation of the organic residues are achieved by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). FTIR and GC-MS provide important information about the residues and the two main components obtained by column chromatography are further analyzed by NMR. The main organic residues are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2 Prime -dithiodiethanol which have potential applications in petroleum drilling because of their S-S and/or C-S functional groups. The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the influence of different adsorbents on the lubricity is investigated and discussed. This homemade lubricant is observed to have good lubricity and by increasing the concentration of the commercial solid lubricant M, the lubricity diminishes. The process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution.

  6. Final versions of the initial package of classroom materials and guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorman, Michiel; Jonker, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the mascil Work Package 3 ‘classroom materials’ is to present guidelines and an online collection of teaching materials that encourage and support teachers to design their own classroom materials that connect IBL and the WoW in mathematics and science education.The collection present

  7. Development of radiative-cooling materials. Final technical report: FY 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Work on research and development on glazing and selective emitter materials that will enhance day and night sky radiative cooling is described. The emphasis is on glazing development with a secondary interest in the appropriate selective emitter. The testing focused on the individual material properties. (MHR)

  8. Performance testing of elastomeric seal materials under low and high temperature conditions: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BRONOWSKI,DAVID R.

    2000-06-01

    The US Department of Energy Offices of Defense Programs and Civilian Radioactive Waste Management jointly sponsored a program to evaluate elastomeric O-ring seal materials for radioactive material shipping containers. The report presents the results of low- and high-temperature tests conducted on 27 common elastomeric compounds.

  9. Analysis and forecast of electrical distribution system materials. Final report. Volume III. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, C G

    1976-08-23

    These appendixes are referenced in Volume II of this report. They contain the detailed electrical distribution equipment requirements and input material requirements forecasts. Forecasts are given for three electric energy usage scenarios. Also included are data on worldwide reserves and demand for 30 raw materials required for the manufacture of electrical distribution equipment.

  10. Advancing Renewable Materials by Integrated Light and X-ray Scattering - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpalu, Yvonne A

    2010-06-30

    Polyhydroxyalkanotes (PHAs), a group of newly developed, commercially available biopolymers, and their composites have the potential to replace petroleum-based amorphous and semicrystalline polymers currently in use for consumer packaging, adhesives, and coating applications and to have significant advantages in medical applications such as tissue engineering. While the potential of PHAs is recognized in the literature and has even been realized in some cases, knowledge of these systems is decades behind that of synthetic polymers. Composites based on PHAs, furthermore, are just emerging in the research community. We argue that widespread adoption of nano-enhanced PHA materials can only be achieved through a proper characterization of the nanofiller morphology and its impact on the polymer matrix. Our goal is to build a robust understanding of the structure-processing relationships of PHAs to make it possible to achieve fundamental control over the final properties of these biopolymers and their bionanocomposites and to develop cost-effective manufacturing technologies for them. With the ultimate goal to design PHA polymer nanocomposites with tailored properties, we have performed a systematic study of the influence of cooling rate on the thermal properties and morphology of linear PHAs (PHB Mw = 690,000 g/mol; PHBV Mw = 407,000 g/mol, 8 mol % HV) and branched (PHBHx, Mw = 903, 000 g/mol, 7.2 mol % Hx) copolymers. Structure-property relations for silica/PHBHx nanocomposites were also investigated. Our studies show that simple two-phase composite models do not account for the molecular weight dependent enhancement in the modulus. Although improvement of the mechanical properties (stiffness/modulus and toughness) must be due to alteration of the matrix by the nanoparticle filler, the observed improvement was not caused by the change of crystallinity or spherulitic morphology. Since the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites can be affected by many factors

  11. Advancing Renewable Materials by Integrated Light and X-ray Scattering - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpalu, Yvonne A

    2010-06-30

    Polyhydroxyalkanotes (PHAs), a group of newly developed, commercially available biopolymers, and their composites have the potential to replace petroleum-based amorphous and semicrystalline polymers currently in use for consumer packaging, adhesives, and coating applications and to have significant advantages in medical applications such as tissue engineering. While the potential of PHAs is recognized in the literature and has even been realized in some cases, knowledge of these systems is decades behind that of synthetic polymers. Composites based on PHAs, furthermore, are just emerging in the research community. We argue that widespread adoption of nano-enhanced PHA materials can only be achieved through a proper characterization of the nanofiller morphology and its impact on the polymer matrix. Our goal is to build a robust understanding of the structure-processing relationships of PHAs to make it possible to achieve fundamental control over the final properties of these biopolymers and their bionanocomposites and to develop cost-effective manufacturing technologies for them. With the ultimate goal to design PHA polymer nanocomposites with tailored properties, we have performed a systematic study of the influence of cooling rate on the thermal properties and morphology of linear PHAs (PHB Mw = 690,000 g/mol; PHBV Mw = 407,000 g/mol, 8 mol % HV) and branched (PHBHx, Mw = 903, 000 g/mol, 7.2 mol % Hx) copolymers. Structure-property relations for silica/PHBHx nanocomposites were also investigated. Our studies show that simple two-phase composite models do not account for the molecular weight dependent enhancement in the modulus. Although improvement of the mechanical properties (stiffness/modulus and toughness) must be due to alteration of the matrix by the nanoparticle filler, the observed improvement was not caused by the change of crystallinity or spherulitic morphology. Since the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites can be affected by many factors

  12. Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

    2007-12-31

    The DOE-funded project on materials for industrial heat recovery systems included four research tasks: materials for aluminum melting furnace recuperator tubes, materials and operational changes to prevent cracking and corrosion of the co-extruded tubes that form primary air ports in black liquor recovery boilers, the cause of and means to prevent corrosion of carbon steel tubes in the mid-furnace area of recovery boilers, and materials and operational changes to prevent corrosion and cracking of recovery boiler superheater tubes. Results from studies on the latter two topics are given in this report while separate reports on results for the first two tasks have already been published. Accelerated, localized corrosion has been observed in the mid-furnace area of kraft recovery boilers. This corrosion of the carbon steel waterwall tubes is typically observed in the vicinity of the upper level of air ports where the stainless clad co-extruded wall tubes used in the lower portion of the boiler are welded to the carbon steel tubes that extend from this transition point or “cut line” to the top of the boiler. Corrosion patterns generally vary from one boiler to another depending on boiler design and operating parameters, but the corrosion is almost always found within a few meters of the cut line and often much closer than that. This localized corrosion results in tube wall thinning that can reach the level where the integrity of the tube is at risk. Collection and analysis of gas samples from various areas near the waterwall surface showed reducing and sulfidizing gases were present in the areas where corrosion was accelerated. However, collection of samples from the same areas at intervals over a two year period showed the gaseous environment in the mid-furnace section can cycle between oxidizing and reducing conditions. These fluctuations are thought to be due to gas flow instabilities and they result in an unstable or a less protective scale on the carbon steel

  13. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  14. Study on GIS-based visual management system of urban hazardous materials transportation%基于GIS的城区危险品运输可视化管控系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪德; 孟祥妹

    2012-01-01

    integrated a-bility of GIS. And, finally, we have brought the system path analysis and selection into full play by means of our angle-modified Dijsktra arithmetic system. In addition, we have also built up a visual management and control system to assist urban hazardous materials supervision authorities to make effective decisions in accordance with the actual conditions. Thus, it can be seen that the visual management and control system can be used to provide technological guidance for actual accident rescue.

  15. Studies on the production of building material grade slag from hazardous-waste incineration plants; Untersuchungen zur Herstellung einer Schlacke mit Baustoffqualitaet aus Sondermuellverbrennungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, J.; Herbel, J.D.; Pasel, C. [Duisburg Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany). Fachgebiet Abfalltechnik

    1998-09-01

    In an attempt to restore the competitive power of hazardous-waste incineration within the present legal framework, plant operators have in some cases lowered disposal prices below the break-even point; in this respect there is no further room for improvement. One approach towards a new marketable solution could be to use rotary kilns not only for disposal but also as production plants. This could be achieved by means of input control and loading materials. If, for example, the slag remaining after combustion could be made to meet building material specifications, thus providing a marketable product, then rotary kilns would be able to serve as production plants for a secondary raw material. If it should prove possible in the course of manufacturing campaigns to develop slags from hazardous-waste incineration plants to a marketable product, then operators will thus have complied to the demand of the Law on Recycling and Waste Management for waste avoidance and that of the Emission Control Law for residue recycling. Targeted use of suitable loading materials for quality improvement could enable operators of hazardous-waste incineration plants to secure a new strategic position on the market as building material manufacturers and utilise existing plant capacities. [Deutsch] Um die Sonderabfallverbrennung im Rahmen der rechtlichen Vorgaben wieder konkurrenzfaehig zu machen, haben die Anlagenbetreiber die Entsorgungspreise teilweise unter die Grenze der Kostendeckung zurueckgenommen; hier besteht kein Spielraum mehr. Ein neuer, marktgerechter Ansatz koennte sich dann ergeben, wenn die Drehrohroefen statt als Beseitigungsaggregate durch Inputsteuerung und Zuschlaege eventuell auch als Produktionsanlagen einzusetzen waeren. Wenn z.B. die Schlacke, als Rueckstand aus der Verbrennung, als ein im Baustoffmarkt absetzbares Produkt nach Qualitaetskriterien gezielt hergestellt wuerde, koennte der Drehrohrofen als Produktionsanlage fuer einen Sekundaerrohstoff betrieben werden

  16. 危险品运输方式优化研究%Research on optimization for transportation way of hazardous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭丰润; 韩文涛; 魏毓

    2013-01-01

    In the given hazardous materials transportation network, many ways may be available to transport the hazardous materials, However, different ways may lead to the difference in the cost of transportation and loss of total social expectations. The selection method of best mode andtransport path to move the goods of danger in a given condition was studied. Through a simulation example, the solving method of the model was presented. The comparison of the different transportation modes showed that a combination of different ways can lower the cost of the transportation as well as the loss of the total social expectations.%在危险品运输过程中,可能存在多种运输方式,采用不同的运输方式运输单位危险品的成本以及社会总期望损失不同.研究了在给定条件下,最佳运输方式和运输路径的选择方法.通过一个仿真例子说明了该模型的求解方法,通过对不同运输方式的对比发现,在一定情况下,采用多种方式交叉组合的运输方式可以降低单位危险品的运输成本以及社会总期望损失.

  17. Summary evaluation of the video, {open_quotes}Transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials: Safety for all concerned{close_quotes}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, M.C.; Young, C.F.

    1993-07-01

    Outreach materials are often developed and distributed without evaluation of their effectiveness. This report provides a glimpse of the effectiveness of one of the US Department of Energy`s videos on transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials. Data from a survey developed by Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc. are summarized. This survey was sent to recipients of the video at three to six weeks after they had received and viewed the video. The response rate is unknown; hence, the results suggest the range of perspectives on the video, rather than the representativeness of those perspectives. The results are also limited by incomplete responses to the survey. Most respondents were middle school and high school teachers who resided throughout the country. Respondents used the video in nearly all school subjects. Most respondents indicated that the video was fairly good and appreciated the factual information, although some saw it as propaganda. Respondents indicated that they would like additional information on hazardous wastes, nuclear power, and transportation. The test crashes were mentioned as a highlight of the video. Recommendations for revising the video and survey are included.

  18. Center for Fundamental and Applied Research in Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials. Final Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullins, Michael; Rogers, Tony; King, Julia; Keith, Jason; Cornilsen, Bahne; Allen, Jeffrey; Gilbert, Ryan; Holles, Joseph

    2010-09-28

    The core projects for this DOE-sponsored Center at Michigan Tech have focused on several of the materials problems identified by the NAS. These include: new electrode materials, enhanced PEM materials, lighter and more effective bipolar plates, and improvement of the carbon used as a current carrier. This project involved fundamental and applied research in the development and testing of lightweight and nanostructured materials to be used in fuel cell applications and for chemical synthesis. The advent of new classes of materials engineered at the nanometer level can produce materials that are lightweight and have unique physical and chemical properties. The grant was used to obtain and improve the equipment infrastructure to support this research and also served to fund seven research projects. These included: 1. Development of lightweight, thermally conductive bipolar plates for improved thermal management in fuel cells; 2. Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts for fuel cells; 3. Development of hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites with improved ionic and electronic properties; 4. Development of oriented polymeric materials for membrane applications; 5. Preparation of a graphitic carbon foam current collectors; 6. The development of lightweight carbon electrodes using graphitic carbon foams for battery and fuel cell applications; and 7. Movement of water in fuel cell electrodes.

  19. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martone, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member.

  20. Quantum Simulations of Materials and Nanostructures (Q-SIMAN). Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, Giulia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Bai, Zhaojun [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ceperley, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Cai, Wei [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gygi, Francois [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Marzari, Nicola [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Pickett, Warren [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Spaldin, Nicola [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Fattebert, Jean-Luc [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schwegler, Eric [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-16

    The focus of this SciDAC SAP (Scientific Application) is the development and use of quantum simulations techniques to understand materials and nanostructures at the microscopic level, predict their physical and chemical properties, and eventually design integrated materials with targeted properties. (Here the word ‘materials’ is used in a broad sense and it encompasses different thermodynamic states of matter, including solid, liquids and nanostructures.) Therefore our overarching goal is to enable scientific discoveries in the field of condensed matter and advanced materials through high performance computing.

  1. Materials for high-temperature hydrogen fluorine environments. Final report, June 1976-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.

    1981-03-01

    A determination has been made of the stability of 35 materials under high-temperature, fluorine rich, hydrogen fluoride torch testing. Refractory materials tested included 4 borides, 3 carbides, 3 nitrides, 12 oxides, 1 oxynitride, 1 sulfide, 10 metals, and carbon (10 types). Three materials distinctly performed better than nickel: lanthanum hexaboride, calcium hexaboride, and lanthanum silicon oxynitride. Of these, lanthanum hexaboride is the best candidate tested since it has an estimated upper use temperature > 1726 K, which is above the melting point and more than 300 K above the upper use temperature of nickel.

  2. Adaptive Back Sheet Material for Acoustic Liner Applications-ARMD Seedling Fund Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Jones, Michael G.; Farrar, Dawnielle

    2014-01-01

    A recently developed piezo-electric composite film is evaluated for its usefulness in application in acoustic liners. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center Liner Technology Facility developed experiments to measure the electrical response of the material to acoustic excitation and the vibrational response of the material to electrical excitation. The robustness of the piezo-electric film was also assessed. The material's electrical response to acoustic excitation is found to be comparable to a commercial microphone in the range of frequencies from 500 to 3000 Hz. However, the vibrational response to electrical excitation in the frequency range of interest is an order of magnitude less than may be necessary for application to acoustic liners. Nevertheless, experimental results indicate that the potential exists for the material to produce a measurable change in the impedance spectrum of a liner. Work continues to improve the authority of the piezo-electric film.

  3. Solar-collector-materials exposure to the IPH site environment. Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    In-situ environmental exposure tests were conducted at nine proposed intermediate-temperature Industrial Process Heat (IPH) sites. Three types of reflector materials were evaluated for survivability at the nine sites: second-surface silvered glass, aluminized acrylic FEK-244 film on aluminumsubstrate and Alzak (electropolished aluminum) on aluminium substrate. Black chrome absorber material and low-iron float glass were evaluated for thermal, photochemical, and environmental degradation. The reflector specimens were monitored for decreases in specular and hemispherical reflectance due to soil buildup. The absorber material was evaluated for changes in solar absorptivity and emissivity, and the float glass was monitored for changes in transmissivity. Surface and subsurface defects on all materials were examined microscopically and, where deemed of note, were documented photographically.

  4. Solar-collector materials exposure to the IPH site environment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    In-situ environmental exposure tests were conducted at nine proposed intermediate-temperature Industrial Process Heat (IPH) sites. Three types of reflector materials were evaluated for survivability at the nine sites: second-surface silvered glass, aluminized acrylic FEK-244 film on aluminum substrate, and Alzak (electropolished aluminum) on aluminum substrate. Black chrome absorber material and low-iron float glass were evaluated for thermal, photochemical, and environmental degradation. The reflector specimens were monitored for decreases in specular and hemispherical reflectance due to soil buildup. The absorber material was evaluated for changes in solar absorptivity and emissivity, and the float glass was monitored for changes in transmissivity. Surface and subsurface defects on all materials were examined microscopically and, where deemed of note, were documented photographically.

  5. Efficient insulation material for furnaces. Final report. Effektivare isolermaterial i ugnar. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rensgard, A.

    1986-03-19

    The project aim has been to test and analyze alternatives for the improvement of heat insulation and faster regulation of temperature by utilizing light ceramic insulation materials such as ceramic fibres.

  6. Exploratory development on laser and optical materials. Final report 1 Dec 1972-15 Aug 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hare, J.M.; Detrio, J.A.; Petty, R.D.; Yaney, P.P.

    1974-12-01

    Topics include analytical solid state material studies--(Theoretical and experimental investigations of the optical Stark spectra of rare earth ions, Judd-Ofelt theory, Quantum efficiencies); Laser materials evaluation; Studies of rare-earth doped CdF/sub 2/, SrF/sub 2/, and BaF/sub 2/--(Electroluminescence of semiconducting CdF/sub 2/, Analyses of the optical spectra of Gd/sup 3 +/ and Ce/sup 3 +/).

  7. NSR&D Program Fiscal Year 2015 Funded Research Stochastic Modeling of Radioactive Material Releases Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrus, Jason P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pope, Chad [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Toston, Mary [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Maas, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Nonreactor nuclear facilities operating under the approval authority of the U.S. Department of Energy use unmitigated hazard evaluations to determine if potential radiological doses associated with design basis events challenge or exceed dose evaluation guidelines. Unmitigated design basis events that sufficiently challenge dose evaluation guidelines or exceed the guidelines for members of the public or workers, merit selection of safety structures, systems, or components or other controls to prevent or mitigate the hazard. Idaho State University, in collaboration with Idaho National Laboratory, has developed a portable and simple to use software application called SODA (Stochastic Objective Decision-Aide) that stochastically calculates the radiation dose distribution associated with hypothetical radiological material release scenarios. Rather than producing a point estimate of the dose, SODA produces a dose distribution result to allow a deeper understanding of the dose potential. SODA allows users to select the distribution type and parameter values for all of the input variables used to perform the dose calculation. Users can also specify custom distributions through a user defined distribution option. SODA then randomly samples each distribution input variable and calculates the overall resulting dose distribution. In cases where an input variable distribution is unknown, a traditional single point value can be used. SODA, developed using the MATLAB coding framework, has a graphical user interface and can be installed on both Windows and Mac computers. SODA is a standalone software application and does not require MATLAB to function. SODA provides improved risk understanding leading to better informed decision making associated with establishing nuclear facility material-at-risk limits and safety structure, system, or component selection. It is important to note that SODA does not replace or compete with codes such as MACCS or RSAC; rather it is viewed as an

  8. Development & Optimization of Materials and Processes for a Cost Effective Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production System. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, Eric W

    2011-01-17

    The overall project objective was to apply high throughput experimentation and combinatorial methods together with novel syntheses to discover and optimize efficient, practical, and economically sustainable materials for photoelectrochemical production of bulk hydrogen from water. Automated electrochemical synthesis and photoelectrochemical screening systems were designed and constructed and used to study a variety of new photoelectrocatalytic materials. We evaluated photocatalytic performance in the dark and under illumination with or without applied bias in a high-throughput manner and did detailed evaluation on many materials. Significant attention was given to -Fe2O3 based semiconductor materials and thin films with different dopants were synthesized by co-electrodeposition techniques. Approximately 30 dopants including Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Ti, Pt, etc. were investigated. Hematite thin films doped with Al, Ti, Pt, Cr, and Mo exhibited significant improvements in efficiency for photoelectrochemical water splitting compared with undoped hematite. In several cases we collaborated with theorists who used density functional theory to help explain performance trends and suggest new materials. The best materials were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visual spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photoelectrocatalytic performance of the thin films was evaluated and their incident photon

  9. Suitability of dredged material for reclamation of surface-mined land. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Van Luik, A.

    1979-12-01

    Eroding ridges of acidic coal-mine spoil in La Salle County, Illinois, were leveled to form a gently-sloped raised plateau. Four test plots were constructed: a control plot and three treatment plots that received a 0.9-m-thick cover of dredged material obtained from the Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago. Two treatment plots received lime applications and all plots were seeded with a mixture of grasses. Pressure-vacuum soil water samplers were installed, in duplicate, at two levels in the control plot and at three levels in each treatment plot. The three levels in the treatment plots coincided with dredged material, the dredged-material mine-spoil interface, and the underlying mine spoil. Surface water, soil water, and groundwater were monitored for 29 water-quality parameters for one year. Rainfall, air temperature, runoff, and water-level elevation data were collected also. Detailed analysis of the data indicates that the dredged material used in this study does not adversely affect water quality; it supports abundant plant growth, lessens groundwater contamination, and controls acid runoff. The dredged material is judged to be a suitable material for use in reclamation of surface-mined land.

  10. Criteria for evaluation of building materials hazard based on their natural radioactivity in Russia and in the European Union countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzina Darya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We hereby have considered the natural radioactivity of building materials as a source of radiation for the human environment. We have considered the Russian and the European evaluation criteria for ensuring radiation safety of the population. We also present an experimental research of the content of natural radionuclides in building materials. We have calculated the effective specific activity and the activity concentration index based on the results presented. We have identified discrepancies between the Russian and the European standards.

  11. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D. [The Trane Company, La Crosse, WI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours. The original refrigerants and the Alternatives tested for retrofit were as follows: Most motor materials exposed to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant (after an initial exposure to the original refrigerant and mineral oil) were compatible with the alternative refrigerant and lubricant. The only concern was delamination and blistering of the sheet insulation containing Nomex, especially after removal of absorbed refrigerant. This was attributed to solution of the adhesive and not to the Nomex itself. Embrittlement of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) found in Mylar and Melinex sheet and sleeving insulations was initially observed, but subsequent tests under dry conditions showed that embrittlement of the PET materials was caused by moisture present during the exposure. Compatibility tests of elastomers with R-245ca, retrofitted from R-11 and R-123, showed that the nitrile was compatible with both R-11 and R-245ca, but not with R-123. The neoprene was unsatisfactory because of shrinkage in the R-245ca.

  12. FY96 materials and processes technology area plan (TAP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Materials and Processes Technology Area Plan (MP TAP) describes the research and development activities performed by the Wright-Laboratory`s Materials Directorate (WL/XL) at WPAFB, OH. WL/ML is responsible for developing MP technologies for all Air Force aircraft, spacecraft, and missiles systems. MP for Structures, Propulsion, and Subsystems thrust of the MP TAP describes the development of technologies utilizing advanced composite materials, lightweight - aluminum and titanium alloys, high temperature intermetallics, and improved fluids, lubricants, and coatings. Applications include airframe and engine retrofits, high speed aircraft, spacelift, missiles and satellites. The MP for Electronics, Optics, and Survivability thrust of the MP TAP describes the development of materials for high temperature semiconductors and superconductors, advanced infrared detectors, non-linear optical devices, and laser hardening. Applications include high power radar and avionic systems, infrared countermeasures, and sensor and aircrew laser protection. The MP for Systems and Operational Support thrust of the MP TAP describes the development of nondestructive inspection (NDI) techniques and repair of composite and LO materials. It also describes ML`s interface with all Air Force fielded systems through logistic centers and system project offices (SPOs) and by conducting electronic and structural failure analysis.

  13. Final Technical Report for DE-SC0001878 [Theory and Simulation of Defects in Oxide Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelikowsky, James R. [University of Texas at Austin

    2014-04-14

    We explored a wide variety of oxide materials and related problems, including materials at the nanoscale and generic problems associated with oxide materials such as the development of more efficient computational tools to examine these materials. We developed and implemented methods to understand the optical and structural properties of oxides. For ground state properties, our work is predominantly based on pseudopotentials and density functional theory (DFT), including new functionals and going beyond the local density approximation (LDA): LDA+U. To study excited state properties (quasiparticle and optical excitations), we use time dependent density functional theory, the GW approach, and GW plus Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) methods based on a many-body Green function approaches. Our work focused on the structural, electronic, optical and magnetic properties of defects (such as oxygen vacancies) in hafnium oxide, titanium oxide (both bulk and clusters) and related materials. We calculated the quasiparticle defect states and charge transition levels of oxygen vacancies in monoclinic hafnia. we presented a milestone G0W0 study of two of the crystalline phases of dye-sensitized TiO{sub 2} clusters. We employed hybrid density functional theory to examine the electronic structure of sexithiophene/ZnO interfaces. To identify the possible effect of epitaxial strain on stabilization of the ferromagnetic state of LaCoO{sub 3} (LCO), we compare the total energy of the magnetic and nonmagnetic states of the strained theoretical bulk structure.

  14. Neutron Spectrometry for Identification of filler material in UXO - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, Mary

    2007-09-12

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO)-contaminated sites often include ordnance filled with inert substances that were used in dummy rounds. During UXO surveys, it is difficult to determine whether ordnance is filled with explosives or inert material (e.g., concrete, plaster-of-paris, wax, etc.) or is empty. Without verification of the filler material, handling procedures often necessitate that the object be blown in place, which has potential impacts to the environment, personnel, communities and survey costs. The Department of Defense (DoD) needs a reliable, timely, non-intrusive and cost-effective way to identify filler material before a removal action. A new technology that serves this purpose would minimize environmental impacts, personnel safety risks and removal costs; and, thus, would be especially beneficial to remediation activities.

  15. Materials science studies of high-temperature superconducting ceramic oxides. Final report, May 1988-March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezzoli, G.C.; Chen, M.F.; Craver, F.; Katz, R.N.

    1997-12-01

    Herein is presented the results of a comprehensive program of research aimed at understanding the materials science and the mechanistic physics of high-temperature superconducting oxides. This comprehensive research program has identified the materials properties that are consistently associated with high-Tc superconductors and has shown that the mechanism that gives rise to the phenomenon of high-Tc superconductivity is associated with bound holes that are due to charge-transfer excitations at high frequency. The latter are a result of the high internal electric field present in high-Tc materials, owing to the asymmetry of the crystal structure. The interaction of bound holes with free electrons and the interaction of local spin fluctuations with the spin of free electrons generate a charge density wave and a spin density wave that cause Cooper pairing.

  16. Laboratory study of acid stimulation of drilling-mud-damaged geothermal-reservoir materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-05-01

    Presented here are the results of laboratory testing performed to provide site specific information in support of geothermal reservoir acidizing programs. The testing program included laboratory tests performed to determine the effectiveness of acid treatments in restoring permeability of geologic materials infiltrated with hydrothermally altered sepiolite drilling mud. Additionally, autoclave tests were performed to determine the degree of hydrothermal alteration and effects of acid digestion on drilling muds and drill cuttings from two KGRA's. Four laboratory scale permeability/acidizing tests were conducted on specimens prepared from drill cuttings taken from two geothermal formations. Two tests were performed on material from the East Mesa KGRA Well No. 78-30, from a depth of approximately 5500 feet, and two tests were performed on material from the Roosevelt KGRA Well No. 52-21, from depths of approximately 7000 to 7500 feet. Tests were performed at simulated in situ geothermal conditions of temperature and pressure.

  17. Final report on CCQM-K80: Comparison of value-assigned CRMs and PT materials: Creatinine in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Johanna E.; Duewer, David L.; Gasca Aragon, Hugo; Lippa, Katrice A.; Toman, Blaza

    2013-01-01

    regression was used to establish the key comparison reference function (KCRF) relating the assigned values to the repeatability measurements. Parametric bootstrap Monte Carlo was used to estimate 95% level-of-confidence coverage intervals for the degrees of equivalence of materials, d +/- U95(d), and of the participating NMIs, D +/- U95(D). Because of the wide range of creatinine mass fraction in the materials, these degrees of equivalence are expressed in percent relative form: %d +/- U95(%d) and %D +/- U95(%D). On the basis of leave-one-out cross-validation, the assigned values for 16 of the 17 materials were deemed equivalent at the 95% level of confidence. These materials were used to define the KCRF. The excluded material was identified as having a marginally underestimated assigned uncertainty, giving it large and potentially anomalous influence on the KCRF. However, this material's %d of 1.4 +/- 1.5 indicates that it is equivalent with the other materials at the 95% level of confidence. The median |%d| for all 17 of the materials is 0.3 with a median U95(%d) of 1.9. All of these higher-order CRMs for creatinine in human serum are equivalent within their assigned uncertainties. The median |%D| for the participating NMIs is 0.3 with a median U95(%D) of 2.1. These results demonstrate that all participating NMIs have the ability to correctly value-assign CRMs and proficiency test materials for creatinine in human serum and similar measurands. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  18. Human semen assays for workplace monitoring. [Monitoring of hazardous materials by determining effects on semen of personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gledhill, B.L.

    1978-11-07

    Decades of human semen studies have yielded compelling evidence that sperm can be used to access reproductive potential and diagnose pathology. With these studies as background, the small number of detailed semen studies of men exposed to physical and chemical agents point with optimism to the application of human semen assays as efficient, effective means to monitor for reproductive hazards in the workplace. Sperm are the most accessible of human gonadal tissue and provide a means of monitoring exposure induced changes in the human testes, changes which may result in infertility and increased frequencies of genetically abnormal gametes. The focus on semen has precipitated the development of new sperm bioassays which use older conventional andrological methods (i.e., sperm counts, motility, and morphology) as well as recently developed high speed flow and scanning methods for automated cytological analyses. The status of these sperm assays for workplace surveillance is reviewed, procedures are suggested with examples of use, and their effectiveness is evaluated. The available mouse models of induced semen changes are briefly described and the importance of these models for evaluating the genetic implications of findings in human semen is discussed.

  19. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  20. A Model for Producing and Sharing Instructional Materials in Veterinary Medicine. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Billy C.; Niec, Alphonsus P.

    This report describes a study of factors which appear to influence the "shareability" of audiovisual materials in the field of veterinary medicine. Specific factors addressed are content quality, instructional effectiveness, technical quality, institutional support, organization, logistics, and personal attitudes toward audiovisuals. (Author/CO)

  1. Removal of Hazardous Pollutants from Wastewaters: Applications of TiO2-SiO2 Mixed Oxide Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivatharsiny Rasalingam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The direct release of untreated wastewaters from various industries and households results in the release of toxic pollutants to the aquatic environment. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP have gained wide attention owing to the prospect of complete mineralization of nonbiodegradable organic substances to environmentally innocuous products by chemical oxidation. In particular, heterogeneous photocatalysis has been demonstrated to have tremendous promise in water purification and treatment of several pollutant materials that include naturally occurring toxins, pesticides, and other deleterious contaminants. In this work, we have reviewed the different removal techniques that have been employed for water purification. In particular, the application of TiO2-SiO2 binary mixed oxide materials for wastewater treatment is explained herein, and it is evident from the literature survey that these mixed oxide materials have enhanced abilities to remove a wide variety of pollutants.

  2. Final Report of Optimization Algorithms for Hierarchical Problems, with Applications to Nanoporous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Stephen G.

    2013-11-11

    The research focuses on the modeling and optimization of nanoporous materials. In systems with hierarchical structure that we consider, the physics changes as the scale of the problem is reduced and it can be important to account for physics at the fine level to obtain accurate approximations at coarser levels. For example, nanoporous materials hold promise for energy production and storage. A significant issue is the fabrication of channels within these materials to allow rapid diffusion through the material. One goal of our research is to apply optimization methods to the design of nanoporous materials. Such problems are large and challenging, with hierarchical structure that we believe can be exploited, and with a large range of important scales, down to atomistic. This requires research on large-scale optimization for systems that exhibit different physics at different scales, and the development of algorithms applicable to designing nanoporous materials for many important applications in energy production, storage, distribution, and use. Our research has two major research thrusts. The first is hierarchical modeling. We plan to develop and study hierarchical optimization models for nanoporous materials. The models have hierarchical structure, and attempt to balance the conflicting aims of model fidelity and computational tractability. In addition, we analyze the general hierarchical model, as well as the specific application models, to determine their properties, particularly those properties that are relevant to the hierarchical optimization algorithms. The second thrust was to develop, analyze, and implement a class of hierarchical optimization algorithms, and apply them to the hierarchical models we have developed. We adapted and extended the optimization-based multigrid algorithms of Lewis and Nash to the optimization models exemplified by the hierarchical optimization model. This class of multigrid algorithms has been shown to be a powerful tool for

  3. Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DOE/EERE project Advanced Magnetic Refrigerant Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Francis

    2014-06-30

    A team led by GE Global Research developed new magnetic refrigerant materials needed to enhance the commercialization potential of residential appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioners based on the magnetocaloric effect (a nonvapor compression cooling cycle). The new magnetic refrigerant materials have potentially better performance at lower cost than existing materials, increasing technology readiness level. The performance target of the new magnetocaloric material was to reduce the magnetic field needed to achieve 4 °C adiabatic temperature change from 1.5 Tesla to 0.75 Tesla. Such a reduction in field minimizes the cost of the magnet assembly needed for a magnetic refrigerator. Such a reduction in magnet assembly cost is crucial to achieving commercialization of magnetic refrigerator technology. This project was organized as an iterative alloy development effort with a parallel material modeling task being performed at George Washington University. Four families of novel magnetocaloric alloys were identified, screened, and assessed for their performance potential in a magnetic refrigeration cycle. Compositions from three of the alloy families were manufactured into regenerator components. At the beginning of the project a previously studied magnetocaloric alloy was selected for manufacturing into the first regenerator component. Each of the regenerators was tested in magnetic refrigerator prototypes at a subcontractor at at GE Appliances. The property targets for operating temperature range, operating temperature control, magnetic field sensitivity, and corrosion resistance were met. The targets for adiabatic temperature change and thermal hysteresis were not met. The high thermal hysteresis also prevented the regenerator components from displaying measurable cooling power when tested in prototype magnetic refrigerators. Magnetic refrigerant alloy compositions that were predicted to have low hysteresis were not attainable with conventional alloy

  5. Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, C.

    1996-12-31

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

  6. 78 FR 79363 - Hazardous Materials: Adoption of ASME Code Section XII and the National Board Inspection Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... tank. Manufacturers will only elect to utilize Section XII if it makes business sense. II...'s compliance and enforcement programs. Within the United States, the most common modes of... practices, improved materials, advances in welding, examination and testing. Notably, fracture mechanics did...

  7. Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, D.C.; Gaines, G.B.; Sliemers, F.A.; Kistler, C.W.; Igou, R.D.

    1976-07-21

    Available information defining the state of the art of encapsulation materials and processes for terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications were collected and analyzed. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for low-cost, long-life terrestrial photovoltaic arrays manufactured by automated, high-volume processes. The criteria for consideration of the encapsulation systems were based on the goals for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total array price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. (WDM)

  8. Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corral, Erica L. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Evans, Lindsey R.

    2012-05-01

    This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

  9. Final Report: Stability and Novel Properties of Magnetic Materials and Ferromagnet / Insulator Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, Paul [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2013-07-24

    We report investigations of the synthesis, structure, and properties of new materials for spintronic applications integrated onto silicon substrates. Our primary focus is materials with very high, negative, intrinsic spin polarization of the density of states at the Fermi level. We have developed a new synthesis method for Fe3O4 thin films through selective oxidation of Fe, resulting in smooth, low-defect density films. We have synthesized Fe4N films and shown that they preferentially oxidize to Fe3O4. When integrated into magnetic tunnel junctions consisting of Fe4N / AlOx / Fe, oxidation at the Fe4N / AlOx interface creates Fe3O4, leading to negative tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Oxidation of Fe in nominally symmetric CoFe / AlOx / CoFe also produces Fe3O4 and negative TMR under selected oxidation conditions.

  10. LDRD final report : mesoscale modeling of dynamic loading of heterogeneous materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Voth, Thomas Eugene; Furnish, Michael David

    2013-12-01

    Material response to dynamic loading is often dominated by microstructure (grain structure, porosity, inclusions, defects). An example critically important to Sandia's mission is dynamic strength of polycrystalline metals where heterogeneities lead to localization of deformation and loss of shear strength. Microstructural effects are of broad importance to the scientific community and several institutions within DoD and DOE; however, current models rely on inaccurate assumptions about mechanisms at the sub-continuum or mesoscale. Consequently, there is a critical need for accurate and robust methods for modeling heterogeneous material response at this lower length scale. This report summarizes work performed as part of an LDRD effort (FY11 to FY13; project number 151364) to meet these needs.

  11. Shock-Driven Hydrodynamic Instability Growth Near Phase Boundaries and Material Property Transitions: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, Pedro [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Fortin, Elizabeth [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Opie, Saul [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gautam, Sudrishti [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Ashish [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Lynch, Jenna [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Chen, Yan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Loomis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Activities for this grant included: 1) Development of dynamic impact experiments to probe strength and phase transition influence on dynamic deformation, 2) development of modern strength and phase aware simulation capabilities, 3) and post-processing of experimental data with simulation and closed form analytical techniques. Two different dynamic experiments were developed to probe material strengths in solid metals (largely copper and iron in this effort). In the first experiment a flyer plate impacts a flat target with an opposite rippled surface that is partially supported by a weaker window material. Post mortem analysis of the target sample showed a strong and repeatable residual plastic deformation dependence on grain orientation. Yield strengths for strain rates near 105 s-1 and plastic strains near ~50% were estimated to be around 180 to 240 MPa, varying in this range with grain orientation. Unfortunately dynamic real-time measurements were difficult with this setup due to diagnostic laser scattering; hence, an additional experimental setup was developed to complement these results. In the second set of experiments a rippled surface was ablated by a controlled laser pulsed, which launched a rippled shock front to an opposite initially flat diagnostic surface that was monitored in real-time with spatially resolved velocimetry techniques, e.g., line VISAR in addition to Transient Imaging Displacement Interferometry (TIDI) displacement measurements. This setup limited the displacements at the diagnostic surface to a reasonable level for TIDI measurements (~ less than one micrometer). These experiments coupled with analytical and numerical solutions provided evidence that viscous and elastic deviatoric strength affect shock front perturbation evolution in clearly different ways. Particularly, normalized shock front perturbation amplitudes evolve with viscosity (η) and perturbation wavelength (λ) as η/λ, such that increasing viscosity

  12. Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

    1994-01-01

    To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

  13. Final report on CCQM-K79: Comparison of value-assigned CRMs and PT materials: Ethanol in aqueous matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sebastian; Philipp, Rosemarie; Duewer, David L.; Gasca Aragon, Hugo; Lippa, Katrice A.; Toman, Blaza

    2013-01-01

    -weighted generalized distance regression was used to establish the key comparison reference function (KCRF) relating the assigned values to the repeatability measurements. On the basis of leave-one-out cross-validation, all of the assigned values for all 27 materials were deemed equivalent at the 95% level of confidence. These materials were used to define the KCRF. Parametric bootstrap Monte Carlo was used to estimate 95% level-of-confidence coverage intervals for the degrees of equivalence of materials, d +/- U95(d), and of the participating NMIs, D +/- U95(D). Because of the very wide range of ethanol mass fraction in the materials, these degrees of equivalence are expressed in percent relative form: %d +/- U95(%d) and %D +/- U95(%D). The median of the absolute values of the %D for the participating NMIs is less than 0.05% with a median U95(%D) of less than 1%. These results demonstrate that the participating NMIs have the ability to correctly value-assign CRMs and proficiency test materials for ethanol in aqueous media and similar measurands. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. Materials, process, product analysis of coal process technology. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, J. C.; Roig, R. W.; Loridan, A.; Leggett, N. E.; Capell, R. G.; Humpstone, C. C.; Mudry, R. N.; Ayres, E.

    1976-02-01

    The purpose of materials-process-product analysis is a systematic evaluation of alternative manufacturing processes--in this case processes for converting coal into energy and material products that can supplement or replace petroleum-based products. The methodological steps in the analysis include: Definition of functional operations that enter into coal conversion processes, and modeling of alternative, competing methods to accomplish these functions; compilation of all feasible conversion processes that can be assembled from combinations of competing methods for the functional operations; systematic, iterative evaluation of all feasible conversion processes under a variety of economic situations, environmental constraints, and projected technological advances; and aggregative assessments (economic and environmental) of various industrial development scenarios. An integral part of the present project is additional development of the existing computer model to include: A data base for coal-related materials and coal conversion processes; and an algorithmic structure that facilitates the iterative, systematic evaluations in response to exogenously specified variables, such as tax policy, environmental limitations, and changes in process technology and costs. As an analytical tool, the analysis is intended to satisfy the needs of an analyst working at the process selection level, for example, with respect to the allocation of RDandD funds to competing technologies.

  15. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part D, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 6, Hazard summaries for important materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, G.M.; Walker, L.B.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of Task 6 of Oak Ridge Phase I Health Studies is to provide summaries of current knowledge of toxic and hazardous properties of materials that are important for the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information gathered in the course of Task 6 investigations will support the task of focussing any future health studies efforts on those operations and emissions which have likely been most significant in terms of off-site health risk. The information gathered in Task 6 efforts will likely also be of value to individuals evaluating the feasibility of additional health,study efforts (such as epidemiological investigations) in the Oak Ridge area and as a resource for citizens seeking information on historical emissions.

  16. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in ashes from a fuel-oil power plant in Cienfuegos, Cuba, and the associated radiation hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Hernández, C M; Bernal-Castillo, J; Morera-Gómez, Y; Guillen-Arruebarrena, A; Cartas-Aguila, H A; Acosta-Milián, R

    2014-03-01

    The radioactivity of NORM was measured in ashes collected from a fuel-oil power plant in Cienfuegos, Cuba, using an HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer. The (226)Ra, (210)Pb, (40)K, (232)Th and (238)U activity concentrations reached 240, 77, 59, 70 and 15 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The potential radiological hazard of these residuals was assessed. The radium equivalent activities of the samples varied from 54 to 345 Bq kg(-1). The gamma index was calculated to be lower than that of the reference values, and the gamma absorbed dose rate was higher than the average reported for the earth's crust; however, the assessed annual effective dose was slightly lower than the annual effective dose limit for public, i.e. 1 mSv. Therefore, these bottom ashes were not dramatically enriched with radionuclides and may be used as an additive for building materials without restrictions from a radiological protection point of view.

  17. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from

  18. Characterizing the emissivity of materials under dynamic compression (final report for LDRD project 79877).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2007-10-01

    Temperature measurements are crucial to equation of state development, but difficult to perform reliably. In the case of infrared pyrometry, a large uncertainty comes from the fact that sample emissivity (the deviation from a blackbody) is unknown. In this project, a method for characterizing the emissivity of shocked materials was developed. By coupling infrared radiation from the National Synchrotron Light Source to a gas gun system, broad spectrum emissivity changes were studied to a peak stress of 8 GPa. Emissivity measurements were performed on standard metals (Al, Cr, Cu, and Pt) as well as a high emissivity coating developed at Sandia.

  19. GEO-TEP. Development of thermoelectric materials for geothermal energy conversion systems. Final report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocher, L.; Weidenkaff, A.

    2008-07-01

    Geothermal heat can be directly converted into electricity by using thermoelectric converters. Thermoelectric conversion relies on intrinsic materials properties which have to be optimised. In this work novel environmentally friendly and stable oxide ceramics were developed to fulfil this task. Thus, manganate phases were studied regarding their potential thermoelectric properties for converting geothermal heat into electricity. Perovskite-type phases were synthesized by applying different methods: the ceramic route, and innovative synthesis routes such as the 'chimie douce' method by bulk thermal decomposition of the citrate precursor or using an USC process, and also the polyol-mediated synthesis route. The crystal structures of the manganate phases are evaluated by XRPD, NPD, and ED techniques while specific microstructures such as twinned domains are highlighted by HRTEM imaging. Besides, the thermal stability of the Mn-oxide phases in air atmosphere are controlled over a wide temperature range (T < 1300 K). The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT was enhanced from 0.021 to 0.3 in a broad temperature range for the studied phases which makes these phases the best perovskitic candidates as n-type polycrystalline thermoelectric materials operating in air at high temperatures. (author)

  20. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

  1. Water Resources Research Program. Abatement of malodors at diked, dredged-material disposal sites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, W.; Dravnieks, A.; Zussman, R.; Goltz, R.

    1976-06-01

    Samples of malodorous air and dredged material were collected at diked disposal sites at the following locations: Buffalo, NY; Milwaukee, WI; Mobile, AL; York Harbor, ME; Houston, TX; Detroit, MI; and Anacortes, WA; during the period July--October, 1975. Odorous compounds in the air samples were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, while the detection threshold, intensity, and character of the various odors were determined by experienced panelists using a dynamic, forced-choice-triangle olfactometer. Although significant problems with malodors were not observed beyond the disposal-area dikes during site visits, noteworthy odor episodes had occurred at some sites. An odor-abatement strategy is presented for handling the expected range of odor conditions at dredged-material disposal sites. Its aim is to reduce to an acceptable level the intensity of malodors in an affected community. The main steps in the strategy cover selection of the disposal site, site preparation, odor characterization of sediments to be dredged, malodor abatement during dredging and disposal operations, malodor abatement after filling of the disposal site, and the handling of malodor complaints.

  2. Long term test of buffer material. Final Report on the pilot parcels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Sanden, Torbjoern; Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Eriksen, Trygve E; Jansson, Mats; Wold, Susanna [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, Karsten; Motamedi, Mehrdad [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden); Rosborg, Bo [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The 'Long Term Test of Buffer Material' (LOT) series at the Aespoe HRL aims at checking models and hypotheses for a bentonite buffer material under conditions similar to those in a KBS3 repository. The test series comprises seven test parcels, which are exposed to repository conditions for 1, 5 and 20 years. This report concerns the two completed pilot tests (1-year tests) with respect to construction, field data and laboratory results. Four research groups were engaged in this part of the project working on physical properties - mineralogy, cation diffusion, bacteria and copper corrosion, respectively. The experimental layout was to place parcels containing heater, central copper tube, pre-compacted bentonite blocks and instruments in vertical boreholes in crystalline rock. The heaters were used for simulating the decay power from spent nuclear fuel at standard KBS3 conditions (S1 parcel, 90 deg C) and to give adverse conditions (A1 parcel, 130 deg C). The latter was used in order to accelerate possible processes. Temperature, total pressure, water pressure and water content were measured during the heating period. The two pilot tests were terminated after approximately 12 months of heating, and the parcels were extracted by overlapping core drilling outside the original borehole. The entire 4.5 m long S1-parcel with approximately 20 cm rock cover was successfully lifted in one piece from the rock, whereas the central part of the A1 parcel was lost during drilling. The upper and lower parts were however retrieved. Reference and exposed bentonite material were analysed with respect to physical properties (triaxial, beam and oedometer tests), and to mineralogical properties (XRD, CEC, ICP-AES and SEM analyses) according to a defined test program. Some precipitation, mainly gypsum, was found in the warmest part of the parcels, and the only unpredicted change was minor uptake of Cu into the clay matrix. An overarching conclusion is that no degrading

  3. Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    During this quarter, the Review Panel made its final recommendations regarding which of the proposals should be funded. Included in this report is a brief status report of each of the research and education projects that are currently funded in this project. The Coordinated Instrumentation Facility (CIF) sponsored 3 seminars on Environmental Sample Preparation Techniques. These seminars were designed to educate the investigators on the use of microwave digestion systems for sample preparation and the use of Inductively Coupled Plasma and Atomic Absorption Specrtroscopy for analyses. During this period, Tulane and Xavier Universities have worked closely with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) to develop a long term relationship that will encourage interaction and collaborations among the investigators at all of the institutions.

  4. Material development for waste-to-energy plants. Refractory linings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O.

    2010-10-15

    Evaluation and SEM analysis of plant exposed, failed linings confirm over and again that failure in broad lines is linked to excess porosity, inferior quality on raw materials, detrimental reactions between raw materials and other mix constituents, volume growth reactions between base material and salt depositions, thermal stress induced crack formation, and uncontrolled craftsmanship. Extensive evaluations, calculations and considerations revealed numerous ways to execute the formulation of experimental castable mixes, of which some formed a broad base for phase I trials. Three mixes of the experimental castable phase II batches reached apparent porosities of {approx} 10% measured with alcohol, estimated to less than 8%-9% if measured in water. These results compare favourably to the open porosities measure with water of generally applied LCCs in the Danish marketplace of 15.5-16.0%. Converted to bonding phase porosities the low levels realised in experiments look rather good: 28% vs 55-57%. Salt cup tests confirm state of the art resistance. Experiments and assessment of surface oxidation of Silicon Carbide grains of three levels of purity confirm that it is impossible to stabilise SiC by pre-oxydation for the purpose of creating a thicker, protective surface layer of SiO{sub 2}. It is evident from the literature and qualified assessment that free Si, as a remnant surplus from SiC manufacture, does indeed hydrolyse in the castable basic environment under development of H{sub 2} gas bubbles adding on to unwanted porosity. Heat conductivity measurements of six different, representative products conducted by the Danish Technological Institute from 300 dec. C to 750 dec. C according to their credited calorimetric method confirm that the pre-firing to excess temperatures and subsequent measurement according to the DIN/EUN norm does indeed give misleading data of up to 45% for a castable containing {approx} 55% Silicon Carbide. Finite Element analysis confirms the

  5. An Investigation of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Sonochemistry for Destruction of Hazardous Waste - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Inez

    2000-09-14

    During the last 20 years, various legislative acts have mandated the reduction and elimination of water and land pollution. In order to fulfill these mandates, effective control and remediation methods must be developed and implemented. The drawbacks of current hazardous waste control methods motivate the development of new technology, and the need for new technology is further driven by the large number of polluted sites across the country. This research explores the application and optimization of ultrasonic waves as a novel method by which aqueous contaminants are degraded. The primary objective of the investigation is to acquire a deeper fundamental knowledge of acoustic cavitation and cavitation chemistry, and in doing so, to ascertain how ultrasonic irradiation can be more effectively applied to environmental problems. Special consideration is given to the types of problems and hazardous chemical substrates found specifically at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The experimental work is divided into five broad tasks, to be completed over a period of three years. The first task is to explore the significance of physical variables during sonolysis, such as ultrasonic frequency. The second aim is an understanding of sonochemical degradation kinetics and by-products, complemented by information from the detection of reactive intermediates with electron paramagnetic resonance. The sonolytic decomposition studies will focus on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Investigation of activated carbon regeneration during ultrasonic irradiation extends sonochemical applications in homogeneous systems to heterogeneous systems of environmental interest. Lastly, the physics and hydrodynamics of cavitation bubbles and bubble clouds will be correlated with sonochemical effects by performing high-speed photographic studies of acoustically cavitating aqueous solutions. The most important benefit will be fundamental information which will allow a more optimal application of

  6. Powder-based synthesis of nanocrystalline material components for structural application. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyuschenko, A.F.; Ivashko, V.S.; Okovity, V.A. [Powder Metallurgy Research Inst., Minsk (Belarus)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Hydroxiapate spray coatings and substrates for implant production as well as multilayered metal ceramic coatings from nanocrystalline materials are a subject of the investigation. The work aims at the improvement of quality of said objects. This study has investigated the processes of hydroxiapatite powder production. Sizes, shapes and relief of initial HA powder surface are analyzed using SEM and TEM. Modes of HA plasma spraying on a substrate from titanium and associated compositions of traditional and nanocrystalline structure are optimized. The quality of the sprayed samples are studied using X-ray phase analysis and metallographic analysis. The results of investigations of bioceramic coating spraying on titanium are theoretically generalized, taking into account obtained experimental data. The results of investigations of ion-beam technology are presented for spraying multilayered coatings consisting of alternating metal-ceramic layers of nanocrystalline structure.

  7. Bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumpelt, M.

    2004-06-01

    Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks that are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian

  8. Characterization of the Tribological Behavior of Oxide-Based NanoMaterials: Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Under the Argonne/Pixelligent cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA – C1200801), Argonne performed labscale tribological tests on proprietary nano-sized ZrO2 material developed by Pixelligent. Pixelligent utilized their proprietary process to prepare variants with different surfactants at different loadings in different carrier fluids for testing and evaluation at Argonne. Argonne applied a range of benchtop tribological test rigs to evaluate friction and wear under a range of conditions (contact geometry, loads, speeds, and temperature) that simulated a broad range of conditions experienced in engines and driveline components. Post-test analysis of worn surfaces provided information on the structure and chemistry of the tribofilms produced during the tests.

  9. Investigations on deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The research carried out by this contract was part of a larger effort funded by LANL in the areas of deflagration to detonation in porous energetic materials (DDT) and detonation shock dynamics in high explosives (DSD). In the first three years of the contract the major focus was on DDT. However, some researchers were carried out on DSD theory and numerical implementation. In the last two years the principal focus of the contract was on DSD theory and numerical implementation. However, during the second period some work was also carried out on DDT. The paper discusses DDT modeling and DSD modeling. Abstracts are included on the following topics: modeling deflagration to detonation; DSD theory; DSD wave front tracking; and DSD program burn implementation.

  10. Studies of low temperature, low flux radiation embrittlement of nuclear reactor structural materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.

    1993-06-01

    There are several existing research programs which have components pertinent to the issue of low flux/low temperature embrittlement; in particular, examination of the Shippingport shield tank which has been exposed to low flux and relatively low temperature is being performed by ANL, and evaluation of low temperature embrittlement in A508 and A533B steels in support of the HTGR is currently being performed by ORNL. However, these programs are not specifically directed at the broader issue of low flux/low temperature embrittlement in a range of structural steels. Hence, the authors coordinated their effort with these programs so that their investigations were complementary to existing programs, and they focused on a set of materials which expand the data base developed in these programs. In particular, the authors have investigated embrittlement phenomena in steels that are similar to those used in support structure.

  11. Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

  12. Novel wide band gap materials for highly efficient thin film tandem solar cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Peters, Craig H.

    2012-06-11

    Tandem solar cells (TSCs), which use two or more materials to absorb sunlight, have achieved power conversion efficiencies of >25% versus 11-20% for commercialized single junction solar cell modules. The key to widespread commercialization of TSCs is to develop the wide-band, top solar cell that is both cheap to fabricate and has a high open-circuit voltage (i.e. >1V). Previous work in TSCs has generally focused on using expensive processing techniques with slow growth rates resulting in costs that are two orders of magnitude too expensive to be used in conventional solar cell modules. The objective of the PLANT PV proposal was to investigate the feasibility of using Ag(In,Ga)Se2 (AIGS) as the wide-bandgap absorber in the top cell of a thin film tandem solar cell (TSC). Despite being studied by very few in the solar community, AIGS solar cells have achieved one of the highest open-circuit voltages within the chalcogenide material family with a Voc of 949 mV when grown with an expensive processing technique (i.e. Molecular Beam Epitaxy). PLANT PV's goal in Phase I of the DOE SBIR was to (1) develop the chemistry to grow AIGS thin films via solution processing techniques to reduce costs and (2) fabricate new device architectures with high open-circuit voltage to produce full tandem solar cells in Phase II. PLANT PV attempted to translate solution processing chemistries that were successful in producing >12% efficient Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by replacing copper compounds with silver. The main thrust of the research was to determine if it was possible to make high quality AIGS thin films using solution processing and to fully characterize the materials properties. PLANT PV developed several different types of silver compounds in an attempt to fabricate high quality thin films from solution. We found that silver compounds that were similar to the copper based system did not result in high quality thin films. PLANT PV was able to deposit AIGS

  13. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Report for the Waste Loading Area, Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.C. Weaver

    2008-08-19

    The objective of the verification survey was to obtain evidence by means of measurements and sampling to confirm that the final radiological conditions were less than the established release criteria. This objective was achieved via multiple verification components including document reviews to determine the accuracy and adequacy of FSS documentation.

  14. High-temperature cementing materials for completion of geothermal wells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Snyder, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    Several portland cement types, oil well cements, and various additives and admixtures were evaluated during the course of development of a number of promising compositions suitable for geothermal applications. Among the cements and various materials considered were portland cement Types I, III, and V; oil well cement Classes G, H, and J; and additives such as silica flour, blast furnace slags, pozzolan, hydrated lime, perlite, and aluminum phosphate. Properties of interest in the study were thickening time, compressive strength, cement-to-metal bond strength, and effects of the cements on the corrosion of steel well casings. Testing procedures and property data obtained on a number of compositions are presented and discussed. Several cementing compositions comprised of Class J oil well cement, pozzolan, blast furnace slags, and silica flour were found to possess properties which appear to make them suitable for use in geothermal well completions. Five of the promising cementing compositions have been submitted to the National Bureau of Standards for additional testing.

  15. Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A.

    1997-02-01

    This regulatory analysis was developed to respond to three petitions for rulemaking to amend 10 CFR parts 20 and 35 regarding release of patients administered radioactive material. The petitions requested revision of these regulations to remove the ambiguity that existed between the 1-millisievert (0.1-rem) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) public dose limit in Part 20, adopted in 1991, and the activity-based release limit in 10 CFR 35.75 that, in some instances, would permit release of individuals in excess of the current public dose limit. Three alternatives for resolution of the petitions were evaluated. Under Alternative 1, NRC would amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to match the annual public dose limit in Part 20 of 1 millisievert (0.1 rem) TEDE. Alternative 2 would maintain the status quo of using the activity-based release criteria currently found in 10 CFR 35.75. Under Alternative 3, the NRC would revise the release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) TEDE.

  16. Final Scientific Report, New Proton Conductive Composite Materials for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lvov, Serguei

    2010-11-08

    This project covered one of the main challenges in present-day PEM fuel cell technology: to design a membrane capable of maintaining high conductivity and mechanical integrity when temperature is elevated and water vapor pressure is severely reduced. The DOE conductivity milestone of 0.1 S cm-1 at 120 degrees C and 50 % relative humidity (RH) for designed membranes addressed the target for the project. Our approach presumed to develop a composite membrane with hydrophilic proton-conductive inorganic material and the proton conductive polymeric matrix that is able to “bridge” the conduction paths in the membrane. The unique aspect of our approach was the use of highly functionalized inorganic additives to benefit from their water retention properties and high conductivity as well. A promising result turns out that highly hydrophilic phosphorsilicate gels added in Nafion matrix improved PEM fuel cell performance by over 50% compared with bare Nafion membrane at 120 degrees C and 50 % RH. This achievement realizes that the fuel cell operating pressure can be kept low, which would make the PEM fuel cell much more cost efficient and adaptable to practical operating conditions and facilitate its faster commercialization particularly in automotive and stationary applications.

  17. Kinetic investigation of the oxidation of naval excess hazardous materials in supercritical water for the design of a transpiration-wall reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, S.F.; Hanush, R.G.; Hunter, T.B. [and others

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Sandia`s supercritical fluids reactor (SFR) to generate data for the design of a transpiration-wall supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactor. The reactor is intended for the disposal of hazardous material generated on naval vessels. The design parameters for the system require an accurate knowledge of destruction efficiency vs. time and temperature. Three candidate materials were selected for testing. The experiments consisted of oxidizing these materials in the SFR at isothermal conditions over the temperature range of 400-550C at 24.1 MPa. A small extrapolation of the results shows that these materials can be adequately destroyed (to 99.9% destruction removal efficiency, DRE, based on total organic carbon (TOC) in the effluent) in approximately 5 seconds at 600C. The results vary smoothly and predictably with temperature such that extrapolation to higher temperatures beyond the experimental capabilities of the SFR can be made with reasonable confidence. The preliminary design of the transpiration-wall reactor has a rapid heat-up section within the reactor vessel that requires the addition of a fuel capable of quickly reacting with oxygen at temperatures below 500C. Candidate alcohols and JP-5 jet fuel were evaluated in this context. Oxidation rates for the alcohols were examined using in situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the potential utility of supplying the oxidizer line with hydrogen peroxide as an additive to enhance rapid initiation of the feed at unusually low temperatures was investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Supercritical Constant Volume Reactor (SCVR) using hydrogen peroxide as the initial oxidizing species. The results show that this concept as a method of enhancing low temperature reactivity appears to fail because thermal decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide is more rapid than the fuel oxidation rate at low temperatures. 8 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Hazardous Material Storage Facilities and Sites - WASTE_DISPOSAL_STORAGE_HANDLING_IDEM_IN: Waste Site Locations for Disposal, Storage and Handling of Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste in Indiana (Indiana Department of Environmental Management, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — WASTE_DISPOSAL_STORAGE_HANDLING_IDEM_IN is a point shapefile that contains waste site locations for the disposal, storage, and handling of solid and hazardous waste...

  19. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  20. Center for Electrocatalysis, Transport Phenomena, and Materials (CETM) for Innovative Energy Storage - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States)

    2015-11-30

    EFRC vision. The direct use of organic hydrides in fuel cells as virtual hydrogen carriers that generate stable organic molecules, protons, and electrons upon electro-oxidation and can be electrochemically charged by re-hydrogenating the oxidized carrier was the major focus of the Center for Electrocatalysis, Transport Phenomena and Materials for Innovative Energy Storage (EFRC-ETM). Compared to a hydrogen-on-demand design that includes thermal decomposition of organic hydrides in a catalytic reactor, the proposed approach is much simpler and does not require additional dehydrogenation catalysts or heat exchangers. Further, this approach utilizes the advantages of a flow battery (i.e., separation of power and energy, ease of transport and storage of liquid fuels) with fuels that have system energy densities similar to current hydrogen PEM fuel cells. EFRC challenges. Two major EFRC challenges were electrocatalysis and transport phenomena. The electrocatalysis challenge addresses fundamental processes which occur at a single molecular catalyst (microscopic level) and involve electron and proton transfer between the hydrogen rich and hydrogen depleted forms of organic liquid fuel and the catalyst. To form stable, non-radical dehydrogenation products from the organic liquid fuel, it is necessary to ensure fast transport of at least two electrons and two protons (per double bond formation). The same is true for the reverse hydrogenation reaction. The transport phenomena challenge addresses transport of electrons to/from the electrocatalyst and the current collector as well as protons across the polymer membrane. Additionally it addresses prevention of organic liquid fuel, water and oxygen transport through the PEM. In this challenge, the transport of protons or molecules involves multiple sites or a continuum (macroscopic level) and water serves as a proton conducting medium for the majority of known sulfonic acid based PEMs. Proton transfer in the presence of

  1. High temperature range recuperator. Phase II. Prototype demonstration and material and analytical studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    A summary of the work performed to fully evaluate the commercial potential of a unique ceramic recuperator for use in recovering waste heat from high temperature furnace exhaust gases is presented. The recuperator concept being developed consists of a vertical cylindrical heat exchange column formed from modular sections. Within the column, the gasketed modules form two helical flow passages - one for high temperature exhaust gases and one for pre-heating combustion air. The column is operated in a counterflow mode, with the exhaust gas entering at the bottom and the combustion air entering at the top of the column. Activities included design and procurement of prototype recuperator modules, construction and testing of two prototype recuperator assemblies, exposure and mechanical properties testing of candidate materials, structural analysis of the modules, and assessment of the economic viability of the concept. The results of the project indicated that the proposed recuperator concept was feasible from a technical standpoint. Economic analysis based upon recuperator performance characteristics and module manufacturing costs defined during the program indicated that 3 to 10 years (depending upon pre-heat temperature) would be required to recover the capital cost of the system in combustion air preheat applications. At this stage in the development of the recuperator, many factors in the analysis had to be assumed. Significant changes in some of the assumptions could dramatically affect the economics. For example, utilizing $2.85 per mcf for the natural gas price (as opposed to $2.00 per mcf) could reduce the payback period by more than half in certain cases. In addition, future commercial application will depend upon ceramic component manufacturing technique advances and cost reduction.

  2. High temperature range recuperator. Phase II. Prototype demonstration and material and analytical studies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    A summary of the work performed to fully evaluate the commercial potential of a unique ceramic recuperator for use in recovering waste heat from high temperature furnace exhaust gases is presented. The recuperator concept being developed consists of a vertical cylindrical heat exchange column formed from modular sections. Within the column, the gasketed modules form two helical flow passages - one for high temperature exhaust gases and one for pre-heating combustion air. The column is operated in a counterflow mode, with the exhaust gas entering at the bottom and the combustion air entering at the top of the column. Activities included design and procurement of prototype recuperator modules, construction and testing of two prototype recuperator assemblies, exposure and mechanical properties testing of candidate materials, structural analysis of the modules, and assessment of the economic viability of the concept. The results of the project indicated that the proposed recuperator concept was feasible from a technical standpoint. Economic analysis based upon recuperator performance characteristics and module manufacturing costs defined during the program indicated that 3 to 10 years (depending upon pre-heat temperature) would be required to recover the capital cost of the system in combustion air preheat applications. At this stage in the development of the recuperator, many factors in the analysis had to be assumed. Significant changes in some of the assumptions could dramatically affect the economics. For example, utilizing $2.85 per mcf for the natural gas price (as opposed to $2.00 per mcf) could reduce the payback period by more than half in certain cases. In addition, future commercial application will depend upon ceramic component manufacturing technique advances and cost reduction.

  3. Application of phase-change materials in passive solar systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliwkowski, J.

    1979-01-01

    The Institute of Energy Conversion of the University of Delaware has designed and constructed a modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. In the winter of 1977-78, the Thermal Wall Panel was tested at Solar One, the Institute's solar house and laboratory. The key results and conclusions from this testing and analysis program include the following: (1) Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable nighttime insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. (2) Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. (3) A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. (4) A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance. Based on these results, it is recommended that full-scale testing of the system be initiated at multiple sites in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

  4. Tulane/Xavier University hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, January 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-02

    Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Summaries which describe objectives, goals, and accomplishments are included on ten collaborative cluster projects, two education projects, and six initiation projects. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Hazardous waste to materials: recovery of molybdenum and vanadium from acidic leach liquor of spent hydroprocessing catalyst using alamine 308.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, K K; Agrawal, Archana; Mishra, D

    2013-08-15

    Recovery of valuable materials/metals from waste goes hand in hand with environmental protection. This paper deals with the development of a process for the recovery of metals such as Mo, V, Ni, Al from spent hydroprocessing catalyst which may otherwise cause a nuisance if dumped untreated. A detailed study on the separation of molybdenum and vanadium from the leach solution of spent hydroprocessing catalyst of composition: 27.15% MoO₃, 1.7% V₂O₅, 3.75% NiO, 54.3% Al₂O₃, 2.3% SiO₂ and 10.4% LOI is reported in this paper. The catalyst was subjected to roasting under oxidizing atmosphere at a temperature of about 550 °C and leaching in dilute sulphuric acid to dissolve molybdenum, vanadium, nickel and part of aluminium. Metals from the leach solution were separated by solvent extraction. Both molybdenum and vanadium were selectively extracted with a suitable organic solvent leaving nickel and dissolved aluminium in the raffinate. Various parameters such as initial pH of the aqueous feed, organic to aqueous ratio (O:A), solvent concentration etc. were optimized for the complete extraction and recovery of Mo and V. Molybdenum and vanadium from the loaded organic were stripped by ammonia solution. They were recovered as their corresponding ammonium salt by selective precipitation, and were further calcined to get the corresponding oxides in pure form.

  6. Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-07-01

    To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

  7. Development of polyimide materials for use in solar energy systems. Final report, August 1, 1978-July 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcoxson, A.L.; Sorathia, U.A.; Gagliani, J.

    1980-01-01

    A program to optimize and characterize improved insulation materials for solar energy systems is described. Two separate and distinct products have been studied, a lightweight flexible insulating foam and a high density, rigid, load bearing insulating foam. These products are derived from a polyimide resin, the formulations and processes for which were developed under NASA-JSC sponsored programs. These materials are non-burning and do not emit measurable quantities of smoke or toxic by-products. Candidate resins were selected on the basis of cost, expected foam insulating and weatherability properties and ease of production. Critical characterization parameters were established for the flexible insulating foam in the form of environmental exposure resistance, thermal conductivity and hydrolytic stability. Studies initiated to improve the exposure resistance included additive studies, using reinforcements and UV absorbers, and postcure and densification studies. Optimum resin formulations, foam densities and foam structures were identified on the basis of the exposure, thermal conductivity, and microwave testing. Two candidate materials were selected and fully characterized for physical and thermal properties. This resulted in the selection of a final candidate material. The rigid foam was optimized through a glass reinforcement and process parameter study. This work was characterized on the basis of low cost, ease of production and the critical property requirement of compressive strength. The result of these studies was an optimized glass strand/microballoon reinforced foam which was then fully characterized for physical and thermal properties. Samples of both the flexible and rigid polyimide insulating materials were then prepared and submitted to DOE.

  8. Social impacts of hazardous and nuclear facilities and events: Implications for Nevada and the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository; [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenburg, W.R. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States); Carter, L.F.; Willard, W. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Lodwick, D.G. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Hardert, R.A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Levine, A.G. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Sociology; Kroll-Smith, S. [New Orleans Univ., LA (United States); Couch, S.R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Edelstein, M.R. [Ramapo College, Mahwah, NJ (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Social impacts of a nuclear waste repository are described. Various case studies are cited such as Rocky Flats Plant, the Feed Materials Production Center, and Love Canal. The social impacts of toxic contamination, mitigating environmental stigma and loss of trust are also discussed.

  9. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  10. Measurement and modeling of energetic-material mass transfer to soil-pore water - Project CP-1227 final technical report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Phelan, James M.; Hadgu, Teklu

    2006-05-01

    Military test and training ranges operate with live-fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low-order detonations also disperse solid-phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization projects have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g., weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution. This final report documents the results of experimental and simulation model development for evaluating mass transfer processes from solid-phase energetics to soil-pore water.

  11. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  12. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, H. K.; Ichinose, G. A.; Somerville, P. G.; Polet, J.

    2006-12-01

    The recent tsunami disaster caused by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake has focused our attention to the hazard posed by large earthquakes that occur under water, in particular subduction zone earthquakes, and the tsunamis that they generate. Even though these kinds of events are rare, the very large loss of life and material destruction caused by this earthquake warrant a significant effort towards the mitigation of the tsunami hazard. For ground motion hazard, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) has become a standard practice in the evaluation and mitigation of seismic hazard to populations in particular with respect to structures, infrastructure and lifelines. Its ability to condense the complexities and variability of seismic activity into a manageable set of parameters greatly facilitates the design of effective seismic resistant buildings but also the planning of infrastructure projects. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) achieves the same goal for hazards posed by tsunami. There are great advantages of implementing such a method to evaluate the total risk (seismic and tsunami) to coastal communities. The method that we have developed is based on the traditional PSHA and therefore completely consistent with standard seismic practice. Because of the strong dependence of tsunami wave heights on bathymetry, we use a full waveform tsunami waveform computation in lieu of attenuation relations that are common in PSHA. By pre-computing and storing the tsunami waveforms at points along the coast generated for sets of subfaults that comprise larger earthquake faults, we can efficiently synthesize tsunami waveforms for any slip distribution on those faults by summing the individual subfault tsunami waveforms (weighted by their slip). This efficiency make it feasible to use Green's function summation in lieu of attenuation relations to provide very accurate estimates of tsunami height for probabilistic calculations, where one typically computes

  13. Safety analysis report: packages. 232-H Byproduct Trailer (packaging of radioactive material). Final report. [Helium containing some tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalfant, G.G. (comp.)

    1975-12-01

    Helium containing some tritium is shipped at low pressure in banks of cylinders mounted on a truck trailer in compliance with 49 CFR 178.350, Specification 7A. The shipping package is not a radiological hazard under normal or accident conditions.

  14. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  15. Material transport by tyred vehicles in coal mines. Final report; Logistica del transporto di materiale tramite mezzi gommati in miniere di carbone. Rapporto finale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The research was carried out at the Monte Sinni mine, a sub-bituminous coal mine located in the south west of Sardinia (Italy). The aim of the research has been to develop a control system for materials flow and for the traffic of the tyred vehicles designed specifically for coal mines. In particular, it has been tried to simulate control of each materials supply step starting from the surface stores to the working sites and vice-versa. The hardware has been supplied by Montan-Forschung (Germany) and the software has been produced by Tele Data Software in Cagliari (Italy). Instrumentation is made up by two physically separated parts. The first has been designed to control the run of the trolley truck and allows the exchange of both data and voice between the driver and a main receiving station. The second controls the run of each transport unit by means of data bearing tags (TPD) which are provided with a fixed numerical identification code and are attached to the units. The transport cycle is controlled by the operating software installed on a personal computer that operates as a `main station`. The control-system of the materials flow has given satisfactory results that have allowed the research to achieve its aims. The future application of the system in the mine will bring about certain advantages also by an economic point of view, mostly due to reduction of the materials supply times, as well as the impossibility of shunting mistakes and miscarriages of the load or part of it.

  16. 基于改进VRP模型的危险品配送路径优化及其求解研究%Research on route optimization and algorithm of hazardous materials distribution based on improved VRP model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕品

    2011-01-01

    High risk of the hazardous materials transportation has always been the concern of the people all over the world. It is very important to study the optimal routes of hazardous materials transportation for lowering risk. To optimize the routes for the distibution of hazardous materials, an improved VRP model was developed to involve transportation risk and cost. Then a genetic algorithm was presented for solving the model, and some experimental calculations were made. The results showed that the genetic algorithm provided valid outcomes. Therefore, the improved VRP model and the proposed algorithm can be applied in the route optimization of hazardous materials transpotation.%危险品道路运输高风险性,一直受到人们的广泛关注.危险品道路运输路径优化的研究,对于降低运输风险具有十分重要的意义.本文针对危险品运输配送过程中的路径优化问题,提出综合考虑道路运输的风险和费用两方面指标改进VRP模型路径优化目标,并设计遗传算法对改进模型进行了求解.最后通过实例进行了验证.结果表明:用遗传算法对改进VRP模型的求解结果与实际分析结果相符.因此,改进VRP模型及其遗传算法求解设计可以应用于危险品运输的路径优化分析.

  17. 78 FR 14577 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance ] and Mitigation Administration, FEMA... Road, Minot, ME 04258. Town of Poland Town Office, 1231 Maine Street, Poland, ME 04274. Town...

  18. 78 FR 9406 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Georgetown......... Georgetown Township Office, 1515 Baldwin Street, Jenison, MI 49428. Charter Township of... Domestic Assistance No. 97.022, ``Flood Insurance.'') James A. Walke, Acting Deputy Associate...

  19. 78 FR 48882 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... 47012. Miami County, Kansas, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1270 City of Fontana City Hall, 204 East North Street, Fontana, KS 66026. City of Louisburg City Hall, 5 South Peoria Street,...

  20. 78 FR 5821 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... County, New Mexico, and Incorporated Areas Docket No.: FEMA-B-1242 City of Clovis Administrative Office, 321 North Connelly Street, Clovis, NM 88101. Unincorporated Areas of Curry County. Curry County Administrative Office, 700 North Main Street, Clovis, NM 88101. ] (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No....

  1. 78 FR 36220 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Tupelo City Hall, Planning Department, 71 East Troy Street, Tupelo, MS 38804. City of Saltillo 142 Front Avenue, Saltillo, MS 38866. Town of Verona City Hall, 194 Main Street, Verona, MS 38879. Unincorporated...

  2. 78 FR 29763 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    .... Department of Planning Services, 200 East Berry Street, Suite 150, Fort Wayne, IN 46802. Tate County.... Unincorporated Areas of Tate County.. Tate County Courthouse, 201 South Ward Street, Senatobia, MS...

  3. 78 FR 29760 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ..., 9544 Depot Street, Holland Patent, NY 13354. Village of New Hartford Village Codes Department, Butler..., NY 13502. Town of Annsville Annsville Code Enforcement Office, 9042 Meadows Road, Taberg, NY 13471..., 2651 State Route 12B, Deansboro, NY 13328. Town of New Hartford Codes and Zoning Office, 111 New...

  4. Geophysics and Seismic Hazard Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuGuihua; ZhouYuanze; YuSheng

    2003-01-01

    The earthquake is a natural phenomenon, which often brings serious hazard to the human life and material possession. It is a physical process of releasing interior energy of the earth, which is caused by interior and outer forces in special tectonic environment in the earth, especially within the lithosphere. The earthquake only causes casualty and loss in the place where people inhabit. Seismic hazard reduction is composed of four parts as seismic prediction, hazard prevention and seismic engineering, seismic response and seismic rescuing, and rebuilding.

  5. Development of Course Content Materials For Training Research and Research Related Personnel to Appraise Research Critically. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Jason; Gowin, D. Bob

    A description of the development of the print materials to improve the ability of learners to appraise critically educational research is provided in this report. The completed materials consist of the following: an introductory statement about the nature of criticism, a statement about the contents of the materials and suggestions for use, and…

  6. Map Your Hazards! - an Interdisciplinary, Place-Based Educational Approach to Assessing Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability, Risk and Risk Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, B. D.; McMullin-Messier, P. A.; Schlegel, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    'Map your Hazards' is an educational module developed within the NSF Interdisciplinary Teaching about Earth for a Sustainable Future program (InTeGrate). The module engages students in place-based explorations of natural hazards, social vulnerability, and the perception of natural hazards and risk. Students integrate geoscience and social science methodologies to (1) identify and assess hazards, vulnerability and risk within their communities; (2) distribute, collect and evaluate survey data (designed by authors) on the knowledge, risk perception and preparedness within their social networks; and (3) deliver a PPT presentation to local stakeholders detailing their findings and recommendations for development of a prepared, resilient community. 'Map your Hazards' underwent four rigorous assessments by a team of geoscience educators and external review before being piloted in our classrooms. The module was piloted in a 300-level 'Volcanoes and Society' course at Boise State University, a 300-level 'Environmental Sociology' course at Central Washington University, and a 100-level 'Natural Disasters and Environmental Geology' course at the College of Western Idaho. In all courses students reported a fascination with learning about the hazards around them and identifying the high risk areas in their communities. They were also surprised at the low level of knowledge, inaccurate risk perception and lack of preparedness of their social networks. This successful approach to engaging students in an interdisciplinary, place-based learning environment also has the broad implications of raising awareness of natural hazards (survey participants are provided links to local hazard and preparedness information). The data and preparedness suggestions can be shared with local emergency managers, who are encouraged to attend the student's final presentations. All module materials are published at serc.carleton.edu/integrate/ and are appropriate to a wide range of classrooms.

  7. Exposure Assessment of Food Safety Hazard of Phthalate Esters of Food Packaging Materials%食品包装材料中邻苯二甲酸酯类对食品安全危害的暴露评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白艳红; 张丽尧; 张相生; 赵电波

    2012-01-01

    主要综述了与食品包装材料密切相关的邻苯二甲酸酯类物质的性质、来源和毒性,分析了在食品加工过程中向食品原料及食品中迁移的危害,提出了进行预防和控制的建议,为食品包装材料安全性及包装食品安全性的研究提供参考。%The nature, source and toxicity of the phthalate esters which was closely related to food packaging materials were studied. Hazards of migration were analyzed when food processing and food ingredients. Recommendations were given in order to prevention and control of hazard of phthalate esters of food safety.

  8. 77 FR 41300 - Hazardous Chemical Reporting: Revisions to the Emergency and Hazardous Chemical Inventory Forms...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... required to prepare or have available a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for a hazardous chemical defined... facility owner or operator is required to submit a MSDS or a list that contains the hazardous chemical... or operator of a facility that must prepare or have available a MSDS for each ``hazardous chemical...

  9. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2009-03-24

    The scientific programs of the FSMRL supported under the DOE A9024 Grant consisted of four interdisciplinary research clusters, as described. The clusters were led by Professors Tai Chiang (Physics), Jeffrey Moore (Chemistry), Paul Goldbart (Physics), and Steven Granick (Materials Science and Engineering). The completed work followed a dominant theme--Nanoscale Materials Systems--and emphasized studies of complex phenomena involving surfaces, interfaces, complex materials, dynamics, energetics, and structures and their transformations. A summary of our key accomplishments is provided for each cluster.

  10. Evaluation of improved materials for stationary diesel engines operating on residual and coal based fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Experimental results to date from an on-going research program on improved materials for stationary diesel engines using residual or coal-based fuels are presented with little discussion of conclusions about these results. Information is included on ring and liner wear, fuel oil qualities, ceramic materials, coatings, test procedures and equipment, and tribology test results. (LCL)

  11. Advanced Borobond™ Shields for Nuclear Materials Containment and Borobond™ Immobilization of Volatile Fission Products - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Borobond is a company-proprietary material developed by the CRADA partner in collaboration with Argonne, and is based on Argonne's Ceramicrete technology. It is being used by DOE for nuclear materials safe storage, and Boron Products, LLC is the manufacturer and supplier of Borobond.

  12. The development of the globally harmonized system (GHS) of classification and labelling of hazardous chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Chris; Azzi, Rola; Wagner, Drew

    2005-10-17

    The hazards of chemicals can be classified using classification criteria that are based on physical, chemical and ecotoxicological endpoints. These criteria may be developed be iteratively, based on scientific or regulatory processes. A number of national and international schemes have been developed over the past 50 years, and some, such as the UN Dangerous Goods system or the EC system for hazardous substances, are in widespread use. However, the unnecessarily complicated multiplicity of existing hazard classifications created much unnecessary confusion at the user level, and a recommendation was made at the 1992 Rio Earth summit to develop a globally harmonized chemical hazard classification and compatible labelling system, including material safety data sheets and easily understandable symbols, that could be used for manufacture, transport, use and disposal of chemical substances. This became the globally harmonized system for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). The developmental phase of the GHS is largely complete. Consistent criteria for categorising chemicals according to their toxic, physical, chemical and ecological hazards are now available. Consistent hazard communication tools such as labelling and material safety data sheets are also close to finalisation. The next phase is implementation of the GHS. The Intergovernmental Forum for Chemical Safety recommends that all countries implement the GHS as soon as possible with a view to have the system fully operational by 2008. When the GHS is in place, the world will finally have one system for classification of chemical hazards.

  13. 76 FR 57662 - National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National Priorities List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan; National... withdrawal of the direct final action (76 FR 45432) is effective as of September 16, 2011. ADDRESSES... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Chemicals, Hazardous waste, Hazardous...

  14. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Douglas C.; Restani, Marco, Ph.D

    2009-12-28

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management award was used to establish the organization and initiate investigations of hazardous waste issues along the U.S.-Mexico border. Scientific investigations conducted during the execution of this grant contributed significant data and established new sampling protocols to the dimension, frequency and severity of hazardous materials (e.g., heavy metals) along the U.S.-Mexico border. Additionally, new protocols and assessments with distinct Homeland Security implications were embedded thus establishing a baseline that will be significant for related investigations in the future.

  15. Portable sensor for hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, L.G.; Fraser, M.E.; Davis, S.J. [Physical Sciences Inc., Andover, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We are beginning the second phase of a three and a half year program designed to develop a portable monitor for sensitive hazardous waste detection. The ultimate goal of the program is to develop our concept to the prototype instrument level. Our monitor will be a compact, portable instrument that will allow real-time, in situ, monitoring of hazardous wastes. This instrument will be able to provide the means for rapid field screening of hazardous waste sites to map the areas of greatest contamination. Remediation efforts can then focus on these areas. Further, our instrument can show whether cleanup technologies are successful at reducing hazardous materials concentrations below regulated levels, and will provide feedback to allow changes in remediation operations, if necessary, to enhance their efficacy.

  16. FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

    2001-01-22

    The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  17. Toxic hazards of underground excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.; Chitnis, V.; Damasian, M.; Lemm, M.; Popplesdorf, N.; Ryan, T.; Saban, C.; Cohen, J.; Smith, C.; Ciminesi, F.

    1982-09-01

    Inadvertent intrusion into natural or man-made toxic or hazardous material deposits as a consequence of activities such as mining, excavation or tunnelling has resulted in numerous deaths and injuries in this country. This study is a preliminary investigation to identify and document instances of such fatal or injurious intrusion. An objective is to provide useful insights and information related to potential hazards due to future intrusion into underground radioactive-waste-disposal facilities. The methodology used in this study includes literature review and correspondence with appropriate government agencies and organizations. Key categories of intrusion hazards are asphyxiation, methane, hydrogen sulfide, silica and asbestos, naturally occurring radionuclides, and various mine or waste dump related hazards.

  18. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  19. R&D of Novel Materials for Animal Litters Using High Carbon Fly Ash Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxley, Chett J. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kadota, Rod [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-10-29

    This research program performed by Ceramatec may significantly increase the beneficial utilization of fly ash, and improve the overall performance of high quality animal litter products. Ceramatec has developed a novel high surface area material, which is capable of ammonia adsorption. High surface area zeolites when combined with agglomerated fly ash can significantly reduce the use of naturally mined materials (i.e. clay bentonite) for animal litter manufacture. This not only preserves natural resources and the natural environment, but it also will reduce CO2 emissions, via the reduced need for heavy mining equipment. This novel animal litter is made with over 85% of recycled materials, thus preventing their disposition to landfills. The novel litter material is similar to traditional clay-like litters, and it is clumpable and has superior odor control properties.

  20. Investigation of Springback Associated with Composite Material Component Fabrication (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project 94-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine processing and design parameters in the fabrication of composite components to obtain a better understanding and attempt to minimize springback associated with composite materials. To accomplish this, both processing and design parameters were included in a Taguchi-designed experiment. Composite angled panels were fabricated, by hand layup techniques, and the fabricated panels were inspected for springback effects. This experiment yielded several significant results. The confirmation experiment validated the reproducibility of the factorial effects, error recognized, and experiment as reliable. The material used in the design of tooling needs to be a major consideration when fabricating composite components, as expected. The factors dealing with resin flow, however, raise several potentially serious material and design questions. These questions must be dealt with up front in order to minimize springback: viscosity of the resin, vacuum bagging of the part for cure, and the curing method selected. These factors directly affect design, material selection, and processing methods.

  1. Mathematical methods in material science and large scale optimization workshops: Final report, June 1, 1995-November 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, A. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Inst. for Mathematics and Its Applications

    1996-12-01

    The summer program in Large Scale Optimization concentrated largely on process engineering, aerospace engineering, inverse problems and optimal design, and molecular structure and protein folding. The program brought together application people, optimizers, and mathematicians with interest in learning about these topics. Three proceedings volumes are being prepared. The year in Materials Sciences deals with disordered media and percolation, phase transformations, composite materials, microstructure; topological and geometric methods as well as statistical mechanics approach to polymers (included were Monte Carlo simulation for polymers); miscellaneous other topics such as nonlinear optical material, particulate flow, and thin film. All these activities saw strong interaction among material scientists, mathematicians, physicists, and engineers. About 8 proceedings volumes are being prepared.

  2. Climatic change and health. Which problems are caused by thermophile hazardous organisms? Final report. Environment and health: climatic change; Klimawandel und Gesundheit. Welche Probleme verursachen Waerme liebende Schadorganismen? Abschlussbericht. Umwelt and Gesundheit: Klimawandel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustin, Jobst; Muecke, Hans-Guido (comps.)

    2010-03-15

    Climatic changes can cause health hazards due to thermophile harmful organisms, especially those with increased allergic potentials. The meeting covered the following topics: climatic change induced health hazards and the German adaptation strategies; the complex relation between climatic change and allergies; ambrosia propagation in Germany - hazards for health and biodiversity; climatic change induced reaction of hygienically precarious organism in urban regions; monitoring and abatement of Thaumetopoea processionea in Bavarian woods; climatic change and pollen flight dynamics; Thaumetopoea processionea as cause for non-distinctive respiratory systems diseases; risk and protection factors for the development of asthma and allergies during infancy; abatement of pathogenic or invasive harmful organisms in Switzerland; health hazards in connection with Thaumetopoea processionea - examples from Bavaria; retrospective analysis of EPS diseases during 2004 and 2005 in the region Kleve.

  3. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  4. Research at and Operation of the Materials Science Beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayers, Dale E.

    2003-10-15

    This is the final report for DOE DE-FG02-89ER45384. An overview of the operational history and status of beamline X-11A at the end of the contract period, and a brief review of the core science program at NCSU and the scientific results of X-11A since the last progress report is also presented.

  5. COMPUTERS HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Augustynek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, over 12.6 million Polish users of the Web registered. On the average, each of them spent 21 hours and 37 minutes monthly browsing the Web. That is why the problems of the psychological aspects of computer utilization have become an urgent research subject. The results of research into the development of Polish information society carried out in AGH University of Science and Technology, under the leadership of Leslaw H. Haber, in the period from 2000 until present time, indicate the emergence dynamic changes in the ways of computer utilization and their circumstances. One of the interesting regularities has been the inverse proportional relation between the level of computer skills and the frequency of the Web utilization.It has been found that in 2005, compared to 2000, the following changes occurred:- A significant drop in the number of students who never used computers and the Web;- Remarkable increase in computer knowledge and skills (particularly pronounced in the case of first years student- Decreasing gap in computer skills between students of the first and the third year; between male and female students;- Declining popularity of computer games.It has been demonstrated also that the hazard of computer screen addiction was the highest in he case of unemployed youth outside school system. As much as 12% of this group of young people were addicted to computer. A lot of leisure time that these youths enjoyed inducted them to excessive utilization of the Web. Polish housewives are another population group in risk of addiction to the Web. The duration of long Web charts carried out by younger and younger youths has been another matter of concern. Since the phenomenon of computer addiction is relatively new, no specific therapy methods has been developed. In general, the applied therapy in relation to computer addition syndrome is similar to the techniques applied in the cases of alcohol or gambling addiction. Individual and group

  6. Demonstration and Validation of Controlled Low-Strength Materials for Corrosion Mitigation of Buried Steel Pipes: Final Report on Project F09-A17

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    812 Park Drive Warner Robins , GA 31088 James B. Bushman and Bopinder S. Phull Bushman and Associates P. O. Box 425 Medina, OH 44258 Final report...Under Project F09-AR17, “Dilute Flowable Backfill Validation for Corrosion Mitigation of Buried Piping at Fort Hood , TX” ERDC/CERL TR-15-33 ii...Appendix C: Fort Hood Demonstration Equipment and Materials for ROI Analysis

  7. Deflagration accident risk analysis of Tianjin harbor hazardous materials consolidation and distribution transportation%天津港危化品公路集疏运爆燃事故风险分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仲珏; 王绪亭; 何志

    2015-01-01

    天津港危化品大部分通过疏港公路运输。在运输过程中,由于疏港公路交通流量密集、各种车辆混行,在恶劣天气状况下,可能发生危化品车辆碰撞,导致危化品泄漏,进而发生爆燃,造成大规模的群死群伤事件。通过测算天津港主要疏港公路——海滨大道现有交通流量,模拟主要危化品车辆发生碰撞后的爆炸半径以及可能的人员伤亡损失情况,对天津港危化品公路运输爆燃风险做出定量分析。模拟结果表明,爆燃事件一旦发生,将有至少2人死亡。%In Tianjin port, most hazardous cargos are transported by consolidation and distribution road. It is likely to cause serious personnel dead and injured in a crash involving hazardous cargo truck on consolidation and distribution road due to dense traffic flow, mixture of various vehicles and bad weather condition. The traffic flow of Haibin Road, which is the main consolidation and distribution road of Tianjin harbor, was calculated. The deflagra⁃tion radiuses of main hazardous cargo were also calculated. Transportation risk of hazardous materials was analyzed quantitatively. The simulation results show that at least 2 people will be killed if deflagration happens.

  8. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Almer, Jonathan D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  9. Precursor Derived Nanostructured Si-C-X Materials for Nuclear Applications. Final Report, October 2010 - September 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordia, Rajendra [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Henager, Chuck [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Polymer derived ceramic route is an attractive approach to make structural materials with unique nanostructures that have very desirable high temperature properties. Processing techniques to make a variety of needed shapes and forms (e.g. coatings, matrices for fiber reinforced composites, porous ceramics) have been developed. With appropriate high temperature processing, the precursors can be converted to nano-crystalline materials. In this collaborative project, we investigated the processing, stability and properties of nanostructured Si-C materials, derived from polymeric precursors, and their performance under conditions appropriate for nuclear energy applications. All the milestones of the project were accomplished. Some of the results are being currently analyzed and additional papers being prepared in which support from NEUP will be acknowledged. So far, eight peer-reviewed papers have been published and one invention disclosure made. In this report, we summarize the major findings of this project.

  10. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  11. Final Technical Report-Grant # DE-FG02-97ER45628 ?Structural Diorder in Materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Edward A

    2009-02-23

    Since the grant was renewed in 2000 and 2003 final technical reports of the grant have been previously submitted for those years. For that reason this final technical report covers the last four years of the grant. We had an exceptionally successful and productive last four years under the support of the grant. Our progress takes three different aspects, described in more detail below: 1.1 instrumentation, infrastructure, and other research support at Sector 20 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS); 1.2 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were PI?s; and 1.3 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were co-PI?s or where Drs. Dale Brewe or Julie Cross were authors or co-authors. Drs. Brewe and Cross are the two research scientists (permanently stationed at sector 20) who are supported by the grant. They provide support to the scientific goals of the grant and more broadly provide research support for many general users at Sector 20. Finally, in section 1.4 we provide a complete list of publications resulting from funding in the grant on which at least one of Stern, Seidler, Cross, or Brewe were co-authors. Given the inclusion of operations funding in the grant, this is of course a subset of the full scientific impact of the grant.

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigations of hot filter materials. Final report; Theoretische und experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Einsatzneignung von Heissgasfiltermaterialien. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, B.; Angermann, J.

    2004-01-12

    Second generation fluidised bed combustors have higher gas turbine inlet temperatures and thus higher efficiencies. High-temperature filters are required for dust filtering of the hot flue gases and/or combustion gases. Several circuit and process variants are discussed on the basis of the first generation combined cycle process. Requirements on ceramic filters are listed, and experience with existing filter systems is presented. SiC-based filter materials are investigated with a view to their performance in hot gas filtering in pressurised fluidised bed systems. Three different SiC material types are analysed which differ in terms of their preparation conditions: Clay-bound SiC, liquid phase sintered SiC (LPS-SiC), and recrystallised SiC (RSiC). Both commercial materials and newly developed or advanced materials from the partnering Fraunhofer Institutes were used. The materials were found to undergo strong modifications subject to the type of material and the gas atmosphere. Liquid-phase sintered SiC generally had more pronounced effects than the other materials, owing to its smaller grain and pore size, which results in a much larger inner surface. (orig.) [German] Die Druckwirbelschichtfeuerung (DWSF) der so genannten 2. Generation zeichnet sich gegenueber herkoemmlichen DWSF-Konzepten durch hoehere Gasturbinen-Eintrittstemperaturen und dementsprechend hoehere Wirkungsgrade aus. Grundlegende Voraussetzung fuer die Realisierung des Prozesses ist jedoch die Verfuegbarkeit von Hochtemperaturfiltern fuer die Entstaubung der heissen Rauch- und/oder Brenngase. Ausgehend vom Druckwirbelschicht GuD-Prozess der 1. Generation werden verschiedene in der Literatur beschriebene Schaltungs- und Prozessvarianten vorgestellt und diskutiert. Die Anforderungen zum Einsatz keramischer Filterelemente fuer die Heissgasreinigung werden abgeleitet und Betriebserfahrungen mit bereits bestehenden Filteranlagen beschrieben. Das Ziel dieser Arbeit ist die Bewertung verschiedener Si

  13. Canister storage building hazard analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    POWERS, T.B.

    1999-05-11

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Canister Storage Building (CSB) hazard analysis to support the CSB final safety analysis report (FSAR) and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', and meets the intent of HNF-PRO-704, ''Hazard and Accident Analysis Process''. This hazard analysis implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports''.

  14. NASA-UVA Light Aerospace Alloy and Structure Technology Program Supplement: Aluminum-Based Materials for High Speed Aircraft. Final report, 1 December 1991-31 March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starke, E.A. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of the study `Aluminum-Based Materials for high Speed Aircraft` which had the objectives (1) to identify the most promising aluminum-based materials with respect to major structural use on the HSCT and to further develop those materials and (2) to assess the materials through detailed trade and evaluation studies with respect to their structural efficiency on the HSCT. The research team consisted of ALCOA, Allied-Signal, Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, Reynolds Metals and the University of Virginia. Four classes of aluminum alloys were investigated: (1) I/M 2XXX containing Li and I/M 2XXX with Li, (2) I/M 6XXX, (3) two P/M 2XXX alloys and (4) two different aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC). The I/M alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.0 aircraft and the P/M and MMC alloys were targeted for a Mach 2.4 aircraft. Design studies were conducted using several different concepts including skin/stiffener (baseline), honeycomb sandwich, integrally stiffened and hybrid adaptations (conventionally stiffened thin-sandwich skins). Alloy development included fundamental studies of coarsening behavior, the effect of stress on nucleation and growth of precipitates, and fracture toughness as a function of temperature were an integral part of this program. The details of all phases of the research are described in this final report.

  15. Uncertainty on shallow landslide hazard assessment: from field data to hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefolini, Emanuele; Tolo, Silvia; Patelli, Eduardo; Broggi, Matteo; Disperati, Leonardo; Le Tuan, Hai

    2015-04-01

    Shallow landsliding that involve Hillslope Deposits (HD), the surficial soil that cover the bedrock, is an important process of erosion, transport and deposition of sediment along hillslopes. Despite Shallow landslides generally mobilize relatively small volume of material, they represent the most hazardous factor in mountain regions due to their high velocity and the common absence of warning signs. Moreover, increasing urbanization and likely climate change make shallow landslides a source of widespread risk, therefore the interest of scientific community about this process grown in the last three decades. One of the main aims of research projects involved on this topic, is to perform robust shallow landslides hazard assessment for wide areas (regional assessment), in order to support sustainable spatial planning. Currently, three main methodologies may be implemented to assess regional shallow landslides hazard: expert evaluation, probabilistic (or data mining) methods and physical models based methods. The aim of this work is evaluate the uncertainty of shallow landslides hazard assessment based on physical models taking into account spatial variables such as: geotechnical and hydrogeologic parameters as well as hillslope morphometry. To achieve this goal a wide dataset of geotechnical properties (shear strength, permeability, depth and unit weight) of HD was gathered by integrating field survey, in situ and laboratory tests. This spatial database was collected from a study area of about 350 km2 including different bedrock lithotypes and geomorphological features. The uncertainty associated to each step of the hazard assessment process (e.g. field data collection, regionalization of site specific information and numerical modelling of hillslope stability) was carefully characterized. The most appropriate probability density function (PDF) was chosen for each numerical variable and we assessed the uncertainty propagation on HD strength parameters obtained by

  16. Synchrotron Studies of Narrow Band and Low-Dimensional Materials. Final Report for July 1, 1990---December 31, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J. W.

    2003-05-13

    This report summarizes a 12-year program of various kinds of synchrotron spectroscopies directed at the electronic structures of narrow band and low-dimensional materials that display correlated electron behaviors such as metal-insulator transitions, mixed valence, superconductivity, Kondo moment quenching, heavy Fermions, and non-Fermi liquid properties.

  17. Low-Density and High Porosity Hydrogen Storage Materials Built from Ultra-Light Elements. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Pingyun [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2014-01-10

    A number of significant advances have been achieved, opening up new opportunities for the synthetic development of novel porous materials and their energy-related applications including gas storage and separation and catalysis. These include lithium-based metal-organic frameworks, magnesium-based metal-organic frameworks, and high gas uptake in porous frameworks with high density of open donor sites.

  18. Development of Multi-Media Programmed Instructional Materials for the Training of Law Enforcement Officers. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph; Schaeffer, Geraldine

    The purpose of this project was to improve basic police training by investigating existing curriculums and producing standardized instructional materials; however, funding termination did not allow the latter. VT 007 473 is a report of a literature and curriculum review for this project. From this review and a related study 168 topics were…

  19. Project M. E. CH. I. C. A.: Materials para Estudios Chicanos Interculturales de America. Final Project Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michal C.; Nieto, Jesus G.

    A group of 25 Chicano, bilingual, community college students were selected to participate in this curriculum development project, 15 spending an entire semester in Mexico, and 10 going on a shorter tour. The major objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and disseminate bilingual Chicano Studies curriculum materials; (2) to train school…

  20. [Origin of Lewis acidity in solid materials]. DOE Final Report for Grant DE-FG02-90ER14130

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fripiat, J. J.

    2001-04-11

    The aim of the research undertaken within the framework of this DOE grant was to further understanding of the origin of the Lewis acidity in solid materials. The study centered around aluminas and alumino-silicates. The main tools for investigation of this phenomenon were high-resolution solid state {sub 27}Al NMR, complemented by EPR and the chemical determination of catalytic activity.