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Sample records for hatchlings testudines podocnemididae

  1. Pivotal temperature and sexual dimorphism of Podocnemis expansa hatchlings (Testudines: Podocnemididae from Bananal Island, Brazil

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    Adélio Lubiana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A common problem when trying to identify the sex of hatchling turtles is that juveniles are not obviously externally dimorphic and current techniques to identify sex are often invasive. In this paper, 300 eggs of Podocnemis expansa from Bananal Island, state of Tocantins (Brazil, were incubated at constant temperatures. The carapaces of the hatchlings were photographed and subjected to geometric morphometric analysis. The hatchlings were subsequently euthanized and had their gonads removed for sex determination. The pivotal temperature of P. expansa was 33.5ºC, confirming that this species has the highest pivotal temperature among reptiles. Geometric morphometric analysis of the shape of the carapace proved efficient in differentiating the sex of the hatchlings and confirmed that this methodology can be efficient for studies that need to ascertain the sex ratio in P. expansa hatchlings.

  2. Enzymes of energy metabolism in hatchlings of amazonian freshwater turtles (Testudines, Podocnemididae

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    WP. Duncan

    Full Text Available The metabolic profiles of selected tissues were analyzed in hatchlings of the Amazonian freshwater turtles Podocnemis expansa, P. unifilis and P. sextuberculata. Metabolic design in these species was judged based on the key enzymes of energy metabolism, with special emphasis on carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid and ketone body metabolism. All species showed a high glycolytic potential in all sampled tissues. Based on low levels of hexokinase, glycogen may be an important fuel for these species. The high lactate dehydrogenase activity in the liver may play a significant role in carbohydrate catabolism, possibly during diving. Oxidative metabolism in P. sextuberculata appears to be designed for the use of lipids, amino acids and ketone bodies. The maximal activities of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, glutamine dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and succinyl-CoA keto transferase display high aerobic potential, especially in muscle and liver tissues of this species. Although amino acids and ketone bodies may be important fuels for oxidative metabolism, carbohydrates and lipids are the major fuels used by P. expansa and P. unifilis. Our results are consistent with the food habits and lifestyle of Amazonian freshwater turtles. The metabolic design, based on enzyme activities, suggests that hatchlings of P. unifilis and P. expansa are predominately herbivorous, whereas P. sextuberculata rely on a mixed diet of animal matter and vegetation.

  3. Chemical characteristics and thickness of Podocnemis expansa post-hatching eggshells (Testudines, Podocnemididae

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    Caio Henrique Ferreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on chemical components of the post-hatching eggshell of reptiles may provide indicators of the quality of the diet offered to females kept in captivity. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the chemical characteristics of the calcareous layer, as well as the thickness of Podocnemis expansa post-hatching eggshells. Eggshell thickness was 183±1.405 µm. This value is similar to that of the eggs of other Testudines with flexible eggshells. As for the chemical composition, the following percentages were observed: nitrogen 7.983 ± 0.054; crude protein 49.91 ± 0.324; crude fat 0.068 ± 0.002; mineral matter 20.302 ± 0.807; calcium 13.374 ± 0.647; and phosphorus 0.176 ± 0.003. Knowledge on chemical composition of the eggshell may aid the nutrition of P. expansa raised in commercial facilities, once this species is an alternative and promising source of exotic meat.

  4. Ontogeny of the cranial bones of the giant amazon river turtle Podocnemis expansa Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines, Podocnemididae = Ontogenia dos ossos do crânio em tartaruga-da-amazônia Podocnemis expansa Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines, Podocnemididae

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    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the normal stages of formation in the sequence of ossification of the cranium of Podocnemis expansa in its various stages of development, embryos were collected starting on the 18th day of natural incubation and were subjected to bone diaphanization and staining. In the neurocranium, the basisphenoid and basioccipitalbones present ossification centers in stage 19, the supraoccipital and opisthotic in stage 20, the exoccipital in stage 21, and lastly the prooptic in stage 24. Dermatocranium: the squamosal, pterygoid and maxilla are the first elements to begin the ossification process,which occurs in stage 16. However, ossification centers begin to appear in stage 17 in most of these bone elements, i.e., the frontal, jugal, postorbital, parietal, premaxilla and prefrontal, followed by the palatine and quadratojugal in stage 19 and lastly by the vomer instage 25. The quadrate bone of the splanchnocranium ossifies in stage 23. The mandible and hyoid apparatus, the dentary, coronoid and supra-angular, show ossification centers in stage 16 and the branchial horn I in stage 17. The sequence and synchronization of ossification in P. expansa show similarities as well as differences when compared with other species of Testudines.Com o propósito de estabelecer etapas normais de formação da sequência de ossificação do crânio em Podocnemis expansa, nos diferentes estágios de desenvolvimento, coletaram-se embriões a partir do 18º dia de incubação natural, os quais foram submetidos à técnica de diafanização e coloração dos ossos. No neurocrânio, no estágio 19, o basisfenoide e o basioccipital apresentam centro de ossificação; no estágio 20, o supraoccipital e o opistótico; no estágio 21, o exoccipital; somente no estágio 24, o proótico. Dermatocrânio: o esquamosal, o pterigoide e a maxila são os primeiros elementos a iniciar o processo de ossificação, que ocorre no estágio 16. Mas a maioria desses elementos

  5. A global phylogeny of Pelomedusoides turtles with new material of Neochelys franzeni Schleich, 1993 (Testudines, Podocnemididae) from the middle Eocene, Messel Pit, of Germany.

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    Cadena, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neochelys franzeni Schleich, 1993 is the only pleurodire or side-necked turtle from the middle Eocene, Messel Pit (the first UNESCO, World Natural Heritage Site in Germany, since 1995). The original description of the species is based on two specimens SMF ME 1091 (Holotype) and 715 (Paratype) housed at the Senckenberg Museum Frankfurt. The excellent preservation of complete and articulated skeletons of this species makes it a key taxon for understanding the evolution and phylogeny of the European Neochelys genus and its relationships with South American and African-Madagascar podocnemidids. Results. Five new specimens of Neochelys franzeni from Messel Pit are described here, together with the redescription of SMF ME 1091 and 715. Specimens correspond to individuals of different ontogenetic stages showing conservative morphology from hatching to adults. A revised diagnosis for the species is presented here, together with its inclusion in a global phylogenetic analysis of Pelomedusoides that shows that this species and the whole Neochelys spp. is sister to the Erymnochelys madagascariensis-Peltocephalus dumerilianus clade within Podocnemididae.

  6. A global phylogeny of Pelomedusoides turtles with new material of Neochelys franzeni Schleich, 1993 (Testudines, Podocnemididae from the middle Eocene, Messel Pit, of Germany

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    Edwin Cadena

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neochelys franzeni Schleich, 1993 is the only pleurodire or side-necked turtle from the middle Eocene, Messel Pit (the first UNESCO, World Natural Heritage Site in Germany, since 1995. The original description of the species is based on two specimens SMF ME 1091 (Holotype and 715 (Paratype housed at the Senckenberg Museum Frankfurt. The excellent preservation of complete and articulated skeletons of this species makes it a key taxon for understanding the evolution and phylogeny of the European Neochelys genus and its relationships with South American and African-Madagascar podocnemidids.Results. Five new specimens of Neochelys franzeni from Messel Pit are described here, together with the redescription of SMF ME 1091 and 715. Specimens correspond to individuals of different ontogenetic stages showing conservative morphology from hatching to adults. A revised diagnosis for the species is presented here, together with its inclusion in a global phylogenetic analysis of Pelomedusoides that shows that this species and the whole Neochelys spp. is sister to the Erymnochelys madagascariensis-Peltocephalus dumerilianus clade within Podocnemididae.

  7. Ontogeny of the cranial bones of the giant amazon river turtle Podocnemis expansa Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines, Podocnemididae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i2.5777 Ontogeny of the cranial bones of the giant amazon river turtle Podocnemis expansa Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines, Podocnemididae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i2.5777

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    Fabiano Campos Lima

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the normal stages of formation in the sequence of ossification of the cranium of Podocnemis expansa in its various stages of development, embryos were collected starting on the 18th day of natural incubation and were subjected to bone diaphanization and staining. In the neurocranium, the basisphenoid and basioccipital bones present ossification centers in stage 19, the supraoccipital and opisthotic in stage 20, the exoccipital in stage 21, and lastly the prooptic in stage 24. Dermatocranium: the squamosal, pterygoid and maxilla are the first elements to begin the ossification process, which occurs in stage 16. However, ossification centers begin to appear in stage 17 in most of these bone elements, i.e., the frontal, jugal, postorbital, parietal, premaxilla and prefrontal, followed by the palatine and quadratojugal in stage 19 and lastly by the vomer in stage 25. The quadrate bone of the splanchnocranium ossifies in stage 23. The mandible and hyoid apparatus, the dentary, coronoid and supra-angular, show ossification centers in stage 16 and the branchial horn I in stage 17. The sequence and synchronization of ossification in P. expansa show similarities as well as differences when compared with other species of Testudines.In order to determine the normal stages of formation in the sequence of ossification of the cranium of Podocnemis expansa in its various stages of development, embryos were collected starting on the 18th day of natural incubation and were subjected to bone diaphanization and staining. In the neurocranium, the basisphenoid and basioccipital bones present ossification centers in stage 19, the supraoccipital and opisthotic in stage 20, the exoccipital in stage 21, and lastly the prooptic in stage 24. Dermatocranium: the squamosal, pterygoid and maxilla are the first elements to begin the ossification process, which occurs in stage 16. However, ossification centers begin to appear in stage 17 in most of these

  8. Avaliação da predação de Podocnemis expansa e Podocnemis unifilis (Testudines, Podocnemididae no rio Javaés, Tocantins Evaluation of predation in Podocnemis expansa and Podocnemis unifilis (Testudines, Podocnemididae in the Javaés River, Tocantins

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    Giovanni Salera Junior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Podocnemis expansa e P. unifilis são animais de vida longa, com uma demorada maturação sexual, o que influencia uma baixa taxa de substituição de indivíduos. Suas populações são caracterizadas por uma pequena mortalidade dos animais adultos, mas alta taxa de mortalidade de filhotes e embriões. Sendo a predação natural de ninhos e filhotes um dos fatores mais importantes do baixo sucesso de eclosão dessas espécies. No rio Javaés, os ovos e recém-eclodidos podem ser predados por uma grande diversidade de animais: dentre as aves, urubus (Coragyps atratus e Cathartes aura, carcará (Polyborus plancus, jaburu (Jabiru mycteria; lagartos (Tupinambis teguixin e mamíferos de pequeno porte, coati (Nasua nasua e cachorro-do-mato (Cerdocyon thous. Do total anual de desovas de P. unifilis em média 65,98% são predadas, sendo 41,68% de forma total e 24,30% parcialmente. Enquanto que apenas 5,31% das ninhadas de P. expansa são sempre parcialmente predadas. Dentre os predadores aquáticos existem diversos peixes, principalmente piranhas (Serrasalmus nattereri e jacarés (Melanosuchus niger e Caimam crocodilus. Os predadores das fêmeas de P. unifilis são: jacaré-açu (Melanosuchus niger, onça-pintada (Panthera onca e onça-parda (Puma concolor. Enquanto que as fêmeas de P. expansa em postura, somente são predadas por P. onca. As fêmeas de P. unifilis em postura são predadas num total médio de 3,93% anualmente, enquanto que para P. expansa a média anual é 5,66% das fêmeas.Podocnemis expansa and P. unifilis long lived with late sexual maturation, which influences a low replacement rate of individuals. Their populations are characterized by low adults mortality, but high mortality of embryos and hatchlings. The natural nest predation is an important factor for hatchling success. In Javaés River, the eggs and hatchlings can be predated by a large number of animals such as birds, vultures (Coragyps atratus and Cathartes aura, carcar

  9. Identificação sexual através do estudo anatômico do sistema urogenital em recém-eclodidos e jovens de Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae Sexual identification using anatomical study of urogenital system in hatchlings and juveniles of tracHemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae

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    Adriana Malvasio

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Individuals of Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 less than 12 months old are examined for sexual identification through anatomical study of urogenital system. Histological analysis is used to confirm sexual identification. It is concluded that accurate sexual identification is possible in hatchlings using gonadal morphology. Differences between testes and ovaries are clear so histological analysis is necessary for this species only in case of doubts.

  10. Ciclo ovárico y jerarquía folicular de Peltocephalus dumerilianus (Testudines: Podocnemididae Ovarian cycle and follicular hierarchy of Peltocephalus dumerilianus (Testudines: Podocnemididae

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    Jaime De La Ossa Velasquez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron cuarenta pares de ovarios de hembras adultas de Peltocephalus dumerilianus (Schweigger 1812, para establecer los cambios morfológicos mensuales producidos durante un año. Se llevaron a cabo exámenes macroscópicos de los oviductos y de los ovarios de especímenes que los habitantes ribereños del municipio de Barcelos, Amazonas, Brasil, utilizaron para su consumo, usando metodológicamente la medida del diámetro y conteo de los folículos ováricos y de los cuerpos lúteos. Los resultados muestran la presencia gradual de folículos acorde con la época reproductiva, resaltando que durante el último tercio del proceso, justo antes de la postura se hacen más evidentes; se analiza la relación existente entre el tamaño de la hembra y la masa ovárica, la cual es estadísticamente significativa (F (10,29=3,655, p Forty pairs of ovaries of mature female Peltocephalus dumerilianus (Schweigger 1812 were analyzed, to establish the morphologic monthly changes that take place during one year; we examined macroscopically the oviducts and the ovaries of specimens that the riverside inhabitants of the municipality of Barcelos, Amazons, Brazil, used for their consumption. We measured the diameter and recorded the number of enlarged ovarian follicles and corpora lutea. The results show the gradual enlargement of follicles in agreement with the reproductive period, observing that during the last third of the process; just before oviposition they become more evident. The positive relationship between the size of the female and the ovarian mass, is statistically significant (F (10.29=3.655, p < 0.05. Follicullar sizes suggest that this species nests only once a year.

  11. Enterobacterias en tortugas silvestres y cautivas del Amazonas, Podocnemis expansa (Testudines: Podocnemididae)

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    Meyer Junior, Júlio Cesar; Marinho, Márcia; Táparo, Cilene Vidovix; Costa, João Bosco da; Dias, Hilma Lúcia Tavares

    2015-01-01

    ResumenLa tortuga amazónica Podocnemis expansa Schweigger, 1812 es un recurso muy importante para las poblaciones ribereñas de fauna de la región amazónica, además de ser una de las principales especies enumeradas para la producción en cautiverio. El consumo de esta especie como alimento en la región ha generado una demanda de estudios sobre salud animal y sus posibles impactos en la salud pública. El objetivo principal de este estudio fue evaluar la microbiota gastrointestinal de las tortuga...

  12. Prevalence and parasitemia of Haemogregarina sp. in Podocnemis expansa (Testudines: Podocnemididae) from the Brazilian Amazon.

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    Picelli, Amanda Maria; de Carvalho, Aluísio Vasconcelos; Viana, Lúcio André; Malvasio, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Seventy-five turtles Podocnemis expansa in the Brazilian Amazon were examined for the presence of ectoparasites and hemoparasites. Samplings were performed in three study areas in the state of Tocantins, Brazil. Twenty-five specimens were sampled per study area (a commercial breeding facility, an indigenous subsistence breeding facility and a wild population of the Javaés River). Hemoparasites of the genus Haemogregarina were found in 66% (50/75) of the turtle specimens, and the infections were restricted to the commercial breeding facility and to the wild population of the Javaés River. The mean level of parasitemia was 54/2,000 erythrocytes (2%). There was no correlation between the body condition index of the chelonians and the level of parasitemia, with no significant difference between genders. No leeches were observed during the physical exams in any of the study areas, but the specimens from the commercial breeding facility were in poor physical condition with shell deformities and the presence of a relatively high amount of skin ulcerations, most likely caused by fungi and bacteria. This was the first study to record the occurrence of hemogregarines on a population scale in P. expansa and helps to increase knowledge about hemoparasites in chelonians in Brazil.

  13. Prevalence and parasitemia of Haemogregarina sp. in Podocnemis expansa (Testudines: Podocnemididae from the Brazilian Amazon

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    Amanda Maria Picelli

    Full Text Available Seventy-five turtles Podocnemis expansa in the Brazilian Amazon were examined for the presence of ectoparasites and hemoparasites. Samplings were performed in three study areas in the state of Tocantins, Brazil. Twenty-five specimens were sampled per study area (a commercial breeding facility, an indigenous subsistence breeding facility and a wild population of the Javaés River. Hemoparasites of the genus Haemogregarina were found in 66% (50/75 of the turtle specimens, and the infections were restricted to the commercial breeding facility and to the wild population of the Javaés River. The mean level of parasitemia was 54/2,000 erythrocytes (2%. There was no correlation between the body condition index of the chelonians and the level of parasitemia, with no significant difference between genders. No leeches were observed during the physical exams in any of the study areas, but the specimens from the commercial breeding facility were in poor physical condition with shell deformities and the presence of a relatively high amount of skin ulcerations, most likely caused by fungi and bacteria. This was the first study to record the occurrence of hemogregarines on a population scale in P. expansa and helps to increase knowledge about hemoparasites in chelonians in Brazil.

  14. INFLUENCIA DE LA TEMPERATURA EN EL COMPORTAMIENTO ALIMENTARIO DE Peltocephalus dumerilianus (TESTUDINES PODOCNEMIDAE

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    Alejandro De La Ossa L

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Analizar los comportamientos de alimentación bajo diferentes condiciones de temperatura en un grupo de neonatos de Peltocephalus dumerilianus (Testudines Podocnemididae. Materiales y Métodos. Los individuos experimentales fueron obtenidos mediante incubación en el laboratorio, se dividieron en 5 grupos al azar. Durante 2 meses con tres repeticiones a la semana se hicieron pruebas de temperatura utilizando dentro de las bandejas calentadores eléctricos, con registro continuo de temperatura mediante termómetro digital - 10 a + 60ºC (± 0.1ºC, procurando mantener un ritmo constante de incremento equivalente a 0,25ºC cada 10 minutos, hasta llegar a la temperatura seleccionada, que fue mantenida por 60 minutos en cada ensayo. Las temperaturas seleccionadas para cada ensayo, fueron: 26ºC, 30ºC, 34ºC, 38ºC y ambiente que fue de 26,8ºC en promedio. Fueron evaluados los siguientes parámetros: duración en minutos de la ingesta, tiempo de inicio de comportamientos agonísticos, presencia de dos tipos de despliegues característicos: morder y disputa por alimento. Resultados. En general todos los parámetros fueron significativos, a mayor temperatura el tiempo de ingestión fue mayor, a menor temperatura el volumen de consumo fue menor, a menor temperatura el inicio de los despliegues agonísticos fue mayor y se mantuvo una relación inversamente proporcional. Conclusiones. Los resultados mostraron que existe relación directamente proporcional entre la temperatura ambiental y los procesos de alimentación, además que se relacionaron con aspectos básicos del comportamiento lo cual se manifestó en los despliegues agonísticos observados.

  15. Radiographic anatomy aspects and gastrointestinal transit time in Podocnemis unifilis troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae. = Aspectos anátomo-radiográficos e tempo de trânsito gastrintestinal em Podocnemis unifilis troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae

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    Fernando Moraes Machado Brito

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzed the radiographic anatomy and determined thegastrointestinal transit time of Podocnemis unifilis. We used ten animals belonging to LAPAS from the Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The animals were orally fed with a barium sulphate suspension at 10 mL kg-1 mixed with mineral oil, at a ratio of 70% of barium sulphate for 30% of mineral oil. Afterwards, the animals underwent radiography in a dorsum ventriloquoal position, with the X-ray device adjusted at 72 Kv and 200 mA, in time intervals to follow the permanency of contrast in the organism. Five minutes after the contrast was supplied, the stomach was filled. After sixteen hours the contrast advanced to the smallintestine. In 48 hours, the whole small intestine and part of the colon were fulfilled. On the 9th day the stomach was empty and the contrast advanced to the colon. On the 11th day, the colon was totally fulfilled, and the contrast was close to cloaca. On the 18th day all contrast was eliminated by the animal. Total time for contrast elimination was, in average, 17.6 ± 2.4 days, with the minimum of 12 and maximum of 22 days, with temperature at 27ºC. The digestion of the food was slower in the duodenum, and faster in the colon-rectum, which presents lower indices of repletion.Avaliou-se aspectos anátomo-radiográficos bem como o tempo de trânsito gastrintestinal em Podocnemis unifilis. Foram utilizados 10 animais pertencentes ao Laboratório de Pesquisas em Animais Silvestres(LAPAS da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Aos animais foi administrada, por via oral, uma suspensão de sulfato de bário 10 mL kg-1 misturada com óleo mineral na proporção de 70% de sulfato de bário para 30% de óleo. Posteriormente, os animais foram radiografados dorso-ventralmente, com o aparelho de raios-X regulado para 72 Kv e 200 mA, em intervalos de tempo pré-estabelecidos. Em média, cinco minutos após a administração do contraste, a porção proximal do estômago estava preenchida. Após 16 horas, o contraste progrediu para o intestino delgado. Com 48 horas, todo o intestino delgado e parte do intestinogrosso estavam preenchidos. No 9 dia o estômago apresentava-se vazio e o contraste progrediu para o cólon. No 11 dia, o contraste encontrava-se na região do reto e o duodeno encontrava-se vazio. No 14 dia, o intestino delgado já estava totalmente sem preenchimento. No 18 dia, todo o contraste foi eliminado. O tempo total de eliminação do contraste foi, em média, de 17,6 ± 2,4 dias, sendo o mínimo de 12 e o máximo de 22 dias em temperatura média de 27°C. A digestão do alimento foi mais lenta no duodeno e mais alta no cólon-reto, que alcançou menores índices de repleção.

  16. Radiographic anatomy aspects and gastrointestinal transit time in Podocnemis unifilis troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae). = Aspectos anátomo-radiográficos e tempo de trânsito gastrintestinal em Podocnemis unifilis troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae)

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    Fernando Moraes Machado Brito; Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira; Cirilo Antônio Paula Lima; Carlos Gomes Ferreira; José Guilherme Souza Pinto; André Luiz Quagliatto Santos

    2010-01-01

    The present study analyzed the radiographic anatomy and determined thegastrointestinal transit time of Podocnemis unifilis. We used ten animals belonging to LAPAS from the Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The animals were orally fed with a barium sulphate suspension at 10 mL kg-1 mixed with mineral oil, at a ratio of 70% of barium sulphate for 30% of mineral oil. Afterwards, the animals underwent radiography in a dorsum ventriloquoal position, with the...

  17. Use and commercialization of Podocnemis expansa (Schweiger 1812 (Testudines: Podocnemididae for medicinal purposes in two communities in North of Brazil

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    Santana Gindomar G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Throughout Brazil a large number of people seek out reptiles for their meat, leather, ornamental value and supposed medicinal importance. However, there is a dearth of information on the use of reptiles in folk medicine. In North Brazil, the freshwater turtle, Podocnemis expansa, is one of the most frequently used species in traditional medicines. Many products derived from P. expansa are utilized in rural areas and also commercialized in outdoor markets as a cure or treatment for different diseases. Here we document the use and commercialization of P. expansa for medicinal purposes in the state of Pará, Northern Brazil. Methods Data were gathered through interview-questionnaires, with some questions left open-ended. Information was collected in two localities in Pará State, North of Brazil. In the City of Belém, data was collected through interviews with 23 herbs or root sellers (13 men and 10 women. Attempts were made to interview all animal merchants in the markets visited. In fishing community of the Pesqueiro Beach, interviews were done with 41 inhabitants (23 men and 18 women and during the first contacts with the local population, we attempted to identify local people with a specialized knowledge of medicinal animal usage. Results P. expansa was traded for use in traditional medicines and cosmetics. Fat and egg shells were used to treat 16 different diseases. Turtle fat was the main product sold. The demand for these products is unknown. However, the use of this species in folk medicine might have a considerable impact on wild population, and this must be taken into account for the conservation and management of this species. Conclusion Our results indicated that the use and commercialization of P. expansa products for medicinal purposes is common in North of Brazil. More studies regarding the use and commerce of Brazilian turtles are urgently needed in order to evaluate the real impact of such activities on natural populations. We hope that our findings about the trade and use of P. expansa in folk medicine will motivate further studies on the use of animals in folk medicine and its implications for conservation.

  18. Use and commercialization of Podocnemis expansa (Schweiger 1812) (Testudines: Podocnemididae) for medicinal purposes in two communities in North of Brazil.

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    Alves, Rômulo R N; Santana, Gindomar G

    2008-01-21

    Throughout Brazil a large number of people seek out reptiles for their meat, leather, ornamental value and supposed medicinal importance. However, there is a dearth of information on the use of reptiles in folk medicine. In North Brazil, the freshwater turtle, Podocnemis expansa, is one of the most frequently used species in traditional medicines. Many products derived from P. expansa are utilized in rural areas and also commercialized in outdoor markets as a cure or treatment for different diseases. Here we document the use and commercialization of P. expansa for medicinal purposes in the state of Pará, Northern Brazil. Data were gathered through interview-questionnaires, with some questions left open-ended. Information was collected in two localities in Pará State, North of Brazil. In the City of Belém, data was collected through interviews with 23 herbs or root sellers (13 men and 10 women). Attempts were made to interview all animal merchants in the markets visited. In fishing community of the Pesqueiro Beach, interviews were done with 41 inhabitants (23 men and 18 women) and during the first contacts with the local population, we attempted to identify local people with a specialized knowledge of medicinal animal usage. P. expansa was traded for use in traditional medicines and cosmetics. Fat and egg shells were used to treat 16 different diseases. Turtle fat was the main product sold. The demand for these products is unknown. However, the use of this species in folk medicine might have a considerable impact on wild population, and this must be taken into account for the conservation and management of this species. Our results indicated that the use and commercialization of P. expansa products for medicinal purposes is common in North of Brazil. More studies regarding the use and commerce of Brazilian turtles are urgently needed in order to evaluate the real impact of such activities on natural populations. We hope that our findings about the trade and use of P. expansa in folk medicine will motivate further studies on the use of animals in folk medicine and its implications for conservation.

  19. NESTING HABITAT OF THE ‘CUPISO’ Podocnemis sextuberculata (TESTUDINES: PODOCNEMIDIDAE IN EREPECU LAKE (PARÁ-BRAZIL

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    Ana Lucia Bermúdez Romero

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify and describe the nesting habitat of Podocnemis sextuberculata at Erepecu Lake, Trombetas River Biological Reserve, (REBIO-Trombetas; Pará-Brazil. Initially, the main features of the beaches that potentially determine the habitat selection by cupiso for nesting were described. The nests observed on the beaches were recorded, marked and fenced as protection from natural predators. Information regarding date and location was analyzed with simple linear regression for each nest in order to determine relationships between beach features and number of nests. The results showed a positive co-relationship between number of nests and area. Nest site selection by P. sextuberculata in the beaches of the Erepecu Lake could depend on trade-off scenarios among natural threats and a suitable nesting habitat. We also suggest that, due to the high annual hydrologic oscillations on the beaches, it is possible that the driving factor for habitat selection would be the risks that the species is exposed to at the time of the search for a nesting site, rather than seeking a particular habitat type.    RESUMEN El objetivo del estudio fue identificar y explicar la influencia del hábitat sobre los nidos de la tortuga “cupiso” (Podocnemis sextuberculata Cornalia, 1849, en el lago Erepecu ubicado en la Reserva Biológica del Río Trombetas (REBIO-Trombetas; Pará-Brasil. Inicialmente se describieron las principales características de las playas escogidas, los nidos encontrados fueron marcados y cercados para su protección contra la depredación natural. A través de regresiones lineales simples se determinó que el número de nidos por playa se correlacionó significativamente con el “área” de las playas.  Los resultados muestran que la selección del lugar de nidificación en las playas del lago Erepecu por P. sextuberculata, podría depender en unos escenarios de compensación entre las amenazas naturales y un hábitat adecuado para anidar, ya que las condiciones ambientales de las playas del lago Erepecu son muy variantes, impidiendo que las hembras anualmente seleccionen un tipo específico de hábitat.

  20. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A large phylogeny of turtles (Testudines) using molecular data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillon, J.-M.; Guéry, L.; Hulin, V.; Girondot, M.

    2012-01-01

    Turtles (Testudines) form a monophyletic group with a highly distinctive body plan. The taxonomy and phylogeny of turtles are still under discussion, at least for some clades. Whereas in most previous studies, only a few species or genera were considered, we here use an extensive compilation of DNA

  2. Implementation of DNA mitochondrial analysis in rhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines: Geoemydidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Henao, Yherson Franchesco; Barreto, Guillermo; Giraldo, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Rhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines: geoemydidae) is considered an almost endemic specie to Colombia and the most primitive species of rhynoclemmys. However, it is classified data deficient by iucn because the available information is not enough to make a direct or indirect assessment of its extinction risk. Here, we describe the implementation of the method to analyze the mitochondrial DNA control sequence (mtdna) of R. nasuta in order to generate tools for future studies in systematics and population conservation. Genomic MTDNA was extracted by salting-out from blood samples from Isla Palma and Playa Chucheros (Bahia Malaga Colombian Pacific Coast) and we used a pair of degenerate primers (reported for chrysemys picta, testudines: emydidae) to perform amplification. Fragments of 800pb were obtained and the sequencing reaction was effective. A homology percentage above of 92 % was established between the obtained sequences and MTDNA sequences from Sacalia quadriocellata (Testudines: geoemydidae), and Cuora aurocapitata (Testudines: geoemydidae) reported in the genbank. This result shows that the described method can be a useful tool for the study of R. nasuta populations in the Colombian pacific region, achieving an effective sequencing of the MTDNA control region of this species.

  3. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Katie L; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Ketten, Darlene R

    2013-01-01

    The position of testudines in vertebrate phylogeny is being re-evaluated. At present, testudine morphological and molecular data conflict when reconstructing phylogenetic relationships. Complicating matters, the ecological niche of stem testudines is ambiguous. To understand how turtles have...... evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR) and submillimeter computed tomography (CT) scans. All families of testudines exhibited...... volume resonating in an underwater sound field, the calculated resonances for the volumes of the middle ear cavities largely fell within testudine hearing ranges. Although there were some differences in morphology, there were no statistically significant differences in the scaling of the volume...

  4. Assessment of hatchling egg losses and two chick sexing methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of hatchling egg losses and two chick sexing methods in the Nigerian indigenous chicken. ... Journal of Agricultural Research and Development ... The aim of the present study is to evaluate hatchling egg loss as well as sex determination methods at day old and sexual dimorphism over 8 weeks in Nigerian ...

  5. Nesting ecology of Podocnemis expansa (Schweigger, 1812 and Podocnemis unifilis (Troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae in the Javaés River, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD. Ferreira Júnior

    Full Text Available Nest site has influence on incubation duration and hatching success of two Neotropical turtles, the Giant Amazon River Turtle (Podocnemis expansa and Yellow-Spotted Side-Neck Turtle (Podocnemis unifilis - "Tracajá". The 2000 and 2001 nesting seasons have been monitored at the Javaés River in Bananal Island, Brazil. Although they nest on the same beaches, there is a separation of the nesting areas of P unifilis and P. expansa nests on the upper parts of the beach. The incubation duration for P. expansa is influenced by the nesting period, the height of the nest from the river, the clutch size, and the grain size in the site of the nest. Nests of Podocnemis expansa placed in coarse sediments have shorter incubation duration than those placed in finer sediments. The hatching success in P. expansa is influenced by grain size, incubation duration, and nesting period. The grain size is negatively correlated with hatching success, indicating that the nests situated in finer-grained sand have better chances of successful egg hatching than those in coarser-grained sand. Nests of the end of the reproductive season have lower hatching success and incubation duration than those at the start of the season. For P. unifilis, the nesting period and nest depth influence the incubation duration; moreover, the river dynamics significantly affect the hatching success. The oscillation of the river level and the moment of initial increase, the height of the nest from the river level, and the nesting period are all decisive components for hatching success. The results of this research show the importance of protecting areas with great geological diversity, wherein the features of the environment can affect the microenvironment of nests, with consequences on incubation duration and hatching success.

  6. Middle ear cavity morphology is consistent with an aquatic origin for testudines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Willis

    Full Text Available The position of testudines in vertebrate phylogeny is being re-evaluated. At present, testudine morphological and molecular data conflict when reconstructing phylogenetic relationships. Complicating matters, the ecological niche of stem testudines is ambiguous. To understand how turtles have evolved to hear in different environments, we examined middle ear morphology and scaling in most extant families, as well as some extinct species, using 3-dimensional reconstructions from micro magnetic resonance (MR and submillimeter computed tomography (CT scans. All families of testudines exhibited a similar shape of the bony structure of the middle ear cavity, with the tympanic disk located on the rostrolateral edge of the cavity. Sea Turtles have additional soft tissue that fills the middle ear cavity to varying degrees. When the middle ear cavity is modeled as an air-filled sphere of the same volume resonating in an underwater sound field, the calculated resonances for the volumes of the middle ear cavities largely fell within testudine hearing ranges. Although there were some differences in morphology, there were no statistically significant differences in the scaling of the volume of the bony middle ear cavity with head size among groups when categorized by phylogeny and ecology. Because the cavity is predicted to resonate underwater within the testudine hearing range, the data support the hypothesis of an aquatic origin for testudines, and function of the middle ear cavity in underwater sound detection.

  7. Supernumerary epidermal shields and carapace variation in Orbigny's slider turtles, Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae Escudos epidérmicos supernumerários e variação na carapaça na tartaruga-tigre-d'água, Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis S. Bujes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal plates of the carapace and plastron of 51 adults (38 females and 13 males, 07 immature individuals, and 46 hatchlings of the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni (Durémil & Bibron, 1835, originated from the delta of Rio Jacuí region, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, were examined. The results showed that 7.7% of males, 10.52% of females, 14.28% of immature individuals, and 6.52% of the hatchlings presented a kind of anomaly on the shell, as well as a presence of supernumerary epidermal shields. Although the modification in the number of epidermal shields presents a high frequency in Testudines, these are the first descriptions of the variation in the pattern of carapacial scutation in eleven individuals from a population of T. dorbigni. The association of several environmental factors acting on the embryonic development of the individual may be responsible for the alteration of the pattern of carapacial scutation in this species.Os escudos epidérmicos da carapaça e do plastrão de 51 adultos (38 fêmeas e 13 machos, 07 imaturos e 46 filhotes da tartaruga de água doce Trachemys dorbigni (Durémil & Bibron, 1835, procedentes da região do delta do Rio Jacuí, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, foram examinados. Desta análise, 7,7% dos machos, 10,52% das fêmeas, 14,28% dos imaturos e 6,52% dos filhotes apresentaram algum tipo de anomalia no casco, bem como presença de escudos epidérmicos supernumerários. Embora a alteração no número dos escudos epidérmicos seja relativamente freqüente em Testudines, estas são as primeiras descrições de variação no padrão de escutelação em onze indivíduos de uma população de T. dorbigni. A associação de diferentes fatores ambientais, interagindo sobre o desenvolvimento embrionário do indivíduo, parece ser a responsável pela alteração do padrão de escutelação nessa espécie.

  8. Radiographic anatomy aspects and gastrointestinal transit time in Podocnemis unifilis troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i4.5082 Radiographic anatomy aspects and gastrointestinal transit time in Podocnemis unifilis troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Podocnemididae. - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i4.5082

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Moraes Machado Brito

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyzed the radiographic anatomy and determined the gastrointestinal transit time of Podocnemis unifilis. We used ten animals belonging to LAPAS from the Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The animals were orally fed with a barium sulphate suspension at 10 mL kg-1 mixed with mineral oil, at a ratio of 70% of barium sulphate for 30% of mineral oil. Afterwards, the animals underwent radiography in a dorsum ventriloquoal position, with the X-ray device adjusted at 72 Kv and 200 mA, in time intervals to follow the permanency of contrast in the organism. Five minutes after the contrast was supplied, the stomach was filled. After sixteen hours the contrast advanced to the small intestine. In 48 hours, the whole small intestine and part of the colon were fulfilled. On the 9th day the stomach was empty and the contrast advanced to the colon. On the 11 th day, the colon was totally fulfilled, and the contrast was close to cloaca. On the 18th day all contrast was eliminated by the animal. Total time for contrast elimination was, in average, 17.6 ± 2.4 days, with the minimum of 12 and maximum of 22 days, with temperature at 27°C. The digestion of the food was slower in the duodenum, and faster in the colon-rectum, which presents lower indices of repletion.The present study analyzed the radiographic anatomy and determined the gastrointestinal transit time of Podocnemis unifilis. We used ten animals belonging to LAPAS from the Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The animals were orally fed with a barium sulphate suspension at 10 mL kg-1 mixed with mineral oil, at a ratio of 70% of barium sulphate for 30% of mineral oil. Afterwards, the animals underwent radiography in a dorsum ventriloquoal position, with the X-ray device adjusted at 72 Kv and 200 mA, in time intervals to follow the permanency of contrast in the organism. Five minutes after the contrast was supplied, the stomach was filled. After sixteen hours the contrast advanced to the small intestine. In 48 hours, the whole small intestine and part of the colon were fulfilled. On the 9th day the stomach was empty and the contrast advanced to the colon. On the 11 th day, the colon was totally fulfilled, and the contrast was close to cloaca. On the 18th day all contrast was eliminated by the animal. Total time for contrast elimination was, in average, 17.6 ± 2.4 days, with the minimum of 12 and maximum of 22 days, with temperature at 27°C. The digestion of the food was slower in the duodenum, and faster in the colon-rectum, which presents lower indices of repletion.

  9. Hotter nests produce hatchling lizards with lower thermal tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayananda, Buddhi; Murray, Brad R; Webb, Jonathan K

    2017-06-15

    In many regions, the frequency and duration of summer heatwaves is predicted to increase in future. Hotter summers could result in higher temperatures inside lizard nests, potentially exposing embryos to thermally stressful conditions during development. Potentially, developmentally plastic shifts in thermal tolerance could allow lizards to adapt to climate warming. To determine how higher nest temperatures affect the thermal tolerance of hatchling geckos, we incubated eggs of the rock-dwelling velvet gecko, Amalosia lesueurii , at two fluctuating temperature regimes to mimic current nest temperatures (mean 23.2°C, range 10-33°C, 'cold') and future nest temperatures (mean 27.0°C, range 14-37°C, 'hot'). Hatchlings from the hot incubation group hatched 27 days earlier and had a lower critical thermal maximum (CT max 38.7°C) and a higher critical thermal minimum (CT min 6.2°C) than hatchlings from cold incubation group (40.2 and 5.7°C, respectively). In the field, hatchlings typically settle under rocks near communal nests. During the hatching period, rock temperatures ranged from 13 to 59°C, and regularly exceeded the CT max of both hot- and cold-incubated hatchlings. Because rock temperatures were so high, the heat tolerance of lizards had little effect on their ability to exploit rocks as retreat sites. Instead, the timing of hatching dictated whether lizards could exploit rocks as retreat sites; that is, cold-incubated lizards that hatched later encountered less thermally stressful environments than earlier hatching hot-incubated lizards. In conclusion, we found no evidence that CT max can shift upwards in response to higher incubation temperatures, suggesting that hotter summers may increase the vulnerability of lizards to climate warming. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Karyotypic characterization of Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines: Emydidae) and Chelonoidis (Geochelone) donosobarrosi (Testudines: Testudinidae), two species of Cryptodiran turtles from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Pablo A; Boeris, Juan M; Sánchez, Julieta; Pastori, María C; Bolzán, Alejandro D; Ledesma, Mario A

    2009-12-01

    We describe for the first time the karyotypes of two species of Cryptodiran turtles from Argentina, namely, Trachemys dorbigni (Emydidae) and Chelonoidis (Geochelone) donosobarrosi (Testudinidae). The karyotype of T. dorbigni (2n = 50) consists of 13 pairs of macrochromosomes and 12 pairs of microchromosomes, whereas the karyotype of C. donosobarrosi (2n = 52) consists of 11 pairs of macrochromosomes and 15 pairs of microchromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a (TTAGGG)n telomeric probe showed that the chromosomes of these species have four telomeric signals, two at each end, indicating that none of the chromosomes of T. dorbigni and C. donosobarrosi are telocentric. The fact that no interstitial telomeric signals were observed after FISH, suggests that interstitial telomeric sequences did not have a major role in the chromosomal evolution of these species. Additional data will be needed to elucidate if interstitial telomeric sequences have a major role in the karyotypic evolution of Testudines.

  11. Asynchronous emergence by loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J D; Hays, G C

    2001-03-01

    For many decades it has been accepted that marine turtle hatchlings from the same nest generally emerge from the sand together. However, for loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nesting on the Greek Island of Kefalonia, a more asynchronous pattern of emergence has been documented. By placing temperature loggers at the top and bottom of nests laid on Kefalonia during 1998, we examined whether this asynchronous emergence was related to the thermal conditions within nests. Pronounced thermal variation existed not only between, but also within, individual nests. These within-nest temperature differences were related to the patterns of hatchling emergence, with hatchlings from nests displaying large thermal ranges emerging over a longer time-scale than those characterised by more uniform temperatures. In many egg-laying animals, parental care of the offspring may continue while the eggs are incubating and also after they have hatched. Consequently, the importance of the nest site for determining incubation conditions may be reduced since the parents themselves may alter the local environment. By contrast, in marine turtles, parental care ceases once the eggs have been laid and the nest site covered. The positioning of the nest site, in both space and time, may therefore have profound effects for marine turtles by affecting, for example, the survival of the eggs and hatchlings as well as their sex (Janzen and Paukstis 1991). During incubation, sea turtle embryos grow from a few cells at oviposition to a self-sufficient organism at hatching some 50-80 days later (Ackerman 1997). After hatching, the young turtles dig up through the sand and emerge typically en masse at the surface 1-7 nights later, with a number of stragglers following over the next few nights (Christens 1990). This contrasts with the frequently observed pattern of hatching asynchrony in birds. It has been suggested that the cause of mass emergence in turtles is that eggs within a clutch are fertilised

  12. Perflurooctanoic acid induces developmental cardiotoxicity in chicken embryos and hatchlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qixiao; Lust, Robert M.; Strynar, Mark J.; Dagnino, Sonia; DeWitt, Jamie C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► PFOA exposure thinned right ventricular wall thickness in D19 chicken embryo hearts. ► PFOA exposure induced left ventricle hypertrophy in hearts of hatchling chickens. ► PFOA exposure induced altered cardiac function in hatchling chickens. -- Abstract: Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα). As the cardiovascular system is crucial for embryonic survival, PFOA-induced effects on the heart may partially explain embryonic mortality. To assess impacts of PFOA exposure on the developing heart in an avian model, we used histopathology and immunohistochemical staining for myosin to assess morphological alterations in 19-day-old chicken embryo hearts after PFOA exposure. Additionally, echocardiography and cardiac myofibril ATPase activity assays were used to assess functional alterations in 1-day-old hatchling chickens following developmental PFOA exposure. Overall thinning and thinning of a dense layer of myosin in the right ventricular wall were observed in PFOA-exposed chicken embryo hearts. Alteration of multiple cardiac structural and functional parameters, including left ventricular wall thickness, left ventricular volume, heart rate, stroke volume, and ejection fraction were detected with echocardiography in the exposed hatchling chickens. Assessment of ATPase activity indicated that the ratio of cardiac myofibril calcium-independent ATPase activity to calcium-dependent ATPase activity was not affected, which suggests that developmental PFOA exposure may not affect cardiac energetics. In summary, structural and functional characteristics of the heart appear to be developmental targets of PFOA, possibly at the level of cardiomyocytes. Additional studies will

  13. Determinants of habitat selection by hatchling Australian freshwater crocodiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchira Somaweera

    Full Text Available Animals almost always use habitats non-randomly, but the costs and benefits of using specific habitat types remain unknown for many types of organisms. In a large lake in northwestern Australia (Lake Argyle, most hatchling (<12-month-old freshwater crocodiles (Crocodylus johnstoni are found in floating vegetation mats or grassy banks rather than the more widely available open banks. Mean body sizes of young crocodiles did not differ among the three habitat types. We tested four potential explanations for non-random habitat selection: proximity to nesting sites, thermal conditions, food availability, and exposure to predation. The three alternative habitat types did not differ in proximity to nesting sites, or in thermal conditions. Habitats with higher food availability harboured more hatchlings, and feeding rates (obtained by stomach-flushing of recently-captured crocodiles were highest in such areas. Predation risk may also differ among habitats: we were twice as likely to capture a crocodile after seeing it in open-bank sites than in the other two habitat types. Thus, habitat selection of hatchling crocodiles in this system may be driven both by prey availability and by predation risk.

  14. Determinants of Habitat Selection by Hatchling Australian Freshwater Crocodiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaweera, Ruchira; Webb, Jonathan K.; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Animals almost always use habitats non-randomly, but the costs and benefits of using specific habitat types remain unknown for many types of organisms. In a large lake in northwestern Australia (Lake Argyle), most hatchling (banks rather than the more widely available open banks. Mean body sizes of young crocodiles did not differ among the three habitat types. We tested four potential explanations for non-random habitat selection: proximity to nesting sites, thermal conditions, food availability, and exposure to predation. The three alternative habitat types did not differ in proximity to nesting sites, or in thermal conditions. Habitats with higher food availability harboured more hatchlings, and feeding rates (obtained by stomach-flushing of recently-captured crocodiles) were highest in such areas. Predation risk may also differ among habitats: we were twice as likely to capture a crocodile after seeing it in open-bank sites than in the other two habitat types. Thus, habitat selection of hatchling crocodiles in this system may be driven both by prey availability and by predation risk. PMID:22163308

  15. Locomotor activity during the frenzy swim: analysing early swimming behaviour in hatchling sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla M; Booth, David T; Limpus, Colin J

    2011-12-01

    Swimming effort of hatchling sea turtles varies across species. In this study we analysed how swim thrust is produced in terms of power stroke rate, mean maximum thrust per power stroke and percentage of time spent power stroking throughout the first 18 h of swimming after entering the water, in both loggerhead and flatback turtle hatchlings and compared this with previous data from green turtle hatchlings. Loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings had similar power stroke rates and percentage of time spent power stroking throughout the trial, although mean maximum thrust was always significantly higher in green hatchlings, making them the most vigorous swimmers in our three-species comparison. Flatback hatchlings, however, were different from the other two species, with overall lower values in all three swimming variables. Their swimming effort dropped significantly during the first 2 h and kept decreasing significantly until the end of the trial at 18 h. These results support the hypothesis that ecological factors mould the swimming behaviour of hatchling sea turtles, with predator pressure being important in determining the strategy used to swim offshore. Loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings seem to adopt an intensely vigorous and energetically costly frenzy swim that would quickly take them offshore into the open ocean in order to reduce their exposure to near-shore aquatic predators. Flatback hatchlings, however, are restricted in geographic distribution and remain within the continental shelf region where predator pressure is probably relatively constant. For this reason, flatback hatchlings might use only part of their energy reserves during a less vigorous frenzy phase, with lower overall energy expenditure during the first day compared with loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings.

  16. TEMPERATURE SELECTION BY HATCHLING AND YEARLING FLORIDA RED-BELLIED TURTLES (PSEUDEMYS NELSONI) IN THERMAL GRADIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We tested hatchling and yearling Florida red-bellied turtles (Pseudemys nelsoni) in laboratory thermal gradient chambers to determine if they would prefer particular temperatures. Most 1995 hatchlings selected the highest temperature zone of 27degrees C (Test 1) and 30 degrees ...

  17. Maternal effects of egg size on emu Dromaius novaehollandiae egg composition and hatchling phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzialowski, Edward M; Sotherland, Paul R

    2004-02-01

    Parental investment in eggs and, consequently, in offspring can profoundly influence the phenotype, survival and ultimately evolutionary fitness of an organism. Avian eggs are excellent model systems to examine maternal allocation of energy translated through egg size variation. We used the natural range in emu Dromaius novaehollandiae egg size, from 400 g to >700 g, to examine the influence of maternal investment in eggs on the morphology and physiology of hatchlings. Female emus provisioned larger eggs with a greater absolute amount of energy, nutrients and water in the yolk and albumen. Variation in maternal investment was reflected in differences in hatchling size, which increased isometrically with egg size. Egg size also influenced the physiology of developing emu embryos, such that late-term embryonic metabolic rate was positively correlated with egg size and embryos developing in larger eggs consumed more yolk during development. Large eggs produced hatchlings that were both heavier (yolk-free wet and dry mass) and structurally larger (tibiotarsus and culmen lengths) than hatchlings emerging from smaller eggs. As with many other precocial birds, larger hatchlings also contained more water, which was reflected in a greater blood volume. However, blood osmolality, hemoglobin content and hematocrit did not vary with hatchling mass. Emu maternal investment in offspring, measured by egg size and composition, is significantly correlated with the morphology and physiology of hatchlings and, in turn, may influence the success of these organisms during the first days of the juvenile stage.

  18. Variação morfológica e populacional de Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae) no extremo sul do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Melise Lucas

    2014-01-01

    A presente dissertação, intitulada “Variação Morfológica e populacional de Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae) no extremo sul do Brasil”, encontra-se organizada em dois artigos. O primeiro artigo, intitulado “Variação geográfica na morfologia e estrutura populacional de Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae) no extremo sul do Brasil” e o segundo artigo, com o título: “Irregularidades no padrão de escudos de Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae): ontogenia e variação espacial”. Es...

  19. MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION IN HATCHLING AMERICAN ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) FROM THREE FLORIDA LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphological variation of 508 hatchling alligators from three lakes in north central Florida (Lakes Woodruff, Apopka, and Orange) was analyzed using multivariate statistics. Morphological variation was found among clutches as well as among lakes. Principal components analysis wa...

  20. RESPONSE OF HATCHLING AND YEARLING TURTLES TO THERMAL GRADIENTS: COMPARISON OF CHELYDRA SERPENTINA AND TRACHEMYS SCRIPTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    In laboratory test, young Chelydra serpentina and Trachemys scripta altered their distribution in the presence of a temperature gradient. Selection of temperatures in the gradient for hatchlings and yearlings showed that body temperature (Tbs) of C. serpentina were lower tha...

  1. Estrutura populacional, razão sexual e abundância de Podocnemis sextuberculata (Testudines, Podocnemididae na Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Mamirauá, Amazonas, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Fachín-Terán

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied turtles in the focal area of the Reserva de Desenvolvimento Sustentável Mamirauá from September 1996 through August 1998. The reserve is located in the western part of the Brazilian Amazon, between the Japurá, Solimões, and Auti-Paraná rivers, near the city of Tefé, in the state of Amazonas. In this study the population structure, sex ratio and abundance of Podocnemis sextuberculata were investigated. We intensively studied the population of turtles in the Jarauá river basin in order to determine population structure. We sampled turtles in different sectors in the focal area of the reserve for one month each year during July and August of 1997 and 1998. We captured the turtles using flag gill nets and trammel nets. The type of net and the size of the nets used influenced the size of the turtles captured. The nets used by the local fishermen were sexually selective in the capture of the turtles. Sevent-two percent of the P. sextuberculata captured were adults; 13% juveniles and 14.7% subadults. During the second year of the study we found a lower density of turtles in the five areas wich we sampled each years. The sex ratio of captured P. sextuberculata was 1.87 males per female.

  2. Los huevos falsos (SAGs facilitan el comportamiento social de emergencia en las crías de la tortuga laúd Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Patiño-Martinez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La emergencia de las crías de tortuga laúd eclosionadas en los nidos profundos desde la arena hasta la superficie de la playa ocurre sin ayuda parental y es el primer gran desafío de supervivencia en su ciclo de vida. Este estudio, desarrollado en la costa Caribe colombiana, describe el comportamiento social de emergencia de neonatos y evalúa el efecto de la traslocación de los nidos en los patrones temporales de emergencia. Se propone por primera vez que el espacio liberado por la deshidratación de falsos huevos (SAGs en la nidada, representa una ventaja reproductiva al facilitar el agrupamiento de los neonatos en un espacio muy limitado y favorecer la sincronía de la emergencia. El tiempo medio registrado para la emergencia en grupo fue de 3.3 días, variando entre uno y seis días. La traslocación de los nidos no afectó el patrón temporal de emergencia que fue predominantemente nocturno (77.77% en nidos naturales y 81.65% en trasladados. Los picos máximos de emergencias a la superficie coincidieron con los periodos de menor temperatura ambiental exterior (22:00h-06:00h. La ventaja selectiva de este patrón temporal y de la emergencia sincrónica está probablemente relacionada con las mayores tasas de depredación y mortalidad por hipertermia observadas durante el día.False eggs (SAGs facilitate social post-hatching emergence behaviour in Leatherback turtles Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae nests. Hatchling emergence to the beach surface from deep sand nests occurs without parental care. Social behaviour among siblings is crucial to overcome this first challenge in sea turtles life. This study, carried out at the Caribbean coast of Colombia, describes the emergence social behaviour of hatchlings from eight nests, and assess the nests translocation effects on temporal patterns of emergence. For the first time, we propose that space released by dehydration of shelled albumen globes (SAGs at the top of the clutch

  3. Two new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Asian geoemydid turtles Kachuga tentoria and Melanochelys trijuga (Testudines: Geoemydidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Modrý, David

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2005), s. 9-13 ISSN 1252-607X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP524/03/D104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Eimeria * Apicomplexa * Testudines Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.844, year: 2005

  4. Eggs and hatchlings variations in desert locusts: phase related characteristics and starvation tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutaro Ould Maeno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Locusts are grasshopper species that express phase polyphenism: modifying their behavior, morphology, coloration, life history and physiology in response to crowding. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, epigenetically modify progeny quality and quantity in response to crowding. Gregarious (crowded females produce larger but fewer progeny than do solitarious (isolated ones. The variability of progeny quality within single egg pod and the reasons why gregarious progeny have a better survival than solitarious ones remains unclear. This study investigated 1 the effects of rearing density on the variation in egg size within single egg pods 2 the starvation tolerance of hatchlings from mothers with different phases and 3 the physiological differences in hatchling energy reserve. Isolated females produced smaller but more eggs than did crowded ones. The variation in egg size within egg pods was greater in the latter than in the former. A negative relationship between egg size and number of eggs per egg pod was observed for both groups. Under starvation conditions, gregarious hatchlings survived significantly longer than solitarious ones. Among the solitarious hatchlings, the survival time was longer as hatchling body size increased. However, small individuals survived as long as large ones among the gregarious hatchlings. The percentage of water content per fresh body weight was almost equal between the two phases, before and after starvation. In contrast, the percentage of lipid content per dry body weight was significantly higher in gregarious hatchlings than in solitarious ones before starvation, but became almost equal after starvation. These results demonstrated that female locusts not only trade-off to modify their progeny size and number, but also vary progenies’ energy reserves. We hypothesized that gregarious females enhance their fitness by producing progeny differently adapted to high environmental variability and particularly to

  5. Effects of Egg Incubation Methods on Locomotor Performances of Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) Hatchlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Uzair Rusli; Joseph, J.; Hock-Chark, L.; Zainudin Bachol

    2015-01-01

    Effects of different incubation methods on crawling and swimming ability of post-emergence green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchlings at Cherating (Kuantan, Pahang) and Chagar Hutang (Pulau Redang, Terengganu) Turtle Sanctuary were analysed during nesting season in 2009. Mean crawling speed of hatchlings incubated in styrofoam box, beach hatchery and in situ were at 0.042±0.008, 0.136±0.026 and 0.143±0.045 m/ s, respectively. Crawling performance of hatclings from styrofoam box can be improved by keeping them for at least 48 h after their emergence. For swimming performance, all types of incubation methods showed significant differences in mean power-stroke rate during their early swimming effort ranging at 93-114 strokes/ min. However, no correlation was found between morphological characteristics of hatchlings and swimming performance. The results from this study may give different perspective in evaluating hatchling production, which is in terms of hatchling morphological characteristics and their locomotor performance. (author)

  6. Nitrate induces a type 1 diabetic profile in alligator hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thea M; Hamlin, Heather J; Freymiller, Haley; Green, Stephen; Thurman, Jenna; Guillette, Louis J

    2018-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects 1 in 300 children by age 18. T1D is caused by inflammation-induced loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, leading to high blood glucose and a host of downstream complications. Although multiple genes are associated with T1D risk, only 5% of genetically susceptible individuals actually develop clinical disease. Moreover, a growing number of T1D cases occur in geographic clusters and among children with low risk genotypes. These observations suggest that environmental factors contribute to T1D etiology. One potential factor, supported primarily by epidemiological studies, is the presence of nitrate and nitrite in drinking water. To test this hypothesis, female hatchling alligators were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate in their tank water (reference, 10mg/L, or 100mg/L NO 3 -N) from hatch through 5 weeks or 5 months of age. At each time point, endpoints related to T1D were investigated: plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, testosterone, estradiol, and thyroxine; pancreas, fat body, and thyroid weights; weight gain or loss; presence of immune cells in the pancreas; and pancreatic beta cell number, assessed by antibody staining of nkx6.1 protein. Internal dosing of nitrate was confirmed by measuring plasma and urine nitrate levels and whole blood methemoglobin. Cluster analysis indicated that high nitrate exposure (most animals exposed to 100mg/L NO3-N and one alligator exposed to 10mg/L NO3-N) induced a profile of endpoints consistent with early T1D that could be detected after 5 weeks and was more strongly present after 5 months. Our study supports epidemiological data correlating elevated nitrate with T1D onset in humans, and highlights nitrate as a possible environmental contributor to the etiology of T1D, possibly through its role as a nitric oxide precursor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. AN ANALYSIS OF HATCHLING RESTING METABOLISM - IN SEARCH OF ECOLOGICAL CORRELATES THAT EXPLAIN DEVIATIONS FROM ALLOMETRIC RELATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLAASSEN, M; DRENT, R

    From data in the literature, an allometric equation is compiled for hatchling resting metabolic rate and an attempt is made to explain residual variation in terms of hatchling type, yolk and water content, embryonic and postnatal growth rate, and environmental circumstances (latitudinal

  8. The relationship between early growth and survival of hatchling saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus in captivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Brien

    Full Text Available Hatchling fitness in crocodilians is affected by "runtism" or failure to thrive syndrome (FTT in captivity. In this study, 300 hatchling C. porosus, artificially incubated at 32°C for most of their embryonic development, were raised in semi-controlled conditions, with growth criteria derived for the early detection of FTT (within 24 days. Body mass, four days after hatching (BM4d, was correlated with egg size and was highly clutch specific, while snout-vent length (SVL4d was much more variable within and between clutches. For the majority of hatchlings growth trajectories within the first 24 days continued to 90 days and could be used to predict FTT affliction up to 300 days, highlighting the importance of early growth. Growth and survival of hatchling C. porosus in captivity was not influenced by initial size (BM4d, with a slight tendency for smaller hatchlings to grow faster in the immediate post-hatching period. Strong clutch effects (12 clutches on affliction with FTT were apparent, but could not be explained by measured clutch variables or other factors. Among individuals not afflicted by FTT (N = 245, mean growth was highly clutch specific, and the variation could be explained by an interaction between clutch and season. FTT affliction was 2.5 times higher among clutches (N = 7 that hatched later in the year when mean minimum air temperatures were lower, compared with those clutches (N = 5 that hatched early in the year. The results of this study highlight the importance of early growth in hatchling C. porosus, which has implications for the captive management of this species.

  9. Warm water and cool nests are best. How global warming might influence hatchling green turtle swimming performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Booth

    Full Text Available For sea turtles nesting on beaches surrounded by coral reefs, the most important element of hatchling recruitment is escaping predation by fish as they swim across the fringing reef, and as a consequence hatchlings that minimize their exposure to fish predation by minimizing the time spent crossing the fringing reef have a greater chance of surviving the reef crossing. One way to decrease the time required to cross the fringing reef is to maximize swimming speed. We found that both water temperature and nest temperature influence swimming performance of hatchling green turtles, but in opposite directions. Warm water increases swimming ability, with hatchling turtles swimming in warm water having a faster stroke rate, while an increase in nest temperature decreases swimming ability with hatchlings from warm nests producing less thrust per stroke.

  10. Impacts of plastic ingestion on post-hatchling loggerhead turtles off South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter G; Cole, Georgina; Spiby, Kevin; Nel, Ronel; Osborne, Alexis; Perold, Vonica

    2016-06-15

    Twenty-four of 40 (60%) loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta post-hatchlings (carapaceTurtles selected for white (38%) and blue (19%) items, but translucent items (23%) were under-represented compared to beach mesodebris. Ingested loads did not decrease up to 52days in captivity, indicating long retention times. Plastic killed 11 turtles by blocking their digestive tracts or bladders, and contributed to the deaths of five other turtles. Our results indicate that the amount and diversity of plastic ingested by post-hatchling loggerhead turtles off South Africa have increased over the last four decades, and now kill some turtles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intraspecific variations in Cyt b and D-loop sequences of Testudine species, Lissemys punctata from south Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    R. Lalitha; V.R. Chandavar

    2018-01-01

    The freshwater Testudine species have gained importance in recent years, as most of their population is threatened due to exploitation for delicacy and pet trade. In this regard, Lissemys punctata, a freshwater terrapin, predominantly distributed in Asian countries has gained its significance for the study. A pilot study report on mitochondrial markers (Cyt b and D-loop) conducted on L. punctata species from southern Karnataka, India was presented in this investigation. A complete region span...

  12. Predation on tent tortoise and leopard tortoise hatchlings by the pale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predation by the pale chanting goshawk Melierax canorus on Psammobates tentorius and Geochelone pardalis hatchlings correlates with the habitat preference of these tortoise species as well as with the breeding pattern of P. tentorius. It is not known why the particularly abundant Chersìna angolata was not preyed upon.

  13. The geomagnetic environment in which sea turtle eggs incubate affects subsequent magnetic navigation behaviour of hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Davidoff, Kyla R; Mangiamele, Lisa A; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2014-09-22

    Loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings (Caretta caretta) use regional magnetic fields as open-ocean navigational markers during trans-oceanic migrations. Little is known, however, about the ontogeny of this behaviour. As a first step towards investigating whether the magnetic environment in which hatchlings develop affects subsequent magnetic orientation behaviour, eggs deposited by nesting female loggerheads were permitted to develop in situ either in the natural ambient magnetic field or in a magnetic field distorted by magnets placed around the nest. In orientation experiments, hatchlings that developed in the normal ambient field oriented approximately south when exposed to a field that exists near the northern coast of Portugal, a direction consistent with their migratory route in the northeastern Atlantic. By contrast, hatchlings that developed in a distorted magnetic field had orientation indistinguishable from random when tested in the same north Portugal field. No differences existed between the two groups in orientation assays involving responses to orbital movements of waves or sea-finding, neither of which involves magnetic field perception. These findings, to our knowledge, demonstrate for the first time that the magnetic environment present during early development can influence the magnetic orientation behaviour of a neonatal migratory animal. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Incubation Temperature during Fetal Development Influences Morphophysiological Characteristics and Preferred Ambient Temperature of Chicken Hatchlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane de Souza Morita

    Full Text Available Skin and feather characteristics, which play a critical role in body temperature maintenance, can be affected by incubation circumstances, such as incubation temperature. However, no study to date has assessed the influence of incubation temperature during the fetal stage on morphometric characteristics and vascular development of the skin, feather characteristics, and their relationship to hormone levels and preferred temperature in later life in chickens. Broiler breeder eggs were exposed to low (36°C, control (37.5°C, or high (39°C temperatures (treatments LT, CK, and HT, respectively from day 13 of incubation onward, because it is known that the endocrine axes are already established at this time. During this period, eggshell temperature of HT eggs (38.8±0.33°C was higher than of LT (37.4±0.08°C and CK eggs (37.8 ±0.15°C. The difference between eggshell and incubator air temperature diminished with the increasing incubation temperature, and was approximately zero for HT. HT hatchlings had higher surface temperature on the head, neck, and back, and thinner and more vascularized skin than did CK and LT hatchlings. No differences were found among treatments for body weight, total feather weight, number and length of barbs, barbule length, and plasma T4 concentration. LT hatchlings showed lower plasma T3 and GH, as well as lower T3/T4 ratio and decreased vascularity in the neck, back, and thigh skin compared to CK hatchlings. On the other hand, HT hatchlings had decreased skin thickness and increased vascularity, and preferred a higher ambient temperature compared to CK and HT hatchlings. In addition, for all treatments, surface temperature on the head was higher than of the other body regions. We conclude that changes in skin thickness and vascularity, as well as changes in thyroid and growth hormone levels, are the result of embryonic strategies to cope with higher or lower than normal incubation temperatures. Additionally exposure to

  15. Influence of artificial lights on the orientation of hatchlings of Eretmochelys imbricata in Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyara Noely Simões

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sea turtle hatchlings, in natural abiotic conditions, emerge from their nests at night and go directly to the sea, following the moonlight’s reflection in the ocean. Increased human activities such as tourism and artificial lights on the coasts, however, have interfered with the ability of sea turtle neonates to find their correct destination, negatively affecting their survival rates. Here we endeavored to assess the influence of artificial lights on the hatchlings of the sea turtle Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766 in the south coast of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. To that end, 10 experiments were conducted with 15 hatchlings/test subjects. Five experiments took place in artificially illuminated areas and five in non-illuminated areas. Circles with a 2 m radius were drawn on the sand a small 2-3 cm depression was made at the center of each circles. The neonates were then placed in the depressions to simulate their coming from a nest. After the neonates crossed the edge of the circles, their tracks were photographed and drawn on a diagram. To ascertain if the trajectories of the neonates differed between the two groups (hatchlings from illuminated versus non-illuminated nests, the Rayleigh test was used. The significance of those differences was tested using ANOVA. To evaluate similarities and significance of clusters, a Multi-Dimensional Scaling was used. The tracks of 86.67% (N = 65 of the hatchlings from nests at illuminated areas departed from their correct trajectory. The distribution of trajectories was considered random (V = 19.4895, p > 0.05 only for tracks originating from artificially illuminated areas. The movement patterns of hatchlings from illuminated and non-illuminated areas differed significantly (F < 0.0001, p < 0.01. Consistent with this, two distinct groups were identified, one from illuminated and one from non-illuminated areas. Therefore, we conclude that artificial illumination impacts the orientation

  16. Distribution and Diversity of Salmonella Strains in Shipments of Hatchling Poultry, United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habing, G G; Kessler, S E; Mollenkopf, D F; Wittum, T E; Anderson, T C; Barton Behravesh, C; Joseph, L A; Erdman, M M

    2015-08-01

    Multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with live poultry contact have been occurring with increasing frequency. In 2013, multistate outbreaks of salmonellosis were traced back to exposure to live poultry, some of which were purchased at a national chain of farm stores (Farm store chain Y). This study was conducted at 36 stores of Farm store chain Y and was concurrent with the timing of exposure for the human outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. We used environmental swabs of arriving shipment boxes of hatchling poultry and shipment tracking information to examine the distribution, diversity and anti-microbial resistance of non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) across farm stores and hatcheries. Isolates recovered from shipment boxes underwent serotyping, anti-microbial resistance (AMR) testing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Postal service tracking codes from the shipment boxes were used to determine the hatchery of origin. The PFGE patterns were compared with the PFGE patterns of NTS causing outbreaks of salmonellosis in 2013. A total of 219 hatchling boxes from 36 stores in 13 states were swabbed between 15 March 2013 and 18 April 2013. NTS were recovered from 59 (27%) of 219 hatchling boxes. Recovery was not significantly associated with species of hatchlings, number of birds in the shipment box, or the presence of dead, injured or sick birds. Four of the 23 PFGE patterns and 23 of 50 isolates were indistinguishable from strains causing human outbreaks in 2013. For serotypes associated with human illnesses, PFGE patterns most frequently recovered from shipment boxes were also more frequent causes of human illness. Boxes positive for the same PFGE pattern most frequently originated from the same mail-order hatchery. Only one of 59 isolates was resistant to anti-microbials used to treat Salmonella infections in people. This study provides critical information to address recurrent human outbreaks of salmonellosis associated with mail-order hatchling

  17. Effect of thermal acclimation on thermal preference, resistance and locomotor performance of hatchling soft-shelled turtle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Xian WU,Ling-Jun HU, Wei DANG, Hong-Liang LU, Wei-Guo DU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The significant influence of thermal acclimation on physiological and behavioral performance has been documented in many ectothermic animals, but such studies are still limited in turtle species. We acclimated hatchling soft-shelled turtles Pelodiscus sinensis under three thermal conditions (10, 20 and 30 °C for 4 weeks, and then measured selected body temperature (Tsel, critical thermal minimum (CTMin and maximum (CTMax, and locomotor performance at different body temperatures. Thermal acclimation significantly affected thermal preference and resistance of P. sinensis hatchlings. Hatchling turtles acclimated to 10 °C selected relatively lower body temperatures and were less resistant to high temperatures than those acclimated to 20 °C and 30 °C. The turtles’ resistance to low temperatures increased with a decreasing acclimation temperature. The thermal resistance range (i.e. the difference between CTMax and CTMin, TRR was widest in turtles acclimated to 20 °C, and narrowest in those acclimated to 10 °C. The locomotor performance of turtles was affected by both body temperature and acclimation temperature. Hatchling turtles acclimated to relatively higher temperatures swam faster than did those acclimated to lower temperatures. Accordingly, hatchling turtles acclimated to a particular temperature may not enhance the performance at that temperature. Instead, hatchlings acclimated to relatively warm temperatures have a better performance, supporting the “hotter is better” hypothesis [Current Zoology 59 (6 : 718–724, 2013 ].

  18. Comparing Acoustic Tag Attachments Designed for Mobile Tracking of Hatchling Sea Turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Hoover, Aimee L.; Shillinger, George L.; Swiggs, Jennifer; Bailey, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The poorly understood movements of sea turtles during the “lost years” of their early life history have been characterized as a “passive drifter” stage. Biologging technology allows us to study patterns of dispersal, but the small body size of young life stages requires particular consideration that such tagging does not significantly impede animal movements. We tested the effect of instrument attachment methods for mobile acoustic tracking of hatchling sea turtles, including a design that wo...

  19. Optimal husbandry of hatchling Eastern Indigo Snakes (Drymarchon couperi) during a captive head-start program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wines, Michael P; Johnson, Valerie M; Lock, Brad; Antonio, Fred; Godwin, James C; Rush, Elizabeth M; Guyer, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Optimal husbandry techniques are desirable for any headstart program, but frequently are unknown for rare species. Here we describe key reproductive variables and determine optimal incubation temperature and diet diversity for Eastern Indigo Snakes (Drymarchon couperi) grown in laboratory settings. Optimal incubation temperature was estimated from two variables dependent on temperature, shell dimpling, a surrogate for death from fungal infection, and deviation of an egg from an ovoid shape, a surrogate for death from developmental anomalies. Based on these relationships and size at hatching we determined optimal incubation temperature to be 26°C. Additionally, we used incubation data to assess the effect of temperature on duration of incubation and size of hatchlings. We also examined hatchling diets necessary to achieve optimal growth over a 21-month period. These snakes exhibited a positive linear relationship between total mass eaten and growth rate, when individuals were fed less than 1711 g of prey, and displayed constant growth for individuals exceeding 1711 g of prey. Similarly, growth rate increased linearly with increasing diet diversity up to a moderately diverse diet, followed by constant growth for higher levels of diet diversity. Of the two components of diet diversity, diet evenness played a stronger role than diet richness in explaining variance in hatchling growth. These patterns document that our goal of satiating snakes was achieved for some individuals but not others and that diets in which total grams consumed over the first 21 months of life is distributed equivalently among at least three prey genera yielded the fastest growth rates for hatchling snakes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Composition and metabolism of phospholipids in Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Diana B; Acosta, Nieves G; Almansa, Eduardo; Tocher, Douglas R; Andrade, José P; Sykes, António V; Rodríguez, Covadonga

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterise the fatty acid (FA) profiles of the major phospholipids, of Octopus vulgaris and Sepia officinalis hatchlings, namely phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE); and to evaluate the capability of both cephalopod species on dietary phospholipid remodelling. Thus, O. vulgaris and S. officinalis hatchlings were in vivo incubated with 0.3μM of L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PC or L-∝-1-palmitoyl-2-[1-(14)C]arachidonyl-PE. Octopus and cuttlefish hatchlings phospholipids showed a characteristic FA profiles with PC presenting high contents of 16:0 and 22:6n-3 (DHA); PS having high 18:0, DHA and 20:5n-3 (EPA); PI a high content of saturated FA; and PE showing high contents of DHA and EPA. Interestingly, the highest content of 20:4n-6 (ARA) was found in PE rather than PI. Irrespective of the phospholipid in which [1-(14)C]ARA was initially bound (either PC or PE), the esterification pattern of [1-(14)C]ARA in octopus lipids was similar to that found in their tissues with high esterification of this FA into PE. In contrast, in cuttlefish hatchlings [1-(14)C]ARA was mainly recovered in the same phospholipid that was provided. These results showed a characteristic FA profiles in the major phospholipids of the two species, as well as a contrasting capability to remodel dietary phospholipids, which may suggest a difference in phospholipase activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predation upon hatchling dinosaurs by a new snake from the late Cretaceous of India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Wilson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Derived large-mouthed snakes (macrostomatans possess numerous specializations in their skull and lower jaws that allow them to consume large vertebrate prey. In contrast, basal snakes lack these adaptations and feed primarily on small prey items. The sequence of osteological and behavioral modifications involved in the evolution of the macrostomatan condition has remained an open question because of disagreement about the origin and interrelationships of snakes, the paucity of well-preserved early snake fossils on many continental landmasses, and the lack of information about the feeding ecology of early snakes. We report on a partial skeleton of a new 3.5-m-long snake, Sanajeh indicus gen. et sp. nov., recovered from Upper Cretaceous rocks of western India. S. indicus was fossilized in association with a sauropod dinosaur egg clutch, coiled around an egg and adjacent to the remains of a ca. 0.5-m-long hatchling. Multiple snake-egg associations at the site strongly suggest that S. indicus frequented nesting grounds and preyed on hatchling sauropods. We interpret this pattern as "ethofossil" preservation of feeding behavior. S. indicus lacks specializations of modern egg-eaters and of macrostomatans, and skull and vertebral synapomorphies place it in an intermediate position in snake phylogeny. Sanajeh and its large-bodied madtsoiid sister taxa Yurlunggur camfieldensis and Wonambi naracoortensis from the Neogene of Australia show specializations for intraoral prey transport but lack the adaptations for wide gape that characterize living macrostomatan snakes. The Dholi Dungri fossils are the second definitive association between sauropod eggs and embryonic or hatchling remains. New fossils from western India provide direct evidence of feeding ecology in a Mesozoic snake and demonstrate predation risks for hatchling sauropod dinosaurs. Our results suggest that large body size and jaw mobility afforded some non-macrostomatan snakes a greater

  2. Experimentally derived salinity tolerance of hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) from the Everglades, Florida (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kristen M.; Schofield, Pamela J.; Gregoire, Denise R.

    2012-01-01

    In a laboratory setting, we tested the ability of 24 non-native, wild-caught hatchling Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) collected in the Florida Everglades to survive when given water containing salt to drink. After a one-month acclimation period in the laboratory, we grouped snakes into three treatments, giving them access to water that was fresh (salinity of 0, control), brackish (salinity of 10), or full-strength sea water (salinity of 35). Hatchlings survived about one month at the highest marine salinity and about five months at the brackish-water salinity; no control animals perished during the experiment. These results are indicative of a "worst-case scenario", as in the laboratory we denied access to alternate fresh-water sources that may be accessible in the wild (e.g., through rainfall). Therefore, our results may underestimate the potential of hatchling pythons to persist in saline habitats in the wild. Because of the effect of different salinity regimes on survival, predictions of ultimate geographic expansion by non-native Burmese pythons that consider salt water as barriers to dispersal for pythons may warrant re-evaluation, especially under global climate change and associated sea-level-rise scenarios.

  3. A 21-year study of seasonal and interspecific variation of hatchling emergence in a nearctic freshwater turtle community: to overwinter or not to overwinter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ernst, Carl H.; Ernst, Evelyn M.; Riley, Julia L.

    2014-01-01

    Hatchling emergence patterns were studied in a community of six species of freshwater turtles in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. including: Chelydra serpentina, Chrysemys picta, Clemmys guttata, Glyptemys insculpta, G. muhlenbergii, and Sternotherus odoratus. Data were collected every year from 1965 to 1985 on estimated date of emergence, carapace length, April – May precipitation, August – September precipitation, annual precipitation, and low temperature and occurrence of precipitation during the 24-hrs prior to the time of each hatchling detection (n = 806). Chelydra serpentina, Ch. picta, and Cl. guttata hatchlings have a facultative delayed emergence strategy. The other species (G. insculpta, G. muhlenbergii, and S. odoratus) appear to be obligate early emergers, with the exception of one hatchling G. muhlenbergii that delayed emergence. Early emergence occurred in some species every year except 1973, the year following intense flooding and nest destruction associated with a major hurricane. However, the majority of hatchlings delayed emergence until the year following oviposition. Mean estimated calendar day of emergence varied annually in C. serpentina and Ch. picta. The same variable also varied among species for comparisons of both early and delayed emergence. Chelydra serpentina hatchlings emerged earlier than all other species whether they used an early or delayed strategy. Carapace length of Ch. picta hatchlings varied significantly among years and C. serpentina hatchlings that delayed emergence were significantly larger in carapace length than those that emerged early. Seasonal and previous 24-hr precipitation had varying effects on the number of emerging hatchlings, but August – September precipitation in one year had a strong correlation with the number of hatchlings that delayed emergence until the following spring. The number of hatchlings detected peaked at a previous 24-hour air temperature of about 12°C for both early and late

  4. Phylogenetic relationships among the species of the genus testudo (Testudines : Testudinidae) inferred from mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Ph Ballasina, Donato L.; Dekker, John T.; Maas, Jolanda; Willemsen, Ronald E.; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    To test phylogenetic relationships within the genus Testudo (Testudines: Testudinidae), we have sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial (mt) 12S rRNA gene of 98 tortoise specimens belonging to the genera Testudo, Indotestudo, and Geochelone. Maximum likelihood and neighbor-joining methods identify

  5. Sensory signals and neuronal groups involved in guiding the sea-ward motor behavior in turtle hatchlings of Chelonia agassizi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, A. L.; Camarena, V.; Ochoa, G.; Urrutia, J.; Gutierrez, G.

    2007-05-01

    Turtle hatchlings orient display sea-ward oriented movements as soon as they emerge from the nest. Although most studies have emphasized the role of the visual information in this process, less attention has been paid to other sensory modalities. Here, we evaluated the nature of sensory cues used by turtle hatchlings of Chelonia agassizi to orient their movements towards the ocean. We recorded the time they took to crawl from the nest to the beach front (120m long) in control conditions and in visually, olfactory and magnetically deprived circumstances. Visually-deprived hatchlings displayed a high degree of disorientation. Olfactory deprivation and magnetic field distortion impaired, but not abolished, sea-ward oriented movements. With regard to the neuronal mapping experiments, visual deprivation reduced dramatically c-fos expression in the whole brain. Hatchlings with their nares blocked revealed neurons with c-fos expression above control levels principally in the c and d areas, while those subjected to magnetic field distortion had a wide spread activation of neurons throughout the brain predominantly in the dorsal ventricular ridge The present results support that Chelonia agassizi hatchlings use predominantly visual cues to orient their movements towards the sea. Olfactory and magnetic cues may also be use but their influence on hatchlings oriented motor behavior is not as clear as it is for vision. This conclusion is supported by the fact that in the absence of olfactory and magnetic cues, the brain turns on the expression of c- fos in neuronal groups that, in the intact hatchling, are not normally involved in accomplishing the task.

  6. Amphibious auditory evoked potentials in four North American Testudines genera spanning the aquatic-terrestrial spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyl, Jeffrey N; Johnston, Carol E

    2015-10-01

    Animals exhibit unique hearing adaptations in relation to the habitat media in which they reside. This study was a comparative analysis of auditory specialization in relation to habitat medium in Testudines, a taxon that includes both highly aquatic and fully terrestrial members. Evoked potential audiograms were collected in four species groups representing diversity along the aquatic-terrestrial spectrum: terrestrial and fossorial Gopherus polyphemus, terrestrial Terrapene carolina carolina, and aquatic Trachemys scripta and Sternotherus (S. odoratus and S. minor). Additionally, underwater sensitivity was tested in T. c. carolina, T. scripta, and Sternotherus with tympana submerged just below the water surface. In aerial audiograms, T. c. carolina were most sensitive, with thresholds 18 dB lower than Sternotherus. At 100-300 Hz, thresholds in T. c. carolina, G. polyphemus, and T. scripta were similar to each other. At 400-800 Hz, G. polyphemus thresholds were elevated to 11 dB above T. c. carolina. The underwater audiograms of T. c. carolina, T. scripta, and Sternotherus were similar. The results suggest aerial hearing adaptations in emydids and high-frequency hearing loss associated with seismic vibration detection in G. polyphemus. The underwater audiogram of T. c. carolina could reflect retention of ancestral aquatic auditory function.

  7. Short telomeres in hatchling snakes: erythrocyte telomere dynamics and longevity in tropical pythons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Beata; Madsen, Thomas

    2009-10-16

    Telomere length (TL) has been found to be associated with life span in birds and humans. However, other studies have demonstrated that TL does not affect survival among old humans. Furthermore, replicative senescence has been shown to be induced by changes in the protected status of the telomeres rather than the loss of TL. In the present study we explore whether age- and sex-specific telomere dynamics affect life span in a long-lived snake, the water python (Liasis fuscus). Erythrocyte TL was measured using the Telo TAGGG TL Assay Kit (Roche). In contrast to other vertebrates, TL of hatchling pythons was significantly shorter than that of older snakes. However, during their first year of life hatchling TL increased substantially. While TL of older snakes decreased with age, we did not observe any correlation between TL and age in cross-sectional sampling. In older snakes, female TL was longer than that of males. When using recapture as a proxy for survival, our results do not support that longer telomeres resulted in an increased water python survival/longevity. In fish high telomerase activity has been observed in somatic cells exhibiting high proliferation rates. Hatchling pythons show similar high somatic cell proliferation rates. Thus, the increase in TL of this group may have been caused by increased telomerase activity. In older humans female TL is longer than that of males. This has been suggested to be caused by high estrogen levels that stimulate increased telomerase activity. Thus, high estrogen levels may also have caused the longer telomeres in female pythons. The lack of correlation between TL and age among old snakes and the fact that longer telomeres did not appear to affect python survival do not support that erythrocyte telomere dynamics has a major impact on water python longevity.

  8. Short telomeres in hatchling snakes: erythrocyte telomere dynamics and longevity in tropical pythons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Ujvari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomere length (TL has been found to be associated with life span in birds and humans. However, other studies have demonstrated that TL does not affect survival among old humans. Furthermore, replicative senescence has been shown to be induced by changes in the protected status of the telomeres rather than the loss of TL. In the present study we explore whether age- and sex-specific telomere dynamics affect life span in a long-lived snake, the water python (Liasis fuscus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Erythrocyte TL was measured using the Telo TAGGG TL Assay Kit (Roche. In contrast to other vertebrates, TL of hatchling pythons was significantly shorter than that of older snakes. However, during their first year of life hatchling TL increased substantially. While TL of older snakes decreased with age, we did not observe any correlation between TL and age in cross-sectional sampling. In older snakes, female TL was longer than that of males. When using recapture as a proxy for survival, our results do not support that longer telomeres resulted in an increased water python survival/longevity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In fish high telomerase activity has been observed in somatic cells exhibiting high proliferation rates. Hatchling pythons show similar high somatic cell proliferation rates. Thus, the increase in TL of this group may have been caused by increased telomerase activity. In older humans female TL is longer than that of males. This has been suggested to be caused by high estrogen levels that stimulate increased telomerase activity. Thus, high estrogen levels may also have caused the longer telomeres in female pythons. The lack of correlation between TL and age among old snakes and the fact that longer telomeres did not appear to affect python survival do not support that erythrocyte telomere dynamics has a major impact on water python longevity.

  9. The relationship between gut contents and supercooling capacity in hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Gary C; Packard, Mary J

    2006-05-01

    Painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) typically spend their first winter of life in a shallow, subterranean hibernaculum (the natal nest) where they seemingly withstand exposure to ice and cold by resisting freezing and becoming supercooled. However, turtles ingest soil and fragments of eggshell as they are hatching from their eggs, and the ingestate usually contains efficient nucleating agents that cause water to freeze at high subzero temperatures. Consequently, neonatal painted turtles have only a modest ability to undergo supercooling in the period immediately after hatching. We studied the limit for supercooling (SCP) in hatchlings that were acclimating to different thermal regimes and then related SCPs of the turtles to the amount of particulate matter in their gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Turtles that were transferred directly from 26 degrees C (the incubation temperature) to 2 degrees C did not purge soil from their gut, and SCPs for these animals remained near -4 degrees C for the 60 days of the study. Animals that were held at 26 degrees C for the duration of the experiment usually cleared soil from their GI tract within 24 days, but SCPs for these turtles were only slightly lower after 60 days than they were at the outset of the experiment. Hatchlings that were acclimating slowly to 2 degrees C cleared soil from their gut within 24 days and realized a modest reduction in their SCP. However, the limit of supercooling in the slowly acclimating animals continued to decline even after all particulate material had been removed from their GI tract, thereby indicating that factors intrinsic to the nucleating agents themselves also may have been involved in the acclimation of hatchlings to low temperature. The lowest SCPs for turtles that were acclimating slowly to 2 degrees C were similar to SCPs recorded in an earlier study of animals taken from natural nests in late autumn, so the current findings affirm the importance of seasonally declining temperatures in

  10. Investigating the effect of in ovo injection of silver nanoparticles on fat uptake and development in broiler and layer hatchlings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, Lane Manalili; Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    consumption, CO2 production, and heat production, HP), fat uptake, and the development of broiler and layer hatchlings. AgNano concentrations (50, 75, and 100¿mg/kg) were injected in ovo at day 1 of incubation to different breeds of broiler and layer chicken embryos. Oxygen consumption and subsequently FU did......Nano affected metabolic rate and FU; however, it did not influence the development of hatchlings. This suggests that in ovo injection of AgNano reduces the need to use yolk fat as an energy source during embryonic development and consequently the remaining fat in the residual yolk sac may provide a potent...

  11. Effect of Increasing Yolk Testosterone Levels on Early Behaviour in Japanese Quail Hatchlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Okuliarová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate effects of increased testosterone content in egg yolk on early behaviour of 1- and 2-day-old Japanese quail. Three different doses of testosterone (0.25; 2.5 and 25 ng, not exceeding a physiological range, were examined in three separate experiments. Testosterone propionate dissolved in 20 μl olive oil was injected into the yolk before the onset of incubation. Behaviour of newly hatched chicks was recorded in response to both a novel environment in the open-field test and manual restraining in the test of tonic immobility (TI. Behavioural consequences of embryonic exposure to elevated testosterone were observed in the open-field test in all three experiments which indicated inhibition of behavioural responses in hatchlings. Birds treated with testosterone in ovo displayed longer latency to leave the start square, decreased locomotor activity, enhanced defecation and lower number of distress calls as compared to control birds. In TI test, the influence of treatment was manifested at the highest concentration only. Hatchlings from testosterone treated eggs expressed longer duration of TI and required less attempts to induce TI in comparison with the control group. Our results demonstrated increased fearfulness of Japanese quail chicks hatched from eggs with experimentally elevated testosterone content. The effect is specific for a short period after hatching since previous studies reported stimulatory effect of yolk testosterone on behaviour of Japanese quail later in ontogeny.

  12. Interanal seam loss in Asian turtles of the Cuora flavomarginata complex (Testudines, Geoemydidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Carl H.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    The taxonomy of Asian box turtles of the genus Cuora is complicated by the description of numerous valid and invalid taxa over the last several decades. However, some characteristics used to differentiate species are questionable. Members of the C. flavomarginata complex are defined by some, but not all, taxonomists as having reduced interanal seam lengths relative to other species. We examined the ratio of interanal scute seam length divided by midline anal scute length in C. flavomarginata and C. evelynae. Hatchlings show a seam that divides 100% of the anal scute along the midline. As individuals increase in carapace length, there is a tendency for the percentage to decrease, especially in females, although there is considerable overlap. We suggest that the decrease in interanal seam length is due to abrasion of the plastron on the substrate as turtles grow larger and older. Differences in habitat substrates across the range of the species may contribute to the wide variation we observed.

  13. Nesting ecology of Chelonia mydas Testudines: Cheloniidae on the Guanahacabibes Peninsula, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Azanza Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The nesting colony of green sea turtles Chelonia mydas at Guanahacabibes Peninsula Biosphere Reserve and National Park is one of the largest in the Cuban archipelago; however, little information about its nesting ecology is available. Temporal and spatial variation in nesting and reproductive success as well as morphometric characteristics of gravid females were used to ecologically characterize this colony. Nine beaches of the Southernmost coast of Guanahacabibes Peninsula were monitored for 14 years 1998-2012 to determine green turtle nesting activity, from May to September peak nesting season in this area. Beach dimensions were measured to determine nest density using the length and the area. Afterward the beaches were divided in two categories, index and secondary. Females were measured and tagged to compare new tagged females 823 with returning tagged females 140. Remigration interval was also determined. Temporal variation was identified as the annual number of nesting emergences and oviposits per female, with apparent peaks in reproductive activity on a biennial cycle in the first six years followed by periods of annual increase in nest number 2003-2008 and periods of decreasing number of nests 2010-2012. We also found intra-seasonal variation with the highest nesting activity in July, particularly in the second half of the month. The peak emergence time was 22:00-02:00hr. In terms of spatial variation, smaller beaches had the highest nest density and nesting was more frequent 6-9m from the high tide line, where hatchling production was maximized although hatchling success was high on average, above 80. Morphometric analysis of females was made and newly tagged turtles were smaller on average than remigrants. Our results are only a first attempt at characterizing Guanahacabibes populations but have great value for establishing conservation priorities within the context of national management plans, and for efficient monitoring and

  14. Effect of eggshell temperature and a hole in the air cell on the perinatal development and physiology of layer hatchlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, R.; Vries, de S.; Anker, van den I.; Meijerhof, R.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the effect of incubation conditions on layer hatchlings, an experiment was performed in which layer eggs were incubated at a normal (37.8°C) or high (38.9°C) eggshell temperature (EST) and a hole was punctured in the air cell of half of the eggs in both EST treatments from d 14 of

  15. Male hatchling production in sea turtles from one of the world’s largest marine protected areas, the Chagos Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Nicole; Laloë, Jacques-Olivier; Mortimer, Jeanne A.; Guzman, Antenor N.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2016-02-01

    Sand temperatures at nest depths and implications for hatchling sex ratios of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) nesting in the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean are reported and compared to similar measurements at rookeries in the Atlantic and Caribbean. During 2012-2014, temperature loggers were buried at depths and in beach zones representative of turtle nesting sites. Data collected for 12,546 days revealed seasonal and spatial patterns of sand temperature. Depth effects were minimal, perhaps modulated by shade from vegetation. Coolest and warmest temperatures were recorded in the sites heavily shaded in vegetation during the austral winter and in sites partially shaded in vegetation during summer respectively. Overall, sand temperatures were relatively cool during the nesting seasons of both species which would likely produce fairly balanced hatchling sex ratios of 53% and 63% male hatchlings, respectively, for hawksbill and green turtles. This result contrasts with the predominantly high female skew reported for offspring at most rookeries around the globe and highlights how local beach characteristics can drive incubation temperatures. Our evidence suggests that sites characterized by heavy shade associated with intact natural vegetation are likely to provide conditions suitable for male hatchling production in a warming world.

  16. The relationship between carbon stable isotope ratios of hatchling down and egg yolk in Black-headed Gulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.R.J.; Baarspul, T.; Dekkers, T.; Van Tienen, P.

    2004-01-01

    We reconstructed the nutrient source for egg synthesis by sampling Black-headed Gull (Larus ridibundus) eggs for yolk, analyzing their carbon stable isotope ratio, and comparing that to hatchling down. Most of the variation in carbon stable isotope ratio was explained by differences between nests,

  17. Hatchlings of the Marine Turtle Lepidochelys olivacea Display Signs of Prenatal Stress at Emergence after Being Incubated in Man-Made Nests: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. A. Herrera-Vargas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Egg translocation and incubation in man-made nests (MMN are common conservation practices through marine turtle hatcheries worldwide. These measures have been associated with reduced hatching rates, altered hatchling sex ratio, fetal dysmorphic anatomical features, and feeble hatchlings health. Previous studies have shown that MMN and natural nests (NN provide different incubatory conditions. Therefore, incubatory challenges imposed by MMN conditions on fetal development could induce stress responses affecting hatchlings functional morphology later on life. There is no evidence of incubatory stress associated with conservation measures in turtle fetuses or hatchlings. Thus, in this paper we tested the hypothesis that MMN incubation exposes turtle fetuses to stressing conditions. Given that the hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis begins functioning by day 11 of incubation in reptiles, our experiments explored the effects of incubatory conditions, rather than those associated with translocation, on fetal stress responses. We showed that Lepidochelys olivacea hatchlings incubated in MMN displayed reduced body weight, hypertrophic inter-renal glands, testicular hypotrophy and hypotrophic dorso-medial cortical pyramidal neurons, when compared with hatchlings emerging from NN. Furthermore, MMN hatchlings had higher serum levels of corticosterone at emergence, and displayed an attenuated acute stress response after traversing the beach. Therefore, the relocation of nests to protect them could negatively impact the health and survival of sea turtles. Thus, this action should only be undertaken when no alternative is available.

  18. IMPLEMENTACIÓN DE LA METODOLOGÍA DE ANÁLISIS DE ADN MITOCONDRIAL EN Rhinoclemmys nasuta (TESTUDINES:GEOEMYDIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yherson Franchesco Molina Henao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines: Geoemydidae es considerada una especie casi endémica de Colombia y la más primitiva del género, sin embargo, se encuentra clasificada por la IUCN como deficiente de datos, ya que la información disponible no es suficiente para hacer una evaluación directa o indirecta de su riesgo de extinción. En este trabajo se describe la implementación del método para realizar la secuenciación de la región control del ADN mitocondrial de R. nasuta, con el propósito de generar herramientas técnicas para futuros estudios de evolutivos y de conservación. Se utilizó el método de desalamiento (Salting-out para extraer ADN a muestras sanguíneas procedentes de Isla Palma y Playa Chucheros (Bahía Málaga–Pacífico Colombiano y se utilizó una pareja de cebadores degenerados (reportada para Chrysemys picta Testudines: Emydidae para realizar la amplificación. Se obtuvieron fragmentos de 800pb siendo exitosa la reacción de secuenciación de los amplificados, y se estableció un porcentaje de homología mayor al 92 % entre las secuencias obtenidas y las secuencias de ADNmt de Sacalia quadriocellata (Testudines:Geoemydidae y Cuora aurocapitata (Testudines:Geoemydidae, depositadas en el GeneBank. Este resultado demuestra que el método descrito puede ser una herramienta útil para el estudio de las poblaciones de R. nasuta del Pacífico colombiano, lográndose una efectiva secuenciación de la región control del ADNmt de esta especie.

  19. Endogenous and exogenous ice-nucleating agents constrain supercooling in the hatchling painted turtle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Jon P; Baker, Patrick J; Dinkelacker, Stephen A; Lee, Richard E

    2003-02-01

    Hatchlings of the painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) commonly hibernate in their shallow, natal nests. Survival at temperatures below the limit of freeze tolerance (approximately -4 degrees C) apparently depends on their ability to remain supercooled, and, whereas previous studies have reported that supercooling capacity improves markedly with cold acclimation, the mechanistic basis for this change is incompletely understood. We report that the crystallization temperature (T(c)) of recently hatched (summer) turtles acclimated to 22 degrees C and reared on a substratum of vermiculite or nesting soil was approximately 5 degrees C higher than the T(c) determined for turtles acclimated to 4 degrees C and tested in winter. This increase in supercooling capacity coincided with elimination of substratum (and, in fewer cases, eggshell) that the hatchlings had ingested; however, this association was not necessarily causal because turtles reared on a paper-covered substratum did not ingest exogenous matter but nevertheless showed a similar increase in supercooling capacity. Our results for turtles reared on paper revealed that seasonal development of supercooling capacity fundamentally requires elimination of ice-nucleating agents (INA) of endogenous origin: summer turtles, but not winter turtles, produced feces (perhaps derived from residual yolk) that expressed ice-nucleating activity. Ingestion of vermiculite or eggshell, which had modest ice-nucleating activity, had no effect on the T(c), whereas ingestion of nesting soil, which contained two classes of potent INA, markedly reduced the supercooling capacity of summer turtles. This effect persisted long after the turtles had purged their guts of soil particles, because the T(c) of winter turtles reared on nesting soil (mean +/- S.E.M.=-11.6+/-1.4 degrees C) was approximately 6 degrees C higher than the T(c) of winter turtles reared on vermiculite or paper. Experiments in which winter turtles were fed INA commonly found in

  20. Aislamiento y serotipificación de Salmonella sp. en estanques con Crocodylus intermedius y testudines cautivos en Villavicencio - Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Pachón C.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Determinar la presencia de microorganismos del género Salmonella sp. en el ambiente acuático de los ejemplares Crocodylus intermedius y testudines en la Estación de Biología Tropical Roberto Franco (EBTRF. Materiales y métodos. En este estudio se utilizó la metodología estándar para aislar e identificar microorganismos del género Salmonella sp., a partir de muestras de agua y sedimento de 52 estanques (nEstanques Crocodylus=25; nEstanques testudines=27; se procedió a serotipificar los aislamientos por el método convencional de Kaufmann-White y se realizaron pruebas de sensibilidad a antimicrobianos por la técnica de Kirby Bauer. Resultados. Se determinó la presencia de Salmonella sp., en un 33% del total de estanques muestreados. El 29% de los aislamientos de Salmonella sp. serotipificados, correspondió al serogrupo B; los serogrupos C, C1, C2 y D1 presentaron menores porcentajes. Con las pruebas de sensibilidad a antimicrobianos se determinó que el 100% de los aislamientos fueron sensibles a norfloxacina. Conclusiones. La ocurrencia de Salmonella sp., en los estanques de la EBTRF fue del 33%, con la mayor presencia del serogrupo B, donde se encuentran especies con características ampliamente zoonóticas. Con los resultados obtenidos es necesario el seguimiento de las normas de bioseguridad establecidas en la estación para el manejo de las poblaciones allí mantenidas y evitar de esa manera la ocurrencia de cuadros zoonóticos.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect survival and development of common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) embryos and hatchlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Meter, Robin J [School of Environmental Science, Engineering, and Policy and Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Spotila, James R [School of Environmental Science, Engineering, and Policy and Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Avery, Harold W [School of Environmental Science, Engineering, and Policy and Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic compounds found in the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We assessed the impact of PAHs and crude oil on snapping turtle development and behavior by exposing snapping turtle eggs from the Refuge and from three clean reference sites to individual PAHs or a crude oil mixture at stage 9 of embryonic development. Exposure to PAHs had a significant effect on survival rates in embryos from one clean reference site, but not in embryos from the other sites. There was a positive linear relationship between level of exposure to PAHs and severity of deformities in embryos collected from two of the clean reference sites. Neither righting response nor upper temperature tolerance (critical thermal maximum, CTM) of snapping turtle hatchlings with no or minor deformities was significantly affected by exposure to PAHs. - Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the egg reduces survival of snapping turtle embryos and causes developmental abnormalities.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect survival and development of common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) embryos and hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Robin J; Spotila, James R; Avery, Harold W

    2006-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic compounds found in the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We assessed the impact of PAHs and crude oil on snapping turtle development and behavior by exposing snapping turtle eggs from the Refuge and from three clean reference sites to individual PAHs or a crude oil mixture at stage 9 of embryonic development. Exposure to PAHs had a significant effect on survival rates in embryos from one clean reference site, but not in embryos from the other sites. There was a positive linear relationship between level of exposure to PAHs and severity of deformities in embryos collected from two of the clean reference sites. Neither righting response nor upper temperature tolerance (critical thermal maximum, CTM) of snapping turtle hatchlings with no or minor deformities was significantly affected by exposure to PAHs.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect survival and development of common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) embryos and hatchlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Meter, Robin J.; Spotila, James R.; Avery, Harold W.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic compounds found in the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We assessed the impact of PAHs and crude oil on snapping turtle development and behavior by exposing snapping turtle eggs from the Refuge and from three clean reference sites to individual PAHs or a crude oil mixture at stage 9 of embryonic development. Exposure to PAHs had a significant effect on survival rates in embryos from one clean reference site, but not in embryos from the other sites. There was a positive linear relationship between level of exposure to PAHs and severity of deformities in embryos collected from two of the clean reference sites. Neither righting response nor upper temperature tolerance (critical thermal maximum, CTM) of snapping turtle hatchlings with no or minor deformities was significantly affected by exposure to PAHs. - Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the egg reduces survival of snapping turtle embryos and causes developmental abnormalities

  4. Measuring Energy Expenditure in Sub-Adult and Hatchling Sea Turtles via Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G.; Jones, T. Todd; Jones, David R.; Liebsch, Nikolai; Booth, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the metabolic of sea turtles is fundamental to understanding their ecology yet the presently available methods are limited. Accelerometry is a relatively new technique for estimating metabolic rate that has shown promise with a number of species but its utility with air-breathing divers is not yet established. The present study undertakes laboratory experiments to investigate whether rate of oxygen uptake ( o 2) at the surface in active sub-adult green turtles Chelonia mydas and hatchling loggerhead turtles Caretta caretta correlates with overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), a derivative of acceleration used as a proxy for metabolic rate. Six green turtles (25–44 kg) and two loggerhead turtles (20 g) were instrumented with tri-axial acceleration logging devices and placed singly into a respirometry chamber. The green turtles were able to submerge freely within a 1.5 m deep tank and the loggerhead turtles were tethered in water 16 cm deep so that they swam at the surface. A significant prediction equation for mean o 2 over an hour in a green turtle from measures of ODBA and mean flipper length (R2 = 0.56) returned a mean estimate error across turtles of 8.0%. The range of temperatures used in the green turtle experiments (22–30°C) had only a small effect on o 2. A o 2-ODBA equation for the loggerhead hatchling data was also significant (R2 = 0.67). Together these data indicate the potential of the accelerometry technique for estimating energy expenditure in sea turtles, which may have important applications in sea turtle diving ecology, and also in conservation such as assessing turtle survival times when trapped underwater in fishing nets. PMID:21829613

  5. Eggs and hatchlings of the Mexican salamander Pseudoeurycea cephalica (Caudata: Plethodontidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bille

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Eggs and hatchlings of Pseudoeurycea c. cephalica from Parque Nacional Lagunas de Zempoala, Morelos, Mexico are described for the first time. The eggs are similar to eggs of P. cephalica manni and P. belli in being unstranded. Egg capsules resemble P. nigromaculata and P. juarezi in having two gelatinous envelopes. The embryos have extensively webbed hands and feet with a continuous reduction in webbing during embryogenesis, supporting the hypothesis that webbing of the feet is a paedomorphic character. The hatchlings are uniform grayish-black dorsally and slightly paler ventrally. They are robust with broad heads and short tails and lack both vomerine and maxillary teeth. Lack of dentition has previously been found in juveniles of P. belli.Se describe por primera vez huevos y recién nacidos de Pseudoeurycea cephalica cephalica procedentes del Parque Nacional Lagunas de Zempoala, Morelos, México. Los huevos se paracen a los de P. cephalica manni y P. belli en que no están unidos entre sí por ningún cordón. Se parecen en cuanto a constitución a los de P. nigromaculata y P. juarezi en tener dos capas gelatinosas. Los embriones tienen los pies y manos palmeados, produciéndose una reducción de la superficie palmeada a lo largo de la embriogénesis, lo cual confirma que el palmeado de pies y manos es un carácter pedomórfico. Los recién nacidos son de color gris negruzco, uniforme dorsalmente y de color más claro ventralmente. Son robustos, con cabeza ancha, cola corta y carecen de dientes tanto vomerinos como maxilares. Esta falta de dentición ya fue encontrada anteriormente en juveniles de P. belli.

  6. Comparing Acoustic Tag Attachments Designed for Mobile Tracking of Hatchling Sea Turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee L. Hoover

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The poorly understood movements of sea turtles during the “lost years” of their early life history have been characterized as a “passive drifter” stage. Biologging technology allows us to study patterns of dispersal, but the small body size of young life stages requires particular consideration that such tagging does not significantly impede animal movements. We tested the effect of instrument attachment methods for mobile acoustic tracking of hatchling sea turtles, including a design that would be suitable for leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea. We obtained 8-week-old hatchery-reared green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas (n = 12 individuals and examined the effect of attaching Vemco V5 acoustic tags. Each animal's swim speed, swimming depth, and stroke frequency were determined under three scenarios: control, direct Velcro® attachment to the carapace, and harness attachment, to determine if there was a significant difference amongst treatments. Turtle swimming speed was significantly slower during the middle period of the trial for the harness attachment compared with the control. No significant change in swim speed was observed when the tag was attached directly with Velcro®, and no significant change in dive depth was observed for either treatment compared to the control. Stroke frequency was significantly greater compared to the control at the end of the trial for the Velcro® attachment only, although there was no corresponding increase in swimming speed. This information can be used to design effective approaches for actively tracking free-ranging hatchling sea turtles to understand dispersal and survival of these vulnerable marine species.

  7. First approximation to congenital malformation rates in embryos and hatchlings of sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcenas-Ibarra, Annelisse; de la Cueva, Horacio; Rojas-Lleonart, Isaias; Abreu-Grobois, F Alberto; Lozano-Guzmán, Rogelio Iván; Cuevas, Eduardo; García-Gasca, Alejandra

    2015-03-01

    Congenital malformations in sea turtles have been considered sporadical. Research carried out in the Mexican Pacific revealed high levels of congenital malformations in the olive ridley, but little or no information is available for other species. We present results from analyses of external congenital malformations in olive ridley, green, and hawskbill sea turtles from Mexican rookeries on the Pacific coast and Gulf of Mexico. We examined 150 green and hawksbill nests and 209 olive ridley nests during the 2010 and 2012 nesting seasons, respectively. Olive ridley eggs were transferred to a hatchery and incubated in styrofoam boxes. Nests from the other two species were left in situ. Number of eggs, live and dead hatchlings, and eggs with or without embryonic development were registered. Malformation frequency was evaluated with indices of prevalence and severity. Mortality levels, prevalence and severity were higher in olive ridley than in hawksbill and green sea turtles. Sixty-three types of congenital malformations were observed in embryos, and dead or live hatchlings. Of these, 38 are new reports; 35 for wild sea turtles, three for vertebrates. Thirty-one types were found in hawksbill, 23 in green, and 59 in olive ridley. The head region showed a higher number of malformation types. Malformation levels in the olive ridley were higher than previously reported. Olive ridleys seem more prone to the occurrence of congenital malformations than the other two species. Whether the observed malformation levels are normal or represent a health problem cannot be currently ascertained without long-term assessments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Squamate hatchling size and the evolutionary causes of negative offspring size allometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiri, S; Feldman, A; Kratochvíl, L

    2015-02-01

    Although fecundity selection is ubiquitous, in an overwhelming majority of animal lineages, small species produce smaller number of offspring per clutch. In this context, egg, hatchling and neonate sizes are absolutely larger, but smaller relative to adult body size in larger species. The evolutionary causes of this widespread phenomenon are not fully explored. The negative offspring size allometry can result from processes limiting maximal egg/offspring size forcing larger species to produce relatively smaller offspring ('upper limit'), or from a limit on minimal egg/offspring size forcing smaller species to produce relatively larger offspring ('lower limit'). Several reptile lineages have invariant clutch sizes, where females always lay either one or two eggs per clutch. These lineages offer an interesting perspective on the general evolutionary forces driving negative offspring size allometry, because an important selective factor, fecundity selection in a single clutch, is eliminated here. Under the upper limit hypotheses, large offspring should be selected against in lineages with invariant clutch sizes as well, and these lineages should therefore exhibit the same, or shallower, offspring size allometry as lineages with variable clutch size. On the other hand, the lower limit hypotheses would allow lineages with invariant clutch sizes to have steeper offspring size allometries. Using an extensive data set on the hatchling and female sizes of > 1800 species of squamates, we document that negative offspring size allometry is widespread in lizards and snakes with variable clutch sizes and that some lineages with invariant clutch sizes have unusually steep offspring size allometries. These findings suggest that the negative offspring size allometry is driven by a constraint on minimal offspring size, which scales with a negative allometry. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary

  9. Macromorfometría de juveniles de Geochelone sulcata (Testudines: Testudinidaeen Costa Rica

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    Manuel Merchán

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Se midieron 31 ejemplares de tortuga africana de espolones Geochelone sulcata para la realización de un estudio biométrico. Se consideraron 26 medidas morfológicas para cada individuo. Las tortugas tenían una edad de entre 5 y 34 meses, y ninguna había alcanzado la madurez sexual. Todas ellas habían nacido en cautiverio en La Garita de Alajuela, Costa Rica, donde son una especie introducida. La longitud recta del espaldar fue de 83.1 mm, la anchura recta del espaldar de 68.3 mm y la altura máxima media de 46.2 mm. Todas las medidas estaban correlacionadas entre sí, salvo la longitud de la cola y la distancia cloacal. El mayor coeficiente de alometría positiva correspondió a la variable Peso. El mayor coeficiente de alometría negativa correspondió a la anchura a nivel de los escudos gulares. Todas las variables se agruparon en dos componentes principales, la longitud de la cola y la distancia cloacal en el Factor 2 y el resto en el Factor 1. La falta de correlación de las medidas de la cola así como su inclusión en un factor aparte al resto de la muestra podría responder a un proceso incipiente de diferenciación sexualGross morphometry of young Geochelone sulcata (Testudines: Testudinidae in Costa Rica. The African Spur tortoise, Geochelone sulcata, has been introduced to Costa Rica. A total of 31 tortoises were measured for 26 gross morphometry parameters. All individuals measured were inmature, aged from 5 to 34 months, and were born in captivity in La Garita de Alajuela, Costa Rica. Mean straight carapace length was 83.1 mm, mean straight plastron length was 68.3 mm and mean maximum height was 46.2 mm. All the measurements were correlated, except tail length and cloacal distance. Weight had the highest positive allometry coefficient. All the variables were joined in two Principal Components; tail length and cloacal distance in Factor 2 and the rest of them in Factor 1. Lack of correlation among tail measures and the other

  10. La reproducción de la "Icotea": (Pseudemys scripta callirostris, (Testudines Emydidae La reproducción de la "Icotea": (Pseudemys scripta callirostris, (Testudines Emydidae

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    Medem Federico

    1975-09-01

    Full Text Available 1. The first exact data about reproduction of the Colombian Painted Turtle, Pseudemys scripta callirostris, are presented, based on studies carried out on 75 adults, 89 hatchlings and 276 eggs.2. There exists a marked sexual dimorphism which comprises the size of the shell, length of tail, and shape of shell and head. The Carapace length, taken in straight line, is up to 300.0 mm in ♀♀ and 252.0 mm in ♂ ♂, but generally less.3. The mating season takes place between September and December.4. Copulation takes place in quiet but deep water and lasts for about 2-3 minutes.5. Only the hind legs are used to excavate the nest; the entire process (excavation, egg laying and covering of the hole lasts between one hour, twenty minutes and four hours, twenty five minutes aproximately. (Figs. 1-2.6. The flask-shaped nesting hole is up to 180.0 mm deep, 110.0 mm wide at the entrance and 130.0 mm wide at the bottom. (Table 1.7. There are from 9-30 eggs to be found in a single nest which are deposited in 2-3-4 layers; the first eggs (last layer are found in 67.0 mm-10.0mm depth. (Table 3.8. The oblong, soft-shelled eggs are pinkish-white when recently laid, they show, moreover, a shallow concavity about 19.0 mm-21.0 mm long. In contrast, those already containing embryos have a less flexible shell, no concavity and are white. (Fig. 3-4.9. The measurements and weight of 152 eggs comprises from 41.0:26.0 mm to 27.0:21.0 mm, and between 15 g, 670 mg and 5 g, 170 mg respectively. (Table 4.10. The egg-laying season takes place principally between late December and late April; according to information there is a second one in August but to a lesser degree; dissected ♀♀ contained both eggs and numerous ovules. (Table 2.11. The incubation period varies between 69 and 92 days. (Table 6.12. Hatchlings are born from late april to early June. 13. The Carapace length ranges from 39.0 mm to 29.5 mm, and the weight varies between 13 g, 300 mg and 7 g, 60 mg

  11. Effect of experience with pine (Pituophis melanoleucus) and king (Lampropeltis getulus) snake odors on Y-maze behavior of pine snake hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J; Boarman, W; Kurzava, L; Gochfeld, M

    1991-01-01

    The abilities of hatchling pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) and king snakes (Lampropeltis getulus) to discriminate the chemical trails of pine and king snakes was investigated inY-maze experiments. Pine snakes were housed for 17 days either with shavings impregnated with pine snake odor, king snake odor, or no odor to test for the effect of experience on choice. Both pine and king snake hatchlings entered the arm with the pine snake odor and did not enter the arm with the king snake odor. The data support the hypothesis that hatchlings of both species can distinguish conspecific odors from other odors and that our manipulation of previous experience was without effect for pine snake hatchlings.

  12. Standard metabolic rates of early life stages of the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin), an estuarine turtle, suggest correlates between life history changes and the metabolic economy of hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher L

    2018-04-01

    I estimated standard metabolic rates (SMR) using measurements of oxygen consumption rates of embryos and unfed, resting hatchlings of the diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) three times during embryonic development and twice during the early post-hatching period. The highest observed SMRs occurred during mid to late embryonic development and the early post-hatching period when hatchlings were still reliant on yolk reserves provided by the mother. Hatchlings that were reliant on yolk displayed per capita SMR 135 % higher than when measured 25 calendar days later after they became reliant on exogenous resources. The magnitude of the difference in hatchling SMR between yolk-reliant and exogenously feeding stages was much greater than that attributed to costs of digestion (specific dynamic action) observed in another emydid turtle, suggesting that processing of the yolk was not solely responsible for the observed difference. The pre-feeding period of yolk reliance of hatchlings corresponds with the period of dispersal from the nesting site, suggesting that elevated SMR during this period could facilitate dispersal activities. Thus, I hypothesize that the reduction in SMR after the development of feeding behaviors may reflect an energy optimization strategy in which a high metabolic expenditure in support of development and growth of the embryo and dispersal of the hatchling is followed by a substantial reduction in metabolic expenditure coincident with the individual becoming reliant on exogenous resources following yolk depletion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Teeth of embryonic or hatchling sauropods from the Berriasian (Early Cretaceous of Cherves-de-Cognac, France

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    Paul M. Barrett

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Cherves-de-Cognac site (Charente, France has yielded a diverse continental microvertebrate fauna of Berriasian (earliest Cretaceous age. Dinosaur remains are rare, but include three teeth that are referrable to an indeterminate sauropod, which might represent either a titanosauriform, a non-titanosauriform macronarian or a non-neosauropod. The small size of these teeth (with a maximum length of 3 mm, as preserved and the almost complete absence of emanel wrinkling suggests that they pertained to embryonic or hatchling individuals. The Cherves-de-Cognac sauropod represents a rare occurrence of sauropod embryos/hatchlings, a new sauropod record from the poorly-known terrestrial Berriasian and another possible instance of the persistence of non-diplodocoid, non-titanosauriform sauropods into the Cretaceous.

  14. Alteration of Diastereoisomeric and Enantiomeric Profiles of Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in Adult Chicken Tissues, Eggs, and Hatchling Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaobo; Qiao, Lin; Sun, Runxia; Luo, Xiaojun; Zheng, Jing; Xie, Qilai; Sun, Yuxin; Mai, Bixian

    2017-05-16

    The concentrations and enantiomer fractions (EFs) of α-, β-, and γ-hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) were measured in chicken diet sources (soil and chicken feed), home-raised adult chicken (Gallus domesticus) tissues, eggs during incubation, and hatchling chicken tissues. HBCD concentrations were not detected-0.69 ng/g dry weight (dw) and 25.6-48.4 ng/g dw in chicken feed and soil, respectively. HBCDs were detected in all adult chicken tissues, except the brain, at median levels of 13.1-44.0 ng/g lipid weight (lw). The proportions of α-HBCD in total HBCDs increased from 51% in soil to more than 87% in adult chicken tissues. The accumulation ratios (ARs) of α-HBCD from diet to adult chicken tissues were 4.27 for liver, 11.2 for fat, and 7.64-12.9 for other tissues, respectively. The AR and carry-over rate (COR) of α-HBCD from diet to eggs were 22.4 and 0.226, respectively. The concentrations of α-HBCD in hatchling chicken liver (median: 35.4 ng/g lw) were significantly lower than those in hatchling chicken pectoral muscle (median: 130 ng/g lw). The EFs of α-HBCD decreased from soil to adult chicken tissues and from eggs to hatchling chicken liver. Meanwhile, the EFs of γ-HBCD increased from soil to adult chicken tissues. These results indicate the preferential enrichment of (-)-α-HBCD and (+)-γ-HBCD in chickens. The alteration of diastereoisomeric and enantiomeric patterns of HBCDs might be influenced by the different absorption and elimination rates of the six HBCD enantiomers as well as variations in HBCD metabolism in chickens.

  15. Varying hydric conditions during incubation influence egg water exchange and hatchling phenotype in the red-eared slider turtle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Virginie; Bonnet, Xavier; Girondot, Marc; Prévot-Julliard, Anne-Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Environmental conditions within the nest, notably temperature and moisture of substrate, exert a powerful influence during embryogenesis in oviparous reptiles. The influence of fluctuating nest temperatures has been experimentally examined in different reptile species; however, similar experiments using moisture as the key variable are lacking. In this article, we examine the effect of various substrate moisture regimes during incubation on different traits (egg mass, incubation length, and hatchling mass) in a chelonian species with flexible-shelled eggs, the red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans). Our results show that the rate of water uptake by the eggs was higher in wet than in dry substrate and varied across development. More important, during the first third of development, the egg mass changes were relatively independent of the soil moisture level; they became very sensitive to moisture levels during the other two-thirds. Moreover, hydric conditions exerted a strong influence on the eggs' long-term sensitivity to the moisture of the substrate. Even short-term episodes of high or low levels of moisture modified permanently their water sensitivity, notably through modification of eggshell shape and volume, and in turn entailed significant effects on hatchling mass (and hence offspring quality). Such complex influences of fluctuating moisture levels at various incubation stages on hatchling phenotype better reflect the natural situation, compared to experiments based on stable, albeit different, moisture levels.

  16. Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings

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    David T. Booth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hatchling sea turtles emerge from nests, crawl down the beach and enter the sea where they typically enter a stereotypical hyperactive swimming frenzy. During this swim the front flippers are moved up and down in a flapping motion and are the primary source of thrust production. I used high-speed video linked with simultaneous measurement of thrust production in tethered hatchlings, along with high-speed video of free swimming hatchlings swimming at different water speeds in a swim flume to investigate the links between kinematics of front flipper movement, thrust production and swimming speed. In particular I tested the hypotheses that (1 increased swimming speed is achieved through an increased stroke rate; (2 force produced per stroke is proportional to stroke amplitude, (3 that forward thrust is produced during both the down and up phases of stroking; and (4 that peak thrust is produced towards the end of the downstroke cycle. Front flipper stroke rate was independent of water speed refuting the hypothesis that swimming speed is increased by increasing stroke rate. Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking. Peak thrust produced per stroke varied within and between bouts of powerstroking, and these peaks in thrust were correlated with both flipper amplitude and flipper angular momentum during the downstroke supporting the hypothesis that stroke force is a function of stroke amplitude. Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke. The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of

  17. High levels of maternally transferred mercury disrupt magnetic responses of snapping turtle hatchlings (Chelydra serpentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landler, Lukas; Painter, Michael S; Coe, Brittney Hopkins; Youmans, Paul W; Hopkins, William A; Phillips, John B

    2017-09-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is involved in spatial behaviours ranging from long-distance migration to non-goal directed behaviours, such as spontaneous magnetic alignment (SMA). Mercury is a harmful pollutant most often generated from anthropogenic sources that can bio-accumulate in animal tissue over a lifetime. We compared SMA of hatchling snapping turtles from mothers captured at reference (i.e., low mercury) and mercury contaminated sites. Reference turtles showed radio frequency-dependent SMA along the north-south axis, consistent with previous studies of SMA, while turtles with high levels of maternally inherited mercury failed to show consistent magnetic alignment. In contrast, there was no difference between reference and mercury exposed turtles on standard performance measures. The magnetic field plays an important role in animal orientation behaviour and may also help to integrate spatial information from a variety of sensory modalities. As a consequence, mercury may compromise the performance of turtles in a wide variety of spatial tasks. Future research is needed to determine the threshold for mercury effects on snapping turtles, whether mercury exposure compromises spatial behaviour of adult turtles, and whether mercury has a direct effect on the magnetoreception mechanism(s) that mediate SMA or a more general effect on the nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA damage in grasshopper Chorthippus brunneus (Orthoptera) hatchlings following paraquat exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, M; Nocoń, Ł; Kędziorski, A; Łaszczyca, P; Sawczyn, T; Tarnawska, M; Zawisza-Raszka, A

    2015-04-01

    Comet assay was applied to study genotoxic damage induced by paraquat (PQ) in brain cells of Chorthippus brunneus (Insecta: Orthoptera) hatchlings. Percentage of the comet fluorescence in the tail (TDNA), length of the comet tail (TL) and Olive tail moment (OTM) were used for quantitative assessment of the DNA damage. Multiple regression analysis supplemented standard statistical elaboration of the results. Increasing PQ concentrations applied either directly to the brain cells suspension (10, 50, and 250 μM PQ final concentration--in vitro protocol) or indirectly (50, 250, and 1250 μM PQ final concentration--in vivo protocol) provoked significant increase of oxidative damage to DNA (higher median TDNA and OTM values). The damage increased with time of exposure (0, 5, 15, and 30 min) following in vitro application, but decreased in longer interval (3 vs 24 h) after in vivo administration of paraquat. On contrary, median TL values did not correlate with paraquat concentration irrespectively of the exposure protocol. Possible reason of this discrepancy in light of paraquat toxicity is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. How neurons generate behaviour in a hatchling amphibian tadpole: an outline

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    Alan Roberts

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adult nervous systems are so complex that understanding how they produce behaviour remains a real challenge. We chose to study hatchling Xenopus tadpoles where behaviour is controlled by a few thousand neurons but there is a very limited number of types of neuron. Young tadpoles can flex, swim away, adjust their trajectory, speed-up and slow-down, stop when they contact support and struggle when grasped. They are sensitive to touch, pressure, noxious stimuli, light intensity and water currents. Using whole-cell recording has led to rapid progress in understanding central networks controlling behaviour. Our methods are illustrated by an analysis of the flexion reflex to skin touch. We then define the 7 types of neuron that allow the tadpole to swim when the skin is touched and use paired recordings to investigate neuron properties, synaptic connections and activity patterns. Proposals on how the swim network operates are evaluated by experiment and network modelling. We then examine GABAergic inhibitory pathways that control swimming but also produce tonic inhibition to reduce responsiveness when the tadpole is at rest. Finally, we analyse the strong alternating struggling movements the tadpole makes when grasped. We show that the mechanisms for rhythm generation here are very different to those during swimming. Although much remains to be explained, study of this simple vertebrate has uncovered basic principles about the function and organisation of vertebrate nervous systems.

  20. Os Testudines continentais do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: taxonomia, história natural e conservação

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    Clóvis S. Bujes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O Rio Grande do Sul é o estado mais meridional do Brasil, apresentando fauna e flora peculiares associadas às características morfoclimáticas da região. A diversidade de Testudines do Rio Grande do Sul é representada por seis espécies continentais e cinco marinhas. Este estudo apresenta comentários sobre a diversidade de quelônios continentais do Rio Grande do Sul, através de uma compilação de dados publicados e alguns inéditos sobre sua biologia e estado de conservação.

  1. Intraspecific variations in Cyt b and D-loop sequences of Testudine species, Lissemys punctata from south Karnataka

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    R. Lalitha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater Testudine species have gained importance in recent years, as most of their population is threatened due to exploitation for delicacy and pet trade. In this regard, Lissemys punctata, a freshwater terrapin, predominantly distributed in Asian countries has gained its significance for the study. A pilot study report on mitochondrial markers (Cyt b and D-loop conducted on L. punctata species from southern Karnataka, India was presented in this investigation. A complete region spanning 1.14 kb and ∼1 kb was amplified by HotStart PCR and sequenced by Sanger sequencing. The Cyt b sequence revealed 85 substitution sites, no indels and 17 parsimony informative sites, whereas D-loop showed 189 variable sites, 51 parsimony informative sites with 5′ functional domains TAS, CSB-F, CSBs (1, 2, 3 preceding tandem repeat at 3′ end. Current data highlights the intraspecific variations in these target regions and variations validated using suitable evolutionary models points out that the overall point mutations observed in the region are transitions leading to no structural and functional alterations. The mitochondrial data generated uncover the genetic diversity within species and conservationist can utilize the data to estimate the effective population size or for forensic identification of animal or its seizures during unlawful trade activities.

  2. Response of hatchling Komodo Dragons (Varanus komodoensis) at Denver Zoo to visual and chemical cues arising from prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiszar, David; Krauss, Susan; Shipley, Bryon; Trout, Tim; Smith, Hobart M

    2009-01-01

    Five hatchling Komodo Dragons (Varanus komodoensis) at Denver Zoo were observed in two experiments that studied the effects of visual and chemical cues arising from prey. Rate of tongue flicking was recorded in Experiment 1, and amount of time the lizards spent interacting with stimuli was recorded in Experiment 2. Our hypothesis was that young V. komodoensis would be more dependent upon vision than chemoreception, especially when dealing with live, moving, prey. Although visual cues, including prey motion, had a significant effect, chemical cues had a far stronger effect. Implications of this falsification of our initial hypothesis are discussed.

  3. Impacts of low dose rate irradiation on the fertility, fecundity and hatchling survival of Japanese rice fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T.G.; Coughlin, D.P.; Marsh, L.C.; Yi, Yi; Winn, R.

    2004-01-01

    A renewed international interest in the effects on biota from low dose rate irradiation has recently occurred. Much of that interest is centered on the relevance of previously accepted dose rate guidelines (e.g. 10 mGy d -1 for aquatic biota) suggested by the ICRP and IAEA. All parties concerned seem to agree that additional data are needed on population level impacts from chronic low-level exposures to radionuclides. Using a Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LoDIF), we conducted an experiment on the fecundity, fertility and hatchling survival of Japanese Rice Fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes). Fish were exposed externally to 137 Cs from juvenile through adulthood at mean dose rates of 3.5, 35 and 350 mGy d -1 . Fish were bred at maturity and the following endpoints were examined: 1) the number of eggs produced; 2) the percent of eggs that hatched; and 3) the survival of hatchlings 20-days post hatch. The influence of gender was examined by breeding irradiated males with control females; control males with irradiated females; irradiated males with irradiated females; and control males with control females. The data contribute to our understanding the impacts of low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  4. Comportamento alimentar e dieta de Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron em cativeiro (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae Feeding behavior and diet of Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron in captivity (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio de Barros Molina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1985 the biology and behavior of Phrynops hilarii (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 at São Paulo Zoo is being studied. Feeding behavior is divided in five phases (foraging, approach, capture, dilaceration and ingestion, but not necessarily all of them happen. During phase 1 the food or prey seems to be visually located. During phase 2 the food itens and stationaty preys are approached and examined by olfaction. Moving preys are pursued and there is no olfactory examination. During phase 3 the food is captured by suction. When food is bigger than turtle mouth it is dilacerated by one or both forefeet used alternately (phase 4. Ingestion is accomplished by gradual suction (phase 5. Intra and inter-specific cleptoparasitism was observed. Success in capture and ingestion of food seems not be dependent on species or size of the turtle. Adults, young, and hatchlings of P. hilarii are primarily carnivorous and vegetables were rarely eaten.

  5. Light pollution affects nesting behavior of loggerhead turtles and predation risk of nests and hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elton; Marco, Adolfo; da Graça, Jesemine; Pérez, Héctor; Abella, Elena; Patino-Martinez, Juan; Martins, Samir; Almeida, Corrine

    2017-08-01

    The introduction of artificial light into wildlife habitats is a rapidly expanding aspect of global change, which has many negative impacts on a wide range of taxa. In this experimental study, which took place on a beach located on the island of Boa Vista (Cabo Verde), three types of artificial light were tested on nesting loggerhead sea turtles as well as on ghost crabs, which intensively predate on nests and hatchlings, to determine the effects they would produce on the behavior of both species. Over the course of 36days, female loggerheads and ghost crabs were studied under yellow, orange and red lights, with observations also being made on dark nights that served as a control treatment. During this period, the frequencies of nesting attempts, the time taken by turtles to complete each phase of the nesting process, and ghost crab abundance and behaviors were carefully recorded. 1146 loggerhead nesting attempts were observed and recorded during the experiments, and results showed a decrease in nesting attempts of at least 20% when artificial lighting was present. A significant decline in successful attempts was also observed within the central sections of the beach, which corresponded to those that received more light. This artificial lighting significantly increased the time that turtles spent on the nesting process and forced them to do more extensive beach crawls. Despite this, the presence of light had no apparent effect on the final selection of the nesting site. Yellow and orange lights significantly disrupted the sea finding behavior and turtles were often unable to orient themselves seaward under these color lights. Disoriented turtles were observed crawling in circuitous paths in front of the light source for several minutes. In addition, artificial lights had the potential to increase the number of ghost crabs present within the illuminated stretches of the beach. However, only yellow lighting produced a significant change on aggressive and prey

  6. Nesting of Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines, Dermochelyidae in the city of Vila Velha, Espírito Santo, Brazil

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    Luis Felipe Silva Pereira Mayorga

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea is seriously threatened with extinction, especially due to accidental catches by amateur and professional fisherman. In Brazil, the only recurrent breeding sites for this species are located along the northern coast of the state of Espírito Santo, although spawning has been occasionally recorded in other states. In February 2010, a nest of D. coriacea was found in Vila Velha, Espírito Santo (20º28’30”S, 40º20’48”W, which contained 132 eggs and a stillborn. Four dead hatchlings were also found scattered within five meters of the nest. The coast of Vila Velha is not considered a breeding site for this species.

  7. Embryonic treatment with xenobiotics disrupts steroid hormone profiles in hatchling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, E; Rhen, T; Sakata, J T; Crews, D

    2000-01-01

    Many compounds in the environment capable of acting as endocrine disruptors have been assayed for their developmental effects on morphogenesis; however, few studies have addressed how such xenobiotics affect physiology. In the current study we examine the effects of three endocrine-disrupting compounds, chlordane, trans-nonachlor, and the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture Aroclor 1242, on the steroid hormone concentrations of red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) hatchlings treated in ovo. Basal steroid concentrations and steroid concentrations in response to follicle-stimulating hormone were examined in both male and female turtles treated with each of the three compounds. Treated male turtles exposed to Aroclor 1242 or chlordane exhibited significantly lower testosterone concentrations than controls, whereas chlordane-treated females had significantly lower progesterone, testosterone, and 5[alpha]-dihydrotestosterone concentrations relative to controls. The effects of these endocrine disruptors extend beyond embryonic development, altering sex-steroid physiology in exposed animals. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10753091

  8. Growth of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris (Daudin, 1802 hatchlings, fed with diets of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. PINHEIRO

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate the growth rate of broad-nosed caiman, Caiman latirostris hatchlings, fed on four animal protein diets: (a dead poultry from a poultry farm; (b dead piglet from nursery and farrowing house in a swine farm; (c whole tilapia (Tilapia rendalli e Oreochromis niloticus; and (d a balanced mixture of a, b, and c sources. Sixteen seven-month old caimans, average weight of 208 g and, 38 cm of total lenght (TL were distributed in four treatments. Four groups of four caimans each were placed in cement enclosures inside a greenhouse. Diets were supplied at the average rate of 97.8% ± 34.8% of the body weight per week (average and standard deviation; wet weight basis. Body mass and total length of caimans were measured every 30 days for six months (Nov. 1995-April. 1996. An analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed. Diets provided suitable growth for weight and TL (mean ± standard deviation, respectively: (a 2,157 ± 743 g and 79.5 ± 6.9 cm; (b 1,811 ± 222 g and 75.7 ± 1.9 cm; (c 2,431 ± 780 g and 80.7 ± 5.8 cm; (d 1,683.5 ± 736 g and 74.5 ± 7.2 cm. There was no significant effect of diet on weight, but diet effect on TL of hatchlings approached significance (p < 0.10. It is concluded that all diets have good potential, in growth sense, to be used in commercial farms or ranches and for captivity propagation programs of caimans.

  9. Toxicity of glyphosate as Glypro and LI700 to red-eared slider (trachemys scripta elegans) embryos and early hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, Donald W; Matson, Cole; Bickham, John; Doelling-Brown, Paige

    2006-10-01

    More than 8.2 billion ha of cropland, gardens, and forests are treated with the herbicide glyphosate each year. Whereas the toxicity of glyphosate and associated adjuvants has been measured in other vertebrates, few, if any, studies have looked at their effects in reptiles. In some instances, management of turtle habitat requires control of successional stages through application of herbicides. Adults and juvenile turtles may be exposed directly, whereas embryos may contact the chemicals through the soil. In the present study, we exposed eggs of red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) to single applications of herbicide ranging from 0 to 11,206 ppm wet weight of glyphosate in Glypro and 0 to 678 ppm of the surfactant, LI700. Hatching success at the highest concentration was significantly lower (73%) than in other treatments (80-100%). At hatch, turtles at the highest concentration weighed less than those at other concentrations. During a 14-d holding period, we observed dose-response relationships in the ability of hatchlings to right themselves when turned on their backs. At the end of the holding period, hatchlings at the highest dose level were still lighter, and somatic indices were lower, than those in other treatments. Genetic damage, as measured by flow cytometry, increased with treatment concentration except for the highest dose. We conclude that because of the high concentrations needed to produce effects and the protection offered by several centimeters of soil or sediment, glyphosate with LI700 poses low levels of risk to red-eared slider embryos under normal field operations with regards to the endpoints measured in the present study. Carelessness in handling glyphosate or failure to follow label directions may produce adverse effects. There also is a risk that the health of turtle embryos may be affected in ways not measured in the present study.

  10. Differential expression of the FMRF gene in adult and hatchling stellate ganglia of the squid Loligo pealei

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    J. Peter H. Burbach

    2013-12-01

    The giant fiber system of the squid Loligo pealei mediates the escape response and is an important neurobiological model. Here, we identified an abundant transcript in the stellate ganglion (SG that encodes a FMRFamide precursor, and characterized FMRFamide and FI/LRF-amide peptides. To determine whether FMRFamide plays a role in the adult and hatchling giant fiber system, we studied the expression of the Fmrf gene and FMRFamide peptides. In stage 29 embryos and stage 30 hatchlings, Ffmr transcripts and FMRFamide peptide were low to undetectable in the SG, in contrast to groups of neurons intensely expressing the Fmrf gene in several brain lobes, including those that innervate the SG. In the adult SG the Fmrf gene was highly expressed, but the FMRFamide peptide was in low abundance. Intense staining for FMRFamide in the adult SG was confined to microneurons and fibers in the neuropil and to small fibers surrounding giant axons in stellar nerves. This shows that the Fmrf gene in the SG is strongly regulated post-hatching, and suggests that the FMRFamide precursor is incompletely processed in the adult SG. The data suggest that the SG only employs the Fmrf gene post-hatching and restricts the biosynthesis of FMRFamide, demonstrating that this peptide is not a major transmitter of the giant fiber system. This contrasts with brain lobes that engage FMRFamide embryonically as a regulatory peptide in multiple neuronal systems, including the afferent fibers that innervate the SG. The biological significance of these mechanisms may be to generate diversity within Fmrf-expressing systems in cephalopods.

  11. Flora bacteriana cloacal y nasal de Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae en el pacífico norte de Costa Rica

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    Mario Santoro

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar la flora normal aerobia, cloacal y nasal de la tortuga lora (Lepidochelys olivacea , entre los meses de julio y agosto del 2002,se colectaron muestras bacteriológicas de 45 quelonios aparentemente sanos,durante el desove en Playa Nancite,Parque Nacional Santa Rosa, Costa Rica, a través del uso de hisopos estériles que se introdujeron en la cloaca y en uno de los conductos nasales. De las muestras recolectadas se obtuvieron e identificaron un total de 99 aislamientos, incluyendo 10 grupos de Gram-negativos y 5 de Gram-positivos. De cada tortuga se obtuvo un promedio de 0.7 bacterias de la cloaca y 1.4 de las cavidades nasales. Las bacterias más frecuente halladas fueron Aeromonas spp.(13/45 y Citrobacter freundi (6/45 en la cloaca, y Bacillus spp. (32/45,Staphylococcus aureus (6/45y Corynebacterium spp.(5/45en las cavidades nasales. En este investigación, la flora microbiana de las tortugas lora resultó constituida por microorganismos potencialmente patógenos para el ser humano y las tortugas.Cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae from the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica.The aerobic cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of 45 apparently healthy female olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea was studied at Nancite nesting beach,in Santa Rosa National Park (Costa Rican North Pacificduring July and August 2002.Bacterial samples were obtained by inserting sterile swabs directly into the cloaca and the nasal cavities of the turtles.Ninety-nine aerobic bacterial isolates, including 10 Gram-negative and 5 Gram-positive bacteria, were recovered.The most common bacteria cultured were Aeromonas spp. (13/45 and Citrobacter freundi (6/45from cloacal samples and Bacillus spp.(32/45, Staphylococcus aureus (6/45and Corynebacterium spp.(5/45from nasal ducts.The results of the present study showed that the aerobic bacterial flora of nesting female olive ridleys was composed of

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION AND DEVELOPMENTAL ABNORMALITIES IN EGGS AND HATCHLINGS OF THE COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE (CHELYDRA SERPENTINA SERPENTINA) FROM THE GREAT LAKES-ST. LAWRENCE RIVER BASIN (1989-91). (R827102)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractDuring 1989-91, we assessed developmental abnormalities in embryos and hatchlings from eggs of the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina serpentina). Eggs were collected and artificially incubated from eight sites in Ontario, Canada and Akwesasne/...

  13. Maximum standard metabolic rate corresponds with the salinity of maximum growth in hatchlings of the estuarine northern diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin): Implications for habitat conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Christopher L.

    2018-01-01

    I evaluated standard metabolic rates (SMR) of hatchling northern diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) across a range of salinities (salinity = 1.5, 4, 8, 12, and 16 psu) that they may encounter in brackish habitats such as those in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A. Consumption of O2 and production of CO2 by resting, unfed animals served as estimates of SMR. A peak in SMR occurred at 8 psu which corresponds closely with the salinity at which hatchling growth was previously shown to be maximized (salinity ∼ 9 psu). It appears that SMR is influenced by growth, perhaps reflecting investments in catabolic pathways that fuel anabolism. This ecophysiological information can inform environmental conservation and management activities by identifying portions of the estuary that are bioenergetically optimal for growth of hatchling terrapins. I suggest that conservation and restoration efforts to protect terrapin populations in oligo-to mesohaline habitats should prioritize protection or creation of habitats in regions where average salinity is near 8 psu and energetic investments in growth appear to be maximized.

  14. Actividad reproductiva de Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae en Isla de Aves, Venezuela (2001-2008 Reproductive activity of Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae in Isla de Aves, Venezuela (2001-2008

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    Vicente Vera

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Isla de Aves, una isla a 650km de La Guaira, Venezuela, protegida como Refugio de Fauna Silvestre, constituye el segundo sitio de mayor anidación de la tortuga verde (Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus 1758 en el Caribe. El seguimiento de la población comenzó en 1972 y de manera más continua desde 1978. Los datos históricos indican que la captura de hembras en la isla, afectó severamente la población hasta 1978, cuando fue construida una base científico-naval. Durante las temporadas de anidación entre 2001-2008 con excepción de 2003 y 2004, las hembras fueron marcadas con placas metálicas y medidas. Asimismo, se muestreó durante 458 noches, en donde se observaron 5 154 eventos, con un máximo de 53 por noche. Los posibles eventos no observados fueron calculados ajustando la distribución temporal de eventos observados a una curva normal. El total de eventos estimados varió de =637.1±106.6 en 2001 a =2 853±42.5 en 2008 (ANOVA F(6.5gl=60.37, pReproductive activity of Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae in Isla de Aves, Venezuela (2001-2008. The second major nesting-site for green turtles in the Caribbean is Isla de Aves, an island protected as a wildlife refuge since 1972, located at 650km Northeast from La Guaira, Venezuela. In this island, the nesting population monitoring started in 1972 and in a more continuous way after 1978, when a Scientific-Naval Station was established and scientific observations started. Since historical data show that female captures had severely affected population levels in this island before 1978, this study aim to describe recent reproductive activities. For this, during the nesting seasons of 2001-2002 and 2005-2008, nesting females were measured and tagged using metal flipper tags. A total of 458 nights were sampled observing 5 154 female emergences, with a maximum of 53 in a single night. Non-observed emergences were calculated fitting the temporal distribution of observed emergences to a normal curve

  15. Spatio-temporal variation in the incubation duration and sex ratio of hawksbill hatchlings: implication for future management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dei Marcovaldi, Maria A G; Santos, Armando J B; Santos, Alexsandro S; Soares, Luciano S; Lopez, Gustave G; Godfrey, Matthew H; López-Mendilaharsu, Milagros; Fuentes, Mariana M P B

    2014-08-01

    Climate change poses a unique threat to species with temperature dependent sex determination (TSD), such as marine turtles, where increases in temperature can result in extreme sex ratio biases. Knowledge of the primary sex ratio of populations with TSD is key for providing a baseline to inform management strategies and to accurately predict how future climate changes may affect turtle populations. However, there is a lack of robust data on offspring sex ratio at appropriate temporal and spatial scales to inform management decisions. To address this, we estimate the primary sex ratio of hawksbill hatchlings, Eretmochelys imbricata, from incubation duration of 5514 in situ nests from 10 nesting beaches from two regions in Brazil over the last 27 years. A strong female bias was estimated in all beaches, with 96% and 89% average female sex ratios produced in Bahia (BA) and Rio Grande do Norte (RN). Both inter-annual (BA, 88 to 99%; RN, 75 to 96% female) and inter-beach (BA, 92% to 97%; RN, 81% to 92% female) variability in mean offspring sex ratio was observed. These findings will guide management decisions in Brazil and provide further evidence of highly female-skew sex ratios in hawksbill turtles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nest site selection by individual leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea, Testudines: Dermochelyidae in Tortuguero, Caribbean coast of Costa Rica

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    Noga Neeman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nest site selection for individual leatherback sea turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, is a matter of dispute. Some authors suggest that a female will tend to randomly scatter her nests to optimize clutch survival at a highly dynamic beach, while others suggest that some site fidelity exists. It is also possible that both strategies exist, depending on the characteristics of each nesting beach, with stable beaches leading to repeating nest site selections and unstable beaches leading to nest scattering. To determine the strategy of the Tortuguero population of D. coriacea, female site preference and repetition were determined by studying whether females repeat their nest zone choices between successive attempts and whether this leads to a correlation in hatching and emergence success of subsequent nests. Nesting data from 1997 to 2008 were used. Perpendicular to the coastline, open sand was preferred in general, regardless of initial choice. This shows a tendency to scatter nests and is consistent with the fact that all vertical zones had a high variability in hatching and emergence success. It is also consistent with nest success not being easily predictable, as shown by the lack of correlation in success of subsequent nesting attempts. Along the coastline, turtles showed a preference for the middle part of the studied section of beach, both at a population level and as a tendency to repeat their initial choice. Interestingly, this zone has the most artificial lights, which leads to slightly lower nest success (though not significantly so and hatchling disorientation. This finding merits further study for a possibly maladaptive trait and shows the need for increased control of artificial nesting on this beach.

  17. Escudos epidérmicos supernumerários e variação na carapaça na tartaruga-tigre-d’água, Trachemys dorbigni (Testudines, Emydidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Bujes, Clovis de Souza; Verrastro Viñas, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The epidermal plates of the carapace and plastron of 51 adults (38 females and 13 males), 07 immature individuals, and 46 hatchlings of the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni (Durémil & Bibron, 1835), originated from the delta of Rio Jacuí region, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, were examined. The results showed that 7.7% of males, 10.52% of females, 14.28% of immature individuals, and 6.52% of the hatchlings presented a kind of anomaly on the shell, as well as a presence of supernumerary ...

  18. Gene expression, glutathione status and indicators of hepatic oxidative stress in laughing gull (Larus atricilla) hatchlings exposed to methylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenko, Kathryn; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Hoffman, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive studies of methylmercury (MeHg) toxicity in birds, molecular effects on birds are poorly characterized. To improve our understanding of toxicity pathways and identify novel indicators of avian exposure to Hg, the authors investigated genomic changes, glutathione status, and oxidative status indicators in liver from laughing gull (Larus atricilla) hatchlings that were exposed in ovo to MeHg (0.05–1.6 µg/g). Genes involved in the transsulfuration pathway, iron transport and storage, thyroid-hormone related processes, and cellular respiration were identified by suppression subtractive hybridization as differentially expressed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) identified statistically significant effects of Hg on cytochrome C oxidase subunits I and II, transferrin, and methionine adenosyltransferase RNA expression. Glutathione-S-transferase activity and protein-bound sulfhydryl levels decreased, whereas glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity increased dose-dependently. Total sulfhydryl concentrations were significantly lower at 0.4 µg/g Hg than in controls. T ogether, these endpoints provided some evidence of compensatory effects, but little indication of oxidative damage at the tested doses, and suggest that sequestration of Hg through various pathways may be important for minimizing toxicity in laughing gulls. This is the first study to describe the genomic response of an avian species to Hg. Laughing gulls are among the less sensitive avian species with regard to Hg toxicity, and their ability to prevent hepatic oxidative stress may be important for surviving levels of MeHg exposures at which other species succumb.

  19. Temperature experienced during incubation affects antioxidant capacity but not oxidative damage in hatchling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treidel, L A; Carter, A W; Bowden, R M

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of how oxidative stress resistance phenotypes are affected by the developmental environment is limited. One component of the developmental environment, which is likely central to early life oxidative stress among ectothermic and oviparous species, is that of temperature. We investigated how incubation temperature manipulations affect oxidative damage and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) hatchlings. First, to determine whether temperature fluctuations elicit oxidative stress, eggs from clutches were randomly assigned to either a constant (29.5 °C) or daily fluctuating temperature incubation (28.7 ± 3 °C) treatment. Second, to assess the effect of temperature fluctuation frequency on oxidative stress, eggs were incubated in one of three fluctuating incubation regimes: 28.7 ± 3 °C fluctuations every 12 h (hyper), 24 h (normal) or 48 h (hypo). Third, we tested the influence of average incubation temperature by incubating eggs in a daily fluctuating incubation temperature regime with a mean temperature of 26.5 °C (low), 27.1 °C (medium) or 27.7 °C (high). Although the accumulation of oxidative damage in hatchlings was unaffected by any thermal manipulation, TAC was affected by both temperature fluctuation frequency and average incubation temperature. Individuals incubated with a low frequency of temperature fluctuations had reduced TAC, while incubation at a lower average temperature was associated with enhanced TAC. These results indicate that although sufficient to prevent oxidative damage, TAC is influenced by developmental thermal environments, potentially because of temperature-mediated changes in metabolic rate. The observed differences in TAC may have important future consequences for hatchling fitness and overwinter survival. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. In ovo feeding with minerals and vitamin D3 improves bone properties in hatchlings and mature broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yair, R; Shahar, R; Uni, Z

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of in ovo feeding (IOF) with inorganic minerals or organic minerals and vitamin D3 on bone properties and mineral consumption. Eggs were incubated and divided into 4 groups: IOF with organic minerals, phosphate, and vitamin D3 (IOF-OMD); IOF with inorganic minerals and phosphate (IOF-IM); sham; and non-treated controls (NTC). IOF was performed on embryonic day (E) 17; tibiae and yolk samples were taken on E19 and E21. Post-hatch, only chicks from the IOF-OMD, sham, and NTC were raised, and tibiae were taken on d 10 and 38. Yolk mineral content was examined by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Tibiae were tested for their whole-bone mechanical properties, and mid-diaphysis bone sections were indented in a micro-indenter to determine bone material stiffness (Young's modulus). Micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to examine cortical and trabecular bone structure. Ash content analysis was used to examine bone mineralization. A latency-to-lie (LTL) test was used to measure standing ability of the d 38 broilers. The results showed that embryos from both IOF-OMD and IOF-IM treatments had elevated Cu, Mn, and Zn amounts in the yolk on E19 and E21 and consumed more of these minerals (between E19 and E21) in comparison to the sham and NTC. On E21, these hatchlings had higher whole-bone stiffness in comparison to the NTC. On d 38, the IOF-OMD had higher ash content, elevated whole-bone stiffness, and elevated Young's modulus (in males) in comparison to the sham and NTC; however, no differences in standing ability were found. Very few structural differences were seen during the whole experiment. This study demonstrates that mineral supplementation by in ovo feeding is sufficient to induce higher mineral consumption from the yolk, regardless of its chemical form or the presence of vitamin D3. Additionally, IOF with organic minerals and vitamin D3 can increase bone ash content, as well as stiffness of the whole

  1. Phylogenomic analyses of 539 highly informative loci dates a fully resolved time tree for the major clades of living turtles (Testudines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, H Bradley; McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Near, Thomas J; Mount, Genevieve G; Spinks, Phillip Q

    2017-10-01

    Accurate time-calibrated phylogenies are the centerpiece of many macroevolutionary studies, and the relationship between the size and scale of molecular data sets and the density and accuracy of fossil calibrations is a key element of time tree studies. Here, we develop a target capture array specifically for living turtles, compare its efficiency to an ultraconserved element (UCE) dataset, and present a time-calibrated molecular phylogeny based on 539 nuclear loci sequenced from 26 species representing the breadth of living turtle diversity plus outgroups. Our gene array, based on three fully sequenced turtle genomes, is 2.4 times more variable across turtles than a recently published UCE data set for an identical subset of 13 species, confirming that taxon-specific arrays return more informative data per sequencing effort than UCEs. We used our genomic data to estimate the ages of living turtle clades including a mid-late Triassic origin for crown turtles and a mid-Carboniferous split of turtles from their sister group, Archosauria. By specifically excluding several of the earliest potential crown turtle fossils and limiting the age of fossil calibration points to the unambiguous crown lineage Caribemys oxfordiensis from the Late Jurassic (Oxfordian, 163.5-157.3Ma) we corroborate a relatively ancient age for living turtles. We also provide novel age estimates for five of the ten testudine families containing more than a single species, as well as several intrafamilial clades. Most of the diversity of crown turtles appears to date to the Paleogene, well after the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction 66mya. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Método Taguchi para optimizar marcadores RAPD-PCR y determinar diversidad genética: un modelo, la tortuga cabezona Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae

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    Julio Martínez-Ortega

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of Taguchi method to optimize RAPD-PCR Markers for determining the genetic diversity: an example the loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta (Testudines:Cheloniidae. DNA was isolated from Caretta caretta two zone of the Colombian Caribbean (Don Diego N=5 and Rosario Islands N=3 and quantified it. Was applied a Taguchi orthogonal matriz of four variables to standardize RAPD-PCR reaction. The data were analyzed with the program PopGen. The conditions were standardized to 7.85 ng/ml of DNA, 3.5 mM MgCl2, 200 mM dNTP's, 0.5 mM oligonucleotide and one unit of Taq DNA polymerase in a final reaction volume of 20 ml. Thermocycling conditions initiated at 94°C for 5 min, followed by 40 cycles of: 94°C for 40 s, 37°C for 40 s and 72°C for 90 s. The markers were recorded in a binary matrix of presence (1 and absence (0, and as a model example of genetic diversity was determined using the Shannon index (H '= 0.44 + / -0.27 individuals and Don Diego H '= 0.25 + / -0.32 for Isla del Rosario, the average rate of genetic structure (Gst=0.27 and the effective migration rate (Nm=1.28. Methodology was standardized using Taguchi method that produces bands of light, legible and reproducible that can be used as a reliable alternative for studies of genetic diversity in the loggerhead turtle and other species, and further, integrate them into the curriculum of molecular biology and/or biochemistry for undergraduate and graduate students.

  3. Critical windows in embryonic development: Shifting incubation temperatures alter heart rate and oxygen consumption of Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) embryos and hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eme, J; Mueller, C A; Manzon, R G; Somers, C M; Boreham, D R; Wilson, J Y

    2015-01-01

    Critical windows are periods of developmental susceptibility when the phenotype of an embryonic, juvenile or adult animal may be vulnerable to environmental fluctuations. Temperature has pervasive effects on poikilotherm physiology, and embryos are especially vulnerable to temperature shifts. To identify critical windows, we incubated whitefish embryos at control temperatures of 2°C, 5°C, or 8°C, and shifted treatments among temperatures at the end of gastrulation or organogenesis. Heart rate (fH) and oxygen consumption ( [Formula: see text] ) were measured across embryonic development, and [Formula: see text] was measured in 1-day old hatchlings. Thermal shifts, up or down, from initial incubation temperatures caused persistent changes in fH and [Formula: see text] compared to control embryos measured at the same temperature (2°C, 5°C, or 8°C). Most prominently, when embryos were measured at organogenesis, shifting incubation temperature after gastrulation significantly lowered [Formula: see text] or fH. Incubation at 2°C or 5°C through gastrulation significantly lowered [Formula: see text] (42% decrease) and fH (20% decrease) at 8°C, incubation at 2°C significantly lowered [Formula: see text] (40% decrease) and fH (30% decrease) at 5°C, and incubation at 5°C and 8°C significantly lowered [Formula: see text] at 2°C (27% decrease). Through the latter half of development, [Formula: see text] and fH in embryos were not different from control values for thermally shifted treatments. However, in hatchlings measured at 2°C, [Formula: see text] was higher in groups incubated at 5°C or 8°C through organogenesis, compared to 2°C controls (43 or 65% increase, respectively). Collectively, these data suggest that embryonic development through organogenesis represents a critical window of embryonic and hatchling phenotypic plasticity. This study presents an experimental design that identified thermally sensitive periods for fish embryos. Crown Copyright

  4. Uma revisão sobre padrões de atividade, reprodução e alimentação de cágados brasileiros (Testudines, Chelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco L. Souza

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A review on activity patterns, reproduction, and feeding habits in Brazilian chelid turtles (Testudines, Chelidae.The knowledge on natural history of some Brazilian chelonian species is still scarce what makes it difficult to ascertain ecological andevolutionary histories. Data like this, however, can be used as fundamental tools for species management and conservation. A survey was made on the activity patterns, reproduction, and feeding behavior of Brazilian Chelidae species (freshwater sidenecked turtles available in the literature. A clear lack of information regarding natural history is evident for most species. The species diversity and the biological importance of this taxon regard it as an interesting target to be studied. Since several Chelidae behaviors (including those reported in this study are considered stereotyped, I suggest that laboratory studies should be encouraged as a way of complementing the field research.

  5. Development of a quantitative PCR for rapid and sensitive diagnosis of an intranuclear coccidian parasite in Testudines (TINC), and detection in the critically endangered Arakan forest turtle (Heosemys depressa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, W Alexander; Gibbons, Paul M; Rivera, Sam; Archer, Linda L; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2013-03-31

    The intranuclear coccidian parasite of Testudines (TINC) is responsible for significant disease in turtles and tortoises causing high mortality and affecting several threatened species. Diagnostic testing has been limited to relatively labor intensive and expensive pan-coccidial PCR and sequencing techniques. A qPCR assay targeting a specific and conserved region of TINC 18S rRNA was designed. The qPCR reaction was run on samples known to be TINC positive and the results were consistent and analytically specific. The assay was able to detect as little as 10 copies of target DNA in a sample. Testing of soil and invertebrates was negative and did not provide any further insights into life cycles. This assay was used to identify TINC in a novel host species, the critically endangered Arakan forest turtle (Heosemys depressa). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (de-71) in chicken (Gallus gallus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and American kestrel (Falco sparverius) embryos and hatchlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, M.A.; Rattner, B.A.; Hale, R.C.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic survival, pipping and hatching success, and sublethal biochemical, endocrine, and histological endpoints were examined in hatchling chickens (Gallus gallus), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following air cell administration of a pentabrominated diphenyl ether (penta-BDE; DE-71) mixture (0.01-20 mu g/g egg) or polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 126 (3,3', 4,4', 5-pentachlorobiphenyl; 0.002 mu g/g egg). The penta-BDE decreased pipping and hatching success at concentrations of 10 and 20 mu g/g egg in kestrels but had no effect on survival endpoints in chickens or mallards. Sublethal effects in hatchling chickens included ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) induction and histological changes in the bursa, but these responses were not observed in other species. Polychlorinated biphenyl congener 126 (positive control) reduced survival endpoints in chicken and kestrel embryos and caused sublethal effects (EROD induction, reduced bursal mass and follicle size) in chickens. Mallards were clearly less sensitive than the other species to administered penta-BDE and PCB 126. In a second experiment, the absorption of penta-BDE (11.1 mu g/g egg, air cell administered during early development) into the contents of chicken and kestrel eggs was determined at various intervals (24 h postinjection, midincubation, and pipping). By pipping, 29% of the penta-BDE administered dose was present in the egg contents in chickens, and 18% of the administered dose was present in kestrel egg contents. Based on uptake in kestrels, the lowest-observed-effect level on pipping and hatching success may be as low as 1.8 mu g total penta-BDE/g egg, which approaches concentrations detected in eggs of free-ranging birds. Because some penta-BDE congeners are still increasing in the environment, the toxic effects observed in the present study are cause for concern in wildlife.

  7. Biometria corporal e parâmetros hematológicos de Trachemys scripta elegans e Trachemys dorbignyi (Testudines: Emydidae criadas em cativeiro em Petrolina, Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gradela

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Este estudo objetivou avaliar a biometria corporal e o perfil hematológico de Trachemys scripta elegans (N=28 e de Trachemys dorbignyi (N=22 criadas em cativeiro na região do submédio do Vale do São Francisco, semiárido nordestino brasileiro, visando estabelecer valores sanguíneos básicos de saúde e gerar dados úteis na fisiologia comparativa de Testudines. Após 120 dias de adaptação e jejum de 24 horas, 2,5 mL de sangue foram coletados do seio occipital dorsal e depositados em tubo com heparina sódica para a avaliação, na sequência, dos níveis hematologicos. A contagem total de eritrócitos (CTE e global de leucócitos (CGL foi realizada em câmara de Neubauer; a dosagem de hemoglobina (HGB pelo método da método da cianometahemoglobina e o hematócrito (HCT através da técnica do microhematócrito. A partir da CTE estabeleceram-se matematicamente os índices hematimétricos. A biometria corporal também foi avaliada: a massa corporal (MC, g; b dimensões máximas da carapaça [comprimento (CMC, cm e largura (LMC, cm];c dimensões máximas do plastrão [comprimento (CMP, cm e largura (LMP, cm]; d comprimento total da cauda (CTC, cm; e comprimento linear da base da cauda ao orifício cloacal (CprC, cm; f comprimento linear do orifício cloacal a extremidade da cauda(CpoC, cm. T. scripta elegans apresentaram valores maiores (P 0,05 entre as espécies. Os resultados demostram que a maior parte da variação observada entre T. scripta elegans e T. dorbignyi é explicada pelas variáveis biométricas e que algumas correlações hematológicas caracterizam diferenças interespecíficas. Conclui-se que os resultados lançam luz sobre valores de referência para estas espécies mantidas em cativeiro na região do semiárido e servem como um modelo para a fisiologia comparativa intra e interespécies.

  8. Neurogenesis in an early protostome relative: progenitor cells in the ventral nerve center of chaetognath hatchlings are arranged in a highly organized geometrical pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Yvan; Rieger, Verena; Martin, Elise; Müller, Carsten H G; Harzsch, Steffen

    2013-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that Chaetognatha represent an evolutionary lineage that is the sister group to all other Protostomia thus promoting these animals as a pivotal model for our understanding of bilaterian evolutionary history. We have analyzed the proliferation of neuronal progenitor cells in the developing ventral nerve center (VNC) of Spadella cephaloptera hatchlings. To that end, for the first time in Chaetognatha, we performed in vivo incorporation experiments with the S-phase specific mitosis marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Our experiments provide evidence for a high level of mitotic activity in the VNC for ca. 3 days after hatching. Neurogenesis is carried by presumptive neuronal progenitor cells that cycle rapidly and most likely divide asymmetrically. These progenitors are arranged in a distinct grid-like geometrical pattern including about 35 transverse rows. Considering Chaetognaths to be an early offshoot of the protostome lineage we conclude that the presence of neuronal progenitor cells with asymmetric division seems to be a feature that is rooted deeply in the Metazoa. In the light of previous evidence indicating the presence of serially iterated peptidergic neurons with individual identities in the chaetognath VNC, we discuss if these neuronal progenitor cells give rise to distinct lineages. Furthermore, we evaluate the serially iterated arrangement of the progenitor cells in the light of evolution of segmentation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nevus melanocítico intradérmico congénito gigante. "El niño tortuga (testudines": Caso clínico Giant congenital melanocytic nevus. "Turtle boy": Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Arango Ospina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos el caso de un paciente de 2 años de edad, conocido en su pueblo, como "el niño tortuga (testudines" debido a la gran similitud con dicho reptil. Desde su nacimiento presentó nevus melanocítico gigante localizado en región torácica posterior, región lumbosacra y lesiones satélites en extremidades y abdomen, de 50 por 40cm de diámetro y color café oscuro; la piel en las zonas afectadas es gruesa con grandes surcos de aspecto corrugado (cerebriforme. El nombre dado al niño se basa en la similitud de sus lesiones con la morfología de una tortuga, ya que el caparazón cubre la zona superior, inferior y lateral del cuerpo de este animal, de la misma forma que el nevus gigante lo hacía en el caso de nuestro paciente. Este caparazón está formado por placas óseas revestidas de placas corneas, que se asemejan a los surcos de aspecto corrugado que conforman el nevus melanocítico gigante. Los estudios clínicos practicados revelaron compromiso cardiovascular, hepático y esplénico, así como una desfavorable evolución y pronostico del cuadro clínico, por lo que esta patología, específicamente para este niño y de acuerdo a la junta Médico-Quirúrgica y valoraciones, fue considerada inoperable.We present the case of a 2 years-old patient, known in his town as "turtle boy"(testudines due to his great simility with this reptile because of his giant congenital melanocytic nevus, located in the posterior and lateral aspect of the chest and in smaller proportion in abdomen and extremities, of 50 by 40cm and dark brown colour. The skin in this zone is thick with great furrows and corrugated aspect. He was called "turtle boy" based on the morphology of the turtle, its shell covers the superior, inferior and lateral zone like in our patient's case. It is formed by bone layers covered by cornea layers, which resemble the furrows and corrugated aspect of the giant congenital melanocytic nevus. Medical investigation reveals

  10. Evaluation of a combination of sodium hypochlorite and polyhexamethylene biguanide as an egg wash for red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) to suppress or eliminate Salmonella organisms on egg surfaces and in hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A; Adamson, Trinka W; Singleton, Charles B; Roundtree, Marlana K; Bauer, Rudy W; Acierno, Mark J

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate a combination of 2 nonantibiotic microbicide compounds, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), as a treatment to suppress or eliminate Salmonella spp from red-eared slider (RES) turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans) eggs and hatchlings. 2,738 eggs from 8 turtle farms in Louisiana. Eggs were randomly sorted into 3 or, when sufficient eggs were available, 4 treatment groups as follows: control, pressure-differential egg treatment with NaOCl and gentamicin, NaOCl and PHMB bath treatment, and pressure-differential egg treatment with NaOCl and PHMB. Bacterial cultures were performed from specimens of eggs and hatchlings and evaluated for Salmonella spp. RES turtle eggs treated with NaOCl and PHMB as a bath (odds ratio [OR], 0.2 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.1 to 0.3]) or as a pressure-differential dip (OR, 0.01 [95% CI, 0.001 to 0.07]) or with gentamicin as a pressure-differential dip (OR, 0.1 [95% CI, 0.06 to 0.2]) were significantly less likely to have Salmonella-positive culture results than control-group eggs. Concern over reptile-associated salmonellosis in children in the United States is so great that federal regulations prohibit the sale of turtles that are < 10.2 cm in length. Currently, turtle farms treat eggs with gentamicin solution. Although this has reduced Salmonella shedding, it has also resulted in antimicrobial resistance. Results of our study indicate that a combination of NaOCl and PHMB may be used to suppress or eliminate Salmonella spp on RES turtle eggs and in hatchlings.

  11. Beach erosion and nest site selection by the leatherback sea turtle Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae and implications for management practices at Playa Gandoca, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Spanier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea nest on dynamic, erosion-prone beaches. Erosive processes and resulting nest loss have long been presumed to be a hindrance to clutch survival. In order to better understand how leatherbacks cope with unstable nesting beaches, I investigated the role of beach erosion in leatherback nest site selection at Playa Gandoca, Costa Rica. I also examined the potential effect of nest relocation, a conservation strategy in place at Playa Gandoca to prevent nest loss to erosion, on the temperature of incubating clutches. I monitored changes in beach structure as a result of erosion at natural nest sites during the time the nest was laid, as well as in subsequent weeks. To investigate slope as a cue for nest site selection, I measured the slope of the beach where turtles ascended from the sea to nest, as well as the slopes at other random locations on the beach for comparison. I examined temperature differences between natural and relocated nest sites with thermocouples placed in the sand at depths typical of leatherback nests. Nests were distributed non-randomly in a clumped distribution along the length of the beach and laid at locations that were not undergoing erosion. The slope at nest sites was significantly different than at randomly chosen locations on the beach. The sand temperature at nest depths was significantly warmer at natural nest sites than at locations of relocated nests. The findings of this study suggest leatherbacks actively select nest sites that are not undergoing erosive processes, with slope potentially being used as a cue for site selection. The relocation of nests appears to be inadvertently cooling the nest environment. Due to the fact that leatherback clutches undergo temperaturedependent sex determination, the relocation of nests may be producing an unnatural male biasing of hatchlings. The results of this study suggest that the necessity of relocation practices, largely in place to

  12. Impacto de la luz artificial sobre la anidación de la tortuga marina Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae, en playa Cipara, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rondón Médicci

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available En Playa Cipara, Península de Paria, Venezuela, se evaluó el impacto de la luz artificial sobre la anidación de la tortuga cardón. Se estimó el número de anidaciones y su distribución espacial a lo largo de la playa entre los años sin y con iluminación artificial y entre segmentos de playa iluminada y oscura. Se hicieron entrevistas a los residentes para conocer su percepción sobre el impacto de la luz artificial hacia las tortugas marinas. Entre el 2000 y 2005 se registraron 1 217 salidas de tortuga cardón; con 1 056 nidos. El número de nidos con huevos dependió significativamente del año (p=0.035 al igual que el número de nidos totales (p=0.015. En los años previos a la electricidad (2000-2003 se observaron 743 salidas, de las cuales 661 con nido y 374 nidadas confirmadas. En los dos años (2004-2005 con iluminación artificial, se contaron 474 salidas con 395 nidos y 232 nidadas. La proporción de salidas con construcción de nido disminuyó significativamente (p=0.005 en los años con luz eléctrica, pero no varió el éxito de desove (p=0.402. No se encontró diferencia significativa entre el número de salidas por metro de playa en los sectores oscuros y los iluminados (p=0.244, ni entre el número de nidos construidos (p=0.379, ni entre las anidaciones con desove (p=0.516. Tampoco en la proporción de las salidas totales que constituyeron anidaciones (p=0.067 entre los sectores iluminados y oscuros, ni en la proporción de nidos exitosos (p=0.833. El volumen medio de arena por metro de playa fue mayor en La Peña, Cipara y La Remate y menor en Varadero (pImpact of artificial light on nesting in the leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae at Cipara beach, Venezuela. The number of Leatherback turtle nests and their spatial distribution was compared between years with and without artificial light, and between dark and lighted beach segments, in Cipara Beach, Paria Peninsula, Venezuela. Residents

  13. Composición química del huevo de Tortuga Golfina Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae y su potencial como recurso alimenticio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Castro-González

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Por su potencial como fuente alimenticia, se analizó la composición química de huevo de Lepidochelys olivácea en La Escobilla, Oaxaca, México. El Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México proporcionó 250 muestras de huevo liofilizado de 25 tortugas, que se analizaron siguiendo métodos oficiales para humedad, cenizas, proteína, grasa, lípidos totales(LT y análisis microbiológicos; además de ácidos grasos(AG por cromatografía de gases, aminoácidos(AA, vitaminas y colesterol(col por HPLC. Los resultados fueron los siguientes: (g/100g humedad(4.7, cenizas(3.8, proteína(53.7 y grasa(47.4. AA esenciales (g aa/100g Proteína: Ile (4.4, Lys(6.6, Leu(7.4, Met+Cys (8.8, Phe+Tyr (10.8; retinol (340μg/100g, colecalciferol (5.9 μg/100g, tocoferol (8.6, tiamina (0.3 y riboflavina (1.1 (mg/100g. Y los de (LT, (AG y (Col se concentraron en tres grupos por peso de tortuga: (LT (44.3-48.7-49.1g/100g, (Col (518.4-522.5-728.7 mg/100g. Entonces se identificaron 17 AGSaturados, 8 AGMonoinsaturados y 11 AGPoliinsaturados. Los AGS más abundantes (mg/100g: C16:0 (485-1263, AGM: C16:1 (456-716, C18:1n-9c (904- 1754 y AGP: C20:4n-6 (105-217, EPA (48-103 y HA (97-189. También, existió diferencia significativa (Fisher, pChemical composition of eggs of the Olive Ridley Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae and it’s potential as a food source. The Olive Ridley is a worldwide distributed species with high nesting production per season, and in La Escobilla Oaxaca, México, there is a 70% of non-hatched eggs that are lost. In order to evaluate their potential use as a source for human and animal food products, their chemical composition was analyzed. Lyophilized egg samples from 25 turtles were obtained and were analyzed following the analytical methods for fatty acids, protein, fat, ash, moisture, amino acids, vitamins, cholesterol and microbiological agents. The analytical composition obtained

  14. Snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) as bioindicators in Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes Basin. II. Changes in hatching success and hatchling deformities in relation to persistent organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solla, S.R. de , [Population Assessment Unit, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Road, Box 5050, Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada); Fernie, K J; Ashpole, S [Population Assessment Unit, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Road, Box 5050, Burlington, ON, L7R 4A6 (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    Hatching success and deformities in snapping turtle hatchlings (Chelydra serpentina) were evaluated using eggs collected from 14 sites in the Canadian lower Great Lakes, including Areas of Concern (AOC), between 2001 and 2004. Eggs were analyzed for PCBs, PBDEs, and pesticides. Between 2002 and 2004, hatchling deformity rates were highest in two AOCs (18.3-28.3%) compared to the reference sites (5.3-11.3%). Hatching success was poorest in three AOCs (71.3-73.1%) compared to the reference sites (86.0-92.7%). Hatching success and deformity rates were generally poorer in 2001 compared to 2002-2004, irrespective of the study location and could be due to egg handling stress in 2001. Hatching success and deformities were generally worst from the Wheatley Harbour, St. Lawrence River (Cornwall), Detroit River, and Hamilton Harbour AOCs. Associations between contaminant burdens with embryonic development were sufficiently poor that the biological relevance is questionable. Stressors not measured may have contributed to development abnormalities. - Hatching success and deformities of snapping turtle eggs varied among Great Lake Areas of Concern, but were not attributable to specific chemical exposure.

  15. Snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) as bioindicators in Canadian areas of concern in the Great Lakes Basin. II. Changes in hatching success and hatchling deformities in relation to persistent organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Solla, S R; Fernie, K J; Ashpole, S

    2008-06-01

    Hatching success and deformities in snapping turtle hatchlings (Chelydra serpentina) were evaluated using eggs collected from 14 sites in the Canadian lower Great Lakes, including Areas of Concern (AOC), between 2001 and 2004. Eggs were analyzed for PCBs, PBDEs, and pesticides. Between 2002 and 2004, hatchling deformity rates were highest in two AOCs (18.3-28.3%) compared to the reference sites (5.3-11.3%). Hatching success was poorest in three AOCs (71.3-73.1%) compared to the reference sites (86.0-92.7%). Hatching success and deformity rates were generally poorer in 2001 compared to 2002-2004, irrespective of the study location and could be due to egg handling stress in 2001. Hatching success and deformities were generally worst from the Wheatley Harbour, St. Lawrence River (Cornwall), Detroit River, and Hamilton Harbour AOCs. Associations between contaminant burdens with embryonic development were sufficiently poor that the biological relevance is questionable. Stressors not measured may have contributed to development abnormalities.

  16. Snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) as bioindicators in Canadian Areas of Concern in the Great Lakes Basin. II. Changes in hatching success and hatchling deformities in relation to persistent organic pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solla, S.R. de; Fernie, K.J.; Ashpole, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hatching success and deformities in snapping turtle hatchlings (Chelydra serpentina) were evaluated using eggs collected from 14 sites in the Canadian lower Great Lakes, including Areas of Concern (AOC), between 2001 and 2004. Eggs were analyzed for PCBs, PBDEs, and pesticides. Between 2002 and 2004, hatchling deformity rates were highest in two AOCs (18.3-28.3%) compared to the reference sites (5.3-11.3%). Hatching success was poorest in three AOCs (71.3-73.1%) compared to the reference sites (86.0-92.7%). Hatching success and deformity rates were generally poorer in 2001 compared to 2002-2004, irrespective of the study location and could be due to egg handling stress in 2001. Hatching success and deformities were generally worst from the Wheatley Harbour, St. Lawrence River (Cornwall), Detroit River, and Hamilton Harbour AOCs. Associations between contaminant burdens with embryonic development were sufficiently poor that the biological relevance is questionable. Stressors not measured may have contributed to development abnormalities. - Hatching success and deformities of snapping turtle eggs varied among Great Lake Areas of Concern, but were not attributable to specific chemical exposure

  17. Aislamiento e identificación de microorganismos entéricos en muestras ambientales y cloacales en Crocodylus intermedius y Testudines de la Estación de Biología Tropical Roberto Franco en Villav icencio, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Pachón

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Los microorganismos entéricos han sido frecuentemente reportados como patógenos en mamíferos, aves, peces, reptiles y humanos, a pesar de hacer parte de su flora normal intestinal. La Estación de Biología Tropical Roberto Franco (EBTRF, lidera el programa de recuperación del Caimán Llanero ( Crocodylus intermedius , que se encuentra en inminente peligro de extinción; adicionalmente cuenta con una colección viva de Testudines que comprende más de 20 especies. Con el fin de determinar la presencia de potenciales enteropatógenos en el hábitat de los ejemplares, se obtuvieron 129 muestras ambientales y cloacales de las especies allí encontradas; se utilizó el medio de cultivo CHROMagar Orientación BD® para realizar los aislamientos y la identificación microbiológica. Los resultados muestran una mayor presentación de flora gram negativa predominando microorganismos de los géneros Escherichia coli (28%, Klebsiella sp (26%, Salmonella sp. (6%, Proteus sp (3% y Citrobacter sp. (1% Sin embargo, microorganismos del género Enterococcus sp. (gram positivo, fueron hallados en un mayor porcentaje (31% en todas las muestras sin importar el origen de las mismas. Conscientes del riesgo que implica el aislamiento de microorganismos entéricos que pueden presentar un carácter zoonótico, se dio inicio a la implementación de un manual de bioseguridad para la Estación con el fin disminuir el riesgo para la población humana y animal.

  18. Great tit hatchling sex ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lessells, C.M.; Mateman, A.C.; Visser, J.

    1996-01-01

    The sex of Great Tit Parus major nestlings was determined using PCR RAPDs. Because this technique requires minute amounts of DNA, chicks could be sampled soon (0-2d) after hatching, before any nestling mortality occurred. The proportion of males among 752 chicks hatching in 102 broods (98.9% of

  19. Caracterización espacio-temporal del hábitat y presencia de Dermatemys mawii (Testudines: Dermatemydidae en la cuenca del Grijalva-Usumacinta, Tabasco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Elena Zenteno Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La tortuga centroamericana (Dermatemys mawii es una especie en peligro de extinción pobremente estudiada. En el presente trabajo se analizaron las variaciones estacionales y espaciales del hábitat y se relacionaron con la presencia/ausencia de D. mawii en tres ríos de la Reserva de la Biosfera Pantanos de Centla (Tabasco, México. Para caracterizar el hábitat se evaluaron 11 variables (hidrológicas, fisicoquímicas del agua y de la vegetación en dos temporadas (seca y lluviosa. Para determinar la presencia/ ausencia de la especie se colocaron 8 trampas de desvío acuáticas, empleando la captura por unidad de esfuerzo (CPUE como indicador de la abundancia relativa. Los resultados indicaron variaciones espacio-temporales. El análisis de componentes principales (ACP permitió determinar la variabilidad ambiental. La presencia de la especie se confirmó en los tres ríos, sin embargo la mayor abundancia relativa se registró en el Río Tabasquillo. Cuatro variables tuvieron el mayor peso como variables predictoras de la presencia de la especie. Con los resultados obtenidos, es evidente la importancia que tiene el ambiente ribereño como hábitat para Dermatemys, asimismo es posible hacer el primer acercamiento a un plan de acción para la protección de la especie y su hábitat en esta reserva.Presence and spatio-temporal habitat characterization of Dermatemys mawii (Testudines: Dermatemydidae in the Grijalva-Usumacinta watershed, Tabasco, Mexico. The Central American River Turtle (Dermatemys mawii is an endangered species that has been poorly studied. There are no reports on their population status, habitat condition, and the species distribution area is still unknown. This study analyzes the seasonal and spatial variations of their habitat and the presence/absence of D. mawii in three rivers within the Pantanos de Centla Biosphere Reserve (Tabasco, Mexico. For habitat characterization, natural segmentation of rivers was used and three

  20. Condiciones óptimas de cultivo de linfocitos y análisis parcial del cariotipo de la tortuga cabezona, Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae en Santa Marta, Caribe Colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellie Ann López

    2008-09-01

    íbridos viables de C. caretta, por lo tanto, se hace necesario realizar estudios a nivel molecular.Lymphocyte culture and partial karyotype of the marine turtle Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae in Santa Marta, Colombian Caribbean. Over the past few years an important reduction in the number of nesting marine turtle Caretta caretta individuals has been registered in the Colombian Caribbean, raising the question of a possible extinction in the medium term. A conservation plan is needed. We studied the culture requirements for C. caretta lymphocytes and preliminary karyotype analysis for cytogenetic identification, immunological study and toxicology without the need to kill individuals. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 47 individuals in Santa Marta, Colombia and tests were made until optimal conditions were established for lymphocyte culture. The karyotype had 56 chromosomes, 32 macrochromosomes and 24 micro-chromosomes. An ideogram showed that C. caretta has four groups of chromosomes. Sexual chromosomes were not observed. These results do not coincide with the karyotype described from the Pacific (Japan. The present study is the first to include a complete description of the chromosome morphology of turtles from the Atlantic Ocean. it is possible that one of the adaptive strategies of this species is genetic interchange with other species of the family, producing viable hybrids. individuals in this study might be viable hybrids of C. caretta and further molecular studies are needed. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (3: 1459-1469. Epub 2008 September 30.

  1. Histología gonadal y criterios fenotípicos de maduración en las tortugas marinas Chelonia mydas y Eretmochelys imbricata (Testudines: Chelonidae de Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Pérez

    2010-03-01

    debe cambiar a: C. mydas: por encima de 93.0cm y E. imbricata por encima de 79.0cm.Gonadic histology and phenotypical maturation criteria in the marine turtles Chelonia mydas and Eretmochelys imbricata (Testudines: Chelonidae from Cuba. Gonad maturity is usually evaluated through macroscopic analysis of the gonads. In sea turtles, the maturation stages are associated with body size, depending on the studied marine stock. Fishermen classify turtles bigger than 65.0cm as sexually mature. If they have secondary sex characters they are recorded as breeding males. We compared body size with macroscopic and microscopic gonad characteristics in two Cuban turtles. Eighteen individuals of C. mydas and twenty of E. imbricata was obtained from the legal fishery stock of Jardines del Rey Archipelago (Cuba, from October 2005 and 2006. In males, breeding condition (maximum spermiogenesis was checked by histological analysis of the testes. In females, sexual maturity was identified by the presence of vitellogenic follicles or ovarian corpora. Most males were immature (C. mydas: 79.0cm; E. imbricata: 73.1±4.9cm, n=3 and lacked secondary sex characters. Some E. imbricata without a developed penis were in spermatogenic stages II to IV (i.e. pubescent. Most females were immature (C. mydas: 79.6±7.7cm, n=17; E. imbricata: 69.0±7.1cm, n=16; i.e.prepubescent and pubescent. The prepubescent females had ovaries with previtellogenic follicles near 1.0mm in a compact and yellowish stroma. The pubescent females had ovaries with previtellogenic follicles between 2.0 and 3.0mm. The stroma was more loosened and irrigated than in prepubescent turtles. The finding of spermatogenic activity in pubescent males indicates asynchrony between testicular and penial development in E. imbricata. The current phenotypical approach used by fishermen is not enough to determine sexual maturation in these turtles. The minimal size tentatively should be changed to: C. mydas: above 93.0cm and E. imbricata above 79

  2. Gas exchange in avian embryos and hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P

    2009-08-01

    The avian egg has been proven to be an excellent model for the study of the physical principles and the physiological characteristics of embryonic gas exchange. In recent years, it has become a model for the studies of the prenatal development of pulmonary ventilation, its chemical control and its interaction with extra-pulmonary gas exchange. Differently from mammals, in birds the initiation of pulmonary ventilation and the transition from diffusive to convective gas exchange are gradual and slow-occurring events amenable to detailed investigations. The absence of the placenta and of the mother permits the study of the mechanisms of embryonic adaptation to prenatal perturbations in a way that would be impossible with mammalian preparations. First, this review summarises the general aspects of the natural history of the avian egg that are pertinent to embryonic metabolism, growth and gas exchange and the characteristics of the structures participating in gas exchange. Then, the review focuses on the embryonic development of pulmonary ventilation, its regulation in relation to the embryo's environment and metabolic state, the effects that acute or sustained changes in embryonic temperature or oxygenation can have on growth, metabolism and ventilatory control.

  3. Determining sex ratios of turtle hatchlings

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Previous status assessments of marine turtles have assumed that the natural sex ratio of a marine turtle population is 1:1 (e.g. Conant et al. 2009). However, this...

  4. Incubação artificial dos ovos e processo de eclosão em Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudines, Emydidae Artificial egg incubation and hatching proccess in Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron (Reptilia, Testudimes, Emydidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio de Barros Molina

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial incubation of 558 eggs from 70 clutches of Trachemys dorbignyi (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 were performed at São Paulo Zoo during 1992 and 1993. Hatching occurred when eggs were incubated between 25 and 31.5oC. Incubation time varied from 54 (at 31.5oC to 120 days (at 25oC, similarly to Trachemys scripla sspp. Hatchling used the caruncle to made small incisions in the egg shell, latter enlarged by movements of the head and forefeet. Hatching usually lasted from one to two days. Newborn's carapace and plastron showed their natural form few hours after the emergence from the egg shell. During the third or fourth week, caruncle usually disappeared, and yolk sac was completely absorbed. Average (x±sd measures of newborn were 3.55±0.18cm of carapace length, 3.35±0.17cm of plastron length, and 10.73±1.36g of weight.

  5. Abundance, population structure and conservation of Podocnemis lewyana (Podocnemididae) at the Prado River, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Zarate, Adriana; Montenegro, Olga; Castano Mora, Olga Victoria; Vargas Ramirez Mario

    2014-01-01

    Along the Prado River, at southeast of Colombia, there is a population of Podocnemis lewyana, an endemic and endangered river turtle. Relative abundance, population structure and conservation threats were determined using field data obtained in 2007 and 2009. Relative abundance was estimated by turtle catch per unit of time, which was used to compare between the two sampling years. Additionally, turtles per kilometer were counted in 2009 alone, to compare with other populations distributed in the north of the country. The population structure was determined by the frequency of individuals of several size classes and sex ratio of captured animals. Sexual dimorphism was examined in adult animals by morphometry. One hundred and ten turtles were captured in 2007 and 72 in 2009. The relative abundance of individuals observed was an averaged of 54.46 sightings/km representing the most abundant population of the country so far. The population's structure was characterized by a higher frequency of individuals of 21-30 cm maximum straight carapace length SCL and absence of individuals of less than 10 cm SCL or greater than 40 cm SCL. Sex ratio was 2.52:1 for 2007 and 2.75:1 for 2009, being higher for females. The main identified threats to the population of P. lewyana at Prado River were (i) alterations of habitat, (ii) changes in the natural flow of the river, (iii) the use of inappropriate fishing arts and (iv) probable interruption of migrations. Prado River is hereby proposed as priority area for further research and conservation of Podocnemis lewyana in the upper Magdalena River basin.

  6. Cytogenetic characterization of the Savannah Sideneck Turtle Podocnemis vogli (Reptilia: Testudinata: Podocnemididae

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    ML. Ortiz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven specimens of Podocnemis vogli were studied; three were collected at Puerto López and Puerto Gaitán in the Meta Department of Colombia, four lacks collecting data. All specimens presented a complement consisting of 28 chromosomes without sexual chromosomes. The first group was composed by four submetacentric pairs and one subtelocentric, the second group by six metacentric pairs and the third group by three acrocentric pairs, differing from the previous description by Rhodin et al. (1978 who found two acrocentric pairs. C, G, NOR and Q band patterns are described for the species. Nucleolar Organizer Regions were localized in the first chromosome pair in an intercalary band inserted in the short arms which could be visualized in interphase as one or two nucleoli. The C band technique allowed heterochromatic regions to be located in chromosomes associated with pericentromeric regions. Some heterochromatic polymorphisms (intercalary bands were identified in chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 7, leading to the supposition that there are chromosome markers which could be associated with different P. vogli populations within their geographic distribution.

  7. Abundance, Population Structure and Conservation of Podocnemis lewyana (Podocnemididae at the Prado River, Colombia

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    Adriana González-Zárate

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available En el río Prado, localizado en el sur oriente de Colombia existe una población de Podocnemis lewyana, una tortuga endémica y en peligro de extinción. Para esta población se determinó la abundancia relativa, la estructura poblacional y las amenazas a la conservación a partir de información de campo obtenida en los años 2007 y 2009. La abundancia relativa se estimó por medio de captura de tortugas por unidad de tiempo. Adicionalmente, solo en el 2009, se realizó un conteo de individuos por kilómetro recorrido para contrastarlo con poblaciones del norte del país. La estructura poblacional se determinó por la frecuencia de individuos en varias clases de tamaño y con la proporción de sexos de los animales capturados. Se examinó el dimorfismo sexual en animales adultos con base en su morfometría. En total se capturaron 110 tortugas el año 2007 y 72 tortugas en el 2009. Se tuvo un promedio de 54,46 avistamientos/km (2009, siendo hasta el momento la población más abundante del país. La estructura de la población se caracterizó por una mayor frecuencia de individuos de 21-30 cm de largo recto máximo del caparazón (LRC y ningún individuo de menos de 10 cm LRC ni mayor a 40 cm LRC. La proporción de sexos fue de 2,52:1 en el 2007 y de 2,75:1 en el 2009, siendo mayor para hembras. Las principales amenazas identificadas para la población del río Prado fueron (i las alteraciones de su hábitat, (ii cambios en el caudal natural del río, (iii uso de artes de pesca inadecuados, y (iv la probable interrupción de sus migraciones. Se propone el río Prado como lugar prioritario para la investigación y conservación de Podocnemis lewyana en la cuenca alta del río Magdalena.

  8. Anatomy of the digestive tube of sea turtles (Reptilia: Testudines

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    Marcela dos S. Magalhães

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study characterized the morphology of the digestive tube of five species of sea turtles. We used specimens found dead along the coast of the state Rio Grande do Norte, as well as specimens accidentally killed as a result of pelagic longline fishing. Nineteen animals of the following species were analyzed: Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758 (n = 9, Lepidochelys olivacea (Eschscholtz, 1829 (n = 6, Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758 (n = 2, Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766 (n = 1 and Dermochelys coriacea (Vandelli, 1761 (n = 1. After opening the plastron, we removed the digestive organs and described the external and internal morphology of each organ. The esophagus of all species had pointed papillae on the mucosa. The stomach varied in shape among species. Differences were found in the mucosa of the small intestine. It was reticular in the duodenum, and longitudinal rectilinear in the jejunum/ileum. In all species an alternation of saccular and narrow regions was observed in the large intestine. The exception was D. coriacea, in which the mucosa of the entire large intestine had irregularly distributed folds. The pattern of the esophagus was the same in all species. The morphology of the stomach differed among species, and these differences reflect their diets. In addition, the distribution pattern of the folds on the mucosa of the small intestine varied between regions of the intestine and among species.

  9. A morphological review of the Cuora flavomarginata complex (Testudines: Geoemydidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, C.H.; Laemmerzahl, A.F.; Lovich, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    A reevaluation of the morphometric and color pattern differences within the Asiatic box turtle, Cuora flavomarginata sensu latu, was conducted in view of determining the taxonomic position of the three currently recognized subspecies: C. f. flavomarginata (Taiwan), C. f. sinensis (southern mainland China), and C. f. evelynae (Ryukyu Islands, Japan). Recent analyses indicate that the allopatric population of C. f. evelynae is the most divergent of the three taxa and shares little possibility for gene exchange with the other two populations. In contrast, the populations of C. f. flavomarginata and C. f. sinensis share many characters. We recommend the recognition of the Ryukyu population as a full species, C. evelynae.

  10. Characterization of innate immune activity in Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines: Chelidae

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    Bruno O. Ferronato

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune activity of the freshwater turtle Phrynops geoffroanus (Schweigger, 1812 was investigated, using a sheep-red-blood cell hemolysis assay. The time- and concentration-dependent hemolytic activity of the turtle plasma was low compared to that reported for other reptiles. However the plasma of P. geoffroanus exhibited higher activity at elevated temperatures, resulting in temperature-dependent hemolysis. The sensitivity of turtle plasma to temperature could be interpreted as a mechanism by which freshwater turtles use basking behavior to elevate body temperature, thus enhancing the innate immune response. However, we cannot discard the possibility that environmental contaminants could be affecting the turtle's immune response, since the animals in this investigation were captured in a polluted watercourse.

  11. Perflurooctanoic Acid Induces Developmental Cardiotoxicity in Chicken Embryos and Hatchlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is detectable in serum of the general U.S. population. PFOA is a known developmental toxicant that induces mortality in mammalian embryos and is thought to induce toxicity via interaction with the peroxi...

  12. Potential distribution of Podocnemis lewyana (Reptilia: Podocnemididae) and its possible fluctuation under different global climate change scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz Yusty, Carlos; Restrepo, Adriana; Paez, Vivian P

    2014-01-01

    We implemented a species distribution modelling approach to establish the potential distribution of Podocnemis lewyana, to explore the climatic factors that may influence the species' distribution and to evaluate possible changes in distribution under future climate scenarios. The distribution models predicted a continuous distribution from south to north along the Magdalena River, from Rivera and Palermo in the Department of Huila to the departments of Atlantico and Magdalena in the north. Temperature was the variable most influential in the distribution of P. lewyana; this species tends to be present in warm regions with low temperature variability. The distribution model predicted an increase in the geographic range of P. lewyana under climate change scenarios. However, taking into account the habitat preferences of this species and its strong association with water, this result should be treated with caution since the model considered only terrestrial climatic variables. Given the life history characteristics of this species (temperature dependent sex determination, high pivotal temperature and a very narrow transition range) and the negative effect of changes in hydrological regimes on embryo survival, expansion of the potential distribution of P. lewyana in the future does not mean that the species will not be affected by global climate change.

  13. Envenenamiento de Chelydra serpentina (Reptilia: Testudines por Tityus trivittatus (Scorpionida: Buthidae Envenomation of Chelydra serpentina (Reptilia: Testudines by Tityus trivittatus (Scorpionida: Buthidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo R de Roodt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el caso de un ejemplar de tortuga mordedora (Chelydra serpentina que fue hallada con los miembros tetanizados en extensión, midriasis y poca respuesta a estímulos externos, en cuyo recinto se encontró un ejemplar de escorpión Tityus trivittatus. Ante el claro cuadro de envenenamiento, se trató al quelonio con antiveneno escorpiónico específico retornando a un estado de relajación muscular a las seis horas y encontrándoselo totalmente normal a las 24 horas sin mostrar secuelas posteriores. Este es el primer comunicado sobre el envenenamiento de quelonios por escorpiones. Se discuten algunos aspectos de este envenenamiento escorpiónico y su tratamiento con antiveneno específico.We report the case of a snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina found tetanized, with the limbs in extension, mydriasis and poor response to external stimuli, in whose terrarium was found a Tityus trivittatus scorpion. Based on the clear clinical picture of envenoming, the turtle was treated with a specific scorpion antivenin, returning to a state of muscle relaxation after six hours of treatment and it was found totally normal at 24 hours, without envenoming sequelae. This is the first report on turtle envenomation by scorpion. The scorpion envenomation in reptiles and the treatment with specific antivenom is discussed.

  14. Atividade peroxidásica em basófilos de Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines Chelidae Peroxidase activity in the basophils of Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines: Chelidae

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    Maria Isabel Afonso da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As peroxidases, presentes nos peroxissomos e lisossomos, pertencem às oxidases e atuam como catalítico para o peróxido de hidrogênio (H2O2, posteriormente decomposto pela oxidação de cossubstratos, evitando danos celulares.(¹ Foi aplicada a técnica da peroxidase(2 em esfregaços sanguíneos de Phrynops geoffroanus, comparando com sangue humano, para avaliação da atividade e controle da reação. O esfregaço sanguíneo humano apresentou marcações em neutrófilos, fagócitos com muitos lisossomos e peroxissomos (Figura 1. Nos esfregaços sanguíneos de Phrynops geoffroanus, as marcações apresentaram-se nos basófilos (Figura 2, que representam de 10% a 25% dos leucócitos de quelônios e possuem grande número de granulações citoplasmáticas,(3 sugerindo a presença de grande quantidade de enzimas e organelas como lisossomos e peroxissomos, possivelmente associadas a sua participação em reações imunes. A atividade peroxidásica representa resposta do organismo a ações ambientais danosas, servindo como marcador biológico.Peroxidase, present in peroxisomes and lysosomes, belongs to the oxidases and acts as a catalyst for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and is later decomposed by oxidation of cosubstrates thereby preventing cell damage.(1 The peroxidase technique(2 was applied to blood smears of Phrynops geoffroanus and the results compared with human blood to evaluate the activity and control of the reaction. The human blood film showed markings in neutrophils and phagocytes with many lysosomes and peroxisomes (Figure 1. In blood smears of Phrynops geoffroanus, the markings were on the basophils (Figure 2, that represent 10% to 25% of leukocytes of turtles and have a large number of cytoplasmatic granules(3 suggesting the presence of large amounts of enzymes and organelles such as lysosomes and peroxisomes, possibly associated with their participation in immune reactions. Peroxidase activity is the body's response to harmful environmental actions and serves as a biological marker.

  15. Temperature effects on snapping performance in the common snapper Chelydra serpentina (Reptilia, Testudines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervust, Bart; Brecko, Jonathan; Herrel, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the effect of temperature on whole-animal performance traits other than locomotion are rare. Here we investigate the effects of temperature on the performance of the turtle feeding apparatus in a defensive context. We measured bite force and the kinematics of snapping in the Common Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina) over a wide range of body temperatures. Bite force performance was thermally insensitive over the broad range of temperatures typically experienced by these turtles in nature. In contrast, neck extension (velocity, acceleration, and deceleration) and jaw movements (velocity, acceleration, and deceleration) showed clear temperature dependence with peak acceleration and deceleration capacity increasing with increasing temperatures. Our results regarding the temperature dependence of defensive behavior are reflected by the ecology and overall behavior of this species. These data illustrate the necessity for carefully controlling T(b) when carrying out behavioral and functional studies on turtles as temperature affects the velocity, acceleration, and deceleration of jaw and neck extension movements. More generally, these data add to the limited but increasing number of studies showing that temperature may have important effects on feeding and defensive performance in ectotherms. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. The Head and Neck Anatomy of Sea Turtles (Cryptodira: Chelonioidea) and Skull Shape in Testudines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marc E. H.; Werneburg, Ingmar; Curtis, Neil; Penrose, Rod; O’Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J.; Evans, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sea turtles (Chelonoidea) are a charismatic group of marine reptiles that occupy a range of important ecological roles. However, the diversity and evolution of their feeding anatomy remain incompletely known. Methodology/Principal Findings Using computed tomography and classical comparative anatomy we describe the cranial anatomy in two sea turtles, the loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and Kemp’s ridley (Lepidochelys kempii), for a better understanding of sea turtle functional anatomy and morphological variation. In both taxa the temporal region of the skull is enclosed by bone and the jaw joint structure and muscle arrangement indicate that palinal jaw movement is possible. The tongue is relatively small, and the hyoid apparatus is not as conspicuous as in some freshwater aquatic turtles. We find several similarities between the muscles of C. caretta and L. kempii, but comparison with other turtles suggests only one of these characters may be derived: connection of the m. adductor mandibulae internus into the Pars intramandibularis via the Zwischensehne. The large fleshy origin of the m. adductor mandibulae externus Pars superficialis from the jugal seems to be a characteristic feature of sea turtles. Conclusions/Significance In C. caretta and L. kempii the ability to suction feed does not seem to be as well developed as that found in some freshwater aquatic turtles. Instead both have skulls suited to forceful biting. This is consistent with the observation that both taxa tend to feed on relatively slow moving but sometimes armoured prey. The broad fleshy origin of the m. adductor mandibulae externus Pars superficialis may be linked to thecheek region being almost fully enclosed in bone but the relationship is complex. PMID:23144831

  17. NIVELES DE MERCURIO EN HUEVOS, EMBRIONES Y NEONATOS DE Trachemys callirostris (TESTUDINES, EMYDIDAE

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    Beatriz Rendón-Valencia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cuantificamos la concentración total de mercurio en cáscaras, yemas y embriones de 16 nidos de hicotea (Trachemys callirostris. Los nidos fueron colectados en diferentes estadios de desarrollo embrionario. No hubo una correlación entre el tiempo estimado desde el desove y los niveles de mercurio en los huevos, sugiriendo que el metal no fue absorbido del substrato, sino que probablemente éste fue transferido a los huevos durante el proceso de foliculogénesis en las hembras reproductivas, las cuales bioacumularon el mercurio de fuentes ambientales. La concentración promedio de mercurio fue mayor en los embriones que en las cáscaras o yemas, indicando que los embriones también bioacumulan el metal presente en otros tejidos del huevo. La variación de la concentración de mercurio dentro de una misma nidada fue relativamente alta. Las concentraciones de mercurio en las yemas no estuvieron asociadas con ninguna de las medidas de fitness que fueron evaluadas (éxito de eclosión, tamaño inicial de los neonatos y tasas de crecimiento de los juveniles en el primer mes. Después de cinco meses de mantenimiento en cautiverio, en un ambiente libre de mercurio, 86 % de los juveniles había eliminado completamente este metal de sus tejidos.

  18. The head and neck anatomy of sea turtles (Cryptodira: Chelonioidea and skull shape in Testudines.

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    Marc E H Jones

    Full Text Available Sea turtles (Chelonoidea are a charismatic group of marine reptiles that occupy a range of important ecological roles. However, the diversity and evolution of their feeding anatomy remain incompletely known.Using computed tomography and classical comparative anatomy we describe the cranial anatomy in two sea turtles, the loggerhead (Caretta caretta and Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii, for a better understanding of sea turtle functional anatomy and morphological variation. In both taxa the temporal region of the skull is enclosed by bone and the jaw joint structure and muscle arrangement indicate that palinal jaw movement is possible. The tongue is relatively small, and the hyoid apparatus is not as conspicuous as in some freshwater aquatic turtles. We find several similarities between the muscles of C. caretta and L. kempii, but comparison with other turtles suggests only one of these characters may be derived: connection of the m. adductor mandibulae internus into the Pars intramandibularis via the Zwischensehne. The large fleshy origin of the m. adductor mandibulae externus Pars superficialis from the jugal seems to be a characteristic feature of sea turtles.In C. caretta and L. kempii the ability to suction feed does not seem to be as well developed as that found in some freshwater aquatic turtles. Instead both have skulls suited to forceful biting. This is consistent with the observation that both taxa tend to feed on relatively slow moving but sometimes armoured prey. The broad fleshy origin of the m. adductor mandibulae externus Pars superficialis may be linked to thecheek region being almost fully enclosed in bone but the relationship is complex.

  19. Mercury levels in eggs, embryos, and neonates of Trachemys callirostris (Testudines, Emydidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendon Valencia, Beatriz; Zapata, Lina M; Bock, Brian C; Paez, Vivian P; Palacio, Jaime A.

    2014-01-01

    We quantified total mercury concentrations in eggshells, egg yolks, and embryos from 16 nests of the Colombian slider (Trachemys callirostris). Nests were collected in different stages of development, but estimated time of incubation in natural substrates was not correlated with mercury levels in the eggs, suggesting that mercury was not absorbed from the substrate, but more likely passed on to the embryos during folliculogenesis by the reproductive females who had bioaccumulated the mercury from environmental sources. Mean mercury concentrations were higher in embryos than in eggshells or egg yolks, indicating that embryos also bioaccumulate mercury present in other egg tissues. Intra-clutch variation in egg yolk mercury concentrations was relatively high. Egg yolk mercury concentrations were not associated with any of the fitness proxies we quantified for the nests (hatching success rates, initial neonate sizes and first-month juvenile growth rates). After five months of captive rearing in a mercury-free laboratory environment, 86 % of the juveniles had eliminated the mercury from their tissues.

  20. Actividad reproductiva de Chelonia mydas (Testudines: Cheloniidae en Isla de Aves, Venezuela (2001-2008

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    Vicente Vera

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Isla de Aves, una isla a 650km de La Guaira, Venezuela, protegida como Refugio de Fauna Silvestre, constituye el segundo sitio de mayor anidación de la tortuga verde (Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus 1758 en el Caribe. El seguimiento de la población comenzó en 1972 y de manera más continua desde 1978. Los datos históricos indican que la captura de hembras en la isla, afectó severamente la población hasta 1978, cuando fue construida una base científico-naval. Durante las temporadas de anidación entre 2001-2008 con excepción de 2003 y 2004, las hembras fueron marcadas con placas metálicas y medidas. Asimismo, se muestreó durante 458 noches, en donde se observaron 5 154 eventos, con un máximo de 53 por noche. Los posibles eventos no observados fueron calculados ajustando la distribución temporal de eventos observados a una curva normal. El total de eventos estimados varió de =637.1±106.6 en 2001 a =2 853±42.5 en 2008 (ANOVA F(6.5gl=60.37, p<0.0001. El intervalo entre reanidaciones fue de =10.7±1.32 días. La frecuencia de anidación se calculó en =1.71±1.6 veces por hembra. El número de hembras estimadas varió entre =373±12.5 para 2001 y =1 669±56.1 para 2008 (ANOVA F(5.6gl=89.42, p<0.0001. La tendencia es significativa (r=0.842, p=0.036. Los resultados indican que el número de hembras que anidan en Isla de Aves ha aumentado, y se sugiere que más de 30 años de protección del área de reproducción está resultando en un creciente número de hembras.

  1. Nest predation of Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron) (Testudines, Emydidae) in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Fernanda A.; Cechin, Sonia Z.; Bager, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Ninhos da tartaruga tigre-d'água, Trachemys dorbigni, foram monitorados durante a estação reprodutiva de 2005/2006 para avaliar as taxas de predação e a variação temporal destas; identificar as espécies predadoras, sua importância na destruição dos ninhos e determinar a influência da dispersão dos ninhos sobre a predação, no extremo sul do Brasil. Dos 58 ninhos monitorados, 98% (n = 57) foram destruídos por predadores. Eventos de predação ocorreram predominantemente nas primeiras 48 horas apó...

  2. Kinosternon scorpioides scorpioides (Testudines: Kinosternidae: A New Record from Northeastern Colombia

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    Carlos Herney Cáceres-Martínez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a new record of the Scorpion Turtle Kinosternon scorpioides scorpioides for the Norte de Santander department, Colombia. This specimen was collected in the tropical dry forest of the department, which is one of the most threatened and least protected ecosystems in the country; this exacerbated by local problems related with pollution and land-use transformation, threatening the presence and conservation of K. s. scorpioides.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the critically endangered Vietnamese three-striped box turtle (Testudines: Geoemydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Jian; Shi, Yan; Xiao, Feng-Fang; Zhang, Xin-Cheng; Zhu, Xin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Vietnamese three-striped box turtle (Cuora cyclornata) was first determined in this study. It was a circular molecule of 16,594 bp in length, consisting of 37 genes typically found in other vertebrates. The AT content of the overall base composition of the whole mitogenome was 60.39%, while the control region was 70.23%. Two ETAS and 4 CSBs were identified, while a remarkable feature was found in the control region: a large number of (TTATTATA)10 direct tandem repeats followed by (TTATA)n (n=10, 8 and 1), which were spaced into three domains by (TA)n (n=1, 1 and 2). The sequence information could play an important role in the study of phylogenetic relationships in turtles and preservation of genetic resources for helping conservation of the endangered species.

  4. Eimeriid coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Geoemydid Turtles (Testudines: Geoemydidae) with a Description of Six New Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Modrý, David

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 4 (2010), s. 301-310 ISSN 0065-1583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Chelonians * oocysts * parasite diversity * Southeast Asia * Systematics Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.881, year: 2010

  5. A new species of Polystomoides ward, 1917 (Monogenea: polystomatidae) from freshwater chelonians (Testudines: chelidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fabiano M; Novelli, Iara A; Sousa, Bernadete M; de SouzaLima, Sueli

    2008-06-01

    This report describes the first occurrence of Polystomoides brasiliensis n. sp. (Monogenea: Polystomatidae), a new monogenean species in the buccal and pharyngeal cavities of the freshwater turtles in Brazil. Live monogeneans were collected from Hydromedusa maximiliani and Phrynops geoffroanus at the Mariano Procópio Museum's lake, in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Polystomoides brasiliensis differs from all other species of this genus in having 8-9 genital spines, except for Polystomoides uruguayensis, which has 8-10 genital spines. However, the new species differs morphometrically from P. uruguayensis in the greater size of the outer and inner hamuli, as well as having a testis that is proportionally greater than the pharynx and oral sucker. The current study is the first report of monogeneans in chelonians of Brazil, and the first record of helminths in H. maximiliani.

  6. Phylogeny, biogeography and diversification patterns of side-necked turtles (Testudines: Pleurodira)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Max C.; Sterli, Juliana

    2018-01-01

    Pleurodires or side-necked turtles are today restricted to freshwater environments of South America, Africa–Madagascar and Australia, but in the past they were distributed much more broadly, being found also on Eurasia, India and North America, and marine environments. Two hypotheses were proposed to explain this distribution; in the first, vicariance would have shaped the current geographical distribution and, in the second, extinctions constrained a previously widespread distribution. Here, we aim to reconstruct pleurodiran biogeographic history and diversification patterns based on a new phylogenetic hypothesis recovered from the analysis of the largest morphological dataset yet compiled for the lineage, testing which biogeographical process prevailed during its evolutionary history. The resulting topology generally agrees with previous hypotheses of the group and shows that most diversification shifts were related to the exploration of new niches, e.g. littoral or marine radiations. In addition, as other turtles, pleurodires do not seem to have been much affected by either the Cretaceous–Palaeogene or the Eocene–Oligocene mass extinctions. The biogeographic analyses highlight the predominance of both anagenetic and cladogenetic dispersal events and support the importance of transoceanic dispersals as a more common driver of area changes than previously thought, agreeing with previous studies with other non-turtle lineages. PMID:29657780

  7. The head and neck anatomy of sea turtles (Cryptodira: Chelonioidea) and skull shape in Testudines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marc E H; Werneburg, Ingmar; Curtis, Neil; Penrose, Rod; O'Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J; Evans, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    Sea turtles (Chelonoidea) are a charismatic group of marine reptiles that occupy a range of important ecological roles. However, the diversity and evolution of their feeding anatomy remain incompletely known. Using computed tomography and classical comparative anatomy we describe the cranial anatomy in two sea turtles, the loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii), for a better understanding of sea turtle functional anatomy and morphological variation. In both taxa the temporal region of the skull is enclosed by bone and the jaw joint structure and muscle arrangement indicate that palinal jaw movement is possible. The tongue is relatively small, and the hyoid apparatus is not as conspicuous as in some freshwater aquatic turtles. We find several similarities between the muscles of C. caretta and L. kempii, but comparison with other turtles suggests only one of these characters may be derived: connection of the m. adductor mandibulae internus into the Pars intramandibularis via the Zwischensehne. The large fleshy origin of the m. adductor mandibulae externus Pars superficialis from the jugal seems to be a characteristic feature of sea turtles. In C. caretta and L. kempii the ability to suction feed does not seem to be as well developed as that found in some freshwater aquatic turtles. Instead both have skulls suited to forceful biting. This is consistent with the observation that both taxa tend to feed on relatively slow moving but sometimes armoured prey. The broad fleshy origin of the m. adductor mandibulae externus Pars superficialis may be linked to thecheek region being almost fully enclosed in bone but the relationship is complex.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships and divergence dates of softshell turtles (Testudines: Trionychidae) inferred from complete mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Liu, J; Xiong, L; Zhang, H; Zhou, H; Yin, H; Jing, W; Li, J; Shi, Q; Wang, Y; Liu, J; Nie, L

    2017-05-01

    The softshell turtles (Trionychidae) are one of the most widely distributed reptile groups in the world, and fossils have been found on all continents except Antarctica. The phylogenetic relationships among members of this group have been previously studied; however, disagreements regarding its taxonomy, its phylogeography and divergence times are still poorly understood as well. Here, we present a comprehensive mitogenomic study of softshell turtles. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 10 softshell turtles, in addition to the GenBank sequence of Dogania subplana, Lissemys punctata, Trionyx triunguis, which cover all extant genera within Trionychidae except for Cyclanorbis and Cycloderma. These data were combined with other mitogenomes of turtles for phylogenetic analyses. Divergence time calibration and ancestral reconstruction were calculated using BEAST and RASP software, respectively. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that Trionychidae is the sister taxon of Carettochelyidae, and support the monophyly of Trionychinae and Cyclanorbinae, which is consistent with morphological data and molecular analysis. Our phylogenetic analyses have established a sister taxon relationship between the Asian Rafetus and the Asian Palea + Pelodiscus + Dogania + Nilssonia + Amyda, whereas a previous study grouped the Asian Rafetus with the American Apalone. The results of divergence time estimates and area ancestral reconstruction show that extant Trionychidae originated in Asia at around 108 million years ago (MA), and radiations mainly occurred during two warm periods, namely Late Cretaceous-Early Eocene and Oligocene. By combining the estimated divergence time and the reconstructed ancestral area of softshell turtles, we determined that the dispersal of softshell turtles out of Asia may have taken three routes. Furthermore, the times of dispersal seem to be in agreement with the time of the India-Asia collision and opening of the Bering Strait, which provide evidence for the accuracy of our estimation of divergence time. Overall, the mitogenomes of this group were used to explore the origin and dispersal route of Trionychidae and have provided new insights on the evolution of this group. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  9. A morphological review of subspecies of the Asian box turtle, Cuora amboinensis (Testudines, Geomydidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Carl H.; Laemmerzahl, Arndt F.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The turtle Cuora amboinensis has an extensive distribution covering most of southern mainland Asia, Indonesia, and extending to the Philippine Islands. Unlike many species, C. amboinensis occurs on both sides of Wallace's Line separating Asian and Australian flora and fauna. Four subspecies are currently recognized; Cuora a. kamaroma (southern continental Asia, Java and the northern Philippines [introduced]), C. a. lineata (Kachin Province, Myanmar [Burma] and adjacent Yunnan Province, China), C. a. couro (Sumatra, Java, Sumbawa, and adjacent smaller Indonesian islands); and C. a. amboinensis (Moluccas, Sulawesi, Philippines). Five pattern and 33 morphological characters were examined for variation in 691 individuals from throughout the species' range. Our analyses suggest that only two presently recognized subspecies are valid: amboinensis andkamaroma. Neither couro nor lineata are supported by our analysis. We recommend that C. a. couroshould be synonymized with the species C. amboinensis and C. a. lineata with the subspecies C. a. kamaroma.

  10. Incubation temperature influences trade-off between structural size and energy reserves in mallard hatchlings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koláčková, M.; Prokůpková, L.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Hořák, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-10 ISSN 1522-2152 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601110803 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : body mass * chemical composition * hatching * incubation * parent-offspring interaction * parental investment * phenotype * reproductive success * reptile * survival * temperature effect * trade-off * waterfowl Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.007, year: 2015

  11. Implantation of cocoa butter reduces egg and hatchling size in Salmo trutta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, M. O.; Armstrong, J. D.; Miles, M. S.; Burton, T.; Groothuis, T. G. G.; Metcalfe, N. B.

    This study demonstrated that, irrespective of hormone type or dose, administering cocoa butter implants during egg development affected the growth of female brown trout Salmo trutta and reduced the size of their offspring. Cortisol treatment also increased adult mortality. Caution is urged in the

  12. Pre-ovulation control of hatchling sex ratio in the Seychelles warbler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, J; Magrath, MJL; Krackow, S

    2002-01-01

    Females of some bird species have a high degree of control over the sex ratio of their offspring at laying. Although several mechanisms have been put forward to explain how females might control the sex of their eggs, virtually nothing is known. As females are the heterogametic sex in birds,

  13. Rearing and growth of the Octopus Robsonella fontaniana (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) from planktonic hatchlings to benthic juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, Iker; Hernández, Jorge; Dörner, Jessica; Paschke, Kurt; Farías, Ana; Crovetto, Enzo; Rosas, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Globally, octopus larviculture is one of the challenges faced in the attempt to diversify aquaculture and achieve cephalopod farming. Currently, only juveniles of Octopus vulgaris, Octopus joubini, and Enteroctopus dofleini have been obtained at an experimental level. This is the first study to look at the characteristics of planktonic and benthic Robsonella fontaniana juveniles in an effort to analyze the morphometric changes occurring during their planktonic and benthic phases and to explore the feasibility of obtaining settlement under controlled conditions. The morphometric measurements varied exponentially over time and did not show different tendencies before and after settlement. Mantle growth in relation to total length fit a logarithmic regression, whereas arm length and eye diameter increased linearly with respect to total length throughout the entire paralarval and juvenile periods. This suggests that the size of the mantle decreases with age in proportion to the total octopus length, whereas the organs more directly involved in catching prey tend to increase in direct proportion to the total length. The present study shows that R. fontaniana can be reared from hatching through the final paralarval stage on a diet of Lithodes santolla (king crab) zoeae; after settlement, the juveniles can be reared on a diet of crab such as Petrolisthes.

  14. DISTRIBUCIÓN POTENCIAL DE Podocnemis lewyana (REPTILIA:PODOCNEMIDIDAE Y SU POSIBLE FLUCTUACIÓN BAJO ESCENARIOS DE CAMBIO CLIMÁTICO GLOBAL

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    Carlos Ortiz-Yusty

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se implementó el modelaje de distribución de especies para establecer el rango de distribución potencial de Podocnemis lewyana, explorar los componentes del clima que pueden influenciar dicha distribución y evaluar posibles fluctuaciones de su distribución bajo escenarios de clima futuro. Los modelos obtenidos predicen una distribución continua de sur a norte por todo el río Magdalena, desde los municipios de Rivera y Palermo en el departamento de Huila, hasta los departamentos de Atlántico y Magdalena en el norte. La temperatura fue el elemento del clima que más influyó en la distribución de P. lewyana; esta especie tiende a estar presente en climas cálidos y con poca variabilidad en la temperatura. El modelo de distribución transferido a los escenarios de clima futuro predicen un aumento en el rango geográfico de P. lewyana. Sin embargo, teniendo en cuenta las preferencias de hábitat de esta especie y su fuerte asociación con los cuerpos de agua, este resultado debe tomarse con cautela, dado que el modelo solo tuvo en cuenta variables climáticas terrestres. Dadas las características de historia de vida de esta especie (presencia de determinación sexual dependiente de la temperatura, alta temperatura pivotal y un rango de transición de temperatura muy estrecho, y el efecto negativo de los cambios en los regímenes hidrológicos en la mortalidad embrionaria, la expansión del área potencial de P. lewyana en el futuro no significa que esta especie no vaya a verse afectada por el cambio climático global.

  15. Predação de ninhos de Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron (Testudines, Emydidae no extremo sul do Brasil Nest predation of Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron (Testudines, Emydidae in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A. Gonçalves

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Ninhos da tartaruga tigre-d'água, Trachemys dorbigni, foram monitorados durante a estação reprodutiva de 2005/2006 para avaliar as taxas de predação e a variação temporal destas; identificar as espécies predadoras, sua importância na destruição dos ninhos e determinar a influência da dispersão dos ninhos sobre a predação, no extremo sul do Brasil. Dos 58 ninhos monitorados, 98% (n = 57 foram destruídos por predadores. Eventos de predação ocorreram predominantemente nas primeiras 48 horas após a oviposição e não houve variação temporal nas taxas de predação. Através de armadilhas fotográficas e observações diretas foram identificadas seis espécies predadoras dos ninhos, não havendo prevalência de nenhuma das espécies. A densidade de ninhos não influenciou as taxas de predação, mas houve correlação negativa entre densidade e tempo decorrido entre a desova e a predação.Nests of the D'Orbigny's slider, Trachemys dorbigni, were monitored during the nesting season of 2005/2006 to evaluate predation rates; time variation on these rates; to identify predator species and their importance on nest destruction and the influence of nest dispersion on predation rates in Southern Brazil. Of the 58 monitored nests, 98% (n = 57 were destroyed by predators. Predation events occurred primarily during the first 48 hours after oviposition and there was no time variation on predation rates. Using camera traps and direct observations we could identify six species of nest predators. There was not prevalence of any predator. Nest density did not influence predation rates, but there was a negative correlation between time after egg laying and predation.

  16. Hematological profile of Chelonia mydas (Testudines, Cheloniidae according to the severity of fibropapillomatosis or its absence Perfil hematológico de Chelonia mydas (Testudines, Cheloniidae de acordo com o grau de acometimento pela fibropapilomatose e sua ausência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Rossi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The green turtle Chelonia mydas feeds and nests in the Brazilian coastal area and is considered an endangered species by the World Conservation Union (IUCN 2009 and threatened by the Red List of Brazilian Fauna (Ministério do Meio Ambiente 2009. Fibropapillomatosis is a disease characterized by benign skin tumors (fibropapillomas, and it is one of the main threats to the survival of this species. Studies suggest the involvement of viruses as infectious agents associated with environmental and genetic factors. Blood samples were collected from 45 turtles captured in the coastal area of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. From these, 27 were affected by fibropapillomas and 18 were tumor free. Biometrical data on the turtles, size, location and quantity of tumors were recorded. The area occupied by fibropapillomas per animal was calculated and four groups were determined according to severity of the disease or its absence. The objective of the study was to compare hemogram results of the sea turtles classified in these four groups. The lowest hematocrit value was observed in severely affected animals. In the hemoglobin assay, the highest value was observed in the group of tumor free turtles and the lowest, in animals severely affected. Lymphocyte counts and curved carapace length were on the verge of statistical significance.Chelonia mydas, denominada tartaruga verde, é uma tartaruga marinha que frequenta o litoral brasileiro para alimentação e nidificação e é considerada em perigo de extinção pela IUCN (World Conservation Union, 2009 e ameaçada pela Lista Vermelha da Fauna Brasileira (Ministério do Meio Ambiente, 2009. A fibropapilomatose, doença caracterizada por tumores cutâneos benignos (fibropapilomas, é uma das mais importantes ameaças à sobrevivência dessa espécie. Pesquisas sugerem o envolvimento de agentes infecciosos virais em associação com fatores ambientais e genéticos. Foram colhidas amostras sanguíneas de 45 tartarugas provenientes do litoral do estado de São Paulo, Brasil, sendo 18 sem fibropapilomas e 27 acometidas. Dados de biometria das tartarugas, quantidade, localização e tamanho dos tumores foram anotados. Foi realizado o cálculo da área de fibropapilomas por animal e foram estipulados 4 grupos de acordo com o grau de acometimento e sua ausência. O objetivo foi realizar uma comparação entre os hemogramas das tartarugas marinhas classificadas nos 4 grupos. Animais de grau grave apresentaram o menor valor para hematócrito. Para dosagem de hemoglobina, observou-se que o maior valor foi para o grupo de tartarugas sem fibropapilomas e o menor para o de grau grave. Os valores de linfócitos e comprimento curvilíneo da carapaça beiraram a significância estatística.

  17. Anatomia vascular das artérias renais natomia e gonadais de Podocnemis unifilis Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines, Pelomedusidae = Vascular anatomy of renal and gonadal arteries of Podocnemis unifilis Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines-Pelomedusidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Líria Queiroz Luz Hirano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o intuito de enriquecer o conhecimento sobre a morfologia vascular das artérias renais e gonadais de Podocnemis unifilis, facilitando o entendimento da fisiologia clínica e cirúrgica destes animais. Foram utilizados cincoexemplares machos de Podocnemis unifilis (tracajá, coletados segundo a Licença nº 066/2004- Ibama/RAM. A artéria carótida esquerda e a veia femoral direita foram canuladas e, pelas mesmas, foi introduzida solução fisiológica para lavagem do sistema vascular; em seguida,aplicou-se solução de Neoprene Látex “450” corada com pigmento específico (Globo S/A Tintas e Pigmentos. O material foi fixado em solução de Formol tamponado a 10% por um período mínimo de 96h. Uma abertura central e de formato quadrangular foi feita na metade caudal do plastrão e casco, de forma a expor os ramos da artéria aorta que irrigam os rins e as gônadas. Observou-se que as artérias renais se originam da face ventral da artéria aorta dorsal, em número de dois pares para cada rim e, em um único exemplar, elas originaram uma artéria renal direita e duas esquerdas. A artéria gonadal surgiu a partir da artéria renal, e apenas um par penetrou pela face dorsal de cada gônada.This work was developed with the aim of enriching knowledge on the vascular morphology of renal and gonadal arteries of Podocnemisunifilis, thus increasing the understanding of the clinical and surgical physiology of these animals. Five Podocnemis unifilis males were used, collected according to license no. 066/2004-Ibama/RAM.The left carotid artery and right femoral vein were cannulated, and a serum solution was introduced to remove obstructions from the vascular system. A solution of Neoprene Latex “450” dye was injected. The material was fixed in a solution of 10% formaldehyde for a period of 96 hours. Next, a square-shaped central opening was made in the caudal end of the plastron and bridge, exposing the branches of the aorta that irrigate the kidneys and gonads. It was observedthat the renal arteries were originated from the ventral face of the dorsal aorta artery, in a number of two pairs per kidney and, in a single case, they originated one right and two left renal arteries.The gonadal artery was originated from the renal artery, and only one pair penetrated the dorsal face of each gonad.

  18. Efecto de la temperatura de incubación sobre algunos aspectos de la ontogenia de Phrynops hilarii (Testudines: Chelidae

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    Piña, Carlos I.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro objetivo es establecer los efectos de la temperatura de incubación sobre diferentes aspectos de la ontogenia y la supervivencia de crías de P. hilarii. En el presente trabajo respondemos las siguientes preguntas: 1 ¿afecta la temperatura de incubación al período de incubación de P. hilarii?; 2 ¿cuál es la menor temperatura a la cual existe desarrollo embrionario de P. hilarii?; 3 ¿varía el éxito de eclosión de P. hilarii en relación a la temperatura a la cual se incuban los huevos?; 4 ¿está la supervivencia de P. hilarii hasta el año de edad relacionada a la temperatura de incubación?

  19. Land tortoise types in the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie with comments on nomenclature and systematic (Reptilia: Testudines: Testudinidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, M.S.; Crumly, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    The holotype of Testudo vosmaeri Fitzinger, 1826 [= Geochelone vosmaeri] is RMNH 6001. The holotype of Testudo forstenii Schlegel & Müller, 1840 [= lndotestudo forstenii] is RMNH 3811. I. forstenii is considered a senior synonym of T. travancorica Boulenger, 1907 because plastral colour pattern,

  20. Home Range of the Spur-Thighed Tortoise, Testudo graeca (Testudines, Testudinidae, in the National Park of El Kala, Algeria

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    Rouag R.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Spur-thighed tortoise is a vulnerable species, the local declines of populations require an imperative need for conservation. Research on habitat use is essential for understanding population ecology. To investigate the home range and movement patterns we studied a population which occupies an enclosed area of 30 ha in northeastern Algeria. Studies of movement showed that home ranges were substantially smaller than in Spain. This difference was due to the high trophic availability with significant richness in plants which make part of the diet of the tortoise. The home range varied from 0.287 ha in males to 0.354 ha for females; there was no sexual difference. The males are the most active with a distance of 3.79 m/d. Females and juveniles are respectively about 2.25 m/d and 2.11 m/d. The distance moved each day do not vary significantly by sex and ages. Results from this study are important for establishing conservation strategies for this vulnerable species.

  1. Description of a New Galapagos Giant Tortoise Species (Chelonoidis; Testudines: Testudinidae from Cerro Fatal on Santa Cruz Island.

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    Nikos Poulakakis

    Full Text Available The taxonomy of giant Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis spp. is currently based primarily on morphological characters and island of origin. Over the last decade, compelling genetic evidence has accumulated for multiple independent evolutionary lineages, spurring the need for taxonomic revision. On the island of Santa Cruz there is currently a single named species, C. porteri. Recent genetic and morphological studies have shown that, within this taxon, there are two evolutionarily and spatially distinct lineages on the western and eastern sectors of the island, known as the Reserva and Cerro Fatal populations, respectively. Analyses of DNA from natural populations and museum specimens, including the type specimen for C. porteri, confirm the genetic distinctiveness of these two lineages and support elevation of the Cerro Fatal tortoises to the rank of species. In this paper, we identify DNA characters that define this new species, and infer evolutionary relationships relative to other species of Galapagos tortoises.

  2. Oral bacterial microbiota and traumatic injuries of free-ranging Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines, Chelidae in southeastern Brazil

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    Bruno O. Ferronato

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available During 2006 and 2007, we collected free-ranging Phrynops geoffroanus, from two anthropogenically altered rivers in southeastern Brazil. Oral microbiological samples were taken for isolation of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria; a physical examination was performed;and we evaluated possible effects on the turtles’ health. Twenty-nine species of bacteria were isolated in Piracicaba River turtles (n=10, and twenty-four species in Piracicamirim stream turtles (n=8, most of them gram-negative. In both sites, potential pathogens for reptiles were: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter agglomerans, Citrobacter freundii, and Bacillus sp. Although boatpropeller lesions were common on the carapace of the turtles, we have not found turtles with signs of clinical diseases. The oral bacterial microbiota of P. geoffroanus inhabiting the Piracicaba River basin are composed of a diverse microbe spectrum, and long-term studies of the effects of pollution and traumatic injuries on this population and its microbial flora are warranted.

  3. The hooked element in the pes of turtles (Testudines): a global approach to exploring primary and secondary homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Werneburg, Ingmar; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-01-01

    The hooked element in the pes of turtles was historically identified by most palaeontologists and embryologists as a modified fifth metatarsal, and often used as evidence to unite turtles with other reptiles with a hooked element. Some recent embryological studies, however, revealed that this element might represent an enlarged fifth distal tarsal. We herein provide extensive new myological and developmental observations on the hooked element of turtles, and re-evaluate its primary and secondary homology using all available lines of evidence. Digital count and timing of development are uninformative. However, extensive myological, embryological and topological data are consistent with the hypothesis that the hooked element of turtles represents a fusion of the fifth distal tarsal with the fifth metatarsal, but that the fifth distal tarsal dominates the hooked element in pleurodiran turtles, whereas the fifth metatarsal dominates the hooked element of cryptodiran turtles. The term ‘ansulate bone’ is proposed to refer to hooked elements that result from the fusion of these two bones. The available phylogenetic and fossil data are currently insufficient to clarify the secondary homology of hooked elements within Reptilia. PMID:24102560

  4. Taxonomic Reevaluation of Phrynops (Testudines: Chelidae with the description of two new genera and a new species of Batrachemys

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    William P. McCord

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Relationships among turtle species loosely categorized within the South American genus Phrynops are explored. Three once recognized genera (Batrachemys, Mesoclemmys and Phrynops that were demoted to subgenera, and then synonymized with Phrynops, are demonstrated to warrant full recognition based on morphometric analysis, skull osteology, and mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequencing. Mesoclemmys is resurrected from the synonymy of Phrynops as a monotypic genus including M. gibba. The genus Rhinemys, previously a synonym of Phrynops, is resurrected for the species R. rufipes. Ranacephala gen. nov. is described to inciude the species R hogei. The genus Batrachemys is resurrected from the synonymy of Phrynops and inciudes B. dahli, B. nasuta B. raniceps, B. tuberculata, and B. zuliae. The taxon vanderhaegei is placed in Bufocephala gen. nov. The genus Phrynops is redefined to include the taxa P. geoffroanus, P. hilarii, P. tuberosus and P.williamsi. Ciadistic analysis of morphological data supports this taxonomy. A new species of Batrachemys is described from the western Amazon region, and is distinguished by having facial markings in juveniles, a relatively wide head, and a flattened shell. The new species, B. heliostemma sp. nov., is sympatric with and most similar to the recently resurrected form Batrachemys raniceps in the upper Amazonian region of Peru and adjacent Brazil, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Colombia. Lastly, morphometric data from living and museum specimens of all species of Batrachemys are presented.Se investigaron las afinidades entre las especies de tortugas agrupadas casualmente dentro del género suramericano Phrynops. Tres géneros anteriormente reconocidos (Batrachemys, Mesoclemmys, y Phrynops, que fueron subsecuentemente colocados como sub-géneros, y luego puestos bajo sinonimia de Phrynops, se reconocen ahora como géneros válidos basándose en análisis morfométrico, osteología craneal y de secuencias génicas, nucleares y mitocondriales. Mesoclemmys se reconocen como género válido, monotipíco, conteniendo la especie M. gibba, y no como sinónimo del género Phrynops. El género Rhinemys, previamente sinónimo de Phrynops, se reconocen como género monotipíco Y conteniendo la especie R. rufipes. Se describen Ranacephala gen. nov. e incluyendo la especie R. hogei. Se reconocen el género Batrachemys no como sinónimo de Phrynops sino como género válido e incluyendo las especies: B. dahli, B. nasuta, B. raniceps, B.tuberculata, y B. zuliae. La especie vanderhaegei se colocan en Bufocephala gen. nov.. El género Phrynops se definen de nuevo e incluye las especies: P. geoffroanus, P. hilarii, P. tuberosus, y P. williamsi. Esta taxonomía está apoyada por análisis cladistíco, Se describe una especie nueva de Batrachemys desde la region peruana de Iquitos, y que se destaca por la presencia de patrones distintivos en las caras de juveniles, por su cabeza relativamente ancha y por su caparazón de forma aplastada. La especie nueva, B.heliostemma sp. nov., se asemeja a Batrachemys raniceps, reconocida nuevamente. Ambas son simpátricas en la region altamazónica de Perú y los paises adyacentes Brazil, Ecuador, Venezuela y Colombia. Finalmente, se presentan los datos morfométricos tomados de ejemplares vivos y de museo para todas las especies del género Batrachemys.

  5. Hybridization of two megacephalic map turtles (testudines: emydidae: Graptemys) in the Choctawhatchee River drainage of Alabama and Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, James; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Kreiser, Brian R.; Folt, Brian; Lechowicz, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Map turtles of the genus Graptemys are highly aquatic and rarely undergo terrestrial movements, and limited dispersal among drainages has been hypothesized to drive drainage-specific endemism and high species richness of this group in the southeastern United States. Until recently, two members of the megacephalic “pulchra clade,” Graptemys barbouri andGraptemys ernsti, were presumed to be allopatric with a gap in both species' ranges in the Choctawhatchee River drainage. In this paper, we analyzed variation in morphology (head and shell patterns) and genetics (mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite loci) from G. barbouri, G. ernsti, and Graptemys sp. collected from the Choctawhatchee River drainage, and we document the syntopic occurrence of those species and back-crossed individuals of mixed ancestry in the Choctawhatchee River drainage. Our results provide a first counter-example to the pattern of drainage-specific endemism in megacephalic Graptemys. Geologic events associated with Pliocene and Pleistocene sea level fluctuations and the existence of paleo-river systems appear to have allowed the invasion of the Choctawhatchee system by these species, and the subsequent introgression likely predates any potential human-mediated introduction.

  6. Nest site selection and hatching success of hawksbill and loggerhead sea turtles (Testudines, Cheloniidae at Arembepe Beach, northeastern Brazil

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    Thiago Zagonel Serafini

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nest site selection influences the hatching success of sea turtles and represents a crucial aspect of their reproductive process. Arembepe Beach, in the State of Bahia, northeastern Brazil, is a known nest site for Caretta caretta and Eretmochelys imbricata. For the nesting seasons in 2004/2005 and 2005/2006, we analyzed the influence of beach profile and amount of beach vegetation cover on nest site selection and the hatching success for both species. Loggerhead turtles nested preferentially in the sand zone, while hawksbill turtles demonstrated no preferences for either sand or vegetation zone. Beach vegetation was important in the modulation of nest site selection behavior for both species, but the amount of beach vegetation cover influenced (negatively hatching success only for the hawksbill, mainly via the increment of non-hatched eggs.Hatching success, outside the tide risk zone, was not influenced by the position of the nests along the beach profile. The pattern of nest distribution by species indicated that management of nests at risk of inundation and erosion by the tide is more important for loggerhead turtles than for hawksbill turtles. Beach vegetation is animportant factor in the conservation of these sea turtle species. Nests that are at risk due to tidal inundation and erosion can be translocated to any position along the beach profile without producing any significant effect on hatching success, as long as highdensities of beach vegetation cover are avoided for hawksbill nests. It is important to point out that the pattern we report here for distribution of hawksbill nests along the beach profile could be due in part to the influence of pure and hybrid individuals, since there are reports of hybridization among hawksbills and loggerheads to the study site.

  7. Genetic diversity in a population of rhinoclemmys nasuta (Testudines: Geoemydidae) associated with an insular locality in the Choco biogeographic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo Cutiva, Leslie Anais; Giraldo, Alan; Barreto, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of the genetic diversity of Rhinoclemmys nasuta population inhabits Isla Palma (Malaga Bay, Valle del Cauca) was carried out using three microsatellite systems (cm72, cm58 and cm"3). In this locality, individuals of R. nasuta are widely distributed in the inland streams and creeks system. 100 to 200 ml of peripheral blood was taken off from ten turtles in five streams of the island, preserving samples in a 0.5 m EDTA. DNA was extracted using salting-out and chelex solution techniques. PCR amplified products were visualized and measured in polyacrylamide gels stained with silver nitrate. successful amplification products were obtained for all systems analyzed, two of which (cm72 and cm3) were found to be monomorphic, while the system cm58 had a high pic (0.698) allowing to estimate the genetic diversity of this population. The observed heterozygosity was low (ho = 0.26) and inbreeding indices fis and fit were high (0.67857 and 0.67881), indicating an excess of homozygotes in each of the rivers and for the all population. The molecular analysis of variance suggested that there is no difference in genetic structure of the population (FST = 0.00075, p= 0.95112). Therefore, the results suggest that the genetic diversity of R. nasutapopulation in Isla Palma was low and exhibited a highly inbred index.

  8. Glycopattern analysis of acidic secretion in the intestine of the red-eared slender turtle; Trachemys scripta elegans (Testudines: Emydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scillitani, Giovanni; Mentino, Donatella; Mastrodonato, Maria

    2017-10-01

    The secretion of the goblet cells in the intestine of Trachemys scripta elegans was studied in situ by histochemical methods to analyze the diversity of sugar chains, with particular regard to the acidic glycans. Conventional histochemical stains (Periodic acid-Schiff, Alcian Blue pH 2.5, High Iron Diamine) and binding with ten FITC-labelled lectins combined with chemical and enzymatic pre-treatments were used to characterize the oligosaccharidic chains. The intestine can be divided into three regions, i.e. a duodenum, a small intestine and a large intestine. Goblet cells were observed in all the three tracts and presented an acidic secretion. WGA, LFA, PNA and SBA binding was observed only after desulfation. Glycans secreted by the three tracts consist mainly of sulfosialomucins with 1,2-linked fucose, mannosylated, glucosaminylated and subterminal galactosyl/galactosaminylated residuals. Differences among tracts are quantitative rather than qualitative, with sulfated, galactosaminylated and glycosaminylated residuals increasing from duodenum to large intestine, and galactosylated and fucosylated residuals showing an opposite trend. Variation is observed also between apices and bases of villi in both duodenum and small intestine, where sulphation decreases from the base to the apex and glycosylation shows an opposite trend. Functional implication of these findings is discussed in a comparative context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Presencia de Trachemys Agassiz, 1857 (Testudines, Emydidae en el Pleistoceno tardío del centro de la Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera, Mario R.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describen restos del caparazón de una tortuga que constituyen el primer registro del género dulceacuícola Trachemys Agassiz, 1857 y de la familia Emydidae Rafinesque, 1815 en la provincia de Córdoba, y el hallazgo más occidental de ambos en la Argentina. Los materiales recuperados consisten en la placa proneural, las placas pleurales IV y VIII derechas y fragmentos de las placas pleurales III y IV izquierdas, epiplastron, hioplastron e hipoplastron derechos, más tres fragmentos indeterminables. Los restos provienendel Sitio El Silencio (30°53’20" S, 62°49’29" W, un yacimiento paleontológico de edad Pleistoceno tardío - Holoceno temprano, expuesto en la costa de la actual laguna Mar Chiquita, en un nivel de limo con intercalaciones de carbonato de calcio asignado a la Formación Tezanos Pinto, cuya depositación se produjo entre los 36.000 y 8.000 AP. El registro esrelacionado con un evento húmedo acontecido entre los 16.500 y 15.500 años AP, que pudo haber sido lo suficientemente marcado y sostenido como para posibilitar el ingreso deTrachemys (y otros taxones vertebrados durante el Pleistoceno a cercanías de la laguna Mar Chiquita, unos 220 km hacia el oeste de su distribución actual.

  10. Estructura de tallas de tortuga pico de loro Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae en Tumbes, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Vera

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se analizó la estructura de tallas de ejemplares de tortuga pico de loro Lepidochelys olivacea, varados y capturados incidentalmente en las playas de Tumbes, Perú (3º38’9,5”S – 80º36’2,48”W y 3º57’21,3”S – 80º57’45,72”W, desde noviembre de 2006 a octubre de 2011. El área de estudio se dividió en tres zonas contiguas, limitadas por las quebradas más activas (Bocapán, El Rubio y Peña Negra. Se registraron 39 ejemplares (74,4% varados y 25,6% capturados incidentalmente, cuyas tallas variaron de 45 a 75 cm LCC (62,5±5,7 cm LCC. El 64,1% correspondió a individuos sub-adultos (<65 cm LCC; n= 25. Espacialmente la mayor cantidad de registros ocurrieron en las zonas 3 y 2, en las cuales porcentajes superiores al 60% se consideraron sub-adultos; mientras que en la zona 1, el 83% fue adulto. Temporalmente en la época lluviosa se registró la mayoría de las observaciones (59%, en la cual el 78,3% de ejemplares se consideró sub–adulto; siendo mayor que en la época seca (43,8%. Las tallas presentaron diferencias significativas entre zonas y épocas climáticas. Se corroboró el patrón de distribución latitudinal por estados de madurez aparente (más adultos en el norte. La presencia del componente adulto indicaría que el litoral de Tumbes sería una potencial zona de anidamiento de L. olivacea, con mayores probabilidades de ovoposición en época seca, corroborada por los eventos de anidamiento recientes.

  11. Anidación de la tortuga Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae en playa Gandoca, Costa Rica (1990 a 1997

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    Didiher Chacón Chaverri

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available La anidación de la tortuga baula fue estudiada en playa Gandoca, una importante playa de anidación de tortugas marinas localizada al sureste de la costa Caribeña de Costa Rica, dentro de los límites del Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Gandoca/Manzanillo (82° 37' O, 09° 37' N. Entre 1990 y 1997, se desarrollaron campañas de observación de la anidación entre los meses de febrero a julio de cada año; 16 variables de la anidación fueron anotadas y una parte de la colonia fue marcada con marcas monel y 3 484 nidos fueron encontrados; durante este periodo se depositaron un promedio de 534 nidos por temporada, 1,135 nidos fue el máximo de anidación anual, mientras que 226 nidos fue el mínimo, el 20.8% de los nidos fueron relocalizados en los viveros. El promedio de la longitud curva del caparazón de las hembras fue de 154.65 cm y el promedio del ancho curvo del caparazón fue de 112.83 cm. Las observaciones mostraron que el promedio de huevos normales para este periodo fue de 79.28, mientras que el promedio de huevos vanos fue de 35. La recolección ilegal de huevos, la basura sobre la playa y la erosión intensiva son parte de los problemas más importantes que están causando el declive de las tortugas en Gandoca.The nesting of the leatherback sea turtle was studied in Gandoca Beach, an important nesting beach on the southeastern Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, in the Gandoca/Manzanillo National Wildlife Refuge. Nesting was recorded from 1990 to 1997 (each February through July. Nesting peaked in April and May (depending on the year; 16 biological paramenters were recorded and part of the rookery was tagged with monel tags. During this period 1 045 females were studied and 3 484 nests were recorded; 534 nests was the yearly mean, (range 226-1 135, 20.8 % of the nests were relocated to hatcheries, as a conservation effort to prevent loss of nests. Mean curve carapace length was 154.65 cm and width 112.83 cm. Mean normal number of eggs/nest was 79.28 and 35 yolkless. Each turtle laid an average of 2.5 nests per season with an internesting interval of 9 days. In 1997, 39% of the nesting females had been previously tagged in Gandoca Beach and a few also in Colombia (Urabá Gulf, Pacuare and Tortuguero (Costa Rica. Poaching activity, beach debris and extensive erosion represent the main hazards that are leading to a decline of the sea turtles in Gandoca.

  12. Camallanus emydidius n. sp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae) in Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron, 1835) (Testudines: Emydidae) from Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina S. Mascarenhas; Gertrud Müller

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a new species of Camallanus found in the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni. Sixty hosts collected in Southern Brazil were examined. All hosts (100%) were parasitized by a new species of Camallanus, which was described as Camallanus emydidius n. sp. The new species differs from other Camallanus species of freshwater turtles mainly because of the morphology of the right spicule, the number of male precloacal and postcloacal papillae, and the presence of ?mucrons? in the ...

  13. Camallanus emydidius n. sp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae) in Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron, 1835) (Testudines: Emydidae) from Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Carolina S; Müller, Gertrud

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a new species of Camallanus found in the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni. Sixty hosts collected in Southern Brazil were examined. All hosts (100%) were parasitized by a new species of Camallanus , which was described as Camallanus emydidius n. sp. The new species differs from other Camallanus species of freshwater turtles mainly because of the morphology of the right spicule, the number of male precloacal and postcloacal papillae, and the presence of "mucrons" in the female posterior extremity.

  14. Camallanus emydidius n. sp. (Nematoda: Camallanidae in Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron, 1835 (Testudines: Emydidae from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina S. Mascarenhas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new species of Camallanus found in the freshwater turtle Trachemys dorbigni. Sixty hosts collected in Southern Brazil were examined. All hosts (100% were parasitized by a new species of Camallanus, which was described as Camallanus emydidius n. sp. The new species differs from other Camallanus species of freshwater turtles mainly because of the morphology of the right spicule, the number of male precloacal and postcloacal papillae, and the presence of “mucrons” in the female posterior extremity.

  15. Neogene amphibians and reptiles (Caudata, Anura, Gekkota, Lacertilia, and Testudines from the south of Western Siberia, Russia, and Northeastern Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davit Vasilyan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The present-day amphibian and reptile fauna of Western Siberia are the least diverse of the Palaearctic Realm, as a consequence of the unfavourable climatic conditions that predominate in this region. The origin and emergence of these herpetofaunal groups are poorly understood. Aside from the better-explored European Neogene localities yielding amphibian and reptile fossil remains, the Neogene herpetofauna of Western Asia is understudied. The few available data need critical reviews and new interpretations, taking into account the more recent records of the European herpetofauna. The comparison of this previous data with that of European fossil records would provide data on palaeobiogeographic affiliations of the region as well as on the origin and emergence of the present-day fauna of Western Siberia. An overview of the earliest occurrences of certain amphibian lineages is still needed. In addition, studies that address such knowledge gaps can be useful for molecular biologists in their calibration of molecular clocks. Methods and Results In this study, we considered critically reviewed available data from amphibian and reptile fauna from over 40 Western Siberian, Russian and Northeastern Kazakhstan localities, ranging from the Middle Miocene to Early Pleistocene. Herein, we provided new interpretations that arose from our assessment of the previously published and new data. More than 50 amphibians and reptile taxa were identified belonging to families Hynobiidae, Cryptobranchidae, Salamandridae, Palaeobatrachidae, Bombinatoridae, Pelobatidae, Hylidae, Bufonidae, Ranidae, Gekkonidae, Lacertidae, and Emydidae. Palaeobiogeographic analyses were performed for these groups and palaeoprecipitation values were estimated for 12 localities, using the bioclimatic analysis of herpetofaunal assemblages. Conclusion The Neogene assemblage of Western Siberia was found to be dominated by groups of European affinities, such as Palaeobatrachidae, Bombina, Hyla, Bufo bufo, and a small part of this assemblage included Eastern Palaearctic taxa (e.g. Salamandrella, Tylototriton, Bufotes viridis. For several taxa (e.g. Mioproteus, Hyla, Bombina, Rana temporaria, the Western Siberian occurrences represented their most eastern Eurasian records. The most diverse collection of fossil remains was found in the Middle Miocene. Less diversity has been registered towards the Early Pleistocene, potentially due to the progressive cooling of the climate in the Northern Hemisphere. The results of our study showed higher-amplitude changes of precipitation development in Western Siberia from the Early Miocene to the Pliocene, than previously assumed.

  16. Flow cytometry as a tool in the evaluation of blood leukocyte function in Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758 (Testudines, Cheloniidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rossi

    Full Text Available Chelonia mydas is a sea turtle that feeds and nests on the Brazilian coast and a disease called fibropapillomatosis is a threat to this species. Because of this, it is extremely necessary to determine a methodology that would enable the analysis of blood leukocyte function in these sea turtles. In order to achieve this aim, blood samples were collected from C. mydas with or without fibropapillomas captured on the São Paulo north coast. Blood samples were placed in tubes containing sodium heparin and were transported under refrigeration to the laboratory in sterile RPMI 1640 cell culture medium. Leukocytes were separated by density gradient using Ficoll-PaqueTM Plus, Amershan Biociences®. The following stimuli were applied in the assessment of leukocyte function: Phorbol Miristate-Acetate (PMA for oxidative burst activity evaluation and Zymosan A (Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bio Particles®, Alexa Fluor® 594 conjugate for phagocytosis evaluation. Three cell populations were identified: heterophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. Monocytes were the cells responsible for phagocytosis and oxidative burst.

  17. Two new species of Temnocephala (Platyhelminthes, Temnocephalida) from the South American snake-necked turtle Hydromedusa tectifera (Testudines, Chelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volonterio, Odile

    2010-12-01

    Temnocephala brevicornis Monticelli, 1889 is the only species of the genus Temnocephala Blanchard, 1849 reported from chelonians to date. During a survey of the species of Temnocephala extant in southern Uruguay, two new species were found on the chelonian Hydromedusa tectifera Cope, 1869. They are described here as Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. and Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. Both resemble T. brevicornis, but differ in the morphometry of the penial stylet, and in qualitative details of the reproductive complex. Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. differs from T. brevicornis by having a massive, cylindrical sphincter in the distal portion of the vagina, and a seminal vesicle that opens into the subpolar to equatorial portion of the contractile vesicle. In addition, the penial stylet in Temnocephala pereirai n. sp. is large in relation to body size, straight and more slender, having the distal portion of its shaft slightly sinuous, and a smaller introvert equipped with about 16 distal crowns of smaller spines. Temnocephala cuocoloi n. sp. is most similar to T. brevicornis, but differs by having a smaller, curved penial stylet that has a smaller introvert in relation to stylet size, with about 10 distal crowns of smaller spines. A key to the species of the Temnocephala from chelonians is provided. This study supports the validity of the following characters previously proposed for the taxonomy of the genus Temnocephala: the shape of the sphincters in the female reproductive system, the shape of the penial stylet, and the number, size, and position of spines in the introvert.

  18. First record of Mesoclemmys tuberculata (Reptilia, Testudines, Chelidae in the Cerrado area of Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Lima Silveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesoclemmys tuberculata is a turtle species that is distributed in northeastern Brazil, recorded mainly in the Caatinga and at some localities in the Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. In this paper we report the first species record in an area of Cerrado of Minas Gerais state, and it is the only known state record in a specific location. During field sampling, a specimen of M. tuberculata was collected in the municipality of João Pinheiro, northwest state, in a Cerrado nuclear area in the São Francisco river basin. The locality of this record is the southern and western limits of M. tuberculata’s known distribution, as well as the most inland locality of species record in the Cerrado biome.

  19. Eimeria lokuma n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), a new coccidium from the African helmeted turtle Pelomedusa subrufa (Lacepede) (Testudines: Pelomedusidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Kamler, M.; Modrý, David

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2006), s. 73-76 ISSN 0165-5752 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD524/03/H133; GA ČR GP524/03/D104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Eimeria * Pelomedusa * Apicomplexa Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.856, year: 2006

  20. Neogene amphibians and reptiles (Caudata, Anura, Gekkota, Lacertilia, and Testudines) from the south of Western Siberia, Russia, and Northeastern Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyan, Davit; Zazhigin, Vladimir S; Böhme, Madelaine

    2017-01-01

    The present-day amphibian and reptile fauna of Western Siberia are the least diverse of the Palaearctic Realm, as a consequence of the unfavourable climatic conditions that predominate in this region. The origin and emergence of these herpetofaunal groups are poorly understood. Aside from the better-explored European Neogene localities yielding amphibian and reptile fossil remains, the Neogene herpetofauna of Western Asia is understudied. The few available data need critical reviews and new interpretations, taking into account the more recent records of the European herpetofauna. The comparison of this previous data with that of European fossil records would provide data on palaeobiogeographic affiliations of the region as well as on the origin and emergence of the present-day fauna of Western Siberia. An overview of the earliest occurrences of certain amphibian lineages is still needed. In addition, studies that address such knowledge gaps can be useful for molecular biologists in their calibration of molecular clocks. In this study, we considered critically reviewed available data from amphibian and reptile fauna from over 40 Western Siberian, Russian and Northeastern Kazakhstan localities, ranging from the Middle Miocene to Early Pleistocene. Herein, we provided new interpretations that arose from our assessment of the previously published and new data. More than 50 amphibians and reptile taxa were identified belonging to families Hynobiidae, Cryptobranchidae, Salamandridae, Palaeobatrachidae, Bombinatoridae, Pelobatidae, Hylidae, Bufonidae, Ranidae, Gekkonidae, Lacertidae, and Emydidae. Palaeobiogeographic analyses were performed for these groups and palaeoprecipitation values were estimated for 12 localities, using the bioclimatic analysis of herpetofaunal assemblages. The Neogene assemblage of Western Siberia was found to be dominated by groups of European affinities, such as Palaeobatrachidae, Bombina, Hyla , Bufo bufo , and a small part of this assemblage included Eastern Palaearctic taxa (e.g. Salamandrella , Tylototriton , Bufotes viridis ). For several taxa (e.g. Mioproteus, Hyla, Bombina , Rana temporaria ), the Western Siberian occurrences represented their most eastern Eurasian records. The most diverse collection of fossil remains was found in the Middle Miocene. Less diversity has been registered towards the Early Pleistocene, potentially due to the progressive cooling of the climate in the Northern Hemisphere. The results of our study showed higher-amplitude changes of precipitation development in Western Siberia from the Early Miocene to the Pliocene, than previously assumed.

  1. Effects of in ovo injection of carbohydrates on somatic characteristics and liver nutrient profiles of broiler embryos and hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, W; Bennett, L W; Gerard, P D; Pulikanti, R; Peebles, E D

    2011-12-01

    Effects of the in ovo injection of commercial diluent supplemented with dextrin or with dextrin in combination with various other carbohydrates on the somatic characteristics and liver nutrient profiles of Ross × Ross 708 broiler embryos and chicks were investigated. Results include information concerning the gluconeogenic energy status of the liver before and after hatch. Eggs containing live embryos were injected in the amnion on d 18 of incubation using an automated multiple-egg injector for the delivery of the following carbohydrates dissolved in 0.4 mL of commercial diluent: 1) 6.25% glucose and 18.75% dextrin; 2) 6.25% sucrose and 18.75% dextrin; 3) 6.25% maltose and 18.75% dextrin; and 4) 25% dextrin. Also, a noninjected control and a 0.4-mL diluent-injected control were included. Body weight relative to set egg weight on d 19 of incubation (E19) was increased by the injection of all carbohydrate solutions, and on the day of hatch was increased by the injection of diluent, sucrose and dextrin, and maltose and dextrin solutions. Hatchability of the fertilized eggs, residual yolk sac weight, and liver weight were not affected by any injection treatment; however, as compared with the 0.4 mL diluent-injected group, all of the supplementary carbohydrates, except for the glucose and dextrin combination group, increased liver glycogen and glucose concentrations on E19. Furthermore, all carbohydrates, except for the 25% dextrin treatment, decreased liver fat concentration on E19. From E19 to the day of hatch, liver glycogen concentrations dropped dramatically from an average of 3.2 to 0.6%. Despite treatment differences observed on E19 for liver glycogen, glucose, and fat concentrations, these differences were lost by the day of hatch. Nevertheless, liver glycogen and glucose concentrations were positively correlated on the day of hatch. In conclusion, the in ovo injection of various supplemental carbohydrates dissolved in 0.4 mL of commercial diluent altered the liver nutrient profile of Ross × Ross 708 broiler embryos before hatch. However, the subsequent pattern of energy utilization during the hatching process modified these effects.

  2. Effects of breeder age, broiler strain, and eggshell temperature on development and physiological status of embryos and hatchlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangsuay, A.; Meijerhof, R.; Anker-Hensen, van den Ilona; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Souza Morita, De V.; Kemp, B.; Brand, Van Den H.

    2016-01-01

    Breeder age and broiler strain can influence the availability of nutrients and oxygen, particularly through differences in yolk size and shell conductance. We hypothesized that these egg characteristics might affect embryonic responses to changes in eggshell temperature (EST). This study aimed to

  3. Effects of in ovo injection of carbohydrates on embryonic metabolism, hatchability, and subsequent somatic characteristics of broiler hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, W; Gerard, P D; Pulikanti, R; Peebles, E D

    2011-10-01

    The effects of the in ovo injection of different carbohydrate solutions on the internal egg temperature (IT), hatchability, and time of hatch of embryonated Ross × Ross 708 broiler hatching eggs were determined. In addition, the BW, liver weight, yolk sac weight (YSW), and yolk-free BW (YFBW) of the embryos on d 19.5 of incubation and of the chicks on day of hatch were determined. Eggs containing live embryos were injected in the amnion on d 18.5 of incubation using an automated multiple-egg injector. Solution injections delivered 1.2 mL of physiological saline (0.85%) alone or with a supplemental carbohydrate. The following supplemental carbohydrates were separately dissolved in saline at a concentration of 0.3 g/mL: glucose, fructose, sucrose, maltose, and dextrin. Temperature transponders were implanted in the air cells of embryonated and nonembryonated eggs after in ovo injection for the detection of IT at 6, 14, and 22 h after injection. The IT of embryonated eggs was significantly greater than that of nonembryonated eggs at all 3 times after the treatment period. Eggs that were injected with saline with or without supplemental carbohydrates experienced a reduction in IT when compared with control eggs whose shells were perforated without solution delivery, and the decrease in IT was associated with a delay in hatch time. Liver weight was negatively related to YSW and positively related to YFBW, and YSW was negatively related to YFBW. Although the saline and carbohydrate solution injections increased chick BW compared with noninjected controls, chick YFBW was decreased in the maltose- and sucrose-injected groups. In conclusion, the injection of 1.2 mL of saline with or without supplemental carbohydrates lowered embryonic metabolism, as reflected by a lower IT and a delay in time of hatch. However, effects of the different carbohydrate solutions on yolk absorption and tissue deposition in yolk-free embryos varied. These results suggest that lower volumes for solutions containing maltose, sucrose, or fructose should be considered for in ovo injection.

  4. Histological description of the reproductive system of male and female hatchlings of the Magdalena River turtle (Podocnemis lewyana)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Ospina, Andres C; Rodriguez, Berardo; Ceballos, Claudia P

    2014-01-01

    In this study we described the macroscopic and microscopic histology of the reproductive system of male and female podocnemis lewyana neonates (3.5 months old). We found macroscopic differences in the morphology of the gonads between the sexes, with ovaries being twice as long as testes, and testes being twice as wide as ovaries. Microscopically, we identified several immature elements, such as the lack of a muscle layer in the oviduct of females, and simple epithelia instead of pseudostratified epithelia in the oviduct and epididymis described in reptile adults. We also found a black pigment observed macroscopically in the mesovarium, and macroscopically and histologically in the epididymis. This pigment is consistent with the center of melano-macrophages described in other vertebrates. Finally we described a supporting mesenchymal structure, the appendage of the oviduct, which was much longer than what has been described in other podocnemis species.

  5. Differential expression of the FMRF gene in adult and hatchling stellate ganglia of the squid Loligo pealei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Grant, P.; Hellemons, A.J.C.G.; DeGiorgis, J.A.; Li, K.W.; Pant, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    The giant fiber system of the squid Loligo pealei mediates the escape response and is an important neurobiological model. Here, we identified an abundant transcript in the stellate ganglion (SG) that encodes a FMRFamide precursor, and characterized FMRFamide and FI/LRF-amide peptides. To determine

  6. Pulmonary anatomy and a case of unilateral aplasia in a common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina): developmental perspectives on cryptodiran lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, E R; Sedlmayr, J C; Schott, R; Lyson, T R; Sanders, R K; Lambertz, M

    2017-12-01

    The common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) is a well studied and broadly distributed member of Testudines; however, very little is known concerning developmental anomalies and soft tissue pathologies of turtles and other reptiles. Here, we present an unusual case of unilateral pulmonary aplasia, asymmetrical carapacial kyphosis, and mild scoliosis in a live adult C. serpentina. The detailed three-dimensional (3D) anatomy of the respiratory system in both the pathological and normal adult C. serpentina, and a hatchling are visualized using computed tomography (CT), microCT, and 3D digital anatomical models. In the pathological turtle, the right lung consists of an extrapulmonary bronchus that terminates in a blind stump with no lung present. The left lung is hyperinflated relative to the normal adult, occupying the extra coelomic space facilitated by the unusual mid-carapacial kyphotic bulge. The bronchial tree of the left lung retains the overall bauplan of the normal specimens, with some minor downstream variation in the number of secondary airways. The primary difference between the internal pulmonary structure of the pathological individual and that of a normal adult is a marked increase in the surface area and density of the parenchymal tissue originating from the secondary airways, a 14.3% increase in the surface area to volume ratio. Despite this, the aplasia has not had an impact upon the ability of the turtle to survive; however, it did interfere with aquatic locomotion and buoyancy control under water. This turtle represents a striking example of a non-fatal congenital defect and compensatory visceral hypertrophy. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  7. Morphological and physiological responses of seagrasses (Alismatales to grazers (Testudines: Cheloniidae and the role of these responses as grazing patch abandonment cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Lacey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, are grazers influencing the distribution of seagrass within shallow coastal ecosystems, yet the drivers behind C. mydas patch use within seagrass beds are largely unknown. Current theories center on food quality (nutrient content as the plant responds to grazing disturbances; however, no study has monitored these parameters in a natural setting without grazer manipulation. To determine the morphological and physiological responses potentially influencing seagrass recovery from grazing disturbances, seagrasses were monitored for one year under three different grazing scenarios (turtle grazed, fish grazed and ungrazed in a tropical ecosystem in Akumal Bay, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Significantly less soluble carbohydrates and increased nitrogen and phosphorus content in Thalassia testudinum were indicative of the stresses placed on seagrasses during herbivory. To determine if these physiological responses were the drivers of the heterogeneous grazing behavior by C. mydas recorded in Akumal Bay, patches were mapped and monitored over a six-month interval. The abandoned patches had the lowest standing crop rather than leaf nutrient or rhizome soluble carbohydrate content. This suggests a modified Giving Up Density (GUD behavior: the critical threshold where cost of continued grazing does not provide minimum nutrients, therefore, new patches must be utilized, explains resource abandonment and mechanism behind C. mydas grazing. This study is the first to apply GUD theory, often applied in terrestrial literature, to explain marine herbivore grazing behavior.

  8. Geoffroy's side-necked turtle [Phrynops geoffroanus (Schweigger, 1812), Testudines: Chelidae] as a model for evolutionary ecotoxicology: relationship between environmental contamination, conditions and genetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venancio, L P R; Zuccari, D A P C; Bonini-Domingos, C R

    2013-12-19

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of human activity factors, such as environmental contamination and habitat changes, as drivers for changing the physiological, biochemical, and genetic diversity of Geoffroy's side-necked turtle populations in one of the most impacted watersheds in southeastern Brazil. The impact of chemical and organic contamination was determined by ecotoxicological analyses to assess the action of some of the major components involved in protection against oxidative stress, phase I and II detoxification metabolism, and antioxidant capacity. The results indicated the influence of domestic and industrial effluents on detoxification metabolism and oxidative stress. However, in spite of increased activity and effect of EROD (CYP1A1) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, GST average values in the urban area agreed with those expected for hypoxic conditions according to the literature. This observation suggests that increased GST in response to ROS production due to the presence of pollutants increases the antioxidant defense network, controlling the oxidative damage caused by hypoxia and reperfusion. To determine the conditions that are reflected in individual ability (fitness), we evaluated the mathematical relationship between weight and length, and found that changes in body shape and weight increase, allowing inferences about animal health and welfare. The data obtained indicate differences in conditions that are associated with the area, but also with sex and reproductive period, and contamination gradient, indicating a strong influence of environmental stressors on the physiology of the specimens. The evaluation of genetic structure among populations of Preto River and Felicidade Stream, based on microsatellites, demonstrated that there was no genetic differentiation, due to extensive gene flow between the areas and high genetic diversity. However, after analysis of intrapopulation structure, we observed the existence of five genetic groups that reflected changes in habitat created by damming and siltation, which initiate separation processes (barriers) between sub-populations. The relationship between the data obtained for biochemical parameters, condition factors and genetic diversity was analyzed by heterozygosity-fitness correlation. The negative relationship observed may be explained by the profile of structural and ecological changes in the populations studied, indicating the important influence of humans on the biology of natural populations. Therefore, Phrynops geoffroanus shows adaptation to environmental contamination, and ecological changes and possible loss of habitat are altering the genetic diversity of the populations studied. This is the first study evaluating all these aspects of P. geoffroanus simultaneously in natural populations in Brazil, using this species as a model.

  9. Morphological variation, phylogenetic relationships, and geographic distribution of the Baenidae (Testudines), based on new specimens from the Uinta Formation (Uinta Basin), Utah (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, J. Howard; Townsend, K. E. Beth; Adrian, Brent; Jager, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We described newly discovered baenid specimens from the Uintan North American Land Mammal Age (NALMA), in the Uinta Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah. These specimens include a partial skull and several previously undescribed postcranial elements of Baena arenosa, and numerous well-preserved shells of B. arenosa and Chisternon undatum. Baenids from the Uintan NALMA (46.5–40 Ma) are critical in that they provide valuable insight into the morphology and evolution of the diverse and speciose baenid family near the end of its extensive radiation, just prior to the disappearance of this clade from the fossil record. These Uintan specimens greatly increase the known variation in these late-surviving taxa and indicate that several characters thought to define these species should be reassessed. The partial cranium of B. arenosa, including portions of the basicranium, neurocranium, face, and lower jaw, was recently recovered from Uinta B sediments. While its morphology is consistent with known specimens of B. arenosa, we observed several distinct differences: a crescent-shaped condylus occipitalis that is concave dorsally, tuberculum basioccipitale that flare out laterally, and a distinct frontal-nasal suture. The current sample of plastral and carapacial morphology considerably expands the documented variation in the hypodigms of B. arenosa and C. undatum. Novel shell characters observed include sigmoidal extragular-humeral sulci, and small, subtriangular gular scutes. Subadult specimens reveal ontogenetic processes in both taxa, and demonstrate that diagnostic morphological differences between them were present from an early developmental age. PMID:28686718

  10. Morphological variation, phylogenetic relationships, and geographic distribution of the Baenidae (Testudines, based on new specimens from the Uinta Formation (Uinta Basin, Utah (USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather F Smith

    Full Text Available We described newly discovered baenid specimens from the Uintan North American Land Mammal Age (NALMA, in the Uinta Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah. These specimens include a partial skull and several previously undescribed postcranial elements of Baena arenosa, and numerous well-preserved shells of B. arenosa and Chisternon undatum. Baenids from the Uintan NALMA (46.5-40 Ma are critical in that they provide valuable insight into the morphology and evolution of the diverse and speciose baenid family near the end of its extensive radiation, just prior to the disappearance of this clade from the fossil record. These Uintan specimens greatly increase the known variation in these late-surviving taxa and indicate that several characters thought to define these species should be reassessed. The partial cranium of B. arenosa, including portions of the basicranium, neurocranium, face, and lower jaw, was recently recovered from Uinta B sediments. While its morphology is consistent with known specimens of B. arenosa, we observed several distinct differences: a crescent-shaped condylus occipitalis that is concave dorsally, tuberculum basioccipitale that flare out laterally, and a distinct frontal-nasal suture. The current sample of plastral and carapacial morphology considerably expands the documented variation in the hypodigms of B. arenosa and C. undatum. Novel shell characters observed include sigmoidal extragular-humeral sulci, and small, subtriangular gular scutes. Subadult specimens reveal ontogenetic processes in both taxa, and demonstrate that diagnostic morphological differences between them were present from an early developmental age.

  11. Attitudes and local ecological knowledge of experts fishermen in relation to conservation and bycatch of sea turtles (reptilia: testudines), Southern Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of ethnoecological tools to evaluate possible damage and loss of biodiversity related to the populations of species under some degree of threat may represent a first step towards integrating the political management of natural resources and conservation strategies. From this perspective, this study investigates fishermen’s ecological knowledge about sea turtles and attitudes towards the conservation and bycatch in Ilhéus, Southern Bahia, Brazil. Methods Fishermen experts semi-structured interviews were performed using snowball sampling method. The interviews consisted of a series of questions relating to the fishermen’s profile, structure and work equipment, the local ecological knowledge of fishermen about sea turtles and bycatch, a projective test, attitudes towards turtle conservation and beliefs and taboos regarding turtles. Indicators for quantitative comparisons of respondents in terms of their broad knowledge and attitudes towards turtle conservation were created. Correlation analyses were made between indicators of knowledge and attitude as well as the relationship between education level and knowledge and attitudes. Results Thirty experts were interviewed for the study. The local ecological knowledge and attitudes of fishermen towards the conservation of sea turtles were respectively medium (0.43) and moderate (0.69) according to experts (based on Likert scale and Cronbach’s Alpha). Potential areas of spawning were reported from Barra Grande to Una covering the entire coast of Ilhéus. Methods for identifying the animal, behavior, and popular names were described by fishermen. The most recent captures of turtles were attributed to fishing line, but according to the respondents, lobster nets and shrimp traps are more likely to capture turtles. Knowledge and attitudes were weakly inversely correlated (r = −0.38, p = 0.04), and the education level of the respondent showed a positive correlation with positive attitudes towards turtle conservation (H = 8.33; p = 0.04). Life history, habitat, specific and exogenous taboos, beliefs and the use of hawksbill turtle to make glasses and other handcrafts are also reported in the study. Conclusions Monitoring of spawning areas, preservation of traditional practices, strategies to moderate the use of fishery resources and the local ecological knowledge/attitudes can provide data to improve the conservation practices and management of sea turtles. PMID:23448503

  12. Palaeoamyda messeliana nov. comb. (Testudines, Pan-Trionychidae from the Eocene Messel Pit and Geiseltal localities, Germany, taxonomic and phylogenetic insights

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    Edwin Cadena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Abundant pan-trionychid (soft-shell turtles specimens have been found in Eocene sequences of central Europe, particularly from two localities in Germany, the Messel Pit (a UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site and Geiseltal, traditionally attributed to Trionyx messelianus or Rafetoides austriacus. Over the last two decades new specimens of this taxon from these two localities have been discovered and fully prepared. However, they have remained unstudied, as well as their phylogenetic position inside Pan-Trionychidae is unknown. Results Five new specimens of Palaeoamyda messeliana nov. comb. from Messel Pit and Geiseltal localities are fully described here. A revised diagnosis for the species is also presented here, together with its inclusion in a phylogenetic analysis of Pan-Trionychidae that shows that this species is sister to the extant Amyda cartilaginea, one of the most abundant pan-trionychid (soft-shell turtles from Asia, both members of the clade Chitrini. The specimens described in here are among the best and most complete fossil pan-trionychid skeletons so far known.

  13. Potential foraging and aggregation zones of the Hawksbill Sea Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata (Testudines: Cheloniidae), near Marino Ballena National Park, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla Salazar, Adrian; Brenes Arias, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Groups of hawksbill sea turtles have been observed over the years, close to the coast of the Marino Ballena National Park. For this reason, in February 2015, we monitored its coast to identify aggregation sites. Turtle size estimates, and identification, were done by direct observation by the divers and from the boat. From February to December 2015, fourteen monitor records per sampling point were done and 41 turtles were recorded. They were 30cm - 80cm long and 59% of the individuals aggrega...

  14. Potential foraging and aggregation zones of the Hawksbill Sea Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata (Testudines: Cheloniidae), in Marino Ballena National Park, Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Bonilla-Salazar, Adrián; Brenes Arias, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    AbstractGroups of hawksbill sea turtles have been observed over the years, close to the coast of the Marino Ballena National Park. For this reason, in February 2015, we monitored its coast to identify aggregation sites. Turtle size estimates, and identification, were done by direct observation by the divers and from the boat. From February to December 2015, fourteen monitor records per sampling point were done and 41 turtles were recorded. They were 30cm - 80cm long and 59% of the individuals...

  15. Mitochondrial DNA markers of loggerhead marine turtles (Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae nesting at Kyparissia Bay, Greece, confirm the western Greece unit and regional structuring

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    Carlos Carreras

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic markers have been widely used in marine turtles to assess population structuring and origin of individuals in common feeding grounds, which are key elements for understanding their ecology and for developing conservation strategies. However, these analyses are very sensitive to missing information, especially from abundant nesting sites. Kyparissia Bay (western Greece hosts the second largest Mediterranean nesting aggregation of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta, but the genetic profile of this nesting site has not, as yet, been described using the extended version of the historically used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA marker. This marker was genotyped for 36 individuals nesting at Kyparissia Bay and haplotype frequencies obtained were compared with published data from other Mediterranean nesting sites. The results confirmed the connection between Kyparissia and other western Greek nesting sites and the isolation of this western Greek group from other Mediterranean nesting areas. As a consequence of this isolation, this abundant group of nesting aggregations (almost 30% of the Mediterranean stock is not likely to significantly contribute to the recovery of other declining Mediterranean units.

  16. Loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758 (Testudines, Cheloniidae, as a new host of Monticellius indicum Mehra, 1939 (Digenea: Spirorchiidae and associated lesiond to spirorchiid eggs

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    Werneck M. R.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present note describes the occurrence of Monticellius indicum Mehra, 1939 (Digenea: Spirorchiidae in an adult loggerhead turtle, Caretta caretta (Linnaeus, 1758, found on the coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Pathological changes due to spirorchiid eggs (type 1 and 3 were found in gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, and heart. This parasite has previously been described in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas (Linnaeus, 1758, from Pakistan, Brazil and Costa Rica as well as in the hawksbill sea turtle, Eretmochelys imbricata (Linnaeus, 1766, in Brazil. This note reports the loggerhead turtle as a new host for M. indicum.

  17. Report of Enodiotrema megachondrus (Looss, 1899 Looss, 1901 (Digenea: Plagiorchiidae in a green turtle Chelonia mydas Linnaeus, 1758 (Testudines, Cheloniidae from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werneck M. R.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the occurrence of Enodiotrema megachondrus (Looss, 1899 Looss, 1901 in a juvenile green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas Linnaeus, 1758 found on the coast of Brazil. This parasite has been described in Caretta caretta from Egypt, France, the Mediterranean Sea, the Madeira Archipelago, the Adriatic Sea and the USA, in C. mydas from Egypt and the USA, in Eretmochelys imbricata from Cuba, in Lepidochelys olivacea from Mexico and Costa Rica and in Lepidochelys kempii from USA. This note represents the first report of E. megachondus in a green sea turtle in the South-West Atlantic Ocean.

  18. Morphological and physiological responses of seagrasses (Alismatales) to grazers (Testudines: Cheloniidae) and the role of these responses as grazing patch abandonment cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Elizabeth A; Collado-Vides, Ligia; Fourqurean, James W

    2014-12-01

    Green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, are grazers influencing the distribution of seagrass within shallow coastal ecosystems, yet the drivers behind C. mydas patch use within seagrass beds are largely unknown. Current theories center on food quality (nutrient content) as the plant responds to grazing disturbances; however, no study has monitored these parameters in a natural setting without grazer manipulation. To determine the morphological and physiological responses potentially influencing seagrass recovery from grazing disturbances, seagrasses were monitored for one year under three different grazing scenarios (turtle grazed, fish grazed and ungrazed) in a tropical ecosystem in Akumal Bay, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Significantly less soluble carbohydrates and increased nitrogen and phosphorus content in Thalassia testudinum were indicative of the stresses placed on seagrasses during herbivory. To determine if these physiological responses were the drivers of the heterogeneous grazing behavior by C. mydas recorded in Akumal Bay, patches were mapped and monitored over a six-month interval. The abandoned patches had the lowest standing crop rather than leaf nutrient or rhi- zome soluble carbohydrate content. This suggests a modified Giving Up Density (GUD) behavior: the critical threshold where cost of continued grazing does not provide minimum nutrients, therefore, new patches must be utilized, explains resource abandonment and mechanism behind C. mydas grazing. This study is the first to apply GUD theory, often applied in terrestrial literature, to explain marine herbivore grazing behavior.

  19. The dazed and confused identity of Agassiz’s land tortoise, Gopherus agassizii (Testudines: Testudinidae with the description of a new species and its consequences for conservation

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    Robert Murphy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a cornucopia of problems associated with the identity of the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii Cooper. The date of publication is found to be 1861, rather than 1863. Only one of the three original cotypes exists, and it is designated as the lectotype of the species. Another cotype is found to have been destroyed in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and subsequent fire. The third is lost. The lectotype is genetically confirmed to be from California, and not Arizona, USA as sometimes reported. Maternally, the holotype of G. lepidocephalus Ottley et Velázques Solis, 1989 from the Cape Region of Baja California Sur, Mexico is also from the Mojavian population of the desert tortoise, and not from Tiburon Island, Sonora, Mexico as previously proposed. A suite of characters serve to diagnose tortoises west and north of the Colorado River, the Mojavian population, from those east and south of the river in Arizona, USA and Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico, the Sonoran population. Species recognition is warranted and because G. lepidocephalus is from the Mojavian population no names are available for the Sonoran species. Thus, a new species, Gopherus morafkai sp. n., is named and this action reduces the distribution of G. agassizii to only 30% of its former range. This reduction has important implications for the conservation and protection of G. agassizii, which may deserve a higher level of protection.

  20. A new Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), possessing mitra-shaped oocysts, from the Neotropical chelid turtle Batrachemys heliostemma (Testudines: Chelidae), and its comparison with Eimeria mitraria (Laveran & Mesnil 1902)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Kamler, M.; Modrý, David

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 5 (2006), s. 555-558 ISSN 0074-0276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP524/03/D104; GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Batrachemys * Eimeria Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.208, year: 2006

  1. Estudo histológico e histoquímico da pele de jurará Kinosternon scorpioides scorpioides (Testudines: Kinosternidae

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    Ana L. Abreu-Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente trabalho foi analisar histológica e histo- químicamente a pele do jurará (Kinosternon scorpioides scorpioides. Foram utilizados seis animais (três machos e três fêmeas. Os animais foram eutanasiados com dose letal de tiopental sódico a 2,5%, para colheita de fragmentos de pele mole das patas e pescoço do animal, que após a fixação em líquido de Bouin, foram incluídos em parafina e corados pelas técnicas de hematoxilina-eosina, Giemsa, Sirius red, Reticulina de Gomori e Fucsina-resorcina de Weigert. Os resultados revelaram que a pele do jurará é delgada e composta de epiderme e derme. A epiderme é formada por estrato germinativo constituído por uma única camada de células cilíndricas; estrato espinhoso apresentando duas ou três camadas de células poliédricas; o estrato granuloso não foi observado nos exemplares estudados O estrato córneo apresenta uma delgada camada de queratina mole. Na derme, os fibroblastos foram as células mais freqüentes e as fibras colágenas formavam feixes espessos dispostos em várias direções. No método do Picro Sirius Red sob luz polarizada observou-se que, independente da região analisada, há predomínio de fibras colágenas tipo I em relação ao colágeno tipo III. Foi também observados mastócitos em pequena quantidade e fibras elásticas na região subepidérmica. Concluiu-se que a pele de Kinosternon scorpioides scorpioides possui características semelhantes a dos demais vertebrados (anfíbios, aves e mamíferos, apresenta peculiaridades, como por exemplo, a ausência de papilas dérmicas e glândulas.

  2. NEW FOSSIL VERTEBRATE REMAINS FROM SAN GIOVANNI DI SINIS (LATE PLEISTOCENE, SARDINIA: THE LAST MAUREMYS (REPTILIA, TESTUDINES IN THE CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN

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    FRANCESCO CHESI

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available New fossil vertebrates from the most representative Upper Pleistocene section (Tyrrhenian, MIS 5e of the outcrop of San Giovanni di Sinis (Oristano, Sardinia are here reported and described. The fossils, although scarce and fragmentary, document the occurrence of a terrapin (Mauremys sp. and the endemic Sardinian deer (Praemegaceros cazioti. Significant is the occurrence of the terrapin because it is the youngest representative of the genus in the central Mediterranean area where it is extinct at present. The Late Pleistocene extinction of Mauremys in Italy follows the same pattern of other Mediterranean reptiles, in being in some cases delayed on the islands. A comparison of the modern range of Mauremys and that of the pond turtle, Emys, as well as of their past ranges as evidenced by the fossil record, might suggest that some sort of thermophily (at least during pre-hatching stages characterized the former taxon and is responsible for its past and present distribution. SHORT NOTE

  3. Los huevos falsos (SAGs facilitan el comportamiento social de emergencia en las crías de la tortuga laúd Dermochelys coriacea (Testudines: Dermochelyidae

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    Juan Patiño-Martinez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La emergencia de las crías de tortuga laúd eclosionadas en los nidos profundos desde la arena hasta la superficie de la playa ocurre sin ayuda parental y es el primer gran desafío de supervivencia en su ciclo de vida. Este estudio, desarrollado en la costa Caribe colombiana, describe el comportamiento social de emergencia de neonatos y evalúa el efecto de la traslocación de los nidos en los patrones temporales de emergencia. Se propone por primera vez que el espacio liberado por la deshidratación de falsos huevos (SAGs en la nidada, representa una ventaja reproductiva al facilitar el agrupamiento de los neonatos en un espacio muy limitado y favorecer la sincronía de la emergencia. El tiempo medio registrado para la emergencia en grupo fue de 3.3 días, variando entre uno y seis días. La traslocación de los nidos no afectó el patrón temporal de emergencia que fue predominantemente nocturno (77.77% en nidos naturales y 81.65% en trasladados. Los picos máximos de emergencias a la superficie coincidieron con los periodos de menor temperatura ambiental exterior (22:00h-06:00h. La ventaja selectiva de este patrón temporal y de la emergencia sincrónica está probablemente relacionada con las mayores tasas de depredación y mortalidad por hipertermia observadas durante el día.

  4. TAMAÑO Y ESTRUCTURA POBLACIONAL DE LA TORTUGA SABALETERA (RHINOCLEMMYS NASUTA, TESTUDINES: GEOEMYDIDAE EN UN AMBIENTE INSULAR DEL PACIFICO COLOMBIANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giraldo Alan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoclemmys nasuta (Boulenger 1902 es una especie endémica que se encuentra registrada en el libro rojo de los reptiles de Colombia y está catalogada como casi amenazada a nivel mundial. Esta especie, de tamaño mediano, habita los cursos de agua en la región Tumbes-Chocó, desde la cuenca del río Esmeraldas (Ecuador hasta la zona media de la cuenca del río Atrato (Chocó, Colombia. Hasta la fecha no se ha podido realizar una adecuada valoración de su estado de conservación debido a diferentes vacíos de conocimientos identificados con relación a la historia natural y la ecología de la especie. En el presente trabajo se recogen los resultados del análisis del tamaño y estructura de una población de R. nasuta estudiada en un ambiente insular del Pacífico colombiano (Isla Palma, Bahía Málaga, Valle del Cauca. En las condiciones de estudio, la población estuvo dominada por individuos adultos siendo la proporción Hembras: Machos: Juveniles de 1.00: 0.71: 0.85. Las hembras fueron consistentemente más grandes que los machos (♀: 179.87 ± 3.27 mm; ♂:151.83 ± 2.41 mm, definiéndose un índice general de dimorfismo sexual de 1.18. Con base en los registros de captura-recaptura, se estimó que el tamaño de la población de esta especie en Isla Palma durante el periodo de estudio fue de 990 individuos (IC90%: 941 a 1044 ind, con una densidad promedio de 2444 ± 122 tortugas por cada hectárea de río. Al evaluar la relación tamaño-peso, se estableció que el crecimiento de R. nasuta es de tipo isométrico (b = 3.04, siendo la tendencia de crecimiento similar entre machos y hembras a pesar del dimorfismo sexual detectado. Este trabajo es el primer esfuerzo de investigación en la región pacífica de Colombia que aborda el estudio sistemático de una población de tortugas continentales. Además, proporciona información sobre la historia natural de R. nasuta que fortalecerá las iniciativas de conservación de tortugas en Colombia.

  5. Primer registro para el Perú de Nematophila grandis (Diesing, 1839 Travassos, 1934 (Trematoda, Diplodiscidae en Podocnemis unifilis (Troschel, 1848 (Testudines, Pelomedusidae

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    Patricia Salízar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo registra por primera vez para el Perú a Nematophila grandis (Diesing, 1839 Travassos, 1934, en la tortuga de río Podocnemis unifilis «taricaya». Los hospederos fueron colectados en las localidades del Río Putumayo, Samiria, Iquitos (Loreto y Manu (Madre de Dios. El material identificado pertenece a la Colección Helmintológica del Departamento de Protozoología, Helmintología e Invertebrados Afines del Museo de Historia Natural de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

  6. Composición química del huevo de Tortuga Golfina Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae y su potencial como recurso alimenticio

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    María Isabel Castro-González

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Por su potencial como fuente alimenticia, se analizó la composición química de huevo de Lepidochelys olivácea en La Escobilla, Oaxaca, México. El Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México proporcionó 250 muestras de huevo liofilizado de 25 tortugas, que se analizaron siguiendo métodos oficiales para humedad, cenizas, proteína, grasa, lípidos totales(LT y análisis microbiológicos; además de ácidos grasos(AG por cromatografía de gases, aminoácidos(AA, vitaminas y colesterol(col por HPLC. Los resultados fueron los siguientes: (g/100g humedad(4.7, cenizas(3.8, proteína(53.7 y grasa(47.4. AA esenciales (g aa/100g Proteína: Ile (4.4, Lys(6.6, Leu(7.4, Met+Cys (8.8, Phe+Tyr (10.8; retinol (340μg/100g, colecalciferol (5.9 μg/100g, tocoferol (8.6, tiamina (0.3 y riboflavina (1.1 (mg/100g. Y los de (LT, (AG y (Col se concentraron en tres grupos por peso de tortuga: (LT (44.3-48.7-49.1g/100g, (Col (518.4-522.5-728.7 mg/100g. Entonces se identificaron 17 AGSaturados, 8 AGMonoinsaturados y 11 AGPoliinsaturados. Los AGS más abundantes (mg/100g: C16:0 (485-1263, AGM: C16:1 (456-716, C18:1n-9c (904- 1754 y AGP: C20:4n-6 (105-217, EPA (48-103 y HA (97-189. También, existió diferencia significativa (Fisher, p<0.05 para (Col, AG totales, AGS, AGM, AGP y AG n-3 (EPA+DHA. No se detectó presencia de agentes microbiológicos. El huevo liofilizado de L. olivacea es una opción para el desarrollo de productos alimenticios por su proteína de alto valor biológico y ácidos grasos n-3.

  7. Two Eimerian Coccidia (Apicomplexa : Eimeriidae) from the critically endangered Arakan forest turtle Heosemys depressa (Testudines: Geoemydidae), with description of Eimeria arakanensis n. sp.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Široký, P.; Modrý, David

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2006), s. 183-189 ISSN 0065-1583 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP524/03/D104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Eimeria * Apicomplexa * Heosemys Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2006

  8. Palaeoamyda messeliana nov. comb. (Testudines, Pan-Trionychidae) from the Eocene Messel Pit and Geiseltal localities, Germany, taxonomic and phylogenetic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Abundant pan-trionychid (soft-shell) turtles specimens have been found in Eocene sequences of central Europe, particularly from two localities in Germany, the Messel Pit (a UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site) and Geiseltal, traditionally attributed to Trionyx messelianus or Rafetoides austriacus . Over the last two decades new specimens of this taxon from these two localities have been discovered and fully prepared. However, they have remained unstudied, as well as their phylogenetic position inside Pan-Trionychidae is unknown. Five new specimens of Palaeoamyda messeliana nov. comb. from Messel Pit and Geiseltal localities are fully described here. A revised diagnosis for the species is also presented here, together with its inclusion in a phylogenetic analysis of Pan-Trionychidae that shows that this species is sister to the extant Amyda cartilaginea , one of the most abundant pan-trionychid (soft-shell) turtles from Asia, both members of the clade Chitrini. The specimens described in here are among the best and most complete fossil pan-trionychid skeletons so far known.

  9. Aspectos Tafonômicos de Testudines da Formação Santana (Cretáceo Inferior,Bacia do Araripe, Nordeste do Brasil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ribeiro de Oliveira

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Araripe Basin is worldwide famous by diverse and exquisitely well preserved fossil assemblages in antana Formation. This lithostratigraphic unit is subdivided into three members: Crato, Ipubi and Romualdo. Up to date six species of turtles are known: Araripemys barretoi Price, 1973; Santanachelys gaffneyi, Hirayama,1998; Brasilemys josai Lapparent de Broin, 2000; Cearachelys placidoi Gaffney, Campos & Hirayama, 2001, Euraxemys essweini Gaffney, Tong & Meylan, 2006 and Caririemys violetae Oliveira & Kellner, 2007.Taphonomical features of turtles from Crato and Romualdo members are presents here. One specimen was examined in the Crato lagerstätte, (MN 4893-V Araripemys sp. (partial skull, axial and apendicular skeleton. This exemplar is preserved in light-beige colored laminated limestone from the Crato Member. Three specimenswere analized (MN 6743-V, MN 6744-V and MN 6760-V in the Romualdo lagerstätte, the two first are Araripemys barretoi specimens (shell and cervical vertebrae and the later is a Cearachelys placidoi specimen (fragmented shell. They are preserved in calcareous nodules. No data of collection of these specimens areavailable, however are possible to infer on aspects of preservation of these exemplares, since that these are preserved in the original sedimentary matrix. All specimens have shown the surface of bones without abrasion, what it allows to infer these turtles as autocthonous.

  10. A study on the Gut contents of six Leathery Turtles Dermochelys Coriacea (Linnaeus) (Reptilia: Testudines: Dermochelyidae) from British waters and from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den J.C.; Nierop, van M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopical investigations of the gut contents of six individuals of Dermochelys coriacea from southern England and the North Sea revealed the presence in all of these of numerous nematocysts, mainly scyphozoan. Only six species of Scyphozoa occur in British shallow waters and in the North Sea,

  11. The hidden function of egg white antimicrobials: egg weight-dependent effects of avidin on avian embryo survival and hatchling phenotype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krkavcová, E.; Kreisinger, J.; Hyánková, L.; Hyršl, P.; Javůrková, Veronika

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2018), č. článku bio031518. ISSN 2046-6390 Keywords : biotin deficiency affects * growth-performance * binding protein * intraspecific variation * maternal testosterone * divergent selection * offspring phenotype * immune function * chi cken-embryo * precocial bird * Albumen * maternal effects * antimicrobials * Avidin-biotin complex * embryogenesis * plasma complement Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2016

  12. The hidden function of egg white antimicrobials: egg weight-dependent effects of avidin on avian embryo survival and hatchling phenotype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krkavcová, E.; Kreisinger, J.; Hyánková, L.; Hyršl, P.; Javůrková, Veronika

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2018), č. článku bio031518. ISSN 2046-6390 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0303 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : biotin deficiency affects * growth-performance * binding protein * intraspecific variation * maternal testosterone * divergent selection * offspring phenotype * immune function * chicken-embryo * precocial bird * albumen * maternal effects * antimicrobials * avidin-biotin complex * embryogenesis * plasma complement Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Reproductive biology (medical aspects to be 3) Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2016

  13. Hatchling sex ratio and female mating status in the great reed warbler, Acrocephalus arundinaceus (Aves, Passeriformes): further evidence for offspring sex ratio manipulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, A.; Prokop, P.; Kašová, M.; Sobeková, Karolina; Kocian, Ľ.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2 (2012), s. 212-217 ISSN 1125-0003 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Great reed warbler * sex ratio * social polygyny Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.890, year: 2012

  14. Changes in thyroid parameters of hatchling American kestrels (Falco sparverius) following embryonic exposure to technical short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs; C10-13, 55.5% CL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernie, Kimberly J; Henry, Paula F.; Letcher, Robert J; Palace, Vince; Peters, Lisa; Rattner, Barnett A.; Sverko, Edward; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are complex mixtures of polychlorinated n-alkanes categorized according to their carbon chain length: short chain (SCCPs, C10 – C13), medium (C14 - C17), and long chain (C>17), chlorinated paraffins. SCCPs are primarily used in metalworking applications, as flame retardants, and in paints, adhesives, sealants, textiles, plastics and rubber (UNEP 2012). In 2012, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP 2012) reported in the Revised Draft Risk Profile for SCCPs, that CPs were produced in the United States, the European Union (EU), Slovakia, Brazil, India, Japan and China. While annual global consumption of SCCPs is large (>25 tonnes/year), it has sharply declined over the past 20 years. SCCPs are released through wastewater, landfills, and air emissions (UNEP 2012). Concentrations of SCCPs have been reported in fish and marine mammals in North and South America, Europe, Japan, Greenland and the Arctic (UNEP 2012 and references therein). Characterization of SCCP concentrations and exposure in terrestrial wildlife is limited. In 2010, SCCP concentrations were reported in the eggs of yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis) (4536 ± 40 pg/g wet weight (ww)) and Audouin’s gulls (Larus audouinii) (6364 ± 20 pg/g ww) in Spain (Morales et al. 2012), and little auks (Alle alle) (5 - 88 ng/g ww) and kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) (5 - 44 ng/g ww) in the European Arctic (Reth et al. 2006). In Sweden, muscle of ospreys contained CPs of unspecified chain length (Jansson et al. 1993). Although the toxicity of SCCPs has been demonstrated in aquatic invertebrates, fish, frogs, and laboratory rats, there are limited avian studies and these reported no effects of SCCPs on egg parameters of domestic hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) and ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) (UNEP 2012). Despite reported accumulation of SCCPs in wild birds, to our knowledge, exposure-related toxicities and effects with respect to avian wildlife remain unknown.

  15. Inter-nest variability in the egg to hatchling mass ratio in the Common Pochard Aythya ferina: Does female body mass matter?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hořák, D.; Albrecht, Tomáš; Klvaňa, P.; Musil, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2007), s. 33-38 ISSN 0001-6454 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6093403; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Common Pochard Aythya ferina * life history * precocial bird * reproduction Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.745, year: 2007 http://www.miiz.waw.pl/periodicals/acta-ornithologica/abstracts/ao_42_1.pdf

  16. Una tortuga Chelidae (Testudines: Pleurodira de cuello largo en el Grupo Neuquén, Río Negro, Argentina: Significado cronológico y paleobiogeográfico A long-necked Chelidae turtle (Testudines: Pleurodira from the Neuquén Group, Río Negro, Argentina: Chronological and paleobiogeographical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo S de la Fuente

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes restos de una tortuga Chelidae cuellilarga de la Formación Anacleto (Santoniano tardío-Campaniano temprano, aflorante en la localidad de Valle de la Luna Rojo, Provincia de Río Negro, Argentina, son conferidos a la especie Yaminuechelys cf. gasparinii De la Fuente, De Lapparent de Broin y Manera de Bianco, 2001. Ellos representan el registro más antiguo para el género y los Chelidae de cuello largo. Se sugiere que el ancestro común de Yaminuechelys e Hydromedusa habitó en Gondwana meridional con anterioridad a la separación de Australia. La presencia de este taxón en el Cretácico Tardío en Patagonia y algunos de los resultados de los análisis filogenéticos previos apoyan la hipótesis sobre una temprana diferenciación y diversificación de los quélidos en dicha región de Gondwana.A long necked chelid turtle species from the Anacleto Formation (late Santonian-early Campanian cropping out at Valle de La Luna Rojo, Río Negro Province, Argentina, is assigned to Yaminuechelys cf. gasparinii De la Fuente, De Lapparent de Broin and Manera de Bianco, 2001 and it represents the oldest record of a long-necked chelid. We suggest that the common ancestor of Yaminuechelys and Hydromedusa lived in Southern Gondwana before the separation of Australia from the remaining Southern Gondwanan landmasses. The presence of this chelid taxon in the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia and some previous phylogenetic analyses support the hypothesis of an early differentiation and diversification of chelids on Southern Gondwana.

  17. Anatomia vascular das artérias renais e gonadais de Podocnemis unifilis Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines, Pelomedusidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i2.680 Vascular anatomy of renal and gonadal arteries of Podocnemis unifilis Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines-Pelomedusidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i2.680

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Árthur Paulino Sanzo Kaminishi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o intuito de enriquecer o conhecimento sobre a morfologia vascular das artérias renais e gonadais de Podocnemis unifilis, facilitando o entendimento da fisiologia clínica e cirúrgica destes animais. Foram utilizados cinco exemplares machos de Podocnemis unifilis (tracajá, coletados segundo a Licença nº 066/2004-Ibama/RAM. A artéria carótida esquerda e a veia femoral direita foram canuladas e, pelas mesmas, foi introduzida solução fisiológica para lavagem do sistema vascular; em seguida, aplicou-se solução de Neoprene Látex “450” corada com pigmento específico (Globo S/A Tintas e Pigmentos. O material foi fixado em solução de Formol tamponado a 10% por um período mínimo de 96h. Uma abertura central e de formato quadrangular foi feita na metade caudal do plastrão e casco, de forma a expor os ramos da artéria aorta que irrigam os rins e as gônadas. Observou-se que as artérias renais se originam da face ventral da artéria aorta dorsal, em número de dois pares para cada rim e, em um único exemplar, elas originaram uma artéria renal direita e duas esquerdas. A artéria gonadal surgiu a partir da artéria renal, e apenas um par penetrou pela face dorsal de cada gônada.This work was developed with the aim of enriching knowledge on the vascular morphology of renal and gonadal arteries of Podocnemis unifilis, thus increasing the understanding of the clinical and surgical physiology of these animals. Five Podocnemis unifilis males were used, collected according to license no. 066/2004-Ibama/RAM. The left carotid artery and right femoral vein were cannulated, and a serum solution was introduced to remove obstructions from the vascular system. A solution of Neoprene Latex “450” dye was injected. The material was fixed in a solution of 10% formaldehyde for a period of 96 hours. Next, a square-shaped central opening was made in the caudal end of the plastron and bridge, exposing the branches of the aorta that irrigate the kidneys and gonads. It was observed that the renal arteries were originated from the ventral face of the dorsal aorta artery, in a number of two pairs per kidney and, in a single case, they originated one right and two left renal arteries. The gonadal artery was originated from the renal artery, and only one pair penetrated the dorsal face of each gonad.

  18. Anestesia de cágado-de-barbicha Phrynops geoffroanus Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines com a associação midazolan e propofol = Anaesthesia of geoffroy’s side-necked turtle Phrynops geoffroanus Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines with the association of midazolam and propofol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Quagliatto Santos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Os cágados apresentam fisiologia e morfologia únicas, que se diferenciam em muitos aspectos dos mamíferos. Por isso, a monitoração do paciente durante um processo anestésico ou sedativo deve ser realizada, porque dosagens e drogas com resultados benéficos em mamíferos têm-se mostrado inadequados para estas espécies. Foram utilizados dez exemplares de Phrynops geoffroanus, provenientes do rio Uberabinha, no município de Uberlândia, Estado de Minas Gerais (licença RAN/IBAMA nº 035/2006, os quais foram anestesiados com o protocolo midazolan 2 mg kg-1 IM-1 e propofol 10 mg kg-1 IV-1. Osbatimentos cardíacos dos exemplares foram monitorados com o aparelho Doppler Vascular Eletrônico nos tempos 0’, 10’, 30’, 60’, 120’ e 180’ pós-anestésico e, durante o período transanestésico, os cágados foram observados em relação aos parâmetros estipulados (locomoção, relaxamento muscular, manipulação, estímulos dolorosos nos membrostorácicos e pélvicos. O propofol (10 mg kg-1 IV-1 se mostrou um anestésico de rápida indução, com duração média da anestesia ideal de 66’. O midazolan na dose de 2 mg kg-1 IM-1 foi um pré-anestésico eficiente, promovendo relaxamento muscular e facilidade de manipulação do animal. A associação de anestésicos utilizada obteve bons resultados, promovendo analgesia por um tempo médio de 97’5’’. Não houve significante diminuição da frequência cardíaca e não foi observada apneia nos quelônios anestesiados.Turtles present a unique morphology and physiology and differ in many ways from mammalians. Therefore, anesthetic monitoring of the patient during sedation and anesthesia should be known, because the drugs and the dosages used successfully in mammals may prove to be inadequate in these species. Ten Phrynops geoffroanus were used, from the Uberabinha River, in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State (license RAN/IBAMA no. 035/2006 which were anesthetized with midazolam (2 mg kg-1 IM-1 and propofol (10 mg kg-1 IV-1. The heart beats from the samples were supervised with Doppler at the times 0’, 10’, 30’, 60’, 120’ and 180’ after being anesthetized and during the trans-anesthetic period. The turtles were observed relating the stipulated parameters (locomotion, muscular quietude, manipulation, painful incentive on the chest and pelvic limbs. Propofol (10 mg kg-1 IV-1 proved to be an anesthetic with quickly induction and duration of ideal anesthesia of 66’. Midazolam on the dosage of 2 mg kg-1 IM-1 was an efficient pre-anesthetic, promoting muscular quietude and facilitating animal manipulation. The association showed good results, promoting analgesia for an average time of 97’5’’. Additionally, it showed no significant decrease in the cardiac frequency and apnea in the anesthetized species.

  19. Parental correlates of offspring sex ratio in Eurasian Oystercatchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heg, D.; Dingemanse, NJ; Lessells, CM; Mateman, AC

    2000-01-01

    We investigated hatchling and fledgling sex ratios in Eurasian Oystercatchers (Haematopus ostralegus) using random amplified polymorphic DNA markers. The overall hatchling (53% males, n = 374 hatchlings from 177 broods) and fledgling (49% males, n = 51) sex ratio did not differ significantly from

  20. AMDAR y PCR-extra-rápida para la identificación de la tortuga cabezona Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae utilizando el gen mitocondrial citocromo c oxidasa I (COI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lancheros-Piliego

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We molecularly identified the loggerhead turtle Caretta caretta using high-speed PCR amplification and restriction analysis of mitochondrial DNA. We isolated the DNA from blood from juvenile C. caretta from Don Diego beach (Magdalena; n=4, in Islas Del Rosario (Bolívar; n=2 in the Colombian Caribbean. By using high-speed PCR amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI, we reduced reaction by one third and obtained fragments of 650 base pairs. We analyzed the amplified IOC product using enzymes HindIII, HpyCH4III and MseI and generated an electrophoretic profile, which compared in silico to other sea turtle species sequences, revealed the loggerhead’s specific pattern. We found similarity between 97-99% with C. caretta in five of the BLAST analyzed nucleotide sequences and 92% in another. We generated a bar code for the sampled turtle information and sequences and stored them in the BOLD database. The ethodology described for the identification of C. caretta is a fast and inexpensive procedure that minimizes time and improves PCR specificity.

  1. Caracterización espacio-temporal del hábitat y presencia de Dermatemys mawii (Testudines: Dermatemydidae en la cuenca del Grijalva-Usumacinta, Tabasco, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Elena Zenteno Ruiz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La tortuga centroamericana (Dermatemys mawii es una especie en peligro de extinción pobremente estudiada. En el presente trabajo se analizaron las variaciones estacionales y espaciales del hábitat y se relacionaron con la presencia/ausencia de D. mawii en tres ríos de la Reserva de la Biosfera Pantanos de Centla (Tabasco, México. Para caracterizar el hábitat se evaluaron 11 variables (hidrológicas, fisicoquímicas del agua y de la vegetación en dos temporadas (seca y lluviosa. Para determinar la presencia/ ausencia de la especie se colocaron 8 trampas de desvío acuáticas, empleando la captura por unidad de esfuerzo (CPUE como indicador de la abundancia relativa. Los resultados indicaron variaciones espacio-temporales. El análisis de componentes principales (ACP permitió determinar la variabilidad ambiental. La presencia de la especie se confirmó en los tres ríos, sin embargo la mayor abundancia relativa se registró en el Río Tabasquillo. Cuatro variables tuvieron el mayor peso como variables predictoras de la presencia de la especie. Con los resultados obtenidos, es evidente la importancia que tiene el ambiente ribereño como hábitat para Dermatemys, asimismo es posible hacer el primer acercamiento a un plan de acción para la protección de la especie y su hábitat en esta reserva.

  2. How nest translocation-time, clutch size and presence of yolkless eggs affected hatching success in Dermochelys coriacea (Linnaeus, 1766 (Testudines: Dermochelyidae, at Projeto Tamar-Ibama, Espirito Santo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dal Pont Morisso, Eduardo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio se analizó el manejo de los nidos de la especie Dermochelys coriacea, utilizados por el Proyecto Tamar-Ibama entre las temporadas reproductivas de 1989/1990 a 1998/1999, para verificación del éxito de la eclosión en relación a los tiempos de traslación. El estudio se realizó en el litoral norte del Estado de Espírito Santo. Existió tendencia a que el tiempo de traslación influencie el éxito de eclosión de los nidos. Los nidos trasladados entre 6 y más de 24 horas presentaron mayor cantidad de huevos sin desarrollo embrionario. No se encontró relación entre el número de huevos inviables trasladados y el tamaño de la postura, con el porcentual de eclosión. Se sugiere que la traslación sea realizada hasta las 6 horas, o 15 días después de la oviposición. The results of managing Dermochelys coriacea (Linnaeus, 1766 nests by Projeto TAMAR - IBAMA, in Northern Espírito Santo, Brazil, during the nesting seasons from 1989/90 to 1998/99 are analyzed. The influence of the translocation time on hatching success of the studied nests is discussed. The time translocation, in relation to natural oviposition, seems to increase the number of non-developed eggs found in each nest if translocated between 6 hours and 15 days post egg-laying. There was no relationship established between either the number of yolkless eggs in a translocated nest or the clutch size, with hatching success. The translocation of Dermochelys nests either within 6 hours or after 15 days from natural oviposition is recommended.

  3. Biometrics, sex ratio and sexual dimorphism of Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron 1835 (Testudines, Emydidae from an artificial reservoir in the municipality of São Gabriel, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Bager

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the population structure of Trachemys dorbigni from an artificial reservoir (30º20’16,03”S, 54º15’46,68”W in the municipality of São Gabriel, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. From March 2009 to February 2010, forty-four individuals were collected: 34 females, seven males, and three juveniles. The sex ratio was 4.85 females: 1 male (1:1. The mean carapace length of the adults was 190.50 ± 22.81mm (N=41 and the mean body mass was 1.210 ± 420g (N=37. Carapace length averaged 179.10 ± 18.60mm (N =7 for males and 192.90 ± 23.10mm (N=34 for females. Females were significantly larger than males for six of the eleven measurements made and smaller for one measurement, which was the distance from the base of tail to the cloacae. The discriminant analysis revealed significant morphological differences between males and females (P<0,05; F3.37=21.02; Wilks’ lambda=0.36, indicating carapace and plastron terminal distance, curvilinear carapace length and distance from the base of tail to the cloacae as important variables for sexing this species.

  4. Aislamiento e identificación de microorganismos entéricos en muestras ambientales y cloacales en Crocodylus intermedius y testudines de la Estación de Biología Tropical Roberto Franco en Villavicencio, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Moreno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Los microorganismos entéricos han sido frecuentemente reportados como patógenos enmamíferos, aves, peces, reptiles y humanos, a pesar de hacer parte de su flora normal intestinal.La Estación de Biología Tropical Roberto Franco (EBTRF, lidera el programade recuperación del Caimán Llanero (Crocodylus intermedius, que se encuentra en inminentepeligro de extinción; adicionalmente cuenta con una colección viva de Testudinesque comprende más de 20 especies. Con el fin de determinar la presencia de potencialesenteropatógenos en el hábitat de los ejemplares, se obtuvieron 129 muestras ambientalesy cloacales de las especies allí encontradas; se utilizó el medio de cultivo CHROMagarOrientaciónBD® para realizar los aislamientos y la identificación microbiológica. Los resultadosmuestran una mayor presentación de flora gram negativa predominando microorganismosde los géneros (28%, Klebsiella sp (26%, Salmonella sp.(6%, Proteus sp (3% y Citrobacter sp. (1% Sin embargo, microorganismos del géneroEnterococcus sp. (gram positivo, fueron hallados en un mayor porcentaje (31% en todaslas muestras sin importar el origen de las mismas. Conscientes del riesgo que implica elaislamiento de microorganismos entéricos que pueden presentar un carácter zoonótico,se dio inicio a la implementación de un manual de bioseguridad para la Estación con elfin disminuir el riesgo para la población humana y animal.

  5. A report on the hybridization between two species of threatenedAsian box turtles (Testudines: Cuora) in the wild on Hainan Island(China) with comments on the origin of 'Serrata'-like turtles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, H.; Parham, James F.; Simison, W. Brian; Wang, J.; Gong, S.; Fu, B.

    2004-03-01

    Ten new turtle taxa were described from pet trade specimens from China since the 1980s (see Fritz and Obst, 1998; Fritz and Obst, 1999; Parham et al., 2001 for a review). Specimens similar to one of these taxa, Cuora serrata Iverson and McCord, 1992 (originally Cuora galbinifrons serrata, elevated by Fritz and Obst, 1997), were shown to be hybrids of male Cuora mouhotii (Gray, 1862; formerly Pyxidea, but see Stuart and Parham, 2004) and females of Cuora galbinifrons Bourret, 1939 or Cuora bourreti Obst and Reimann, 1994 (Parham et al., 2001; and Stuart and Parham, 2004).

  6. Anestesia de cágado-de-barbicha Phrynops geoffroanus Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines com a associação midazolan e propofol - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i3.674 Anaesthesia of geoffroy’s side-necked turtle Phrynops geoffroanus Schweigger, 1812 (Testudines with the association of midazolam and propofol - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v31i3.674

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Cristina Scarpa Bosso

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Os cágados apresentam fisiologia e morfologia únicas, que se diferenciam em muitos aspectos dos mamíferos. Por isso, a monitoração do paciente durante um processo anestésico ou sedativo deve ser realizada, porque dosagens e drogas com resultados benéficos em mamíferos têm-se mostrado inadequados para estas espécies. Foram utilizados dez exemplares de Phrynops geoffroanus, provenientes do rio Uberabinha, no município de Uberlândia, Estado de Minas Gerais (licença RAN/IBAMA nº 035/2006, os quais foram anestesiados com o protocolo midazolan 2 mg kg-1 IM-1 e propofol 10 mg kg-1 IV-1. Os batimentos cardíacos dos exemplares foram monitorados com o aparelho Doppler Vascular Eletrônico nos tempos 0’, 10’, 30’, 60’, 120’ e 180’ pós-anestésico e, durante o período transanestésico, os cágados foram observados em relação aos parâmetros estipulados (locomoção, relaxamento muscular, manipulação, estímulos dolorosos nos membros torácicos e pélvicos. O propofol (10 mg kg-1 IV-1 se mostrou um anestésico de rápida indução, com duração média da anestesia ideal de 66’. O midazolan na dose de 2 mg kg-1 IM-1 foi um pré-anestésico eficiente, promovendo relaxamento muscular e facilidade de manipulação do animal. A associação de anestésicos utilizada obteve bons resultados, promovendo analgesia por um tempo médio de 97’5’’. Não houve significante diminuição da frequência cardíaca e não foi observada apneia nos quelônios anestesiados.Turtles present a unique morphology and physiology and differ in many ways from mammalians. Therefore, anesthetic monitoring of the patient during sedation and anesthesia should be known, because the drugs and the dosages used successfully in mammals may prove to be inadequate in these species. Ten Phrynops geoffroanus were used, from the Uberabinha River, in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State (license RAN/IBAMA no. 035/2006 which were anesthetized with midazolam (2 mg kg-1 IM-1 and propofol (10 mg kg-1 IV-1. The heart beats from the samples were supervised with Doppler at the times 0’, 10’, 30’, 60’, 120’ and 180’ after being anesthetized and during the trans-anesthetic period. The turtles were observed relating the stipulated parameters (locomotion, muscular quietude, manipulation, painful incentive on the chest and pelvic limbs. Propofol (10 mg kg-1 IV-1 proved to be an anesthetic with quickly induction and duration of ideal anesthesia of 66’. Midazolam on the dosage of 2 mg kg-1 IM-1 was an efficient pre-anesthetic, promoting muscular quietude and facilitating animal manipulation. The association showed good results, promoting analgesia for an average time of 97’5’’. Additionally, it showed no significant decrease in the cardiac frequency and apnea in the anesthetized species.

  7. Digestive enzyme ratios are good indicators of hatchling yolk reserve and digestive gland maturation in early life stages of cuttlefish Sepia officinalis L.: application of these new tools in ecology and aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Georges; Martinez, A S; Le Pabic, C; Le Bihan, E; Robin, J P; Koueta, N

    2018-01-01

    In Sepia officinalis (Linnaeus, 1758), the digestive gland matures during the first month post-hatching, while a shift from intracellular acid to extracellular alkaline digestion occurs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of using enzymatic ratios for the description of digestive system maturation in early life stages of S. officinalis. Second, it is intended to apply these new tools as eco-physiological indicators for understanding the impact of cuttlefish eggs' life history from different spawning sites of the English Channel on digestive performance of juveniles. An experimental rearing was performed over 35 days after hatching (DAH) on juveniles from wild collected eggs in 2010 and 2011. Four digestive enzyme activities and their ratios [i.e., trypsin, cathepsin, acid (ACP), and alkaline (ALP) phosphatase, ALP/ACP, and trypsin/cathepsin] were studied along with histological features (e.g., internal yolk surface and digestive gland development). The two enzyme ratios were good indicators of digestive system maturation allowing the study of the digestive gland's development. They were highly correlated to juveniles' weight increase and histological features of the gland in early DAH. These ratios described more accurately the shift occurring between the intracellular acid and the extracellular alkaline modes of digestion in S. officinalis and were more specific than separated enzyme activities. Their application as eco-physiological tools revealed that enzyme ratios reflected yolk content and digestive gland development in new hatching juveniles. Finally, ALP/ACP ratio was shown to be a powerful tool to describe growth performance of S. officinalis which is useful for aquaculture optimization.

  8. Histological description of the reproductive system of male and female hatchlings of the Magdalena River turtle (Podocnemis lewyana); Descripcion histologica del sistema reproductivo de machos y hembras de la tortuga del Rio Magdalena (Podocnemis lewyana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Ospina, Andres C; Rodriguez, Berardo; Ceballos, Claudia P

    2014-07-01

    In this study we described the macroscopic and microscopic histology of the reproductive system of male and female podocnemis lewyana neonates (3.5 months old). We found macroscopic differences in the morphology of the gonads between the sexes, with ovaries being twice as long as testes, and testes being twice as wide as ovaries. Microscopically, we identified several immature elements, such as the lack of a muscle layer in the oviduct of females, and simple epithelia instead of pseudostratified epithelia in the oviduct and epididymis described in reptile adults. We also found a black pigment observed macroscopically in the mesovarium, and macroscopically and histologically in the epididymis. This pigment is consistent with the center of melano-macrophages described in other vertebrates. Finally we described a supporting mesenchymal structure, the appendage of the oviduct, which was much longer than what has been described in other podocnemis species.

  9. Notes on the herpetofauna of western Bas-Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagy, Z. T.; Kusamba, C.; Collet, M.; Gvoždík, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2013), s. 413-419 ISSN 2071-5773 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Anura * checklist * mangroves * Mayombe * Squamata * Testudines Subject RIV: EG - Zoology http://www.herpetologynotes.seh-herpetology.org/Volume6_PDFs/Nagy_HerpetologyNotes_volume6_pages413-419.pdf

  10. Mitochondrial haplotype diversity in the tortoise species Testudo graeca from North Africa and the Middle East

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Ballasina, Donato L. P.; Zorgdrager, Fokla

    2005-01-01

    Background: To help conservation programs of the endangered spur-thighed tortoise and to gain better insight into its systematics, genetic variation and evolution in the tortoise species Testudo graeca (Testudines: Testudinidae) was investigated by sequence analysis of a 394-nucleotide fragment of

  11. Complex Sensory Corpuscles in the Upper Jaw of Horsfield's Tortoise (Testudo horsfieldii)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtová, Marcela; Páč, L.; Knotek, Z.; Tichý, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 2 (2009), s. 193-197 ISSN 0001-7213 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601110910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Mechanoreceptors * reptiles * Testudines Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.403, year: 2009

  12. Complex Sensory Corpuscles in the Upper Jaw of Horsfield's Tortoise (Testudo horsfieldii)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buchtová, Marcela; Páč, L.; Knotek, Z.; Tichý, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 78, č. 2 (2009), s. 193-197 ISSN 0001-7213 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) KJB601110919 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Mechanoreceptors * reptiles * Testudines Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 0.403, year: 2009

  13. Tracing the Co-evolutionary History of the Chelonid Fibropapilloma-associated Herpesvirus and Its Host Sea Turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alfaro Nuñez, Luis Alonso

    This thesis describes various aspects of marine turtle (Testudines) evolution and tackles a well-described and controversial disease of these animals, fibropapillomatosis (FP), which is believed to be caused by the Chelonid fibropapilloma-associated herpesvirus (CFPHV). A large dataset of samples...

  14. AFLP analysis shows high incongruence between genetic differentiation and morphology-based taxonomy in a widely distributed tortoise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulíček, Peter; Jandzik, D.; Fritz, U.; Schneider, C.; Široký, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2013), s. 151-160 ISSN 0024-4066 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Amplified fragment length polymorphism * morphological plasticity * reptiles * stabilizing selection * Testudines Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.535, year: 2013

  15. Biometria, razão sexual e dimorfismo sexual de Trachemys dorbigni (Duméril & Bibron 1835 (Testudines, Emydidae em um açude no município de São Gabriel, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melise Lucas Silveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2012v25n3p187   Com o intuito de se estudar a estrutura de uma população de Trachemys dorbigni, foram realizadas coletas durante o período de março de 2009 a fevereiro de 2010, em um açude (30º20’16,03”S e 54º15’46,68”W, no município de São Gabriel, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Foram coletados 44 indivíduos, sendo 34 fêmeas, sete machos e três juvenis. A razão sexual encontrada foi diferente de 1:1 (4,85 fêmeas:1 macho. O comprimento médio da carapaça dos adultos foi igual a 190,50 ± 22,81mm (N=41 e a massa média foi igual a 1,210 ± 420g (N=37. Os machos apresentaram comprimento médio da carapaça de 179,10 ± 18,60mm (N=7 e as fêmeas, de 192,90 ± 23,10mm (N=34. As fêmeas mostraram-se significativamente maiores do que os machos em seis medidas das onze obtidas e menores em apenas uma medida, comprimento da base da cauda ao orifício cloacal. A análise discriminante mostrou diferenças morfológicas significativas entre machos e fêmeas (P<0,05; F3.37=21,02; Wilks’ lambda=0,36, indicando a distância terminal entre a carapaça e o plastrão, o comprimento curvilíneo da carapaça e o comprimento da base da cauda ao orifício cloacal como variáveis importantes na diferenciação entre os sexos.

  16. Maternal Lipid Provisioning Mirrors Evolution of Reproductive Strategies in Direct-Developing Whelks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Sergio A; Phillips, Nicole E; Sewell, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    The energetic input that offspring receive from their mothers is a well-studied maternal effect that can influence the evolution of life histories. Using the offspring of three sympatric whelks: Cominella virgata (one embryo per capsule); Cominella maculosa (multiple embryos per capsule); and Haustrum scobina (multiple embryos per capsule and nurse-embryo consumption), we examined how contrasting reproductive strategies mediate inter- and intraspecific differences in hatchling provisioning. Total lipid content (as measured in μg hatchling(-1) ± SE) was unrelated to size among the 3 species; the hatchlings of H. scobina were the smallest but had the highest lipid content (33.8 ± 8.1 μg hatchling(-1)). In offspring of C. maculosa, lipid content was 6.6 ± 0.4 μg hatchling(-1), and in offspring of C. virgata, it was 21.7 ± 3.2 μg hatchling(-1) The multi-encapsulated hatchlings of C. maculosa and H. scobina were the only species that contained the energetic lipids, wax ester (WE) and methyl ester (ME). However, the overall composition of energetic lipid between hatchlings of the two Cominella species reflected strong affinities of taxonomy, suggesting a phylogenetic evolution of the non-adelphophagic development strategy. Inter- and intracapsular variability in sibling provisioning was highest in H. scobina, a finding that implies less control of allocation to individual hatchlings in this adelphophagic developer. We suggest that interspecific variability of lipids offers a useful approach to understanding the evolution of maternal provisioning in direct-developing species. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  17. Latitudinal diversity gradients in Mesozoic non-marine turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, David B.; Holroyd, Patricia A.; Valdes, Paul; Barrett, Paul M.

    2016-11-01

    The latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG)-the pattern of increasing taxonomic richness with decreasing latitude-is prevalent in the structure of the modern biota. However, some freshwater taxa show peak richness at mid-latitudes; for example, extant Testudines (turtles, terrapins and tortoises) exhibit their greatest diversity at 25° N, a pattern sometimes attributed to recent bursts of climatically mediated species diversification. Here, we test whether this pattern also characterizes the Mesozoic distribution of turtles, to determine whether it was established during either their initial diversification or as a more modern phenomenon. Using global occurrence data for non-marine testudinate genera, we find that subsampled richness peaks at palaeolatitudes of 15-30° N in the Jurassic, 30-45° N through the Cretaceous to the Campanian, and from 30° to 60° N in the Maastrichtian. The absence of a significant diversity peak in southern latitudes is consistent with results from climatic models and turtle niche modelling that demonstrate a dearth of suitable turtle habitat in Gondwana during the Jurassic and Late Cretaceous. Our analyses confirm that the modern testudinate LBG has a deep-time origin and further demonstrate that LBGs are not always expressed as a smooth, equator-to-pole distribution.

  18. HATCH-OUT ANALYSIS AND REPEATABILITY ESTIMATES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGROSEARCH UIL

    quantifying the problem areas that cause low hatchability (Mauldin, 2003). It allows the hatchery ... (Map data, 2013). The eggs collected from each .... of egg size on heat production and the transition of energy from egg to hatchling. Poult. Sci.,.

  19. Support of ASTP/KOSMOS fundulus embryo development experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, P. M.; Keefe, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Results from the Kosmos Biosatellite 782 flight are presented. Experiments with fish hatchlings are discussed along with postflight observation and testing. The preparation of fertilized eggs for the experiments is described.

  20. Life-cycle of the African nightcrawler, Eudrilus eugeniae (Oligochaeta)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-31

    Mar 31, 1988 ... producer, the life history of this species was studied. The development ... hatching success of 84% and 2,7 hatchlings per cocoon that hatched. Sexual ... The experimental work was conducted ... Sartorius analytical balance.

  1. Gulf of Mexico Kemps ridley sea turtle age and growth

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study involves analysis of skeletal growth marks in humerus bones of 333 Kemps ridley sea turtles stranded dead along the Gulf of Mexico US coast (hatchling to...

  2. Gulf of Mexico Kemps ridley sea turtle age and growth from 1988 to 2010 (NCEI Accession 0160329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset involves analysis of skeletal growth marks in humerus bones of 333 Kemps ridley sea turtles stranded dead along the Gulf of Mexico US coast (hatchling...

  3. Estimating Viability of Gopher Tortoise Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    northeastern Florida. Journal of Herpetology 30:14–18. Butler, J. A., and S. Sowell. 1996. Survivorship and predation of hatchling and yearling gopher...tortoises, Gopherus polyphemus, Journal of Herpetology 30:455–458. Congdon, J. D., A. E. Dunham, R. C. van Loben Sels. 1993. Delayed sexual maturity and...2003. Nesting and hatchling ecology of gopher tortoises (Gopherus polyphemus) in southern Mississippi. Journal of Herpetology 37:315–324. Eubanks, J

  4. Effect of exogenous estradiol applied at different embryonic stages on sex determination, growth, and mortality in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousignant, A; Crews, D

    1994-01-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) occurs in three orders of reptiles. Several studies have examined the ability of estradiol to produce female hatchlings incubated at a male-producing temperature. The results of these experiments support the idea that estradiol could be used as a powerful tool in the conservation of endangered species with TSD by manipulating hatchling sex ratios. However, these experiments have concentrated on the mechanism of determination. This experiment was designed to test the efficacy of various dosages of estradiol applied at two different stages to alter the hatchling sex ratio as well as determining the potential use of such manipulation for conservation efforts by monitoring egg mortality and hatchling growth. The leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius) exhibits TSD and reaches reproductive maturity in less than one year, making it an excellent model for evaluating the long-term effects of estradiol. The results demonstrate that estradiol has a dose-dependent effect on the hatchling sex ratio while only high dosages applied at the later stage of development showed increased mortality. Estrogen-determined females grew at the same rate as temperature-determined females and have produced viable hatchlings. Estradiol treatment of eggs from endangered species may provide a method of insuring female offspring when the TSD pattern is unknown or equipment for controlled incubation is unavailable.

  5. Developmental plasticity in reptiles: Insights into thermal and maternal effects on chameleon phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Robin M

    2018-04-23

    Embryonic environments affect a range of phenotypic traits including sex and reproductive success. I determined (1) how the interaction between incubation temperature and egg size affects sex allocation of Chamaeleo calyptratus and (2) how incubation temperature and maternal parent (clutch) affect water uptake by eggs and body size, growth, and climbing speed of hatchlings and juveniles. Eggs from five clutches were exposed to five temperature treatments with clutches replicated within and among treatments. Temperature affected sex, but only when egg size was included as a factor in analyses. At intermediate (28°C) temperatures, daughters were more likely to be produced from large eggs and sons more likely to be produced from small eggs, while at 25 and 30°C, the pattern of sex allocation was reversed. Temperature and clutch affected water uptake and body size. Nonetheless, the direction of temperature and clutch effects on water uptake by eggs and on the size of hatchlings were not the same and the direction of temperature effects on body sizes of hatchlings and juveniles differed as well. Clutch affected hatchling size but not juvenile size and growth rate. Clutch, but not incubation temperature, affected climbing speed, but the fastest hatchlings were not from the same clutches as the fastest juveniles. The independent effects of incubation temperature and clutch indicate that hatchling phenotypes are influenced largely by conditions experienced during incubation, while juvenile phenotypes are influenced largely by conditions experienced in the rearing environment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Communal nesting under climate change: fitness consequences of higher incubation temperatures for a nocturnal lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayananda, Buddhi; Gray, Sarah; Pike, David; Webb, Jonathan K

    2016-07-01

    Communal nesting lizards may be vulnerable to climate warming, particularly if air temperatures regulate nest temperatures. In southeastern Australia, velvet geckos Oedura lesueurii lay eggs communally inside rock crevices. We investigated whether increases in air temperatures could elevate nest temperatures, and if so, how this could influence hatching phenotypes, survival, and population dynamics. In natural nests, maximum daily air temperature influenced mean and maximum daily nest temperatures, implying that nest temperatures will increase under climate warming. To determine whether hotter nests influence hatchling phenotypes, we incubated eggs under two fluctuating temperature regimes to mimic current 'cold' nests (mean = 23.2 °C, range 10-33 °C) and future 'hot' nests (27.0 °C, 14-37 °C). 'Hot' incubation temperatures produced smaller hatchlings than did cold temperature incubation. We released individually marked hatchlings into the wild in 2014 and 2015, and monitored their survival over 10 months. In 2014 and 2015, hot-incubated hatchlings had higher annual mortality (99%, 97%) than cold-incubated (11%, 58%) or wild-born hatchlings (78%, 22%). To determine future trajectories of velvet gecko populations under climate warming, we ran population viability analyses in Vortex and varied annual rates of hatchling mortality within the range 78- 96%. Hatchling mortality strongly influenced the probability of extinction and the mean time to extinction. When hatchling mortality was >86%, populations had a higher probability of extinction (PE: range 0.52- 1.0) with mean times to extinction of 18-44 years. Whether future changes in hatchling survival translate into reduced population viability will depend on the ability of females to modify their nest-site choices. Over the period 1992-2015, females used the same communal nests annually, suggesting that there may be little plasticity in maternal nest-site selection. The impacts of climate change may

  7. The progressive onset of cholinergic and adrenergic control of heart rate during development in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Marina R; Leite, Cleo A C; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2015-10-01

    The autonomic control of heart rate was studied throughout development in embryos of the green iguana, Iguana iguana by applying receptor agonists and antagonists of the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. Acetylcholine (Ach) slowed or stopped the heart and atropine antagonized the response to Ach indicating the presence of muscarinic cholinoceptors on the heart of early embryos. However, atropine injections had no impact on heart rate until immediately before hatching, when it increased heart rate by 15%. This cholinergic tonus increased to 34% in hatchlings and dropped to 24% in adult iguanas. Although epinephrine was without effect, injection of propranolol slowed the heart throughout development, indicating the presence of β-adrenergic receptors on the heart of early embryos, possibly stimulated by high levels of circulating catecholamines. The calculated excitatory tonus varied between 33% and 68% until immediately before hatching when it fell to 25% and 29%, a level retained in hatchlings and adults. Hypoxia caused a bradycardia in early embryos that was unaffected by injection of atropine indicating that hypoxia has a direct effect upon the heart. In later embryos and hatchlings hypoxia caused a tachycardia that was unaffected by injection of atropine. Subsequent injection of propranolol reduced heart rate both uncovering a hypoxic bradycardia in late embryos and abolishing tachycardia in hatchlings. Hypercapnia was without effect on heart rate in late stage embryos and in hatchlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative effects of in ovo exposure to sodium perchlorate on development, growth, metabolism, and thyroid function in the common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) and red-eared slider (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenreich, Karen M; Dean, Karen M; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rowe, Christopher L

    2012-11-01

    Perchlorate is a surface and groundwater contaminant found in areas associated with munitions and rocket manufacturing and use. It is a thyroid-inhibiting compound, preventing uptake of iodide by the thyroid gland, ultimately reducing thyroid hormone production. As thyroid hormones influence metabolism, growth, and development, perchlorate exposure during the embryonic period may impact embryonic traits that ultimately influence hatchling performance. We topically exposed eggs of red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta) and snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) to 200 and 177 μg/g of perchlorate (as NaClO(4)), respectively, to determine impacts on glandular thyroxine concentrations, embryonic growth and development, and metabolic rates of hatchlings for a period of 2 months post-hatching. In red-eared sliders, in ovo perchlorate exposure delayed hatching, increased external yolk size at hatching, increased hatchling mortality, and reduced total glandular thyroxine concentrations in hatchlings. In snapping turtles, hatching success and standard metabolic rates were reduced, liver and thyroid sizes were increased, and total glandular thyroxine concentrations in hatchlings were reduced after exposure to perchlorate. While both species were negatively affected by exposure, impacts on red-eared sliders were most severe, suggesting that the slider may be a more sensitive sentinel species for studying effects of perchlorate exposure to turtles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Accumulation and selective maternal transfer of contaminants in the turtle Trachemys scripta associated with coal ash deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, R.D.; Rowe, C.L.; Congdon, J.D. [University of Georgia, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    2001-07-01

    Coal combustion wastes are enriched in a number of potentially toxic compounds and may pose risks to biota exposed to the wastes. Slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) are common inhabitants of coal ash settling basins in South Carolina, USA, where they feed on contaminated prey items and accumulate high levels of potentially toxic compounds in their tissues. Furthermore, female sliders sometimes nest in contaminated spill piles and thus may expose embryos to contaminated soils. We examined two potential pathways by which female T. scripta may influence the survivorship and quality of their offspring in a contaminated habitat: (1) nesting in contaminated soil and (2) maternal transfer of pollutants. Eggs were collected from turtles captured in coal ash-polluted or unpolluted sites; individual clutches were incubated in both ash-contaminated and uncontaminated soil in outdoor, artificial nests. Incubation in contaminated soil was associated with reduced embryo survivorship. Adult females from the polluted site accumulated high levels of As, Cd, Cr, and Se in their tissues, yet Se was the only element transferred maternally to hatchlings at relatively high levels. Hatchlings from polluted-site females exhibited reduced O{sub 2} consumption rates compared to hatchlings from reference sites. Relatively high levels of Se transferred to hatchlings by females at the ash-polluted site might contribute to the observed differences in hatchling physiology.

  10. UV laser radiation alters the embryonic protein profile of adrenal-kidney-gonadal complex and gonadal differentiation in the lizard, Calotes Versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodnapur, Bharati S; Inamdar, Laxmi S; Nindi, Robertraj S; Math, Shivkumar A; Mulimani, B G; Inamdar, Sanjeev R

    2015-02-01

    To examine the impact of ultraviolet (UV) laser radiation on the embryos of Calotes versicolor in terms of its effects on the protein profile of the adrenal-kidney-gonadal complex (AKG), sex determination and differentiation, embryonic development and hatching synchrony. The eggs of C. versicolor, during thermo-sensitive period (TSP), were exposed to third harmonic laser pulses at 355 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for 180 sec. Subsequent to the exposure they were incubated at the male-producing temperature (MPT) of 25.5 ± 0.5°C. The AKG of hatchlings was subjected to protein analysis by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and to histology. The UV laser radiation altered the expression of the protein banding pattern in the AKG complex of hatchlings and it also affected the gonadal sex differentiation. SDS-PAGE of AKG of one-day-old hatchlings revealed a total of nine protein bands in the control group whereas UV laser irradiated hatchlings expressed a total of seven protein bands only one of which had the same Rf as a control band. The UV laser treated hatchlings have an ovotestes kind of gonad exhibiting a tendency towards femaleness instead of the typical testes. It is inferred that 355 nm UV laser radiation during TSP induces changes in the expression of proteins as well as their secretions. UV laser radiation had an impact on the gonadal differentiation pathway but no morphological anomalies were noticed.

  11. Multilocus phylogeny and statistical biogeography clarify the evolutionary history of major lineages of turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anieli G; Sterli, Juliana; Moreira, Filipe R R; Schrago, Carlos G

    2017-08-01

    Despite their complex evolutionary history and the rich fossil record, the higher level phylogeny and historical biogeography of living turtles have not been investigated in a comprehensive and statistical framework. To tackle these issues, we assembled a large molecular dataset, maximizing both taxonomic and gene sampling. As different models provide alternative biogeographical scenarios, we have explicitly tested such hypotheses in order to reconstruct a robust biogeographical history of Testudines. We scanned publicly available databases for nucleotide sequences and composed a dataset comprising 13 loci for 294 living species of Testudines, which accounts for all living genera and 85% of their extant species diversity. Phylogenetic relationships and species divergence times were estimated using a thorough evaluation of fossil information as calibration priors. We then carried out the analysis of historical biogeography of Testudines in a fully statistical framework. Our study recovered the first large-scale phylogeny of turtles with well-supported relationships following the topology proposed by phylogenomic works. Our dating result consistently indicated that the origin of the main clades, Pleurodira and Cryptodira, occurred in the early Jurassic. The phylogenetic and historical biogeographical inferences permitted us to clarify how geological events affected the evolutionary dynamics of crown turtles. For instance, our analyses support the hypothesis that the breakup of Pangaea would have driven the divergence between the cryptodiran and pleurodiran lineages. The reticulated pattern in the ancestral distribution of the cryptodiran lineage suggests a complex biogeographic history for the clade, which was supposedly related to the complex paleogeographic history of Laurasia. On the other hand, the biogeographical history of Pleurodira indicated a tight correlation with the paleogeography of the Gondwanan landmasses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Impaired imprinting and social behaviors in chicks exposed to mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, during the final week of embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Hideo; Kagami, Keisuke; Nishigori, Hidekazu

    2014-03-15

    The effects of glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction during embryogenesis on the imprinting abilities and social behaviors of hatchlings were examined using "fertile hen's egg-embryo-chick" system. Of embryos treated with mifepristone (0.4μmol/egg) on day 14, over 75% hatched a day later than the controls (day 22) without external anomalies. The mifepristone-treated hatchlings were assayed for imprinting ability on post-hatching day 2 and for social behaviors on day 3. The findings were as follows: imprinting ability (expressed as preference score) was significantly lower in mifepristone-treated hatchlings than in controls (0.65±0.06 vs. 0.92±0.02, P<0.005). Aggregation tests to evaluate the speed (seconds) required for four chicks, individually isolated with cardboard dividers in a box, to form a group after removal of the barriers showed that aggregation was significantly slower in mifepristone-treated hatchlings than in controls (8.7±1.1 vs. 2.6±0.3, P<0.001). In belongingness tests to evaluate the speed (seconds) for a chick isolated at a corner to join a group of three chicks placed at the opposite corner, mifepristone-treated hatchlings took significantly longer than controls (4.5±0.4/40 cm vs. 2.4±0.08/40 cm, P<0.001). In vocalization tests, using a decibel meter to measure average decibel level/30s (chick vocalization), mifepristone-treated hatchlings had significantly weaker vocalizations than controls (14.2±1.9/30s vs. 26.4±1.3/30s P<0.001). In conclusion, glucocorticoid receptor dysfunction during the last week embryogenesis altered the programming of brain development, resulting in impaired behavioral activities in late life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An Immunohistochemical Approach to Identify the Sex of Young Marine Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezak, Boris M; Guthrie, Kathleen; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2017-08-01

    Marine turtles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). During critical periods of embryonic development, the nest's thermal environment directs whether an embryo will develop as a male or female. At warmer sand temperatures, nests tend to produce female-biased sex ratios. The rapid increase of global temperature highlights the need for a clear assessment of its effects on sea turtle sex ratios. However, estimating hatchling sex ratios at rookeries remains imprecise due to the lack of sexual dimorphism in young marine turtles. We rely mainly upon laparoscopic procedures to verify hatchling sex; however, in some species, morphological sex can be ambiguous even at the histological level. Recent studies using immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques identified that embryonic snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) ovaries overexpressed a particular cold-induced RNA-binding protein in comparison to testes. This feature allows the identification of females vs. males. We modified this technique to successfully identify the sexes of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) hatchlings, and independently confirmed the results by standard histological and laparoscopic methods that reliably identify sex in this species. We next tested the CIRBP IHC method on gonad samples from leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea). Leatherbacks display delayed gonad differentiation, when compared to other sea turtles, making hatchling gonads difficult to sex using standard H&E stain histology. The IHC approach was successful in both C. caretta and D. coriacea samples, offering a much-needed tool to establish baseline hatchling sex ratios, particularly for assessing impacts of climate change effects on leatherback turtle hatchlings and sea turtle demographics. Anat Rec, 300:1512-1518, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. GOPHERUS AGASSIZII (Desert Tortoise)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAMES L. BOONE, DANNY L. RAKESTRAW, AND KURT R. RAUTENSTRAUCH

    1997-01-01

    GOPHERLTS AGAISSIZII (Desert Tortoise). Predation. A variety of predators, most notably coyotes (Canis Iatrans) and Common Ravens (Corvis corau) have been reported to prey on hatchling desert tortoises (Emst et al. 1994). Turtles of the United States and Canada (Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C. 578 pp.). Here, we report an observation of a hatchling tortoise, fitted with a radiotransmitter, that was preyed upon by native fire ants (Solenopsis sp.) in the eastern Mojave Desert at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (36 degrees 50 minutes N, 116 degree 25 minutes E). On 8/27/94, tortoise No.9315 (carapace length = 45 mm, age = 5 d) was found alive with eyes, chin, and parts of the head and legs being eaten by ants. The tortoise was alive, but lethargic, and responded little when touched. Eight of 74 other radiomarked hatchlings monitored at Yucca Mountain during 1992-1994 were found dead with fire ants on their carcass 3-7 days after the hatchlings emerged from their nests. It is not known whether those tortoises were killed by ants or were being scavenged when found. While imported fire ants (S. invicta) have long been known to kill hatchling gopher tortoises (G. polyphemus; Mount 1981. J. Alabama Acad. Sci. 52: 71-78), native fire ants have previously not been implicated as predators of desert tortoises. However, only 1 of 75 (or at worst 9 of 75) was killed by fire ants, suggesting that although fire ants do kill hatchlings, they were not important predators on desert tortoises during this study. Tortoise specimens were deposited at the University of California at Berkeley

  15. Detection of Leptospira spp. in wild Phrynops geoffroanus (Geoffroy's side-necked turtle) in urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J P; Kawanami, A E; Silva, A S L; Chung, D G; Werther, K

    2016-12-01

    Leptospira spp., a zoonotic agent relevant for public health, occurs frequently in tropical regions. The aquatic environment represents a viable survival and transmission pathway. This study aimed to investigate the presence of anti-Leptospira spp. antibodies in Phrynops geoffroanus (Geoffroy's side-necked turtle) serum samples using the microagglutination test (MAT), and Leptospira spp. in gastric and cloacal lavage samples using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Antibodies against nine different Leptospira spp. serovars were detected in 45.45% (30/66) of the serum samples. Specific amplification of Leptospira spp. genomic material (331bp) was observed in 16.67% (11/66) of the samples. In conclusion, these freshwater testudines host Leptospira spp. and eliminate them. This situation may represent a risk to public health, especially to people who use urban streams for fishing and recreational activities. Additionally, we described some Leptospira spp. serovars, not yet reported in testudines, detected here in P. geoffroanus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genomic V exons from whole genome shotgun data in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D N; von Haeften, B; Sánchez-Espinel, C; Faro, J; Gambón-Deza, F

    2014-08-01

    Reptiles and mammals diverged over 300 million years ago, creating two parallel evolutionary lineages amongst terrestrial vertebrates. In reptiles, two main evolutionary lines emerged: one gave rise to Squamata, while the other gave rise to Testudines, Crocodylia, and Aves. In this study, we determined the genomic variable (V) exons from whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) data in reptiles corresponding to the three main immunoglobulin (IG) loci and the four main T cell receptor (TR) loci. We show that Squamata lack the TRG and TRD genes, and snakes lack the IGKV genes. In representative species of Testudines and Crocodylia, the seven major IG and TR loci are maintained. As in mammals, genes of the IG loci can be grouped into well-defined IMGT clans through a multi-species phylogenetic analysis. We show that the reptilian IGHV and IGLV genes are distributed amongst the established mammalian clans, while their IGKV genes are found within a single clan, nearly exclusive from the mammalian sequences. The reptilian and mammalian TRAV genes cluster into six common evolutionary clades (since IMGT clans have not been defined for TR). In contrast, the reptilian TRBV genes cluster into three clades, which have few mammalian members. In this locus, the V exon sequences from mammals appear to have undergone different evolutionary diversification processes that occurred outside these shared reptilian clans. These sequences can be obtained in a freely available public repository (http://vgenerepertoire.org).

  17. Effects of Different Rearing Strategies and Ages on Levels of Natural Antibodies in Saliva of the Philippine Crocodile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groffen, J.; Parmentier, H.K.; Ven, van de W.A.C.; Weerd, van M.

    2013-01-01

    The endemic Philippine crocodile (Crocodylus mindorensis) is a relatively small, critically endangered freshwater crocodile. In a head start program, crocodile hatchlings are caught in the wild, reared in captivity, and released back into the wild after two years. The current study aimed to

  18. Reproductive ecology and egg production of the radiated tortoise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We captured and marked 1438 radiated tortoises of which 26% were adults. Mating and nesting coincided with the rainy season, and mating events peaked in December, shortly before females started nesting in January. The incubation period was approximately 263–342 days, and hatchlings emerged after the onset of the ...

  19. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alarm calls of Bronze Mannikins communicate predator size to familiar conspecifics. Abstract · Vol 27, No 1 (1992) - Articles Predation on tent tortoise and leopard tortoise hatchlings by the pale chanting goshawk in the Little Karoo Abstract PDF · Vol 29, No 2 (1994) - Articles Temporal and spatial patterns of abundance and ...

  20. Rainfall, El Niño, and reproduction of red-cockaded woodpeckers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; Richard R. Schaefer; James R. McCormick; D. Craig Rudolph; D. Brent Burt

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis Vieillot) reproduction and rainfall during May when group members are provisioning nestlings with food. Patterns of variation over a 4-year period of approximately 30 woodpecker groups suggested that the mean number of hatchling deaths was positively related to...

  1. Environmental Assessment for Beach Shoreline Protection at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    by embryonic snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina ). Journal of Experimental Biology 108:195-204. 47 Packard, G.C., M.J. Packard, and W.H.N. Gutzke...composition of hatchling snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina ). Journal of Comparative Physiology B 158:117-125. Parmenter, C.J. 1980. Incubation

  2. The effects of varying sampling intervals on the growth and survival ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four different sampling intervals were investigated during a six-week outdoor nursery management of Heterobranchus longifilis (Valenciennes, 1840) fry in outdoor concrete tanks in order to determine the most suitable sampling regime for maximum productivity in terms of optimum growth and survival of hatchlings and ...

  3. Desert Tortoise Head-start Program at Twentynine Palms Marine Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    starting method, extinction , predation, mortality, survivorship Kenneth An Nagy, Scott Hillard University of California - Los Angeles Regents of the...the netting problems were corrected. The remaining two predators were ants : native fire ants (Solenopsis xyloni—already known as hatchling...predators from another study site) and common Harvester Ants , Pogonomyrmex californicus. Both have been controlled when and where necessary by cautious use

  4. Effects of population density on the growth and egg-laying capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the population density of adult African giant land snail, Archachatina marginata on the egg-laying capacity and the growth of the brooders and hatchlings were investigated for 9 months. Ten culture pens were stocked with snails at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% capacity with each group in 2 replicates.

  5. Complex patterns of geographic variation in heat tolerance and Hsp70 expression levels in the common frog Rana temporaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Pekkonen, Minna; Lindgren, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    1. We tested for geographical variation in heat tolerance and Hsp70 expression levels of Rana temporaria tadpoles along a 1500 km long latitudinal gradient in Sweden.   2. Temperature tolerance of the hatchling tadpoles did not differ among populations, but they tolerated stressful hot temperatur...

  6. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS OF NEWLY HATCHED INDIVIDUALS AND COCOON MASS IN LUMBRICID EARTHWORMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Marianne; Bjerre, Arne

    1991-01-01

    Earthworm cocoons from laboratory cultures were collected and their mass was determined. When hatched, the mass of the young worms was found. Cocoon mass and the mass of hatchlings varied considerably within species. The hygromass of newly hatched earthworms was found to correlate linearly...

  7. GROWTH OF CORMORANT PHALACROCORAX-CARBO-SINENSIS CHICKS IN RELATION TO BROOD SIZE, AGE RANKING AND PARENTAL FISHING EFFORT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PLATTEEUW, M; KOFFIJBERG, K; DUBBELDAM, W

    1995-01-01

    Growth parameters of Cormorant hatchlings are described in relation to brood size and age ranking of each chick within individual broods. Growth rates, expressed as body mass increment per day over the period of linear, growth (5-30 days), ranged from 56.4-102.8 g . d(-1) and were found to be

  8. Direct effects of incubation temperature on morphology, thermoregulatory behaviour and locomotor performance in jacky dragons (Amphibolurus muricatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Damien; Keogh, J Scott; Schwanz, Lisa E

    2014-07-01

    Incubation temperature is one of the most studied factors driving phenotypic plasticity in oviparous reptiles. We examined how incubation temperature influenced hatchling morphology, thermal preference and temperature-dependent running speed in the small Australian agamid lizard Amphibolurus muricatus. Hatchlings incubated at 32 °C grew more slowly than those incubated at 25 and 28 °C during their first month after hatching, and tended to be smaller at one month. These differences were no longer significant by three months of age due to selective mortality of the smallest hatchlings. The cooler incubation treatments (25 °C and 28 °C) produced lizards that had deeper and wider heads. Hatchlings from 28 °C had cooler and more stable temperature preferences, and also had lower body temperatures during a 2-h thermoregulatory behaviour trial. Locomotor performance was enhanced at higher body temperatures, but incubation temperature had no measurable effect either independently or in interaction with body temperature. Our study demonstrates that incubation temperature has direct effects on morphology and thermoregulatory behaviour that appears to be independent of any size-dependent effects. We postulate a mechanistic link between these two effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of in ovo exposure to 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77) on heart development in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Tiffany; Walker, Mary K; Dean, Karen M; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2018-01-01

    Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs from 2 uncontaminated sites, the Patuxent Research Refuge (Laurel, MD, USA) and the Cobleskill Reservoir (Cobleskill, NY, USA) were dosed with polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 77 to evaluate effects on the developing cardiovascular system. To ensure embryonic viability, treatments were administered into the air cell at embryonic day 2.5 including: untreated (control), vehicle (filtered sterilized fatty acid mixture), 100 ng/g and 1000 ng/g egg. Eggs were dosed in the field with 0.2 μL/egg, returned to the nest, collected at embryonic day 13, hatched in the laboratory, and necropsied. The PCB 77-treated hatchlings were compared with uninjected, vehicle-injected, and environmentally exposed hatchlings collected from a PCB-contaminated Upper Hudson River (NY, USA) site. The PCB 77-treated embryos showed no effects on hatching success or hatchling mortality, heart index, or morphological measures of 4 distinct heart layers (heart width, length, septal thickness, total and ventricular cavity area) compared with controls. Hatchlings that had received PCB 77 exhibited increased incidence of a cardiomyopathy and absence of the ventricular heart wall compact layer (Chi square test; p PCB 77 resulted in distinct cardiomyopathy has implications for long-term individual fitness. Environ Toxicol Chem 2018;37:116-125. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  10. Adaptive hatching hypotheses do not explain asynchronous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the core of the suite of adaptive hatching hypotheses advanced to explain asynchronous hatching in birds is the assumption that if food is not limited then all the hatchlings will develop normally to adulthood. In this study Brown-headed Parrot Poicephalus cryptoxanthus chicks were hand fed and weighed on a daily basis.

  11. essential oil as hatching egg disinfectant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... disinfectant for hatching egg obtained from broiler breeder flock. Oregano essential ... contamination rate, hatchability of fertile egg, body weight at 21 and 42 days, body weight gain and total feed ... successful healthy hatchlings. Several ...... Insecticidal properties of essential plant oils against the mosquito.

  12. Amphibious Ready Group/Marine Expeditionary Unit Readiness Training Final Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-11

    highway and non-road. Highway vehicles range in size from gasoline -powered motorcycles and cars to large diesel-powered tractor-trailers. USEPA has...Panama City, Florida. Miller, K., G.C. Packard, and M.J. Packard. 1987. Hydric conditions during incubation influence locomotor performance of hatchling

  13. Department of Defense 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    CREDIT: NANCY JONESBONBREST, PEO C3T HATCHLINGS FROM ENDANGERED SEA TURTLES ARE RELEASED INTO THE ATLANTIC OCEAN NEAR KENNEDY SPACE CENTER/CAPE...environmental compliance requirements. • Stressed threatened and endangered species and related ecosystems, on and adjacent to DoD installations...resulting in increased endangered species and land management requirements. • Increased operational health surveillance and health and safety risks

  14. PATERNAL GENOTYPE INFLUENCES INCUBATION PERIOD, OFFSPRING SIZE, AND OFFSPRING SHAPE IN AN OVIPAROUS REPTILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Mats; Gullberg, Annica; Shine, Richard; Madsen, Thomas; Tegelström, Håkan

    1996-06-01

    Theoretical models for the evolution of life-history traits assume a genetic basis for a significant proportion of the phenotypic variance observed in characteristics such as hatching date and offspring size. However, recent experimental work has shown that much of the phenotypic variance in hatchling reptiles is induced by nongenetic factors, such as maternal nutrition and thermoregulation, and the physical conditions experienced during embryogenesis. Thus, there is no unambiguous evidence for strictly genetic (intraspecific) influences on the phenotypes of hatchling reptiles. We report results from a technique that uses a genetic marker trait and DNA fingerprinting to determine paternity of offspring from multiply sired clutches of European sand lizards, Lacerta agilis. By focusing on paternal rather than maternal effects, we show that hatchling genotypes exert a direct influence on the duration of incubation, the size (mass, snout-vent length) and shape (relative tail length) of the hatchling, and subsequent growth rates of the lizard during the first 3 mo of life. Embryos with genes that code for a few days' delay in hatching are thereby larger when they hatch, having undergone further differentiation (and hence, have changed in bodily proportions), and are able to grow faster after hatching. Our data thus provide empirical support for a crucial but rarely tested assumption of life-history theory, and illuminate some of the proximate mechanisms that produce intraspecific variation in offspring phenotypes. © 1996 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Breeding biology and nestling development of the Grasshopper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth rate of body mass, tarsus, wing and primary feathers were similar between sexes, which showed significant but moderate body mass dimorphism at fledging (♂85–90% of ♀). Second hatchlings were smaller ... Keywords: ageing, Butastur rufipennis, hatch order, reproduction, siblicide. OSTRICH 2012, 83(3): 137– ...

  16. Effect of Incubator Type and Broiler Breeder Age on Hatchability and Chick Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ICS Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of broiler breeder age and incubator type on hatching parameters, hatch window, embryo diagnosis results, and hatchling physical quality. The treatments consisted of a combination of three broiler breeder ages (29, 35 and 59 weeks of age and two incubator types (single stage, SS; or and multiple stage, MS. A completely randomized design in a 3x2 factorial arrangement was applied. In Experiment I, 1,896 eggs were used and 360 eggs in Experiment II. There was an interaction between breeder age and incubator type only for hatchling physical quality score. Independently of incubator type, hatchability rate, late embryo mortality, and egg contamination were higher in the eggs laid by older breeders (59-wk-old. Early mortality (0-4 days was higher in the embryos from young breeders (29-wk-old. A shorter hatch window birth was obtained in the SS incubator, resulting in higher hatchling body weight relative to egg weight, and better hatchling physical quality score. Both types of incubators provide good conditions for embryo development; however, the physical quality of chicks derived from eggs from intermediate-aged breeders (35-wk-old is better when eggs are incubated in SS incubators.

  17. Short Communications Predation on tent tortoise and leopard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-06-26

    Jun 26, 1991 ... Predation by the pale chanting goshawk Melierax canorus on. Psammobates tentorius and Geoche/one pardalis hatchlings oorrelates with the habitat preference of these tortoise spe- ... into the region covered by the VI scute length of prey items ... pairs of birds occupying territories incorporating KBV and.

  18. Public Awareness Program and Development of Education Toolkit for Green Sea Turtle Conservation in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ruhana; Yahya, Nurhartini Kamalia; Ong, Leh Mui; Kheng, Lim Kian; Abidin, Zulkalnain Zainal; Ayob, Anuar; Jainal, Aslina Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Nobody knows exactly what happened during "the lost years" of the turtles in the wild, thus a green turtle headstarting project was carried out at Pantai Pandan, Lundu, Sarawak, Malaysia from June 2014 until December 2015 to shed some lights on the growth of hatchlings during a small part of their "lost years". As a consequent,…

  19. Developmental success, stability, and plasticity in closely related parthenogenetic and sexual lizards (Heteronotia, Gekkonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Michael; Shine, Richard

    2004-07-01

    The developmental trajectory of an organism is influenced by the interaction between its genes and the environment in which it develops. For example, the phenotypic traits of a hatchling reptile can be influenced by the organism's genotype, by incubation temperature, and by genetically coded norms of reaction for thermally labile traits. The evolution of parthenogenesis provides a unique opportunity to explore such effects: a hybrid origin of this trait in vertebrates modifies important aspects of the genotype (e.g., heterozygosity, polyploidy) and may thus impact not only on the phenotype generally, but also on the ways in which incubation temperature affects expression of the phenotype. The scarcity of vertebrate parthenogenesis has been attributed to developmental disruptions, but previous work has rarely considered reaction norms of embryogenesis in this respect. We used closely related sexual and asexual races of the Australian gecko Heteronotia binoei, which include those with multiple origins of parthenogenesis, to explore the ways in which reproductive modes (sexual, asexual), incubation temperatures (24, 27, and 30 degrees C), and the interaction between these factors affected hatchling phenotypes. The hatchling traits we considered included incubation period, incidence of deformities, hatchling survivorship, body size and shape, scalation (including fluctuating asymmetry), locomotor performance, and growth rate. Developmental success was slightly reduced (higher proportion of abnormal offspring) in parthenogenetic lineages although there was no major difference in hatching success. Incubation temperature affected a suite of traits including incubation period, tail length, body mass relative to egg mass, labial scale counts, running speed, growth rate, and hatchling survival. Our data also reveal an interaction between reproductive modes and thermal regimes, with the phenotypic traits of parthenogenetic lizards less sensitive to incubation temperature than

  20. Effects of acute gamma radiation on the reproductive ability of the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowmithra, K.; Shetty, N.J.; Harini, B.P.; Jha, S.K.; Chaubey, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Earthworms are the most suitable biological indicators of radioactive pollution because they are the parts of nutritional webs, and are present in relatively high numbers. Four months old Eisenia fetida were exposed to different doses of gamma radiation, namely 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 Gy to study the effects of radiation on different reproductive parameters. The number of cocoons laid and the hatchlings emerged were recorded for all the selected doses. There was no reduction in cocoon production, however; decreasing size and weight of the cocoons was observed from the samples exposed to 20 Gy and above doses. Significant reductions in the hatchlings were recorded in earthworms exposed to 10 Gy and above doses. The dose response curves for a percentage reduction in hatchlings were constructed. Exposure to radiation dose of 1 and 2 Gy did not show any reduction, however, there was ≈10%, ≈50% and ≈90% decrease in the hatchlings in samples exposed to 3, 15 and 45, 50, 55 and 60 Gy doses respectively. Delayed hatchability was also reported at al exposure level. Histology of irradiated earthworms revealed that the structural damage in the seminal vesicles was prominent at the exposed dose of 3 Gy onwards with complete degeneration on exposure to 60 Gy of gamma radiation. - Highlights: • Eisenia fetida exposed to several doses of gamma-radiation to study the impact on reproduction. • There was no reduction in the cocoon production however. • There was reduction in size, weight and change in shape of the cocoons observed. • Reduction in number of hatchlings and degradation of seminal vesicles was pragmatic

  1. Molecular decay of enamel matrix protein genes in turtles and other edentulous amniotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary edentulism (toothlessness has evolved on multiple occasions in amniotes including several mammalian lineages (pangolins, anteaters, baleen whales, birds, and turtles. All edentulous amniote clades have evolved from ancestors with enamel-capped teeth. Previous studies have documented the molecular decay of tooth-specific genes in edentulous mammals, all of which lost their teeth in the Cenozoic, and birds, which lost their teeth in the Cretaceous. By contrast with mammals and birds, tooth loss in turtles occurred in the Jurassic (201.6-145.5 Ma, providing an extended time window for tooth gene degradation in this clade. The release of the painted turtle and Chinese softshell turtle genomes provides an opportunity to recover the decayed remains of tooth-specific genes in Testudines. Results We queried available genomes of Testudines (Chrysemys picta [painted turtle], Pelodiscus sinensis [Chinese softshell turtle], Aves (Anas platyrhynchos [duck], Gallus gallus [chicken], Meleagris gallopavo [turkey], Melopsittacus undulatus [budgerigar], Taeniopygia guttata [zebra finch], and enamelless mammals (Orycteropus afer [aardvark], Choloepus hoffmanni [Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth], Dasypus novemcinctus [nine-banded armadillo] for remnants of three enamel matrix protein (EMP genes with putative enamel-specific functions. Remnants of the AMBN and ENAM genes were recovered in Chrysemys and retain their original synteny. Remnants of AMEL were recovered in both testudines, although there are no shared frameshifts. We also show that there are inactivated copies of AMBN, AMEL and ENAM in representatives of divergent avian lineages including Galloanserae, Passeriformes, and Psittaciformes, and that there are shared frameshift mutations in all three genes that predate the basal split in Neognathae. Among enamelless mammals, all three EMP genes exhibit inactivating mutations in Orycteropus and Choloepus. Conclusions Our results

  2. Identification of a novel herpesvirus in captive Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Richard R; Norton, Terry M; Bronson, Ellen; Allender, Matthew C; Stedman, Nancy; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-02-25

    Herpesviruses are significant pathogens of chelonians which most commonly cause upper respiratory tract disease and necrotizing stomatitis. Herpesvirus infection was identified in two populations of captive Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina) using histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA sequencing. Necrotizing lesions with eosinophilic to amphophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were identified in the tissues of one hatch-year individual in January 2013, which was herpesvirus positive by PCR. A separate captive group of adults had an observed herpesvirus prevalence of 58% using PCR in July 2011. In these cases, a novel herpesvirus, Terrapene herpesvirus 1 (TerHV1), was identified and serves as the first herpesvirus sequenced in the genus Terrapene. Similar to the other herpesviruses of the Order Testudines, TerHV1 clusters with the genus Scutavirus of the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Contributions to the knowledge of amphibians and reptiles from Volta Grande do Xingu, northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Silva, W; Oliveira, R M; Gonzaga, A F N; Pinto, K C; Poli, F C; Bilce, T M; Penhacek, M; Wronski, L; Martins, J X; Junqueira, T G; Cesca, L C C; Guimarães, V Y; Pinheiro, R D

    2015-08-01

    The region of Volta Grande do Xingu River, in the state of Pará, presents several kinds of land use ranging from extensive cattle farming to agroforestry, and deforestation. Currently, the Belo Monte Hydroelectric Power Plant affects the region. We present a checklist of amphibians and reptiles of the region and discuss information regarding the spatial distribution of the assemblies based on results of Environmental Programmes conducted in the area. We listed 109 amphibian (Anura, Caudata, and Gymnophiona) and 150 reptile (Squamata, Testudines, and Crocodylia) species. The regional species richness is still considered underestimated, considering the taxonomic uncertainty, complexity and cryptic diversity of various species, as observed in other regions of the Amazon biome. Efforts for scientific collection and studies related to integrative taxonomy are needed to elucidate uncertainties and increase levels of knowledge of the local diversity.

  4. Nesting environment may drive variation in eggshell structure and egg characteristics in the Testudinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, D Charles

    2018-05-14

    Testudines exhibit considerable variation in the degree of eggshell calcification, which affects eggshell conductance, water physiology of the embryos, and calcium metabolism of embryos. However, the underlying reason for different shell types has not been explored. Phylogenetically controlled analyses examined relationships between egg size, shell mass, and clutch size in ∼200 turtle species from a range of body sizes and assigned by family as laying either rigid- or pliable-shelled eggs. Shell type affected egg breadth relative to pelvic dimensions, egg mass, and relative shell mass but did not affect size, mass, or total shell mass of the clutch. These results suggest that calcium availability may be a function of body size and the type of shell may reflect in part the interplay between clutch size and egg size. It was further concluded that the eggshell probably evolved as a means of physical protection. Differences in shell calcification may not primarily reflect reproductive parameters but rather correlate with the acidity of a species' nesting environment. Low pH environments may have thicker calcareous layer to counteract the erosion caused by the soil and maintain the integrity of the physical barrier. Limited calcium availability may constrain clutch size. More neutral nesting substrates expose eggshells to less erosion so calcification per egg can be reduced and this allows larger clutch sizes. This pattern is also reflected in thick, calcified crocodilian eggs. Further research is needed to test whether eggshell calcification in the testudines correlates with nest pH in order to verify this relationship. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of inverting the position of layers eggs during storage on hatchery performance parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JCS de Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Storing hatchable eggs is a common practice in commercial hatcheries. However, storage time may negative effects on several performance parameters. An experiment was carried out to evaluate inverting egg position during storage of eggs laid by young and old layer breeders. Fertile eggs of 32 and 58-week-old breeders were stored for seven, 14, and 21 days at 18ºC ± 2ºC and 80% ± 10% relative humidity (RU. The following parameters were evaluated: egg weight loss, hatchability and hatchling weight, and embryodiagnosis results. Eggs stored with the small end up lost less weight during storage compared with the control eggs. Storing eggs for 14 days with the small end up reduced early embryo mortality, improving hatchability. In addition, hatchling weight increased. These results show that the detrimental effects of long storage periods may be alleviated when eggs are stored with the small end up to 14 days of storage.

  6. Dinosaur Reproduction and Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, John R.

    Non-avian dinosaur reproductive and parenting behaviors were mostly similar to those of extant archosaurs. Non-avian dinosaurs were probably sexually dimorphic and some may have engaged in hierarchical rituals. Non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodontidae, Oviraptorosauria) had two active oviducts, each of which produced single eggs on a daily or greater time scale. The eggs of non-coelurosaurian dinosaurs (e.g. Ornithischia, Sauropoda) were incubated in soils, whereas the eggs of non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodon, Oviraptor) were incubated with a combination of soil and direct parental contact. Parental attention to the young was variable, ranging from protection from predators to possible parental feeding of nest-bound hatchlings. Semi-altricial hadrosaur hatchlings exited their respective nests near the time of their first linear doubling. Some reproductive behaviors, once thought exclusive to Aves, arose first in non-avian dinosaurs. The success of the Dinosauria may be related to reproductive strategies.

  7. Embryos in the fast lane: high-temperature heart rates of turtles decline after hatching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Guo Du

    Full Text Available In ectotherms such as turtles, the relationship between cardiovascular function and temperature may be subject to different selective pressures in different life-history stages. Because embryos benefit by developing as rapidly as possible, and can "afford" to expend energy to do so (because they have access to the yolk for nutrition, they benefit from rapid heart (and thus, developmental rates. In contrast, hatchlings do not have a guaranteed food supply, and maximal growth rates may not enhance fitness--and so, we might expect a lower heart rate, especially at high temperatures where metabolic costs are greatest. Our data on two species of emydid turtles, Chrysemys picta, and Graptemys pseudogeographica kohnii, support these predictions. Heart rates of embryos and hatchlings were similar at low temperatures, but heart rates at higher temperatures were much greater before than after hatching.

  8. An outbreak of chlamydiosis in farmed Indopacific crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.W. Huchzermeyer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of chlamydiosis was diagnosed in hatchling and juvenile Indopacific crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus on a crocodile farm in Papua New Guinea. The outbreak was characterised by high mortality with hepatitis and exudative conjunctivitis. The agent appears to have been introduced with live wild-caught crocodiles, which are purchased routinely by the farm. Improved quarantine procedures and treatment with tetracycline led to a rapid reduction of losses on the farm.

  9. Reptile Perinatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Krista A

    2017-05-01

    Reptile perinatology refers to the time period surrounding hatching for oviparous species, and immediately after birth for viviparous species. Veterinarians working in myriad conservation and breeding programs require knowledge in this area. This article reviews anatomy and physiology of the amniotic egg, the basics of artificial incubation, when manual pipping is indicated, and basic medicine of the reptile hatchling or neonate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evolution of parental incubation behaviour in dinosaurs cannot be inferred from clutch mass in birds

    OpenAIRE

    Birchard, Geoffrey F.; Ruta, Marcello; Deeming, D. Charles

    2013-01-01

    A recent study proposed that incubation behaviour (i.e. type of parental care) in theropod dinosaurs can be inferred from an allometric analysis of clutch volume in extant birds. However, the study in question failed to account for factors known to affect egg and clutch size in living bird species. A new scaling analysis of avian clutch mass demonstrates that type of parental care cannot be distinguished by conventional allometry because of the confounding effects of phylogeny and hatchling m...

  11. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Agonistic Behaviour in Juvenile Crocodilians

    OpenAIRE

    Brien, Matthew L.; Lang, Jeffrey W.; Webb, Grahame J.; Stevenson, Colin; Christian, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    We examined agonistic behaviour in seven species of hatchling and juvenile crocodilians held in small groups (N = 4) under similar laboratory conditions. Agonistic interactions occurred in all seven species, typically involved two individuals, were short in duration (5-15 seconds), and occurred between 1600-2200 h in open water. The nature and extent of agonistic interactions, the behaviours displayed, and the level of conspecific tolerance varied among species. Discrete postures, non-contact...

  12. Population assessment of the American crocodile, Crocodylus acutus (Crocodilia: Crocodylidae on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

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    Laurie A. Mauger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The American crocodile, Crocodylus acutus, is widely distributed in the American neotropics. It is endangered throughout most of its range and is listed as vulnerable by the International Union for the Conservation of Natural Fauna and Flora (IUCN and on Appendix I of the Convention for the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES. Despite this listing, there are few published reports on population status throughout most of its range. We investigated the status of the C. acutus, at several locations along the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. We carried out spotlight and nesting surveys from 2007-2009 along the Costa Rican Pacific coast in four distinct areas, coastal areas of Las Baulas (N=40 and Santa Rosa (N=9 National Parks and the Osa Conservation Area (N=13, and upriver in Palo Verde National Park (N=11. We recorded crocodile locations and standard environmental data at each observation. Encounter rates, population structure, distribution within each area and data on successful nesting (presence of hatchlings, nests, etc were determined. We attempted to capture all crocodiles to record standard morphometrics. A total of 586 crocodiles were observed along 185.8km of survey route. The majority of animals encountered (54.9% were either hatchlings (<0.5m or juveniles (0.5-1.25m. The average non-hatchling encounter rate per survey for the Pacific coast was 3.1 crocodiles/km, with individual encounter rates ranging from 1.2 crocodiles/km to 4.3 crocodiles/ km in Las Baulas National Park and the Osa Conservation Area respectively. Distribution of size classes within the individual locations did not differ with the exception of Santa Rosa and Las Baulas National Parks, where hatchlings were found in water with lower salinities. These were the first systematic surveys in several of the areas studied and additional work is needed to further characterize the American crocodile population in Costa Rica.

  13. Dynamic Camouflage in Benthic and Pelagic Cephalopods: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Crypsis Based on Color, Reflection, and Bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    cruise. 4 Figure 1: Hatchling cuttlefish on a dynamic background of varying intensities and spatial frequencies. The background changed in...captured as a reflectance map . A pinhole aperture is used to block light from off-axis sample points and stray light. The available range for both...image processing techniques (figure 8) to determine the variability and the areas of change in individual animal responses a) over an hour period on

  14. Missile Defense Agency Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS): Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1 Final BMDS PEIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    coastal area includes shoreline, tidal wetlands, coastal wetlands, and coastal estuaries. 3-3 Exhibit 3-1. Map of Global Biomes Source: Modified...under IFR versus VFR. Using this information, a map of the Region of Influence would be developed for the affected areas , as well as charts detailing...sea turtle nesting areas could disturb buried nests or cover the nests with a sand layer too deep for the hatchlings to escape. Because sea turtle

  15. Effects of ionizing radiation on salamander orientation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoop, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Pens were stocked with larvae of Am, bystoma opacum, A. maculatum, and Rana sylvatica and observations were made on survivorship, metamorphosis, size of juveniles, length of larval period, and migration. Migrating adults were irradiated with a 137 Cs source; the control and experimental animals were then returned to their points of capture and released. Radiation effects were not evident. Studies were conducted on the uptake and turnover of sodium, praseodymium, and europium by larval and hatchling amphibians and reptiles

  16. Ontogenetic investigation of underwater hearing capabilities in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using a dual testing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Ashley L; Bartol, Soraya M; Bartol, Ian K

    2014-07-15

    Sea turtles reside in different acoustic environments with each life history stage and may have different hearing capacity throughout ontogeny. For this study, two independent yet complementary techniques for hearing assessment, i.e. behavioral and electrophysiological audiometry, were employed to (1) measure hearing in post-hatchling and juvenile loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta (19-62 cm straight carapace length) to determine whether these migratory turtles exhibit an ontogenetic shift in underwater auditory detection and (2) evaluate whether hearing frequency range and threshold sensitivity are consistent in behavioral and electrophysiological tests. Behavioral trials first required training turtles to respond to known frequencies, a multi-stage, time-intensive process, and then recording their behavior when they were presented with sound stimuli from an underwater speaker using a two-response forced-choice paradigm. Electrophysiological experiments involved submerging restrained, fully conscious turtles just below the air-water interface and recording auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when sound stimuli were presented using an underwater speaker. No significant differences in behavior-derived auditory thresholds or AEP-derived auditory thresholds were detected between post-hatchling and juvenile sea turtles. While hearing frequency range (50-1000/1100 Hz) and highest sensitivity (100-400 Hz) were consistent in audiograms pooled by size class for both behavior and AEP experiments, both post-hatchlings and juveniles had significantly higher AEP-derived than behavior-derived auditory thresholds, indicating that behavioral assessment is a more sensitive testing approach. The results from this study suggest that post-hatchling and juvenile loggerhead sea turtles are low-frequency specialists, exhibiting little differences in threshold sensitivity and frequency bandwidth despite residence in acoustically distinct environments throughout ontogeny. © 2014

  17. Effects of Ascorbic Acid Injection in Incubated Eggs Submitted to Heat Stress on Incubation Parameters and Chick Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sgavioli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dose-dependent positive effects on hatchability and hatchling weight have been attributed to ascorbic acid (AA when eggs were submitted or not to intermittent heat stress during incubation. Fertile breeder (Cobb(r eggs were used to determine if the pre-incubation injection of AA in ovo affects the incubation and hatchling quality of egg incubated under thermoneutral or intermittent heat stress conditions. Eggs were not injected or injected with 0, 2,4, or 6% AA/100µL water and incubated at continuous thermoneutral (37.5ºC or hot (39.0ºC temperature. Eggshell temperature (EST increased in the second half of the incubation period in all experimental groups. The EST of non-injected eggs and of those injected with water was higher when incubated at 39°C than at 37.5°C, but EST was not different among eggs injected with AA. Egg mass loss and eggshell conductance were higher in the eggs incubated at 39°C than at 37.5°C.Hatchability was lower in the eggs injected with AA. Liver and yolk sac weights were higher, whereas heart and liver weights were lower in hatchlings from eggs incubated at 39°C; however, hatchling weight was not affected by incubation temperature. The results showed that AA doses affected egg conductive heat loss and hatchability, and that they did not minimize the effects of high incubation temperature on liver and heart development.

  18. Biochemical indices and life traits of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta from Cape Verde Islands.

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    Sara Vieira

    Full Text Available The loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta is an endangered marine reptile for whom assessing population health requires knowledge of demographic parameters such as individual growth rate. In Cape Verde, as within several populations, adult female loggerhead sea turtles show a size-related behavioral and trophic dichotomy. While smaller females are associated with oceanic habitats, larger females tend to feed in neritic habitats, which is reflected in their physiological condition and in their offspring. The ratio of RNA/DNA provides a measure of cellular protein synthesis capacity, which varies depending on changes in environmental conditions such as temperature and food availability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined use of morphometric data and biochemical indices as predictors of the physiological condition of the females of distinct sizes and hatchlings during their nesting season and how temperature may influence the physiological condition on the offspring. Here we employed biochemical indices based on nucleic acid derived indices (standardized RNA/DNA ratio-sRD, RNA concentration and DNA concentration in skin tissue as a potential predictor of recent growth rate in nesting females and hatchling loggerhead turtles. Our major findings were that the physiological condition of all nesting females (sRD decreased during the nesting season, but that females associated with neritic habitats had a higher physiological condition than females associated with oceanic habitats. In addition, the amount of time required for a hatchling to right itself was negatively correlated with its physiological condition (sRD and shaded nests produced hatchlings with lower sRD. Overall, our results showed that nucleic acid concentrations and ratios of RNA to DNA are an important tool as potential biomarkers of recent growth in marine turtles. Hence, as biochemical indices of instantaneous growth are likely temperature-, size- and age

  19. Impacts of age and calcium on Phytase efficacy in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    A total of 648 straight-run hatchling Heritage 56M × fast feathering Cobb 500F broiler birds were used to determine the effects of Ca concentration and age on phytase efficacy. Corn and SBM based diets with 0.19%non-phytate P were prepared with three Ca (6.5, 8.0 and 9.5 g/kg) concentrations. A 6-ph...

  20. Different male versus female breeding periodicity helps mitigate offspring sex ratio skews in sea turtles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Clive Hays

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The implications of climate change for global biodiversity may be profound with those species with little capacity for adaptation being thought to be particularly vulnerable to warming. A classic case of groups for concern are those animals exhibiting temperature-dependent sex-determination (TSD, such as sea turtles, where climate warming may produce single sex populations and hence extinction. We show that, globally, female biased hatchling sex ratios dominate sea turtle populations (exceeding 3:1 in >50% records, which, at-a-glance, reiterates concerns for extinction. However, we also demonstrate that more frequent breeding by males, empirically shown by satellite tracking 23 individuals and supported by a generalized bio-energetic life history model, generates more balanced operational sex ratios (OSRs. Hence, concerns of increasingly skewed hatchling sex ratios and reduced population viability are less acute than previously thought for sea turtles. In fact, in some scenarios skewed hatchling sex ratios in groups with TSD may be adaptive to ensure optimum OSRs.

  1. Genetic assessments and parentage analysis of captive Bolson tortoises (Gopherus flavomarginatus inform their "rewilding" in New Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Edwards

    Full Text Available The Bolson tortoise (Gopherus flavomarginatus is the first species of extirpated megafauna to be repatriated into the United States. In September 2006, 30 individuals were translocated from Arizona to New Mexico with the long-term objective of restoring wild populations via captive propagation. We evaluated mtDNA sequences and allelic diversity among 11 microsatellite loci from the captive population and archived samples collected from wild individuals in Durango, Mexico (n = 28. Both populations exhibited very low genetic diversity and the captive population captured roughly 97.5% of the total wild diversity, making it a promising founder population. Genetic screening of other captive animals (n = 26 potentially suitable for reintroduction uncovered multiple hybrid G. flavomarginatus×G. polyphemus, which were ineligible for repatriation; only three of these individuals were verified as purebred G. flavomarginatus. We used these genetic data to inform mate pairing, reduce the potential for inbreeding and to monitor the maintenance of genetic diversity in the captive population. After six years of successful propagation, we analyzed the parentage of 241 hatchlings to assess the maintenance of genetic diversity. Not all adults contributed equally to successive generations. Most yearly cohorts of hatchlings failed to capture the diversity of the parental population. However, overlapping generations of tortoises helped to alleviate genetic loss because the entire six-year cohort of hatchlings contained the allelic diversity of the parental population. Polyandry and sperm storage occurred in the captives and future management strategies must consider such events.

  2. Preliminary findings of Salmonella spp. in captive green iguanas (Iguana iguana) and their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, M A; Shane, S M

    2000-06-12

    Captive reptiles are routinely identified as reservoirs of Salmonella spp. and reports of reptile-associated salmonellosis are increasing. Unfortunately, little is known about the epidemiology of Salmonella spp. and green iguanas. We did a limited survey of a green-iguana farm in El Salvador to identify sources of Salmonella spp. in green iguanas and their environment. A limited number of samples for microbiological culture were collected from iguanas (adult, hatchling, and embryos) and their environment (food, water, soil, shelter, insects, and wild-caught lizards). Salmonella spp. was isolated from the intestine of both adult (3/20) and hatchling iguanas (8/20). There was no evidence of Salmonella spp. in the reproductive tracts of female iguanas (0/10). Salmonella spp. was isolated from the surface of 40% (7/16) of the egg surfaces tested. Salmonella spp. was not identified from the externalized yolk-sac of the iguana embryos tested. Soil samples from a breeding pen and a nest were both positive for Salmonella spp. Eight different Salmonella spp. serotypes were identified in this survey. These results suggest that horizontal transmission of Salmonella spp. is a potential source of exposure to hatchling iguanas at this facility.

  3. Rates of oxygen uptake increase independently of changes in heart rate in late stages of development and at hatching in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Marina R; Abe, Augusto S; Crossley, Dane A; Taylor, Edwin W

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), heart rate (f H ), heart mass (M h ) and body mass (M b ) were measured during embryonic incubation and in hatchlings of green iguana (Iguana iguana). Mean f H and VO 2 were unvarying in early stage embryos. VO 2 increased exponentially during the later stages of embryonic development, doubling by the end of incubation, while f H was constant, resulting in a 2.7-fold increase in oxygen pulse. Compared to late stage embryos, the mean inactive level of VO 2 in hatchlings was 1.7 fold higher, while f H was reduced by half resulting in a further 3.6 fold increase in oxygen pulse. There was an overall negative correlation between mean f H and VO 2 when data from hatchlings was included. Thus, predicting metabolic rate as VO 2 from measurements of f H is not possible in embryonic reptiles. Convective transport of oxygen to supply metabolism during embryonic incubation was more reliably indicated as an index of cardiac output (CO i ) derived from the product of f H and M h . However, a thorough analysis of factors determining rates of oxygen supply during development and eclosion in reptiles will require cannulation of blood vessels that proved impossible in the present study, to determine oxygen carrying capacity by the blood and arteriovenous oxygen content difference (A-V diff), plus patterns of blood flow. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Amphibian embryo and parental defenses and a larval predator reduce egg mortality from water mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Mestre, Ivan; Touchon, Justin C; Warkentin, Karen M

    2006-10-01

    Water molds attack aquatic eggs worldwide and have been associated with major mortality events in some cases, but typically only in association with additional stressors. We combined field observations and laboratory experiments to study egg stage defenses against pathogenic water mold in three temperate amphibians. Spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) wrap their eggs in a protective jelly layer that prevents mold from reaching the embryos. Wood frog (Rana sylvatica) egg masses have less jelly but are laid while ponds are still cold and mold growth is slow. American toad (Bufo americanus) eggs experience the highest infection levels. They are surrounded by thin jelly and are laid when ponds have warmed and mold grows rapidly. Eggs of all three species hatched early when infected, yielding smaller and less developed hatchlings. This response was strongest in B. americanus. Precocious hatching increased vulnerability of wood frog hatchlings to invertebrate predators. Finally, despite being potential toad hatchling predators, R. sylvatica tadpoles can have a positive effect on B. americanus eggs. They eat water mold off infected toad clutches, increasing their hatching success.

  5. Hibernation Site Philopatry in Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) in New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Zappalorti, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Northern Pine Snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) are one of the few snakes that spend the winter in underground hibernacula that they excavate. We report the use of hibernacula by Pine Snakes from 1986 to 2012 in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. We determined whether philopatry to a specific hibernaculum varied as a function of age, sex, and location of the hibernaculum. Three hibernacula were occupied nearly continuously for 27 yr by 1 to 27 snakes each year. With known-age snakes (N = 120), captured mainly as hatchlings and 2-yr-olds, we found that 23% were always philopatric. Philopatry was related to age of last capture, sex, and capture location. Philopatry was higher for 1) females compared with males, 2) snakes at two solitary hibernacula compared with a hibernaculum complex, and 3) snakes 6 yr old or younger, compared with older snakes. Of hatchlings found hibernating, 24% used the same hibernation site the next year, and 38% were located at year 4 or later. The number of snakes that always used the same hibernation site declined with the age of last capture. Snakes that entered hibernacula as hatchlings were found more often than those that entered as 2-yr-olds. For the seven snakes that were 14 yr or older, females were found 64– 86 % of the time, whereas males were found 15 to 50% of the time. Understanding the behavior and habitat requirements of snakes during different seasons is central to life-history analysis and for conserving viable populations. PMID:27011392

  6. Life History Variation in Invading Applesnails (Pomacea canaliculata) May Pose Ecological Threats to Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfurt, R. K.; Boland, B. B.; Burks, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    In native habitats, channeled applesnails (Pomacea canaliculata) graze periphyton. However, casual observations from introduced populations suggest these invaders show variation in feeding ecology, predator response and life history strategies. Attempts to predict this consumer influence on ecosystem function suffer from a lack of basic data. We tested how salinity affected snail mortality. Both adults and hatchlings tolerated salinity levels up to 8 ppt. Adult feeding on lettuce increased significantly at 8 ppt compared to 0 ppt (p = 0.002), while hatchling consumption of algae did not vary (p = 0.284). To see how these consumers responded to predators from the invaded ecosystem, we tested behavioural responses to predatory cues from fish, turtles, crayfish and adult applesnails. Results indicated that fish and crayfish prompted similar predator-avoidance behaviors in hatchlings (p's 0.05) between native (ramshorn) and exotic applesnails, whereas adult fish consumed more applesnails (x2, p < 0.001). Our current efforts focus on examining if predator presence or macrophyte choice alters applesnail feeding rates. Research providing insight into the basic ecology of applesnails can foster management efforts at the ecosystem scale.

  7. Feeding Relationship between Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797 Early Life-Cycle Stages and Their Prey in the Western Iberian Upwelling System: Correlation of Reciprocal Lipid and Fatty Acid Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Lourenço

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Under the influence of the Western Iberian upwelling system, the Iberian Atlantic coast holds important hatcheries and recruitment areas for Octopus vulgaris. Recently identified as an octopus hatchery, the Ría de Vigo harbors an important mesozooplankton community that supports O. vulgaris paralarvae during the first days of their planktonic stage. This study represents a preliminary approach to determine the nutritional link between wild O. vulgaris hatchlings, paralarvae and their zooplankton prey in the Ría de Vigo, by analyzing their lipid class content and fatty acid profiles. The results show that octopus hatchlings are richer in structural lipids as phospholipids and cholesterol, while the zooplankton is richer in reserve lipids like triacylglycerol and waxes. Zooplankton samples are also particularly rich in C18:1n9 and 22:6n3 (DHA, that seem to be successfully incorporated by O. vulgaris paralarvae thus resulting in a distinct fatty acid profile to that of the hatchlings. On the other hand, content in C20:4n6 (ARA is maintained high through development, even though the zooplankton is apparently poorer in this essential fatty acid, confirming its importance for the development of O. vulgaris paralarvae. The content in monounsaturated fatty acids, particularly C18:1n7, and the DHA: EPA ratio are suggested as trophic markers of the diet of O. vulgaris paralarvae.

  8. Effects of the mosquito larvicide GB-1111 on mallard and bobwhite embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    Golden Bear Oil or GB-1111 is a petroleum distillate that is used throughout the United States as a larvicide for mosquito pupae. The oil forms a barrier at the air-water interface, which suffocates air-breathing insects. There are few published studies on non-target effects of GB-1111 but the product label warns that ?GB-1111 is toxic to fish and other aquatic organisms.? Fertile eggs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) were incubated in the laboratory, and treated on days 4 or 11 of incubation with external applications equivalent to either 0, 1/3, 1, 3, or 10 times the maximum rate (5 gal/A) of field application of GB-1111. Hatching success was significantly reduced in mallards treated on day 4 or day 11 at 3 and 10 times the maximum field application, with a calculated approximate LD50 of 1.9 times the maximum field application. Most mortality occurred within a week of treatment. Hatching success of bobwhite was only reduced at the highest level of treatment. Other effects at this level in bobwhite included a significant increase in incidence of abnormal embryos/ hatchlings, lower body and liver weights of hatchlings and a two-fold increase in hepatic microsomal P450-associated monooxygenase activity (EROD) in hatchlings. Recommended rates of field application of GB-1111 are potentially toxic to mallard embryos, especially under conditions of larvicide drift or spray overlap, but unlikely to impair the survival or development of bobwhite embryos.

  9. Impact of vinclozolin on reproductive behavior and endocrinology in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, S.; Henry, P.F.P.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been demonstrated in mammalian models, but less research is available for avian species. The effects of vinclozolin (VIN), an antiandrogenic fungicide, on sexual differentiation and maturation were investigated in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). On day 4 of incubation, embryos were exposed to no treatment, oil, or 25, 50, or 100 ppm of VIN. Endpoints measured included adult male reproductive behavior, hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I) content in hatchlings and adults, plasma steroid levels in hatchlings and adults, proctodeal gland growth during maturation, and relative testicular weight at seven weeks of age. Results showed that exposure to VIN significantly (p < 0.05) altered GnRH-I in male hatchlings, whereas GnRH-I levels in females remained unaffected. Although steroid levels were unaltered by any VIN treatment, the display of male reproductive behavior seemed delayed, with the number of mounts and the number of cloacal contacts being significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the VIN-treated males. This could have an extreme negative impact on wild avian species that are routinely exposed to similar EDCs.

  10. Developmental effects of Arochlor 1242 in American kestrels and associated hormone concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.B.; Henry, P.F.P.; Rattner, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, diverse field and experimental studies have been brought together to suggest that abnormal sexual and reproductive development in wildlife might be caused by the endocrine-like activity of pollutants acting on embryos. For example, hormonal and gonadal anomalies in juvenile alligators from Florida are associated with exposure to DDT and dicofol, experimental work on laboratory rodents has identified estrogenic and androgenic properties of several pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, and injection of gull eggs with metabolites of DDT produces intersex gonads in the male hatchlings. Very little evidence is available for birds that demonstrates a deficit in reproductive capability by this mechanism. Our breeding and egg-injection studies are investigating the potential of Aroclor 1242 and hydroxylated PCB congener 30, both with known estrogenic activity, to alter the course of embryonic development of reproductive structures and to affect later reproductive function in American kestrels. Findings from young birds whose parents were exposed indicated that gonadal morphology appeared consistent with the genetic sex of exposed birds; testes of exposed birds showed no difference in size or symmetry when compared to controls. Histological preparations showed very little intersexuality of male testes; females had ovaries that were indistinguishable from controls. Female hatchlings tended to show increased androgen and decreased estrogen in their serum with greater dose of Aroclor; females hatchlings that resulted from injected eggs showed an opposite trend. Analyses in progress include LHRH and catecholamine concentrations in the brain.

  11. Contribución al conocimiento sobre la Taxonomía, distribución geográfica y ecología de la Tortuga "Bache" (Chelydra Serpentina Acutirostris Contribución al conocimiento sobre la Taxonomía, distribución geográfica y ecología de la Tortuga "Bache" (Chelydra Serpentina Acutirostris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medem Federico

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available 1. Studies on the external morphological characters of Chelydra serpentina acutirostris are presented, the principal scope of which contributes to the knowledge about the taxonomic status of this form considered as a valid subspecies.2. These characteristics are compared with those of the other three subspecies, principally with Chelydra serpentina rossignonii.3. Based on 18 specimens of acutirostris, mainly from Colombia, and 16 of rossignonii, mainly from Honduras, certain characters are re-evaluated.4. The type specimens of the four living representatives of the genus Chelydra, commonly known as "Snapping Turtles", are as follows:a Chelydra serpentina serpentina (Linnaeus, 1758.Holotype: Originally deposited at the Museum Adolphi FridericiRegis (Museum Drottningholmense, according to the Prodromus Stockholm, 1764, tom. II, p. 16, but presently lost (fide Andersson, 1900, pp. 4, 23.b Chelydra serpentina acutirostris Peters, 1962.Holotype: ZBM 4500, hatchling, vicinity of Guayaquil, Ecuador,Carl Reiss.c Chelydra serpentina rossignonii (Bocourt, 1868.Syntypes: MNHNP 1501, 1501 A, hatchlings, swamp of Panzos,vicinity of Rio Polochic, Guatemala, and MNHNP 1230, hatchling,Mexico, without exact locality, datum and collectors.d Chelydra serpentina osceola Stejneger, 1918.Holotype: USNM 10369, Clearwater, Pinellas County, Florida,United States, September, 1879, S. T. Walker.5. A redescription of the holotype of acutirostris is presented, and comparisons with the syntypes of rossignonii made.6. Unfortunately, either the holotype or the syntypes all were described from hatchlings, many of the external morphological characters of which are markedly different from those of adults.7. Certain external characters which are traditionally considered as constant in the keys of classification, although in reality they are not, but rather show a considerable variation, therefore they are of no taxonomic value in relation to an exact subspecific classification.8

  12. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavens, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2006-11-01

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2005-September 2006. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon zoos in 2005 and 2006 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Twenty-six turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 62 at the Oregon Zoo in fall 2005. These turtles joined two that were held back from release in summer 2005 due to their small size. All 90 juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2006. Twenty-eight juvenile turtles were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 21 at the Skamania site, and 19 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 944; 285 for the Klickitat ponds, 158 for the Klickitat lake, 227 for the Skamania pond complex, and 274 at Pierce NWR. In 2006, 20 females from the Klickitat population were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Fifteen nests were located and protected; these produced 55 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. One wild hatchling captured in spring 2006 was placed in the head-start program to attain more growth in captivity. During the 2006 field season trapping effort, 414 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 374 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations

  13. Pathogenicity in six Australian reptile species following experimental inoculation with Bohle iridovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, E; Wirth, W; Burgess, G; Scott, J; Owens, L

    2015-08-20

    Ranaviruses are able to infect multiple species of fish, amphibian and reptile, and some strains are capable of interclass transmission. These numerous potential carriers and reservoir species compound efforts to control and contain infections in cultured and wild populations, and a comprehensive knowledge of susceptible species and life stage is necessary to inform such processes. Here we report on the challenge of 6 water-associated reptiles with Bohle iridovirus (BIV) to investigate its potential pathogenicity in common native reptiles of the aquatic and riparian fauna of northern Queensland, Australia. Adult tortoises Elseya latisternum and Emydura krefftii, snakes Boiga irregularis, Dendrelaphis punctulatus and Amphiesma mairii, and yearling crocodiles Crocodylus johnstoni were exposed via intracoelomic inoculation or co-habitation with infected con-specifics, but none were adversely affected by the challenge conditions applied here. Bohle iridovirus was found to be extremely virulent in hatchling tortoises E. latisternum and E. krefftii via intracoelomic challenge, as demonstrated by distinct lesions in multiple organs associated with specific immunohistochemistry staining and a lethal outcome (10/17) of the challenge. Virus was re-isolated from 2/5 E. latisternum, 4/12 E. krefftii and 1/3 brown tree snakes B. irregularis. Focal necrosis, haemorrhage and infiltration of granulocytes were frequently observed histologically in the pancreas, liver and sub-mucosa of the intestine of challenged tortoise hatchlings. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the presence of ranavirus antigens in the necrotic lesions and in individual cells of the vascular endothelium, the connective tissue and in granulocytes associated with necrosis or present along serosal surfaces. The outcome of this study confirms hatchling tortoises are susceptible to BIV, thereby adding Australian reptiles to the host range of ranaviruses. Additionally, given that BIV was originally isolated from an

  14. Ocean Warming Enhances Malformations, Premature Hatching, Metabolic Suppression and Oxidative Stress in the Early Life Stages of a Keystone Squid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rui; Pimentel, Marta S.; Boavida-Portugal, Joana; Teixeira, Tatiana; Trübenbach, Katja; Diniz, Mário

    2012-01-01

    Background The knowledge about the capacity of organisms’ early life stages to adapt to elevated temperatures is very limited but crucial to understand how marine biota will respond to global warming. Here we provide a comprehensive and integrated view of biological responses to future warming during the early ontogeny of a keystone invertebrate, the squid Loligo vulgaris. Methodology/Principal Findings Recently-spawned egg masses were collected and reared until hatching at present day and projected near future (+2°C) temperatures, to investigate the ability of early stages to undergo thermal acclimation, namely phenotypic altering of morphological, behavioural, biochemical and physiological features. Our findings showed that under the projected near-future warming, the abiotic conditions inside the eggs promoted metabolic suppression, which was followed by premature hatching. Concomitantly, the less developed newborns showed greater incidence of malformations. After hatching, the metabolic burst associated with the transition from an encapsulated embryo to a planktonic stage increased linearly with temperature. However, the greater exposure to environmental stress by the hatchlings seemed to be compensated by physiological mechanisms that reduce the negative effects on fitness. Heat shock proteins (HSP70/HSC70) and antioxidant enzymes activities constituted an integrated stress response to ocean warming in hatchlings (but not in embryos). Conclusions/Significance The stressful abiotic conditions inside eggs are expected to be aggravated under the projected near-future ocean warming, with deleterious effects on embryo survival and growth. Greater feeding challenges and the lower thermal tolerance limits of the hatchlings are strictly connected to high metabolic demands associated with the planktonic life strategy. Yet, we found some evidence that, in the future, the early stages might support higher energy demands by adjusting some cellular functional properties

  15. Factors affecting hatch success of hawksbill sea turtles on Long Island, Antigua, West Indies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Allan Ditmer

    Full Text Available Current understanding of the factors influencing hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata hatch success is disparate and based on relatively short-term studies or limited sample sizes. Because global populations of hawksbills are heavily depleted, evaluating the parameters that impact hatch success is important to their conservation and recovery. Here, we use data collected by the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project (JBHP to investigate hatch success. The JBHP implements saturation tagging protocols to study a hawksbill rookery in Antigua, West Indies. Habitat data, which reflect the varied nesting beaches, are collected at egg deposition, and nest contents are exhumed and categorized post-emergence. We analyzed hatch success using mixed-model analyses with explanatory and predictive datasets. We incorporated a random effect for turtle identity and evaluated environmental, temporal and individual-based reproductive variables. Hatch success averaged 78.6% (SD: 21.2% during the study period. Highly supported models included multiple covariates, including distance to vegetation, deposition date, individual intra-seasonal nest number, clutch size, organic content, and sand grain size. Nests located in open sand were predicted to produce 10.4 more viable hatchlings per clutch than nests located >1.5 m into vegetation. For an individual first nesting in early July, the fourth nest of the season yielded 13.2 more viable hatchlings than the initial clutch. Generalized beach section and inter-annual variation were also supported in our explanatory dataset, suggesting that gaps remain in our understanding of hatch success. Our findings illustrate that evaluating hatch success is a complex process, involving multiple environmental and individual variables. Although distance to vegetation and hatch success were inversely related, vegetation is an important component of hawksbill nesting habitat, and a more complete assessment of the impacts of specific

  16. Reproduction and conservation of the Magdalena River turtle (Podocnemis lewyana) in the Claro Cocorna Sur River, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceballos, Claudia P; Romero, Isabel; Gomez Saldarriaga, Catalina; Miranda, Karla

    2014-01-01

    The Magdalena river turtle, Podocnemis lewyana, is an endangered and endemic turtle from Colombia. Among the most important information needed to conserve endangered species is to identify, monitor, and protect the sites used by the species to reproduce and grow. In this study we report, for the first time, the reproductive output and the nesting beaches of P. lewyana in the Claro Cocorna Sur River, a tributary of the Magdalena river drainage. We systematically examined a river transect of 8 km with 14 sandy beaches during two nesting seasons in one year. We recorded a yearly production of 47 clutches, 957 eggs, and two preferred nesting beaches: Alto Bonito with 51 %, and Belgica with 28.3 % of this reproductive output. Aafuver, a community-based organization, has led a headstarting program since 2010 to decrease in-situ egg mortality due to predation on nesting beaches. Aafuver collects and incubates the eggs ex-situ, raises the hatchlings for one to five months and then releases them into the same river. To understand potential effects of such egg manipulation, we monitored and compared in-situ and ex-situ incubation temperatures. We found ex-situ temperatures below the pivotal temperature known for P. lewyana and below the temperatures in nesting beaches. Finally, we monitored hatchlings growth under aafuver captive conditions, and found that hatchlings duplicated their body mass during the first three months of age. Egg weight was strongly associated to body weight at hatching; however this association is lost by the third month of age. We strongly encourage supporting this community-based conservation program, and the protection of the Claro Cocorna Sur River as an important nesting and growth habitat for the conservation of P. lewyana.

  17. Reproduction and conservation of the Magdalena River turtle (Podocnemis lewyana) in the Claro Cocorna Sur River, Colombia; Reproduccion y conservacion de la tortuga del Rio Magdalena (Podocnemis lewyana) en el Rio Claro Cocorna Sur, Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceballos, Claudia P; Romero, Isabel; Gomez Saldarriaga, Catalina; Miranda, Karla

    2014-07-01

    The Magdalena river turtle, Podocnemis lewyana, is an endangered and endemic turtle from Colombia. Among the most important information needed to conserve endangered species is to identify, monitor, and protect the sites used by the species to reproduce and grow. In this study we report, for the first time, the reproductive output and the nesting beaches of P. lewyana in the Claro Cocorna Sur River, a tributary of the Magdalena river drainage. We systematically examined a river transect of 8 km with 14 sandy beaches during two nesting seasons in one year. We recorded a yearly production of 47 clutches, 957 eggs, and two preferred nesting beaches: Alto Bonito with 51 %, and Belgica with 28.3 % of this reproductive output. Aafuver, a community-based organization, has led a headstarting program since 2010 to decrease in-situ egg mortality due to predation on nesting beaches. Aafuver collects and incubates the eggs ex-situ, raises the hatchlings for one to five months and then releases them into the same river. To understand potential effects of such egg manipulation, we monitored and compared in-situ and ex-situ incubation temperatures. We found ex-situ temperatures below the pivotal temperature known for P. lewyana and below the temperatures in nesting beaches. Finally, we monitored hatchlings growth under aafuver captive conditions, and found that hatchlings duplicated their body mass during the first three months of age. Egg weight was strongly associated to body weight at hatching; however this association is lost by the third month of age. We strongly encourage supporting this community-based conservation program, and the protection of the Claro Cocorna Sur River as an important nesting and growth habitat for the conservation of P. lewyana.

  18. Evolution of parental incubation behaviour in dinosaurs cannot be inferred from clutch mass in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchard, Geoffrey F; Ruta, Marcello; Deeming, D Charles

    2013-08-23

    A recent study proposed that incubation behaviour (i.e. type of parental care) in theropod dinosaurs can be inferred from an allometric analysis of clutch volume in extant birds. However, the study in question failed to account for factors known to affect egg and clutch size in living bird species. A new scaling analysis of avian clutch mass demonstrates that type of parental care cannot be distinguished by conventional allometry because of the confounding effects of phylogeny and hatchling maturity. Precociality of young but not paternal care in the theropod ancestors of birds is consistent with the available data.

  19. The first “lost year” of Mediterranean sea turtles: dispersal patterns indicate subregional management units for conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casale, Paolo; Mariani, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Identifying highly frequented areas is a priority for sea turtle conservation, and the distribution of young individuals in open waters represents a major knowledge gap due to methodological biases. The drift of hatchlings from 38 loggerhead and 10 green turtle nesting sites in the Mediterranean......-scale international approach. In-water studies in specific zones are identified as a research priority for improving the current knowledge and inform conservation plans....... The Levantine zone may be particularly key for the conservation of the Mediterranean populations of both species, since it may host the highest concentration of individuals. Subregional management units identified by dispersal patterns may facilitate turtle conservation through a relatively small...

  20. Ontogenetic development of migration: Lagrangian drift trajectories suggest a new paradigm for sea turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hays, Graeme C.; Fossette, Sabrina; Katselidis, Kostas A.

    2010-01-01

    Long distance migration occurs in a wide variety of taxa including birds, insects, fishes, mammals and reptiles. Here, we provide evidence for a new paradigm for the determinants of migration destination. As adults, sea turtles show fidelity to their natal nesting areas and then at the end...... dispersion that would be experienced by hatchlings. Hence, the prevailing oceanography around nesting areas may be crucial to the selection of foraging sites used by adult sea turtles. This environmental forcing may allow the rapid evolution of new migration destinations if ocean currents alter with climate...

  1. A Big Bang or small bangs? Effects of biotic environment on hatching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina MANCA

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The beginning and end of diapause are two important transition points in cladoceran life history. The influence of environmental variables on the dynamics of these processes still deserves attention, especially as concerns the role of biotic factors. In this paper we focus on emergence from diapause, testing (1 whether ephippia of Daphnia obtusa Kurz can assess the presence in the water of typical planktivorous fish or ostracods, and (2 whether such an assessment results in changes in hatching strategy. Total number of hatchlings from D. obtusa ephippial eggs did not differ between the control and the treatments in which the presence of fish or ostracods could be detected (ANOVA, P = 0.884. However, hatching dynamics were different: most of the eggs hatched synchronously at day 4 (83.3% of the total hatchlings number in the control, while only a low proportion of eggs hatched on day 4 in the fish (38.3%, and ostracod treatments (24.0% of the total. Mean hatching time was longer, and variability larger, in the treatments than in the control; differences resulted statistically significant (ANOVA, P = 0.005. With respect to the control, representing a simple microcosm controlled by abiotic variables only, the treatments may be regarded as relatively complex environments, in which Daphnia is also exposed to biotic cues. Under these more complex conditions, the same number of hatchlings is obtained through different hatching dynamics. In the treatments, the first hatchlings appeared later and the hatching rate was more variable than in the control. These observations confirm previously observed patterns from laboratory experiments which tested the effect of competition and fluctuating environmental conditions (light:dark, temperature regimes on D. obtusa reproductive and demographic parameters. They are also in agreement with recently obtained evidence concerning the importance of biotic cues for hatching of ephippial eggs. Overall, the evidence

  2. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L Caldwell

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  3. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  4. Western Pond Turtle Head-starting and Reintroduction; 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Leuven, Susan; Allen, Harriet; Slavin, Kate (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wildlife Management Program, Olympia, WA)

    2005-09-01

    This report covers the results of the western pond turtle head-starting and reintroduction project for the period of October 2004-September 2005. Wild hatchling western pond turtles from the Columbia River Gorge were reared at the Woodland Park and Oregon Zoos in 2004 and 2005 as part of the recovery effort for this Washington State endangered species. The objective of the program is to reduce losses to introduced predators like bullfrogs and largemouth bass by raising the hatchlings to a size where they are too large to be eaten by most of these predators. Thirty-five turtles were placed at the Woodland Park Zoo and 53 at the Oregon Zoo. Of these, 77 head-started juvenile turtles were released at three sites in the Columbia Gorge in 2005. Four were held back to attain more growth in captivity. Eleven were released at the Klickitat ponds, 22 at the Klickitat lake, 39 at the Skamania site, and 5 at Pierce National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This brought the total number of head-start turtles released since 1991 to 257 for the Klickitat ponds, 136 for the Klickitat lake, 206 for the Skamania pond complex, and 255 at Pierce NWR. In 2005, 34 females from the two Columbia Gorge populations were equipped with transmitters and monitored for nesting activity. Twenty-four nests were located and protected; these produced 90 hatchlings. The hatchlings were collected in September and transported to the Oregon and Woodland Park zoos for rearing in the head-start program. During the 2005 field season trapping effort, 486 western pond turtles were captured in the Columbia Gorge, including 430 previously head-started turtles. These recaptures, together with confirmed nesting by head-start females and visual resightings, indicate the program is succeeding in boosting juvenile recruitment to increase the populations. Records were also collected on 216 individual painted turtles captured in 2005 during trapping efforts at Pierce NWR, to gather baseline information on this native

  5. The Power of Comparative Physiology: Evolution, Integration and Applied

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    and olive ridley marine turtle hatchlings. T.T. Jones, R.R. Reina Symposium and P.L. Lutz. Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca 44.0 REGULATION OF VERTEBRATE... preference of 16[deg]C acclimated emabs was a genseralist woodrat, with a choice bersween control anod 50% juniper diet under Wsarm (26 1 4.6fdeg]C and thsey...and Olive Ridley Marine Turtle Harvey B. Lillywhite’, Jaishri G. Mceon2, Gopinathan K. Menon’. Ming C. Tuo: ’University, Hatchllngs of Florida

  6. Hemodynamic consequences of cardiac malformations in two juvenile ball pythons (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Bjarke; Wang, Tobias

    2009-12-01

    Two cases of bifid ventricles and cardiac malformations in juvenile ball python (Python regius) were investigated by blood pressure measurements and macro- and microscopic sectioning. A study of a normal ball python was included for reference. In both cases, all cardiac chambers were enlarged and abnormally shaped. Internal assessment of the ventricles revealed a pronounced defect of the muscular ridge, which normally is responsible for separating the systemic and pulmonary circuits. Consistent with the small muscular ridge, systolic pressures were identical in the pulmonary and systemic arteries, but, the snakes, nevertheless, lived to reach body weights severalfold of their hatchling weight.

  7. Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase- and Plasmid-Encoded Cephamycinase-Producing Enterobacteria in the Broiler Hatchery as a Potential Mode of Pseudo-Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Projahn, Michaela; Daehre, Katrin; Roesler, Uwe; Friese, Anika

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance through extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and transferable (plasmid-encoded) cephamycinases (pAmpCs) represents an increasing problem in human and veterinary medicine. The presence of ESBL-/pAmpC-producing commensal enterobacteria in farm animals, such as broiler chickens, is considered one possible source of food contamination and could therefore also be relevant for human colonization. Studies on transmission routes along the broiler production chain showed that 1-day-old hatchlings are already affected. In this study, ESBL-/pAmpC-positive broiler parent flocks and their corresponding eggs, as well as various environmental and air samples from the hatchery, were analyzed. The eggs were investigated concerning ESBL-/pAmpC-producing enterobacteria on the outer eggshell surface (before/after disinfection), the inner eggshell surface, and the egg content. Isolates were analyzed concerning their species, their phylogroup in the case of Escherichia coli strains, the respective resistance genes, and the phenotypical antibiotic resistance. Of the tested eggs, 0.9% (n = 560) were contaminated on their outer shell surface. Further analyses using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed a relationship of these strains to those isolated from the corresponding parent flocks, which demonstrates a pseudo-vertical transfer of ESBL-/pAmpC-producing enterobacteria into the hatchery. Resistant enterobacteria were also found in environmental samples from the hatchery, such as dust or surfaces which could pose as a possible contamination source for the hatchlings. All 1-day-old chicks tested negative directly after hatching. The results show a possible entry of ESBL-/pAmpC-producing enterobacteria from the parent flocks into the hatchery; however, the impact of the hatchery on colonization of the hatchlings seems to be low. ESBL-/pAmpC-producing enterobacteria occur frequently in broiler-fattening farms. Recent studies investigated the prevalence and

  8. Herpetofauna of the Northwest Amazon forest in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, with remarks on the Gurupi Biological Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the biodiversity of an area is the first step for establishing effective interventions for conservation, especially when it comes to herpetofauna, since 4.1% and 9.2%, respectively, of Brazilian amphibians and reptiles are endangered. The aim of this study is to identify the composition of the herpetofauna occurring in the Northwest Amazonian state of Maranhão, with a focus on the Gurupi Biological Reserve and surrounding areas. Samples were collected between May 2012 and October 2013 (18 months, through pitfall traps, time constrained active search, and opportunistic encounters, and these records were supplemented by specimens collected by third parties and by bibliographic records. A total of 131 species were recorded: 31 species of amphibians and 100 species of reptiles (six testudines, 30 lizards, two amphisbaenas, 60 snakes and two alligators, including some species new to the state of Maranhão and the northeast region of Brazil. This inventory contributes to the knowledge of the herpetofauna for the Belém Endemism Center, the most devastated region of the Brazilian Amazon, and considered poorly sampled.

  9. Herpetofauna of the Northwest Amazon forest in the state of Maranhão, Brazil, with remarks on the Gurupi Biological Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Marco Antonio; Vieira, Ruhan Saldanha; Entiauspe-Neto, Omar Machado; Sousa, Samantha Oliveira E; Farias, Tayse; Sousa, Alanna Grazieli; de Moura, Geraldo Jorge Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biodiversity of an area is the first step for establishing effective interventions for conservation, especially when it comes to herpetofauna, since 4.1% and 9.2%, respectively, of Brazilian amphibians and reptiles are endangered. The aim of this study is to identify the composition of the herpetofauna occurring in the Northwest Amazonian state of Maranhão, with a focus on the Gurupi Biological Reserve and surrounding areas. Samples were collected between May 2012 and October 2013 (18 months), through pitfall traps, time constrained active search, and opportunistic encounters, and these records were supplemented by specimens collected by third parties and by bibliographic records. A total of 131 species were recorded: 31 species of amphibians and 100 species of reptiles (six testudines, 30 lizards, two amphisbaenas, 60 snakes and two alligators), including some species new to the state of Maranhão and the northeast region of Brazil. This inventory contributes to the knowledge of the herpetofauna for the Belém Endemism Center, the most devastated region of the Brazilian Amazon, and considered poorly sampled.

  10. Ecological opportunities, habitat, and past climatic fluctuations influenced the diversification of modern turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Fabrício Mota; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola

    2016-08-01

    Habitat may be viewed as an important life history component potentially related to diversification patterns. However, differences in diversification rates between aquatic and terrestrial realms are still poorly explored. Testudines is a group distributed worldwide that lives in aquatic and terrestrial environments, but until now no-one has evaluated the diversification history of the group as a whole. We aim here to investigate the diversification history of turtles and to test if habitat influenced speciation rate in these animals. We reconstructed the phylogeny of the modern species of chelonians and estimated node divergence dates using molecular markers and a Bayesian approach. Then, we used Bayesian Analyses of Macroevolutionary Mixtures to evaluate the diversification history of turtles and evaluate the effect of habitat on this pattern. Our reconstructed phylogeny covered 300 species (87% of the total diversity of the group). We found that the emydid subfamily Deirochelyinae, which forms the turtle hotspot in south-eastern United States, had an increase in its speciation rate, and that Galapagos tortoises had similar increases. Current speciation rates are lower in terrestrial turtles, contradicting studies supporting the idea terrestrial animals diversify more than aquatic species. Our results suggest that habitat, ecological opportunities, island invasions, and climatic factors are important drivers of diversification in modern turtles and reinforce the importance of habitat as a diversification driver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Asociacion faunistica de vertebrados mesozoicos de la localidad de Galve (Teruel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez Hemández, B.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Sediments of Tithonian-Barremian of Iberian Basin in the surroundings of Galve (Teniel, Spain have a high content of vertebrate's remains. These ones have been studied since s. XX until today by different scientists. More than ninety taxons have been mentioned in these papers, distributed in Hybodontiformes, Squalomorpha, Batoidea, Rajiforms, Amphibia, Reptilia (Chelonia, Sauria, Crocodylia, Pterosauria, Ornithischia, Saurischia and Marnmalia.Los sedimentos del Tithónico-Barremiense de la Cuenca Ibérica aflorantes en los alrededores de la localidad de Galve (Teniel, son particularmente ricos en restos de vertebrados mesozoicos. Estos han sido estudiados por diferentes autores, desde principios del siglo xx hasta la actualidad. El objetivo del presente artículo es recopilar los distintos taxones que han sido citados para esta área, a lo largo del tiempo, recogiéndose más de noventa taxones distribuidos entre Hybodontiformes, Squalomorpha, Batoidea, Rajiformes, Amphibia, Reptilia (Testudines, Sauria, Crocodilia, Pterosauria, Ornithischia, Saurischia y Mammalia.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  13. Sex Reversal in Reptiles: Reproductive Oddity or Powerful Driver of Evolutionary Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; Sarre, Stephen D; O'Meally, Denis; Georges, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Is sex a product of genes, the environment, or both? In this review, we describe the diversity of sex-determining mechanisms in reptiles, with a focus on systems that display gene-environment interactions. We summarise the field and laboratory-based evidence for the occurrence of environmental sex reversal in reptiles and ask whether this is a widespread evolutionary mechanism affecting the evolution of sex chromosomes and speciation in vertebrates. Sex determination systems exist across a continuum of genetic and environmental influences, blurring the lines between what was once considered a strict dichotomy between genetic sex determination and temperature-dependent sex determination. Across this spectrum, we identify the potential for sex reversal in species with clearly differentiated heteromorphic sex chromosomes (Pogona vitticeps, Bassiana duperreyi, Eremias multiocellata, Gekko japonicus), weakly differentiated homomorphic sex chromosomes (Niveoscincus ocellatus), and species with only a weak heritable predisposition for sex (Emys orbicularis, Trachemys scripta). We argue that sex reversal is widespread in reptiles (Testudines, Lacertidae, Agamidae, Scincidae, Gekkonidae) and has the potential to have an impact on individual fitness, resulting in reproductively, morphologically, and behaviourally unique phenotypes. Sex reversal is likely to be a powerful evolutionary force responsible for generating and maintaining lability and diversity in reptile sex-determining modes. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M.; Raza, Sarah; O’Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population. PMID:27144443

  15. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarata, Troy; Howard, Alexis; Elsey, Ruth M; Raza, Sarah; O'Connor, Alice; Beatty, Brian; Conrad, Jack; Solounias, Nikos; Chow, Priscilla; Mukta, Saima; Vasilyev, Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    New nephron formation (nephrogenesis) ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds) and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles) may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates) showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  16. Homeotic shift at the dawn of the turtle evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygielski, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    All derived turtles are characterized by one of the strongest reductions of the dorsal elements among Amniota, and have only 10 dorsal and eight cervical vertebrae. I demonstrate that the Late Triassic turtles, which represent successive stages of the shell evolution, indicate that the shift of the boundary between the cervical and dorsal sections of the vertebral column occurred over the course of several million years after the formation of complete carapace. The more generalized reptilian formula of at most seven cervicals and at least 11 dorsals is thus plesiomorphic for Testudinata. The morphological modifications associated with an anterior homeotic change of the first dorsal vertebra towards the last cervical vertebra in the Triassic turtles are partially recapitulated by the reduction of the first dorsal vertebra in crown-group Testudines, and they resemble the morphologies observed under laboratory conditions resulting from the experimental changes of Hox gene expression patterns. This homeotic shift hypothesis is supported by the, unique to turtles, restriction of Hox-5 expression domains, somitic precursors of scapula, and brachial plexus branches to the cervical region, by the number of the marginal scute-forming placodes, which was larger in the Triassic than in modern turtles, and by phylogenetic analyses.

  17. The girdles of the oldest fossil turtle, Proterochersis robusta, and the age of the turtle crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Schoch, Rainer R; Lyson, Tyler R

    2013-12-06

    Proterochersis robusta from the Late Triassic (Middle Norian) of Germany is the oldest known fossil turtle (i.e. amniote with a fully formed turtle shell), but little is known about its anatomy. A newly prepared, historic specimen provides novel insights into the morphology of the girdles and vertebral column of this taxon and the opportunity to reassess its phylogenetic position. The anatomy of the pectoral girdle of P. robusta is similar to that of other primitive turtles, including the Late Triassic (Carnian) Proganochelys quenstedti, in having a vertically oriented scapula, a large coracoid foramen, a short acromion process, and bony ridges that connect the acromion process with the dorsal process, glenoid, and coracoid, and by being able to rotate along a vertical axis. The pelvic elements are expanded distally and suturally attached to the shell, but in contrast to modern pleurodiran turtles the pelvis is associated with the sacral ribs. The primary homology of the character "sutured pelvis" is unproblematic between P. robusta and extant pleurodires. However, integration of all new observations into the most complete phylogenetic analysis that support the pleurodiran nature of P. robusta reveals that this taxon is more parsimoniously placed along the phylogenetic stem of crown Testudines. All current phylogenetic hypotheses therefore support the basal placement of this taxon, imply that the sutured pelvis of this taxon developed independently from that of pleurodires, and conclude that the age of the turtle crown is Middle Jurassic.

  18. Flipper-driven terrestrial locomotion of a sea turtle-inspired robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazouchova, Nicole; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Goldman, Daniel I

    2013-01-01

    To discover principles of flipper-based terrestrial locomotion we study the mechanics of a hatchling sea turtle-inspired robot, FlipperBot (FBot), during quasi-static movement on granular media. FBot implements a symmetric gait using two servo-motor-driven front limbs with flat-plate flippers and either freely rotating or fixed wrist joints. For a range of gaits, FBot moves with a constant step length. However, for gaits with sufficiently shallow flipper penetration or sufficiently large stroke, per step displacement decreases with each successive step resulting in failure (zero forward displacement) within a few steps. For the fixed wrist, failure occurs when FBot interacts with ground disturbed during previous steps, and measurements reveal that flipper generated forces decrease as per step displacement decreases. The biologically inspired free wrist is less prone to failure, but slip-induced failure can still occur if FBot pitches forward and drives its leading edge into the substrate. In the constant step length regime, kinematic and force-based models accurately predict FBot's motion for free and fixed wrist configurations, respectively. When combined with independent force measurements, models and experiments provide insight into how disturbed ground leads to locomotory failure and help explain differences in hatchling sea turtle performance. (paper)

  19. Effects of incubation temperature on growth and performance of the veiled chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Robin M

    2008-10-01

    I evaluated the effect of incubation temperature on phenotypes of the veiled chameleon, Chamaeleo calyptratus. I chose this species for study because its large clutch size (30-40 eggs or more) allows replication within clutches both within and among experimental treatments. The major research objectives were (1) to assess the effect of constant low, moderate, and high temperatures on embryonic development, (2) to determine whether the best incubation temperature for embryonic development also produced the "best" hatchlings, and (3) to determine how a change in incubation temperature during mid-development would affect phenotype. To meet these objectives, I established five experimental temperature regimes and determined egg survival and incubation length and measured body size and shape, selected body temperatures, and locomotory performance of lizards at regular intervals from hatching to 90 d, or just before sexual maturity. Incubation temperature affected the length of incubation, egg survival, and body mass, but did not affect sprint speed or selected body temperature although selected body temperature affected growth in mass independently of treatment and clutch. Incubation at moderate temperatures provided the best conditions for both embryonic and post-hatching development. The highest incubation temperatures were disruptive to development; eggs had high mortality, developmental rate was low, and hatchlings grew slowly. Changes in temperature during incubation increased the among-clutch variance in incubation length relative to that of constant temperature treatments. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Development of a meridic diet for Hylobius transversovittatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and the role of carbohydrates in feeding, growth, and survival of larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomic-Carruthers, Nada

    2007-08-01

    The root-feeding weevil Hylobius transversovittatus Goeze (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is used for biological control of the invasive plant purple loosestrife, Luthrum salicaria L. (Lythraceae). A simple rearing system for this weevil was developed with the goals of improving production techniques and increasing the availability of insects for field introduction. Additionally, the dietary effects of digestible and indigestible carbohydrates were explored. A meridic diet for rearing H. transversovittatus was formulated through nutritional alterations of a boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, diet. Diet attractiveness was evaluated on two levels: first, by recording the incidence of initial tunneling, and second, by estimating the larval establishment rate. The performance of test diet formulations was further assessed by measuring developmental and survival rates of H. transversovittatus. Sucrose, starch, and three types of indigestible carbohydrates were tested as components to improve diet performance. Physical properties of the diet, modified by fillers in test formulations, produced major effects on the initial tunneling of hatchlings. The establishment of hatchlings was affected by chemical properties of the diet. Increases in sucrose concentration decreased larval establishment, decreased the rate of larval development, and decreased larval survival. However, omitting sucrose from the diet, or replacing it with starch, increased mortality of first instars. In advanced stages of larval development, omitting sucrose from the diet did not significantly affect larval survival. The developmental rate of larvae was increased when the amount of digestible carbohydrate was reduced. To date, seven generations of the univoltine H. transversovittatus have been successfully produced on this new meridic diet.

  1. The good, the bad, and the ugly: agonistic behaviour in juvenile crocodilians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Brien

    Full Text Available We examined agonistic behaviour in seven species of hatchling and juvenile crocodilians held in small groups (N = 4 under similar laboratory conditions. Agonistic interactions occurred in all seven species, typically involved two individuals, were short in duration (5-15 seconds, and occurred between 1600-2200 h in open water. The nature and extent of agonistic interactions, the behaviours displayed, and the level of conspecific tolerance varied among species. Discrete postures, non-contact and contact movements are described. Three of these were species-specific: push downs by C. johnstoni; inflated tail sweeping by C. novaeguineae; and, side head striking combined with tail wagging by C. porosus. The two long-snouted species (C. johnstoni and G. gangeticus avoided contact involving the head and often raised the head up out of the way during agonistic interactions. Several behaviours not associated with aggression are also described, including snout rubbing, raising the head up high while at rest, and the use of vocalizations. The two most aggressive species (C. porosus, C. novaeguineae appeared to form dominance hierarchies, whereas the less aggressive species did not. Interspecific differences in agonistic behaviour may reflect evolutionary divergence associated with morphology, ecology, general life history and responses to interspecific conflict in areas where multiple species have co-existed. Understanding species-specific traits in agonistic behaviour and social tolerance has implications for the controlled raising of different species of hatchlings for conservation, management or production purposes.

  2. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Kathleen M. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY),Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26°C and downshifted 30-26-30°C) and females (constant 30°C and upshifted 26-30-26°C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26°C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30°C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26°C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30°C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25°C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30°C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  3. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  4. Lipid metabolism during embryonic development of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawniczak, Cynthia J; Teece, Mark A

    2009-05-01

    The metabolism of lipids and fatty acids during embryonic development of Chelydra serpentina (common snapping turtle) was investigated. Substantial changes in lipid class and fatty acid composition occurred as lipids were transferred from the yolk to the yolk sac membrane (YSM) and then to the brain, eyes, heart, and lungs of the hatchling. Lipids were hydrolyzed in the yolk prior to transport to the YSM, shown by a large increase in free fatty acids (FFAs) during the second half of development. Triglyceride-derived docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was utilized preferentially to phospholipid-derived DHA. In the YSM, arachidonic acid (ARA) was selectively incorporated into phospholipids while DHA was preferentially incorporated into triglycerides. Selective incorporation of DHA and ARA into the brain and eyes, and ARA into the heart was observed, indicating the importance of these PUFAs for organ development and function. The amount of DHA and ARA in each organ was less than 1% of that measured in the yolk of the freshly laid egg, indicating that only a small portion of yolk PUFAs were incorporated into the hatchling organs studied. We discuss the differences in the mechanisms and utilization of yolk lipids in turtles compared with lipid uptake during embryonic development in birds.

  5. Meeting embryonic requirements of broilers throughout incubation: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Molenaar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available During incubation of chicken embryos, environmental conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity, and CO2 concentration, must be controlled to meet embryonic requirements that change during the different phases of embryonic development. In the current review, the effects of embryo temperature, egg weight loss, and CO2 concentration on hatchability, hatchling quality, and subsequent performance are discussed from an embryonic point of view. In addition, new insights related to the incubation process are described. Several studies have shown that a constant eggshell temperature (EST of 37.5 to 38.0°C throughout incubation results in the highest hatchability, hatchling quality, and subsequent performance. Egg weight loss must be between 6.5 and 14.0% of the initial egg weight, to obtain an adequate air cell size before the embryo internally pips. An increased CO2 concentration during the developmental phase of incubation (first 10 days can accelerate embryonic development and hatchability, but the physiological mechanisms of this acceleration are not completely understood. Effects of ar increased CO2 concentration during late incubation also need further investigation. The preincubation warming profile, thermal manipulation, and in ovo feeding are new insights related to the incubation process and show that the optimal situation for the embryo during incubation highly depends on the conditions of the eggs before (storage duration and during incubation (environmental conditions and on the conditions of the chickens after hatching (environmental temperature.

  6. Effect of copper nanoparticles on metabolic rate and development of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineda, Lane Manalili; Sawosz, E.; Vadalasetty, K. P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of an in ovo injection of CuNano and the timing of injection on metabolic rate (O consumption and heat production, HP) and development of layer hatchlings. On day 1 of incubation, 192 fertile eggs from 29-week-old Lohmann breeder strain...... weights were used as a measure of hatchling development. In ovo injection of CuNano on different days during incubation significantly decreased O consumption and HP compared with the control group. The residual yolk sac weight in the treated groups was significantly higher than in the control group (P0.......05). Furthermore, the plasma concentrations of IgM and IgG and the mRNA expression of NF-kB and TNF-α were not affected (both; P>0.05), indicating the absence of inflammatory modulation by CuNano. These preliminary results demonstrated that CuNano, regardless of the day of injection, altered the metabolic rate...

  7. Comparative kinetics of sup 47 Ca, sup 85 Sr and sup 226 Ra in the freshwater turtle, Trachemys scripta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, T.G. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States) Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Whicker, F.W.; Ibrahim, S.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Pinder, J.E. III (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of {sup 47}Ca, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 226}Ra were compared in the yellow-bellied slider, a common freshwater turtle of the southeastern USA. The absorption and elimination processes were examined as a function of stable dietary Ca, season, age and sex of the animals. Turtles were gavaged with radionuclides and serial whole-body analyses were performed on the live animals for up to 480 days. Only in the juvenile age class did reduced dietary Ca cause a significant increase in {sup 85}Sr absorption. The absorption of {sup 85}Sr and {sup 226}Ra in the adult male, adult female and hatchling groups was unaffected by dietary Ca. Mean absorption was greater than that which has been reported for other organisms and significantly differed among isotopes. The high absorption values were not restricted to immatures, but continued into maturity. Elimination rates were not affected by the dietary treatment, nor were isotopic differences in elimination observed. Annual mean elimination rate constants pooled among animal groups, were 0.22 {+-} 0.07 for {sup 85}Sr and 0.26 {+-} 0.18 for {sup 226}Ra. Retention was strongly affected by season with the greatest elimination occurring in the summer and declining to levels that were not distinguishable from zero in the winter. Elimination rate constants for hatchlings were greater than for the other age groups. (author).

  8. Comparative kinetics of 47Ca, 85Sr and 226Ra in the freshwater turtle, Trachemys scripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinton, T.G.; Whicker, F.W.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Pinder, J.E. III

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of 47 Ca, 85 Sr and 226 Ra were compared in the yellow-bellied slider, a common freshwater turtle of the southeastern USA. The absorption and elimination processes were examined as a function of stable dietary Ca, season, age and sex of the animals. Turtles were gavaged with radionuclides and serial whole-body analyses were performed on the live animals for up to 480 days. Only in the juvenile age class did reduced dietary Ca cause a significant increase in 85 Sr absorption. The absorption of 85 Sr and 226 Ra in the adult male, adult female and hatchling groups was unaffected by dietary Ca. Mean absorption was greater than that which has been reported for other organisms and significantly differed among isotopes. The high absorption values were not restricted to immatures, but continued into maturity. Elimination rates were not affected by the dietary treatment, nor were isotopic differences in elimination observed. Annual mean elimination rate constants pooled among animal groups, were 0.22 ± 0.07 for 85 Sr and 0.26 ± 0.18 for 226 Ra. Retention was strongly affected by season with the greatest elimination occurring in the summer and declining to levels that were not distinguishable from zero in the winter. Elimination rate constants for hatchlings were greater than for the other age groups. (author)

  9. Nesting Activity of Loggerhead Turtles (Caretta caretta at Göksu Delta, Turkey during 2004 and 2008 nesting seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih H. Durmus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Göksu Delta is one of the most important nesting beaches in Turkey for the endangered loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta. This paper provides information on the nesting activities of loggerhead turtles, the spatial and temporal distribution of nesting, nesting success, nesting density, hatching success, incubation duration and clutch size over two nesting seasons. A total of 902 emergences occurred over two seasons, of which 239 (26.5% nests were deposited (137 nests in 2004 and 102 nests in 2008 and the overall mean nesting density was 3.4 nests/km. The peak of nesting emergences takes place mainly in June. Of the overall nests, 226 (94.6% were excavated and 16044 eggs were counted. Of these eggs, 3680 (22.9% hatchlings emerged and 2695 (73.2% of hatchlings of them were able to reach the sea. The mean number of eggs per clutch was 71 (range: 15 – 143. The shortest and longest incubation duration in these 2 seasons ranged from 46 to 62 days with a mean of 53 days. The main problems are negatively affecting loggerhead turtle population at Göksu Delta are dense jackal predation both adult and eggs and inundation in nests. The average nesting effort here (mean: 119.5 nests/season confirms that Göksu Delta is one of the most important nesting sites for loggerhead turtles in Turkey.

  10. Seasonal change in the capacity for supercooling by neonatal painted turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, G C; Packard, M J; McDaniel, L L

    2001-05-01

    Hatchlings of the North American painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) typically spend their first winter of life inside the shallow, subterranean nest where they completed incubation the preceding summer. This facet of their natural history commonly causes neonates in northerly populations to be exposed in mid-winter to ice and cold, which many animals survive by remaining unfrozen and supercooled. We measured the limit of supercooling in samples of turtles taken shortly after hatching and in other samples after 2 months of acclimation (or acclimatization) to a reduced temperature in the laboratory or field. Animals initially had only a limited capacity for supercooling, but they acquired an ability to undergo deeper supercooling during the course of acclimation. The gut of most turtles was packed with particles of soil and eggshell shortly after hatching, but not after acclimation. Thus, the relatively high limit of supercooling for turtles in the days immediately after hatching may have resulted from the ingestion of soil (and associated nucleating agents) by the animals as they were freeing themselves from their eggshell, whereas the relatively low limit of supercooling attained by acclimated turtles may have resulted from their purging their gut of its contents. Parallels may, therefore, exist between the natural-history strategy expressed by hatchling painted turtles and that expressed by numerous terrestrial arthropods that withstand the cold of winter by sustaining a state of supercooling.

  11. Metal stress in zooplankton diapause production: post-hatching response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aránguiz-Acuña, Adriana; Pérez-Portilla, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Aquatic organisms commonly respond to harsh conditions by forming diapausing stages, which enable populations to survive adverse periods forming egg banks. Production of diapausing eggs is frequently observed in monogonont rotifers, previously changing from asexual to partial sexual reproduction (mixis). In despite that zooplankton are frequently used in ecotoxicological assessment because of their sensitivity to various toxicants and their important role in the ecosystems, toxicity evaluations often consider the directly exposed population produced by parthenogenetic reproduction, exclusively. We assessed experimentally effects of exposure to metals on mixis delay and fitness of hatchlings of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis obtained from a brackish water lagoon with high metal content, especially copper. We show that sub-lethal concentrations of copper affected traits related to sexual reproduction and diapausing egg production in the rotifer. Copper addition did not delay the start of mixis, suggesting that rapid initiation of mixis is promoted in risky environments, according to the hypothesis of mixis as an escape strategy. Higher investment in mixis was obtained when individuals were exposed to metal. Addition of copper negatively affected the hatching success of diapausing eggs and performance of hatchlings. Nevertheless, these effects were greater for individuals formed in non-metal conditions, suggesting an adaptive advantage of populations from natural sediments exposed to copper. These results highlight the ecological and evolutionary consequences of the presence of metals in freshwater environments by modulating diapause adaptive efficacy and the selective process in egg banks.

  12. Transgenerational endpoints provide increased sensitivity and insight into multigenerational responses of Lymnaea stagnalis exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reátegui-Zirena, Evelyn G; Fidder, Bridgette N; Olson, Adric D; Dawson, Daniel E; Bilbo, Thomas R; Salice, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Ecotoxicology provides data to inform environmental management. Many testing protocols do not consider offspring fitness and toxicant sensitivity. Cadmium (Cd) is a well-studied and ubiquitous toxicant but little is known about the effects on offspring of exposed parents (transgenerational effects). This study had three objectives: to identify endpoints related to offspring performance; to determine whether parental effects would manifest as a change in Cd tolerance in offspring and how parental exposure duration influenced the manifestation of parental effects. Adult snails were exposed to Cd 0, 25, 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg Cd/L for eight weeks. There were effects on adult endpoints (e.g., growth, reproduction) but only at the highest concentrations (>100 μg/L). Alternatively, we observed significant transgenerational effects at all Cd concentrations. Surprisingly, we found increased Cd tolerance in hatchlings from all parental Cd exposure concentrations even though eggs and hatchlings were in Cd-free conditions for 6 weeks. Explicit consideration of offspring performance adds value to current toxicity testing protocols. Parental exposure duration has important implications for offspring effects and that contaminant concentrations that are not directly toxic to parents can cause transgenerational changes in resistance that have significant implications for toxicity testing and adaptive responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Captive breeding of the barndoor skate (Dipturus laevis) at the Montreal Biodome, with comparison notes on two other captive-bred skate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Serge; Pépin, Serge; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Misserey, Laurent; Rojas, Salvador

    2008-03-01

    In 1997, the Montreal Biodome obtained five barndoor skates (Dipturus laevis) from the waters off Boston, Massachusetts. Six years later, those specimens began reproducing, and the first egg case was collected in November 2003. Since then, 73 hatchlings have been born and raised. Egg cases were observed year round, and annual fecundity was measured for the first time: one female laid 69 eggs in 2005, 85 in 2006 and 115 in 2007. Egg incubation was longer than believed previously, ranging from 342 to 494 days. Hatching occurred throughout the year. Hatchlings averaged 193 mm total length and 128 mm disk width and weighed 32 g. They were fed krill and diced fish. All but one survived the first month. A photo identification system was useful in recognizing two groups of 10 specimens during their first year, and transponders could be inserted in the wing muscles of 1-year-old skates. Total lengths at birth and at age 2 were similar to the data reported from the wild, suggesting a similar growth pattern in captivity. The reproduction characteristics of the barndoor skate were compared with those of two other skate species currently bred at the Montreal Biodome, the winter skate (Leucoraja ocellata) and the thorny skate (Amblyraja radiata). Zoo Biol 27:145-153, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Effects of absolute fasting on reproduction and survival of the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata in its native range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburi, Nicolás E; Martín, Pablo R

    2016-08-01

    A South American freshwater gastropod, the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata, has become a driver of ecosystemic changes in wetlands and an important rice pest after its introduction to various parts of the world, mainly Asia. The objective of this study was to study the effect of an abrupt interruption in food availability in the short term (up to 4 weeks) and long term (up to 8 months) on survival and reproductive activity. The main results indicate that short-term fasting mainly affects the survival of males, but only when they are raised together with females, probably due to a greater mate-searching activity that increases mortality in the individuals with lower reserves. The number of copulating snails or egg-laying females shows an abrupt drop when fasting and a rapid recovery after the food supply is restored. The strategy of discontinuing reproductive activity prioritizes energy conservation for the survival of the females. Interpopulation variation in resistance to starvation was observed in adults, which can be explained to some extent by the food availability that they experienced in their natural environment. No interpopulational differences in survival were seen in hatchlings. The mean maximum values of survival under starvation were 52.6 days in hatchlings and the 3.3% of adults survive over than 200 days, which may be a relevant trait in dispersal and establishment in new habitats.

  15. Projected response of an endangered marine turtle population to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Vincent S.; Stock, Charles A.; Spotila, James R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Tomillo, Pilar Santidrián

    2012-11-01

    Assessing the potential impacts of climate change on individual species and populations is essential for the stewardship of ecosystems and biodiversity. Critically endangered leatherback turtles in the eastern Pacific Ocean are excellent candidates for such an assessment because their sensitivity to contemporary climate variability has been substantially studied. If incidental fisheries mortality is eliminated, this population still faces the challenge of recovery in a rapidly changing climate. Here we combined an Earth system model, climate model projections assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and a population dynamics model to estimate a 7% per decade decline in the Costa Rica nesting population over the twenty-first century. Whereas changes in ocean conditions had a small effect on the population, the ~2.5°C warming of the nesting beach was the primary driver of the decline through reduced hatching success and hatchling emergence rate. Hatchling sex ratio did not substantially change. Adjusting nesting phenology or changing nesting sites may not entirely prevent the decline, but could offset the decline rate. However, if future observations show a long-term decline in hatching success and emergence rate, anthropogenic climate mitigation of nests (for example, shading, irrigation) may be able to preserve the nesting population.

  16. Evolutionary implications of a high selfing rate in the freshwater snail Lymnaea truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouvé, S; Degen, L; Renaud, F; Goudet, J

    2003-10-01

    Self-compatible hermaphroditic organisms that mix self-fertilization and outcrossing are of great interest for investigating the evolution of mating systems. We investigate the evolution of selfing in Lymnaea truncatula, a self-compatible hermaphroditic freshwater snail. We first analyze the consequences of selfing in terms of genetic variability within and among populations and then investigate how these consequences along with the species ecology (harshness of the habitat and parasitism) might govern the evolution of selfing. Snails from 13 localities (classified as temporary or permanent depending on their water availability) were sampled in western Switzerland and genotyped for seven microsatellite loci. F(IS) (estimated on adults) and progeny array analyses (on hatchlings) provided similar selfing rate estimates of 80%. Populations presented a low polymorphism and were highly differentiated (F(ST) = 0.58). Although the reproductive assurance hypothesis would predict higher selfing rate in temporary populations, no difference in selfing level was observed between temporary and permanent populations. However, allelic richness and gene diversity declined in temporary habitats, presumably reflecting drift. Infection levels varied but were not simply related to either estimated population selfing rate or to differences in heterozygosity. These findings and the similar selfing rates estimated for hatchlings and adults suggest that within-population inbreeding depression is low in L. truncatula.

  17. Calcium provision to oviparous and viviparous embryos of the reproductively bimodal lizard Lacerta (Zootoca) vivipara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James R; Ecay, Tom W; Heulin, Benoit

    2009-08-01

    Embryos of oviparous squamate reptiles typically obtain calcium from both yolk and eggshell but differ from other oviparous amniotes (turtles, birds and crocodilians) because they are heavily dependent on calcium-rich yolk. Eggs of viviparous squamates lack calcareous eggshells, and embryos receive calcium solely from yolk or from both yolk and placenta. The pattern of calcium mobilization by amniote embryos has been predicted to influence the evolution of viviparity if embryos are dependent on calcium from the eggshell and calcium placentotrophy evolves subsequent to viviparity. We studied the pattern of maternal provision and embryonic utilization of calcium of an oviparous and a viviparous population of the reproductively bimodal lizard Lacerta vivipara to test the hypotheses: (1) oviparous embryos are not dependent on eggshell calcium and (2) calcium content of viviparous hatchlings does not differ from oviparous hatchlings. Our findings do not support either of these hypotheses because oviparous females oviposited eggs with heavily calcified shells and calcium-poor yolk, and embryonic mobilization of shell calcium was greater than for other oviparous squamates. The calcium content of yolk from viviparous females did not differ from oviparous yolk, but viviparous eggs lacked calcareous eggshells. Uterine secretion by viviparous females compensated for the low calcium content of yolk, and placental calcium transfer was among the highest recorded for squamates. The pattern of calcium provision in these two populations suggests that dependence on uterine calcium, either stored temporarily in an eggshell or transferred directly across a placenta, did not constrain the evolution of reproductive mode in this lineage.

  18. Estudios adicionales sobre los Crocodylia y Testudinata del Alto Caquetá y Río Caguán Estudios adicionales sobre los Crocodylia y Testudinata del Alto Caquetá y Río Caguán

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    Medem Federico

    1969-06-01

    sospechabaanteriormente. Additional studies on reproduction of the Spectacled Caiman (Caiman sclerops, two Side-neck Turtles (Podocnemis expansa, Podocnemis anifilis and one Snake-neck Turtle (Phrynops geoffroanus tuberosus have been carried out in the Upper Caquetá and its tributary, río Caguán, which belong to the Colombian Amazon Basin.  Moreover, it had been found, that the Matamatá (Chelus fimbriatus] belongs to the native faunistic elements of the Upper Caquetá, and was not introduced from other rivers or its lower course, as formerly suspected.  The main results are the following: 1 Caiman sclerops. Eggs. Measurements: From 67.0 : 41.5 mm. to 73.5 : 41.0 mm, Hatchlings. Total length: Between 239.5 mm. and 255.5 mm. Weight: From 32 g, 250 mg. to 47 g. 2 Podocnemis expansa. Originally not native to Upper Caquetá, but introduced as hatchlings from its lower course and río Putumayo in 1940, 1943 and 1955; actually already reproducing. Eggs. Measurements: Between 44.5 : 36.5 mm. and 48.5 : 45.5 mm, Weight: 34 g, 350 mg. and 44 g, 300 mg. Hatchlings. Measurements (Carapace Length : Between 39.5 mm, and 45.0 mm. Weight: 17 g, 300 mg. and 20 g. 3 Podocnemis unifilis. Eggs. Measurements: Between 41.0 : 28.5 mm. and 51.0 : 33.5 mm. Weight: 15 g. to 31 g. Hatchlings. Measurements: Between 34.0 mm, and 48.0 mm, Weight: 8 g, 750 mg. to 21 g, 100 mg. The nests are between 180 mm. and 210 mm, deep and contain normally from 14 to 27 eggs; the first hatchlings are found in 80 mm. to 150 mm, depth.  4 Light seems to be the main factor for the orientation of hatchlings to find their way in direction to the water; they develop a considerable speed, needing only 25 minutes to cover the distance of 96 meters from the nest to the river shore; here they do not remain in shallow water, but rather dive immediately in direction to the depth of rivers and lakes, evidently seeking for better protection against their natural enemies, even fishes, in the muddy and dark waters. 5 Phrynops geoffroanus

  19. The platelet-derived growth factor signaling system in snapping turtle embryos, Chelydra serpentina: potential role in temperature-dependent sex determination and testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhen, Turk; Jangula, Adam; Schroeder, Anthony; Woodward-Bosh, Rikki

    2009-05-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (Pdgf) signaling system is known to play a significant role during embryonic and postnatal development of testes in mammals and birds. In contrast, genes that comprise the Pdgf system in reptiles have never been cloned or studied in any tissue, let alone developing gonads. To explore the potential role of PDGF ligands and their receptors during embryogenesis, we cloned cDNA fragments of Pdgf-A, Pdgf-B, and receptors PdgfR-alpha and PdgfR-beta in the snapping turtle, a reptile with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). We then compared gene expression profiles in gonads from embryos incubated at a male-producing temperature to those from embryos at a female-producing temperature, as well as between hatchling testes and ovaries. Expression of Pdgf-B mRNA in embryonic gonads was significantly higher at a male temperature than at a female temperature, but there was no difference between hatchling testes and ovaries. This developmental pattern was reversed for Pdgf-A and PdgfR-alpha mRNA: expression of these genes did not differ in embryos, but diverged in hatchling testes and ovaries. Levels of PdgfR-beta mRNA in embryonic gonads were not affected by temperature and did not differ between testes and ovaries. However, expression of both receptors increased at least an order of magnitude from the embryonic to the post-hatching period. Finally, we characterized expression of these genes in several other embryonic tissues. The brain, heart, and liver displayed unique expression patterns that distinguished these tissues from each other and from intestine, lung, and muscle. Incubation temperature had a significant effect on expression of PdgfR-alpha and PdgfR-beta in the heart but not other tissues. Together, these findings demonstrate that temperature has tissue specific effects on the Pdgf system and suggest that Pdgf signaling is involved in sex determination and the ensuing differentiation of testes in the snapping turtle.

  20. Life histories and conservation of long-lived reptiles, an illustration with the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs-Gonzalez, Venetia; Bonefant, Christophe; Basille, Mathieu; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Beauchamp, Jeff; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    Successful species conservation is dependent on adequate estimates of population dynamics, but age-specific demographics are generally lacking for many long-lived iteroparous species such as large reptiles. Accurate demographic information allows estimation of population growth rate, as well as projection of future population sizes and quantitative analyses of fitness trade-offs involved in the evolution of life-history strategies.Here, a long-term capture–recapture study was conducted from 1978 to 2014 on the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) in southern Florida. Over the study period, 7,427 hatchlings were marked and 380 individuals were recaptured for as many as 25 years. We estimated survival to be strongly age dependent with hatchlings having the lowest survival rates (16%) but increasing to nearly 90% at adulthood based on mark–recapture models. More than 5% of the female population were predicted to be reproductive by age 8 years; the age-specific proportion of reproductive females steadily increased until age 18 when more than 95% of females were predicted to be reproductive. Population growth rate, estimated from a Leslie–Lefkovitch stage-class model, showed a positive annual growth rate of 4% over the study period.Using a prospective sensitivity analysis, we revealed that the adult stage, as expected, was the most critical stage for population growth rate; however, the survival of younger crocodiles before they became reproductive also had a surprisingly high elasticity. We found that variation in age-specific fecundity has very limited impact on population growth rate in American crocodiles.We used a comparative approach to show that the original life-history strategy of American crocodiles is actually shared by other large, long-lived reptiles: while adult survival rates always have a large impact on population growth, this decreases with declining increasing growth rates, in favour of a higher elasticity of the juvenile stage.Crocodiles, as

  1. Acute and persistent effects of pre- and posthatching thermal environments on growth and metabolism in the red-eared slider turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, Day B; Peterson, Charles C; Lovern, Matthew B

    2012-04-01

    Many ectotherms possess the capacity to survive a wide range of thermal conditions. Long-term exposure to temperature can induce acclimational and/or organizational effects, and the developmental stage at which temperature exposure occurs may affect the type, degree, and persistence of these effects. We incubated red-eared slider turtle embryos at three different constant temperatures (T(inc); 26.5, 28.5, 30.5°C), then divided the resulting hatchlings between two water temperatures (T(water); 25, 30°C). We calculated growth rates to assess the short- and long-term effects of thermal experience on this metabolically costly process. We also measured resting metabolic rate (RMR) at three body temperatures (T(body;) 26.5, 28.5, 30.5°C) shortly after hatching and 6 months posthatching to characterize the degree and persistence of acclimation to T(inc) and T(water) . Hatchling RMRs were affected by T(body) and T(inc) , and fit a pattern consistent with positive but incomplete metabolic compensation to T(inc) . Average growth rates over the first 11 weeks posthatching were strongly affected by T(water) but only marginally influenced by T(inc) , and only at T(water) = 30°C. Six-month RMRs exhibited strong acclimation to T(water) consistent with positive metabolic compensation. However, within each T(water) treatment, RMR fit patterns indicative of inverse metabolic compensation to T(inc) , opposite of the pattern observed in hatchlings. Average growth rates calculated over 6 months continued to show a strong effect of T(water) , and the previously weak effect of T(inc) observed within the 30°C T(water) treatment became more pronounced. Our results suggest that metabolic compensation was reversible regardless of the life stage during which exposure occurred, and therefore is more appropriately considered acclimational than organizational. © 2012 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  2. The Evolution of Diapsid Reproductive Strategy with Inferences about Extinct Taxa.

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    Jason R Moore

    Full Text Available Diapsids show an extremely wide range of reproductive strategies. Offspring may receive no parental care, care from only one sex, care from both parents, or care under more complex regimes. Young may vary from independent, super-precocial hatchlings to altricial neonates needing much care before leaving the nest. Parents can invest heavily in a few young, or less so in a larger number. Here we examine the evolution of these traits across a composite phylogeny spanning the extant diapsids and including the limited number of extinct taxa for which reproductive strategies can be well constrained. Generalized estimating equation(GEE-based phylogenetic comparative methods demonstrate the influences of body mass, parental care strategy and hatchling maturity on clutch volume across the diapsids. The influence of polygamous reproduction is not important despite a large sample size. Applying the results of these models to the dinosaurs supports the hypothesis of paternal care (male only in derived non-avian theropods, previously suggested based on simpler analyses. These data also suggest that sauropodomorphs did not care for their young. The evolution of parental-care occurs in an almost linear series of transitions. Paternal care rarely gives rise to other care strategies. Where hatchling condition changes, diapsids show an almost unidirectional tendency of evolution towards increased altriciality. Transitions to social monogamy from the ancestral state in diapsids, where both sexes are polygamous, are common. In contrast, once evolved, polygyny and polyandry are very evolutionarily stable. Polygyny and maternal care correlate, as do polyandry and paternal care. Ancestral-character estimation (ACE of these care strategies with the character transition likelihoods estimated from the original data gives good confidence at most important nodes. These analyses suggest that the basalmost diapsids had no parental care. Crocodilians independently evolved

  3. Morfologia de órgãos genitais femininos de quelônio semi-aquático Mesoclemmys vanderhaegei

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    Walkiria F. Silva

    Full Text Available RESUMO: O Mesoclemmys vanderhaegei (Testudines: Chelidae é um quelônio de água doce cuja ocorrência é descrita nas bacias dos rios Amazonas, Tocantins, Paraguai, Paraná e Uruguai. Consta na lista vermelha de espécies ameaçadas da International Union for Conservation of Nature, como espécie de baixo risco, mas que poderá se tornar ameaçada, sendo necessário a atualização de seus dados ecológicos e biológicos. Considerando que planos de manejo e conservação de espécies dependem também de vasto conhecimento sobre a biologia reprodutiva, apresentamos a primeira descrição macroscópica dos órgãos genitais de fêmeas jovens e adultas de M. vanderhaegei correlacionando esses achados ao tamanho do espécime e ao período do ano. Exemplares de M. vanderhaegei foram coletados no município de Chapada dos Guimarães, área de ampla ocorrência natural da espécie. A descrição dos órgãos genitais foi realizada a partir de 17 fêmeas fixadas em formol a 10% e dissecadas para evidenciação de particularidades relacionadas à anatomia externa e interna. Os órgãos genitais M. vanderhaegei jovens e adultas são constituídos por pares de ovários e ovidutos que desembocam dorsolateralmente na cloaca, formando junto com o ureter a papila urogenital. Os ovários são órgãos alongados, com a extremidade cranial mais larga e caudal afunilada, já os ovidutos são longos e localizados lateralmente aos ovários, sendo em adultas, muito diferenciado na sua forma e tamanho em relação ao das jovens. Em ambas faixas etárias, os órgãos genitais são sustentados por pregas de membrana celomática que emergem do teto da cavidade, constituindo os mesovário e mesoviduto. De acordo com a forma e o padrão de mucosa do oviduto em fêmeas adultas, o segmento cranial corresponde as regiões do infundíbulo e magnum, o segmento médio, ao istmo e no caudal identificam-se as regiões útero e vagina. No assoalho do urodeum aloja-se o clit

  4. First large-scale DNA barcoding assessment of reptiles in the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar, based on newly designed COI primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltán T; Sonet, Gontran; Glaw, Frank; Vences, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding of non-avian reptiles based on the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is still in a very early stage, mainly due to technical problems. Using a newly developed set of reptile-specific primers for COI we present the first comprehensive study targeting the entire reptile fauna of the fourth-largest island in the world, the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar. Representatives of the majority of Madagascan non-avian reptile species (including Squamata and Testudines) were sampled and successfully DNA barcoded. The new primer pair achieved a constantly high success rate (72.7-100%) for most squamates. More than 250 species of reptiles (out of the 393 described ones; representing around 64% of the known diversity of species) were barcoded. The average interspecific genetic distance within families ranged from a low of 13.4% in the Boidae to a high of 29.8% in the Gekkonidae. Using the average genetic divergence between sister species as a threshold, 41-48 new candidate (undescribed) species were identified. Simulations were used to evaluate the performance of DNA barcoding as a function of completeness of taxon sampling and fragment length. Compared with available multi-gene phylogenies, DNA barcoding correctly assigned most samples to species, genus and family with high confidence and the analysis of fewer taxa resulted in an increased number of well supported lineages. Shorter marker-lengths generally decreased the number of well supported nodes, but even mini-barcodes of 100 bp correctly assigned many samples to genus and family. The new protocols might help to promote DNA barcoding of reptiles and the established library of reference DNA barcodes will facilitate the molecular identification of Madagascan reptiles. Our results might be useful to easily recognize undescribed diversity (i.e. novel taxa), to resolve taxonomic problems, and to monitor the international pet trade without specialized expert knowledge.

  5. Cross-reactivity of a polyclonal antibody against Chinemys reevesii vitellogenin with the vitellogenins of other turtle species: Chelydra serpentina , Macrochelys temminckii , and Pelodiscus sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Masahiro; Tada, Noriko; Kamata, Yoichi

    2008-09-01

    Vitellogenin (VTG), a yolk-precursor protein in oviparous vertebrates, is a useful biomarker for reproductive physiology and environmental estrogenic pollution. To examine interspecific applicability of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantifying Chinemys reevesii VTG, we observed cross-reactivity between a polyclonal antibody against Chinemys reevesii VTG and the VTGs from other turtle species: Chelydra serpentina (Chelydridae), Macrochelys temminckii (Chelydridae), and Pelodiscus sinensis (Trionychidae), which are phylogenetically distant from Chinemys reevesii (Geoemydidae). The VTGs of the three species were induced by injecting estradiol 17beta into the turtles and purified by using the EDTA-MgCl(2) precipitation method. The purified VTG appeared as a 200-kDa protein in sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that the molecular mass of the VTGs of the three species was similar to that of Chinemys reevesii VTG. The purified VTGs were serially diluted (0.004-2 mug/ml) and applied to the ELISA. Although the VTGs of the two chelydrid turtles showed cross-reactivity in a concentration-dependent manner, the degree of cross-reactivity was only 22.8-41.2% (mean=30.0%) and 19.7-53.0% (mean=33.2%) for Chelydra serpentina VTG and Macrochelys temminckii VTG, respectively. The ELISA may therefore be theoretically applicable to measure relative levels of the VTGs of these two species, but the absolute concentration values may be inaccurate. Pelodiscus sinensis VTG showed almost no cross-reactivity (8.0-9.7%, mean=8.9%) at any concentration tested, thus indicating the inapplicability of the ELISA to quantify Pelodiscus sinensis VTG. There are thus limitations in extending the applicability of the ELISA across species, even within the order Testudines.

  6. Intra-genomic GC heterogeneity in sauropsids: evolutionary insights from cDNA mapping and GC3 profiling in snake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Extant sauropsids (reptiles and birds) are divided into two major lineages, the lineage of Testudines (turtles) and Archosauria (crocodilians and birds) and the lineage of Lepidosauria (tuatara, lizards, worm lizards and snakes). Karyotypes of these sauropsidan groups generally consist of macrochromosomes and microchromosomes. In chicken, microchromosomes exhibit a higher GC-content than macrochromosomes. To examine the pattern of intra-genomic GC heterogeneity in lepidosaurian genomes, we constructed a cytogenetic map of the Japanese four-striped rat snake (Elaphe quadrivirgata) with 183 cDNA clones by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and examined the correlation between the GC-content of exonic third codon positions (GC3) of the genes and the size of chromosomes on which the genes were localized. Results Although GC3 distribution of snake genes was relatively homogeneous compared with those of the other amniotes, microchromosomal genes showed significantly higher GC3 than macrochromosomal genes as in chicken. Our snake cytogenetic map also identified several conserved segments between the snake macrochromosomes and the chicken microchromosomes. Cross-species comparisons revealed that GC3 of most snake orthologs in such macrochromosomal segments were GC-poor (GC3 < 50%) whereas those of chicken orthologs in microchromosomes were relatively GC-rich (GC3 ≥ 50%). Conclusion Our results suggest that the chromosome size-dependent GC heterogeneity had already occurred before the lepidosaur-archosaur split, 275 million years ago. This character was probably present in the common ancestor of lepidosaurs and but lost in the lineage leading to Anolis during the diversification of lepidosaurs. We also identified several genes whose GC-content might have been influenced by the size of the chromosomes on which they were harbored over the course of sauropsid evolution. PMID:23140509

  7. Emendation and new species of Hapalorhynchus Stunkard, 1922 (Digenea: Schistosomatoidea) from musk turtles (Kinosternidae: Sternotherus) in Alabama and Florida rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jackson R; Halanych, Kenneth M; Arias, Cova R; Folt, Brian; Goessling, Jeffrey M; Bullard, Stephen A

    2017-12-01

    Hapalorhynchus Stunkard, 1922 is emended based on morphological study of existing museum specimens (type and voucher specimens) and newly-collected specimens infecting musk turtles (Testudines: Kinosternidae: Sternotherus spp.) from rivers in Alabama and Florida (USA). Hapalorhynchus conecuhensis n. sp. is described from an innominate musk turtle, Sternotherus cf. minor, (type host) from Blue Spring (31°5'27.64″N, 86°30'53.21″W; Pensacola Bay Basin, Alabama) and the loggerhead musk turtle, Sternotherus minor (Agassiz, 1857) from the Wacissa River (30°20'24.73″N, 83°59'27.56″W; Apalachee Bay Basin, Florida). It differs from congeners by lacking a body constriction at level of the ventral sucker, paired anterior caeca, and a transverse ovary as well as by having a small ventral sucker, proportionally short posterior caeca, nearly equally-sized anterior and posterior testes, a small cirrus sac, and a uterus extending dorsal to the ovary and the anterior testis. Specimens of Hapalorhynchus reelfooti Byrd, 1939 infected loggerhead musk turtles, stripe-necked musk turtles (Sternotherus peltifer Smith and Glass, 1947), Eastern musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus [Latreille in Sonnini and Latreille, 1801]), and S. cf. minor. Those of Hapalorhynchus cf. stunkardi infected S. minor and S. odoratus. Sternothorus minor, S. peltifer, and S. cf. minor plus S. minor and S. odoratus are new host records for H. reelfooti and H. cf. stunkardi, respectively. This is the first report of an infected musk turtle from the Coosa and Tallapoosa Rivers (Mobile-Tensaw River Basin), Pensacola Bay Basin, or Apalachee Bay Basin. Sequence analysis of the large subunit rDNA (28S) showed a strongly-supported clade for Hapalorhynchus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Postembryonic Nephrogenesis and Persistence of Six2-Expressing Nephron Progenitor Cells in the Reptilian Kidney.

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    Troy Camarata

    Full Text Available New nephron formation (nephrogenesis ceases in mammals around birth and is completely absent in adults. In contrast, postembryonic nephrogenesis is well documented in the mesonephric kidneys of fishes and amphibians. The transient mesonephros in reptiles (including birds and mammals is replaced by the metanephros during embryogenesis. Thus, one may speculate that postembryonic nephrogenesis is restricted to the mesonephric kidney. Previous reports have suggested the metanephros of non-avian reptiles (hereafter reptiles may continually form nephrons throughout life. We investigated the presence of adult nephrogenesis in reptiles by examining adult kidneys from several species including Trachemys scripta, Chrysemys picta, Boa constrictor, Tupinambis tegu, Anolis carolinensis, and Alligator mississipiensis among others. We found that all major reptilian groups (Testudines, Crocodylia, and Squamates showed the presence of adult nephrogenesis. The total amount of nephrogenesis varied greatly between species with turtles displaying the highest density of nephrogenesis. In contrast, we were unable to detect adult nephrogenesis in monotremes, and in the iguanid A. carolinensis. Nephron progenitor cells express the transcription factor Six2, which in mammals, becomes downregulated as the progenitor cell population is exhausted and nephrogenesis ends. Using the alligator as a model, we were able to detect Six2-positive cap mesenchyme cells in the adult kidney, which spatially correlated with areas of nephrogenesis. These results suggest that the metanephric kidney of reptiles has maintained the ability to continually grow new nephrons during postembryonic life, a process lost early in mammalian evolution, likely due to the persistence of a Six2-expressing progenitor cell population.

  9. A new xinjiangchelyid turtle from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, China and the evolution of the basipterygoid process in Mesozoic turtles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Most turtles from the Middle and Late Jurassic of Asia are referred to the newly defined clade Xinjiangchelyidae, a group of mostly shell-based, generalized, small to mid-sized aquatic froms that are widely considered to represent the stem lineage of Cryptodira. Xinjiangchelyids provide us with great insights into the plesiomorphic anatomy of crown-cryptodires, the most diverse group of living turtles, and they are particularly relevant for understanding the origin and early divergence of the primary clades of extant turtles. Results Exceptionally complete new xinjiangchelyid material from the ?Qigu Formation of the Turpan Basin (Xinjiang Autonomous Province, China) provides new insights into the anatomy of this group and is assigned to Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. A phylogenetic analysis places Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. in a monophyletic polytomy with other xinjiangchelyids, including Xinjiangchelys junggarensis, X. radiplicatoides, X. levensis and X. latiens. However, the analysis supports the unorthodox, though tentative placement of xinjiangchelyids and sinemydids outside of crown-group Testudines. A particularly interesting new observation is that the skull of this xinjiangchelyid retains such primitive features as a reduced interpterygoid vacuity and basipterygoid processes. Conclusions The homology of basipterygoid processes is confidently demonstrated based on a comprehensive review of the basicranial anatomy of Mesozoic turtles and a new nomenclatural system is introduced for the carotid canal system of turtles. The loss of the basipterygoid process and the bony enclosure of the carotid circulation system occurred a number of times independently during turtle evolution suggesting that the reinforcement of the basicranial region was essential for developing a rigid skull, thus paralleling the evolution of other amniote groups with massive skulls. PMID:24053145

  10. Inference of the protokaryotypes of amniotes and tetrapods and the evolutionary processes of microchromosomes from comparative gene mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Uno

    Full Text Available Comparative genome analysis of non-avian reptiles and amphibians provides important clues about the process of genome evolution in tetrapods. However, there is still only limited information available on the genome structures of these organisms. Consequently, the protokaryotypes of amniotes and tetrapods and the evolutionary processes of microchromosomes in tetrapods remain poorly understood. We constructed chromosome maps of functional genes for the Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis, the Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis, and the Western clawed frog (Xenopus tropicalis and compared them with genome and/or chromosome maps of other tetrapod species (salamander, lizard, snake, chicken, and human. This is the first report on the protokaryotypes of amniotes and tetrapods and the evolutionary processes of microchromosomes inferred from comparative genomic analysis of vertebrates, which cover all major non-avian reptilian taxa (Squamata, Crocodilia, Testudines. The eight largest macrochromosomes of the turtle and chicken were equivalent, and 11 linkage groups had also remained intact in the crocodile. Linkage groups of the chicken macrochromosomes were also highly conserved in X. tropicalis, two squamates, and the salamander, but not in human. Chicken microchromosomal linkages were conserved in the squamates, which have fewer microchromosomes than chicken, and also in Xenopus and the salamander, which both lack microchromosomes; in the latter, the chicken microchromosomal segments have been integrated into macrochromosomes. Our present findings open up the possibility that the ancestral amniotes and tetrapods had at least 10 large genetic linkage groups and many microchromosomes, which corresponded to the chicken macro- and microchromosomes, respectively. The turtle and chicken might retain the microchromosomes of the amniote protokaryotype almost intact. The decrease in number and/or disappearance of microchromosomes by repeated

  11. First Large-Scale DNA Barcoding Assessment of Reptiles in the Biodiversity Hotspot of Madagascar, Based on Newly Designed COI Primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltán T.; Sonet, Gontran; Glaw, Frank; Vences, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding of non-avian reptiles based on the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene is still in a very early stage, mainly due to technical problems. Using a newly developed set of reptile-specific primers for COI we present the first comprehensive study targeting the entire reptile fauna of the fourth-largest island in the world, the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar. Methodology/Principal Findings Representatives of the majority of Madagascan non-avian reptile species (including Squamata and Testudines) were sampled and successfully DNA barcoded. The new primer pair achieved a constantly high success rate (72.7–100%) for most squamates. More than 250 species of reptiles (out of the 393 described ones; representing around 64% of the known diversity of species) were barcoded. The average interspecific genetic distance within families ranged from a low of 13.4% in the Boidae to a high of 29.8% in the Gekkonidae. Using the average genetic divergence between sister species as a threshold, 41–48 new candidate (undescribed) species were identified. Simulations were used to evaluate the performance of DNA barcoding as a function of completeness of taxon sampling and fragment length. Compared with available multi-gene phylogenies, DNA barcoding correctly assigned most samples to species, genus and family with high confidence and the analysis of fewer taxa resulted in an increased number of well supported lineages. Shorter marker-lengths generally decreased the number of well supported nodes, but even mini-barcodes of 100 bp correctly assigned many samples to genus and family. Conclusions/Significance The new protocols might help to promote DNA barcoding of reptiles and the established library of reference DNA barcodes will facilitate the molecular identification of Madagascan reptiles. Our results might be useful to easily recognize undescribed diversity (i.e. novel taxa), to resolve taxonomic problems, and to monitor the international pet trade

  12. Preparation and application of an innovative thrombocyte/leukocyte-enriched plasma to promote tissue repair in chelonians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Ianni

    Full Text Available Platelet concentrates are widely used in mammalian regenerative medicine to improve tissue healing. Chelonians (Testudines would benefit from the application of thrombocyte preparations to regenerate damaged tissues, since traumatic injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both wild-living and domesticated animals. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol that optimized the recovery of the thrombocytes from blood samples and to show the efficacy of thrombocyte-enriched plasma in chelonians. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from Testudo spp. (n = 12 and Trachemys scripta elegans (n = 10. Blood cells were fractionated by sodium diatrizoate-sodium polysucrose density gradient using a two-step centrifugation protocol. Thrombocytes and leukocytes were isolated and resuspended to obtain thrombocyte-leucocyte rich plasma (TLRP. The mean recovery of leukocytes and thrombocytes was 48.9% (±4.0 SEM, n = 22 of the whole blood cell content. No statistically significant difference was observed between blood samples collected from different turtle species. The ability of TLRP to form a gel was evaluated by adding variable concentrations of calcium gluconate at room temperature and at 37°C. A reliable and consistent clotting of the TLRP was obtained in glass tubes and dishes by adding 5-20% v/v of a 100 mg/ml solution of calcium gluconate. Furthermore, in order to test the clinical efficacy of TLRP, a preliminary evaluation was performed on four turtles (Testudo spp. with traumatic injuries. In all the four animals, a successful clinical outcome was observed. The results demonstrated that a thrombocyte-enriched plasma, comparable to mammalian platelet rich plasma, can be prepared from chelonian blood samples. Furthermore, although the low number of cases presented does not allow definitive conclusions from a clinical point of view, their outcome suggests that TLRP application could be further investigated to improve the

  13. Preparation and Application of an Innovative Thrombocyte/Leukocyte-Enriched Plasma to Promote Tissue Repair in Chelonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Merli, Elisa; Burtini, Francesca; Conti, Virna; Pelizzone, Igor; Di Lecce, Rosanna; Parmigiani, Enrico; Squassino, Gian Paolo; Del Bue, Maurizio; Lucarelli, Enrico; Ramoni, Roberto; Grolli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are widely used in mammalian regenerative medicine to improve tissue healing. Chelonians (Testudines) would benefit from the application of thrombocyte preparations to regenerate damaged tissues, since traumatic injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality for both wild-living and domesticated animals. The aim of this study was to establish a protocol that optimized the recovery of the thrombocytes from blood samples and to show the efficacy of thrombocyte-enriched plasma in chelonians. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from Testudo spp. (n = 12) and Trachemys scripta elegans (n = 10). Blood cells were fractionated by sodium diatrizoate-sodium polysucrose density gradient using a two-step centrifugation protocol. Thrombocytes and leukocytes were isolated and resuspended to obtain thrombocyte-leucocyte rich plasma (TLRP). The mean recovery of leukocytes and thrombocytes was 48.9% (±4.0 SEM, n = 22) of the whole blood cell content. No statistically significant difference was observed between blood samples collected from different turtle species. The ability of TLRP to form a gel was evaluated by adding variable concentrations of calcium gluconate at room temperature and at 37°C. A reliable and consistent clotting of the TLRP was obtained in glass tubes and dishes by adding 5-20% v/v of a 100 mg/ml solution of calcium gluconate. Furthermore, in order to test the clinical efficacy of TLRP, a preliminary evaluation was performed on four turtles (Testudo spp.) with traumatic injuries. In all the four animals, a successful clinical outcome was observed. The results demonstrated that a thrombocyte-enriched plasma, comparable to mammalian platelet rich plasma, can be prepared from chelonian blood samples. Furthermore, although the low number of cases presented does not allow definitive conclusions from a clinical point of view, their outcome suggests that TLRP application could be further investigated to improve the healing process of

  14. Recombination and evolution of duplicate control regions in the mitochondrial genome of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenfei Zheng

    Full Text Available Complete mitochondrial (mt genome sequences with duplicate control regions (CRs have been detected in various animal species. In Testudines, duplicate mtCRs have been reported in the mtDNA of the Asian big-headed turtle, Platysternon megacephalum, which has three living subspecies. However, the evolutionary pattern of these CRs remains unclear. In this study, we report the completed sequences of duplicate CRs from 20 individuals belonging to three subspecies of this turtle and discuss the micro-evolutionary analysis of the evolution of duplicate CRs. Genetic distances calculated with MEGA 4.1 using the complete duplicate CR sequences revealed that within turtle subspecies, genetic distances between orthologous copies from different individuals were 0.63% for CR1 and 1.2% for CR2app:addword:respectively, and the average distance between paralogous copies of CR1 and CR2 was 4.8%. Phylogenetic relationships were reconstructed from the CR sequences, excluding the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs at the 3' end using three methods: neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood algorithm, and Bayesian inference. These data show that any two CRs within individuals were more genetically distant from orthologous genes in different individuals within the same subspecies. This suggests independent evolution of the two mtCRs within each P. megacephalum subspecies. Reconstruction of separate phylogenetic trees using different CR components (TAS, CD, CSB, and VNTRs suggested the role of recombination in the evolution of duplicate CRs. Consequently, recombination events were detected using RDP software with break points at ≈290 bp and ≈1,080 bp. Based on these results, we hypothesize that duplicate CRs in P. megacephalum originated from heterological ancestral recombination of mtDNA. Subsequent recombination could have resulted in homogenization during independent evolutionary events, thus maintaining the functions of duplicate CRs in the mtDNA of P

  15. REPTILES DEL VALLE SECO DEL RÍO MAGDALENA (HUILA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAFAEL MORENO-ARIAS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una caracterización de la fauna de reptiles del valle seco del río Magdalena en el departamento del Huila, así como la comparación faunística entre unidades de cobertura vegetal y épocas climáticas. Se registraron 31 especies pertenecientes a 30 géneros, 17 familias y dos órdenes. En el orden Squamata, la familia más diversa fue Teiidae (lagartijas con tres especies y Colubridae (serpientes con nueve. Para el orden Testudines se registró una especie. Con base en curvas de acumulación de especies y los estimadores no paramétricos Jackknife 2 y Bootstrap, para las lagartijas se obtuvo una alta representatividad en el muestreo (83% y 92% respectivamente, mientras que para las serpientes fue menor (75% y 82% respectivamente. La estructura y composición de los ensambles de reptiles en cada unidad de cobertura vegetal no fue significativamente diferente, en general se caracterizaron por presentar pocas especies con muchos individuos y numerosas especies raras. El arbustal presentó la mayor riqueza de especies seguido del bosque de ribera y los cultivos de cacao. En general la abundancia de reptiles fue mayor en la época de lluvias que en la época seca, sin embargo la manera en que responden las especies a las épocas climáticas está dada por sus características ecológicas, fisiológicas y comportamentales.

  16. A new xinjiangchelyid turtle from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, China and the evolution of the basipterygoid process in Mesozoic turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, Márton; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Wings, Oliver; Ge, Sun; Joyce, Walter G

    2013-09-22

    Most turtles from the Middle and Late Jurassic of Asia are referred to the newly defined clade Xinjiangchelyidae, a group of mostly shell-based, generalized, small to mid-sized aquatic froms that are widely considered to represent the stem lineage of Cryptodira. Xinjiangchelyids provide us with great insights into the plesiomorphic anatomy of crown-cryptodires, the most diverse group of living turtles, and they are particularly relevant for understanding the origin and early divergence of the primary clades of extant turtles. Exceptionally complete new xinjiangchelyid material from the ?Qigu Formation of the Turpan Basin (Xinjiang Autonomous Province, China) provides new insights into the anatomy of this group and is assigned to Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. A phylogenetic analysis places Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. in a monophyletic polytomy with other xinjiangchelyids, including Xinjiangchelys junggarensis, X. radiplicatoides, X. levensis and X. latiens. However, the analysis supports the unorthodox, though tentative placement of xinjiangchelyids and sinemydids outside of crown-group Testudines. A particularly interesting new observation is that the skull of this xinjiangchelyid retains such primitive features as a reduced interpterygoid vacuity and basipterygoid processes. The homology of basipterygoid processes is confidently demonstrated based on a comprehensive review of the basicranial anatomy of Mesozoic turtles and a new nomenclatural system is introduced for the carotid canal system of turtles. The loss of the basipterygoid process and the bony enclosure of the carotid circulation system occurred a number of times independently during turtle evolution suggesting that the reinforcement of the basicranial region was essential for developing a rigid skull, thus paralleling the evolution of other amniote groups with massive skulls.

  17. Structural and functional properties of a probabilistic model of neuronal connectivity in a simple locomotor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrison-Hort, Robert; Soffe, Stephen R; Borisyuk, Roman

    2018-01-01

    Although, in most animals, brain connectivity varies between individuals, behaviour is often similar across a species. What fundamental structural properties are shared across individual networks that define this behaviour? We describe a probabilistic model of connectivity in the hatchling Xenopus tadpole spinal cord which, when combined with a spiking model, reliably produces rhythmic activity corresponding to swimming. The probabilistic model allows calculation of structural characteristics that reflect common network properties, independent of individual network realisations. We use the structural characteristics to study examples of neuronal dynamics, in the complete network and various sub-networks, and this allows us to explain the basis for key experimental findings, and make predictions for experiments. We also study how structural and functional features differ between detailed anatomical connectomes and those generated by our new, simpler, model (meta-model). PMID:29589828

  18. Temperature-dependent sex determination in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, B E; Tousignant, A; Ewert, M A; Nelson, C E; Crews, D

    1993-05-01

    The leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius, has temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). Previous reports have shown that females are produced predominantly at cool incubation temperatures and males are produced predominantly at warm incubation temperatures (Pattern Ib). We report here that incubation at even higher temperatures (34 and 35 degrees C) produces mostly females (Pattern II). The lethal maximum constant incubation temperature for this species appears to be just above 35 degrees C. Although a previous study indicated that females from a warm incubation temperature (32 degrees C) failed to lay eggs, we found that 12 of 14 mature females incubated at 32.5 degrees C, and 5 of 6 mature females incubated at 34 degrees C produced fertile eggs and viable hatchlings.

  19. Acute Lameness in a Roller Pigeon ( Columba livia ) with Multicentric Lymphosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan M; Williams, Robert J; Gogal, Robert M

    2017-06-01

    A 3-yr-old adult female roller pigeon ( Columba livia ) used as part of a breeding pair for an ongoing research study presented with acute left limb lameness. Palpation of the left leg and region revealed a large lump near the coxofemoral joint. The bird was able to ambulate in the cage, but would not brood her hatchling. The bird was humanely euthanized and necropsy was performed. Grossly, multiple large white to pale tan nodules were noted in the pancreas, lung, rib cage, intestines, and unilaterally in the left kidney. Microscopic examination of the various organs revealed neoplastic proliferation of round cells consistent with lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemistry was performed with the use of antibodies to CD3, CD79a, CD20, and CD21 to phenotype the cells. The results indicated that the neoplastic infiltrating cells were predominantly of T-cell origin.

  20. Factors affecting fledgling output of great tits, Parus major, in the long term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, S.; Alvarez, E.; Barba, E.

    2016-07-01

    Fledgling production has often been used as an estimator of avian reproductive success, and it is conditioned by factors affecting offspring development and/or survival during the nesting period. We aimed to determine which predictors influenced fledgling output among a set of basic breeding parameters and local temperature data collected over 25 years in a Mediterranean great tit, Parus major, population, using an information–theoretic approach for model selection. Of the studied variables, the number of hatchlings per nest was the single–most important predictor influencing fledgling production, with larger broods eventually yielding more fledglings, although mass prior to fledging may have been compromised. This result suggests an overall good adjustment between brood size and resource availability in the studied population. (Author)

  1. Effects of Environmental Contamination and Acute Toxicity of N-Nitrate on Early Life Stages of Endemic Arboreal Frog, Polypedates cruciger (Blyth, 1852).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balangoda, Anusha; Deepananda, K H M Ashoka; Wegiriya, H C E

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the potential toxic effects of environmentally relevant nitrate concentrations on development, growth, and mortality of early life stages of common hour-glass tree frog, Polypedates cruciger. Tadpoles from hatchlings through pre-adult were exposed to environmentally relevant nitrate concentrations detected in Mirissa, Sri Lanka. Newly hatched, external gill stage, and internal gill stage tadpoles were exposed to potassium nitrate for bioassay tests. No behavioral changes or abnormalities were observed in control and nitrate-induced group. However, detected environmental nitrate concentration significantly increased (p nitrate pollution than internal gill stage. The results suggest that environmentally relevant nitrate can cause mortality on the amphibian population in ecosystems associated with agro-pastoral activities through altering the growth and direct toxicological effects on the survivorship.

  2. Incubation times of dinosaur eggs via embryonic metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A.

    2016-08-01

    The incubation times for the eggs of 21 dinosaurs are determined from an estimate of their embyronic metabolic rate and the mass of the hatchlings via a mass growth model based on conservation of energy. Embryos in extant birds and crocodiles are studied in order to determine the best model for embryonic metabolism and growth. These results are used to develop a theoretical model that predicts the incubation times of an egg. This model is applied to dinosaur eggs and provides a unique window into dinosaur reproduction. The dinosaurs studied come from both Saurischia and Ornithischia. The incubation times vary from about 28 days for Archaeopteryx lithographica to about 76 days for Alamosaurus sanjuanensis.

  3. Assessing the effects of FBC ash treatments of metal-contaminated soils using life history traits and metal bioaccumulation analysis of the earthworm Eisenia andrei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumiaux, F.; Demuynck, S.; Schikorski, D.; Lemiere, S.; Lepretre, A. [Universite Lille Nord de France, Villeneuve Dascq (France)

    2010-03-15

    Earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were exposed, in controlled conditions, to metal-contaminated soils previously treated in situ with two types of fluidized bed combustion ashes. Effects on this species were determined by life history traits analysis. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was indicated by metal bioaccumulation. Ashes-treated soils reduced worm mortality compared to the untreated soil. However, these ashes reduced both cocoon hatching success and hatchlings numbers compared to the untreated soil. In addition, sulfo-calcical ashes reduced or delayed worm maturity and lowered cocoon production compared to silico-alumineous ones. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was demonstrated for Zn, Cu and to a lesser extent Pb. Only silico-alumineous ashes reduced Cd bioaccumulation, although Cd was still bioconcentrated. Thus, although ash additions to metal-contaminated soils may help in immobilizing metals, their use might result, depending on the chemical nature of ashes, to severe detrimental effects on earthworm reproduction with possible long term consequences to populations.

  4. A diminutive perinate European Enantiornithes reveals an asynchronous ossification pattern in early birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Fabien; Chiappe, Luis M; Sanchez, Sophie; Garwood, Russell J; Edwards, Nicholas P; Wogelius, Roy A; Sellers, William I; Manning, Phillip L; Ortega, Francisco; Serrano, Francisco J; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Cuesta, Elena; Escaso, Fernando; Sanz, Jose Luis

    2018-03-05

    Fossils of juvenile Mesozoic birds provide insight into the early evolution of avian development, however such fossils are rare. The analysis of the ossification sequence in these early-branching birds has the potential to address important questions about their comparative developmental biology and to help understand their morphological evolution and ecological differentiation. Here we report on an early juvenile enantiornithine specimen from the Early Cretaceous of Europe, which sheds new light on the osteogenesis in this most species-rich clade of Mesozoic birds. Consisting of a nearly complete skeleton, it is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils representing post-hatching stages of development. Comparisons between this new specimen and other known early juvenile enantiornithines support a clade-wide asynchronous pattern of osteogenesis in the sternum and the vertebral column, and strongly indicate that the hatchlings of these phylogenetically basal birds varied greatly in size and tempo of skeletal maturation.

  5. Identification and partial sequencing of a crocodile poxvirus associated with deeply penetrating skin lesions in farmed Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchzermeyer, F W; Wallace, D B; Putterill, J F; Gerdes, G H

    2009-09-01

    When large numbers of crocodile skins were downgraded because of the presence of small pin prick-like holes, collapsed epidermal cysts were found deep in the dermis of juvenile crocodiles while forming cysts were observed in hatchlings. Histopathology of these forming cysts showed the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusions in proliferating and ballooning epidermal cells. Pox virions were seen in electron microscope preparations made from the scabs of such early lesions. The partial sequencing of virus material from scrapings of these lesions and comparison of it with the published sequence of crocodile poxvirus showed the virus associated with the deep lesions to be closely related, but different. To differentiate between the two forms of crocodile pox infection it is suggested that the previously known form should be called "classical crocodile pox" and the newly discovered form "atypical crocodile pox". The application of strict hygiene measures brought about a decline in the percentage of downgraded skins.

  6. Identification and partial sequencing of a crocodile poxvirus associated with deeply penetrating skin lesions in farmed Nile crocodiles, Crocodylus niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.W. Huchzermeyer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available When large numbers of crocodile skins were downgraded because of the presence of small pin pricklike holes, collapsed epidermal cysts were found deep in the dermis of juvenile crocodiles while forming cysts were observed in hatchlings. Histopathology of these forming cysts showed the presence of intracytoplasmic inclusions in proliferating and ballooning epidermal cells. Pox virions were seen in electron microscope preparations made from the scabs of such early lesions. The partial sequencing of virus material from scrapings of these lesions and comparison of it with the published sequence of crocodile poxvirus showed the virus associated with the deep lesions to be closely related, but different. To differentiate between the two forms of crocodile pox infection it is suggested that the previously known form should be called ''classical crocodile pox'' and the newly discovered form ''atypical crocodile pox''. The application of strict hygiene measures brought about a decline in the percentage of downgraded skins.

  7. Sightings and successful reproduction of allochthonous reptiles in Calabria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Sperone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports information about the presence of three allochthonous reptiles species in Calabria: Testudo marginata, Trachemys scripta elegans and Chamaeleo chamaeleon. The first one was found in three sites located in the Catena Costiera Massif and in the Crati Valley (Northern Calabria. The slider turtle was found in seven different sites throughout all the region. It massively colonised the Angitola artificial lake: here, this turtle lives in natural conditions and its reproduction was confirmed by the presence of nests, eggs and hatchlings. C. chamaeleon is present in sandy coastal habitats near Palmi and Gioia Tauro (Southern Calabria. From a conservationistic point of view, serious damages to autochtonous species could be caused by the spreading of T. scripta elegans: this species has already determined the local extinction of Angitola’s Emys orbicularis populations.

  8. Diet and foraging of the endemic lizard Cnemidophorus littoralis (Squamata, Teiidae) in the restinga de Jurubatiba, Macaé, RJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, V A; Amaral, V C; Sluys, M V; Rocha, C F D

    2006-08-01

    We investigated the diet and foraging of the endemic teiid lizard Cnemidophorus littoralis in a restinga habitat in Jurubatiba, Macaé - RJ. The stomach contents were removed, analyzed and identified to the Order level. There was no relationship between C. littoralis morphological variables and number, length or volume of preys. Termites (48.7%) and larvae (35.5%) were the most important prey items which occurred in the examined lizards' stomachs. The diet did not differ between males and females. Cnemidophorus littoralis is an active forager and predominantly consumes relatively sedentary prey or prey that is aggregated in the environment. We also found an intact and undigested hatchling of the crepuscular/nocturnal gekkonid lizard Hemidactylus mabouia in the stomach of an adult male of C. littoralis, which indicates that C. littoralis is a potential source of mortality for individuals of H. mabouia in the restinga de Jurubatiba.

  9. Preliminary data on dinosaurs habitat during the Upper Maastrichtian, Hateg Basin, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorescu, D.; Klarik, L.; Bojar, A.-V.

    2002-01-01

    The Hateg basin is located in the south-western part of the Transylvanian Depression and it is filled with sediments that overly the crystalline rocks of the Getic nappe. The basin show multiple stage of Mesozoic evolution. The Latest Cretaceous (Middle and Upper Maastrichtian) with continuous transition to Paleocene is represented by two continental lithostratigraphic units: the Densus-Ciula and the Sinpetru Formations. The Upper Maastrichtian of Densus-Ciula Formation at Tustea Quarry is represented by a pebbly alluvium with massive, matrix supported conglomerates, cross bedded sandstones and mudstones, the last one containing calcretes and dinosaur remains, including eggs and hatchlings of the hadrosaurid Telmatosaurus transsylvanicus. In order to constrain the paleoenvironment in which dinosaurs lived, calcretes and dinosaur eggshells were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotopic composition

  10. Factors affecting fledgling output of great tits, Parus major, in the long term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez, S

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fledgling production has often been used as an estimator of avian reproductive success, and it is conditioned by factors affecting offspring development and/or survival during the nesting period. We aimed to determine which predictors influenced fledgling output among a set of basic breeding parameters and local temperature data collected over 25 years in a Mediterranean great tit, Parus major, population, using an information–theoretic approach for model selection. Of the studied variables, the number of hatchlings per nest was the single–most important predictor influencing fledgling production, with larger broods eventually yielding more fledglings, although mass prior to fledging may have been compromised. This result suggests an overall good adjustment between brood size and resource availability in the studied population.

  11. The anatomy, affinity, and phylogenetic significance of Markuelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xi-Ping; Donoghue, Philip C J; Cunningham, John A; Liu, Jian-Bo; Cheng, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The fossil record provides a paucity of data on the development of extinct organisms, particularly for their embryology. The recovery of fossilized embryos heralds new insight into the evolution of development but advances are limited by an almost complete absence of phylogenetic constraint. Markuelia is an exception to this, known from cleavage and pre-hatchling stages as a vermiform and profusely annulated direct-developing bilaterian with terminal circumoral and posterior radial arrays of spines. Phylogenetic analyses have hitherto suggested assignment to stem-Scalidophora (phyla Kinorhyncha, Loricifera, Priapulida). We test this assumption with additional data and through the inclusion of additional taxa. The available evidence supports stem-Scalidophora affinity, leading to the conclusion that scalidophorans, cyclonerualians, and ecdysozoans are primitive direct developers, and the likelihood that scalidophorans are primitively metameric.

  12. Body size distribution demonstrates flexible habitat shift of green turtle (Chelonia mydas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Green turtles (Chelonia mydas, listed as Endangered on the IUCN redlist, have a broad migration area and undergo a habitat shift from the pelagic (hatchling to neritic (growth zones. We studied habitat utilisation of the coastal feeding grounds around Okinawajima Island, Japan, in 103 green turtles. The western and eastern turtle aggregations off Okinawa had homogeneous genetic compositions, but different body size distributions. The western coastal feeding ground supported larger individuals than the eastern coastal feeding ground. Thus, green turtles appear to prefer different feeding grounds during their growth, and have a flexible habitat shift including a secondary habitat shift from east to west around Okinawajima Island after they are recruited to the coastal habitats. This study suggests maintaining coastal habitat diversity is important for green turtle conservation.

  13. Recurrent sublethal warming reduces embryonic survival, inhibits juvenile growth, and alters species distribution projections under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Michael A; Riddell, Eric A; Levy, Ofir; Sears, Michael W

    2018-01-01

    The capacity to tolerate climate change often varies across ontogeny in organisms with complex life cycles. Recently developed species distribution models incorporate traits across life stages; however, these life-cycle models primarily evaluate effects of lethal change. Here, we examine impacts of recurrent sublethal warming on development and survival in ecological projections of climate change. We reared lizard embryos in the laboratory under temperature cycles that simulated contemporary conditions and warming scenarios. We also artificially warmed natural nests to mimic laboratory treatments. In both cases, recurrent sublethal warming decreased embryonic survival and hatchling sizes. Incorporating survivorship results into a mechanistic species distribution model reduced annual survival by up to 24% compared to models that did not incorporate sublethal warming. Contrary to models without sublethal effects, our model suggests that modest increases in developmental temperatures influence species ranges due to effects on survivorship. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. Preliminary data on dinosaurs habitat during the Upper Maastrichtian, Hateg Basin, Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorescu, D; Klarik, L [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Geology and Geophysics (Romania); Bojar, A -V [Department of Geology and Paleontology, Graz (Austria)

    2002-10-01

    The Hateg basin is located in the south-western part of the Transylvanian Depression and it is filled with sediments that overly the crystalline rocks of the Getic nappe. The basin show multiple stage of Mesozoic evolution. The Latest Cretaceous (Middle and Upper Maastrichtian) with continuous transition to Paleocene is represented by two continental lithostratigraphic units: the Densus-Ciula and the Sinpetru Formations. The Upper Maastrichtian of Densus-Ciula Formation at Tustea Quarry is represented by a pebbly alluvium with massive, matrix supported conglomerates, cross bedded sandstones and mudstones, the last one containing calcretes and dinosaur remains, including eggs and hatchlings of the hadrosaurid Telmatosaurus transsylvanicus. In order to constrain the paleoenvironment in which dinosaurs lived, calcretes and dinosaur eggshells were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotopic composition.

  15. Ground-nesting marine birds and potential for human disturbance in Glacier Bay National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Romano, Marc D.; Piatt, John F.; Piatt, John F.; Gende, S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve contains a diverse assemblage of marine birds that use the area for nesting, foraging and molting. The abundance and diversity of marine bird species in Glacier Bay is unmatched in the region, due in part to the geomorphic and successional characteristics that result in a wide array of habitat types (Robards and others, 2003). The opportunity for proactive management of these species is unique in Glacier Bay National Park because much of the suitable marine bird nesting habitat occurs in areas designated as wilderness. Ground-nesting marine birds are vulnerable to human disturbance wherever visitors can access nest sites during the breeding season. Human disturbance of nest sites can be significant because intense parental care is required for egg and hatchling survival, and repeated disturbance can result in reduced productivity (Leseberg and others, 2000). Temporary nest desertion by breeding birds in disturbed areas can lead to increased predation on eggs and hatchlings by conspecifics or other predators (Bolduc and Guillemette, 2003). Human disturbance of ground-nesting birds may also affect incubation time and adult foraging success, which in turn can alter breeding success (Verhulst and others, 2001). Furthermore, human activity can potentially cause colony failure when disturbance prevents the initiation of nesting (Hatch, 2002). There is management concern about the susceptibility of breeding birds to disturbance from human activities, but little historical data has been collected on the distribution of ground-nesting marine birds in Glacier Bay. This report summarizes results obtained during two years of a three-year study to determine the distribution of ground-nesting marine birds in Glacier Bay, and the potential for human disturbance of those nesting birds.

  16. Complex expression patterns of lymphocyte-specific genes during the development of cartilaginous fish implicate unique lymphoid tissues in generating an immune repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracle, A. L.; Anderson, M. K.; Litman, R. T.; Walsh, C. J.; Luer, C. A.; Rothenberg, E. V.; Litman, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Cartilaginous fish express canonical B and T cell recognition genes, but their lymphoid organs and lymphocyte development have been poorly defined. Here, the expression of Ig, TCR, recombination-activating gene (Rag)-1 and terminal deoxynucleosidase (TdT) genes has been used to identify roles of various lymphoid tissues throughout development in the cartilaginous fish, Raja eglanteria (clearnose skate). In embryogenesis, Ig and TCR genes are sharply up-regulated at 8 weeks of development. At this stage TCR and TdT expression is limited to the thymus; later, TCR gene expression appears in peripheral sites in hatchlings and adults, suggesting that the thymus is a source of T cells as in mammals. B cell gene expression indicates more complex roles for the spleen and two special organs of cartilaginous fish-the Leydig and epigonal (gonad-associated) organs. In the adult, the Leydig organ is the site of the highest IgM and IgX expression. However, the spleen is the first site of IgM expression, while IgX is expressed first in gonad, liver, Leydig and even thymus. Distinctive spatiotemporal patterns of Ig light chain gene expression also are seen. A subset of Ig genes is pre-rearranged in the germline of the cartilaginous fish, making expression possible without rearrangement. To assess whether this allows differential developmental regulation, IgM and IgX heavy chain cDNA sequences from specific tissues and developmental stages have been compared with known germline-joined genomic sequences. Both non-productively rearranged genes and germline-joined genes are transcribed in the embryo and hatchling, but not in the adult.

  17. Developmental toxicity in white leghorn chickens following in ovo exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden-Adams, M. M.; Stuckey, Joyce E.; Gaworecki, K.M.; Berger-Ritchie, J.; Bryant, K.; Jodice, P.G.; Scott, T.R.; Ferrario, J.B.; Guan, B.; Vigo, C.; Boone, J.S.; McGuinn, W.D.; DeWitt, J.C.; Keil, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies show that perfluorinated compounds cause various toxicological effects; nevertheless, effects on immune function and developmental endpoints have not been addressed at length. This study examined the effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in white leghorn hatchlings on various developmental, immunological, and clinical health parameters. In addition, serum PFOS concentrations were determined by LC/MS/MS. Embryonic day (ED) 0 eggs were injected with either safflower oil/10% DMSO (control, 0 mg/kg egg wt) or PFOS in safflower oil/10% DMSO at 1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg egg wt, and the chicks were grown to post-hatch day (PHD) 14. Treatment with PFOS did not affect hatch rate. Following in ovo exposure chicks exhibited increases in spleen mass at all treatment levels, in liver mass at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg egg wt, and in body length (crown-rump length) at the 5 mg/kg treatment. Right wings were shorter in all treatments compared to control. Increases in the frequency of brain asymmetry were evident in all treatment groups. SRBC-specific immunoglobulin (IgM and IgY combined) titers were decreased significantly at all treatment levels, while plasma lysozyme activity was increased at all treatment levels. The PHA skin test response decreased in relation to increasing PFOS dose. Serum concentrations where significant immunological, morphological, and neurological effects were observed at the lowest dose (1 mg/kg egg wt) averaged 154 ng PFOS/g serum. These concentrations fall within environmental ranges reported in blood samples from wild caught avian species; thereby, verifying that the environmental egg concentrations used for the injections do indeed relate to serum levels in hatchlings that are also environmentally relevant. These data indicate that immune alterations and brain asymmetry can occur in birds following in ovo exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of PFOS and demonstrates the need for further research on the developmental effects of

  18. A unique life history among tetrapods: an annual chameleon living mostly as an egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Kristopher B; Andriamandimbiarisoa, Laza N; Fox, Stanley F; Raxworthy, Christopher J

    2008-07-01

    The approximately 28,300 species of tetrapods (four-limbed vertebrates) almost exclusively have perennial life spans. Here, we report the discovery of a remarkable annual tetrapod from the arid southwest of Madagascar: the chameleon Furcifer labordi, with a posthatching life span of just 4-5 months. At the start of the active season (November), an age cohort of hatchlings emerges; larger juveniles or adults are not present. These hatchlings grow rapidly, reach sexual maturity in less than 2 months, and reproduce in January-February. After reproduction, senescence appears, and the active season concludes with population-wide adult death. Consequently, during the dry season, the entire population is represented by developing eggs that incubate for 8-9 months before synchronously hatching at the onset of the following rainy season. Remarkably, this chameleon spends more of its short annual life cycle inside the egg than outside of it. Our review of tetrapod longevity (>1,700 species) finds no others with such a short life span. These findings suggest that the notorious rapid death of chameleons in captivity may, for some species, actually represent the natural adult life span. Consequently, a new appraisal may be warranted concerning the viability of chameleon breeding programs, which could have special significance for species of conservation concern. Additionally, because F. labordi is closely related to other perennial species, this chameleon group may prove also to be especially well suited for comparative studies that focus on life history evolution and the ecological, genetic, and/or hormonal determinants of aging, longevity, and senescence.

  19. Taxonomy and life history of the Acropora-eating flatworm Amakusaplana acroporae nov. sp. (Polycladida: Prosthiostomidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, K. A.; Gillis, J. A.; Billings, R. E.; Borneman, E. H.

    2011-09-01

    Efforts to culture and conserve acroporid corals in aquaria have led to the discovery of a corallivorous polyclad flatworm (known as AEFW - Acropora-eating flatworm), which, if not removed, can eat entire colonies. Live observations of the AEFW, whole mounts, serial histological sections and comparison of 28S rDNA sequences with other polyclads reveal that this is a new species belonging to the family Prosthiostomidae Lang, 1884 and previously monospecific genus Amakusaplana (Kato 1938). Amakusaplana acroporae is distinguished from Amakusaplana ohshimai by a different arrangement and number of eyes, a large seminal vesicle and dorsoventrally compressed shell gland pouch. Typical of the genus, A. acroporae, lacks a ventral sucker and has a small notch at the midline of the anterior margin. Nematocysts and a Symbiodinium sp. of dinoflagellate from the coral are abundantly distributed in the gut and parenchyma. Individual adults lay multiple egg batches on the coral skeleton, each egg batch has 20-26 egg capsules, and each capsule contains between 3-7 embryos. Embryonic development takes approximately 21 days, during which time characteristics of a pelagic life stage (lobes and ciliary tufts) develop but are lost before hatching. The hatchling is capable of swimming but settles to the benthos quickly, and no zooxanthellae were observed in the animal at this stage. We suggest that intracapsular metamorphosis limits the dispersal potential of hatchlings and promotes recruitment of offspring into the natal habitat. The evolutionary and ecological significance of retaining lobes and ciliary tufts in the embryo are discussed. Camouflage, high fecundity and possible dispersal dimorphisms probably explain how Amakusaplana acroporae can cause Acropora sp. mortality in aquaria where natural predators may be absent.

  20. Generation of juvenile rainbow trout derived from cryopreserved whole ovaries by intraperitoneal transplantation of ovarian germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungki; Katayama, Naoto; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2016-09-23

    Cryopreservation of fish sperm offers the practical applications in the selective breeding and biodiversity conservation. However, because of the lack of cryopreservation methods for fish eggs and embryos, maternally inherited cytoplasmic compartments cannot be successfully preserved. We previously developed an alternative method to derive functional eggs and sperm from cryopreserved whole testis by transplanting testicular cells into female and male recipients. However, if target fish had ovaries, the previous method employing male-derived germ cells would be ineffective. Here, we aimed to generate functional gametes from cryopreserved whole ovaries by transplanting ovarian germ cells into peritoneal cavity of sterile hatchlings. Cryopreservation conditions for rainbow trout ovaries (1.0 M DMSO, 0.1 M trehalose, and 10% egg yolk) were optimized by testing several different cryoprotective agents. Ovarian germ cells from thawed ovaries were intraperitoneally transplanted into allogeneic triploid hatchlings. Transplanted germ cells migrated toward and were incorporated into recipient gonads, where they underwent gametogenesis. Transplantation efficiency of ovarian germ cells remained stable after cryopreservation period up to 1185 days. Although all triploid recipients that did not undergo transplantation were functionally sterile, 5 of 25 female recipients and 7 of 25 male recipients reached sexual maturity at 2.5 years post-transplantation. Inseminating the resultant eggs and sperm generated viable offspring displaying the donor characteristics of orange body color, green fluorescence, and chromosome numbers. This method is thus a breakthrough tool for the conservation of endangered fish species that are crucial to cryopreserve the genetic resources of female fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The ontogeny of morphological defenses in Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) and loggerhead (Caretta caretta) sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Michael; Higgins, Benjamin; Stewart, Joshua; Wyneken, Jeanette

    2015-08-01

    Marine turtles are large reptiles that compensate for high juvenile mortality by producing hundreds of hatchlings during a long reproductive lifespan. Most hatchlings are taken by predators during their migration to, and while resident in, the open ocean. Their survival depends upon crypticity, minimizing movement to avoid detection, and foraging efficiently to grow to a size too difficult for predators to either handle or swallow. While these behavioral antipredator tactics are known, changes in morphology accompanying growth may also improve survival prospects. These have been only superficially described in the literature. Here, we compare the similarities and differences in presumed morphological defenses of growing loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) posthatchlings, related species that differ in growth rate, timing of habitat shift (the return from oceanic to neritic locations), and size at maturity. In both species, vertebral spination and carapace widening increase disproportionally as small turtles grow, but later in ontogeny, the spines regress, sooner in ridley than in loggerhead turtles. Carapace widening occurs in both species but loggerheads are always longer than they are wide whereas in Kemp's ridley turtles, the carapace becomes as wide as long. Our analysis indicates that these changes are unrelated to when each species shifts habitat but are related to turtle size. We hypothesize that the spines function in small turtles as an early defense against gape-limited predators, but changes in body shape function throughout ontogeny-initially to make small turtles too wide to swallow and later by presenting an almost flat and hardened surface that large predators (such as a sharks) are unable to grasp. The extremely wide carapace of the Kemp's ridley may compensate for its smaller adult size (and presumed greater vulnerability) than the loggerhead. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effect of egg composition and oxidoreductase on adaptation of Tibetan chicken to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C L; He, L J; Li, P C; Liu, H Y; Wei, Z H

    2016-07-01

    Tibetan chickens have good adaptation to hypoxic conditions, which can be reflected by higher hatchability than lowland breeds when incubated at high altitude. The objective of this trial was to study changes in egg composition and metabolism with regards the adaptation of Tibetan chickens to high altitude. We measured the dry weight of chicken embryos, egg yolk, and egg albumen, and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in breast muscle, heart, and liver from embryos of Tibetan chicken and Dwarf chicken (lowland breed) incubated at high (2,900 m) and low (100 m) altitude. We found that growth of chicken embryos was restricted at high altitude, especially for Dwarf chicken embryos. In Tibetan chicken, the egg weight was lighter, but the dry weight of egg yolk was heavier than that of Dwarf chicken. The LDH activities of the three tissues from the high altitude groups were respectively higher than those of the lowland groups from d 15 to hatching, except for breast muscle of Tibetan chicken embryos on d 15. In addition, under the high altitude environment, the heart tissue from Tibetan chicken had lower LDH activity than that from Dwarf chicken at d 15 and 18. The lactic acid content of blood from Tibetan chicken embryos was lower than that of Dwarf chicken at d 12 and 15 of incubation at high altitude. There was no difference in SDH activity in the three tissues between the high altitude groups and the lowland groups except in three tissues of hatchlings and at d 15 of incubation in breast muscle, nor between the two breeds at high altitude except in the heart of hatchlings. Consequently, the adaptation of Tibetan chicken to high altitude may be associated with higher quantities of yolk in the egg and a low metabolic oxygen demand in tissue, which illuminate the reasons that the Tibetan chicken have higher hatchability with lower oxygen transport ability. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  3. Modeling Commercial Freshwater Turtle Production on US Farms for Pet and Meat Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Ivana; Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Grant, William E; Feldman, Mark; Forstner, Michael R J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater turtles are being exploited for meat, eggs, traditional medicine, and pet trade. As a response, turtle farming became a booming aquaculture industry in the past two decades, specifically in the southeastern states of the United States of America (US) and across Southeast Asia. However, US turtle farms are currently producing turtles only for the pet trade while commercial trappers remain focused on catching the largest individuals from the wild. In our analyses we have created a biological and economic model that describes farming operations on a representative turtle farm in Louisiana. We first modeled current production of hatchling and yearling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) (i.e., traditional farming) for foreign and domestic pet markets, respectively. We tested the possibility of harvesting adult turtles from the breeding stock for sale to meat markets to enable alternative markets for the farmers, while decreasing the continued pressures on wild populations (i.e., non-traditional farming). Our economic model required current profit requirements of ~$13/turtle or ~$20.31/kg of meat from non-traditional farming in order to acquire the same profit as traditional farming, a value which currently exceeds market values of red-eared sliders. However, increasing competition with Asian turtle farms and decreasing hatchling prices may force the shift in the US toward producing turtles for meat markets. In addition, our model can be modified and applied to more desirable species on the meat market once more knowledge is acquired about species life histories and space requirements under farmed conditions.

  4. Chicken (Gallus domesticus) inner ear afferents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, H.; Chen, X.; Hartsfield, J. F.; Hara, J.; Martin, D.; Fermin, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    Neurons from the vestibular (VG) and the statoacoustic (SAG) ganglion of the chick (Gallus domesticus) were evaluated histologically and morphometrically. Embryos at stages 34 (E8 days), 39 (E13 days) and 44 (E18 days) were sacrificed and temporal bones microdissected. Specimens were embedded in JB-4 methacrylate plastic, and stained with a mixture of 0.2% toluidine blue (TB) and 0.1% basic Fuschin in 25% ethanol or with a mixture of 2% TB and 1% paraphenylenediamine (PDA) for axon and myelin measurement study. Images of the VIIIth nerve were produced by a V150 (R) color imaging system and the contour of 200-300 neuronal bodies (perikarya) was traced directly on a video screen with a mouse in real time. The cross-sectional area of VG perikarya was 67.29 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 128.46 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 275.85 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). The cross-sectional area of SAG perikarya was 62.44 micrometers2 at stage 34 (E8), 102.05 micrometers2 at stage 39 (E13) and 165.02 micrometers2 at stage 44 (E18). A significant cross-sectional area increase of the VG perikarya between stage 39 (E13) and stage 44 (E18) was determined. We randomly measured the cross-sectional area of myelin and axoplasm of hatchling afferent nerves, and found a correspondence between axoplasmic and myelin cross-sectional area in the utricular, saccular and semicircular canal nerve branches of the nerve. The results suggest that the period between stage 34 (E8) and 39 (E13) is a critical period for afferent neuronal development. Physiological and behavioral vestibular properties of developing and maturing hatchlings may change accordingly. The results compliment previous work by other investigators and provide valuable anatomical measures useful to correlate physiological data obtained from stimulation of the whole nerve or its parts.

  5. Modeling Commercial Freshwater Turtle Production on US Farms for Pet and Meat Markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Mali

    Full Text Available Freshwater turtles are being exploited for meat, eggs, traditional medicine, and pet trade. As a response, turtle farming became a booming aquaculture industry in the past two decades, specifically in the southeastern states of the United States of America (US and across Southeast Asia. However, US turtle farms are currently producing turtles only for the pet trade while commercial trappers remain focused on catching the largest individuals from the wild. In our analyses we have created a biological and economic model that describes farming operations on a representative turtle farm in Louisiana. We first modeled current production of hatchling and yearling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans (i.e., traditional farming for foreign and domestic pet markets, respectively. We tested the possibility of harvesting adult turtles from the breeding stock for sale to meat markets to enable alternative markets for the farmers, while decreasing the continued pressures on wild populations (i.e., non-traditional farming. Our economic model required current profit requirements of ~$13/turtle or ~$20.31/kg of meat from non-traditional farming in order to acquire the same profit as traditional farming, a value which currently exceeds market values of red-eared sliders. However, increasing competition with Asian turtle farms and decreasing hatchling prices may force the shift in the US toward producing turtles for meat markets. In addition, our model can be modified and applied to more desirable species on the meat market once more knowledge is acquired about species life histories and space requirements under farmed conditions.

  6. Modeling Commercial Freshwater Turtle Production on US Farms for Pet and Meat Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Ivana; Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Grant, William E.; Feldman, Mark; Forstner, Michael R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater turtles are being exploited for meat, eggs, traditional medicine, and pet trade. As a response, turtle farming became a booming aquaculture industry in the past two decades, specifically in the southeastern states of the United States of America (US) and across Southeast Asia. However, US turtle farms are currently producing turtles only for the pet trade while commercial trappers remain focused on catching the largest individuals from the wild. In our analyses we have created a biological and economic model that describes farming operations on a representative turtle farm in Louisiana. We first modeled current production of hatchling and yearling red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans) (i.e., traditional farming) for foreign and domestic pet markets, respectively. We tested the possibility of harvesting adult turtles from the breeding stock for sale to meat markets to enable alternative markets for the farmers, while decreasing the continued pressures on wild populations (i.e., non-traditional farming). Our economic model required current profit requirements of ~$13/turtle or ~$20.31/kg of meat from non-traditional farming in order to acquire the same profit as traditional farming, a value which currently exceeds market values of red-eared sliders. However, increasing competition with Asian turtle farms and decreasing hatchling prices may force the shift in the US toward producing turtles for meat markets. In addition, our model can be modified and applied to more desirable species on the meat market once more knowledge is acquired about species life histories and space requirements under farmed conditions. PMID:26407157

  7. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effects of the mosquito larvicide GB-1111 on bird eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Albers, P.H.; Melancon, M.J.; Miles, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Golden Bear Oil (GB-1111; legal trade name for GB-1313) is a petroleum distillate used in the United States and other countries as a mosquito larvicide. As part of an evaluation of the potential effects of GB-1111 on birds, fertile eggs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) were incubated in the laboratory, and treated on day 4 of incubation with external applications equivalent to either 0, 1/3, 1, 3 or 10 times the maximum rate (X) of 47 l/ha (5 gal/A) of field application of GB-1111. Hatching success was significantly reduced in mallards treated at 3 and 10 times the maximum field application, with a calculated approximate LD 50 of 1.9 times the maximum field application. Most mortality occurred within a week of treatment. Hepatic P450-associated monooxygenase activity (ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase; EROD) was negatively related to dose. In the 3X group there was a significant increase in the concentration of hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) but a decrease in protein-bound thiols (PBSH). Hatching success of bobwhite was marginally reduced at the highest level of treatment (10X). Other effects at this level in bobwhite included a significant increase in incidence of abnormal embryos or hatchlings, lower body and liver weights, and a two-fold increase in hepatic microsomal EROD activity in hatchlings. The recommended maximum rate of field application of GB-1111 is unlikely to impair the survival or development of bobwhite embryos but is potentially toxic to mallard embryos under conditions of larvicide drift or spray overlap. - Mosquito larvicide GB-1111 is unlikely to harm bobwhite embryos when applied according to product label guidance, but could pose a potential risk to mallard embryos under conditions of larvicide drift or spray overlap

  9. Using GAMM to examine inter-individual heterogeneity in thermal performance curves for Natrix natrix indicates bet hedging strategy by mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Mathew J; Aubret, Fabien; Coulon, Aurélie

    2017-01-01

    The thermal performance curve (TPC) illustrates the dependence on body- and therefore environmental- temperature of many fitness-related aspects of ectotherm ecology and biology including foraging, growth, predator avoidance, and reproduction. The typical thermal performance curve model is linear in its parameters despite the well-known, strong, non-linearity of the response of performance to temperature. In addition, it is usual to consider a single model based on few individuals as descriptive of a species-level response to temperature. To overcome these issues, we used generalized additive mixed modeling (GAMM) to estimate thermal performance curves for 73 individual hatchling Natrix natrix grass snakes from seven clutches, taking advantage of the structure of GAMM to demonstrate that almost 16% of the deviance in thermal performance curves is attributed to inter-individual variation, while only 1.3% is attributable to variation amongst clutches. GAMM allows precise estimation of curve characteristics, which we used to test hypotheses on tradeoffs thought to constrain the thermal performance curve: hotter is better, the specialist-generalist trade off, and resource allocation/acquisition. We observed a negative relationship between maximum performance and performance breadth, indicating a specialist-generalist tradeoff, and a positive relationship between thermal optimum and maximum performance, suggesting "hotter is better". There was a significant difference among matrilines in the relationship between Area Under the Curve and maximum performance - relationship that is an indicator of evenness in acquisition or allocation of resources. As we used unfed hatchlings, the observed matriline effect indicates divergent breeding strategies among mothers, with some mothers provisioning eggs unequally resulting in some offspring being better than others, while other mothers provisioned the eggs more evenly, resulting in even performance throughout the clutch. This

  10. Atlantic leatherback migratory paths and temporary residence areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Fossette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sea turtles are long-distance migrants with considerable behavioural plasticity in terms of migratory patterns, habitat use and foraging sites within and among populations. However, for the most widely migrating turtle, the leatherback turtle Dermochelys coriacea, studies combining data from individuals of different populations are uncommon. Such studies are however critical to better understand intra- and inter-population variability and take it into account in the implementation of conservation strategies of this critically endangered species. Here, we investigated the movements and diving behaviour of 16 Atlantic leatherback turtles from three different nesting sites and one foraging site during their post-breeding migration to assess the potential determinants of intra- and inter-population variability in migratory patterns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using satellite-derived behavioural and oceanographic data, we show that turtles used Temporary Residence Areas (TRAs distributed all around the Atlantic Ocean: 9 in the neritic domain and 13 in the oceanic domain. These TRAs did not share a common oceanographic determinant but on the contrary were associated with mesoscale surface oceanographic features of different types (i.e., altimetric features and/or surface chlorophyll a concentration. Conversely, turtles exhibited relatively similar horizontal and vertical behaviours when in TRAs (i.e., slow swimming velocity/sinuous path/shallow dives suggesting foraging activity in these productive regions. Migratory paths and TRAs distribution showed interesting similarities with the trajectories of passive satellite-tracked drifters, suggesting that the general dispersion pattern of adults from the nesting sites may reflect the extent of passive dispersion initially experienced by hatchlings. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Intra- and inter-population behavioural variability may therefore be linked with initial hatchling drift scenarios

  11. A Transcriptomic Analysis of Cave, Surface, and Hybrid Isopod Crustaceans of the Species Asellus aquaticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A Stahl

    Full Text Available Cave animals, compared to surface-dwelling relatives, tend to have reduced eyes and pigment, longer appendages, and enhanced mechanosensory structures. Pressing questions include how certain cave-related traits are gained and lost, and if they originate through the same or different genetic programs in independent lineages. An excellent system for exploring these questions is the isopod, Asellus aquaticus. This species includes multiple cave and surface populations that have numerous morphological differences between them. A key feature is that hybrids between cave and surface individuals are viable, which enables genetic crosses and linkage analyses. Here, we advance this system by analyzing single animal transcriptomes of Asellus aquaticus. We use high throughput sequencing of non-normalized cDNA derived from the head of a surface-dwelling male, the head of a cave-dwelling male, the head of a hybrid male (produced by crossing a surface individual with a cave individual, and a pooled sample of surface embryos and hatchlings. Assembling reads from surface and cave head RNA pools yielded an integrated transcriptome comprised of 23,984 contigs. Using this integrated assembly as a reference transcriptome, we aligned reads from surface-, cave- and hybrid- head tissue and pooled surface embryos and hatchlings. Our approach identified 742 SNPs and placed four new candidate genes to an existing linkage map for A. aquaticus. In addition, we examined SNPs for allele-specific expression differences in the hybrid individual. All of these resources will facilitate identification of genes and associated changes responsible for cave adaptation in A. aquaticus and, in concert with analyses of other species, will inform our understanding of the evolutionary processes accompanying adaptation to the subterranean environment.

  12. Plasma esterases in the tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae (Reptilia, Teiidae): impact of developmental stage, sex, and organophosphorus in vitro exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Agustín; Attademo, Andrés M; Lajmanovich, Rafael C; Peltzer, Paola M; Junges, Celina; Cabagna, Mariana C; Fiorenza, Gabriela S; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we determined normal serum butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities in Tupinambis merianae in order to obtain reference values for organophosphorus pesticide monitoring. Forty-two T. merianae individuals were grouped by sex and size to identify potential differences in their enzyme levels to allow for proper representation of normal values for females, males, juveniles, and hatchlings. Mean CbE was determined using two model substrates: alpha-naphtylacetate (α-NA) and p-nitrophenyl valerate (4-NPV). BChE and CbE sensitivity to malaoxon (Mx) was also evaluated as well as the possibility of BChE reactivation with pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM). Mean adult females' BChE was significantly higher than adult males, juveniles, and hatchlings. No significant differences were found between groups regarding CbE. CbE (4-NPV) activity showed slightly negative correlation with lizard snout-vent length, while BChE and CbE (α-NA) showed no correlation with body size. Apparent IC(50) values for BChE and CbE (α-NA) suggested different sensitivities among groups. CbE (4-NPV) could not be inhibited. All Mx-inhibited groups treated with 2-PAM in a final concentration of 2.8 mM showed clear signs of reactivation. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that (1) plasma esterase activity did not vary with age and sex, except for BChE activity, and (2) because biological and environmental variables could be confounding factors in the response of plasma cholinesterases, complementary biomarkers like CbE inhibition and oxime-induced reactivation of esterases are strongly recommended.

  13. Distribution of α-Gustducin and Vimentin in premature and mature taste buds in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Rajapaksha, Prasangi; Payne, Jason; Goodfellow, Forrest; Wang, Zhonghou; Kawabata, Fuminori; Tabata, Shoji; Stice, Steven; Beckstead, Robert; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-14

    The sensory organs for taste in chickens (Gallus sp.) are taste buds in the oral epithelium of the palate, base of the oral cavity, and posterior tongue. Although there is not a pan-taste cell marker that labels all chicken taste bud cells, α-Gustducin and Vimentin each label a subpopulation of taste bud cells. In the present study, we used both α-Gustducin and Vimentin to further characterize chicken taste buds at the embryonic and post-hatching stages (E17-P5). We found that both α-Gustducin and Vimentin label distinct and overlapping populations of, but not all, taste bud cells. A-Gustducin immunosignals were observed as early as E18 and were consistently distributed in early and mature taste buds in embryos and hatchlings. Vimentin immunoreactivity was initially sparse at the embryonic stages then became apparent in taste buds after hatch. In hatchlings, α-Gustducin and Vimentin immunosignals largely co-localized in taste buds. A small subset of taste bud cells were labeled by either α-Gustducin or Vimentin or were not labeled. Importantly, each of the markers was observed in all of the examined taste buds. Our data suggest that the early onset of α-Gustducin in taste buds might be important for enabling chickens to respond to taste stimuli immediately after hatch and that distinctive population of taste bud cells that are labeled by different molecular markers might represent different cell types or different phases of taste bud cells. Additionally, α-Gustducin and Vimentin can potentially be used as molecular markers of all chicken taste buds in whole mount tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence of environmental and vertical transmission of Burkholderia symbionts in the oriental chinch bug, Cavelerius saccharivorus (Heteroptera: Blissidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Hideomi; Aita, Manabu; Nagayama, Atsushi; Meng, Xian-Ying; Kamagata, Yoichi; Navarro, Ronald; Hori, Tomoyuki; Ohgiya, Satoru; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2014-10-01

    The vertical transmission of symbiotic microorganisms is omnipresent in insects, while the evolutionary process remains totally unclear. The oriental chinch bug, Cavelerius saccharivorus (Heteroptera: Blissidae), is a serious sugarcane pest, in which symbiotic bacteria densely populate the lumen of the numerous tubule-like midgut crypts that the chinch bug develops. Cloning and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes revealed that the crypts were dominated by a specific group of bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia of the Betaproteobacteria. The Burkholderia sequences were distributed into three distinct clades: the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), the plant-associated beneficial and environmental (PBE) group, and the stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental group (SBE). Diagnostic PCR revealed that only one of the three groups of Burkholderia was present in ∼89% of the chinch bug field populations tested, while infections with multiple Burkholderia groups within one insect were observed in only ∼10%. Deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene confirmed that the Burkholderia bacteria specifically colonized the crypts and were dominated by one of three Burkholderia groups. The lack of phylogenetic congruence between the symbiont and the host population strongly suggested host-symbiont promiscuity, which is probably caused by environmental acquisition of the symbionts by some hosts. Meanwhile, inspections of eggs and hatchlings by diagnostic PCR and egg surface sterilization demonstrated that almost 30% of the hatchlings vertically acquire symbiotic Burkholderia via symbiont-contaminated egg surfaces. The mixed strategy of symbiont transmission found in the oriental chinch bug might be an intermediate stage in evolution from environmental acquisition to strict vertical transmission in insects. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Diverse dinosaur-dominated ichnofaunas from the Potomac Group (Lower Cretaceous) Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Ray; Lockley, Martin G.; Weems, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently fossil footprints were virtually unknown from the Cretaceous of the eastern United States. The discovery of about 300 footprints in iron-rich siliciclastic facies of the Patuxent Formation (Potomac Group) of Aptian age is undoubtedly one of the most significant Early Cretaceous track discoveries since the Paluxy track discoveries in Texas in the 1930s. The Patuxent tracks include theropod, sauropod, ankylosaur and ornithopod dinosaur footprints, pterosaur tracks, and miscellaneous mammal and other vertebrate ichnites that collectively suggest a diversity of about 14 morphotypes. This is about twice the previous maximum estimate for any known Early Cretaceous vertebrate ichnofauna. Among the more distinctive forms are excellent examples of hypsilophodontid tracks and a surprisingly large mammal footprint. A remarkable feature of the Patuxent track assemblage is the high proportion of small tracks indicative of hatchlings, independently verified by the discovery of a hatchling-sized dinosaur. Such evidence suggests the proximity of nest sites. The preservation of such small tracks is very rare in the Cretaceous track record, and indeed throughout most of the Mesozoic.This unusual preservation not only provides us with a window into a diverse Early Cretaceous ecosystem, but it also suggests the potential of such facies to provide ichnological bonanzas. A remarkable feature of the assemblage is that it consists largely of reworked nodules and clasts that may have previously been reworked within the Patuxent Formation. Such unusual contexts of preservation should provide intriguing research opportunities for sedimentologists interested in the diagenesis and taphonomy of a unique track-bearing facies.

  16. A toothed turtle from the Late Jurassic of China and the global biogeographic history of turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Walter G; Rabi, Márton; Clark, James M; Xu, Xing

    2016-10-28

    Turtles (Testudinata) are a successful lineage of vertebrates with about 350 extant species that inhabit all major oceans and landmasses with tropical to temperate climates. The rich fossil record of turtles documents the adaptation of various sub-lineages to a broad range of habitat preferences, but a synthetic biogeographic model is still lacking for the group. We herein describe a new species of fossil turtle from the Late Jurassic of Xinjiang, China, Sichuanchelys palatodentata sp. nov., that is highly unusual by plesiomorphically exhibiting palatal teeth. Phylogenetic analysis places the Late Jurassic Sichuanchelys palatodentata in a clade with the Late Cretaceous Mongolochelys efremovi outside crown group Testudines thereby establishing the prolonged presence of a previously unrecognized clade of turtles in Asia, herein named Sichuanchelyidae. In contrast to previous hypotheses, M. efremovi and Kallokibotion bajazidi are not found within Meiolaniformes, a clade that is here reinterpreted as being restricted to Gondwana. A revision of the global distribution of fossil and recent turtle reveals that the three primary lineages of derived, aquatic turtles, including the crown, Paracryptodira, Pan-Pleurodira, and Pan-Cryptodira can be traced back to the Middle Jurassic of Euramerica, Gondwana, and Asia, respectively, which resulted from the primary break up of Pangaea at that time. The two primary lineages of Pleurodira, Pan-Pelomedusoides and Pan-Chelidae, can similarly be traced back to the Cretaceous of northern and southern Gondwana, respectively, which were separated from one another by a large desert zone during that time. The primary divergence of crown turtles was therefore driven by vicariance to the primary freshwater aquatic habitat of these lineages. The temporally persistent lineages of basal turtles, Helochelydridae, Meiolaniformes, Sichuanchelyidae, can similarly be traced back to the Late Mesozoic of Euramerica, southern Gondwana, and Asia. Given

  17. Cambios alimenticios en tres especies de Sphoeroides (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae posterior al huracán Isidoro en Bocana de la Carbonera, Sureste del Golfo de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Eugenia Palacios-Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    hurricane impact, the three species share the available food resources in different proportions (bivalves, gastropods, barnacles and decapods, according to different strategies that enabled them to coexist and reduce interspecific competition. After the impact, the abundance of available prey decreased and the interespecific competition for food increased, leading to S. testudines and S. nephelus change their trophic spectrum (xiphosurans, amphipods, isopods and detritus and displacing S. splengleri of the inlet. The distribution of food resources was conditioned by the abundance and diversity of prey, as well as the adaptive response of each species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (4: 1223-1235. Epub 2010 December 01.

  18. Octylphenol (OP) alters the expression of members of the amyloid protein family in the hypothalamus of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina serpentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Vance L; Chiu, Suzanne; Kennedy, Sean W; Brooks, Ronald J

    2002-03-01

    The gonadal estrogen estradiol-17beta (E(2)) is important for developing and regulating hypothalamic function and many aspects of reproduction in vertebrates. Pollutants such as octylphenol (OP) that mimic the actions of estrogens are therefore candidate endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We used a differential display strategy (RNA-arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction) to isolate partial cDNA sequences of neurotransmitter, developmental, and disease-related genes that may be regulated by OP or E(2) in the snapping turtle Chelydra serpentina serpentina hypothalamus. Hatchling and year-old male snapping turtles were exposed to a 10 ng/mL nominal concentration of waterborne OP or E(2) for 17 days. One transcript [421 base pairs (bp)] regulated by OP and E(2) was 93% identical to human APLP-2. APLP-2 and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) regulate neuronal differentiation and are also implicated in the genesis of Alzheimer disease in humans. Northern blot analysis determined that the turtle hypothalamus contains a single APLP-2 transcript of 3.75 kb in length. Exposure to OP upregulated hypothalamic APLP-2 mRNA levels 2-fold (p < 0.05) in month-old and yearling turtles. E(2) did not affect APLP-2 mRNA levels in hatchlings but stimulated a 2-fold increase (p < 0.05) in APLP-2 mRNA levels in yearling males. The protein beta-amyloid, a selectively processed peptide derived from APP, is also involved in neuronal differentiation, and accumulation of this neurotoxic peptide causes neuronal degeneration in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, we also sought to determine the effects of estrogens on the expression of beta-amyloid. Using homology cloning based on known sequences, we isolated a cDNA fragment (474 bp) from turtle brain with 88% identity to human APP. Northern blot analysis determined that a single 3.5-kb transcript was expressed in the turtle hypothalamus. Waterborne OP also increased the expression of hypothalamic APP after 35 days of

  19. The effect of wheat prebiotics on the gut bacterial population and iron status of iron deficient broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tako, Elad; Glahn, Raymond P; Knez, Marija; Stangoulis, James Cr

    2014-06-13

    Currently, there is a lot of interest in improving gut health, and consequently increasing Fe absorption, by managing the colonic microbial population. This is traditionally done by the consumption of probiotics, live microbial food supplements. However, an alternative, and often very effective approach, is the consumption of food ingredients known as prebiotics. Fructans and arabinoxylans are naturally occurring non-digestible oligosaccharides in wheat that exhibit prebiotic properties and may enhance intestinal iron (Fe) absorption. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prebiotics from wheat on Fe bioavailability in vitro (Caco-2 cells) and in vivo (broiler chickens, Gallus gallus). In the current study, the effect of intra-amniotic administration of wheat samples extracts at 17 d of embryonic incubation on the Fe status and possible changes in the bacterial population in intestinal content of broiler hatchlings were investigated. A group of 144 eggs were injected with the specified solution (1 ml per egg) into the amniotic fluid. Immediately after hatch (21 d) and from each treatment group, 10 chicks were euthanized and their small intestine, liver and cecum were removed for relative mRNA abundance of intestinal Fe related transporters, relative liver ferritin amounts and bacterial analysis of cecal content, respectively. The in vivo results are in agreement with the in vitro observations, showing no differences in the hatchling Fe status between the treatment groups, as Fe bioavailability was not increased in vitro and no significant differences were measured in the intestinal expression of DMT1, Ferroportin and DcytB in vivo. However, there was significant variation in relative amounts of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the intestinal content between the treatments groups, with generally more bifidobacteria being produced with increased prebiotic content. In this study we showed that prebiotics naturally found in wheat grains/bread products

  20. Nutritional modulation of IGF-1 in relation to growth and body condition in Sceloporus lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Christine A; Jetzt, Amanda E; Cohick, Wendie S; John-Alder, Henry B

    2015-05-15

    Nutrition and energy balance are important regulators of growth and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis. However, our understanding of these functions does not extend uniformly to all classes of vertebrates and is mainly limited to controlled laboratory conditions. Lizards can be useful models to improve our understanding of the nutritional regulation of the GH/IGF-1 axis because many species are relatively easy to observe and manipulate both in the laboratory and in the field. In the present study, the effects of variation in food intake on growth, body condition, and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA levels were measured in (1) juveniles of Sceloporus jarrovii maintained on a full or 1/3 ration and (2) hatchlings of Sceloporus undulatus subjected to full or zero ration with or without re-feeding. These parameters plus plasma IGF-1 were measured in a third experiment using adults of S. undulatus subjected to full or zero ration with or without re-feeding. In all experiments, plasma corticosterone was measured as an anticipated indicator of nutritional stress. In S. jarrovii, growth and body condition were reduced but lizards remained in positive energy balance on 1/3 ration, and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and plasma corticosterone were not affected in comparison to full ration. In S. undulatus, growth, body condition, hepatic IGF-1 mRNA, and plasma IGF-1 were all reduced by zero ration and restored by refeeding. Plasma corticosterone was increased in response to zero ration and restored by full ration in hatchlings but not adults of S. undulatus. These data indicate that lizards conform to the broader vertebrate model in which severe food deprivation and negative energy balance is required to attenuate systemic IGF-1 expression. However, when animals remain in positive energy balance, reduced food intake does not appear to affect systemic IGF-1. Consistent with other studies on lizards, the corticosterone response to reduced food intake is an unreliable indicator

  1. Effects of a combined hatching and brooding system on hatchability, chick weight, and mortality in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, L J F; van Wagenberg, A V; Groot Koerkamp, P W G; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2009-11-01

    Chicks hatch over a time window of approximately 36 to 48 h and are removed from the hatchers only when the majority of the chicks has hatched. Consequently, chicks are exposed to prolonged posthatch holding periods and delays in feed and water access, leading to dehydration and impaired posthatch performance. It is questionable whether the physiological requirements of the hatchlings can be met with current hatching systems. An alternative system that may better match the requirements of the hatchlings is a system that combines the hatching and brooding phase, so that feed and water can be provided immediately after hatch. Such a system, named Patio, was developed in the Netherlands and tested from 2006 to 2008, to evaluate effects on hatchability and early performance of broilers. This paper describes the Patio system and the results from these tests. A total of 21 broiler production trials (780,686 eggs) in the Patio system were evaluated at 3 locations and compared with control hatches of eggs of the same parental flock in the hatchery. Hatchability in the Patio was on average 1.45, 1.83, and 1.86% higher at location 1, 2, and 3, respectively. However, in the calculation of the hatchability in the Patio, possible second grade chicks were included, whereas these were excluded in the calculation of hatchability in the hatchery. Additionally, in the hatchery, the hatching process was interrupted earlier than in the Patio, meaning that possible late hatching chicks remained in the flock in the Patio, but not in the hatchery. In 3 trials, the Patio chicks were 11.6 to 16.3% heavier at d 0, when the hatchery chicks were placed in the broiler house. Mean cumulative 7-d mortality was only assessed in the Patio and was 1.27, 1.09, and 1.43% at location 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The Patio system appears to function as an alternative to current hatching and brooding systems. Further studies are required to determine to what extent the higher hatchability is due to second

  2. Spatial Ecology of the American Crocodile in a Tropical Pacific Island in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguera-Reina, Sergio A; Venegas-Anaya, Miryam; Sánchez, Andrés; Arbelaez, Italo; Lessios, Harilaos A; Densmore, Llewellyn D

    2016-01-01

    Conservation of large predators has long been a challenge for biologists due to the limited information we have about their ecology, generally low numbers in the wild, large home ranges and the continuous expansion of human settlements. The American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) is a typical apex predator, that has suffered from all of these characteristic problems, especially the latter one. Humans have had a major impact on the recovery of this species throughout its range, even though most of the countries it inhabits have banned hunting. The last decade has made it clear that in order to implement sound conservation and management programs, we must increase our understanding of crocodile spatial ecology. However, in only two countries where American crocodiles have telemetry studies even been published. Herein we have characterized the spatial ecology of C. acutus on Coiba Island, Panama, by radio-tracking (VHF transmitters) 24 individuals between 2010 and 2013, to determine movement patterns, home range, and habitat use. We have then compared our findings with those of previous studies to develop the most comprehensive assessment of American crocodile spatial ecology to date. Females showed a higher average movement distance (AMD) than males; similarly, adults showed a higher AMD than sub-adults and juveniles. However, males exhibited larger home ranges than females, and concomitantly sub-adults had larger home ranges than juveniles, hatchlings, and adults. There was an obvious relationship between seasonal precipitation and AMD, with increased AMD in the dry and "low-wet" seasons, and reduced AMD during the "true" wet season. We found disaggregate distributions according to age groups throughout the 9 habitat types in the study area; adults and hatchlings inhabited fewer habitat types than juveniles and sub-adults. These sex- and age-group discrepancies in movement and habitat choice are likely due to the influences of reproductive biology and Coiba

  3. Spatial and stage-structured population model of the American crocodile for comparison of comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy W.; Slone, Daniel H.; Swain, Eric D.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Lohmann, Melinda; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Rice, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    the American crocodile. This modeling effort examines how CERP restoration alternatives will affect growth and survival rates of hatchling and juvenile crocodiles, hatchling dispersal to suitable nursery habitat, and relative abundance and distribution in response to changing salinity and water depth for all stage classes of crocodiles. The response of the American crocodile to restoration efforts will provide a quantifiable measure of restoration success. By applying the crocodile model to proposed restoration alternatives and predicting population responses, we can choose alternatives that approximate historical conditions, enhance habitat for multiple species, and identify future research needs.

  4. Spawn in two deep-sea volute gastropods (Neogastropoda: Volutidae) from southwestern Atlantic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchaszadeh, Pablo E.; Teso, Valeria; Pastorino, Guido

    2017-12-01

    The gastropods Odontocymbiola pescalia and Provocator corderoi and their egg capsules were collected by the R/V Puerto Deseado from the Mar del Plata Submarine Canyon ( 37°53‧S, at depths of 291-1404 m) and from Burdwood Bank ( 54°27‧S, 128-785 m). Odontocymbiola pescalia egg capsules measured 15.67 ± 3.38 mm in diameter. They were subspherical in shape with an external calcareous layer. Each egg capsule contained 3-5 embryos and white material as extra embryonic food. Embryos grew to a size of up to 9.3 ± 1.1 mm in mean shell length before hatching as crawling juveniles. The spawn of P. corderoi consisted of a single dome shaped egg capsule of 14.17 ± 1.5 mm in diameter, attached to hard substrata by a basal membrane with a rounded outline. A curved semilunar furrow (seam) on one side of the capsules was always present. The number of embryos per capsule was 2-6. Embryos hatched as crawling juveniles with a shell length of 5.9 ± 0.6 mm. The size and number of whorls in the hatchling shell suggested a slow rate of development, akin to many other deep-sea invertebrates. The egg capsules and reproductive development strategies of both species were compared with those from other congeneric representatives.

  5. Spatial distribution and diet of Cephalopholis fulva (Ephinephelidae at Trindade Island, Brazil

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    Flavio do Nascimento Coelho

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze the population structure and diet of the coney Cephalopholis fulva at Trindade Island, Brazil, through direct observation with SCUBA diving in 11 reef sites around the Island, up to 50 m deep. Diet was based on 77 individuals collected with speargun. Mean population density and biomass were estimated at 29 individuals/100 m² and 13 kg/100 m², respectively. This species is regularly distributed along the costal environments of the Trindade Island, with no significant differences in densities and biomass detected among the different collection habitats (reef crest, reef slope, and reef plateau. However, significantly higher densities were observed micro-habitats with greater structural complexity, which may offer more shelter and food to C. fulva. Four food item groups were identified from the gut contents of C. fulva: Annelida, Crustacea, Teleostei, and Testudinata. It is the first record of predation of the green turtle Chelonia mydas hatchlings by the coney. Trindade Island seems to present the densest concentration of C. fulva in all Brazilian and Caribbean ecosystems inhabited by this species. Scarcity of competitors, predators, and fishing pressure may explain the high densities observed in the Island.

  6. Embryonic origin of mate choice in a lizard with temperature-dependent sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putz, Oliver; Crews, David

    2006-01-01

    Individual differences in the adult sexual behavior of vertebrates are rooted in the fetal environment. In the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), hatchling sex ratios differ between incubation temperatures, as does sexuality in same-sex animals. This variation can primarily be ascribed to the temperature having direct organizing actions on the brain. Here we demonstrate that embryonic temperature can affect adult mate choice in the leopard gecko. Given the simultaneous choice between two females from different incubation temperatures (30.0 and 34.0 degrees C), males from one incubation temperature (30.0 degrees C) preferred the female from 34.0 degrees C, while males from another incubation temperature (32.5 degrees C) preferred the female from 30.0 degrees C. We suggest that this difference in mate choice is due to an environmental influence on brain development leading to differential perception of opposite-sex individuals. This previously unrecognized modulator of adult mate choice lends further support to the view that mate choice is best understood in the context of an individual's entire life-history. Thus, sexual selection results from a combination of the female's as well as the male's life history. Female attractiveness and male choice therefore are complementary. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Reintroduction medicine: whooping cranes in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Dominique L; Hartup, Barry K

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents veterinary management strategies and diagnostic findings in the reintroduction of the endangered whooping crane (Grus americana). Between 2005 and 2010, 63 (27 male, 36 female) hatchling whooping cranes were assigned to a reintroduction project involving autumn release of costume-reared chicks in Wisconsin. Veterinary care included preventive measures and comprehensive pre-release evaluations to improve fitness and reduce translocation of potential disease agents to native habitats. A total of 44 clinically normal birds were released (70% of assigned individuals). Cases of morbidity were classified according to primary body system affected. Musculoskeletal disorders were described in 57 birds (90%); five birds were removed from the project prior to release (8%), all for abnormalities that prevented normal function. Fourteen birds died or were euthanized prior to release (22%); pre-release mortality was attributed to developmental abnormality, predation, trauma or infectious disease. Chronic respiratory aspergillosis, diagnosed in seven birds (11%), was the most common infectious disease of concern. Predation and trauma were primary causes of post-release mortality; no evidence of infectious disease of captive origin was detected in the study population by the end of 2010. The assessment of data accumulated by this project helped to outline successful health management strategies, as well as identify and mitigate ongoing risks to captive whooping cranes that impede reintroduction efforts and achieving management goals for species recovery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The influence of regional hydrology on nesting behavior and nest fate of the American alligator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Cristina A.; Bass, Oron L.; Nuttle, William; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Rice, Kenneth G.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Whelan, Kevin R.T.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic conditions are critical to the nesting behavior and reproductive success of crocodilians. In South Florida, USA, growing human settlement has led to extensive surface water management and modification of historical water flows in the wetlands, which have affected regional nesting of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Although both natural and anthropogenic factors are considered to determine hydrologic conditions, the aspects of hydrological patterns that affect alligator nest effort, flooding (partial and complete), and failure (no hatchling) are unclear. We deconstructed annual hydrological patterns using harmonic models that estimated hydrological matrices including mean, amplitude, timing of peak, and periodicity of surface water depth and discharge and examined their effects on alligator nesting using survey data from Shark Slough, Everglades National Park, from 1985 to 2005. Nest effort increased in years with higher mean and lesser periodicity of water depth. A greater proportion of nests were flooded and failed when peak discharge occurred earlier in the year. Also, nest flooding rates were greater in years with greater periodicity of water depth, and nest failure rate was greater when mean discharge was higher. This study guides future water management decisions to mitigate negative impacts on reproduction of alligators and provides wildlife managers with a tool for assessing and modifying annual water management plans to conserve crocodilians and other wetland species.

  9. ANNUAL ACTIVITY OF THE NOBLE CRAYFISH (ASTACUS ASTACUS IN THE ORLJAVA RIVER (CROATIA

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    FALLER M.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the annual activity of the noble crayfish (Astacus astacus at three sites along the Orljava River, in the continental part of Croatia, between August 2003 and September 2004. Each site represented the typical characteristics of the upper, middle and lower section of the river (5, 24 and 37 km from the spring, respectively. The biggest population size was recorded on the most upstream site, with greatest structural variability of bottom, high biotic index, and the lowest mean water temperature. Males dominated in catch during the whole research period (total sex ratio was 1.77 males: 1 female. The number of caught crayfish fluctuated during the year and their activity was positively correlated with the water temperature. The crayfish catch within the two downstream sites was dramatically lower in the autumn 2004 then the year before. No obvious reason could be found; therefore we concluded that this was probably result of natural fluctuations in population. Males were significantly longer than females on all three sites. Males and females had similar percentages of injuries, mainly on claws and antennae. Crayfish were active during the whole year, even when water temperature was just 1°C. Phases of life cycle (moulting, active cement glands, mating, hatchlings occurred a month later in our population than in the Northern Europe populations, probably as a consequence of differences in the climate.

  10. Anti-predator meshing may provide greater protection for sea turtle nests than predator removal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M O'Connor

    Full Text Available The problem of how to protect sea turtle nests from terrestrial predators is of worldwide concern. On Queensland's southern Sunshine Coast, depredation of turtle nests by the introduced European red fox (Vulpes vulpes has been recorded as the primary terrestrial cause of egg and hatchling mortality. We investigated the impact of foxes on the nests of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta and occasional green turtle (Chelonia mydas over ten nesting seasons. Meshing of nests with fox exclusion devices (FEDs was undertaken in all years accompanied by lethal fox control in the first five-year period, but not in the second five-year period. Lethal fox control was undertaken in the study area from 2005 to February 2010, but foxes still breached 27% (range19-52% of turtle nests. In the second five-year period, despite the absence of lethal fox control, the average percentage of nests breached was less than 3% (range 0-4%. Comparison of clutch depredation rates in the two five-year periods demonstrated that continuous nest meshing may be more effective than lethal fox control in mitigating the impact of foxes on turtle nests. In the absence of unlimited resources available for the eradication of exotic predators, the use of FEDs and the support and resourcing of a dedicated volunteer base can be considered an effective turtle conservation tool on some beaches.

  11. Increasing salinity drastically reduces hatching success of crustaceans from depression wetlands of the semi-arid Eastern Cape Karoo region, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabidi, Annah; Bird, Matthew S; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2018-04-13

    Salinity is an important factor affecting freshwater aquatic species distribution and diversity. The semi-arid Eastern Cape Karoo region of South Africa has been earmarked for shale gas development through hydraulic fracturing. The process uses large amounts of water and produces briny wastewater. When not managed properly, these wastewaters may lead to salinisation of surface freshwater bodies in the region. Therefore, the effect of salinity on the hatching success of crustacean resting eggs was examined using sediments from four depression wetlands found in the region. The sediments were exposed for 28 days to salinity levels of 0.5 g L -1 , 2.5 g L -1 , 5 g L -1 and 10 g L -1 . Control aquaria in which no salt was added were also set up. There was a significant decrease in the emerged taxa richness and abundances at salinities of 2.5 g L -1 and above. Anostraca, Notostraca and Spinicaudata hatchlings were abundant at salinities of 0.5 g L -1 and below, while Copepoda, Daphniidae (Cladocera) and Ostracoda were observed in the highest salinity, but their densities were still lower with increased salinities. Given the importance of large branchiopods in the trophic balance of depression wetlands, their loss may alter the ecological balance and function of these ecosystems.

  12. Diversity and genetic structure of white mullet populations in the Gulf of Mexico analyzed by microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Almanzar, Eloisa; Ramírez-Saad, Hugo; Velázquez-Aragón, José A.; Serrato, Alejandra; Ibáñez, Ana L.

    2017-11-01

    The white mullet (Mugil curema) is a species of wide geographical distribution on both coasts of America, inhabiting coastal lagoons, estuaries and rivers. Adults form schools and migrate into the open sea to spawn, where both eggs and hatchlings are subject to transport by surface currents. In northern Gulf of Mexico, under the influence of temperate waters M. curema has a single spawning in spring and summer, while in southern Gulf of Mexico, with warmer environments, spawnings are in summer and winter. These asynchronous spawning may point to the existence of different populations, while the planktonic mobility of eggs and larvae open the possibility that the putative populations mix together. Aiming to address whether there are different genetic groups of M. curema, ten coastal sampling sites along the Gulf of Mexico plus one site in the NE Atlantic coast were selected. A total of 363 individuals comprising all sampling sites were analyzed by means of microsatellites. 10 loci were tested and the number of alleles per locus varied between 7 and 19. All loci showed significant genetic differentiation (FST = 0.287), while Evanno test resulted in a K = 3 value, suggesting that three is the most probable number of M. curema groups in the studied area. This grouping is possibly associated with spawning time, contrasting oceanographic conditions in the north, center, and south of the Gulf of Mexico, as well as ecological and geomorphologic differences between lagoon environments; giving as consequence variations in the history of life of M. curema populations.

  13. Effect of Lignite Fly Ash on the Growth and Reproduction of Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarojini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is an amorphous ferroalumino silicate, an important solid waste around thermal power plants. It creates problems leading to environmental degradation due to improper utilization or disposal. However, fly ash is a useful ameliorant that may improve the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and is a source of readily available plant macro and micronutrients when it is used with biosolids. Supply of nutrients from fly ash with biosolids may enhance their agricultural use. The growth and reproduction of Eisenia fetida was studied during vermicomposting of fly ash with cowdung and pressmud in four different proportions (T1,T2,T3 & T4 and one control i.e., cow dung and pressmud alone. The growth, cocoon and hatchlings production were observed at the interval of 15 days over a period of 60 days. The maximum worm growth and reproduction was observed in bedding material alone. Next to that the T1 was observed as the best mixture for vermiculture.

  14. Expert elicitation, uncertainty, and the value of information in controlling invasive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Fred A.; Smith, Brian J.; Bonneau, Mathieu; Martin, Julien; Romagosa, Christina; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Reed, Robert; Eckles, Jennifer Kettevrlin; Vitt, Laurie J.

    2017-01-01

    We illustrate the utility of expert elicitation, explicit recognition of uncertainty, and the value of information for directing management and research efforts for invasive species, using tegu lizards (Salvator merianae) in southern Florida as a case study. We posited a post-birth pulse, matrix model in which four age classes of tegus are recognized: hatchlings, 1 year-old, 2 year-olds, and 3 + year-olds. This matrix model was parameterized using a 3-point process to elicit estimates of tegu demographic rates in southern Florida from 10 herpetology experts. We fit statistical distributions for each parameter and for each expert, then drew and pooled a large number of replicate samples from these to form a distribution for each demographic parameter. Using these distributions, as well as the observed correlations among elicited values, we generated a large sample of matrix population models to infer how the tegu population would respond to control efforts. We used the concepts of Pareto efficiency and stochastic dominance to conclude that targeting older age classes at relatively high rates appears to have the best chance of minimizing tegu abundance and control costs. We conclude that expert opinion combined with an explicit consideration of uncertainty can be valuable in conducting an initial assessment of what control strategy, effort, and monetary resources are needed to reduce and eventually eliminate the invader. Scientists, in turn, can use the value of information to focus research in a way that not only increases the efficacy of control, but minimizes costs as well.

  15. Long-term growth of Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) in a southern Nevada population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medica, P.A.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Saethre, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of growth rates, age at maturity, and longevity are important aspects of a species life history and are directly applicable to life table creation and population viability analyses. We measured the growth of a cohort of 17 semi-wild Desert Tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) located in Rock Valley, Nevada over a 47-yr period beginning in 1963. The tortoises were initially marked as hatchling and juvenile animals between the years 1963 and 1965 and ranged in size from 47 to 77 mm in plastron length. We assigned ages of 1-4 yr to the tortoises at initial capture based on their body size. These tortoises were recaptured, measured, and weighed approximately annually since their initial capture. Growth of male and female tortoises did not differ significantly until animals reached the age of 23-25 yr. Annual tortoise growth was correlated with the production of ephemeral vegetation, while accounting for size, sex, and repeated measurements of the animals as well as the interval between measurements. However, the production of ephemeral plants was likewise highly correlated (non-linearly) with winter rainfall. Stochastic predation events between 2003 and 2007 decimated this cohort of tortoises. The average age of the long-term surviving tortoises from this cohort was 43 yr with a range of 39-47 yr. Twelve of the tortoises survived to the age of 39 yr and 11 of the 12 reached 40 yr.

  16. Early life manipulations of vasopressin-family peptides alter vocal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Nicole M; Peck, Samantha C; Kim, Tabitha H; Goldstein, Michael H; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2017-07-26

    Vocal learning from social partners is crucial for the successful development of communication in a wide range of species. Social interactions organize attention and enhance motivation to learn species-typical behaviour. However, the neurobiological mechanisms connecting social motivation and vocal learning are unknown. Using zebra finches ( Taeniopygia guttata ), a ubiquitous model for vocal learning, we show that manipulations of nonapeptide hormones in the vasopressin family (arginine vasotocin, AVT) early in development can promote or disrupt both song and social motivation. Young male zebra finches, like human infants, are socially gregarious and require interactive feedback from adult tutors to learn mature vocal forms. To investigate the role of social motivational mechanisms in song learning, in two studies, we injected hatchling males with AVT or Manning compound (MC, a nonapeptide receptor antagonist) on days 2-8 post-hatching and recorded song at maturity. In both studies, MC males produced a worse match to tutor song than controls. In study 2, which experimentally controlled for tutor and genetic factors, AVT males also learned song significantly better compared with controls. Furthermore, song similarity correlated with several measures of social motivation throughout development. These findings provide the first evidence that nonapeptides are critical to the development of vocal learning. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Protein requirements for Blue-fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva) growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carciofi, A C; Sanfilippo, L F; de-Oliveira, L D; do Amaral, P P; Prada, F

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the protein requirements for hand-rearing Blue-fronted Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva). Forty hatchlings were fed semi-purified diets containing one of four (as-fed basis) protein levels: 13%, 18%, 23% and 28%. The experiment was carried out in a randomized block design with the initial weight of the nestling as the blocking factor and 10 parrots per protein level. Regression analysis was used to determine relationships between protein level and biometric measurements. The data indicated that 13% crude protein supported nestling growth with 18% being the minimum tested level required for maximum development. The optimal protein concentration for maximum weight gain was 24.4% (p = 0.08; r(2) = 0.25), tail length 23.7% (p = 0.09; r(2) = 0.19), wing length 23.0% (p = 0.07; r(2) = 0.17), tarsus length 21.3% (p = 0.06; r(2) = 0.10) and tarsus width 21.4% (p = 0.07; r(2) = 0.09). Tarsus measurements were larger in males (p < 0.05), indicating that sex must be considered when studying developing psittacines. These results were obtained using a highly digestible protein and a diet with moderate metabolizable energy levels.

  18. Hydrodynamic role of longitudinal ridges in a leatherback turtle swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Jooha; Lee, Sang-Im; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), the fastest swimmer and the deepest diver among marine turtles, has five longitudinal ridges on its carapace. These ridges are the most remarkable morphological features distinguished from other marine turtles. To investigate the hydrodynamic role of these ridges in the leatherback turtle swimming, we model a carapace with and without ridges by using three dimensional surface data of a stuffed leatherback turtle in the National Science Museum, Korea. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel in the ranges of the real leatherback turtle's Reynolds number (Re) and angle of attack (α). The longitudinal ridges function differently according to the flow condition (i.e. Re and α). At low Re and negative α that represent the swimming condition of hatchlings and juveniles, the ridges significantly decrease the drag by generating streamwise vortices and delaying the main separation. On the other hand, at high Re and positive α that represent the swimming condition of adults, the ridges suppress the laminar separation bubble near the front part by generating streamwise vortices and enhance the lift and lift-to-drag ratio. Supported by the NRF program (2011-0028032).

  19. Investigation into the possibility of vertical transmission of avian bornavirus in free-ranging Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnatte, Pauline; Nagy, Eva; Ojkic, Davor; Crawshaw, Graham; Smith, Dale A

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of in ovo infection with avian bornavirus (ABV) in wild Canada geese (Branta canadensis), 53 eggs were opportunistically collected at various stages of embryonic development from 16 free-ranging goose nests at a large urban zoo site where ABV infection is known to be present in this species. ABV RNA was detected in the yolk of one of three unembryonated eggs using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. ABV RNA was not identified in the brains from 23 newly hatched goslings or 19 embryos, nor from three early whole embryos. Antibodies against ABV were not detected in the plasma of any of the hatched goslings using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Possible reasons for the failure to detect ABV RNA in hatchlings or embryos include low sample size, eggs deriving from parents not actively infected with ABV, the testing of only brain tissue, and failure of the virus to replicate in Canada goose embryos. In conclusion, this preliminary investigation demonstrating the presence of ABV RNA in the yolk of a Canada goose egg provides the first evidence for the potential for vertical transmission of ABV in waterfowl.

  20. Nitrogen excretion during embryonic development of the green iguana, Iguana iguana (Reptilia; Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, M R; Taylor, E W; Abe, A S

    2012-10-01

    Development within the cleidoic egg of birds and reptiles presents the embryo with the problem of accumulation of wastes from nitrogen metabolism. Ammonia derived from protein catabolism is converted into the less toxic product urea or relatively insoluble uric acid. The pattern of nitrogen excretion of the green iguana, Iguana iguana, was determined during embryonic development using samples from allantoic fluid and from the whole homogenized egg, and in hatchlings and adults using samples of blood plasma. Urea was the major excretory product over the course of embryonic development. It was found in higher concentrations in the allantoic sac, suggesting that there is a mechanism present on the allantoic membrane enabling the concentration of urea. The newly hatched iguana still produced urea while adults produced uric acid. The time course of this shift in the type of nitrogen waste was not determined but the change is likely to be related to the water relations associated with the terrestrial habit of the adult. The green iguana produces parchment-shelled eggs that double in mass during incubation due to water absorption; the eggs also accumulate 0.02 mM of urea, representing 82% of the total measured nitrogenous residues that accumulate inside the allantois. The increase in egg mass and urea concentration became significant after 55 days of incubation then were unchanged until hatching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Feeding rosemary leaves powder ameliorates rooster age-related subfertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Rad, Seyyed Mohsen; Zeinoaldini, Saeed; Zhandi, Mahdi; Moravej, Hossein; Ansari, Mahdi

    2017-10-01

    Having a high proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids avian spermatozoa predispose to lipoperoxidation which results in fertility reduction. In the current study, rosemary leaves powder (RLP) was fed to senescent breeder roosters to improve their reproductive performance. Twenty four 70-week-old roosters were randomly divided into four groups and received following treatments including 0 (RLP-0), 2.5 (RLP-2.5), 5 (RLP-5) or 7.5 (RLP-7.5) g of RLP/kg of diet for eight consecutive weeks. Semen characteristics were evaluated weekly. Sperm penetration rate was assessed once, however, fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and hatchling quality evaluated twice (using eggs collected during 1st and 2nd weeks following AI) at the end of experiment. Excluding body weight and sperm abnormality percentage, other traits including semen concentration (RLP-2.5 = 3.57, RLP-5 = 4.21 and RLP-7.5 = 3.79; SEM = 0.12; p roosters. Further studies are needed to divulge the causal mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring scenarios of light pollution from coastal development reaching sea turtle nesting beaches near Cabo Pulmo, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Verutes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available New coastal development may offer economic benefits to resort builders and even local communities, but these projects can also impact local ecosystems, key wildlife, and the draw for tourists. We explore how light from Cabo Cortés, a proposed coastal development in Baja California Sur, Mexico, may alter natural light cues used by sea turtle hatchlings. We adapt a viewshed approach to model exterior light originating from the resort under plausible zoning scenarios. This spatially explicit information allows stakeholders to evaluate the likely impact of alternative development options. Our model suggests that direct light’s ability to reach sea turtle nesting beaches varies greatly by source location and height—with some plausible development scenarios leading to significantly less light pollution than others. Our light pollution maps can enhance decision-making, offering clear guidance on where to avoid elevated lamps or when to recommend lighting restrictions. Communities can use this information to participate in development planning to mitigate ecological, aesthetic and economic impacts from artificial lighting. Though tested in Mexico, our approach and free, open-source software can be applied in other places around the world to better understand and manage the threats of light pollution to sea turtles. Keywords: Artificial light, Viewshed analysis, Sea turtle conservation, Coastal resort management, InVEST

  3. Effect of temperature on incubation period, embryonic mortality, hatch rate, egg water loss and partridge chick weight (Rhynchotus rufescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakage ES

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incubation temperature (34.5; 35.5; 36.5; 37.5 and 38.5ºC, on incubation period, embryonic mortality, hatching rate, water loss and chick weight at hatch, using daily incubation of partridge (Rhynchotus rufescens eggs. The highest hatching percentage was obtained between 35.5 and 36.5ºC. Incubation length and temperature were inversely proportional. Water loss was lower in eggs incubated at low temperatures as compared to high temperatures. There was no difference among incubation temperatures in absolute and relative hatchling weights. Early embryonic mortality increased at low temperatures (36.5ºC. Our results show that, under conditions of daily incubation of eggs in the same incubator, higher hatching rate can be obtained using temperatures between 35.5ºC and 36.5ºC; incubation temperature is inversely proportional to incubation length, and absolute and relative weights of partridge chicks are not affected by incubation temperature.

  4. Multiple fitness benefits of polyandry in a cephalopod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe E Squires

    Full Text Available Sex differences in reproductive investment play a crucial role in sexual conflict. One intriguing aspect of sexual conflict is the evolution of female multiple mating (polyandry, particularly in systems where females receive no obvious direct benefits from males, and where mating is highly costly. Here, theory predicts that polyandrous females can increase their reproductive success by taking advantage of the genetic benefits of mating with multiple males. Cephalopods provide a model system for addressing this question, as all species mate multiply. Here we examine differences in reproductive success between monandrous, multiply mated (to the same male and polyandrous female dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica.We mated females in the laboratory with two different males (polyandrous; controlling for mating order, or with a single male (monandrous. To control for mating frequency, we mated monandrous females either once (monandrous 1, or with the same male twice (monandrous 2, and measured reproductive success for each of the three treatments (polyandrous, monandrous 1, monandrous 2. Females mated to two different males produced eggs faster and had larger hatchlings relative to egg mass than females mated once with a single male.The benefits of polyandry demonstrated here are the first, to our knowledge, in any cephalopod. These benefits may outweigh the significant costs associated with mating and help to explain how multiple mating has evolved (or is maintained in this group.

  5. Counterbalancing effects of maternal mercury exposure during different stages of early ontogeny in American toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Christine M; Hopkins, William A; Bodinof, Catherine M; Budischak, Sarah A; Wada, Haruka; Unrine, Jason M

    2011-10-15

    Maternal transfer of environmental contaminants is a disadvantageous parental effect which can have long-lasting implications for offspring fitness. We investigated the effects of mercury (Hg) on the reproductive success of female amphibians and the subsequent effects of maternal transfer on the development of their offspring. American toads (Bufo americanus) maternally transferred Hg to their eggs, and there was a negative relationship between Hg concentrations and the percentage of viable hatchlings produced in clutches. However, when we continued to monitor larvae that successfully hatched, we found 21% greater metamorphic success in larvae from Hg-exposed mothers compared to reference larvae. The negative effect in the embryonic stage and positive effect in the larval stage counterbalanced one another, ultimately resulting in no difference in predicted terrestrial recruitment, regardless of maternal Hg exposure. Our findings demonstrate that maternal effects on survival manifesting at different stages in ontogeny have the potential to produce complicated outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Anti-predator meshing may provide greater protection for sea turtle nests than predator removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Julie M; Limpus, Colin J; Hofmeister, Kate M; Allen, Benjamin L; Burnett, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    The problem of how to protect sea turtle nests from terrestrial predators is of worldwide concern. On Queensland's southern Sunshine Coast, depredation of turtle nests by the introduced European red fox (Vulpes vulpes) has been recorded as the primary terrestrial cause of egg and hatchling mortality. We investigated the impact of foxes on the nests of the loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) and occasional green turtle (Chelonia mydas) over ten nesting seasons. Meshing of nests with fox exclusion devices (FEDs) was undertaken in all years accompanied by lethal fox control in the first five-year period, but not in the second five-year period. Lethal fox control was undertaken in the study area from 2005 to February 2010, but foxes still breached 27% (range19-52%) of turtle nests. In the second five-year period, despite the absence of lethal fox control, the average percentage of nests breached was less than 3% (range 0-4%). Comparison of clutch depredation rates in the two five-year periods demonstrated that continuous nest meshing may be more effective than lethal fox control in mitigating the impact of foxes on turtle nests. In the absence of unlimited resources available for the eradication of exotic predators, the use of FEDs and the support and resourcing of a dedicated volunteer base can be considered an effective turtle conservation tool on some beaches.

  7. MALE REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION IN THE MAGELLANIC PENGUIN (SPHENISCUS MAGELLANICUS) USING CHILLED-STORED SEMEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Justine K; Nollens, Hendrik H; Schmitt, Todd L; Steinman, Karen J; Dubach, Jean M; Robeck, Todd R

    2016-03-01

    Research was performed to increase our understanding of male Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) reproductive biology and to develop artificial insemination (AI) technology to assist with maintaining the species' genetic diversity. Seminal traits were characterized from seven males with noncontaminated ejaculates (n = 123) displaying high in vitro motion parameters, membrane integrity, and morphology. Seven females were maintained in nest sites that permitted visual, auditory, and tactile contact with their paired male but not copulation for 18.3 ± 2.4 days before egg lay. After cloacal AI (2.6 ± 0.4 inseminations/female) with semen chilled for up to 20.5 hr at 5°C, all females produced one to two fertile eggs, with the first oviposition occurring within 7 days of plasma progesterone concentrations exceeding 0.8 ng/ml. Overall fertility was 91.7%, hatchability was 63.6%, and genetic analyses confirmed that all embryos and hatchlings were sired by AI males. The heterospermic AI design demonstrated that eggs were fertilized by spermatozoa chilled for 1.5-19.8 hr before AI and were laid 4.5-11.5 days post AI. These results contribute new data on Magellanic penguin sperm biology and demonstrate that high fertility rates after AI of chilled semen can be achieved with females remaining in proximity to their paired mate.

  8. Paternal epigenetic effects of population density on locust phase-related characteristics associated with heat-shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Li, Shaoqin; Ren, Qiang; Tong, Xiwen; Zhang, Xia; Kang, Le

    2015-02-01

    Many species exhibit transgenerational plasticity by which environmental cues experienced by either parent can be transmitted to their offspring, resulting in phenotypic variants in offspring to match ancestral environments. However, the manner by which paternal experiences affect offspring plasticity through epigenetic inheritance in animals generally remains unclear. In this study, we examined the transgenerational effects of population density on phase-related traits in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria. Using an experimental design that explicitly controls genetic background, we found that the effects of crowd or isolation rearing on phase plasticity could be inherited to the offspring. The isolation of gregarious locusts resulted in reduced weight in offspring eggs and altered morphometric traits in hatchlings, whereas crowding of solitarious locusts exhibited opposite effects. The consequences of density changes were transmitted by both maternal and paternal inheritance, although the expression of paternal effects was not as pronounced as that of maternal effects. Prominent expression of heat-shock proteins (Hsps), such as Hsp90, Hsp70 and Hsp20.6, could be triggered by density changes. Hsps were significantly upregulated upon crowding but downregulated upon isolation. The variation in parental Hsp expression was also transmitted to the offspring, in which the pattern of inheritance was consistent with that of phase characteristics. These results revealed a paternal effect on phase polyphenism and Hsp expression induced by population density, and defined a model system that could be used to study the paternal epigenetic inheritance of environmental changes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Developmental origin of limb size variation in lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Robin M; Skewes, Sable A

    2017-05-01

    In many respects, reptile hatchlings are fully functional, albeit miniature, adults. This means that the adult morphology must emerge during embryonic development. This insight emphasizes the connection between the mechanisms that generate phenotypic variation during embryonic development and the action of selection on post-hatching individuals. To determine when species-specific differences in limb and tail lengths emerge during embryonic development, we compared allometric patterns of early limb growth of four distantly related species of lizards. The major questions addressed were whether early embryonic limb and tail growth is characterized by the gradual (continuous allometry) or by the abrupt emergence (transpositional allometry) of size differences among species. Our observations supported transpositional allometry of both limbs and tails. Species-specific differences in limb and tail length were exhibited when limb and tail buds first protruded from the body wall. Genes known to be associated with early limb development of tetrapods are obvious targets for studies on the genetic mechanisms that determine interspecific differences in relative limb length. Broadly comparative studies of gene regulation would facilitate understanding of the mechanisms underlying adaptive variation in limb size, including limb reduction and loss, of squamate reptiles. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reproduction of Trachemys callirostris callirostris (Emydidae) in environments created by mining in La Guajira, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguizamo Pardo, Cindy; Bonilla Gomez, Maria Argenis

    2014-01-01

    The Colombian slider turtle (Trachemys callirostris callirostris) is a subspecies under a high level of exploitation in Colombia, of which nothing is known about its reproduction in highly disturbed areas with low hunting pressure. We studied some reproductive traits in three different aquatic environments created by coal mining in the Cerrejon Mine, La Guajira Department, during part of the reproductive season in 2011 (between March and June). We recorded hatching success (56.9 %) only in the stabilization ponds. In the mining reservoir, the 100 % predation rate was the factor limiting hatching success. The recommended option there is protect the nests from the main predator (Procyon cancrivorus) and the relocation of some of them for ex-situ incubation. The low level of nesting recorded in the rehabilitated area may have been the result of extraction of adult females, but also could be due to habitat limiting factors influencing the growth of individuals, or by demographic factors. Size variables measured for clutches, eggs, and hatchlings at the three study sites, showed the possibility that nesting females are larger than those of other populations subjected to hunting in Colombia. However, to determine the extent of geographic variation when compared to other populations it will be necessary to examine temporal variation in reproductive traits of the Cerrejon Population.

  11. Depletion of primordial germ cells (PGCs) by X-irradiation to extraembryonic region of chicken embryos and expression of xenotransplanted quail PGCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Y.; Yazawa, S.; Usui, F.; Nakamura, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.; Tagami, T.; Hiramatsu, K.; Kagami, H.; Ono, T.

    2009-01-01

    The generation of germline chimeras by the transfer of primordial germ cells (PGCs) requires incorporation of the PGCs of the donor into the gonadal tissue of the recipient embryo. We investigated the utility of soft x-irradiation with application of a lead (12 x 3 x 0.25 mm, - 0.1 g) shield to the embryo proper for the production of chicken-quail germline chimeras. Chicken embryos shielded during irradiation for 120s (- 7.2 Gy) at stages 13 to 17 showed a hatchability of 35% (106/301), whereas the hatchability of unshielded embryos was 26% (27/105). The relative population of gonadal PGCs at stage 30 for embryos irradiated at stage 13 with or without shielding was 13 and 5%, respectively, of the value for nonirradiated controls. Chicken embryos irradiated at stages 13 or 14 with or without shielding and transfused with quail embryonic blood containing PGCs each exhibited - 130 relative population of donor PGCs in the left gonad at stage 30. Xenotransplanted hatchlings exhibited donor-derived PGCs as detected by Southern hybridization and PCR. Exposure of chicken embryos to - 7.2 Gy of x-radiation at stage 13 with the application of a lead shield to the embryo proper is thus a feasible approach to depletion of endogenous germ cells and the production of chicken-quail germline chimeras

  12. Egg incubation effects generate positive correlations between size, speed and learning ability in young lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, Joshua Johnstone; Lindström, Tom; Shine, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that body size and locomotor performance are targets of Darwinian selection in reptiles. However, much of the variation in these traits may derive from phenotypically plastic responses to incubation temperature, rather than from underlying genetic variation. Intriguingly, incubation temperature may also influence cognitive traits such as learning ability. Therefore, we might expect correlations between a reptile's size, locomotor speed and learning ability either due to selection on all of these traits or due to environmental effects during egg incubation. In the present study, we incubated lizard eggs (Scincidae: Bassiana duperreyi) under 'hot' and 'cold' thermal regimes and then assessed differences in hatchling body size, running speed and learning ability. We measured learning ability using a Y-maze and a food reward. We found high correlations between size, speed and learning ability, using two different metrics to quantify learning (time to solution, and directness of route), and showed that environmental effects (incubation temperature) cause these correlations. If widespread, such correlations challenge any simple interpretation of fitness advantages due to body size or speed within a population; for example, survivors may be larger and faster than nonsurvivors because of differences in learning ability, not because of their size or speed.

  13. A mathematical model of a crocodilian population using delay-differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Angela; Plummer, Tenecia; Uminsky, David; Vega, Cinthia; Wickman, Clare; Zawoiski, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The crocodilia have multiple interesting characteristics that affect their population dynamics. They are among several reptile species which exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) in which the temperature of egg incubation determines the sex of the hatchlings. Their life parameters, specifically birth and death rates, exhibit strong age-dependence. We develop delay-differential equation (DDE) models describing the evolution of a crocodilian population. In using the delay formulation, we are able to account for both the TSD and the age-dependence of the life parameters while maintaining some analytical tractability. In our single-delay model we also find an equilibrium point and prove its local asymptotic stability. We numerically solve the different models and investigate the effects of multiple delays on the age structure of the population as well as the sex ratio of the population. For all models we obtain very strong agreement with the age structure of crocodilian population data as reported in Smith and Webb (Aust. Wild. Res. 12, 541-554, 1985). We also obtain reasonable values for the sex ratio of the simulated population.

  14. Thermal and substrate color-induced melanization in laboratory reared red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, John W; Clark, David L; Mortensen, Rebecca A; Commissaris, Carolyn V; Wittle, Lawrence W; Tucker, John K

    2016-10-01

    Color and pigmentation patterns of the integument can facilitate crypsis, thermoregulation, and social signaling. According to the "thermal melanism hypothesis", cold environmental temperature should increase the quantity of melanin that is deposited in the integument thereby facilitating radiative warming. We studied the influences of water temperature (26°C or 31°C) and substrate color (black or white) on the degree of melanization in the red-eared slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, under laboratory conditions. Turtles reared on a black substrate, or in 26°C water, for 120 days were darker than those reared on a white substrate or in 31°C water. A potential tradeoff between the fitness benefits of crypsis and the benefits of radiative warming through melanism was detected because turtles reared in 26°C water and on a white substrate were darker than those reared on a white substrate and in 31°C water. Low temperatures limited metabolic processes because turtles reared in 26°C water grew more slowly than those reared in 31°C water. However, histological analyses revealed that melanization was a dynamic process in all treatments confirming that the degree of melanization in the cool water treatment was not influenced by the initial and relatively dark hatchling coloration in individuals that grew relatively slowly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hibernacula and summer den sites of pine snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus) in the New Jersey pine barrens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J.; Zappalorti, R.T.; Gochfeld, M.; Boarman, W.I.; Caffrey, M.; Doig, V.; Garber, S.D.; Lauro, B.; Mikovsky, M.; Safina, C.; Saliva, Jorge

    1988-01-01

    We examined eight summer dens (used only in summer) and seven hibernacula (occupied both in winter and summer) of the snake Pituophis melanoleucus in the New Jersey Pine Barrens, comparing above ground characteristics of hibernacula and summer dens with characteristics at nearby random points. Temperatures at the soil surface and at 10 cm depth were significantly warmer, and there was less leaf cover around the random points compared to the entrances of the hibernacula and summer dens. Hibernacula had significantly more vegetation cover within 5 m, more leaf cover over the burrow entrance, and were closer to trees than were summer dens. Most hibernacula and summer dens were beside old fallen logs (73%), the entrance tunnels following decaying roots into the soil. Excavation of the hibernacula and summer dens indicated that most hibernacula appeared to be dug by the snakes and had an average of eight side chambers and 642 cm of tunnels, compared to less than one side chamber and 122 cm of tunnels for summer dens. Except for hatchlings, most snakes in hibernacula were located in individual chambers off the main tunnel; all snakes were at depths of 50-111 cm (X̄ = 79 cm). Pine snakes may select optimum hibernation sites which reduce winter mortality.

  16. Deep-sea octopus (Graneledone boreopacifica) conducts the longest-known egg-brooding period of any animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Bruce; Seibel, Brad; Drazen, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Octopuses typically have a single reproductive period and then they die (semelparity). Once a clutch of fertilized eggs has been produced, the female protects and tends them until they hatch. In most shallow-water species this period of parental care can last from 1 to 3 months, but very little is known about the brooding of deep-living species. In the cold, dark waters of the deep ocean, metabolic processes are often slower than their counterparts at shallower depths. Extrapolations from data on shallow-water octopus species suggest that lower temperatures would prolong embryonic development periods. Likewise, laboratory studies have linked lower temperatures to longer brooding periods in cephalopods, but direct evidence has not been available. We found an opportunity to directly measure the brooding period of the deep-sea octopus Graneledone boreopacifica, in its natural habitat. At 53 months, it is by far the longest egg-brooding period ever reported for any animal species. These surprising results emphasize the selective value of prolonged embryonic development in order to produce competitive hatchlings. They also extend the known boundaries of physiological adaptations for life in the deep sea.

  17. Round window administration of gentamicin: a new method for the study of ototoxicity of cochlear hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, K R; Morgan, A S; Girod, D A; Durham, D

    1998-11-01

    Damage to inner ear sensory hair cells after systemic administration of ototoxic drugs has been documented in humans and animals. Birds have the ability to regenerate new hair cells to replace those damaged by drugs or noise. Unfortunately, the systemic administration of gentamicin damages both ears in a variable fashion with potentially confounding systemic drug effects. We developed a method of direct application of gentamicin to one cochlea of hatchling chickens, allowing the other ear to serve as a within-animal control. We tested variables including the vehicle for application, location of application, dosage, and duration of gentamicin exposure. After 5 or 28 days survival, the percent length damage to the cochlea and regeneration of hair cells was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Controls consisted of the opposite unexposed cochlea and additional animals which received saline instead of gentamicin. Excellent damage was achieved using gentamicin-soaked Gelfoam pledgets applied to the round window membrane. The percent length damage could be varied from 15 to 100% by changing the dosage of gentamicin, with exposures as short as 30 min. No damage was observed in control animals. Regeneration of hair cells was observed in both the base and apex by 28 days survival.

  18. Anaerobic and aerobic bacteriology of the saliva and gingiva from 16 captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis): new implications for the "bacteria as venom" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Citron, Diane M; Cox, Cathleen R; Recchio, Ian M; Okimoto, Ben; Bryja, Judith; Fry, Bryan G

    2013-06-01

    It has been speculated that the oral flora of the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis) exerts a lethal effect on its prey; yet, scant information about their specific oral flora bacteriology, especially anaerobes, exists. Consequently, the aerobic and anaerobic oral bacteriology of 16 captive Komodo dragons (10 adults and six neonates), aged 2-17 yr for adults and 7-10 days for neonates, from three U.S. zoos were studied. Saliva and gingival samples were collected by zoo personnel, inoculated into anaerobic transport media, and delivered by courier to a reference laboratory. Samples were cultured for aerobes and anaerobes. Strains were identified by standard methods and 16S rRNA gene sequencing when required. The oral flora consisted of 39 aerobic and 21 anaerobic species, with some variation by zoo. Adult dragons grew 128 isolates, including 37 aerobic gram-negative rods (one to eight per specimen), especially Enterobacteriaceae; 50 aerobic gram-positive bacteria (two to nine per specimen), especially Staphylococcus sciuri and Enterococcusfaecalis, present in eight of 10 and nine of 10 dragons, respectively; and 41 anaerobes (one to six per specimen), especially clostridia. All hatchlings grew aerobes but none grew anaerobes. No virulent species were isolated. As with other carnivores, captive Komodo oral flora is simply reflective of the gut and skin flora of their recent meals and environment and is unlikely to cause rapid fatal infection.

  19. The behavioural and physiological strategies of bird and reptile embryos in response to unpredictable variation in nest temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei-Guo; Shine, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Temperature profoundly affects the rate and trajectory of embryonic development, and thermal extremes can be fatal. In viviparous species, maternal behaviour and physiology can buffer the embryo from thermal fluctuations; but in oviparous animals (like most reptiles and all birds), an embryo is likely to encounter unpredictable periods when incubation temperatures are unfavourable. Thus, we might expect natural selection to have favoured traits that enable embryos to maintain development despite those fluctuations. Our review of recent research identifies three main routes that embryos use in this way. Extreme temperatures (i) can be avoided (e.g. by accelerating hatching, by moving within the egg, by cooling the egg by enhanced rates of evaporation, or by hysteresis in rates of heating versus cooling); (ii) can be tolerated (e.g. by entering diapause, by producing heat-shock proteins, or by changing oxygen use); or (iii) the embryo can adjust its physiology and/or developmental trajectory in ways that reduce the fitness penalties of unfavourable thermal conditions (e.g. by acclimating, by exploiting brief windows of favourable conditions, or by producing the hatchling phenotype best suited to those incubation conditions). Embryos are not simply passive victims of ambient conditions. Like free-living stages of the life cycle, embryos exhibit behavioural and physiological plasticity that enables them to deal with unpredictable abiotic challenges. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  20. Carryover effects of predation risk on postembryonic life-history stages in a freshwater shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ituarte, Romina Belén; Vázquez, María Guadalupe; González-Sagrario, María de los Ángeles; Spivak, Eduardo Daniel

    2014-04-01

    For organisms with complex life histories it is well known that risk experienced early in life, as embryos or larvae, may have effects throughout the life cycle. Although carryover effects have been well documented in invertebrates with different levels of parental care, there are few examples of predator-induced responses in externally brooded embryos. Here, we studied the effects of nonlethal predation risk throughout the embryonic development of newly spawned eggs carried by female shrimp on the timing of egg hatching, hatchling morphology, larval development and juvenile morphology. We also determined maternal body mass at the end of the embryonic period. Exposure to predation risk cues during embryonic development led to larger larvae which also had longer rostra but reached the juvenile stage sooner, at a smaller size and with shorter rostra. There was no difference in hatching timing, but changes in larval morphology and developmental timing showed that the embryos had perceived waterborne substances indicative of predation risk. In addition to carryover effects on larval and juvenile stages, predation threat provoked a decrease of body mass in mothers exposed to predator cues while brooding. Our results suggest that risk-exposed embryos were able to recognize the same infochemicals as their mothers, manifesting a response in the free-living larval stage. Thus, future studies assessing anti-predator phenotypes should include embryonic development, which seems to determine the morphology and developmental time of subsequent life-history stages according to perceived environmental conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of patch quality by aphidophagous ladybirds: laboratory study on the minimum density of aphids required for oviposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. Das

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that there is a density of aphids below which ladybirds are unlikely to lay eggs. This is adaptive as theory indicates that a certain minimum population density of aphids is required if hatchling larvae are to survive. The responses of gravid females of the two spot ladybird, Adalia bipunctata (L. (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, recorded over a period of an hour, to colonies of 5 and 50 pea aphids on bean plants and similar plants each previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours were determined. Proportionally more of the ladybirds on plants with 50 aphids or that were previously infested with the same number of aphids for 48 hours laid eggs and larger clusters of eggs, and were less active than those on plants that were infested with or had previously been infested with five aphids. That is, gravid females showed similar oviposition and activity responses to aphid abundance and different levels of honeydew contamination. This indicates that honeydew contamination may be an important cue used by ladybirds when locating and assessing the abundance of prey in aphid colonies.

  2. Survey of Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate Health Condition in Terms of Parasites and Microbes in Alas Purwo National Park, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qurrota A'yunin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian waters have six types of turtles that can live, spawn and breed. Sea turtle conservation becomes an important and urgent program to be done in order to protect and save sea turtle population in Indonesia. One of the factors that most affect the turtle population is the cause of degradation of pathogenic factors. Alas Purwo National Park, East Java, there is some communities that have activities turtle conservation. Conservation is done by securing and protecting turtle eggs. Turtle eggs that have hatched are released into the sea once it is ready. This study aims was to determine the type of bacteria and fungi that infect hatchlings and environmental factors that influence. This research is descriptive method to Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate is by way of random sampling. Sampling of microbes in sea turtle was conducted using cotton swab method and then microbes was cultured and indentified in laboratory. The results showed The kind of parasites and microbes which were indentified in hatching and adult Hawksbill sea turtles were fungus with genus Aspergillus sp., Geotrichum sp., Fusarium sp., and Gliocladium sp. ; bacteria are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloaceae; and parasite is Chelonibia testudinaria barnacles.  The parameter average value of water in pond indicated 28.1 – 29.2°C for temperature, 32 - 34 ‰ for salinity, 7.78 – 8.2 for pH, and 3.86 – 4.21 mg/L for DO.

  3. Effects of zinc and female aging on nymphal life history in a grasshopper from polluted sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Maria; Babczyńska, Agnieszka; Kozłowski, Michał; Sawczyn, Tomasz; Augustyniak, Michał

    2008-01-01

    Insect reproduction is influenced by various factors, including food quality and quantity, temperature, population density and female age. Contamination, including heavy metals, may disturb reproductive processes. The aim of this work was to assess interactions between effects of aging in female Chorthippus brunneus and environmental pollution on their reproduction measured in number of laid eggs. We also compared basic developmental parameters (number of hatchlings, body mass, embryonic developmental rate) in grasshopper nymphs additionally exposed to zinc during diapause. Aging grasshoppers from heavily polluted areas (Olkusz and Szopienice) lay significantly fewer eggs than insects from the reference site (Pilica). Zinc application caused the decrease in hatching success and duration of embryogenesis in insects from each site. This suggests a cumulative effect of female age, pollutants and additional stressing factors. The intensity of this process differed between populations. In insects from the reference site, it was shown in a moderate degree. In insects from Szopienice, an additional stressor exerted a weaker effect than in insects from Pilica. In grasshoppers from Olkusz, we found the strongest decrease of hatching percentage and increase in duration of embryogenesis after zinc intoxication. This may indicate that the population from Olkusz exists at the limit of its energetic abilities.