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Sample records for hastings ulster-new zealand

  1. Disrupting the Education Monopoly: A Conversation with Reed Hastings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    This article features an interview with Netflix CEO, Reed Hastings. In this interview, Hastings relates that he told the "Wall Street Journal" in 2008 that he started looking at education--trying to figure out why our education is lagging when our technology is increasing at great rates and there's great innovation in so many other areas…

  2. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Bias HAST System Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Furrer, III, Clint T [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandoval, Paul Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garrett, Stephen E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Nathaniel Bryant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    High-reliability components for high-consequence systems require detailed testing of operation after having undergone highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) under unusual conditions of high-temperature and humidity. This paper describes the design and operation of a system called "Wormwood" that is a highly multiplexed temperature measurement system that is designed to operate under HAST conditions to allow measurement of the temperature as a function of time and position in a HAST chamber. HAST chambers have single-point temperature measurements that can be traceable to NIST standards. The objective of these "Wormwood" measurements is to verify the uniformity and stability of the remaining volume of the HAST chamber with respect to the single traceable standard.

  3. Hastings Wetland Management District: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Hastings WMD outlines District accomplishments during the 1980 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the WMD and...

  4. Hastings Wetland Management District Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Hastings Wetland Management District outlines District accomplishments for the 1977 calendar year. The report begins by giving District...

  5. Austerity in MCMC Land: Cutting the Metropolis-Hastings Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korattikara, A.; Chen, Y.; Welling, M.

    2014-01-01

    Can we make Bayesian posterior MCMC sampling more efficient when faced with very large datasets? We argue that computing the likelihood for N datapoints in the Metropolis-Hastings (MH) test to reach a single binary decision is computationally inefficient. We introduce an approximate MH rule based on

  6. 76 FR 15936 - Opportunity for Designation in the Aberdeen, SD; Decatur, IL; Hastings, NE; Fulton, IL; the State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ...); Hastings Grain Inspection, Inc. (Hastings); John R. McCrea Agency, Inc. (McCrea); Missouri Department of... line east to the eastern Knox County line; Bounded on the East by the eastern and southern Knox County...

  7. MR urography using HASTE imaging : comparison with intravenous urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seung Mun; Kim, Nam Hyeun; Ryu, Dae Sik; Park, Jong Yeon; Kim, Han Gwun; Park, Man Soo [Kangnung Hospital, Asan Foundation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of MR urography(MRU) using Half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo(HASTE) sequence compared with conventional intravenous urography(IVU). Thirty five lesions of 32 patients who underwent MRU because of delayed excretion or nonvisualization of the ureter were included in this study. HASTE MR urography was performed with a 1.0 MR imaging unit. Coronal images including those of the kidney, ureter and bladder were obtained in every patient using the multislice technique, and were postprocessed by means of the maximal intensity projection technique. Scan time was 17-19 seconds. We analyzed the results of MRU, focusing on level of obstruction, incidence of stone, ureter dilatation, and motion artifact, and in each case compared MRU findings with those of IVU. In 12 of 35 lesions(34.2%), MRU more effectively diagnosed causes of obstruction than did IVU, while in seven lesions(20%), MRU and IVU were similar. In eight lesions(22.9%), all of which were caused by a stone, IVU was better than MRU, and in a further eight, neither modality was able to diagnose the cause. For diagnosis of the level of obstruction, MRU was better than IVU in 20 of 35 lesions(57.1%), and similar to IVU in seven(20%). In three lesions(8.6%), neither modality was able to detect the level of obstruction. Four lesions not related to obstruction were polycystic renal disease, cystic renal change, vesicovaginal fistula and extra-renal pelvis. Dilatation of the ureter was seen in 23 lesions(65.8%) on MRU and in seven lesions on IVU. Thus, MRU revealed dilatation of for the ureter more efectively than IVU. MRU using HASTE was valuable for the detection of underlying causes and levels of obstruction in the urinary tract, and of abnormalities in surrounding structures in patients with non-visualization of the kidney or delayed contrast excretion of the ureter, as seen on delayed IVU urogram.

  8. The Hastings Center and the early years of bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The Hastings Center was founded in 1969 to study ethical problems in medicine and biology. The Center arose from a confluence of three social currents: the increased public scrutiny of medicine and its practices, the concern about the moral problems being generated by technological developments, and the desire of one of its founders (Callahan) to make use of his philosophical training in a more applied way. The early years of the Center were devoted to raising money, developing an early agenda of issues, and identifying a cadre of people around the country interested in the issues. Various stresses and strains in the Center and the field are identified, and some final reflections are offered on the nature and value of the contributions made by bioethics as an academic field.

  9. Porta-enxertos para tomateiro conduzido com quatro hastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaelle Fazzi Gomes

    Full Text Available RESUMO Uma das formas de melhoria da qualidade e da produção do tomateiro é a adoção de técnicas adequadas de manejo da cultura, destacando-se o uso da enxertia e o método de condução das plantas. Contudo, no Brasil, há falta de informações que estimulem essas práticas. Por isso, este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o desempenho de porta-enxertos para tomateiro, com vigoroso sistema radicular, conduzido com quatro hastes, em fibra da casca de coco, em ambiente protegido. Adotou-se o espaçamento de 2,0 m entrelinhas e 0,40 m entre plantas. Para isso, foi utilizado o delineamento em blocos casualizados, com quatro tratamentos e seis repetições, sendo, os tratamentos, dois porta-enxertos (‘Maxifort’ e ‘Multifort’, autoenxertia (‘Alambra’ em ‘Alambra’, e o pé franco (‘Alambra’. Cada parcela foi constituída de 20 plantas, sendo avaliadas as 14 plantas centrais. Não houve efeito significativo no uso dos porta-enxertos sobre as características de produção e de qualidade dos frutos. Na avaliação do estado nutricional, houve diferenças para os teores de P, Mg e Ca em plantas enxertadas. Portanto, os porta-enxertos ‘Maxifort’ e ‘Multifort’, cultivados nas condições em que o experimento foi realizado, não proporcionaram aumento da produção e da qualidade dos frutos.

  10. A Behavioral Synthesis Frontend to the Haste/TiDE Design Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Sparsø, Jens; Jensen, Jonas Braband

    2009-01-01

    and a controller. The tool may be seen as an add-on to the Haste/TiDE tool flow, and it can be used to automatically optimize parts of a design and to quickly xplore alternative optimizations. The paper outlines the design flow, explains key elements of the design tool, and presents a number of benchmark results....

  11. Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm for Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis (IFA), already well established in educational measurement, is increasingly applied to psychological measurement in research settings. However, high-dimensional confirmatory IFA remains a numerical challenge. The current research extends the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm, initially proposed for…

  12. High-Dimensional Exploratory Item Factor Analysis by a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    A Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm for high-dimensional maximum marginal likelihood exploratory item factor analysis is proposed. The sequence of estimates from the MH-RM algorithm converges with probability one to the maximum likelihood solution. Details on the computer implementation of this algorithm are provided. The…

  13. Using parallel computation to improve Independent Metropolis--Hastings based estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, Pierre; Smith, Murray H

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the implications of the fact that parallel raw-power can be exploited by a generic Metropolis--Hastings algorithm if the proposed values are independent. In particular, we present improvements to the independent Metropolis--Hastings algorithm that significantly decrease the variance of any estimator derived from the MCMC output, for a null computing cost since those improvements are based on a fixed number of target density evaluations. Furthermore, the techniques developed in this paper do not jeopardize the Markovian convergence properties of the algorithm, since they are based on the Rao--Blackwell principles of Gelfand and Smith (1990), already exploited in Casella and Robert (1996), Atchade and Perron (2005) and Douc and Robert (2010). We illustrate those improvement both on a toy normal example and on a classical probit regression model but insist on the fact that they are universally applicable.

  14. Abdominal MR imaging using a HASTE sequence : image comparison on the different echo times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Bo; Lee, Moon Gyu; Lim, Tae Hwan; Jeong, Yoong Ki; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Auh, Yong Ho [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To determine the optimal parameters of abdominal HASTE imaging by means of a comparison of intermediate and long TE (echo time). We evaluated 30 consecutive patients who had undergone liver MR during a three-month period. Twelve patients were diagnosed as normal, four as having liver cirrhosis, and 14 were found to be suffering form hepatic hemangioma. On the basis of measured signal intensity of the liver, spleen, pancreas and gallbladder, and of fat, muscle, hemangioma, and background, we calculated the ratios of signal to noise (S/N), signal difference to noise (SD/N), and signal intensity (SI). Image quality was compared using these three ratios, and using two HASTE sequences with TEs of 90 msec and 134 msec, images were qualitatively evaluated. S/N ratio of the liver was higher when TE was 90 msec(p<.05), though S/N, SD/N and SI rations of the spleen, gallbladder, and pancreas-and of hemangiom-were higher when TE was 134 msec (p<.05). However, in muscle, all these three ratios were higher at a TE of 90 msec. SD/N ratio and SI of fat were higher at a TE of 134 msec. Overall image quality was better at a TE of 134 msec than at one of 90msec. A HASTE sequence with a TE of 134msec showed greater tissue contrast and stronger T2-weighted images than one with a TE of 90msec.

  15. Excretory MR urography using breathhold three-dimensional FISP: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Won Kue; Lee, Jeong Min; Jin, Kong Young; Hwang, Ho keung; Han, Young Min [Chonbuk Narional University Hospital, Chonju (Korea, Republic of); Ym, Seong Hee [Namwon Medical Center, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    To compare the usefulness of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography using breath-hold three-dimensional fast imaging with steady state precession (3-D FISP) with conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy. Twenty-three patients in whom ultrasonography (US) and/or intravenous urography (IVU) revealed signs of urinary obstruction were enrolled in this study. Fifteen were men and eight were women, and their mean age was 54 (range, 21-80) years. All MR images were obtained using a 1.5T MR unit. MR urography using the HASTE technique (MRU) and gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography using the 3D-FISP technique were performed, and in all cases, reconstructions involved maximum intensity projection. For contrast-enhanced MR urography(CEMRU), images were obtained 3, 5, 20, and 30 minutes after the administration of intravenous contrast media, and for selected cases, additional images were obtained until 24 hours after contrast media injection. For qualitative analysis, two experienced radiologists compared CEMRU and MRU in terms of their diagnostic value as regards the level and cause of urinary obstruction, and morphologic accuracy. In addition, signal to noise ration(SNR) and contrast to noise ration (CNR) of the urinary tract at each anatomic level were quantitatively analysed. Quantitative analysis showed that in terms of SNR and CNR of the urinary tract at the level of the mid and distal ureter, CEMRU using 3-D FISP was better than MRU using HASTE (p less than 0.05). Qualitative analysis indicated that for the depiction of the whole length of normal ureter, and detection of the level of obstruction, anatomic anomalies and intrinsic tumors, 3-D FISP was superior to HASTE. There was, however, no difference between these two modalities in the diagnosis of ureteral stone and the degree of hydronephrosis. In addition, 3-D FISP was better than HASTE for the

  16. [Diagnostic value of HASTE technique and excretory MR urography in urinary system obstructions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğmuş, Beşir; Bozkurt, Mahmut; Bakir, Zeki

    2004-12-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of static-liquid magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in T2-weighted HASTE (half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spinecho) sequences and T1-weighted excretory MRU with i.v. diuretic and contrast material injection. The study included 29 patients (15 men, 14 women). Thirty-one urinary obstructions were detected on intravenous urography (IVU) two of which were due to bilateral obstructions. The cases were evaluated by T2 HASTE sequences combined with T1-weighted FLASH 3D sequences after i.v. diuretics and gadolinium DTPA injection. Thirty-one urinary obstructions were detected on IVU. Thirty of which were confirmed by T2-weighted MRU and all were confirmed by excretory MRU. In one nonobstructive case, unilateral grade 1 ureteropelvicaliectasis related to ureteral stone was falsely interpreted by both sequences. There were no statistical differences among IVU, T2-weighted MRU and excretory MRU in detecting the obstruction levels. In 22 cases with ureteral stones, 12 of which were confirmed by T2-weighted MRU and 18 cases were confirmed by excretory MRU. Sensitivity and specificity fo detecting the ureteral stones as a cause of obstruction with T2-weighted MRU were 50%and 89% and with excretory MRU were 77% and 89% respectively. In 9 obstructive cases due to causes other than the stones, 8 of which were detected by T2-weighted MRU and all of which were detected by excretory MRU. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting the causes other than the stones with T2-weighted MRU were 96% and 100% and with excretory MRU were 100% and 100% respectively. MRU is a useful thechnique revealing high-quality images to determine the urinary system obstructions to obtain the causes of obstructions. MRU should be used as an alternative imaging technique in cases which IVU can not be applied. The existence and the causes of obstruction can be detected by HASTE MRU. Excretory MRU can supply additional information in cases with functional kidneys where

  17. Metropolis-Hastings Algorithms in Function Space for Bayesian Inverse Problems

    KAUST Repository

    Ernst, Oliver

    2015-01-07

    We consider Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods adapted to a Hilbert space setting. Such algorithms occur in Bayesian inverse problems where the solution is a probability measure on a function space according to which one would like to integrate or sample. We focus on Metropolis-Hastings algorithms and, in particular, we introduce and analyze a generalization of the existing pCN-proposal. This new proposal allows to exploit the geometry or anisotropy of the target measure which in turn might improve the statistical efficiency of the corresponding MCMC method. Numerical experiments for a real-world problem confirm the improvement.

  18. Hastings Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Affordable Care Act. I see this debate as having ended—as of this writing—in a draw. After months of repeal efforts, Republicans in the House barely passed in early May, with a 217- ...

  19. A Bootstrap Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm for Bayesian Analysis of Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Faming; Kim, Jinsu; Song, Qifan

    2016-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have proven to be a very powerful tool for analyzing data of complex structures. However, their computer-intensive nature, which typically require a large number of iterations and a complete scan of the full dataset for each iteration, precludes their use for big data analysis. In this paper, we propose the so-called bootstrap Metropolis-Hastings (BMH) algorithm, which provides a general framework for how to tame powerful MCMC methods to be used for big data analysis; that is to replace the full data log-likelihood by a Monte Carlo average of the log-likelihoods that are calculated in parallel from multiple bootstrap samples. The BMH algorithm possesses an embarrassingly parallel structure and avoids repeated scans of the full dataset in iterations, and is thus feasible for big data problems. Compared to the popular divide-and-combine method, BMH can be generally more efficient as it can asymptotically integrate the whole data information into a single simulation run. The BMH algorithm is very flexible. Like the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, it can serve as a basic building block for developing advanced MCMC algorithms that are feasible for big data problems. This is illustrated in the paper by the tempering BMH algorithm, which can be viewed as a combination of parallel tempering and the BMH algorithm. BMH can also be used for model selection and optimization by combining with reversible jump MCMC and simulated annealing, respectively.

  20. A Bootstrap Metropolis–Hastings Algorithm for Bayesian Analysis of Big Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsu; Song, Qifan

    2016-01-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods have proven to be a very powerful tool for analyzing data of complex structures. However, their computer-intensive nature, which typically require a large number of iterations and a complete scan of the full dataset for each iteration, precludes their use for big data analysis. In this paper, we propose the so-called bootstrap Metropolis-Hastings (BMH) algorithm, which provides a general framework for how to tame powerful MCMC methods to be used for big data analysis; that is to replace the full data log-likelihood by a Monte Carlo average of the log-likelihoods that are calculated in parallel from multiple bootstrap samples. The BMH algorithm possesses an embarrassingly parallel structure and avoids repeated scans of the full dataset in iterations, and is thus feasible for big data problems. Compared to the popular divide-and-combine method, BMH can be generally more efficient as it can asymptotically integrate the whole data information into a single simulation run. The BMH algorithm is very flexible. Like the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, it can serve as a basic building block for developing advanced MCMC algorithms that are feasible for big data problems. This is illustrated in the paper by the tempering BMH algorithm, which can be viewed as a combination of parallel tempering and the BMH algorithm. BMH can also be used for model selection and optimization by combining with reversible jump MCMC and simulated annealing, respectively. PMID:29033469

  1. A Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for sampling from distributions with intractable normalizing constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Faming; Jin, Ick-Hoon

    2013-08-01

    Simulating from distributions with intractable normalizing constants has been a long-standing problem in machine learning. In this letter, we propose a new algorithm, the Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings (MCMH) algorithm, for tackling this problem. The MCMH algorithm is a Monte Carlo version of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. It replaces the unknown normalizing constant ratio by a Monte Carlo estimate in simulations, while still converges, as shown in the letter, to the desired target distribution under mild conditions. The MCMH algorithm is illustrated with spatial autologistic models and exponential random graph models. Unlike other auxiliary variable Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms, such as the Møller and exchange algorithms, the MCMH algorithm avoids the requirement for perfect sampling, and thus can be applied to many statistical models for which perfect sampling is not available or very expensive. The MCMH algorithm can also be applied to Bayesian inference for random effect models and missing data problems that involve simulations from a distribution with intractable integrals.

  2. A Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm for Sampling from Distributions with Intractable Normalizing Constants

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2013-08-01

    Simulating from distributions with intractable normalizing constants has been a long-standing problem inmachine learning. In this letter, we propose a new algorithm, the Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings (MCMH) algorithm, for tackling this problem. The MCMH algorithm is a Monte Carlo version of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. It replaces the unknown normalizing constant ratio by a Monte Carlo estimate in simulations, while still converges, as shown in the letter, to the desired target distribution under mild conditions. The MCMH algorithm is illustrated with spatial autologistic models and exponential random graph models. Unlike other auxiliary variable Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms, such as the Møller and exchange algorithms, the MCMH algorithm avoids the requirement for perfect sampling, and thus can be applied to many statistical models for which perfect sampling is not available or very expensive. TheMCMHalgorithm can also be applied to Bayesian inference for random effect models and missing data problems that involve simulations from a distribution with intractable integrals. © 2013 Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  3. Efficient implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, with application to the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, W.A.; Barker, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Judicious choice of candidate generating distributions improves efficiency of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. In Bayesian applications, it is sometimes possible to identify an approximation to the target posterior distribution; this approximate posterior distribution is a good choice for candidate generation. These observations are applied to analysis of the Cormack-Jolly-Seber model and its extensions. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  4. Clinical application of Half Fourier Acquisition Single Shot Turbo Spin Echo (HASTE) imaging accelerated by simultaneous multi-slice acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, J.; Marques, J.P.; Telgte, A. ter; Dorst, A van; Leeuw, H.F. de; Meijer, F.J.A.; Norris, D.G.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose As a single-shot sequence with a long train of refocusing pulses, Half-Fourier Acquisition Single-Shot Turbo-Spin-Echo (HASTE) suffers from high power deposition limiting use at high resolutions and high field strengths, particularly if combined with acceleration techniques such as

  5. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining maximum marginal likelihood estimates of contextual effects in the framework of nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM). Results indicate that the MH-RM algorithm can produce estimates and standard…

  6. Gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Cheong, Gyung Ho; Oh, Hee Sul; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Young Gon [Medical School, Chungbuk National University, Chongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    To compare the feasibility of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography (GEMRU) and conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney. Fifteen patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney, as demonstrated by ultrasonography or intravenous urography, were enrolled in this study. Nine were men and six were women, and their age ranged from 18 to 77 (mean, 60.6) years. For all MR examinations, a 1.5T MR unit was employed. For breath-hold MR urography, the HASTE technique (MRU) was used, and reconstruction involved the use of a maximum intensity-projection (MIP) algorithm. For gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography, the fast low angle shot (FLASH) 3-D method was used and images were obtained at 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes, and reconstruction again involved the use of MIP algorithm. In some cases, additional GEMRU was obtained 24 hour after contrast material injection, and an MIP algorithm was used for reconstruction. MRU and GEMRU were independently interpreted by two radiologists who for quantitative analysis compared SNR with CNR, and at each anatomic level qualitatively analyzed morphologic accuracy and diagnostic value of the lesions. In quantitative analysis, SNR and CNR differences between the two sequences at the renal pelvis and the level of the ureter were not significant (p greater than 0.05). In qualitative analysis, GEMRU was superior to MRU for the assessment of evaluated ureter at each level (p less than 0.05), anatomic anomaly and intrinsic tumor. Ureteral stones, however, were more easily diagnosed with MRU. For assessment of the ureter GEMRU is superior to MRU and has the advantage of evaluating renal function. We believe that for evaluation of the urinary tract, especially the distal ureter, GEMRU may be a valuable adjunct to routine MR urography. (author)

  7. Parâmetros quantitativos de hastes florais de gladíolo conforme a data de plantio em ambiente subtropical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Teixeira Schwab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo:O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar as épocas de cultivo, em ambiente subtropical, em que é possível produzir hastes de gladíolo (Gladiolusx grandiflorus que atendam aos padrões comerciais quantitativos do mercado nacional de flores de corte. Dois experimentos de campo foram realizados, um de agosto de 2011 a julho de 2012 e outro de agosto de 2012 a julho de 2013, com três cultivares do gladíolo e 12 datas de plantio para cada experimento. O comprimento total da haste, o comprimento do pendão e o diâmetro da haste foram avaliados quando as hastes estavam em ponto de colheita, ou seja, quando a cor das pétalas apareceu nos três primeiros floretes na base da haste. Os melhores meses para a produção de hastes de gladíolo são julho, agosto, setembro, fevereiro, março e abril, embora em nenhuma das datas de plantio tenham sido produzidas hastes com parâmetros quantitativos abaixo do padrão mínimo (exceto em períodos com geada, durante o espigamento.

  8. Caracterização de hastes de flores tropicais da emissão até a colheita.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Loges

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento e o tempo para colheita de flores tropicais foram avaliados no Laboratório de Floricultura da Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco. Para tanto, foram mensuradas, separadamente, plantas das espécies Tapeinochilos ananassae, Zingiber spectabilis, Heliconia rostrata, H. rauliniana, Renanthera coccinea e variedades de Anthurium andraeanum, Alpinia purpurata e Etlingera elatior quanto ao comprimento e diâmetro das hastes e inflorescências desde o momento da emissão da inflorescência, em intervalos de 7 a 8 dias após a marcação (DAM até o ponto de corte. Este experimento foi conduzido no município de Paulista (PE. As análises de variância foram efetuadas utilizando o Programa SAS. As médias dos tratamentos foram comparadas pelo teste de Tukey a 5% de probabilidade. As hastes florais de A. purpurata variedades Vermelha, Jungle King e Jungle Queen atingiram o ponto de colheita aos 29, 37 e 43 DAM, respectivamente. As cultivares de A. andraeanum atingiram o ponto de corte entre 20 e 29 DAM. H. rauliniana e H. rostrata não apresentaram diferença para comprimento da inflorescência e da haste entre 9 e 15 DAM, atingindo, ambas espécies, o ponto de corte aos 15 DAM. As variedades de E. elatior atingiram o ponto de corte entre 36 e 42 DAM. Houve aumento do comprimento e diâmetro das inflorescências com o decorrer do tempo, porém o comprimento e diâmetro das hastes não diferiram no intervalo de 21 a 42 DAM. O Z. spectabilis atingiu o ponto de colheita entre os 29 e 37 DAM, porém como as inflorescências podem ser colhidas com tamanho maior, o ponto de corte ultrapassa os 42 DAM. As hastes florais de T. ananasseae a partir de 29 DAM atingiram o ponto de colheita e as hastes florais de R. coccinea aos 42 DAM. Os resultados indicaram que a data da colheita e a qualidade das inflorescências podem ser estimadas antecipadamente, a partir da emissão das inflorescências.

  9. Haste verde e retenção foliar na cultura da soja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre José da Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Haste verde em soja é uma síndrome que mantém as hastes primárias e secundárias da soja verdes, mesmo após a maturação fisiológica da semente. Retenção foliar é a manutenção das folhas verdes por um período mais longo, após maturação da semente. Sua ocorrência na cultura da soja tem sido atribuída a utilização de alguns fungicidas empregados no controle do complexo de doenças foliares em soja, principalmente ferrugem e doenças de final de ciclo. No entanto, vários fatores podem contribuir para a ocorrência deste distúrbio nas plantas. Os principais são: deficiência de potássio, desequilíbrio nutricional, stresse hídrico (excesso ou falta, stresse de temperaturas altas, ataque de pragas, principalmente percevejos, cultivares sensíveis, ocorrência de antracnose e aplicação de alguns fungicidas. Devido à escassez de informações sobre o assunto é comum atribuir qualquer distúrbio fisiológico a aplicação de fungicidas. O adequado manejo da cultura desde nutrição equilibrada, controle integrado de pragas e doenças, atenção para exigência hídrica, térmica e foperiódica da planta são fatores importantes para evitar ou reduzir ao máximo o aparecimento desta síndrome. Trabalhos objetivando interação entre estes fatores e cultivares, utilização de fungicidas são necessários para maiores informações sobre o assunto.

  10. Uso de sacarose nas soluções de manutenção de hastes florais de gérberas de corte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Schmitt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available As flores de corte são produtos altamente perecíveis e sua vida pós-colheita deve ser prolongada ao máximo para garantir a fidelidade dos consumidores. Uma possível medida para ampliar o período pós-colheita é a adição de fontes exógenas de carboidratos na solução de manutenção das hastes florais. Neste sentido, no presente trabalho avaliou-se a resposta de hastes florais à adição de sacarose nas soluções de manutenção. Foram utilizadas hastes de gérberas (Gerbera jamesonii ‘Essandre’ colhidas em produtor comercial. Os experimentos foram conduzidos em delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado com três repetições e cinco hastes florais por unidade sob condições ambiente de 19,4 °C e umidade relativa superior a 80% experimental. Foram aplicados tratamentos com soluções de sacarose a 2, 2,5 e 5% (p/v em recipientes de vidro (3,3 L e contendo um litro de solução. As hastes foram avaliadas para longevidade determinada pelo número de dias de qualidade comercial da flor. Determinou-se também o pH da solução, alongamento das hastes após período de vida em vaso, conteúdo de substâncias de reserva e unidades formadoras de colônia (UFC.g-1 em tecidos das hastes. A adição de sacarose não contribui para o aumento da longevidade de pós-colheita das hastes florais de gérbera ‘Essandre’. A concentração de 2,5% de sacarose resulta em maior quantidade de substâncias de reserva nas hastes florais. Não houve diferença no número de colônias bacterianas com relação a adição de sacarose. O pH das soluções com adição de sacarose apresenta uma queda, a partir do terceiro dia após o início das avaliações.

  11. Hastes florais de helicônia sob deficiência de macronutrientes Flower stems postharvest characteristics of heliconia under macronutrients deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cecília Ribeiro de Castro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar características pós-colheita da primeira haste floral de plantas de Heliconia psittacorum x H. spathocircinata Aristeguieta, cultivar Golden Torch, sob deficiência de macronutrientes. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação, mediante técnica do elemento faltante. As inflorescências produzidas do tratamento sob omissão de N apresentaram coloração laranja-pálido e deformação nas hastes florais. O comprimento e o diâmetro da haste floral e o comprimento da inflorescência foram reduzidos nos tratamentos com omissão de N, P ou K em até 31,23%, em relação ao tratamento completo. A massa de matéria seca e a durabilidade pós-colheita das hastes florais foram reduzidas em 67 e 38,46%, respectivamente, em ambos os tratamentos com omissão de N ou K. As deficiências desses macronutrientes reduziram, ainda, a produção de hastes florais, a partir do segundo perfilho emitido. Hastes florais com maior massa de matéria seca e diâmetro apresentaram maior durabilidade pós-colheita. O teor de carboidrato na parte subterrânea mostrou correlação positiva (0,90 com a massa de matéria seca das hastes florais. Hastes florais com maior teor de carboidratos solúveis nas folhas retardaram a emissão da inflorescência.The objective of this work was to evaluate Heliconia psittacorum x H. spathocircinata Aristeguieta 'Golden Torch' first flower stem morphological and physiological characteristics as well as postharvest longevity, under macronutrients omissions. A greenhouse experiment was conducted under the technique of the lacking element. Inflorescences produced under N omission treatment showed a pale orange color and floral stem deformation. Stem length and diameter as well as inflorescence length were reduced under omission of N, P or K, down to 31.23% when compared to the complete solution treatment. Floral stem dry matter and postharvest longevity were reduced on 67% and 38

  12. Studietur til New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Helle Høy; Hammer, Lisbet; Jepsen, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Forholdene for de danske og de newzealandske gravide og fødende minder på mange måder om hinanden - og dog. Tre danske jordemødre har været på studietur til New Zealand for blandt andet at studere deres måde at organisere kendt jordemoderordninger.......Forholdene for de danske og de newzealandske gravide og fødende minder på mange måder om hinanden - og dog. Tre danske jordemødre har været på studietur til New Zealand for blandt andet at studere deres måde at organisere kendt jordemoderordninger....

  13. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm. CRESST Report 833

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining full-information maximum likelihood (FIML) estimates of contextual effects in the framework of a nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM; Cai, 2008, 2010a, 2010b). Results indicate that the MH-RM…

  14. New Zealand's cetaceans and pinnipeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthorn, M W

    1981-11-01

    The 8 species of baleen whale in New Zealand waters range in length from 6 to 30+ metres, and the 25 species of toothed whale range up to 18 metres. A single porpoise species is known in New Zealand sub-Antarctic waters. The baleen whales and many of the toothed whales are migratory, and New Zealand straddles their well-defined routes: a combination which allowed whaling to flourish. The toothed whales are the more gregarious and may indulge in mass strandings. Current research aims to investigate the biology of all of the whale species. The otariid, or eared seals found in the New Zealand region are the New Zealand sealion and the New Zealand fur seal. The commonest of the phocid, or earless seals on the New Zealand coast are the elephant and leopard seals. All of these breed in the southern parts of the region but range further north. The fur seal population is rising slowly, but the small population size of the New Zealand sealion gives cause for concern. Marine mammals form an important part of the fauna of the New Zealand region, and veterinary knowledge and general research should be increased.

  15. African Journals Online: New Zealand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: New Zealand. Home > African Journals Online: New Zealand. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This Journal is Open Access ...

  16. Gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MR urography versus T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography in children; Kontrastangehobene T{sub 1}-gewichtete MR-Urographie versus T{sub 2}-gewichtete (HASTE) MR-Urographie im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staatz, G.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Haage, P.; Tacke, J.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Rohrmann, D. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Stollbrink, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Kinderklinik

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MR urography (EMRU) versus T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography in children with upper urinary tract abnormalities. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study 63 children, aged from 3 weeks to 15 years, underwent MR urography in a 1.5-T scanner. Before and after an intravenous injection of 0.05 mg/kg body weight of furosemide, respiratory-triggered HASTE images were obtained for T{sub 2}-weighted MR urography. EMRU was performed subsequent to i.v. gadolinium injection with respiratory-gated, coronal 3D-gradient-echo sequences. Results: Compared to T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography, gadolinium-enhanced MR urography revealed a superior diagnostic accuracy in non-dilated collecting systems (horseshoe kidneys, ectopic kidneys, duplex systems, single ectopic ureters, ureteroceles). EMRU and T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MRU turned out to be equivalent in the assessment of obstructed but normal functioning upper urinary tracts (UPJ obstructions, megaureters). Non-functioning dilated collecting systems and multicystic dysplastic kidneys were best visualized with use of T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MRU allows accurate evaluation of most upper urinary tract abnormalities. T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MRU complements GMRU in the evaluation of non-functioning renal units and cystic disease of the kidneys. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Vergleich der kontrastangehobenen T{sub 1}-gewichteten MR-Urographie mit der T{sub 2}-gewichteten (HASTE) MR-Urographie bei Kindern mit Anomalien des oberen Harntraktes. Methoden: In einer prospektiven Studie wurde bei 63 Kindern (3 Wo. - 15J.) eine MR-Urographie (MRU) in einem 1,5-Tesla-Magneten durchgefuehrt. Die T{sub 2}-gewichtete MRU erfolgte vor und nach intravenoeser Injektion von 0,05 mg/kg KG Furosemid mit atemgetriggerten HASTE-Sequenzen. Fuer die T{sub 1}-gewichtete MRU wurden nach

  17. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, a handy tool for the practice of environmental model estimation : illustration with biochemical oxygen demand data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Torre

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental scientists often face situations where: (i stimulus-response relationships are non-linear; (ii data are rare or imprecise; (iii facts are uncertain and stimulus-responses relationships are questionable. In this paper, we focus on the first two points. A powerful and easy-to-use statistical method, the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, allows the quantification of the uncertainty attached to any model response. This stochastic simulation technique is able to reproduce the statistical joint distribution of the whole parameter set of any model. The Metropolis-Hastings algorithm is described and illustrated on a typical environmental model: the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD. The aim is to provide a helpful guideline for further, and ultimately more complex, models. As a first illustration, the MH-method is also applied to a simple regression example to demonstrate to the practitioner the ability of the algorithm to produce valid results.

  18. Influência da sacarose e do corte da base da haste na longevidade de inflorescências de Zinnia elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro Tânia Forster

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Flores de zínia (Zinnia elegans Jacq. são adaptadas às condições climáticas da Região Sudeste do País, com excelente potencial para a comercialização como flor de corte. O presente trabalho objetivou avaliar a influência da sacarose aplicada na forma de solução de condicionamento, e do corte periódico da base das hastes sobre a longevidade e absorção de água pelas flores. Hastes florais uniformizadas em tamanho foram submetidas ao condicionamento, por seis horas, com sacarose a 5, 10, 15 e 20% ou com soluções de 10% de sacarose por 0, 6, 12, 18 e 24 horas, com ou sem cortes periódicos na base das hastes a cada 48 horas. O tratamento das flores por seis horas com sacarose a 5, 10, 15 ou 20% não afetou a longevidade das flores, comparado àquelas mantidas somente com água destilada. O corte periódico da base das hastes promoveu melhor suprimento de água às flores, estendendo a longevidade. O condicionamento das flores com 10% de sacarose por 18 ou 24 horas acelerou a senescência das flores em vaso. A taxa de produção de etileno foi inibida pelo aumento da concentração de sacarose na solução de condicionamento.

  19. Osteossínteses com hastes intramedulares em crianças Osteosynthesis with intramedullary nails on children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Jorge Alvachian Fernandes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Os autores fazem uma ampla revisão da literatura destacando o emprego de hastes intramedulares flexíveis no tratamento de fraturas em crianças. Destacam o tratamento das fraturas diafisárias do fêmur e dos ossos do antebraço e enfatizam também a importância da abordagem não cirúrgica. A idade e o peso limite das crianças ainda não estão bem definidos para o emprego do método. A retirada de implantes tem destaque controverso na literatura, com tendência da permanência dos implantes.The authors present a comprehensive review of the literature emphasizing the use of flexible intramedullary nails in the treatment of fractures in children, focusing the treatment of femoral shaft and forearm fractures and emphasizing the importance of the non-surgical approach. Children's age and weight threshold are not well defined for the use of the method. The removal of implants is a controversial matter in the literature, with a trend towards keeping the implants.

  20. Beyond Random Walk and Metropolis-Hastings Samplers: Why You Should Not Backtrack for Unbiased Graph Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chul-Ho; Eun, Do Young

    2012-01-01

    Graph sampling via crawling has been actively considered as a generic and important tool for collecting uniform node samples so as to consistently estimate and uncover various characteristics of complex networks. The so-called simple random walk with re-weighting (SRW-rw) and Metropolis-Hastings (MH) algorithm have been popular in the literature for such unbiased graph sampling. However, an unavoidable downside of their core random walks -- slow diffusion over the space, can cause poor estimation accuracy. In this paper, we propose non-backtracking random walk with re-weighting (NBRW-rw) and MH algorithm with delayed acceptance (MHDA) which are theoretically guaranteed to achieve, at almost no additional cost, not only unbiased graph sampling but also higher efficiency (smaller asymptotic variance of the resulting unbiased estimators) than the SRW-rw and the MH algorithm, respectively. In particular, a remarkable feature of the MHDA is its applicability for any non-uniform node sampling like the MH algorithm,...

  1. 2011 Christchurch, New Zealand Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Island, New Zealand earthquake occurred as part of the aftershock sequence of the M 7.0 September 3, 2010 Darfield, NZ earthquake. It involved...

  2. New Zealand's Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The rugged Southern Alps extend some 650 kilometers along the western side of New Zealand's South Island. The mountains are often obscured by clouds, which is probably why the Maoris called New Zealand 'Aotearoa', the long white cloud. The higher peaks are snow-covered all year round. Westerly winds bring clouds that drop over 500 centimeters of rain annually on luxuriant rain forest along the west coast. The drier eastern seaboard is home to the majority of the island's population.This pair of MISR images is from April 13, 2000 (Terra orbit 1712). The upper image is a natural color view from the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. It is presented at a resolution of 550 meters per pixel. The lower image is a stereo anaglyph generated from the instrument's 46-degree and 26-degree forward-viewing cameras, and is presented at 275-meter per pixel resolution to show the portion of the image containing the Southern Alps in greater detail. Viewing the anaglyph in 3-D requires the use of red/blue glasses with the red filter over your left eye. To facilitate stereoscopic viewing, both images have been oriented with north at the left.The tallest mountain in the Southern Alps is Mt. Cook, at an elevation of 3754 meters. Its snow-covered peak is visible to the left of center in each of these MISR images. From the high peaks, glaciers have gouged long, slender mountain lakes and coastal fiords. Immediately to the southeast of Mt. Cook (to the right in these images), the glacial pale-blue water of Lake Pukaki stands out. Further to the south in adjacent valleys you can easily see Lakes Hawea and Wanaka, between which (though not visible here) is the Haast Pass Road, the most southerly of the few links between the east and west coast road systems. Further to the south is the prominent 'S' shape of Lake Wakatipu, 83 kilometers long, on the northern shore of which is Queenstown, the principal resort town of the island. The remote and spectacular Fiordland National Park

  3. Suicide in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmasebi, Said

    2005-07-18

    This paper explores and questions some of the notions associated with suicide including mental illness. On average, about two-thirds of suicide cases do not come into contact with mental health services, therefore, we have no objective assessment of their mental status or their life events. One method of improving our objective understanding of suicide would be to use data mining techniques in order to build life event histories on all deaths due to suicide. Although such an exercise would require major funding, partial case histories became publicly available from a coroner's inquest on cases of suicide during a period of three months in Christchurch, New Zealand. The case histories were accompanied by a newspaper article reporting comments from some of the families involved. A straightforward contextual analysis of this information suggests that (i) only five cases had contact with mental health services, in two of the cases this was due to a previous suicide attempt and in the other three it was due to drug and alcohol dependency; (ii) mental illness as the cause of suicide is fixed in the public mindset, (iii) this in turn makes psychological autopsy type studies that seek information from families and friends questionable; (iv) proportionally more females attempt, but more men tend to complete suicide; and (v) not only is the mental health-suicide relationship tenuous, but suicide also appears to be a process outcome. It is hoped that this will stimulate debate and the collaboration of international experts regardless of their school of thought.

  4. Overview of geothermal energy in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochstein, M.P.

    1986-03-01

    The author has attempted in this article to give an overview of the activities of New-Zealand professionals in geothermal development. 6 topics are dealt with: - history and present stage of development of low enthalpy geothermal prospects in New Zealand; - history of development of high enthalpy geothermal prospects in New Zealand to 1980; - history of development of high enthalpy resources since 1980; - the role of New Zealand scientists and engineers and of private New Zealand companies in geothermal development outside New Zealand; - history and objectives of the Geothermal diploma Course at the University of Auckland. - Future of geothermal energy.

  5. Comparison of T{sub 2}-weighted turbo-spin echo sequence and ultra-fast HASTE sequence in the diagnosis of cervical myelopathies and spinal stenoses against static and kinematic MRT of the cervical spine; Vergleich von T{sub 2}-gewichteter Turbo-Spin-Echo- und ultraschneller, HASTE-Sequenz in der Diagnostik von zervikalen Myelopathien und Spinalstenosen mit der statischen und kinematischen MRT der Halswirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C.; Metzner, J.; Brinkmann, G.; Kuehn, B.; Bischoff, L.; Hutzelmann, A.; Wesner, F.; Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel (Germany)

    1997-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare HASTE-sequence with T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequence in the detection of cervical myelopathy and cervical spinal stenosis in kinematic MRI. Methods: 24 patients with degenerative disease of the cervical spine were studied. Images were evaluated according to the following criteria: Artifacts, delineation of the vertebra, disks and degenerative changes, grade of spinal stenosis (grade 0-3) and evaluation of the cervical spinal cord. Results: Due to image blurring and artifacts, evaluation and delineation of the cervical spine was possible in all cases in the T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequence, but only in 23 of 24 patients using HASTE-sequence. Differentiation between osteophytes and disks was obtained in most cases (23/24) in the T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequence but none in the HASTE-sequence. Cervical myelopathy was observed in 4 patients in T{sub 2}-weighted TSE images but only in two cases using HASTE-sequence. Compared to T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequence spinal canal stenosis was underestimated using HASTE-sequence. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Beurteilung von zervikalen Myelopathien und Spinalstenosen im Vergleich von ultraschneller HASTE-Sequenz sowie T{sub 2}-TSE-Sequenz. Methode: 24 Patienten mit degenerativen Halswirbelsaeulenveraenderungen wurden untersucht. Die Aufnahmen wurden hinsichtlich der Artefaktanfaelligkeit, der Darstellung von Halswirbelkoerper, Bandscheiben und degenerativen Veraenderungen, dem Grad einer Spinalstenose (Stadium 0-3) sowie der Beurteilung des Zervikalmarks ausgewertet. Ergebnisse; Aufgrund von ausgepraegten Artefakten konnten nur 23 von 24 Untersuchungen mit der HASTE-Sequenz, hingegen alle Untersuchungen mit der T{sub 2}-TSE-Sequenz ausgewertet werden. Eine Differenzierung von osteophytaeren Randanbauten von Bandscheiben und Wirbelkoerpern war in der HASTE-Sequenz gegenueber der T{sub 2}-TSE-Sequenz nur eingeschraenkt moeglich. Eine in 4 Faellen in der T{sub 2}-TSE-Sequenz diagnostizierte

  6. in New Zealand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon Braund

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood poisoning is a significant international health concern. Very little is known about trends in exposures within schools and preschools. The objectives of this study were to investigate the data recorded by the New Zealand National Poisons Centre (NPC on these types of exposures over a 21 year period (1989 to 2009 and to determine trends and propose strategies to reduce the exposures. Methods: Call information regarding human poison exposure at preschools and schools from Jan1st 1989 to Dec 31st 2009 were extracted from the dataset held by the NPC. The number of calls received by the NPC relating to the exposures was plotted against year as totals and then categorized according to gender. The number of calls related to each substance type for each year, and the number of calls related to each age group for each year were quantified. Results: There were 3632 calls over this period. In every year studied, there were more calls relating to males than females. Household items were responsible for 31% of exposures, followed by plants (20%, industrial items (14% and therapeutic agents (14%. Almost one quarter of all exposures occurred in the 13 year old age group. Further investigation of this group, showed that the causes of exposures included “splash” incidents (27%, “pengestion” (pen breaking in mouth and releasing contents (16%, “exploratory” (5% and “prank” (4%. Conclusion: Identification of these areas allows recommendations to be made including feedback to teachers about exposure risks, storage and access of science, cleaning and art supplies.    

  7. Suicide in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Shahtahmasebi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores and questions some of the notions associated with suicide including mental illness. On average, about two-thirds of suicide cases do not come into contact with mental health services, therefore, we have no objective assessment of their mental status or their life events. One method of improving our objective understanding of suicide would be to use data mining techniques in order to build life event histories on all deaths due to suicide. Although such an exercise would require major funding, partial case histories became publicly available from a coroner's inquest on cases of suicide during a period of three months in Christchurch, New Zealand. The case histories were accompanied by a newspaper article reporting comments from some of the families involved. A straightforward contextual analysis of this information suggests that (i only five cases had contact with mental health services, in two of the cases this was due to a previous suicide attempt and in the other three it was due to drug and alcohol dependency; (ii mental illness as the cause of suicide is fixed in the public mindset, (iii this in turn makes psychological autopsy type studies that seek information from families and friends questionable; (iv proportionally more females attempt, but more men tend to complete suicide; and (v not only is the mental health-suicide relationship tenuous, but suicide also appears to be a process outcome. It is hoped that this will stimulate debate and the collaboration of international experts regardless of their school of thought.

  8. Iphimediidae of New Zealand (Crustacea, Amphipoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Oliver Coleman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand species of Iphimediidae, Amphipoda, are revised. Based on new material from the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, two new species are described in detail: Labriphimedia meikae sp. nov. and Labriphimedia martinae sp. nov. A key to the six species belonging to three genera of New Zealand Iphimediidae is provided.

  9. Efeito do treinamento com haste vibratória na biomecânica da marcha com dupla-tarefa em idosas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Zamfolini Hallal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: As quedas em idosos são responsáveis por muitos casos de lesões e morte. As alterações de equilíbrio e força muscular decorrentes do envelhecimento, que contribuem para a ocorrência de quedas, podem ser parcialmente revertidas com o exercício físico. Objetivo: Verificar os efeitos de 8 semanas de treinamento de equilíbrio com haste vibratória, sobre o comprimento de passo e a ativação muscular do membro inferior de idosas durante marcha com duplas tarefas. Métodos: Participaram do estudo 16 idosas divididas aleatoriamente em dois grupos: grupo treinamento de equilíbrio (GTE e grupo de treinamento de equilíbrio com haste vibratória (GTEHV. A avaliação da marcha foi composta por três condições distintas que incluiram marcha em velocidade de preferencia e duplas tarefas. Foram coletados os dados eletromiográficos dos músculos reto femoral, vasto lateral, bíceps femoral, tibial anterior e gastrocnêmio lateral, e dados cinemáticos de comprimento de passo. Resultados: O GTEHV apresentou maiores valores de comprimento de passo após o treinamento. Ambos os grupos (GTE e GTEHV mostraram menores valores de ativação muscular após o treinamento. Conclusão: Os resultados sugerem que o treinamento de equilíbrio com haste vibratória pode ser eficaz para melhora do desempenho durante diferentes condições de marcha em idosos, contribuindo para a prevenção de quedas nesta população.

  10. Progresso da seca da haste (Botrytis cinerea do hibisco (Hibiscus sabdariffa em quatro épocas e dois métodos de plantio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O progresso da seca da haste em hibisco foi estudado em quatro épocas e dois métodos de plantio. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições e os oito tratamentos foram dispostos em esquema fatorial 4 (épocas de plantio x 2 (métodos de plantio, sendo: semeadura direta em 05/02/03, 06/03/03, 05/04/03 e 15/05/03; transplantio de mudas em 24/12/02, 25/01/03, 24/02/03 e 25/03/03. Imediatamente após o surgimento dos sintomas, avaliou-se a doença a cada 10 dias até o final do ciclo, aos 205 dias, calculando-se a porcentagem de hastes infectadas por planta. Calculou-se a área abaixo da curva de progresso para a incidência (AACPI. As curvas de progresso da doença dos tratamentos foram submetidas ao ajuste dos modelos linear, exponencial, monomolecular, logístico e Gompertz. Houve interação significativa de métodos e épocas de plantio na incidência da doença. Constatou-se menor incidência da seca da haste em transplantio de mudas comparado à semeadura direta em todas as épocas de plantio. Verificou-se aumento da incidência proporcionado pelo atraso na época de plantio nos dois métodos. O modelo exponencial foi o que melhor descreveu o comportamento da doença em todos os tratamentos. As diferenças estatísticas entre os tratamentos, considerando a taxa de progresso, não refletiram a intensidade da doença no campo. Na mesma época de plantio, as quantidades inicial e máxima da doença, observadas na semeadura direta, foram superiores aos tratamentos referentes ao transplantio de mudas, coerentes com os valores da AACPI. Registrou-se uma relação direta entre queda de temperatura e aumento da incidência da seca da haste.

  11. Avaliação da endotelização de hastes de stents em artérias ilíacas de coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Kiyochi Takimura

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A rápida endotelização pós-implante de stent é ocorrência desejável por teoricamente reduzir a possibilidade de trombose do stent. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a extensão da endotelização de hastes de stents eluidores de sirolimus (liberados da face luminal e abluminal e abluminal exclusivamente em artérias ilíacas de coelhos. MÉTODOS: Foram implantados em artérias ilíacas de 10 coelhos quatro stents eluidores de sirolimus na face luminal e abluminal, três stents eluidores de sirolimus na face abluminal, seis stents recobertos com polímero e quatro stents sem recobrimento. Após quatro semanas, foi realizada eutanásia e utilizou-se microscopia eletrônica de varredura para quantificação da área de hastes de stent exposta e da porcentagem de endotelização. RESULTADOS: A área (média ± DP (mm² de hastes expostas de stent sem recobrimento, stent recoberto com polímero, stent eluidor de sirolimus na face luminal e abluminal e stent eluidor de sirolimus na face abluminal foi de 0,12 ± 0,08; 0,09 ± 0,12; 0,60 ± 0,67 e 0,05 ± 0,04 respectivamente (p = 0,120. A porcentagem de endotelização (média ± DP (% de stent sem recobrimento, stent recoberto com polímero, stent eluidor de sirolimus na face luminal e abluminal e stent eluidor de sirolimus na face abluminal foi de 99 ± 01; 99 ± 0; 97 ± 03 e 99 ± 0 respectivamente (p = 0,133. CONCLUSÃO: Após quatro semanas de implante em artérias ilíacas de coelhos, os stents com liberação de sirolimus tanto da face luminal e abluminal quanto da face abluminal exclusivamente apresentaram taxas de endotelização de hastes de stent semelhantes aos apresentados nos demais tipos de stents sem eluição de medicamento.

  12. Teacher Education in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of how teacher education is currently structured in New Zealand. This overview is set in a historical, cultural, political and professional context with a brief examination of aspects of these influences on the structure. Two very recent policy documents are discussed to exemplify current directions in New Zealand…

  13. The Anita Peridotite, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czertowicz, Tom; Scott, James; Waight, Tod Earle

    2016-01-01

    The orogenic Anita Peridotite in Fiordland, SW New Zealand, provides an opportunity to examine the composition of a large block of upper mantle exhumed from beneath a Cretaceous arc. This Little studied 1km2 km massif is dominated by spinel-facies harzburgite and dunite. Olivine Mg# of 92...

  14. Apologies in New Zealand English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Janet

    1990-01-01

    Examines the syntactic, semantic, and sociolinguistic features of a corpus of 183 apologies in New Zealand English, within the context of an interaction model with 2 intersecting dimensions, affective and referential meaning, attempting to relate the relative "weightiness" of the offense to features of the apology. (53 references)…

  15. Avian malaria in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoener, E R; Banda, M; Howe, L; Castro, I C; Alley, M R

    2014-07-01

    Avian malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium have the ability to cause morbidity and mortality in naïve hosts, and their impact on the native biodiversity is potentially serious. Over the last decade, avian malaria has aroused increasing interest as an emerging disease in New Zealand with some endemic avian species, such as the endangered mohua (Mohua ochrocephala), thought to be particularly susceptible. To date, avian malaria parasites have been found in 35 different bird species in New Zealand and have been diagnosed as causing death in threatened species such as dotterel (Charadrius obscurus), South Island saddleback (Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus), mohua, hihi (Notiomystis cincta) and two species of kiwi (Apteryx spp.). Introduced blackbirds (Turdus merula) have been found to be carriers of at least three strains of Plasmodium spp. and because they are very commonly infected, they are likely sources of infection for many of New Zealand's endemic birds. The spread and abundance of introduced and endemic mosquitoes as the result of climate change is also likely to be an important factor in the high prevalence of infection in some regions and at certain times of the year. Although still limited, there is a growing understanding of the ecology and epidemiology of Plasmodium spp. in New Zealand. Molecular biology has played an important part in this process and has markedly improved our understanding of the taxonomy of the genus Plasmodium. This review presents our current state of knowledge, discusses the possible infection and disease outcomes, the implications for host behaviour and reproduction, methods of diagnosis of infection, and the possible vectors for transmission of the disease in New Zealand.

  16. T2-weighted MR imaging of liver lesions: a prospective evaluation comparing turbo spin-echo, breath-hold turbo spin-echo and half-Fourier turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences; Estudio de lesiones hepaticas con imagenes de resonancia magnetica potenciadas en T2: evaluacion prospectiva comparando secuencias turbo eco del espin, turbo eco del espin con respiracion sostenida y half-Fourier turbo eco del espin (HASTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.; Villajos, M.; Oses, M. J.; Veintemillas, M.; Rue, M.; Puig, J.; Sentis, M. [Fundacion Parc Tauli. Sabadell (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To compare turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences quantitatively and qualitatively in T2-weighted images of liver lesions. The authors evaluated prospectively 89 liver lesions in 73 patients using a 1.0-T magnetic resonance system to compare TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences. The quantitative parameters were: lesion-to-liver contrast and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative analysis was performed by two observers in consensus who examined four parameters: respiratory artifacts, lesion edge definition, intrahepatic vessel definition and image quality. Repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized to compare the quantitative variables and Friedman's nonparametric test for the qualitative parameters. In quantitative terms, the lesion-to-liver contrast was similar in TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (2.45{+-}1.44 versus 2.60{+-}1.66), both of which were significantly better than the HASTE sequence (1.12{+-}0.72; p<0.001). The lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher in the TSE sequence (62.60{+-}46.40 versus 40.22{+-}25.35 versus 50.90{+-}32.10 for TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, respectively; p<0.001). In the qualitative comparisons, the HASTE sequence was significantly better than the TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (p<0.001) in terms of artifacts and definition of lesion edge and intrahepatic vessels. Image quality was also significantly greater in the HASTE sequence (p<0.001). In quantitative terms, the TSE sequence is better than the breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, but there are no movement artifacts in the HASTE sequence, which is also significantly superior to TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences in qualitative terms and, thus, can be employed for T2-weighted images in liver studies. (Author) 17 refs.

  17. 7 CFR 319.56-32 - Peppers from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peppers from New Zealand. 319.56-32 Section 319.56-32... from New Zealand. Peppers (fruit) (Capsicum spp.) from New Zealand may be imported into the United... peppers must be grown in New Zealand in insect-proof greenhouses approved by the New Zealand Ministry of...

  18. New Zealand geothermal: Wairakei -- 40 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This quarterly bulletin highlights the geothermal developments in New Zealand with the following articles: A brief history of the Wairakei geothermal power project; Geothermal resources in New Zealand -- An overview; Domestic and commercial heating and bathing -- Rotorua area; Kawerau geothermal development: A case study; Timber drying at Kawerau; Geothermal greenhouses at Kawerau; Drying of fibrous crops using geothermal steam and hot water at the Taupo Lucerne Company; Prawn Park -- Taupo, New Zealand; Geothermal orchids; Miranda hot springs; and Geothermal pipeline.

  19. Storage of cut Heliconia bihai (L. cv. Lobster Claw flowers at low temperatures Armazenamento de hastes florais de Heliconia bihai (L. cv. Lobster Claw em baixa temperatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza S. Costa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The postharvest conservation of cut Heliconia flowers is an important factor to the success of commercialization, especially with regard to exportation. In the present study, the maximal storage time of cut inflorescences of Heliconia bihai cv. Lobster Claw at two different temperatures (12 and 19 °C was evaluated and compared to laboratory conditions (25 °C, control treatment. Changes in visual quality, fresh weight and bract color (L*, a* and b* were determined. The visual quality of the inflorescences and fresh weight decreased with time in all treatments. Symptoms of chilling injury were observed on the inflorescences stored at 12 °C for six and eight days. Bract color was not affected by temperature, storage time or the senescence process. The results indicate that a temperature of 12 °C is not recommended for a storage time longer than four days, whereas 19 °C can be used for a storage time of up to eight days for cut inflorescences of H. bihai cv. Lobster Claw.A conservação pós-colheita de flores de corte de Heliconia é fator relevante para o sucesso da comercialização, principalmente para a exportação. Neste estudo, o período máximo de armazenamento de hastes florais de Heliconia bihai cv. Lobster Claw, foi avaliado em duas diferentes temperaturas (12 e 19 °C e comparado com as condições de laboratório (25 °C, tratamento controle. As variáveis avaliadas foram: qualidade visual, massa de matéria fresca e a coloração das inflorescências (L*, a* e b*. A qualidade visual das inflorescências e a massa de matéria fresca de todos os tratamentos reduziram ao longo do tempo. Sintomas de injúria por frio foram observados nas inflorescências armazenadas a 12 °C, durante seis e oito dias. A coloração das brácteas não foi afetada pela temperatura, período de armazenamento nem pelo processo de senescência. Os resultados indicam que a temperatura de 12 °C não é recomendada para armazenar hastes florais de

  20. O emprego de hastes intramedulares bloqueadas no tratamento das fraturas diafisárias do úmero Use of blocked intramedullary shaft for the treatment of humeral diaphyseal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Baldy dos Reis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos os resultados clínicos e radiográficos de 31 pacientes portadores de fraturas diafisárias do úmero que foram operados com hastes intramedulares. Destes quatro apresentaram fraturas no local da inserção da haste e foram tratados com outro método. Dos 27 pacientes restantes o índice de consolidação foi de 96,1 % e que durou em média de 63,4 dias. Cinco queixaram-se de dor no ombro e em apenas um apresentou limitação da abdução. Paralisia temporária do nervo radial foi constatada em dois pacientes e pseudartrose em um que após 5 meses da cirurgia foi submetido a nova intervenção cirúrgica com o emprego de placa e enxerto ósseo autólogo. Concluímos que embora o emprego de hastes intramedulares bloqueadas apresentou alto índice de a via de acesso retrógrada pode levar a fraturas no seu ponto de entrada e via anterógrada com violação do manguito rotador pode gerar dores no ombro.Clinical and radiographic outcomes of 31 patients with humeral diaphyseal fractures submitted to surgery with intramedullary shafts were studied. From these, four patients presented fractures at the shaft insertion site and were treated using a different method. From the 27 patients left, the healing rate was 96.1%, with an average duration of 63.4 days. Five of them complained of pain in the shoulder and only one presented abduction limitation. Temporary palsy of the radial nerve was found in two patients and pseudoarthrosis in one of them, who was submitted to a new surgical intervention with plate and autologous bone graft, after 5 months. It was concluded that, although blocked intramedullary shafts presents a high incidence of the retrograde access port leading to fractures in its insertion site and the anterograde port causing pain in the shoulder.

  1. Fast MR Imaging of the Paediatric Abdomen with CAIPIRINHA-Accelerated T1w 3D FLASH and with High-Resolution T2w HASTE: A Study on Image Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxia Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the applicability of fast MR techniques to routine paediatric abdominopelvic MRI at 1.5 Tesla. “Controlled Aliasing in Parallel Imaging Results in Higher Acceleration-” (CAIPIRINHA- accelerated contrast-enhanced-T1w 3D FLASH imaging was compared to standard T1w 2D FLASH imaging with breath-holding in 40 paediatric patients and to respiratory-triggered T1w TSE imaging in 10 sedated young children. In 20 nonsedated patients, we compared T2w TIRM to fat-saturated T2w HASTE imaging. Two observers performed an independent and blinded assessment of overall image quality. Acquisition time was reduced by the factor of 15 with CAIPIRINHA-accelerated T1w FLASH and by 7 with T2w HASTE. With CAIPIRINHA and with HASTE, there were significantly less motion artefacts in nonsedated patients. In sedated patients, respiratory-triggered T1w imaging in general showed better image quality. However, satisfactory image quality was achieved with CAIPIRINHA in two sedated patients where respiratory triggering failed. In summary, fast scanning with CAIPIRINHA and HASTE presents a reliable high quality alternative to standard sequences in paediatric abdominal MRI. Paediatric patients, in particular, benefit greatly from fast image acquisition with less breath-hold cycles or shorter sedation.

  2. Efeito de variáveis ambientais, épocas e métodos de plantio na intensidade da seca da haste (Botrytis cinerea em Hibiscus sabdariffa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo objetivou avaliar o efeito da temperatura (15, 20, 25 e 30ºC, do período de molhamento foliar (0, 6, 12 e 24 h, de épocas (setembro, outubro, novembro e dezembro e métodos de plantio (semeadura direta e transplantio de mudas, na intensidade da seca da haste (Botrytis cinerea do hibisco (Hibiscus sabdariffa. As variáveis ambientais foram avaliadas em condições controladas com inoculação artificial e as épocas e métodos de plantio foram avaliados em condições de infecção natural em campo. Os dados de frequência de infecção analisados, como área abaixo da curva de progresso da frequência de infecção (AACPF e comprimento de lesões relacionados às variáveis ambientais, foram submetidos à análise de variância e regressão e, em seguida, plotadas as superfícies de resposta. Os dados de incidência (AACPI relacionados às épocas e métodos de plantio foram submetidos à análise de variância, utilizando-se o programa estatístico Sisvarâ/UFLA. A interação da temperatura e da duração do período de molhamento foliar influenciou a frequência de infecção e o comprimento de lesões da seca da haste. Houve aumento na frequência de infecção e no comprimento de lesões com o incremento do período de molhamento foliar e redução da temperatura. As lesões apresentaram maior tamanho na temperatura de 15ºC e 24 horas de molhamento foliar. Na ausência de molhamento foliar houve manifestação de sintomas somente a 15ºC. A 30ºC houve dependência de maior período de molhamento foliar para a manifestação de sintomas. Houve interação significativa de métodos e épocas de plantio na incidência da doença. Constatou-se menor incidência da seca da haste em transplantio de mudas comparado à semeadura direta em todas as épocas de plantio. Verificou-se aumento da incidência proporcionado pelo atraso na época de plantio nos dois métodos. Registrou-se uma relação direta entre queda de

  3. Número e espaçamento entre hastes de guia de onda para medida da umidade do solo com TDR Number and spacing between wave guide rods for measurement of soil water content with TDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênio F. Coelho

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Com este trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar o desempenho de diferentes modelos matemáticos para ajuste dos dados de umidade, em função da constante dielétrica aparente do solo, e a viabilidade de uso de guias de onda de duas e três hastes, com diferentes espaçamentos. Amostras de solo deformadas foram acondicionadas em segmentos de tubos de PVC de 0,075 m de diâmetro. Construíram-se 24 guias de onda com capacitor e 24 guias de onda sem capacitor, sendo que, para cada tipo, 12 guias de onda de duas hastes e 12 de três hastes, com espaçamento entre hastes de 0,009 a 0,022 m, de impedâncias previamente determinadas, foram inseridas no solo, após a saturação em cada segmento de tubo. Dados de umidade do solo determinados por gravimetria e da constante dielétrica aparente obtidos pelo analisador Trase System, foram tomados em cada recipiente durante a secagem do solo de 0,31 a 0,13 m³ m-3. Cinco modelos matemáticos foram ajustados aos dados de umidade em função da correspondente constante dielétrica aparente do solo e o efeito dos modelos na obtenção da umidade do solo, em função da constante dielétrica aparente, foi avaliado estatisticamente. O modelo de Malicki foi o de melhor ajuste dos dados da constante dielétrica aparente, em função da umidade do solo. As guias de onda de três hastes, de diâmetro 0,003 m, comprimento 0,15 m, com espaçamentos entre hastes de 0,017 m, foram as de melhor desempenho, enquanto as guias de onda de três hastes sem capacitor indicaram melhor desempenho na determinação da umidade do solo, comparadas com as de duas hastes sem capacitor. As guias de onda de três hastes sem capacitor apresentaram melhor desempenho na determinação da umidade do solo que as de três hastes com capacitor.The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of different mathematical models to adjust the humidity data as a function of the apparent dielectric constant of the soil and to evaluate the

  4. The North Zealand CAP Monitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Minna; Ravn, Pernille; Notander Clausen, Lise

    Contect We describe how we developed a monitoring system for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) at North Zealand Regional hospital. We serve 310.000 inhabitants and annually around 3200 patients with CAP are admitted. As part of a program of clinical pathways for common conditions, a pathway...... nurses and two senior doctors. Direct observations of the clinical processes revealed problems of coordination, complex disease trajectories that did not fit with the pneumonia pathway, unclear guidelines and variation in their interpretation. Intervention We designed a measurement system to monitor...

  5. California's coast redwood in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Gaman

    2012-01-01

    New Zealanders are making a significant effort to develop their forest industry to benefit from rapid growth exhibited by Sequoia sempervirens on both the North Island and South Island. US and New Zealand forest products companies have established redwood plantations in the past decade, and have found that microclimate, site preparation, soil chemistry, fertilization...

  6. Evolution of campylobacter species in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Zealand is an isolated archipelago in the South-West Pacific with a unique fauna and flora, a feature partly attributable to it being the last sizable land mass to be colonized by man. In this chapter we test the hypothesis that different periods in the history of New Zealand – from pre-history ...

  7. CERN signs agreement with New Zealand

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "New Zealand's particle physicists have joined the world's most ambitious scientific undertaking with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between their government and CERN . This agreement formalises the participation of New Zealand scientists in the laboratory's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project" (1 page).

  8. Obesity and Intellectual Disability in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman, Kurstyn V.; Leland, Louis S., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The international literature suggests that obesity is likely to be more pronounced in the population of people with intellectual disability (ID). However, there are no published New Zealand data for this population. Method: We accessed a database containing anonymous data for a New Zealand ID population. Ninety-eight people of 141 had…

  9. New Zealand Police and Restorative Justice Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, L. Thomas, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In New Zealand, selected sworn police officers called youth aid officers participate in discussions and deliberations concerning the actions required to restore the sense of community balance upset by the actions of juvenile offenders. The author explores a representative sample of all sworn police officers serving in the New Zealand Police,…

  10. Benign Rabbit Calicivirus in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Leila J; Mahar, Jackie E; Strive, Tanja; Zheng, Tao; Holmes, Edward C; Ward, Vernon K; Duckworth, Janine A

    2017-06-01

    The Czech v351 strain of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV1) is used in Australia and New Zealand as a biological control agent for rabbits, which are important and damaging introduced vertebrate pests in these countries. However, nonpathogenic rabbit caliciviruses (RCVs) can provide partial immunological cross-protection against lethal RHDV infection and thus interfere with effective rabbit biocontrol. Antibodies that cross-reacted against RHDV antigens were found in wild rabbits before the release of RHDV1 in New Zealand in 1997, suggesting that nonpathogenic RCVs were already present in New Zealand. The aim of this study was to confirm the presence of nonpathogenic RCV in New Zealand and describe its geographical distribution. RCV and RHDV antibody assays were used to screen serum samples from 350 wild rabbits from 14 locations in New Zealand. The serological survey indicated that both RCV and RHDV are widespread in New Zealand wild rabbits, with antibodies detected in 10 out of 14 and 12 out of 14 populations, respectively. Two closely related RCV strains were identified in the duodenal tissue from a New Zealand wild rabbit (RCV Gore-425A and RCV Gore-425B). Both variants are most closely related to Australian RCV strains, but with 88% nucleotide identity, they are genetically distinct. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the New Zealand RCV strains fall within the genetic diversity of the Australian RCV isolates, indicating a relatively recent movement of RCVs between Australia and New Zealand. IMPORTANCE Wild rabbits are important and damaging introduced vertebrate pests in Australia and New Zealand. Although RHDV1 is used as a biological control agent, some nonpathogenic RCVs can provide partial immunological cross-protection against lethal RHDV infection and thus interfere with its effectiveness for rabbit control. The presence of nonpathogenic RCVs in New Zealand wild rabbits has been long hypothesized, but earlier attempts to isolate a New Zealand

  11. Rainfall erosivity in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, Andreas; Haas, Kathrin; Dvorackova, Anna; Fuller, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall and its kinetic energy expressed by the rainfall erosivity is the main driver of soil erosion processes by water. The Rainfall-Runoff Erosivity Factor (R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation is one oft he most widely used parameters describing rainfall erosivity. This factor includes the cumulative effects of the many moderate-sized storms as well as the effects oft he occasional severe ones: R quantifies the effect of raindrop impact and reflects the amopunt and rate of runoff associated with the rain. New Zealand is geologically young and not comparable with any other country in the world. Inordinately high rainfall and strong prevailing winds are New Zealand's dominant climatic features. Annual rainfall up to 15000 mm, steep slopes, small catchments and earthquakes are the perfect basis for a high rate of natural and accelerated erosion. Due to the multifacted landscape of New Zealand its location as island between the Pacific and the Tasmanian Sea there is a high gradient in precipitation between North and South Island as well as between West and East Coast. The objective of this study was to determine the R-factor for the different climatic regions in New Zealand, in order to create a rainfall erosivity map. We used rainfall data (breakpoint data in 10-min intervals) from 34 gauging stations for the calcuation of the rainfall erosivity. 15 stations were located on the North Island and 19 stations on the South Island. From these stations, a total of 397 station years with 12710 rainstorms were analyzed. The kinetic energy for each rainfall event was calculated based on the equation by Brown and Foster (1987), using the breakpoint precipitation data for each storm. On average, a mean annual precipitation of 1357 mm was obtained from the 15 observed stations on the North Island. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is relatively even with 22-24% of annual rainfall occurring in spring , fall and winter and 31% in summer. On the South Island

  12. Hastes instrumentadas para a mensuração da resistência mecânica do solo Instrumented shanks for soil mechanical resistance measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav I. Adamchuk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A presença de camada de solo compactada pode significar sérios problemas ao desenvolvimento do sistema radicular das culturas em geral. A correção pode ser feita por métodos biológicos ou mecânicos. Uma das formas de diagnóstico da sua presença é com o uso de penetrômetros que exigem tempo considerável para a obtenção de dados. Com o advento dos recursos de espacialização das informações na forma de mapas, a necessidade de amostragem passou a ser ainda maior. Este trabalho reporta a busca de uma solução alternativa ao uso do penetrômetro. Envolve a geração de mapas de resistência mecânica do solo ao deslocamento de uma haste em três profundidades, baseado em três hastes instrumentadas, um receptor de GPS e um sistema de aquisição de dados. O sistema é acoplado a uma barra porta-ferramenta montada no engate de três pontos do trator. A configuração mostrou ser mecanicamente bastante simples e confiável. Dados de um teste inicial em campo demonstraram que o sistema pode produzir mapas que denotam a variabilidade espacial da referida resistência nas áreas amostradas, com alta resolução, densidade de amostragem elevada e com capacidade operacional ainda mais elevada se comparada com levantamentos feitos com métodos convencionais.The presence of soil compaction may be considered a serious problem for the development of crop root systems. It can be alleviated by biological or mechanical methods (such as tillage. One of the most popular diagnostic methods is based on standardized cone penetrometer measurements, which requires a considerable amount of time to obtain the data. With the advent of site-specific field management, high-density measurements have become a necessity. This work reports on an alternative approach to use a cone penetromenter. It involves the generation of maps of soil mechanical resistance at three depths using three instrumented blades, a GPS receiver and a data logger. The system is attached

  13. Artrodese tibiotalocalcaneana com haste intramedular retrógrada: avaliação clínica e funcional de 29 pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Barbosa Caixeta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: avaliar clínica e funcionalmente o pós-operatório de pacientes submetidos à artrodese tibiotalocalcaneana para o tratamento das artropatias traumáticas e neurológicas do tornozelo. Métodos: estudo retrospectivo de 29 pacientes submetidos à artrodese do tornozelo com haste intramedular retrógrada. Todos os pacientes foram avaliados em relação ao tempo de consolidação, escores Aofas e EVA e grau de satisfação, além de complicações do ato cirúrgico. O tempo de seguimento médio foi de 36 meses (variação de 6-60. Resultados: a taxa de união foi de 82% e o tempo médio de consolidação foi de 16 semanas (10-24. O critério Aofas melhorou no pós-operatório em 65,5% (média de 57,7 nos casos neurológicos e de 75,7 nos pós-traumáticos e a EVA melhorou 94,1% (média de 2,3 nos casos neurológicos e de 4,2 nos pós-traumáticos e 86% dos pacientes mostraram-se satisfeitos com o procedimento feito. As complicações ocorreram em 11 pacientes (38%, entre elas pseudartrose (17,24%, infecção (17,24%, falha do material (13,8% e fratura (13,8%. Conclusão: a artrodese tibiotalocalcaneana com haste intramedular retrógrada mostrou ser uma boa opção para o salvamento da articulação do tornozelo, com melhoria dos critérios clínicos e funcionais (Aofas = 65,5% e EVA = 94,1%.

  14. Hyperomma of New Zealand (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Paederinae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schomann, Andrea Maria

    In this project a classical taxonomical revision of the New Zealand species of Hyperomma was conducted, as well as a broader molecular phylogenetic study revolving around this flightless genus, which occurs in Australia and New Zealand only. Seventeen new species were described, two new synonymies...... found, 8 known species re-described after contemporary standards, and a species inventory with keys to those 25 species and the paederine genera occurring in New Zealand was produced. The genus was placed in the phylogenetic context of its subfamily, Paederinae, for which a robust phylogenetic...... hypothesis was inferred based on a 5-gene dataset. This resulted in placement of Hyperomma in the "Dicax group", but also discovered the necessity to restructure the subfamily quite radically. Finally, the divergence time of the species of Hyperomma occurring in New Zealand from those occurring in Australia...

  15. Selenium and ocular health in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheck, Leo; Davies, Jo; Wilson, Graham

    2010-06-11

    Selenium is an essential mineral and severe selenium deficiency is known to cause significant health problems. It has been well documented that New Zealand soil is low in selenium. Recent studies have addressed the roles of selenoproteins in the eyes, with evidence suggesting that selenium supplementation may have a role in preventing cataract formation and age-related maculopathy. This paper summarises the role of selenium in ocular and general health and discusses selenium supplementation in a New Zealand specific context.

  16. Modelling Nitrogen Fertiliser Demand in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Darran; Cao, Kay; Rys, Gerald

    2006-01-01

    In New Zealand, the demand for nitrogen fertiliser has increased markedly since the early 1980s. Potentially, this trend has significant environmental and climate change implications. While many factors could contribute to this trend, little work has been done to examine the drivers of increased use of nitrogen fertiliser in New Zealand. In this paper, we review the international literature and discuss a theoretical framework for modelling fertiliser demand. Using a national data set, we deve...

  17. New Zealand's drug development industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Michelle Marie; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din; Carswell, Christopher; Garg, Sanjay

    2013-09-13

    The pharmaceutical industry's profitability depends on identifying and successfully developing new drug candidates while trying to contain the increasing costs of drug development. It is actively searching for new sources of innovative compounds and for mechanisms to reduce the enormous costs of developing new drug candidates. There is an opportunity for academia to further develop as a source of drug discovery. The rising levels of industry outsourcing also provide prospects for organisations that can reduce the costs of drug development. We explored the potential returns to New Zealand (NZ) from its drug discovery expertise by assuming a drug development candidate is out-licensed without clinical data and has anticipated peak global sales of $350 million. We also estimated the revenue from NZ's clinical research industry based on a standard per participant payment to study sites and the number of industry-sponsored clinical trials approved each year. Our analyses found that NZ's clinical research industry has generated increasing foreign revenue and appropriate policy support could ensure that this continues to grow. In addition the probability-based revenue from the out-licensing of a drug development candidate could be important for NZ if provided with appropriate policy and financial support.

  18. The Place of "New Zealand" in the New Zealand History Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The article provides a historical perspective on the debate over a New Zealand senior history curriculum that emerged in the 1980s and has remained largely intact over the subsequent 20 years. While the contested nature of history education is an international phenomenon, New Zealand stands apart: there school history is largely Eurocentric in…

  19. PARTICIPAÇÃO DA MASSA SECA DE FOLHAS E HASTES DO CAPIM-TANZÂNIA QUANDO ADUBADO COM DOSES CRESCENTES DE FÓSFORO EM UM LATOSSOLO VERMELHO DISTRÓFICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Fátima Rodrigues

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou avaliar a participação da massa seca das folhas e das hastes do capim-tanzânia (Panicum maximum Jacq., em um latossolo vermelho distrófico, adubado com doses crescentes de P. Para tanto,desenvolveu-se um experimento em casa de vegetação no período de dezembro de 2000 a agosto de 2001, utilizando-se o delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com cinco repetições, sete doses de P (0; 75; 150; 300; 450; 600; 750 mg dm-3 de P na forma de superfosfato triplo e três cortes da parte aérea com intervalos de 36 dias. Aos sessenta dias após o plantio, fez-se um corte de uniformização das cinco plantas de cada vaso a 10 cm do solo. Os materiais vegetais provenientes dos primeiro e terceiro cortes foram separados em folhas, hastes e massa seca total e o do segundo corte, somente em massa total. Avaliaram-se a produção de massa seca das frações folhas e hastes, a participação dessas frações na massa seca total e o coeficiente de utilização biológica (CUB do P. Para todos os parâmetros avaliados, verificou-se efeito significativo (P<0,01 pelo teste de F, das doses de P e da interação doses x cortes. A adubação fosfatada influenciou de maneira negativa a participação da massa seca das folhas e o CUB. A participação da massa seca das hastes foi ligeiramente inferior quando comparada com as folhas. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Adubação fosfatada, coeficiente de utilização biológica, massa seca de folhas, massa seca de hastes.

  20. Food Regimes Revisited: A New Zealand Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Roche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Food Regimes’ was coined by Friedmann and McMichael in 1989 and provided a organising framework for a considerable amount of Australian and New Zealand research during a period of economic restructuring and ‘deregulation’. Subsequently Food regimes were overtaken by other perspectives in New Zealand and elsewhere including an interest in commodity productions chains, regulation, post-productivist landscapes, and post structural political economy. More recently McMichael has reintroduced Food Regimes to his analysis. The paper will compare and contrast McMichael’s earlier and more recent engagements with Food Regimes. The export meat, the dairy, and pip fruit industries of Zealand it will be used to illustrate points about the timing, boundaries and margins as well as the transformation of Food Regimes. Finally the paper will attempt to connect the more recent focus on commodity chain analysis and post productivist landscapes with McMichael’s renewed interest in food Regimes.

  1. New Zealand Diastylidae and Gynodiastylidae (Crustacea: Cumacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Sarah

    2015-10-13

    Recent work in the collections at the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research collections in Wellington has yielded 14 new diastylid species in five genera, Colurostylis whitireia n. sp., Diastylis acanthoelachys n. sp., D. adaioacanthus n. sp., D. curtain n. sp., D. dasys n. sp., D. enodis n. sp., D. homoacanthus n. sp., D. implanus n. sp., D. spinacellulosus n. sp., Diastylopsis aspratilis n. sp., D. bicarina n. sp., Leptostylis wisniewskiae n. sp., L. zealandiensis n. sp., Makrokylindrus semiechinata n. sp. and a single new gynodiastylid species, Gynodiastylis chathamensis n. sp. Makrokylindrus is recorded from New Zealand waters for the first time. Keys to all diastylid and gynodiastylid species from New Zealand waters are included, as well as an updated global key to Diastylopsis.

  2. New Zealand's migration policy: a revolving door?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, V

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the rise in immigration to New Zealand, new migration policy changes, and the implications for Australia. New Zealand approved new targets for immigration in 1988-89, which led to expectations of 10.5 new immigrants per 1000 population. Australia's immigration targets include 4.5 immigrants per 1000 population. Neither country approves the free movement of citizens between the two countries under the Trans-Tasman Arrangements. New Zealand expects to gain 10,000 persons/year, which is less than Australia's net gain. The differences between the countries are accounted for by New Zealand's larger temporary and permanent out-migration. New Zealand aims to increase immigration in order to increase economic performance. New Zealand adopted a point system similar to Australia's in November 1991. The target is not a quota. Approval's exceeded targets during 1992-93 and 1995-96. For example, in 1995, there were 46,649 successful applications, of which 37.5% were for immigrants from Northeast Asia; in 1996, 47% of approvals were from Northeast Asian countries. Many Asian immigrants settle in Auckland, which was 10% Asian in 1996. Policy changes in October 1995 limited new approvals to within 10% of the target. English language requirements were enforced with heavy fines. Tax evasion among immigrants was constrained. In 1997-98, movement declined to very low levels, and annual net migration goals were not met. Several recent changes aim to attract businessmen and skilled immigrants. Asian immigration flows are very large; re-emigration to Australia is driven by employment concerns.

  3. Attitudes of non-Maori New Zealanders towards the use of Maori in New Zealand English

    OpenAIRE

    De Bres, Julia

    2010-01-01

    As majority language speakers have an important impact on minority languages, the the attitudes and behaviours of non-Māori New Zealanders towards the Māori language are likely to have an influence on Māori language regeneration (de Bres 2008). Moreover, as the presence of Māori words is arguably the most distinctive feature of New Zealand English (Deverson 1991, Macalister 2005), these attitudes and behaviours are also likely to influence aspects of New Zealand English. Although there is now...

  4. Celebrating Islam and Multiculturalism in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismatu Ropi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Syarif Hidayatullah State Islamic University (UIN Jakarta in collaboration with the Embassy of New Zealand in Jakarta, the Asia New Zealand Foundation and the International Office of UIN Jakarta on 20 to 24 May 2013 held a photographic exhibition documenting the stories of Asian Muslims in the Kiwi Island, and a half-day discussion of a book by Adrienne Jansen and Ans Westra entitled “The Crescent Moon: The Asian Face of Islam in New Zealand”.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v20i2.392 

  5. Marine biodiversity of Aotearoa New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis P Gordon

    Full Text Available The marine-biodiversity assessment of New Zealand (Aotearoa as known to Māori is confined to the 200 nautical-mile boundary of the Exclusive Economic Zone, which, at 4.2 million km(2, is one of the largest in the world. It spans 30 degrees of latitude and includes a high diversity of seafloor relief, including a trench 10 km deep. Much of this region remains unexplored biologically, especially the 50% of the EEZ deeper than 2,000 m. Knowledge of the marine biota is based on more than 200 years of marine exploration in the region. The major oceanographic data repository is the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA, which is involved in several Census of Marine Life field projects and is the location of the Southwestern Pacific Regional OBIS Node; NIWA is also data manager and custodian for fisheries research data owned by the Ministry of Fisheries. Related data sources cover alien species, environmental measures, and historical information. Museum collections in New Zealand hold more than 800,000 registered lots representing several million specimens. During the past decade, 220 taxonomic specialists (85 marine from 18 countries have been engaged in a project to review New Zealand's entire biodiversity. The above-mentioned marine information sources, published literature, and reports were scrutinized to give the results summarized here for the first time (current to 2010, including data on endemism and invasive species. There are 17,135 living species in the EEZ. This diversity includes 4,315 known undescribed species in collections. Species diversity for the most intensively studied phylum-level taxa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, Kinorhyncha, Echinodermata, Chordata is more or less equivalent to that in the ERMS (European Register of Marine Species region, which is 5.5 times larger in area than the New Zealand EEZ. The implication is that, when all other New Zealand phyla are equally well studied

  6. Marine biodiversity of Aotearoa New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dennis P; Beaumont, Jennifer; MacDiarmid, Alison; Robertson, Donald A; Ahyong, Shane T

    2010-08-02

    The marine-biodiversity assessment of New Zealand (Aotearoa as known to Māori) is confined to the 200 nautical-mile boundary of the Exclusive Economic Zone, which, at 4.2 million km(2), is one of the largest in the world. It spans 30 degrees of latitude and includes a high diversity of seafloor relief, including a trench 10 km deep. Much of this region remains unexplored biologically, especially the 50% of the EEZ deeper than 2,000 m. Knowledge of the marine biota is based on more than 200 years of marine exploration in the region. The major oceanographic data repository is the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), which is involved in several Census of Marine Life field projects and is the location of the Southwestern Pacific Regional OBIS Node; NIWA is also data manager and custodian for fisheries research data owned by the Ministry of Fisheries. Related data sources cover alien species, environmental measures, and historical information. Museum collections in New Zealand hold more than 800,000 registered lots representing several million specimens. During the past decade, 220 taxonomic specialists (85 marine) from 18 countries have been engaged in a project to review New Zealand's entire biodiversity. The above-mentioned marine information sources, published literature, and reports were scrutinized to give the results summarized here for the first time (current to 2010), including data on endemism and invasive species. There are 17,135 living species in the EEZ. This diversity includes 4,315 known undescribed species in collections. Species diversity for the most intensively studied phylum-level taxa (Porifera, Cnidaria, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Bryozoa, Kinorhyncha, Echinodermata, Chordata) is more or less equivalent to that in the ERMS (European Register of Marine Species) region, which is 5.5 times larger in area than the New Zealand EEZ. The implication is that, when all other New Zealand phyla are equally well studied, total marine

  7. NEW ZEALAND'S WETLANDS: CONSERVATION AND WISE USE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Maranhão

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand is unique when it comes to landscapes and biodiversity, being one of the countries which has the highest numbers of endemism. With such vast diversity, wetlands play a key role maintaining many of these species and also providing essential ecosystem services for the local communities. However, New Zealand has been largely degraded on wetland areas in the last two hundred years, remaining only 10% of the original composition which brings a special attention to the country. In this case, this review provides an overview of New Zealand’s wetlands highlighting aspects such as definitions, uses, values, threats and management.

  8. Personal Data Protection in New Zealand: Lessons for South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Like South Africa, New Zealand is a \\'third\\' country in terms of the EU Directive on data protection. New Zealand recognised the need for data protection and adopted a data protection Act over 15 years ago. The focus of this article is on the data protection provisions in New Zealand law with a view to establishing whether ...

  9. The adaptive capacity of New Zealand communities to wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Jakes; E.R. Langer

    2012-01-01

    When we think of natural disasters in New Zealand, we tend to think of earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. However, a series of events is placing New Zealand communities at greater risk of wildfire. In a case study of a rural New Zealand community that experienced wildfire, process elements such as networks and relationships among locals, development and application of...

  10. Padrão de co-ativação dos músculos do tronco durante exercícios com haste oscilatória Trunk muscles co-activation patterns during exercises with oscillatory pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nise Ribeiro Marques

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou comparar o padrão de co-ativação dos músculos do tronco durante exercícios com uma haste oscilatória. Participaram do estudo doze voluntárias, que realizaram três diferentes exercícios. A atividade eletromiográfica foi coletada dos músculos oblíquo interno (OI, oblíquo externo (OE, reto abdominal (RA, multifido (MU e iliocostal lombar (IL. O sinal de eletromiografia (EMG foi analisado no domínio do tempo (RMS e foram calculadas as razões: ântero-posterior (A/P=RA+OE+OI/MU+IL, MU/IL e OE/OI. A oscilação bilateral da haste no plano frontal (exercício II provocou maior valor da razão MU/IL que a oscilação unilateral da haste no plano sagital (exercício III. Já a oscilação bilateral da haste no plano frontal (exercício II e a oscilação unilateral da haste no plano sagital (exercício III geraram maior valor de OI/OE que a oscilação bilateral da haste no plano transverso (exercício I. Portanto, os exercícios II e III exigem maior ativação de músculos estabilizadores do tronco, sendo mais indicados para treinamentos que visem o maior recrutamento destes músculos nas atividades de vida diária.This study aimed to compare trunk muscle co-activation pattern during exercises using an oscillatory pole. Twelve volunteers participated in this study, in which they performed three different exercises. EMG activity of internal oblique (IO, external oblique (EO, rectus abdominis (RA, multifidus (MU and iliocostalis lumborum (IL was collected. The EMG signals were analyzed in time domain (RMS and muscles activation ratios were computed as follow: anterior-posterior (A/P=RA+EO+IO/MU+IL, MU/IL and OE/OI. The bilateral oscillation of the pole in frontal plane (exercise II promoted a higher value of MU/IL ratio than unilateral oscillation of the pole in sagital plane (exercise III. Also, the bilateral oscillation of the pole in frontal plane (exercise II and the unilateral oscillation of the pole in sagital

  11. The New Zealand Geography Olympiad Maatangi Whenua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the New Zealand Geography Olympiad for 4th, 5th, and 6th form geography students, focusing on the schools round, the regional rounds, and the National Final, which produced a four member team that traveled to Toronto (Canada) to compete in the 4th National Geographic International Geography Olympiad. Discusses the International Olympiad.…

  12. Earthquakes in the New Zealand Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cleland

    1995-01-01

    Presents a thorough overview of earthquakes in New Zealand, discussing plate tectonics, seismic measurement, and historical occurrences. Includes 10 figures illustrating such aspects as earthquake distribution, intensity, and fissures in the continental crust. Tabular data includes a list of most destructive earthquakes and descriptive effects…

  13. Teaching Gender Geography in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    In New Zealand universities, gender is still not a substantial part of the curriculum in most geography departments. Although at the University of Waikato, the situation is different. Its specific history of radical scholarship has enabled feminist academics in a variety of disciplines including geography to have had a stronger voice than in other…

  14. Rationalising National Assessment in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, John

    2013-01-01

    In the 1990s and 2000s, New Zealand governments monitored national educational performance broadly through cyclical "light-sampling" of primary school students, and the annual proportions of secondary school students who gained formal credentials. In 2008, a centre-right coalition government legislated for national standards of…

  15. New Zealand scientists in firing line

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Kiwi scientists have a great chance to have their work bombarded with protons and to participate in world-class particle physics research, with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between CERN (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research) and New Zealand" (1/2 page)

  16. Developments in environmental education in New Zealand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New Zealand has experienced a recent resurgence of interest in environmental education, particularly in the informal sector. Whilst this resurgence is welcomed it takes place against a background of earlier frustrated initiatives and within a socio- political context where the emphasis is on market economics and constrained ...

  17. developments in environmental education in new zealand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New Zealand has experienced a recent resurgence of interest in environmental education, particularly in the informal sector. Whilst this resurgence is welcomed it takes place against a background of earlier frus- trated initiatives and within a socio-political context where the emphasis is on market economics and con-.

  18. Culture and Crisis Response in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annan, Jean; Dean, Shelley; Henry, Geoff; McGhie, Desiree; Phillipson, Roger

    2010-01-01

    New Zealand is a bicultural nation, founded on the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi by the native Maori and the British Crown. It is also home to people from many countries, cultures and ethnicities. Therefore, culturally-relevant response to crisis events has become a significant aspect of the Ministry of Education's interdisciplinary Traumatic…

  19. Slow Learner Education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, Mary

    A survey of slow learner education in state secondary schools was conducted in Auckland and North Auckland, New Zealand. Thirty-five schools containing 30,787 pupils replied to the questionnaire which covered the following areas: assessment prior to placement, educational objectives, identification methods, special classes, teaching groups,…

  20. White clover dynamics in New Zealand pastures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinxterhuis, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    The study presented in this thesis is based on the overall target of increased herbage production in cooler times of the year, through the use of fertiliser N, while maintaining the benefits of white clover ( Trifolium repens L.) in New Zealand pastures. To help

  1. Anticipated Death in New Zealand School Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Few resources seem to be available to support school communities that have a child whose death is anticipated. The present article draws on the experiences of school staff and special education employees who have been involved in New Zealand school communities where a child was terminally ill and died. These experiences could help other school…

  2. Critical Health Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Katie; Burrows, Lisette

    2017-01-01

    Health education in Aotearoa New Zealand is an enigma. Premised on ostensibly open and holistic philosophical premises, the school curriculum not only permits, but in some ways prescribes, pedagogies and teacher dispositions that engage with the diversity of young people at its centre. A capacity, to not only understand contemporary health…

  3. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  4. Wellbeing in the New Zealand Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutter, Anne K.; O'Steen, Billy; Gilmore, Alison

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the usage and contexts of "wellbeing" in New Zealand's curriculum, a formal statement of education policy enacted by a democratically elected government. The analysis is guided by a current model of student wellbeing rooted in seven, interdependent domains: "Having," "Being," "Relating,"…

  5. Numeral Variation in New Zealand Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, David; McKee, Rachel; Major, George

    2011-01-01

    Lexical variation abounds in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) and is commonly associated with the introduction of the Australasian Signed English lexicon into Deaf education in 1979, before NZSL was acknowledged as a language. Evidence from dictionaries of NZSL collated between 1986 and 1997 reveal many coexisting variants for the numbers from one…

  6. Fasciola hepatica in a New Zealander traveler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mei L; Teo, Clarence H Y; Wansaicheong, Gervais Khin-Lin; Giron, Danilo Medina; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2008-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a reemerging zoonosis endemic in many parts of the world. Reports of imported fascioliasis by migrants into nonendemic countries are common, but tourists and business travelers are rarely afflicted. Here, we report a case of a New Zealander traveler who acquired the infection on a business trip.

  7. Hybrid Compounding in New Zealand English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Marta; Onysko, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates hybrid compound formation of Maori and English terms in present day New Zealand English (NZE). On the background of Maori and English language contact, the phenomenon of hybrid compounding emerges as a process that, on the one hand, symbolizes the vitality of the Maori element in NZE and, on the other hand, marks the…

  8. Treatment of fractures of the tibial diaphysis using external fixator compared with locked intramedullary nails Tratamento das fraturas diafisárias da tíbia com fixador externo comparado com a haste intramedular bloqueada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Tavares Cardozo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare efficiency of external fixator in modular form with unilateral and uniplanar intramedullary locked seeking definitive treatment of fractures of the tibia diaphysis. METHODS: Orthopedic surgical treatments were compared to 50 patients with definite diafisária fracture of the tibia, through the use of the external fixator, modular and intramedullary locked. The fractures were treated at emergency hospital school of Orthopedics and Traumatology service in the period from January 2007 to January 2011, with a variation of 15 to 48 weeks. RESULTS: this study has proven functional results and excellent consolidation when locked intramedullary rods were used and the versatility and speed of application of external fixator reaching the necessary stabilization of bony fragments. Consolidation of fractures was obtained in 95 cases when using the intramedullary locked and 90 cases undergoing external fixation. CONCLUSIONS: the definitive treatment of tibial diaphysis fractures by external fixator modular presented themselves as valid alternative treatment in patients who could not be submitted for early conversion to internal osteosynthesis or when the intramedullary nails are not available to the surgeon. OBJETIVO: Comparar a eficiência de fixador externo modular na forma uniplanar e unilateral com haste intramedular bloqueada (HIB buscando tratamento definitivo das fraturas diafisárias da tíbia. MÉTODOS: Foram comparados os tratamentos cirúrgicos ortopédicos definitivos de 50 pacientes com fratura diafisária da tíbia, por meio do uso do fixador externo modular e da haste intramedular bloqueada. As fraturas foram tratadas no setor de emergência de um hospital-escola pelo serviço de ortopedia e traumatologia de janeiro de 2007 a janeiro de 2011, com variação de 15 a 48 semanas. RESULTADOS: Este estudo comprovou resultados funcionais e de consolidação excelentes quando usada a haste intramedular bloqueada e a

  9. Intercultural residential care in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiata, Liz; Kerse, Ngaire

    2004-03-01

    Along with other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, New Zealand's society is aging such that an increase in the number of older people requiring residential care is predicted. What cannot be foreseen is how culturally defined health beliefs affect the care given to older people in residential care. In this article, the authors describe and discuss the culturally based health beliefs of some Pacific Islands caregivers and predominately European (Pakeha) older people resident at one long-term care facility in Auckland, New Zealand. The delivery of care is influenced by culturally related beliefs about "being old." Racism is evident in residential care, and the authors discuss the reactions of caregivers, residents, and management. This research extends the discussion of caregiving and receiving in to the cross-cultural setting, and the findings highlight a number of elements in cultural differences between carer and cared-for that might affect care practices at the residential facility studied.

  10. Equity in statin use in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Preventive medications such as statins are used to reduce cardiovascular risk. There is some evidence to suggest that people of lower socioeconomic position are less likely to be prescribed statins. In New Zealand, Maori have higher rates of cardiovascular disease. AIM: This study aimed to investigate statin utilisation by socioeconomic position and ethnicity in a region of New Zealand. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in which data were collected on all prescriptions dispensed from all pharmacies in one city during 2005/6. Linkage with national datasets provided information on patients' age, gender and ethnicity. Socioeconomic position was identified using the New Zealand Index of Socioeconomic Deprivation 2006. RESULTS: Statin use increased with age until around 75 years. Below age 65 years, those in the most deprived socioeconomic areas were most likely to receive statins. In the 55-64 age group, 22.3% of the most deprived population received a statin prescription (compared with 17.5% of the mid and 18.6% of the least deprived group. At ages up to 75 years, use was higher amongst Maori than non-Maori, particularly in middle age, where Maori have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. In the 45-54 age group, 11.6% of Maori received a statin prescription, compared with 8.7% of non-Maori. DISCUSSION: Statin use approximately matched the pattern of need, in contrast to other studies which found under-treatment of people of low socioeconomic position. A PHARMAC campaign to increase statin use may have increased use in high-risk groups in New Zealand.

  11. Wood Quality: A Perspective from New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    John Walker

    2013-01-01

    Forest products are commodities and subject to cyclical trends; yet resource-hungry countries offer exporters a period of sustained growth for those with the right products. Products have their distinctive requirements, e.g., finishing timber (colour, stability), structural (strength stiffness, stability), paper (fibre length and tear strength). The failure to incorporate such key properties in radiata pine (Pinus radiata) breeding programmes has been a lost opportunity for New Zealand forest...

  12. Recovery in New Zealand: an evolving concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Mary; Reynolds, Paul; Smith, Cherryl

    2012-02-01

    Recovery was first officially promoted in New Zealand in 1998 and it became a key concept in mental health service development. Since the mid 2000s however, recovery has been on the wane in New Zealand, but the fundamental concepts within the term live on in two more recently adopted terms: whanau ora and well-being. He Korowai Oranga (Maori Health Strategy) defines whanau ora as families being supported to achieve health and well-being. The extended family is recognized as a source of strength, identity, security and support. Whanau ora is underpinned by Te Whare Tapa Wha, a well-being model that focuses on health being a balance between Taha Wairua (spiritual health), Taha Tinana (physical health), Taha Hinengaro (psychological health) and Taha Whānau (family health). New Zealanders are also using the term well-being, not just for the whole population but for people diagnosed with mental illness. The advantages of placing recovery into the larger well-being agenda are reduced discrimination and segregation of people with a diagnosis into a distinct population group, reduced association with medical and deficits approaches that can counter the recovery approach, and bypassing the dilution of the recovery approach that has occurred in traditional services.

  13. Multifocal retinitis in New Zealand sheep dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, P L; Dubielzig, R R; Kazacos, K R

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-nine percent of 1,448 working sheep dogs were affected with varying degrees of multifocal retinal disease on ophthalmoscopic examination. Lesions consisted of localized areas of hyperreflexia in the tapetal fundus, often associated with hyperpigmentation. Severely affected animals had widespread hyperreflexia with retinal vascular attenuation. Only 6% of 125 New Zealand dogs raised in urban environment were similarly affected. Both eyes of 70 dogs from New Zealand were examined histologically. Forty-seven of 70 dogs had ocular inflammatory disease. Ten other dogs had noninflammatory eye disease, and 13 dogs had normal eyes. Histologically, eyes with inflammatory disease were divided into three categories: Dogs 3 years of age or less with active inflammatory disease of the retina, uvea, and vitreous. Four dogs in this group had migrating nematode larvae identified morphologically as genus Toxocara. Diffuse retinitis and retinal atrophy in conjunction with localized retinal necrosis and choroidal fibrosis. Dogs in this category were severely, clinically affected. Chronic, low-grade retinitis with variable retinal atrophy. Most dogs in this category were over 3 years of age, and many were visually functional. The existence of a definable spectrum of morphological changes associated with inflammation, suggests that Toxocara sp. ocular larva migrans may be the cause of a highly prevalent, potentially blinding syndrome of working sheep dogs in New Zealand.

  14. Locating women in the New Zealand computing industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Hunter, PhD

    Full Text Available It is well recognised that women are under-represented in computing occupations in many Western countries, but is the situation similar in New Zealand? This article presents a quantitative analysis of gendered employment patterns in New Zealand\\'s computing industry. Findings from analysis of 2001 and 2006 census employment data demonstrate that women are now well represented in some newer computing occupations in New Zealand, but they remain significantly under-represented in traditional computing roles such as programming and systems analysis. Furthermore, New Zealand women in computing do not have pay parity with men. On some occasions during the early days of computing in New Zealand women participated more equally in number but they have always experienced pay discrimination.

  15. Postharvest handling of floral rods (Gladiolus grandiflorus L. Manejo pós-colheita de hastes florais de gladíolos (Gladiolus grandiflorus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Mello Oliveira Mónica Danielly

    2008-06-01

    ítrico, substituídas a cada três dias. A longevidade foi avaliada, mediante o grupamento da qualidade das hastes, relativo ao período de armazenamento, em escala variando de 0 a 5, tomando como referência o número de dias, a partir da colheita, onde as flores não apresentavam abscisão ou morte de pétalas e aparência geral, em escalas qualitativas, variando de 1 a 7. A utilização de soluçôes de ácido cítrico não foi efetiva na manutenção da qualidade floral de gladíolos sob intermitência de refrigeração e condiçôes ambientes ao nível de 5% de significância.Palavras-chave: Gladiolus grandiflorus L.; conservação; flores de corte.

  16. Manejo pós-colheita de hastes florais de gladíolos (Gladiolus grandiflorus L. Postharvest handling of floral rods (Gladiolus grandiflorus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leirson Rodrigues da Silva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de soluções de ácido cítrico em diferentes concentrações na manutenção da qualidade pós-colheita de gladíolos de corte mantidos sob intermitência de refrigeração e condições ambiente. As flores foram colhidas pela manhã, no ponto de colheita comercial e transportadas para laboratório de Pós-Colheita, e mantidas a 10°C durante três dias, onde em seguida foram armazenadas sob condiçôes ambientes (24 ± 2°C e 85 ± 2%UR, sob os seguintes tratamentos: água destilada (controle e em soluçôes de 30, 60, 90 e 120 mg. L-1 de ácido cítrico, substituídas a cada três dias. A longevidade foi avaliada, mediante o grupamento da qualidade das hastes, relativo ao período de armazenamento, em escala variando de 0 a 5, tomando como referência o número de dias, a partir da colheita, onde as flores não apresentavam abscisão ou morte de pétalas e aparência geral, em escalas qualitativas, variando de 1 a 7. A utilização de soluçôes de ácido cítrico não foi efetiva na manutenção da qualidade floral de gladíolos sob intermitência de refrigeração e condiçôes ambientes ao nível de 5% de significânciaThe aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of citric acid solutions in different concentrations on maintaining postharvest quality of cut gladiolus under cold or room storage conditions. The flowers were harvested in the morning, at the point of commercial harvest and transported to a postharvest laboratory and kept at 10°C during tree days, in which they were stored under room conditions (24 ± 2°C e 85 ± 2% RH, using the following treatments: distilled water (control and in 30, 60, 90 and 120 mg. L-1 citric acid solutions substituited every tree days. The longevity was evaluated through the grouping of stem quality on the storage periods ranging in scale from 0 to 5 taking by reference to the number of days from the harvest where the flowers no presented abscision or

  17. International tourism and economic growth in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Jaforullah

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines whether the tourism-led growth hypothesis holds for the New Zealand economy. Using unit root tests, cointegration tests and vector error correction models, and annual data over the period 1972-2012 on international tourism expenditure, real gross domestic product (GDP) and the exchange rate for New Zealand, it finds that the tourism-led growth hypothesis holds for New Zealand. The long-run elasticity of real GDP with respect to international tourism expenditure is estimate...

  18. The Enduring Legacy of New Zealand's UNCLOS Investment (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R.; Davy, B. W.; Herzer, R. H.; Barnes, P.; Barker, D. H.; Stagpoole, V.; Uruski, C.

    2013-12-01

    Data collected by surveys for New Zealand's extended continental shelf project have contributed to research into the tectonic history and resource potential of New Zealand. More than 20 scientific papers and a similar number of conference presentations and posters have used the data collected by these surveys. Data collected by these surveys have added significantly to national and international databases. Although the surveys were generally oriented to establish prolongation rather than to cross structural trends, the data have revealed the crustal, basement and sedimentary structure of many parts of the New Zealand region. In the area east of New Zealand, the data provide insight into the Cretaceous evolution of the New Zealand sector of Gondwana. Data collected southwest of New Zealand provided details about the relatively sudden transition from sea floor spreading between New Zealand and Australia in the Tasman Sea to orthogonal spreading in the Emerald Basin and the development of the modern Australian-Pacific plate boundary, including Late Tertiary motion on the Alpine Fault in the South Island, New Zealand. The data have been used to understand the formation of the New Caledonia Basin, the Norfolk Ridge and their associated structures, and they underpin the international collaboration between New Zealand, New Caledonia and Australia to promote resource exploration in the Tasman Sea. Data north of New Zealand have been used to understand the complex tectonic history of back arc spreading and island arc migration in the South Fiji Basin region. Seismic data collected along the axis of the New Caledonia Basin led to extensive hydrocarbon exploration surveys in the deepwater Taranaki region inside New Zealand's EEZ, and to an application for a hydrocarbon exploration licence in New Zealand's extended continental shelf.

  19. Corporate Real Estate Management: The New Zealand Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Kium Teoh

    1993-01-01

    This study represents the first to be performed on corporate real estate asset management in New Zealand. A nationwide survey of all non-real estate companies listed in the New Zealand Stock Exchange, and a case study of a New Zealand corporation were undertaken. An interdisciplinary model of corporate real estate asset management is developed based on the findings of both the survey and the case study. The study results indicate that having a positive corporate perception on corporate real e...

  20. Health economics and health policy: experiences from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Health economics has had a significant impact on the New Zealand health system over the past 30 years. In this paper, I set out a framework for thinking about health economics, give some historical background to New Zealand and the New Zealand health system, and discuss examples of how health economics has influenced thinking about the organisation of the health sector and priority setting. I conclude the paper with overall observations about the role of health economics in health policy in New Zealand, also identifying where health economics has not made the contribution it could and where further influence might be beneficial.

  1. The New Zealand Food Composition Database: A useful tool for assessing New Zealanders' nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Subathira; Huffman, Lee; Sivakumaran, Sivalingam

    2018-01-01

    A country-specific food composition databases is useful for assessing nutrient intake reliably in national nutrition surveys, research studies and clinical practice. The New Zealand Food Composition Database (NZFCDB) programme seeks to maintain relevant and up-to-date food records that reflect the composition of foods commonly consumed in New Zealand following Food Agricultural Organisation of the United Nations/International Network of Food Data Systems (FAO/INFOODS) guidelines. Food composition data (FCD) of up to 87 core components for approximately 600 foods have been added to NZFCDB since 2010. These foods include those identified as providing key nutrients in a 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey. Nutrient data obtained by analysis of composite samples or are calculated from analytical data. Currently >2500 foods in 22 food groups are freely available in various NZFCDB output products on the website: www.foodcomposition.co.nz. NZFCDB is the main source of FCD for estimating nutrient intake in New Zealand nutrition surveys. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Teaching Evolution in New Zealand's Schools--Reviewing Changes in the New Zealand Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alison; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand has had a national school science curriculum for more than 80 years. In the past the evolution content of this document has varied, and has at times been strongly influenced by creationist lobby groups. The "new" science curriculum, to be fully implemented in 2010, places much greater emphasis than before on understanding…

  3. A hydrological model of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R. A.; Tarboton, D. G.; Ibbitt, R. P.; Wild, M.; Henderson, R. D.; Turner, R.

    2003-04-01

    We present initial results from a hydrological model of New Zealand, using Topnet, a variant of TOPMODEL, linked to a kinematic wave channel network routing algorithm. This model run uses daily timesteps for the period 1985-2001, and subdivides the country into approximately 35,000 sub-catchments of 7-10 sq km each. The sub-catchments are linked by 55,000 river reaches, which route sub-catchment runoff. The model subcatchments and reaches are defined automatically by DEM analyses, and initial estimates of model parameters are defined by GIS overlay, coupled with purpose-built model assembly code, and lookup tables for model parameters. A daily simulation for 1 year over New Zealand takes two hours on a standard desktop computer. The model is forced by gridded daily rainfall and temperature data, and it calculates daily water balance for each of the sub-catchments (rain, evaporation, throughfall, infiltration, soil drainage, surface runoff, subsurface runoff, and changes in storage in the canopy, root zone, and saturated storage), as well as daily flows in each river reach. The model as currently implemented does not include snow, glaciers, or deep groundwater flow (i.e. across sub-catchment boundaries). The first applications of the model are for developing an annual water balance of New Zealand for the period 1994-2001, at the regional scale, and for driving a high-spatial resolution, daily time-stepping national erosion model. We are moving to further applications for water resource modeling (e.g. impact of abstraction and/or storage), and for flood forecasting, using hourly rainfall from a mesoscale atmospheric model.

  4. TAG Oil hunting elephants in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2005-10-15

    Calgary-based TAG Oil is an exploration company that manages 4.1 million acres of major producing oil and gas fields in New Zealand. The enormous Maui field, with 4 tcf of natural gas in place, has dominated the gas market in New Zealand by meeting nearly 90 per cent of the country's energy demand at costs much lower than world prices. However, the maturing field is in decline and will cease production by 2008. New gas field discoveries will only meet 60 per cent of the country's energy requirements for 5 additional years. Unless new large reserves of gas are discovered, the supply and demand situation will get worse. Lead time to place new production on-stream requires 5 to 10 years, which creates a large supply gap over the next decade. Public resistance to coal-fired power plants, new hydroelectric dams and nuclear power has left the country with no viable alternative to natural gas. TAG Oil has taken this unique opportunity to create value when gas demand is at its maximum and energy alternatives are at a minimum. This paper presented 8 reasons why New Zealand is a good place for petroleum investment. Most exploration has occurred in the Taranaki Basin, where only 130 exploration wells have been drilled. The rest of the sedimentary basins are essentially unexplored, although many exhibit oil seeps and have hydrocarbon potential. In 1998, an onshore gas discovery was made on the East Coast Basin. Sub-commercial discoveries have also been made in the offshore Canterbury and Great South basins. TAG Oil is focusing on shallow oil and gas pools in the Miocene reservoirs at Taranaki, as well as on deeper gas prospects in Tariki and Kapuni Sands. One of the challenges was a shortage of drilling rigs, so TAG is having a rig built in Calgary and shipped south. 2 figs.

  5. TAG Oil hunting elephants in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-10-01

    Calgary-based TAG Oil is an exploration company that manages 4.1 million acres of major producing oil and gas fields in New Zealand. The enormous Maui field, with 4 tcf of natural gas in place, has dominated the gas market in New Zealand by meeting nearly 90 per cent of the country's energy demand at costs much lower than world prices. However, the maturing field is in decline and will cease production by 2008. New gas field discoveries will only meet 60 per cent of the country's energy requirements for 5 additional years. Unless new large reserves of gas are discovered, the supply and demand situation will get worse. Lead time to place new production on-stream requires 5 to 10 years, which creates a large supply gap over the next decade. Public resistance to coal-fired power plants, new hydroelectric dams and nuclear power has left the country with no viable alternative to natural gas. TAG Oil has taken this unique opportunity to create value when gas demand is at its maximum and energy alternatives are at a minimum. This paper presented 8 reasons why New Zealand is a good place for petroleum investment. Most exploration has occurred in the Taranaki Basin, where only 130 exploration wells have been drilled. The rest of the sedimentary basins are essentially unexplored, although many exhibit oil seeps and have hydrocarbon potential. In 1998, an onshore gas discovery was made on the East Coast Basin. Sub-commercial discoveries have also been made in the offshore Canterbury and Great South basins. TAG Oil is focusing on shallow oil and gas pools in the Miocene reservoirs at Taranaki, as well as on deeper gas prospects in Tariki and Kapuni Sands. One of the challenges was a shortage of drilling rigs, so TAG is having a rig built in Calgary and shipped south. 2 figs.

  6. Analogue forecasting of New Zealand climate anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, A. Brett; Thompson, Craig S.

    2006-03-01

    An analogue forecast scheme is described for multifield prediction of monthly and seasonal New Zealand climate anomalies on the basis of the methodology of Livezey and Barnston ([1988]) for US seasonal temperatures. The method is applied to predicting terciles of temperature and precipitation for six regions of New Zealand. Empirical orthogonal function analysis is used to reduce sea surface temperature and sea-level pressure predictors down to a set of five independent indices, which incorporate variations due to El Niño-Southern Oscillation, Indian Ocean sea temperatures and a wave 3 pattern in the Southern Hemisphere westerlies. A full bootstrap cross-validation procedure is carried out, along with Monte Carlo tests, to assess the skill of the method on independent data and to determine the significance of the results. Significant skill is found for seasonal temperature forecasts for the summer and winter seasons; there is less success in predicting monthly temperatures or rainfall at either timescale. Considerable care is required to constrain the climate state vector, from which analogues are defined, and to constrain the search procedure itself, in order to produce results that are stable with respect to small parameter changes in the model. For the New Zealand region, 5 to 7 is found to be the optimum number of closest analogues, and the inclusion of anti-analogues improves the predictions, at least in the seasonal case. Skill in predicting regional temperature and rainfall is shown to be related to a combination of skill in predicting sea-level pressure patterns and to how strongly these patterns project onto temperature and rainfall anomalies.

  7. The principal time balls of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinns, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Accurate time signals in New Zealand were important for navigation in the Pacific. Time balls at Wellington and Lyttelton were noted in the 1880 Admiralty list of time signals, with later addition of Otago. The time ball service at Wellington started in March 1864 using the first official observatory in New Zealand, but there was no Wellington time ball service during a long period of waterfront redevelopment during the 1880s. The time ball service restarted in November 1888 at a different harbour location. The original mechanical apparatus was used with a new ball, but the system was destroyed by fire in March 1909 and was never replaced. Instead, a time light service was inaugurated in 1912. The service at Lyttelton, near Christchurch, began in December 1876 after construction of the signal station there. It used telegraph signals from Wellington to regulate the time ball. By the end of 1909, it was the only official time ball in New Zealand, providing a service that lasted until 1934. The Lyttelton time ball tower was an iconic landmark in New Zealand that had been carefully restored. Tragically, the tower collapsed in the 2011 earthquakes and aftershocks that devastated Christchurch. A daily time ball service at Port Chalmers, near Dunedin, started in June 1867, initially using local observatory facilities. The service appears to have been discontinued in October 1877, but was re-established in April 1882 as a weekly service, with control by telegraph from Wellington. The service had been withdrawn altogether by the end of 1909. Auckland never established a reliable time ball service, despite provision of a weekly service for mariners by a public-spirited citizen between August 1864 and June 1866. A time ball was finally installed on the Harbour Board building in 1901, but the signal was unreliable and it ceased in 1902. Complaints from ships' masters led to various proposals to re-establish a service. These concluded with erection of a time ball on the new

  8. Marine Biodiversity of Aotearoa New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Dennis P.; Jennifer Beaumont; Alison MacDiarmid; Robertson, Donald A.; Ahyong, Shane T.

    2010-01-01

    The marine-biodiversity assessment of New Zealand (Aotearoa as known to Māori) is confined to the 200 nautical-mile boundary of the Exclusive Economic Zone, which, at 4.2 million km(2), is one of the largest in the world. It spans 30 degrees of latitude and includes a high diversity of seafloor relief, including a trench 10 km deep. Much of this region remains unexplored biologically, especially the 50% of the EEZ deeper than 2,000 m. Knowledge of the marine biota is based on more than 200 ye...

  9. Low temperature storage of NAA, GA3 and 2,4-D treated citrus budsticks Armazenamento em baixa temperatura de hastes porta-borbulhas de citros tratadas com ANA, GA3 e 2,4-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Chamhum Salomão

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold storage allows citrus budstick conservation for several months, although gradual bud viability loss and abscission of leaf petioles is observed. This study aimed to maintain bud viability reducing leaf petiole abscission in budsticks of 'Baianinha' and 'Valencia' sweet oranges (C. sinensis Osbeck, 'Tahiti' lime (C. latifolia Tanaka, and 'Murcott' tangor (C. sinensis × C. reticulata, using NAA, GA3, 2,4-D, and low temperature storage. After a 15-minutes-immersion in distilled water and NAA and GA3 solutions at concentrations of 10, 100, 500 and 1000 µmol L-1, and 2,4-D solutions at concentrations of 1, 10, 50 and 100 µmol L-1, the shoots were stored in polyethylene bags at 5 ± 1ºC for 74 days. Percentage of leaf petiole abscission, fresh and dry matter losses, bud viability, and growth flush were evaluated. NAA and 2,4-D had the highest efficiency for petiole abscission inhibition, reaching almost 99% of success. The packaging system and shoot storage under low temperature efficiently reduced fresh and dry matter losses. Bud viability of 'Baianinha', 'Valencia' and 'Murcott' shoots was not reduced by storage, maintaining above 95% of grafting success. NAA, GA3 and 2,4-D treatments had no influence on sprout growth.O armazenamento refrigerado possibilita a conservação de hastes porta-borbulhas de citros por vários meses, embora ocorra perda gradual da viabilidade das borbulhas e abscisão dos pecíolos foliares. Este estudo objetivou manter a viabilidade das borbulhas e reduzir a abscisão dos pecíolos foliares das hastes porta-borbulhas das laranjeiras 'Baianinha' e 'Valência'(C. sinensis Osbeck, da lima ácida 'Tahiti'(C. latifolia Tanaka e da tangoreira 'Murcote' (C. sinensis × C. reticulata por meio do tratamento com ANA, GA3, 2,4-D e armazenamento refrigerado. As hastes foram imersas por 15 minutos em água destilada e em soluções com os reguladores de crescimento ANA e GA3 nas concentrações 10, 100, 500 e 1000 µmol L-1 e

  10. Boro e nitrogênio na incidência de hastes ocas e no rendimento de brócolis Boron and nitrogen on hollow stem and yield of broccoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Campagnol

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A incidência de hastes ocas em brócolis (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck depende de vários fatores que afetam a absorção e o transporte de B, elemento responsável pelo aparecimento dessa desordem fisiológica. O trabalho avaliou os efeitos de quatro níveis de nitrogênio e dois níveis de boro e da interação entre eles na incidência de hastes ocas e na produção de brócolis. As doses de N (100, 150, 200 e 250 kg ha-1 foram divididas em quatro aplicações iguais aos 15, 30, 45 e 60 dias após o transplante. O boro (0, 4 e 8 kg ha-1 foi aplicado metade no plantio e a outra metade em cobertura aos 45 dias após o transplante. A massa média das inflorescências e a produção total foram diminuídas com a aplicação de B em função do crescimento mais lento das plantas provocado pela toxicidade desse elemento. Contudo, nas áreas não adubadas com B, a porcentagem de plantas com hastes ocas foi, em média, de 44,14%, sendo que a incidência dessa anomalia sofreu drástica redução com a aplicação de B, onde a maior dose (8 kg ha-1 resultou em apenas 4,52% de inflorescências afetadas. Doses de N superiores a 215,4 kg ha-1 aumentaram o número de plantas com hastes ocas somente nas áreas que não receberam B.The incidence of hollow stem in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck depends on several factors that affect the absorption and transport of boron, which is the element responsible for the appearance of this physiological disorder. This study evaluated the effects of four levels of nitrogen and two levels of boron and the interaction between them in the incidence of hollow stem and yield of broccoli. The levels of N (100, 150, 200 and 250 kg ha-1 were divided into four applications equal to 15, 30, 45, and 60 days after transplant. Half of the boron (0, 4 and 8 kg ha-1 was applied at planting and half in coverage at 45 days after transplanting. Average mass and total yield were reduced with B application

  11. Research on the Sociology of Education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Richard J.

    The premise of this paper is that the state of educational sociology in New Zealand is uncertain. The following reasons are given: (1) The tradition of sociology is underdeveloped in New Zealand; (2) The community of scholars is scattered and divided; (3) Not enough effort has gone into the development of graduate research and occupational…

  12. GIS in New Zealand Schools: Issues and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Lex

    2006-01-01

    There are undoubtedly many parallels between Australia and New Zealand in the history of geographic information system (GIS) in schools. These parallels occur in the social, institutional, professional development, and curricula areas, and each of these topics is considered in this article. In New Zealand at least, there is still a lot that needs…

  13. Comparative characteristics of elite New Zealand and South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. A comparative study of elite New Zealand and South African u/16 rugby players with special reference to game-specific skills, physical abilities and anthropometric data. Design and settings. A battery of tests was used to obtain information concerning a group of elite New Zealand players (N=24) and two elite ...

  14. Breeding Responses of New Zealand White Does to Artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of artificial insemination on the reproductive performance of rabbits in the humid tropical conditions of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria. Eighteen post pubertal New Zealand White does aged 7-8 months and four matured bucks (8 months old) of the same New Zealand White ...

  15. Fortunate Inhabitants? Challenges for School Geography in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John

    2014-01-01

    This article is a reflection on the challenges faced by school geography teachers in New Zealand. After a brief description of how the geography curriculum is currently organised, it provides a short statement about the current curriculum settlement in New Zealand. This leads to the main argument that much of the twentieth century school geography…

  16. Gene expression profiling of breast tumours from New Zealand patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukaruppan, Anita; Lasham, Annette; Blenkiron, Cherie; Woad, Kathryn J; Black, Michael A; Knowlton, Nicholas; McCarthy, Nicole; Findlay, Michael P; Print, Cristin G; Shelling, Andrew N

    2017-10-27

    New Zealand has one of the highest rates of breast cancer incidence in the world. We investigated the gene expression profiles of breast tumours from New Zealand patients, compared them to gene expression profiles of international breast cancer cohorts and identified any associations between altered gene expression and the clinicopathological features of the tumours. Affymetrix microarrays were used to measure the gene expression profiles of 106 breast tumours from New Zealand patients. Gene expression data from six international breast cancer cohorts were collated, and all the gene expression data were analysed using standard bioinformatic and statistical tools. Gene expression profiles associated with tumour ER and ERBB2 status, molecular subtype and selected gene expression signatures within the New Zealand cohort were consistent with those found in international cohorts. Significant differences in clinicopathological features such as tumour grade, tumour size and lymph node status were also observed between the New Zealand and international cohorts. Gene expression profiles, which are a sensitive indicator of tumour biology, showed no clear difference between breast tumours from New Zealand patients and those from non-New Zealand patients. This suggests that other factors may contribute to the high and increasing breast cancer incidence in New Zealand compared to international populations.

  17. Making an Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language (ODNZSL),1 launched in 2011, is n example of a contemporary sign language dictionary that leverages the 21st century advantages of a digital medium and an existing body of descriptive research on the language, including a small electronic corpus of New Zealand ...

  18. The socio-cultural value of New Zealand wilderness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry Wray

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand's wilderness resource has become iconic on both a national and international scale, and provides an important source of cultural identity for many Kiwis (a colloquial term for a New Zealander). Now, in the early 21st Century, however, social changes such as urbanization, globalization, increasing consumerism, and growing international tourism may be...

  19. Parents, Participation, Partnership: Problematising New Zealand Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Angel; Ritchie, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    This article interrogates notions of teacher "partnership with parents" within early childhood care and education settings in the context of Aotearoa (New Zealand). "Te Whariki," the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, clearly positions children's learning and development as being fostered when their families' cultures and…

  20. Anti-Nuclear Attitudes in New Zealand and Australia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Wellington, 5 March 1985. 5. John Henderson, Keith Jackson , Richard Kennawav, eds. Beyond New Zealand; The Foreign Policy of a Small State. (Auckland...the city of San Francisco this first day of September, 1951. For Australia: PERCY C. SPENDER For New Zealand: C.A. BERENDSEN For the United States of

  1. Water quality in New Zealand's planted forests: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda R. Baillie; Daniel G. Neary

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviewed the key physical, chemical and biological water quality attributes of surface waters in New Zealand’s planted forests. The purpose was to: a) assess the changes in water quality throughout the planted forestry cycle from afforestation through to harvesting; b) compare water quality from planted forests with other land uses in New Zealand; and c)...

  2. IA of bio-economic projects in Region Zealand, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybæk, Rikke; Kjær, Tyge; Palsberg, Aske

    Creating new pathways for sustainable ready-to-implement bio-economic projects within Region Zealand, Denmark, based on available biomass resources and existing and proven technology concepts.......Creating new pathways for sustainable ready-to-implement bio-economic projects within Region Zealand, Denmark, based on available biomass resources and existing and proven technology concepts....

  3. New Zealand Teachers Respond to the "National Writing Project" Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Terry; Whitehead, David; Dix, Stephanie; Cawkwell, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on early data from a two-year project (2009-11) being undertaken in the New Zealand context by the authors entitled: "Teachers as Writers: Transforming Professional Identity and Classroom Practice". Based on the National Writing Project in the USA (and in New Zealand in the 1980s) its hypothesis is that when teachers…

  4. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system.

  5. Fluorescence markers in some New Zealand honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Jessie; Loomes, Kerry M; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Stephens, Jonathan M

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescence characteristics of various New Zealand honeys were investigated to establish if this technique might detect signatures unique to manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) and kanuka (Kunzea ericoides) honeys. We found unique fluorescence profiles for these honeys which distinguished them from other New Zealand honey floral types. Two excitation-emission (ex-em) marker wavelengths each for manuka and kanuka honeys were identified; manuka honey at 270-365 (MM1) and 330-470 (MM2) nm and kanuka honey at 275-305 (KM1) and 445-525 (KM2) nm. Dilution of manuka and kanuka honeys with other honey types that did not possess these fluorescence profiles resulted in a proportional reduction in fluorescence signal of the honeys at the marker wavelengths. By comparison, rewarewa (Knightia excelsa), kamahi (Weinmannia racemosa), and clover (Trifolium spp.) honeys did not exhibit unique fluorescence patterns. These findings suggests that a fluorescence-based screening approach has potential utility for determining the monoflorality status of manuka and kanuka honeys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporomandibular joint replacement: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, B; Buchanan, J; Cliff, J

    2014-05-01

    Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) has been performed in New Zealand utilizing the TMJ Concepts patient-fitted system since 2000. The data analysed in this study were collected retrospectively from questionnaires sent to all maxillofacial surgeons in New Zealand who had implanted TMJ Concepts devices between 2000 and 2011. A total of 63 devices were implanted in 42 patients (13 males, 29 females) during this 12-year period. The primary indication for TMJ TJR was end-stage joint disease resulting from ankylosis and arthritis. The mean age of the patients was 47 years (range 7-80 years). The most common complication reported was transient facial nerve impairment in 4.8% of the patients. Objective results, measured as the maximal incisional opening, improved by a mean of 17.3mm (PTMJ TJR using the TMJ Concepts prosthesis is a reliable treatment option for the management of end-stage TMJ disease. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. New Zealand students on tour at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The three prize-winners Katrina Hamblin, Jordan Roach and Ellen Clarkson in front of the CMS magnet, with their teacher Noema Watene on the left. The "Journey to the End of Science" makes a stop at CERN. Katrina Hamblin, Jordan Roach and Ellen Clarkson, three high-school students from Fairfield College in Hamilton, New Zealand, won first prize in the New Zealand Royal Society's scientific film competition - the trip of a lifetime to Europe. The reward for their excellent documentary on the nuclear physicist and winner of the Nobel prize for Medicine Maurice Wilkins was a trip to Italy and Switzerland, stopping at CERN on the way. Accompanied by one of their teachers and a science journalist, the students were shown around the antiproton decelerator and the CMS experiment by Alick Macpherson, a Kiwi physicist at CERN. Their faithful camera always at the ready, the students filmed every minute of their visits to the various sites - perhaps they were hatching plans for next year's competition...

  8. Microbiology of raw milk in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Bruce; Smythe, Betty; Lindsay, Denise; Shepherd, Joanna

    2012-07-02

    The results of this study demonstrate the occurrence of the non-spore-forming pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli (total count and O157:H7), Listeria, Campylobacter and Salmonella, in New Zealand's raw milk supply. Samples of raw milk were collected monthly within five major dairying regions over one year. Each month, samples from five randomly selected farm vats in each region were collected for analysis (297 samples in total). Methods based on plate count techniques were used to enumerate S. aureus and E. coli. Enrichment methods in combination with a modified most probable number detection method were used to monitor samples for the presence of E. coli O157:H7, Listeria, Campylobacter and Salmonella. Salmonella was not detected in this study, and Campylobacter was isolated once (0.34%). E. coli was present at pathogenic E. coli O157 strains (i.e. lacking genes for stx1, stx2, eae and Hly A) were detected in 1% of samples. S. aureus was not detected (1 but innocua was present in 4% of samples. The results demonstrate that raw milk sampled from farm vats in New Zealand, as in other countries, inevitably contains recognised pathogens and, hence, control by pasteurisation or an equivalent treatment of raw milk remains paramount. Even so, the prevalence of most of these pathogens was lower than those reported in many of the studies performed in other countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The First New Zealanders? An Alternative Interpretation of Stable Isotope Data from Wairau Bar, New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A Brown

    Full Text Available PLOS ONE Volume 8 includes an article "The First New Zealanders: Patterns of Diet and Mobility Revealed through Isotope Analysis". The paper proposes that burial groups within the settlement phase site of Wairau Bar differ in terms of dietary stable isotopes and 87Sr/86Sr. The authors argue this difference is probably due to one group being a founding population while the other burials are later. Here we review the work of Kinaston et al. and present an alternative analysis and interpretation of the isotopic data. Treating the isotope data independently from cultural and biological factors we find that sex best explains dietary variation. Our reassessment of 87Sr/86Sr confirms the authors original finding of high mobility of early New Zealanders but suggests a larger range of individuals should be considered 'non-local' on current evidence.

  10. Working in psychiatry in New Zealand: Experiences of International (non-New Zealand) Medical Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed; Shuaib, Mohammad; Akthtar, Sohail; Ali, Aala; Zaman, Rashid

    2017-09-01

    On the 11 th of February 2016, the Health Secretary in the United Kingdom (UK) Jeremy Hunt announced his plan to impose the Junior Doctor Contract despite thousands of healthcare professionals storming the streets of Westminster in defiant protest. A leading member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists Psychiatric Trainee Committee described the Junior Doctor Contract as 'poisonous', exclaiming that it would be a 'disaster for mental health' and that it would 'disincentivize doctors to work in an already desperately under-resourced specialty'. The number of doctors who applied for documentation to work abroad surged by over 1000 per cent on the same day that the Health Secretary made the Junior Doctor Contract announcement. Not surprisingly, Jeremy Hunt was accused of acting as 'a recruiting agent' for hospitals in Australasia. This paper provides background information about working conditions for Junior Doctors in the National Health Service in the UK and the anticipated effects that the Junior Doctor Contract will have on their morale, well-being and occupational functioning. Our paper then provides a brief overview of mental health services in New Zealand with a focus on a Maori mental health service provider in the North Island. We conclude our paper by offering insights from International Medical Graduates from the UK and from South Africa working as a Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Psychiatric Registrar and Consultants in Waikato District Health Board (DHB) in Hamilton, New Zealand, respectively.

  11. Early childhood caries: a New Zealand perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach K

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries, primarily a preventable disease, remains the most common chronic disease of childhood and one of the most common reasons for hospital admissions for children in New Zealand. The most vulnerable children are shouldering the burden of the disease, with Maori and Pacific children having greater experience and severity of dental caries. Early childhood caries has deleterious effects on a child’s oral and general health and significant numbers of preschool-aged children experience pain and infection. Early identification by primary health care providers of children at high risk of developing early childhood caries can ensure these children are referred to the appropriate oral health services to receive appropriate and timely management.

  12. Wood Quality: A Perspective from New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Walker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Forest products are commodities and subject to cyclical trends; yet resource-hungry countries offer exporters a period of sustained growth for those with the right products. Products have their distinctive requirements, e.g., finishing timber (colour, stability, structural (strength stiffness, stability, paper (fibre length and tear strength. The failure to incorporate such key properties in radiata pine (Pinus radiata breeding programmes has been a lost opportunity for New Zealand forestry that constrains exports. Radiata pine remains a utilitarian, undifferentiated commodity. A complementary opportunity in international markets lies in naturally-durable eucalypts grown on New Zealand’s east coast drylands. These are species whose properties mimic those of the finest tropical hardwoods that are in most demand in Asian markets.

  13. Survival on Home Dialysis in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Mark R.; Walker, Rachael C.; Polkinghorne, Kevan R.; Lynn, Kelvin L.

    2014-01-01

    Background New Zealand (NZ) has a high prevalence of both peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home haemodialysis (HD) relative to other countries, and probably less selection bias. We aimed to determine if home dialysis associates with better survival than facility HD by simultaneous comparisons of the three modalities. Methods We analysed survival by time-varying dialysis modality in New Zealanders over a 15-year period to 31-Dec-2011, adjusting for patient co-morbidity by Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression. Results We modelled 6,419 patients with 3,254 deaths over 20,042 patient-years of follow-up. Patients treated with PD and facility HD are similar; those on home HD are younger and healthier. Compared to facility HD, home dialysis (as a unified category) associates with an overall 13% lower mortality risk. Home HD associates with a 52% lower mortality risk. PD associates with a 20% lower mortality risk in the early period (3 years), with no overall net effect. There was effect modification and less observable benefit associated with PD in those with diabetes mellitus, co-morbidity, and in NZ Maori and Pacific People. There was no effect modification by age or by era. Conclusion Our study supports the culture of home dialysis in NZ, and suggests that the extent and duration of survival benefit associated with early PD may be greater than appreciated. We are planning further analyses to exclude residual confounding from unmeasured co-morbidity and other sociodemographic factors using database linkage to NZ government datasets. Finally, our results suggest further research into the practice of PD in NZ Maori and Pacific People, as well as definitive study to determine the best timing for switching from PD in the late phase. PMID:24806458

  14. New Lepidium (Brassicaceae) from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, P. J.; Heenan, P. B.; Houliston, G. J.; Rolfe, J. R.; Mitchell, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A revision of the New Zealand endemic Lepidium oleraceum and allied species is presented. Sixteen species are recognised, 10 of these are new. The new species are segregated on the basis of morphological characters supported by molecular data obtained from three DNA markers (two rDNA and one cpDNA). One species, Lepidium castellanum sp. nov., is endemic to the Kermadec Islands where it is sympatric with Lepidium oleraceum. The North Island of New Zealand supports four species, with two of them, Lepidium amissum sp. nov. and Lepidium obtusatum, now extinct. The South Island supports six species, that, aside from Lepidium banksii, Lepidium flexicaule and Lepidium oleraceum, are all confined to the south-eastern half of the island (Lepidium aegrum sp. nov., Lepidium crassum sp. nov. and Lepidium juvencum sp. nov.). One of these, Lepidium juvencum sp. nov., extends to Stewart Island. The Chatham Islands support six species (Lepidium flexicaule, Lepidium oblitum sp. nov., Lepidium oleraceum, Lepidium oligodontum sp. nov., Lepidium panniforme sp. nov., and Lepidium rekohuense sp. nov.), one of which, Lepidium oligodontum sp. nov., extends to the Antipodes Islands group. The remote, subantarctic Bounty Islands group supports one endemic, Lepidium seditiosum sp. nov., which is the only vascular plant to be recorded from there. Lepidium limenophylax sp. nov. is known from islands off the south-western side of Stewart Island/Rakiura, The Snares and Auckland islands. Lepidium naufragorum, although not related to Lepidium oleraceum and its allies, is also treated because populations with entire leaves are now known. Typification is undertaken for Lepidium banksii, Lepidium oleraceum, Lepidium oleraceum var. acutidentatum, var. frondosum and var. serrulatum. PMID:23794938

  15. New Zealand traffic and local air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Paul; Moncrieff, Ian

    2004-12-01

    Since 1996 the New Zealand Ministry of Transport (MOT) has been investigating the effects of road transport on local air quality. The outcome has been the government's Vehicle Fleet Emissions Control Strategy (VFECS). This is a programme of measures designed to assist with the improvement in local air quality, and especially in the appropriate management of transport sector emissions. Key to the VFECS has been the development of tools to assess and predict the contribution of vehicle emissions to local air pollution, in a given urban situation. Determining how vehicles behave as an emissions source, and more importantly, how the combined traffic flows contribute to the total emissions within a given airshed location was an important element of the programme. The actual emissions output of a vehicle is more than that determined by a certified emission standard, at the point of manufacture. It is the engine technology's general performance capability, in conjunction with the local driving conditions, that determines its actual emissions output. As vehicles are a mobile emissions source, to understand the effect of vehicle technology, it is necessary to work with the average fleet performance, or "fleet-weighted average emissions rate". This is the unit measure of performance of the general traffic flow that could be passing through a given road corridor or network, as an average, over time. The flow composition can be representative of the national fleet population, but also may feature particular vehicle types in a given locality, thereby have a different emissions 'signature'. A summary of the range of work that has been completed as part of the VFECS programme is provided. The NZ Vehicle Fleet Emissions Model and the derived data set available in the NZ Traffic Emission Rates provide a significant step forward in the consistent analysis of practical, sustainable vehicle emissions policy and air-quality management in New Zealand.

  16. The practice of surrogacy in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lynley; Snelling, Jeanne; Tomlins-Jahnke, Huia

    2012-06-01

    Commercial surrogacy is prohibited in New Zealand by the Human Assisted Reproductive Technology Act 2004 (HART Act). However, altruistic clinic-assisted surrogacy is permitted. Couples wishing to attempt altruistic surrogacy must apply for approval to a statutorily appointed ethics committee. One of seven principles that underpin the HART Act stipulates that the needs, values and beliefs of Maori (NZ's indigenous population) should be considered and treated with respect. This paper reviews the outcomes of surrogacy applications since the HART Act was established and the uptake of surrogacy by Maori. The authors examined the demographic data provided to the ethics committee by way of surrogacy applications and the outcome data provided by fertility clinics. This paper reviews the outcomes for surrogacy applications: the number accepted/declined, the number of live births, those applications discontinued and uptake by Maori. Of 104 applications for surrogacy between 2005 and 2010, 4 (3.8%) were declined. By July 2011, of 100 approved, there have been 26 (26%) live births; 52 (52%) were discontinued, and 22 (22%) remain ongoing. Maori are much less likely to utilise surrogacy. Of the 104 original applications, 9 (8.6%) Maori women were willing to act as a surrogate, and 2 (1.9%) were intended mothers. 7 (6.7%) Maori were partners of a surrogate, with 2 (1.9%) intending mothers having Maori partners. The process of surrogacy applications is comprehensive and robust, resulting in few being declined. Further research is required to discover why applications are discontinued and why, despite explicit attempts to meet the needs of Maori, few utilise surrogacy. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. Survival on home dialysis in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Marshall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New Zealand (NZ has a high prevalence of both peritoneal dialysis (PD and home haemodialysis (HD relative to other countries, and probably less selection bias. We aimed to determine if home dialysis associates with better survival than facility HD by simultaneous comparisons of the three modalities. METHODS: We analysed survival by time-varying dialysis modality in New Zealanders over a 15-year period to 31-Dec-2011, adjusting for patient co-morbidity by Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression. RESULTS: We modelled 6,419 patients with 3,254 deaths over 20,042 patient-years of follow-up. Patients treated with PD and facility HD are similar; those on home HD are younger and healthier. Compared to facility HD, home dialysis (as a unified category associates with an overall 13% lower mortality risk. Home HD associates with a 52% lower mortality risk. PD associates with a 20% lower mortality risk in the early period (3 years, with no overall net effect. There was effect modification and less observable benefit associated with PD in those with diabetes mellitus, co-morbidity, and in NZ Maori and Pacific People. There was no effect modification by age or by era. CONCLUSION: Our study supports the culture of home dialysis in NZ, and suggests that the extent and duration of survival benefit associated with early PD may be greater than appreciated. We are planning further analyses to exclude residual confounding from unmeasured co-morbidity and other sociodemographic factors using database linkage to NZ government datasets. Finally, our results suggest further research into the practice of PD in NZ Maori and Pacific People, as well as definitive study to determine the best timing for switching from PD in the late phase.

  18. Space and place in Outdoor Education in New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2010-01-01

    The article draws on a doctoral study of young peoples’ participation in organised friluftsliv and outdoor education in Denmark and New Zealand. The research questions concentrate on views of nature, values and general characteristics in friluftsliv and outdoor education. The results are based...... on a qualitative approach using case study design with interviews and observations. For the analysis, ethnological cultural analysis was employed combined with configuration analysis to conceptualise the data. Theories and concepts of space and place in outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed. Results from...... the empirical studies on outdoor education in New Zealand are discussed and compared to the cultural perspective of friluftsliv in Denmark....

  19. Mad on radium New Zealand in the atomic age

    CERN Document Server

    Priestley, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Although New Zealander Lord Rutherford was the first to split the atom, the country has since been known around the world for its nuclear-free stance. In this engaging and accessible book, an alternative history is revealed of ""nuclear New Zealand""-when there was much enthusiasm for nuclear science and technology. From the first users of X-rays and radium in medicine to the plans for a nuclear power station on the Kaipara Harbour, this account uncovers the long and rich history of New Zealanders' engagement with the nuclear world and the roots

  20. Kiwi magic: New Zealand paleomagnetism comes of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Gillian M.; Roberts, Andrew P.

    When the New Zealand Geological Society held its annual meeting in November 1988 in Hamilton, they scheduled a major symposium, Palaeomagnetism and Its Applications in the New Zealand Region. That interest and enthusiasm for paleomagnetic research in New Zealand has reached such a level is a tribute to those who, over the past 30 years, have built expertise and developed our facilities to international standards.In 1957 Colin Bull became the first geophysicist appointed to the physics department at Victoria University, in Wellington. He brought with him from the United Kingdom a magnet assembly that was incorporated into an astatic magnetometer by Jim Gellen [1959] as part of his Master's degree project.

  1. The future of Western Samoan migration to New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Va'a, L F

    1992-01-01

    "The history of Samoan migration to New Zealand, a demographic profile of the migrants, and the future of such migration are discussed. Migration became a serious phenomenon after independence in 1962, with primarily young, unskilled workers moving to take up jobs in the agricultural and service sectors. Remaining essentially unchanged since 1962, New Zealand's immigration policy gives preferential treatment to Western Samoans and recognizes their valuable labor contribution. The future of migration to New Zealand is discussed in the context of the costs and benefits to Western Samoa.... The author argues that emigration has been beneficial rather than deleterious to Western Samoa's development...." Data are from official sources. excerpt

  2. Haste bloqueada "Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto": experiência clínica no tratamento das fraturas femorais Ribeirão Preto school of medicine locking nail: clinical experience in the femoral fractures treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mendes Paschoal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Uma série de 103 casos de fraturas diafisárias complexas do fêmur foram tratadas com a haste intramedular bloqueada FMRP, no período de maio de 1987 a dezembro 1995. Das 103 fraturas, 67 eram cominutivas, 12 bifocais (segmentar, 4 espirais, 13 proximais e 21 distais, instáveis, rotacionalmente, da diáfise femoral. Do total dos casos, constatou-se 97 bloqueios estáticos e 6 dinâmicos. Dessas 97 estáticas, 7 foram dinamizadas durante a evolução. Clínica e radiográficamente a consolidação ocorreu em 97,09% dos casos, com média de 16,72 semanas e em 3 casos não houve consolidação. Houve 4 casos de infecção suspeita e 3 estabelecidas que foram debeladas e evoluíram para consolidação. Houve 81 casos de encurtamentos que variaram entre 0,5 a 4 cm com média de 1 cm. O encurtamento menor ou igual a 2 cm ocorreu em 73 casos. Desvio de alinhamento em qualquer plano acima de 10 º e igual a 15º foi observado em 8 pacientes. Houve 10 casos de deformidades rotacionais, porém nenhum caso acima de 10º. A incidência de infecção foi baixa e a de consolidação alta. A estabilização dessas fraturas complexas permitiu imediata mobilização do paciente, reabilitação precoce do membro e diminuição da permanência hospitalar, excetuando os politraumatizados. A haste FMRP permitiu o tratamento dessas fraturas sem o uso de intensificador de imagens e de fresas flexíveis com baixo custo operacional. Os resultados foram semelhantes aos obtidos com as hastes intramedulares bloqueadas que necessitam de aparelhagem técnica mais sofisticada, porém com vantagens para o paciente e a equipe cirúrgica.A series of 103 cases of complex femoral fracture were treated with FMRP (Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto nail. These fractures were treated from May 1987 until December 1995. From the 103 fractures, 67 were cominutive, 12 bifocal (segmental, 4 spiral, 13 proximal e 21 distal and unstable rotationaly. From the total of cases, 97

  3. Haste intramedular polimérica bioreabsorvível (PLLA/PHBV para uso na recuperação de fraturas ósseas Intramedullary bioresorbable polymeric pin (PLLA/PHBV for use in bone fracture recuperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina M. P. Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A crescente utilização de materiais poliméricos bioreabsorvíveis em medicina, tem estimulado pesquisadores na área ortopédica na busca de soluções mais biológicas, substituindo artefatos tais como fios, hastes e placas metálicas por polímeros bioreabsorvíveis no tratamento de fraturas. Para tanto, resolveu-se estudar implantes da blenda de PLLA/PHBV (dois polímeros bioreabsorvíveis moldados em uma mini-injetora. Esses implantes foram utilizados para recuperação de fraturas de fêmur de coelhos e avaliados em comparação ao fio de Steinmann (aço inox, usado comercialmente. Após eutanásia com 6, 12 e 24 semanas de implantação dos artefatos, os ossos foram estudados com radiografias, exame histológico e ensaio mecânico, enquanto os implantes poliméricos foram submetidos a microscopia eletrônica de varredura (SEM, ensaio mecânico e calorimetria diferencial de varredura modular (MDSC. As radiografias mostraram calos ósseos bem formados, tanto com o uso da haste de polímero como com o controle metálico. O estudo histológico mostrou ausência de reações inflamatórias ou osteólise. O ensaio mecânico mostrou que a consolidação óssea ocorreu nos dois grupos. Tanto no ensaio mecânico como na calorimetria observou-se que a haste polimérica apresentou sinais de degradação progressiva no tempo estudado. Com os dados obtidos neste estudo, podemos afirmar que o implante PLLA/PHBV demonstrou ser efetivo na reparação de fraturas do fêmur de coelhos quando comparado com o controle metálico.The growing interest in medicine with the use of bioreabsorbable polymeric materials has been stimulating researchers from orthopedic area to develop more biological solutions, substituting threads, stems and metallic plates for bioreabsorbable polymers in the treatment of fractures. So, we decided to study implants of the PLLA/PHBV blends (two bioreabsorbable polymers moulded in a mini-injector. Those implants were used for

  4. Crescimento e produção de hastes florais de gladíolo cultivado sob diferentes tensões de água no solo Growth and production of gladiolus floral stems under different soil water tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelma Rezende Durão Pereira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As plantas ornamentais, em geral, e o gladíolo, em particular, são bastante suscetíveis às variações do nível de água no solo. No presente estudo foram avaliados os efeitos de diferentes níveis de tensão de água no solo sobre o crescimento e produção do gladíolo, em experimento realizado em casa-de-vegetação em Lavras, Minas Gerais. Esses efeitos foram caracterizados nas fases de crescimento vegetativo, espigamento e floração, por análises das seguintes medidas de crescimento: altura da planta, tamanho da haste floral e número de flores. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado em esquema de faixas, avaliando-se quatro níveis de tensão de água no solo (15, 25, 40 e 60 kPa em cada uma das três fases fenológicas da cultura, totalizando doze tratamentos e seis repetições. Os resultados mostraram que a altura da planta, tamanho da haste floral e o número de flores foram significativamente reduzidos pelo aumento dos níveis de tensão de água no solo, sendo os efeitos mais intensos nas fases de crescimento e espigamento. Os melhores resultados em relação ao tamanho da planta, da haste floral e número de flores, foram obtidos mantendo-se a tensão de água no solo próxima à capacidade de campo.The ornamental plants in general, and specially the gladiolus, are susceptible to variations of the soil water level. The effects of different soil water tensions on growth and production of gladiolus were evaluated in an experiment carried out in a greenhouse located in Lavras, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. These effects were characterized during the stages of vegetative growth, pre-flowering and flowering by analyzing plant height, floral stem length and number of flowers. The experimental design was completely randomized in a strip outline of four levels of soil water tensions (15, 25, 40 and 60 kPa on each growth stage, totalizing twelve treatments and six replications. The results demonstrated that plant

  5. Some prehistory of New Zealand intensive care medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2009-01-01

    In taking 1960 as the foundation year for the practice of intensive care medicine in New Zealand, this paper briefly looks into the previous two centuries for some interventions in life-threatening conditions...

  6. Mobile computing in a New Zealand Bachelor of Nursing Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClunie-Trust, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Mobile computing is rapidly becoming a reality in New Zealand health care settings. Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) are the most frequently used of these mobile technologies, giving nurses access to clinical learning resources, including drug references, medical encyclopaedias and diagnostic information. The implementation of mobile computing at Waikato Institute of Technology (Wintec) will ensure graduates of our Bachelor of Nursing Programme are able to meet health care service demands for knowledge in contemporary information technologies as well as the information technology requirements defined by the Nursing Council of New Zealand and the Health Practitioners Competency Assurance Act 2003 for registration as a nurse in New Zealand. This opinion paper presents strategies for the implementation of mobile computing as a core element of the curriculum for the Bachelor of Nursing Programme at Wintec in Hamilton, New Zealand.

  7. Midwifery education in New Zealand: Education, practice and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkison, Andrea; Pairman, Sally; McAra-Couper, Judith; Kensington, Mary; James, Liz

    2016-02-01

    New Zealand's midwifery education model is intertwined with a practice model which is underpinned by autonomy and partnership. The curriculum prepares students for practice across the scope of midwifery on their own responsibility. While students have formal learning opportunities within educational institutions they spend at least half of their programme learning through authentic work experiences alongside midwives and women. Midwifery educators partner with practising midwives to support students to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to practise midwifery in the New Zealand context. This paper provides an overview of New Zealand's midwifery education model and identifies how it is integrated with New Zealand's unique midwifery service. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Transactions and Proceedings of the New Zealand Institute, 1868

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1870-01-01

    ..., the various other societies engaged in similar pursuits that exist in the New Zealand Islands; and who in consequence transmit their papers, or abstracts of them, to the Institute for incorporation in their Transactions...

  9. Postcolonial Anxieties and the Browning of New Zealand Rugby

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrew D Grainger; Mark Falcous; Joshua I Newman

    2012-01-01

    This article examines postcolonial race politics and the re-centering of embodied whiteness and mediated white bodies as constituted through "white flight" and the so-called browning of rugby in New Zealand...

  10. Redução de haste verde e retenção foliar na soja em razão de maior disponibilidade de nitrogênio pelo tratamento de sementes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fávero

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Problemas relacionados à retenção foliar e maturação desuniforme na cultura da soja têm sido relatados em várias regiões do país, inclusive no Estado do Paraná, desafiando pesquisadores brasileiros. Várias hipóteses já foram levantadas sobre o desequilíbrio nutricional das plantas e intensificação do problema, porém nenhuma com conclusão definitiva. Com o objetivo de avaliar como a disponibilidade de N via inoculação e uso de Co e Mo no tratamento de sementes, associado ao uso de fungicida e inseticida, pode minimizar a retenção foliar e haste verde, instalou-se um ensaio no campo da Estação Experimental da Copacol, em Cafelândia, PR. Oito combinações de produtos foram usadas no tratamento de sementes de soja, considerando a presença ou ausência de Co e Mo, inoculante e inseticida/fungicida. Avaliaram-se o teor de N foliar, a frequência de plantas anormais por ocasião da colheita, a porcentagem de vagens, com 0, 1, 2, 3 e 4 grãos formados, o peso de 1000 grãos, o teor de umidade, a impureza na colheita e o rendimento de grãos. O uso do Co e Mo e a inoculação de sementes promoveram aumento do teor de N foliar na soja e reduziram o número de plantas anormais, refletindo positivamente no rendimento e seus componentes. Os resultados evidenciaram efeito positivo da melhor nutrição das plantas de soja com relação ao N na redução de haste verde e reafirmaram a necessidade do uso do Co e Mo e da inoculação de sementes.

  11. Adubação com nitrogênio e boro na incidência de hastes ocas e na produção de couve-flor Nitrogen and boron fertilization on hollow stem and yield of cauliflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Kojoi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O aparecimento de caule oco em couve-flor causa prejuízos aos produtores. O boro e o nitrogênio estão associados a essa desordem fisiológica, mas poucos estudos foram feitos em condições tropicais. Objetivou-se, no trabalho, avaliar os efeitos da adubação com N e B e da interação entre esses nutrientes na produção e na ocorrência de hastes ocas em couve-flor 'Shiromaru III', cultivada em solo da região de Ribeirão Preto (SP, durante o período de julho a setembro de 2003. O experimento foi conduzido em blocos inteiramente casualizados em esquema fatorial (3 x 3, com três doses de N (120, 180 e 240 kg ha-1 e três doses de B (2, 4 e 6 kg ha-1 e 4 repetições. A produção total e a massa média de inflorescências não foram influenciadas pelas doses de N e de B. A incidência de hastes ocas foi influenciada pela adubação com N, sendo que as aplicações de 180 e 240 kg ha-1 reduziram o aparecimento dessa anomalia em 9,03% e 11,72%, respectivamente.The hollow stem in cauliflower causes damages to producers. Nitrogen and boron are related to this physiological disorder but few studies were performed at tropical conditions. The aim of the experiment was to evaluate the effects of N and B applications and interaction between these nutrients on yield and hollow stem on cauliflower Shiromaru III, cultivated on soil of Ribeirão Preto region during the period from July to September of 2003. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design in a factorial scheme (3 x 3 with three rates of nitrogen (120, 180 and 240 kg ha-1 N and three rates of boron (2, 4 and 6 kg ha-1 B and four replicates. The total yield and head weight were not influenced by B and N applications. Hollow stem incidence was influenced by N fertilization, where applications of 180 and 240 kg ha-1 reduced the disorder in 9.03 and 11.72%, respectively.

  12. Relationships between medical students and drug companies in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyber, Rosemary; Fancourt, Nicholas; Stone, Bradley

    2011-08-26

    The relationships between doctors and drug companies have generated considerable global debate. Medical students are unique stakeholders in this discussion, although they are underrepresented in descriptive data. This article reviews international literature on the effects of drug company promotion, the effect on students, the New Zealand context and explores implications for New Zealand medical students. Creating an influence free environment to inform and involve students in the debate is a strong precursor to delivering gold standard patient care in the future.

  13. The Future of Electricity Generation in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Phil; Bull, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Increasing demand for electricity in New Zealand requires approximately 150 megawatts of new capacity to be installed annually. Rapidly increasing global prices for fossil fuels; the New Zealand Energy Strategy with its focus on renewable technologies; climate change policies; and a gradual shift from an energy constrained electricity system to one with capacity constraints are all factors underlying a change in the type of generation plant being installed and the location of that plant. This...

  14. New Zealand Defense into 2035 -- Future 35 Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    capstone military review that was promised as an election platform. The Government of New Zealand then commissioned the Defence Value for Money Study...in 2009 led by Dr Roderick Deane, the Chair of the New Zealand State Services Commission and Pacific Road Corporate Finance. The Value for Money Study...redistribution would occur within the NZDF and the Value for Money Study was undertaken, to understand where it could occur to deliver efficiencies. In

  15. The New Zealand Tsunami Database: historical and modern records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberopoulou, A.; Downes, G. L.; Cochran, U. A.; Clark, K.; Scheele, F.

    2016-12-01

    A database of historical (pre-instrumental) and modern (instrumentally recorded)tsunamis that have impacted or been observed in New Zealand has been compiled andpublished online. New Zealand's tectonic setting, astride an obliquely convergenttectonic boundary on the Pacific Rim, means that it is vulnerable to local, regional andcircum-Pacific tsunamis. Despite New Zealand's comparatively short written historicalrecord of c. 200 years there is a wealth of information about the impact of past tsunamis.The New Zealand Tsunami Database currently has 800+ entries that describe >50 highvaliditytsunamis. Sources of historical information include witness reports recorded indiaries, notes, newspapers, books, and photographs. Information on recent events comesfrom tide gauges and other instrumental recordings such as DART® buoys, and media ofgreater variety, for example, video and online surveys. The New Zealand TsunamiDatabase is an ongoing project with information added as further historical records cometo light. Modern tsunamis are also added to the database once the relevant data for anevent has been collated and edited. This paper briefly overviews the procedures and toolsused in the recording and analysis of New Zealand's historical tsunamis, with emphasison database content.

  16. Prescribing by nurse practitioners: Insights from a New Zealand study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot, Betty; Zonneveld, Rebecca; Nelson, Katherine; Weatherall, Mark

    2017-10-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) in New Zealand have been able to prescribe medicines since 2001; however, little is known about their prescribing practice. This study describes the NPs who prescribe community-dispensed medicines, the patients, and identifies the most frequently prescribed medications. A retrospective search of the Ministry of Health pharmaceutical collection was completed from 2013 to 2015. NP registration number, patient age, gender, deprivation index, and the name and date of dispensed medication, including the New Zealand pharmaceutical schedule therapeutic group, were identified. NPs prescribe a broad range of medications across all therapeutic groups with antibacterial and analgesics being the most commonly prescribed medicines. This is comparable to all prescribers in New Zealand and NPs in Australia. The majority of patients lived in the more deprived areas of New Zealand indicating that NPs are working in areas of greater health need. The majority of NPs registered in New Zealand prescribe medicines. Those in primary care prescribe the most medications. NPs prescribe a broad range of medicines across all drug therapeutic groups. The patients seen by NPs often live in the most deprived areas of New Zealand. Understanding prescribing patterns will help to inform curricular development and continuing education programs for NPs. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. New Zealand and Slovenia : cultural contacts, 1923-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Podbrežnik

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Situated many thousands of miles apart, possessing very different historical experiences and occupying different positions in the world, Slovenia and New Zealand nonetheless share a number of common features as a result of the political, economic and cultural contacts that have been estab­ lished between the two countries. The author of this paper attempts to gauge the intensity of the contacts, mostly cultural, that have been forged between the two countries, with an emphasis on descriptions of New Zealand and portrayals of its people in the work of some of Slovenia's most outstanding travel writers. Alma Karlin (Samotno potovanje, Miran Ogrin (Na jugu sveta and Tomo Križnar (Samotne sledi have all succeeded in acquainting the Slovene reading public with New Zealand and its people and culture. So that readers might understand more fully the observa­ tions offered by these writers, the author of this paper provides background information in the{orm of a short account of the history of New Zealand and of New Zealand literature, going on to focus on those New Zealand writers whose work has been translated into Slovene, most notably Katherine Mansfield. Other writers whose work has been translated include Janet Frame, Dorothy Eden, Ngaio Marsh, Stephanie Johnson and Samuel Butler.

  18. Electromyographic activity of shoulder muscles during exercises performed with oscillatory and non-oscillatory poles Atividade eletromiográfica dos músculos do ombro durante exercícios executados com hastes oscilatória e não oscilatória

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Z. Hallal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain and dysfunction of the shoulder complex are commonly found physiotherapy practice. These musculoskeletal abnormalities are related to instability and inadequate kinematic function, that depend on the integrity of the muscle tissues. Thus, to enhance the results of exercise therapies, and prevent and attenuate pain and dynfunction, the use of oscillatory pole has been implemented in clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to analyze the electromyographic (EMG activity of shoulder stabilizing muscles during exercises performed with an oscillatory and a non-oscillatory pole. METHODS: Twelve female volunteers, aged 20.4 years±1.9, participated in this study. EMG data were collected from upper trapezius (UT, lower trapezius (LT and middle deltoid (MD during three different exercises with an oscillatory and a non-oscillatory pole. The EMG signals were analyzed in the time domain through the calculation of Root Mean Square (RMS. The RMS values were normalized by the peak value obtained over all trials for each muscle. Statistical analysis was performed with repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc of Bonferroni tests. RESULTS: The EMG activity of UT, LT and MD muscles were significantly higher with the oscillatory pole than the non-oscillatory pole (all pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A dor e a disfunção no complexo articular do ombro é comumente encontrada na prática fisioterapêutica. Essas anormalidades musculoesqueléticas estão relacionadas à instabilidade e inadequado funcionamento cinemático, que dependem da integridade dos tecidos musculares. Assim, no sentido de prevenir e reabilitar esses sintomas, o uso da haste oscilatória vem sendo implantado para melhorar os resultados de técnicas cinesioterapêuticas. OBJETIVOS: Analisar a atividade eletromiográfica (EMG dos músculos que estabilizam a articulação do ombro durante a realização de exercícios com haste oscilatória e haste não-oscilatória. M

  19. Mysidae (Mysida) of New Zealand: a checklist, identification key to species and an overview of material in New Zealand collections

    OpenAIRE

    Jocqué, M.; Blom, W.

    2009-01-01

    Mysida are small, mostly marine crustaceans that are an important element of food webs, specifically as prey for several commercially important fish species. Taking their ecological and economical importance into account, relatively little attention is attributed to these organisms, and they are often neglected in biodiversity surveys and studies. To draw attention to these animals and stimulate research in New Zealand, we summarize information available for New Zealand Mysidae. We present a ...

  20. Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners in New Zealand: differences associated with being a practitioner in New Zealand compared to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Asmita; Toossi, Vahideh

    2016-10-28

    While New Zealand has experienced an increase in the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) based acupuncture, very little is known about the practitioners who provide this type of treatment modality. Therefore, this study was designed to identify differences associated with being a TCM practitioner in New Zealand compared to China. Ten Auckland-based TCM practitioners were individually interviewed. The interview schedule comprised of questions that were designed to identify any potential differences in practising TCM in New Zealand compared to China. Data were analysed using an inductive thematic approach. The main differences in practising between the two countries were related to the role and authority that a TCM practitioner had. This in turn resulted in differences between the conditions that were treated in these two countries. Differences in patient demography were also identified between the two countries. TCM is used as a form of alternative healthcare treatment in New Zealand for non-Chinese individuals. Acupuncture is the most utilised form of TCM treatment in New Zealand, and is predominantly used for pain management purposes. TCM treatment has been utilised by individuals from a number of different ethnic groups, reflecting the ethnic diversity of the New Zealand population.

  1. Tsunami Hazard Assessment in New Zealand Ports and Harbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrero, J. C.; Wotherspoon, L.; Power, W. L.; Goring, D.; Barberopoulou, A.; Melville, B.; Shamseldin, A.

    2012-12-01

    The New Zealand Ministry of Science and Innovation (MSI) has sponsored a 3-year collaborative project involving industry, government and university research groups to better assess and prepare for tsunami hazards in New Zealand ports and harbors. As an island nation, New Zealand is highly dependent on its maritime infrastructure for commercial and recreational interests. The recent tsunamis of 2009, 2010 and 2011 (Samoa, Chile and Japan) highlighted the vulnerability of New Zealand's marine infrastructure to strong currents generated by such far field events. These events also illustrated the extended duration of the effects from such tsunamis, with some of the strongest currents and highest water levels occurring many hours, if not days after the tsunami first arrival. In addition, New Zealand also sits astride the Tonga-Kermadec subduction zone, which given the events of recent years, cannot be underestimated as a major near field hazard. This presentation will discuss the modeling and research strategy that will be used to mitigate tsunami hazards in New Zealand ports and harbors. This will include a detailed time-series analysis (including Fourier and discrete Wavelet techniques) of water levels recorded throughout New Zealand form recent tsunami events (2009 Samoa, 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan). The information learned from these studies will guide detailed numerical modeling of tsunami induced currents at key New Zealand ports. The model results will then be used to guide a structural analysis of the relevant port structures in terms of hydrodynamic loads as well as mooring and impact loads due to vessel and/or debris. Ultimately the project will lead to an improvement in New Zealand's tsunami response plans by providing a decision making flow chart, targeted for marine facilities, to be used by emergency management officials during future tsunami events.Tsunami effects at Port Charles, New Zealand: (top) inundation into a neighborhood and (bottom left and right

  2. Trampoline injury in New Zealand: emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, P A; Chalmers, D J; Wilson, B D

    1996-12-01

    To examine trampoline related injuries resulting in emergency department attendance. Cases were identified by searching free text descriptions of the circumstances of injury contained in the records of the emergency department of a large city hospital. 114 cases were identified for a 12 month period, giving an incidence rate of 108 per 100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval = 89 to 129) compared with 9.3 hospital admissions per 100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval = 8.3 to 10.4) for a corresponding period reported in earlier research from New Zealand. This suggested that for every one hospital admission there are approximately 12 emergency department attendances. Of the cases, 95% were aged less than 20 years. As for the earlier research, falls from the trampoline to the surrounding surface were the commonest cause of injury. In the present study, sprains and strains were the commonest type of injury (40%), and the body site most frequently involved was the lower limb (46%). The findings support the conclusion from earlier research that although existing trampoline standards address many of the issues relating to trampoline safety, the need remains for measures to reduce the impact of falls from the trampoline to the ground surface and to prohibit the use of trampolines as unsupervised "play equipment".

  3. An Online Survey of New Zealand Vapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Truman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Using electronic cigarettes (vaping is controversial, but is increasingly widespread. This paper reports the results of an electronic survey of vapers in New Zealand, a country where the sale and supply of e-liquids containing nicotine is illegal, although vapers can legally access e-liquids from overseas. An on-line survey was conducted, using vaper and smoking cessation networks for recruitment, with follow up surveys conducted 1 and 2 months after the initial survey. 218 participants were recruited. Almost all had been smokers, but three quarters no longer smoked, with the remainder having significantly reduced their tobacco use. Three participants were non-smokers before starting to vape, but none had gone on to become smokers. The overriding motivation to begin and continue vaping was to stop or to reduce smoking. The results were consistent with a progression from initially both vaping and smoking using less effective electronic cigarette types, then moving to more powerful devices, experimentation with flavors and nicotine strengths—all resulting in reducing or stopping tobacco use. Lack of access to nicotine and lack of support for their chosen cessation method were the main problems reported. Vaping had resulted in effective smoking cessation for the majority of participants.

  4. Alcohol imagery on New Zealand television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeder Anthony I

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent and nature of alcohol imagery on New Zealand (NZ television, a content analysis of 98 hours of prime-time television programs and advertising was carried out over 7 consecutive days' viewing in June/July 2004. The main outcome measures were number of scenes in programs, trailers and advertisements depicting alcohol imagery; the extent of critical versus neutral and promotional imagery; and the mean number of scenes with alcohol per hour, and characteristics of scenes in which alcohol featured. Results There were 648 separate depictions of alcohol imagery across the week, with an average of one scene every nine minutes. Scenes depicting uncritical imagery outnumbered scenes showing possible adverse health consequences of drinking by 12 to 1. Conclusion The evidence points to a large amount of alcohol imagery incidental to storylines in programming on NZ television. Alcohol is also used in many advertisements to market non-alcohol goods and services. More attention needs to be paid to the extent of alcohol imagery on television from the industry, the government and public health practitioners. Health education with young people could raise critical awareness of the way alcohol imagery is presented on television.

  5. Phospholipids of New Zealand Edible Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Mitchell, Kevin; Scott, Dawn

    2017-07-01

    Edible brown algae have attracted interest as a source of beneficial allenic carotenoid fucoxanthin, and glyco- and phospholipids enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unlike green algae, brown algae contain no or little phosphatidylserine, possessing an unusual aminophospholipid, phosphatidyl-O-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine], PHEG, instead. When our routinely used technique of 31P-NMR analysis of phospholipids was applied to the samples of edible New Zealand brown algae, a number of signals corresponding to unidentified phosphorus-containing compounds were observed in total lipids. NI (negative ion) ESI QToF MS spectra confirmed the presence of more familiar phospholipids, and also suggested the presence of PHEG or its isomers. The structure of PHEG was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic standard. An unusual MS fragmentation pattern that was also observed prompted us to synthesise a number of possible candidates, and was found to follow that of phosphatidylhydroxyethyl methylcarbamate, likely an extraction artefact. An unexpected outcome was the finding of ceramidephosphoinositol that has not been reported previously as occurring in brown algae. An uncommon arsenic-containing phospholipid has also been observed and quantified, and its TLC behaviour studied, along with that of the newly synthesised lipids.

  6. Avaliação do emprego da haste femoral curta na fratura trocantérica instável do fêmur Evaluating the use of a proximal femoral nail in unstable trochanteric fracture of the femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Antonio Matheus Guimarães

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar a taxa de consolidação da fratura trocantérica instável submetida a osteossíntese com haste femoral curta (PFN® - AO/ASIF, em pacientes operados entre novembro de 1999 e março de 2004. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados 45 pacientes com idades entre 60 e 93 anos, portadores de fratura trocantérica instável do fêmur, submetidos à osteossíntese com PFN® curto, mediante redução indireta em mesa de tração e auxílio de radioscopia. As fraturas foram classificadas de acordo com a classificação AO/OTA. A qualidade óssea foi avaliada através do índice de Singh, na rotina radiográfica pré-operatória. A qualidade da redução obtida e o posicionamento do implante foram avaliados pela radiografia pós-operatória em ântero-posterior e perfil do fêmur proximal, com análise do ângulo cervicodiafisário e a distância entre a ponta do parafuso deslizante e o centro da cabeça femoral, o chamado tip apex distance (TAD. RESULTADOS: A média de idade dos pacientes estudados foi de 80,8 anos (60-93. O sexo feminino foi predominante, com 37 casos (82,2%. O lado direito foi acometido em 22 casos (48,89% e o esquerdo em 23 (51,1%. Todas as fraturas eram instáveis, sendo 22 do tipo 31A2 (48,8% e 23 do tipo 31A3 (51,1%. O tempo médio de utilização da radioscopia foi de 102,4 segundos (61-185. A diferença entre o tempo de radioscopia para a redução e fixação dos dois grupos de fraturas estudados não foi significativa (p = 0,62. Com relação à qualidade óssea, 82,2% dos pacientes apresentavam índice de Singh menor que IV, caracterizando perda da arquitetura óssea normal. Quanto à consolidação da fratura, 44 casos evoluíram com êxito com tempo médio de 3,2 meses, variando entre dois e sete meses. Em sete casos ocorreu a necessidade de novo procedimento cirúrgico, sendo quatro para a retirada de material de síntese, devido a migração dos parafusos proximais da haste. Um caso de fratura do tipo 31A2

  7. Microbial biopesticides for control of invertebrates: Progress from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glare, Travis R; O'Callaghan, Maureen

    2017-11-28

    Biopesticides are needed for control of endemic and invasive pests impacting New Zealand's primary sectors including pests that are emerging as a result of climate change and farming intensification. Products developed in New Zealand are usually based on endemic strains of microorganisms, including new species/strains with novel modes of action. For example, Invade and BioShield were developed using endemic strains of the bacterium Serratia entomophila, for use in New Zealand only. To date, most of these home-grown products have either struggled for market share or have remained in small niche markets. However, the number of products registered for use has been steadily increasing in response to consumer demand. Factors limiting past use of biopesticides in New Zealand include market size, registration costs and limited efficacy over a range of climatic zones. Many promising new agents are currently under development as biopesticides with international applications and the launch of several new start-up companies suggests a brighter future for biopesticide use in New Zealand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Toward Developing a Nurse Endoscopist Role in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dawn; Scrymgeour, Gill; Marshall, Bob

    The purpose of this exploratory descriptive mixed-method study was to explore the potential role of the nurse endoscopist as a part of the solution in fulfilling the workforce requirements of a bowel screening program, ascertain the possible enablers of a nurse endoscopist role in New Zealand, and determine whether there are endoscopy nurses who would wish to follow the nurse endoscopist/nurse practitioner pathway. A questionnaire with both open- and closed-ended questions gained in-depth information regarding the aspirations of New Zealand endoscopy nurses, their perceived enablers and barriers of a nurse endoscopist role, and statistical information on the New Zealand endoscopy nursing workforce. New Zealand has a highly experienced and educated endoscopy nursing workforce who supports the development of the nurse endoscopist role, some of whom expressed interest in a nurse endoscopist/practitioner pathway. It was concluded that with the addition of a specific education pathway and funding, standardization of training for endoscopists, and specific job description for nurse endoscopists, the future development of this role is possible in New Zealand.

  9. Corporal punishment and child maltreatment in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    On 2 May, 2007, the New Zealand Parliament passed a law repealing Section 59 of the Crimes Act. In so doing, New Zealand became the first English-speaking nation in the world to make corporal punishment of a child illegal. The passage of this legislation was surrounded by intense and persistent public debate, and supporters of corporal punishment continue to advocate against the law change to the present day. In Sweden, where the first stage of similar repeal took place in 1957, it may be difficult for many to understand the strength of the public opposition to this change in New Zealand. This article will present a viewpoint on the evolution of the debate in New Zealand, review the wider context of child maltreatment and family violence in New Zealand and summarize a range of attempts to prevent or intervene effectively in the cycle of dysfunction. Child maltreatment and family violence are public health issues of great importance, and a stain on all societies. While corporal punishment may be a significant contributing factor, there is no single 'solution'. Change must occur on multiple levels (political, economic, cultural, familial and professional) before the tide will turn.

  10. Japanese women's experiences of pharmacological pain relief in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Keiko; Patterson, Jean; Griffiths, Christine R

    2014-06-01

    In Japan, most women manage labour pain without pharmacological interventions. However, New Zealand statistics show a high percentage of epidural use amongst Asian women. Entonox (a gas mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen) and pethidine are also available to women in New Zealand. This article investigates how Japanese women in New Zealand respond to the use of pharmacological pain relief in labour. The study was guided by two research questions: (1) How do Japanese women experience and manage labour pain in New Zealand? (2) How do they feel about the use of pharmacological pain relief? Thirteen Japanese women who had given birth in New Zealand were interviewed individually or in a focus group. The conversations were analysed using thematic analysis. Although in Japan very few women use pain relief, nine women received epidural and/or Entonox out of 11 women who experienced labour pain. The contrast between their Japanese cultural expectations and their birth experiences caused some of the women subsequent personal conflict. Japanese women's cultural perspectives and passive attitudes were demonstrated to influence the decision-making process concerning pain relief. It was concluded that understanding Japanese cultural worldviews and approaches to the role of pain in labour would help maternity providers in their provision of appropriate care for Japanese women. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Blue whale vocalizations recorded around New Zealand: 1964-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian S; Collins, Kym; Barlow, Jay; Calderan, Susannah; Leaper, Russell; McDonald, Mark; Ensor, Paul; Olson, Paula A; Olavarria, Carlos; Double, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Previous underwater recordings made in New Zealand have identified a complex sequence of low frequency sounds that have been attributed to blue whales based on similarity to blue whale songs in other areas. Recordings of sounds with these characteristics were made opportunistically during the Southern Ocean Research Partnership's recent Antarctic Blue Whale Voyage. Detections of these sounds occurred all around the South Island of New Zealand during the voyage transits from Nelson, New Zealand to the Antarctic and return. By following acoustic bearings from directional sonobuoys, blue whales were visually detected and confirmed as the source of these sounds. These recordings, together with the historical recordings made northeast of New Zealand, indicate song types that persist over several decades and are indicative of the year-round presence of a population of blue whales that inhabits the waters around New Zealand. Measurements of the four-part vocalizations reveal that blue whale song in this region has changed slowly, but consistently over the past 50 years. The most intense units of these calls were detected as far south as 53°S, which represents a considerable range extension compared to the limited prior data on the spatial distribution of this population.

  12. Food safety regulations in Australia and New Zealand Food Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dilip

    2014-08-01

    Citizens of Australia and New Zealand recognise that food security is a major global issue. Food security also affects Australia and New Zealand's status as premier food exporting nations and the health and wellbeing of the Australasian population. Australia is uniquely positioned to help build a resilient food value chain and support programs aimed at addressing existing and emerging food security challenges. The Australian food governance system is fragmented and less transparent, being largely in the hands of government and semi-governmental regulatory authorities. The high level of consumer trust in Australian food governance suggests that this may be habitual and taken for granted, arising from a lack of negative experiences of food safety. In New Zealand the Ministry of Primary Industries regulates food safety issues. To improve trade and food safety, New Zealand and Australia work together through Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) and other co-operative agreements. Although the potential risks to the food supply are dynamic and constantly changing, the demand, requirement and supply for providing safe food remains firm. The Australasian food industry will need to continually develop its system that supports the food safety program with the help of scientific investigations that underpin the assurance of what is and is not safe. The incorporation of a comprehensive and validated food safety program is one of the total quality management systems that will ensure that all areas of potential problems are being addressed by industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); Yielder, Jill [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  14. Characteristics of and differences between Pasifika women and New Zealand European women diagnosed with breast cancer in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charis; Lao, Chunhuan; Lawrenson, Ross; Tin Tin, Sandar; Schaaf, Michelle; Kidd, Jacquie; Allan-Moetaua, Anne; Herman, Josephine; Raamsroop, Reena; Campbell, Ian; Elwood, Mark

    2017-12-15

    Breast cancer in New Zealand-based Pasifika women is a significant issue. Although Pasifika women have a lower incidence of breast cancer compared to New Zealand European women, they have higher breast cancer mortality and lower five-year survival. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and tumour biology of Pasifika women and to compare New Zealand European women to identify what factors impact on early (Stage 1 and 2) vs advanced stage (Stage 3 and 4) at diagnosis. Data on all Pasifika and New Zealand European women diagnosed with breast cancer (C50) during the period 1 June 2000 to 31 May 2013 was extracted from the Auckland and Waikato Breast Cancer Registries. Descriptive tables and Chi-square test were used to examine differences in characteristics and tumour biology between Pasifika and New Zealand European women. Logistic regression was used to identify factors that contributed to an increased risk of advanced stage at diagnosis. A significantly higher proportion of Pasifika women had advanced disease at diagnosis compared to New Zealand European women (33.3% and 18.3%, respectively). Cancer biology in Pasifika women was more likely to be: 1) HER2+, 2) ER/PR negative and 3) have a tumour size of ≥50mm. Pasifika women live in higher deprivation areas of 9-10 compared to New Zealand European women (55% vs 14%, respectively) and were less likely to have their cancer identified through screening. Logistic regression showed that if Pasifika women were on the screen-detected pathway they had similar odds (not sig.) of having advanced disease at diagnosis to New Zealand European women. Mode of detection, deprivation, age and some biological factors contributed to the difference in odds ratio between Pasifika and New Zealand European women. For those of screening age, adherence to the screening programme and improvements in access to earlier diagnosis for Pasifika women under the current screening age have the potential to make a substantial

  15. Casuarinicola australis Taylor, 2010 (Hemiptera: Triozidae, newly recorded from New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thorpe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence in New Zealand of the triozid Casuarinicola australis Taylor, 2010 is reported for the first time, based on new material from Auckland. This is also the first record of the genus from New Zealand.

  16. Casuarinicola australis Taylor, 2010 (Hemiptera: Triozidae), newly recorded from New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Thorpe

    2013-01-01

    The presence in New Zealand of the triozid Casuarinicola australis Taylor, 2010 is reported for the first time, based on new material from Auckland. This is also the first record of the genus from New Zealand.

  17. Environmental management frameworks for offshore mining: the New Zealand approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ellis, Joanne

    2017-07-27

    The New Zealand region contains untapped natural mineral, oil, and gas resources while also supporting globally unique and diverse faunal communities that need to be managed sustainably. In this paper key information from the international literature is reviewed that can underpin an Environmental Mining Management System which includes elements of Environmental Risk Assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmental Management Planning. This paper focuses on four developing areas of seafloor mining activities presently being undertaken or planned in the New Zealand region: hydrocarbons (oil and gas), minerals, ironsands and phosphorite nodules. A number of issues with the implementation of environmental management systems are identified including the difficulty of assessing new marine activities or technologies and the need for standardised reporting metrics. Finally, the development of ecosystem-based management and marine spatial planning is discussed which will be required to enhance environmental mining management frameworks in New Zealand.

  18. Information behaviour of recent Chinese immigrants in Auckland, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Machet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Public library services in New Zealand are being re-examined in light of the developments in ICT and an increasinglymulticultural population. The research question investigated was “Can an internet portal on a public library website beused to meet the information needs of new Chinese Mandarin immigrants to the Auckland region of New Zealand?” In anattempt to effectively answer the research question and sub-questions a literature survey was carried out focusing on twoaspects relevant to the study: immigration theory and information behaviour (IB. Thirty Chinese Mandarin speakingrecent migrants to the Auckland region of New Zealand were interviewed in-depth to determine their IB and resourcesused. The findings indicate that respondents were in need of everyday survival information. The findings suggest that amore coordinated approach to information provision, for example through a library web portal, will assist respondents intheir search for information relating to their initial settlement.

  19. Relativism, Values and Morals in the New Zealand Curriculum Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Lone Morris; Ryan, Sueann

    The New Zealand Curriculum Framework, 1993, is the official document for teaching, learning and assessment in New Zealand schools. It consists of a set of curriculum statements, which define the learning principles, achievement aims and essential skills for seven learning areas. It also indicates the place of attitudes and values in the school curriculum. This paper investigates the requirements for teaching attitudes, values and ethics in the curriculum statements for Science, Biology and Technology. The question is raised whether the teaching of skills for resolving moral and ethical dilemmas are required by the official education standards in New Zealand, and internationally. The paper reports on a survey done on pre-service teacher trainees of their understanding of these requirements. Implications for courses that might need to be provided in future pre-service teacher education programmes are briefly discussed.

  20. The seasonality of human cryptosporidiosis in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAKE, I. R.; PEARCE, J.; SAVILL, M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY In New Zealand human cryptosporidiosis demonstrates spring and autumn peaks of incidence with the spring peak being three times greater in magnitude than the autumn peak. The imbalance between the two peaks is notable, and may be associated with the high livestock density in New Zealand. In the summer and autumn the cryptosporidiosis rate was positively associated with temperatures in the current and previous month, highlighting the importance of outdoor recreation to transmission. No associations between spring incidence and weather were found providing little support for the importance of drinking-water pathways. Imported travel cases do not appear to be an important factor in the aetiology of cryptosporidiosis in New Zealand. PMID:18053274

  1. New Zealand signs up to co-operate with CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    On 4 December 2003 a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between CERN and the government of New Zealand was signed in the presence of Peter Hamilton, New Zealand's ambassador to Switzerland. This MoU concerns the further development of scientific and technical co-operation in high-energy particle physics between Ernest Rutherford's birthplace and CERN, which now hosts one of the world's most ambitious scientific endeavours, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).    In anticipation of the MoU, two New Zealand universities (the University of Auckland and the University of Canterbury in Christchurch) have already joined the CMS collaboration to work on pixel detectors, where they can benefit from the expertise of the pixel group at the Paul Scherrer Institute. These detectors are not only valuable in high-energy particle physics, but also serve medical applications.

  2. Outdoor education in New Zealand: a comparative and cultural perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren

    2009-01-01

      This presentation takes general view of understanding outdoor education in New Zealand.  This is seen from an outsider's perspective and is compared with "friluftsliv" in Denmark and the Nordic countries. Analysing and understanding one's culture is never easy, and the main challenge is to focus......, 1992) of friluftsliv in Denmark and outdoor education in New Zealand. Friluftsliv and outdoor education are understood as socio-cultural constructs which develop and differ in time and space. The theoretical framework is based on ethnological cultural analysis (Ehn & Lofgren, 1982, 2008) combined...... with the theory and analysis of configurations (Eichberg, 2001), using interviews with leaders and participants (Kvale, 1994) and a series of observations of practise (Spradley, 1980). The study points out central cultural characteristics in outdoor education in New Zealand according to time, space, energy...

  3. Repairing Organisational Legitimacy : the Case of the New Zealand Police

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Samkin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates how the New Zealand Police use non-financial annual report disclosures in response toadverse media publicity. This longitudinal case study spans the reporting periods ending 30 June 2000through to 30 June 2007. It involves a detailed examination of the narrative disclosures and images containedin the annual reports, including the Commissioner’s Overview and the Outcome Reports during this time.Three controversial items covered by the media were traced through the annual reports to establish whetherthe New Zealand Police use image repair discourse supplemented by semiotics in non-financial annual reportdisclosures to repair organisational legitimacy. The analysis found that non-financial disclosures together withimage repair discourse strategies were used by the New Zealand Police, a public sector agency, to repairorganisational legitimacy. This paper provides a valuable contribution to researchers and practitioners as itextends the understanding of how public sector agencies use non-financial annual report disclosures.

  4. Teaching Evolution in New Zealand's Schools—Reviewing Changes in the New Zealand Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alison; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin

    2011-05-01

    New Zealand has had a national school science curriculum for more than 80 years. In the past the evolution content of this document has varied, and has at times been strongly influenced by creationist lobby groups. The `new' science curriculum, to be fully implemented in 2010, places much greater emphasis than before on understanding evolution, and also on teaching the nature of science. Interplay between the two can potentially improve student understanding of the culture and processes of science in general and evolutionary theory in particular. While the explicit use of the word `evolution' highlights its significance, it is necessary to provide both resources and pedagogical guidelines to support teachers in dealing with this important topic.

  5. Headspace analysis of Italian and New Zealand parmesan cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Vaughan S; Reed, Christine J; Milligan, Daniel B; McEwan, Murray J; Barringer, Sheryl A; Harper, W James

    2012-06-01

    New Zealand is a leader in the global dairy industry. Milk powder is the principal export product, but there is also a prominent cheese manufacturing industry, catering more for the domestic market. The Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometric (SIFT-MS) technique was used to compare 4 New Zealand cheeses marketed as "parmesan" with 4 Italian Parmigiano Reggiano and Grana Padano cheeses. The cheese headspace was analyzed in real time without any sample preconcentration. Total of 38 volatile compounds in the cheese headspace were monitored with headspace concentrations varying between single digit parts per billion (ppb) to tens of parts per million (ppm). When the results were subjected to multivariate statistical analysis, a clear discrimination was found between the New Zealand "parmesan" and Italian cheeses based solely on the measured concentrations of these volatile compounds. If the volatile compounds used in the analyses were restricted to known odor-active compounds in Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, the ability to discriminate between the cheeses was maintained. The analyses also showed that it was possible to clearly differentiate between the different processing plants in individual countries. Important discriminatory volatiles in the samples tested were butanoic acid and phenylacetaldehyde for discriminating between Italian cheeses and ethyl butyrate, acetaldehyde and methylbutanals between New Zealand cheeses. We conclude that the New Zealand "parmesans" do not provide a good representation of the aroma of Italian "parmesans." SIFT-MS has been shown to clearly differentiate both country of origin and the manufacturer of "parmesan" cheeses made in Italy and New Zealand based on differences in volatile organic compounds. Thus this method will have benefit for use in the quality control of "parmesan" and other cheese varieties. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Country of Origin as a Brand: The Case of New Zealand Lamb

    OpenAIRE

    Roxanne Clemens; Bruce A. Babcock

    2004-01-01

    New Zealand has used country-of-origin labeling (COOL) as a "country brand" to differentiate New Zealand lamb in international markets and increase consumer awareness of this lamb as a high-quality imported product. The case of New Zealand lamb is especially interesting as an unsubsidized commodity product competing against subsidized lamb in some of the most competitive and sophisticated retail markets in the world. Given New Zealand's dependence on international markets, producers, processo...

  7. Determinação do vírus do enrolamento em hastes velhas de batatal para sementes Grafting old potato stems for leaf roll virus determination in seed potato fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. Cupertino

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available O enrolamento da fôlha é, presentemente, a moléstia de vírus de maior importância em relação à produção da batata-semente certificada, no Estado de São Paulo. Determinações relativamente precisas sôbre a ocorrência do virus em lotes de batata-semente certificada são necessárias para garantia dos lavradores que adquirem tais sementes e bom funcionamento do Serviço de Certificação. Os métodos de determinação baseados em amostras do produto depois de colhido são os que podem oferecer maior precisão, mas geralmente demandam um período de tempo que os tornam desvantajosos para a comercialização do produto. A determinação da ocorrência do vírus nos tubérculos de batata após colheita, com base em testes feitos com amostras de hastes das plantas produtoras, colhidas ao acaso, em fins de ciclo, tem-se mostrado extremamente prometedora nos testes efetuados e é considerada exequível mesmo para uso em larga escala. Os melhores resultados nas determinações foram obtidas usando-se Datura stramonium como planta-teste aos 40 dias de idade, para enxertia com as hastes das plantas a serem provadas, colhidas 60 a 70 dias depois de brotadas. Os sintomas desenvolvidos nos casos positivos são de fácil identificação, e as determinações podem ser obtidas dentro de 30 a 40 dias após a enxertia.Leaf roll is, at present, the most important virus problem in connection with the production of certified seed potato in São Paulo, Brazil. Leaf roll virus determinations based on samples obtained from seed lots can offer a high degree of accuracy, but generally demand a period of time that interferes with the seed potato sales to growers. The use of potato stems, collected at random late in the season, for grafting tests to determine the occurrence of the leaf roll virus in the planting and consequently in the tubers, is considered very promising for the conditions encountered in São Paulo and feasible even on a large scale. The best

  8. Supply chain JV boost for New Zealand coal shippers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    A new joint venture means New Zealand's coal exporters will soon have a second supply chain option. Four companies have formed the West Coast-Coal Company (WCCC) to truck 1.3 mta coal from the Pike River mine on New Zealand's South Island to the port of Greymouth 46 km away, ship it to Port Taranaki in North Island and stockpile it for transshipment on to Panamax carriers for export. An insert to the article mentions opposition faced by Solid Energy to coal mining on sites inhabitated by the endangered carnivorous snail Powelliphanta Augustus. 3 figs.

  9. Drawing conclusions: perceptions of the New Zealand agricultural landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy West

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available When I made the decision to finish my undergraduate education in New Zealand, I was barraged with comments about 'the beautiful natural landscapes', 'Oh you'll love the natural beauty' and 'They have such a diverse wild landscape'. However it was the aversion to comments about the agriculture which interested me. 'There are more sheep than people' is what I heard, yet where was the talk about the land which these sheep occupied? So began my quest, both as a landscape architect and as an artist, to record what there was to the New Zealand agricultural landscapes.

  10. Representing the 2006 Palestinian Election in New Zealand Newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Nister Kabir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the news and editorial representation of the 2006 Palestinian election appearing in three New Zealand newspapers - the Otago Daily Times, the Press and the New Zealand Herald - and finds that the attention of these newspapers is consistent with some elite Western nations' policy towards the Middle East. These newspapers identify Palestine's (Hamas-led government as a threat, an identification that parallels the Western policy line. In addition, Hamas's attack on Israel was prominently reported but nothing was said about the killings perpetrated by Israelis in the context of coverage of the 2006 Palestinian election.

  11. Comentários neurocirúrgicos e fisiológicos sobre a secção da haste pituitária em seres humanos (miscotomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Le Beau

    1967-12-01

    Full Text Available Nossa primeira hipofisectomia para tratamento de carcinoma metastático do seio foi feita em novembro de 1951 e a secção da haste pituitária (miscotomia para o mesmo fim foi iniciada em novembro de 1956. Quando se consegue impedir a regeneração vascular hipotálamo-hipofisária os resultados gerais da miscotomia são pouco diferentes daqueles obtidos com a hipofisectomia. Empregamos a miscotomia sempre que, por condições locais ou gerais, a remoção total da hipófise parece constituir grande risco cirúrgico. Temos publicado estudos anatomo-fisiológicos desde 1958 mostrando: (a as variações da necrose do lobo anterior da hipófise que não são totais nem definitivas (regeneração pituitária e a importância das artérias trabeculares a este respeito; b a grande capacidade de regeneração vascular a partir do hipctálamo e dirigindo-se para a parte restante do lobo anterior da hipófise, o que constitui um novo sistema anatomo-funcional portal; c após isolamento permanente da pituitária ocorre proliferação das células de prolactina (células orangeófilas e hipertrofia compensadora da pars tuberalis. A remoção cirúrgica de tecido hipofisário normal nos permitiu descrever, pela primeira vez no ser humano, as células ACTH (1964 e as células FSH (1966.

  12. Genomic breed prediction in New Zealand sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Ken G; Auvray, Benoît; Newman, Sheryl-Anne N; McEwan, John C

    2014-09-16

    Two genetic marker-based methods are compared for use in breed prediction, using a New Zealand sheep resource. The methods were a genomic selection (GS) method, using genomic BLUP, and a regression method (Regp) using the allele frequencies estimated from a subset of purebred animals. Four breed proportions, Romney, Coopworth, Perendale and Texel, were predicted, using Illumina OvineSNP50 genotypes. Both methods worked well with correlations of predicted proportions and recorded proportions ranging between 0.91 and 0.97 across methods and prediction breeds, except for the Regp method for Perendales, where the correlation was 0.85. The Regp method gives predictions that appear as a gradient (when viewed as the first few principal components of the genomic relatedness matrix), decreasing away from the breed centre. In contrast the GS method gives predictions dominated by the breeds of the closest relatives in the training set. Some Romneys appear close to the main Perendale group, which is why the Regp method worked less well for predicting Perendale proportion. The GS method works better than the Regp method when the breed groups do not form tight, distinct clusters, but is less robust to breed errors in the training set (for predicting relatives of those animals). Predictions were found to be similar to those obtained using STRUCTURE software, especially those using Regp. The methods appear to overpredict breed proportions in animals that are far removed from the training set. It is suggested that the training set should include animals spanning the range where predictions are made. Breeds can be predicted using either of the two methods investigated. The choice of method will depend on the structure of the breeds in the population. The use of genomic selection methodology for breed prediction appears promising. As applied, it worked well for predicting proportions in animals that were predominantly of the breed types present in the training set, or to put it

  13. Asia-Born New Zealand-Educated Business Graduates' Transition to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne; McGrath, Terry; Butcher, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In 2008 the Asia New Zealand Foundation commissioned a three-year project examining Asia-born New Zealand-educated business graduates' study to work transitions. Data were collected through annual online surveys and in-depth interviews. Graduates were asked to discuss their post-study experiences, reflections on studying in New Zealand, and…

  14. Te Reo Maori: Indigenous Language Acquisition in the Context of New Zealand English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Elaine; Keegan, Peter; McNaughton, Stuart; Kingi, Te Kani; Carr, Polly Atatoa; Schmidt, Johanna; Mohal, Jatender; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan

    2018-01-01

    This study assessed the status of te reo Maori, the indigenous language of New Zealand, in the context of New Zealand English. From a broadly representative sample of 6327 two-year-olds ("Growing Up in New Zealand"), 6090 mothers (96%) reported their children understood English, and 763 mothers (12%) reported their children understood…

  15. History in the New Zealand Curriculum: Discourse Shaping and Key Competencies Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Philippa

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on history in the New Zealand curriculum in light of its seemingly confused curriculum identity despite revision processes of the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC; New Zealand Ministry of Education, 2007). Some thinking about curriculum as a socially constructed political process that teachers can actively engage with sets the scene…

  16. Why People Gamble: A Qualitative Study of Four New Zealand Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Samson; Dyall, Lorna; Clarke, Dave; Abbott, Max; Townsend, Sonia; Kingi, Pefi

    2012-01-01

    In multicultural countries such as New Zealand, it is particularly important that gambling research take into account possible cultural differences. Many New Zealanders come from cultures that do not have a history of gambling, including the Maori (New Zealand indigenous people), Pacific Islanders, and recent migrants. Little research has examined…

  17. Work and Psychiatric Illness in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Implications for Career Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Annie; Miller, Judi

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the influence of Maori culture upon psychiatric service provision in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the implications of this for career counselling of people with experience of mental illness in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The research explored the experiences of a group of women in Aotearoa/New Zealand who have been diagnosed with…

  18. Climate's Long-term Impact on New Zealand Infrastructure (CLINZI) - A Case Study of Hamilton City, New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Jollands, Nigel; Ruth, Matthias; Bernier, C.; Golubiewski, N.

    2005-01-01

    Infrastructure systems and services (ISS) are vulnerable to changes in climate. This paper reports on a study of the impact of gradual climate changes on ISS in Hamilton City, New Zealand. This study is unique in that it is the first of its kind to be applied to New Zealand ISS. This study also considers a broader range of ISS than most other climate change studies recently conducted. Using historical climate data and four climate change scenarios, we modelled the impact of climate change on ...

  19. Education Solutions for Child Poverty: New Modalities from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airini

    2015-01-01

    This article describes education solutions to child poverty. Through a focus on New Zealand, the article explores the meaning of child poverty, children's perspectives on child poverty and solutions, and modalities in citizenship, social and economics education to help address child poverty. Four modalities are proposed: centre our work in…

  20. Addressing Child Maltreatment in New Zealand: Is Poverty Reduction Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Tim; Vaithianathan, Rhema; De Haan, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Jonathan Boston provides an insightful analysis of the emergence and persistence of child poverty in New Zealand (Boston, 2014, "Educational Philosophy and Theory"). His remarks on why child poverty matters are brief but, as he reports, "there is a large and robust body of research on the harmful consequences of child poverty"…

  1. Energy policies of IEA countries: New Zealand 2006 review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-09-23

    New Zealand faces some serious energy sector challenges, requiring special attention to security of supply issues, both in oil and gas domains. Natural gas production from the major Maui field is rapidly declining. New Zealand's greenhouse gas emissions are rising: the most recent estimates put them at 21% above their Kyoto target over the first commitment period. These challenges are not insurmountable. New Zealand's energy policy is characterised by a commitment to free and open markets complimented by light-handed regulation. The IEA commends this approach and encourages continued policy improvements and enhancements. The energy policy review of New Zealand offers a comprehensive analysis of the country's energy sector, evaluating its strengths and weaknesses across the fuel mix, as well as looking at broader issues such as energy efficiency, environmental performance and technology research and development. It also includes policy critiques and recommendations, drawing on experience across IEA member countries. 33 figs., 21 tabs., 3 annexes.

  2. Australia and New Zealand Applied Linguistics (ANZAL): Taking Stock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews some emerging trends in applied linguistics in both Australia and New Zealand. It sketches the current scene of (selected) postgraduate applied linguistics programs in higher education and considers how various university programs define applied linguistics through the classes (titles) they have postgraduate students complete to…

  3. Options for postgraduate anatomy education in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian S; Fox, Carly M

    2012-03-30

    Medical education in Australia has changed considerably in recent times. As a result, hours dedicated to subjects such as anatomy have been reduced. Young doctors preparing for a career in anatomy-focussed specialties such as surgery and radiology require an indepth knowledge of this subject matter. Many Australian and New Zealand universities now offer postgraduate anatomy courses to address this potential gap in a budding surgeon's education. This article summarises the current options for postgraduate surgical anatomy education in Australia and New Zealand. All universities in Australia and New Zealand were contacted between September 2010 and December 2010 regarding the nature and content of course offerings. An Internet-based search was also conducted. There are currently nine universities in Australia and New Zealand offering postgraduate anatomy courses. Courses vary in contact hours, dissection time, lecture content, and examination methods. There are currently two universities offering a Postgraduate Diploma of Surgical Anatomy - the University of Melbourne, and the University of Otago. University of Western Australia and the University of New England offer a graduate diploma and a graduate certificate, respectively. Several other universities offer courses that deliver quality anatomical education but do not award students a university-recognised qualification. The Australian Orthopaedic Association now offers courses in Perth, Sydney and Brisbane, which delivers anatomy education specific to orthopaedics. There are a number of courses available to budding surgeons and radiologists to help fill the anatomy education void. With the development of such courses questions of accessibility, affordability and equity remain.

  4. New Zealand's Past and Tomorrow's Schools: Reasons, Reforms and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novlan, Jerome F.

    1998-01-01

    Studies the evolution of New Zealand's educational system, including its recent reforms, the driving forces behind such radical changes, and some results and issues. Decentralization has removed layers of intervening support for schools, engendered new learning partnerships, and required increased parent involvement. Issues concerning equity, the…

  5. Adolescents At Risk: Causes of Youth Suicide in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Wilhelmina J.

    1997-01-01

    Explores causes of the high teenage suicide rate in New Zealand by looking at environmental-social factors. Examines the problems these youth face, such as depression and alcohol use, and discusses their risk-taking behaviors. Findings are linked to current theory on adolescent suicide. Prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies are…

  6. Energy Literacy and Agency of New Zealand Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Bielschowsky, I.; Lawson, R.; Stephenson, J.; Todd, S.

    2017-01-01

    The development of energy literacy (knowledge, attitudes, and intended behaviour) and agency of New Zealand children (age 9-10) were investigated through thematic and exploratory statistical analyses of interviews (October 2011-April 2012) with 26 children, their parents and teachers, focus groups and photo elicitation. The children knew that…

  7. The Distribution of Signs in New Zealand Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, David; Kennedy, Graeme

    2006-01-01

    Until now, teachers and learners of NZSL have not had access to information on the most frequently used signs in the Deaf community. This article describes the first study of the distribution of signs in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). We hope that it will help teachers of NZSL make decisions about which signs to teach first and suggest…

  8. Auckland--New Zealand's Los Angeles or San Francisco?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovich, Dushko

    1995-01-01

    Compares Auckland (New Zealand) with San Francisco (California) in terms of topographical structure, geographic location, and urban development. Both cities contain striking similarities. Maintains that Auckland can become a world-class city renowned for its beauty if developers and government work in tandem. (MJP)

  9. Some Thoughts on the New Zealand Geography Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craymer, Clive

    1998-01-01

    Believes that the current geography curriculum in New Zealand needs to be reevaluated in order to maintain geography's relevance in the school curriculum. Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current curriculum and considers possible content for a new curriculum, such as field inquiry and global patterns and processes. (CMK)

  10. Soil Genesis and Development: Views Held by New Zealand Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happs, John C.

    1984-01-01

    To help plan effective teaching strategies, it is important to determine students' existing knowledge about the topic to be taught. Interviews with New Zealand students showed that they hold nonscientific ideas about soil. These student views should be respected by teachers. They should be discussed and compared with scientific viewpoints. (RM)

  11. Building and Sustaining Successful School Leadership in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notman, Ross; Henry, D. Annie

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines success factors of six New Zealand primary and secondary school principals. These factors are grouped under principals' personal characteristics, leadership skills that connect with their teachers, leadership strategies that impact positively on school stakeholder needs, and factors that sustain leadership success. Emerging…

  12. The genus Dendrothele (Agaricales, Basidiomycota) in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.K. Nakasone; H.H. Burdsall

    2011-01-01

    Sixteen species of Dendrothele sensu lato are confirmed from New Zealand. Nine new taxa are described: Dendrothele arachispora, D. aucklandica, D. australis, D. cymbiformis, D. leptostachys, D. magnenavicularis, D. navicularis, D. novae-zelandiae and D. subellipsoidea. Ten species were previously reported, but...

  13. Biochemical polymorphism in New Zealand white x Chinchilla rabbit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated diversity within New Zealand white and Chinchilla rabbit crosses using four structural protein loci: Hemoglobin (Hb), Albumin (Alb), Transferin (Tf) and Carbonic anhydrase (CA). Blood (4mls) was sampled from a total of 49 rabbits through ocular venipuncture. The samples collected were analysed using ...

  14. Research funding systems in Australia, New Zealand and the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny; Ross, S

    2011-01-01

    . This article reports on a study involving interviews with 274 academics at universities in Australia (Melbourne), New Zealand (Auckland) and the UK (Birmingham). Perceptions of the three research funding systems demonstrated significant differences across universities, and some interesting gender and seniority...

  15. Partial diagenetic overprint of late jurassic belemnites from New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Campbell, Hamish J.; Frei, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Jurassic (~153 Ma) belemnite (Belemnopsis sp.) from New Zealand that has been partially overprinted by alteration. We report the physical pathways and settings of alteration, the resulting elemental and isotopic trends including δ7Li values and Li/Ca ratios, and assess whether remnants of the primary shell...

  16. The Hierarchy of Minority Languages in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bres, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a case for the existence of a minority language hierarchy in New Zealand. Based on an analysis of language ideologies expressed in recent policy documents and interviews with policymakers and representatives of minority language communities, it presents the arguments forwarded in support of the promotion of different types of…

  17. Making an Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: The Online Dictionary of New Zealand Sign Language (ODNZSL),1 launched in 2011, is an example of a contemporary sign language dictionary that leverages the 21st century advantages of a digital medium and an existing body of descriptive research on the language, including a small electronic corpus of New ...

  18. Pre-emigration reflections: Afrikaans speakers moving to New Zealand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on the pre-emigration reflections of 15 Afrikaans speakers, all of whom were in the final stages of preparing to emigrate to New Zealand. The study explores the linguistic histories of the participants, their attitudes to their mother tongue (Afrikaans) and to English, and their views on South Africa\\'s language ...

  19. Tenuous Affair: Environmental and Outdoor Education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David; Straker, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between outdoor education and environmental education in Aotearoa New Zealand has undergone many changes since formal education began in early colonial times. Discussion draws from qualitative doctoral research undertaken by the authors that investigated education for sustainability in outdoor education and how meaning is ascribed…

  20. Honoring Family and Culture: Learning from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Nancy G.

    2009-01-01

    The New Zealand Ministry of Education's early childhood curriculum policy is built on a framework called "Te Whariki." This framework provides a sociocultural context for children's early learning and emphasizes a learning partnership between teachers, parents, families, and community. Besides interpersonal relationships, Te Whariki…

  1. Diasporic and Discursive Eruptions in the New Zealand Brain Drain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshier, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Human and social capital discourses attempt to explain New Zealand's brain drain. Solutions related to each discourse involve offering incentives for returning or creating links so that expatriates can contribute to their homeland from abroad. Establishing such "diaspora networks" might be the role of adult education. (Contains 43…

  2. The safety experience of New Zealand adventure tourism operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim A; Page, Stephen; Walker, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This survey examined parameters of the New Zealand adventure tourism industry client injury risk. The research also sought to establish priorities for intervention to reduce adventure tourism risk, and identify client injury control measures currently in place (or absent) in the New Zealand adventure tourism industry, with a view to establishing guidelines for the development of effective adventure tourism safety management systems. This 2003 survey builds upon an exploratory study of New Zealand adventure tourism safety conducted by us during 1999. A postal questionnaire was used to survey all identifiable New Zealand adventure tourism operators. The questionnaire asked respondents about their recorded client injury experience, perceptions of client injury risk factors, safety management practices, and barriers to safety. Some 27 adventure tourism activities were represented among the responding sample (n=96). The highest client injury risk was reported in the snow sports, bungee jumping and horse riding sectors, although serious underreporting of minor injuries was evident across the industry. Slips, trips and falls (STF) were the major client injury mechanisms, and a range of risk factors for client injuries were identified. Safety management measures were inconsistently applied across the industry. The industry should consider the implications of poor injury reporting standards and safety management practices generally. Specifically, the industry should consider risk management that focuses on minor (e.g., STF) as well as catastrophic events.

  3. School Culture Meets Sport: A Case Study in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Lisette; McCormack, Jaleh

    2011-01-01

    This article draws on ethnographic work undertaken with 21 students and several members of staff at an elite girls' school in New Zealand to investigate the relation between school culture, pedagogical practices and discourses of physical education and school sport. It explores what and who contours the participation of these young women in sport,…

  4. The State of Accounting Education Scholarship in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines publishing trends of New Zealand accounting education scholars over the 20-year period 1991-2010. Longitudinal analyses of the annual number of publications, research theme studied, researcher productivity, and institutional productivity, along with cross-sectional analyses of authors' Hirsch "h"-index scores, the…

  5. Discursive Constructions of Literacies: Shifting Sands in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandretto, Susan; Tilson, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Literacy policy and pedagogy in Aotearoa New Zealand have a strong discursive heritage of traditional literacies, which emphasise code breaking and meaning making with linguistic codes and conventions over other possible modes of communication. In a rapidly evolving landscape where changes in communication technologies give birth to new literacies…

  6. The origin and phylogenetic relationships of the New Zealand ravens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, R Paul; Mitchell, Kieren J; Wood, Jamie R; De Pietri, Vanesa L; Jarvie, Scott; Llamas, Bastien; Cooper, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The relationships of the extinct New Zealand ravens (Corvus spp.) are poorly understood. We sequenced the mitogenomes of the two currently recognised species and found they were sister-taxa to a clade comprising the Australian raven, little raven, and forest raven (C.coronoides, C. mellori and C. tasmanicus respectively). The divergence between the New Zealand ravens and Australian raven clade occurred in the latest Pliocene, which coincides with the onset of glacial deforestation. We also found that the divergence between the two putative New Zealand species C. antipodum and C. moriorum probably occurred in the late Pleistocene making their separation as species untenable. Consequently, we consider Corax antipodum (Forbes, 1893) to be a subspecies of Corvus moriorum Forbes, 1892. We re-examine the osteological evidence that led 19th century researchers to assign the New Zealand taxa to a separate genus, and re-assess these features in light of our new phylogenetic hypotheses. Like previous researchers, we conclude that the morphology of the palate of C. moriorum is unique among the genus Corvus, and suggest this may be an adaptation for a specialist diet. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Language Maintenance and Shift in Three New Zealand Speech Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Janet; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Drawing on the results of sociolinguistic research in three ethnically different communities in Wellington, New Zealand, this paper explores and illustrates the process of language shift and language revival. Members of the Greek, Tongan, and Chinese communities were interviewed; and data were collected on their language proficiency, patterns of…

  8. Getting into a Flap! /t/ in New Zealand English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Laurie; Holmes, Janet

    1996-01-01

    Examines the constraints on the realization of "/t/" in New Zealander English. On the basis of an examination of the speech of two similar speakers from that country, a series of allophonic rules is provided. The article shows that the distribution of allophones for these speakers is not the same as for other speakers who have been…

  9. Immigrant Women and Language Maintenance in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Janet

    1993-01-01

    Among both first- and second-generation immigrant groups in New Zealand and Australia, women maintain the ethnic language (EL) longer than men. Compared with men's networks, women's networks encourage more extensive use of EL in social interactions, and women value the social and affective functions expressed by EL. (Contains 71 references.…

  10. The Social Composition of VET in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathdee, Rob

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies three, overlapping, phases of restructuring of New Zealand's system of vocational education and training (VET). These are the meritocratic, the market and the managed. In very different ways, each phase has been designed to increase the propensity of students from all social backgrounds to participate in VET. This paper…

  11. Reframing Health Education in New Zealand/Aotearoa Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkinson, Margaret; Burrows, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Health education in New Zealand schools has a chequered history, peppered with controversy since its inclusion as a school subject in the early nineteenth century. In this paper we examine the trials and challenges faced by health education teachers over time, pointing to the particular components of this subject that are regarded as controversial…

  12. Minimum Wage Effects on Educational Enrollments in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail A.; Cruickshank, Amy A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of minimum wages on educational enrollments in New Zealand. A significant reform to the youth minimum wage since 2000 has resulted in some age groups undergoing a 91% rise in their real minimum wage over the last 10 years. Three panel least squares multivariate models are estimated from a national sample…

  13. Classroom Studies in New Zealand: Whence and Whither?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Eric; Wilson, Bruce

    This paper reviews the research carried out in New Zealand classrooms since 1967, including conference papers, theses and dissertations, published articles, and unpublished reports. Classroom research is defined as any work, irrespective of disciplinary affiliation, which is concerned with the actual day to day operation of classroom life. Review…

  14. Attitudes to other ethnicities among New Zealand workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houkamau, C.A.; Boxall, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the “other-group orientation” (OGO) of New Zealand (NZ) workers as a way of measuring their attitudes to the growing ethnic diversity in the contemporary workplace. Design/methodology/approach In all, 500 randomly selected NZ employees were surveyed

  15. Technology Education in New Zealand: The Connected Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to identify what actually takes place when policy directives bring together Technology Education, Enterprise Education, and the wider Community Partnerships. Since the introduction of a national technology curriculum to New Zealand schools in 1999 there has been little critique as to the intentions of the curriculum. In late 2005…

  16. Rising levels of New Zealand medical student debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Antonia; Poole, Phillippa

    2017-06-16

    There is little recent data on the debt levels accrued by New Zealand medical graduates. We aimed to quantify the level of student loan debt accrued by medical graduates upon completion of their medical degree, and to investigate the association of New Zealand Government Student Loan (GSL) debt with gender and age. At graduation each year from 2006-2015, students from one New Zealand medical programme were invited to complete a career intention survey that included information on levels of GSL debt and the number of income sources used. The overall response rate was 83.8%. On average, 92% of domestic students reported having some student loan debt, with 28% a debt of $90,000 or more. The proportion of students reporting a student loan debt of $90,000 or more increased over the period of the study (Pstudents were more likely to have a larger student loan debt than younger students, there was no difference in debt levels by gender. Students with larger student loans were more likely to rely on a larger number of financial sources to fund their studies. New Zealand medical students are carrying higher levels of student loan debt year on year. The effect of this on the future medical workforce is not certain; however, this could be negative if graduates choose to enter careers that are more highly paid over areas of high need. The full impact of large loans on individuals and the health system will take years to determine.

  17. Disposal practices for unused medications in New Zealand community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Alfred Y C; Peake, Barrie M; Braund, Rhiannon

    2011-09-01

    One of the recommended methods for households to dispose of unused medications in many countries is to return them to community pharmacies. However, such a practice will only reduce the environmental levels of pharmaceuticals if the medications are also disposed of and destroyed properly by the pharmacies. This study reports the results of a questionnaire sent to New Zealand community pharmacists regarding disposal practices for unused or expired medications in their workplaces. A pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire was sent to 500 randomly selected community pharmacies from all areas of New Zealand. The participants were asked how they disposed of a variety of medications. In addition, participants were also asked about whether they knew how unused medications were destroyed if their pharmacy used a third-party contractor or distributor to dispose of them. Of the 265 respondents, 80.4% and 61.1% respectively reported that solid and semi-solid medications were removed by contractors. However liquid and Class B controlled drugs were predominantly disposed of down the pharmacy sink. Over 60% of the participating pharmacists indicated that they believed the contractors incinerated the collected pharmaceutical waste, and over 90% of the participating pharmacists indicated their wish for a state-run disposal and destruction system. Liquid medications and Class B controlled drugs, which were commonly reported to be disposed of down the sewage system, may increase the potential for environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals in New Zealand. There is a need for increased environmental awareness amongst community pharmacists in New Zealand.

  18. Restorative Justice: Two Examples from New Zealand Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearmouth, Janice; McKinney, Rawiri; Glynn, Ted

    2007-01-01

    In this article, Janice Wearmouth, formerly professor of education at the University of Wellington, New Zealand and now at Liverpool Hope University, Rawiri McKinney, an advocate for Rangatahi who has recently completed his Master of Education degree, and Ted Glynn, foundation professor of teacher education at the University of Waikato, discuss…

  19. Alcohol advertising in the New Zealand university student press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Kim; Kypri, Kypros

    2008-09-01

    University students drink more heavily than their non-student peers in New Zealand. The promotion of alcohol via advertising is a known contributor to heavy drinking. The aim of this paper was to determine the nature and extent of alcohol-related advertising and related policies at New Zealand universities. We sought to obtain all issues for 2005, of student newspapers at five New Zealand universities that had participated in an ongoing research project examining alcohol-related harm. The number of alcohol-related advertisements was determined and counts were weighted by the proportion of the page they took up. We surveyed senior university administrators to determine whether policies existed to regulate alcohol advertising on campus. The number of alcohol-related advertisements in student publications ranged from 1 to 129 across the academic year (median: 74 advertisements, 34 full-page equivalents). At three universities, most advertisements promoted bars, pubs and restaurants, while at the other two universities, most alcohol-related advertising was for events sponsored by a brewery, alcohol company or local pub. At one university with almost no advertising, a brewery sponsorship agreement with the student association forbade other parties from advertising alcohol and related events. Alcohol-related advertising is pervasive in the New Zealand university student press. Student associations should consider the ethics of alcohol industry sponsorship in light of the high prevalence of heavy drinking in this population group.

  20. Lost in Translation: Aligning Strategies for Research in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billot, Jennie; Codling, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In New Zealand, the funding of higher education research has been influenced by revised policy-driven imperatives. Amidst the institutional reactions to new criteria for governmental funding, individual academics are being asked to increase their productivity in order for their employing institution to access public funding. For this to occur,…

  1. Images of Academic Leadership in Large New Zealand Polytechnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardno, Carol

    2013-01-01

    As accountability stakes continue to be raised in all education sectors, leadership as a factor that can have an impact on improved student outcomes is being studied with heightened interest. This study was conducted from 2011 to 2012 in New Zealand's large urban polytechnics with the aim of investigating the nature and expectations of academic…

  2. The House Crow (Corvus splendens: A Threat to New Zealand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane L. Fraser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The house crow (Corvus splendens, a native of the Indian subcontinent, has shown a rapid expansion of habitat range across Eastern Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe and Asia. It is an adaptable, gregarious commensal bird which is regarded globally as an important pest species due to its impacts on livestock, agricultural and horticultural crops and indigenous fauna and as a fecal contaminator of human environments and water resources. Two Maxent (v3.3.3k models (A with presence data in Australia and (B with simulated entry data locations in New Zealand and a third ArcGIS model (C with environmental and social layers are used to determine an overall suitability index and establish a niche-based model of the potential spatial distribution for C. splendens within New Zealand. The results show that New Zealand, particularly the northern regions of North Island, has suitable environments for the establishment of the house crow. In order of suitability Model B showed highest potential land area suitability (31.84% followed by Model A (13.79% and Model C (10.89%. The potential for further expansion of this bird’s invasive range is high and, if New Zealand is invaded, impacts are likely to be significant.

  3. An inherited cataract in New Zealand Romney sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, H V; Jolly, R D; West, D M; Bruere, A N

    1982-08-01

    A bilateral cataract was noted to occur in sheep on a New Zealand Romney stud. Extensive breeding trials showed that this defect was inherited as an autosomal dominant. As such this form of cataract is of minimal importance to the sheep industry as control is merely by culling affected individuals.

  4. Lantana poisoning of cattle and sheep in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, H; Carter, R G

    1985-08-01

    The investigation of a field case of Lantana camara poisoning in cattle is reported. Toxicity was confirmed by the experimental dosing of two sheep with dried leaf powder at 6 and 12 mg/kg body weight. Marked cholestatic hepatophy and renal tubular disease resulted. This is the first reported case of toxicity due to grazing a Lantana camara variety grown in New Zealand.

  5. Sense or Nonsense?: New Zealand Heritage Leglislation in Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Vossler

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the current legislative ‘landscape’ that shapes the nature of historic heritage protection and management in New Zealand. It identifies some of the principal laws that impinge on historic heritage and outlines the purpose and principles, administrative processes, protective measures and offences and enforcement provisions associated with each of these statutes.

  6. Smoking in film in New Zealand: measuring risk exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stockwell Alannah

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking in film is a risk factor for smoking uptake in adolescence. This study aimed to quantify exposure to smoking in film received by New Zealand audiences, and evaluate potential interventions to reduce the quantity and impact of this exposure. Methods The ten highest-grossing films in New Zealand for 2003 were each analysed independently by two viewers for smoking, smoking references and related imagery. Potential interventions were explored by reviewing relevant New Zealand legislation, and scientific literature. Results Seven of the ten films contained at least one tobacco reference, similar to larger film samples. The majority of the 38 tobacco references involved characters smoking, most of whom were male. Smoking was associated with positive character traits, notably rebellion (which may appeal to adolescents. There appeared to be a low threshold for including smoking in film. Legislative or censorship approaches to smoking in film are currently unlikely to succeed. Anti-smoking advertising before films has promise, but experimental research is required to demonstrate cost effectiveness. Conclusion Smoking in film warrants concern from public health advocates. In New Zealand, pre-film anti-smoking advertising appears to be the most promising immediate policy response.

  7. Smoking in film in New Zealand: measuring risk exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Jesse; Fry, Bridget; Smith, Tara; Okawa, Ken; Chakrabarti, Anannya; Ah-Yen, Damien; Yi, Jesse; Townsend, Simon; Carroll, Rebecca; Stockwell, Alannah; Sievwright, Andrea; Dew, Kevin; Thomson, George

    2006-10-04

    Smoking in film is a risk factor for smoking uptake in adolescence. This study aimed to quantify exposure to smoking in film received by New Zealand audiences, and evaluate potential interventions to reduce the quantity and impact of this exposure. The ten highest-grossing films in New Zealand for 2003 were each analysed independently by two viewers for smoking, smoking references and related imagery. Potential interventions were explored by reviewing relevant New Zealand legislation, and scientific literature. Seven of the ten films contained at least one tobacco reference, similar to larger film samples. The majority of the 38 tobacco references involved characters smoking, most of whom were male. Smoking was associated with positive character traits, notably rebellion (which may appeal to adolescents). There appeared to be a low threshold for including smoking in film. Legislative or censorship approaches to smoking in film are currently unlikely to succeed. Anti-smoking advertising before films has promise, but experimental research is required to demonstrate cost effectiveness. Smoking in film warrants concern from public health advocates. In New Zealand, pre-film anti-smoking advertising appears to be the most promising immediate policy response.

  8. Penal Innovation in New Zealand: He Ara Hou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Greg; Eskridge, Chris

    1994-01-01

    Explores prison history/development in New Zealand, focusing on recent implementation of progressive prison operation/management program, He Ara Hou. Notes extremely positive results of program, such as higher administrative efficiency; greatly decreased levels of internal disorder; competent, stable workforce; and human product whose senses of…

  9. Fruit and seed of Beilschmiedie (Lauraceae) in New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardner, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    The differences in the fruit and seed of the two New Zealand species of Beilschmiedia, B. tarairi and B. lawa, indicate that these organs might be a fertile source of taxonomic characters in the genus. Beilschmiedia neocaledonica of New Caledonia is like B. tarairi in having a mucilaginous layer in

  10. Localising Neoliberalism: Indigenist Brokerage in the New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The examination of indigenist interests in the New Zealand university is framed by a theoretical understanding of indigeneity as a strategy in regulating social organisation and resource management in neoliberal global capitalism. Three stages of the brokerage of indigenist interests are identified. These are: the production and representation of…

  11. Factors Associated with Reports of Wife Assault in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson, David M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the frequency of wife assault among New Zealand mothers. Wife assault occurred at a rate of 2 percent to 3 percent per year. Rates of assault were related to length of marriage, type of marriage, planning of pregnancy, parental age, church attendance, and family socioeconomic status. (Author/BL)

  12. Job stressors of New Zealand dentists and their coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, K M S; Thomson, W M; Newton, J T; Rich, A M

    2008-06-01

    Dentistry is understood to be a stressful profession. Although there has been recent research about stress and dentistry in the UK and the Netherlands, little is known about the job stressors and coping strategies of New Zealand dentists. To investigate job stressors and coping strategies among New Zealand dentists. A nationwide postal survey of a representative sample of 700 dentists. The response rate was 65%. The most commonly reported stressors were treating difficult children (52%), constant time pressure (48%) and maintaining high levels of concentration (43%). The strategies most utilized for managing work-related stress included interactions with people (78%), sports (64%) and forgetting about work (59%). Dentists who had graduated overseas reported more sources of stress than New Zealand graduates. There were differences in the strategies used by male and female practitioners to manage stress. There is considerable variation in the number of stressors experienced by dentists. Overseas-qualified dentists appear to be under more stress than New Zealand-trained dentists and may need greater professional support. Dentists should be encouraged to make greater use of active coping strategies.

  13. Nurses and the euthanasia debate: reflections from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M; Bickley Asher, J

    2015-03-01

    Through an examination of the present situation relating to legalizing euthanasia and/or physician-assisted death in New Zealand, this paper is intended to encourage nurses worldwide to ponder about their own position on the ever present topic of assisted dying and euthanasia. In New Zealand, euthanasia remains illegal, but in 2012, the 'End of Life Choice Bill' was put in the ballot for potential selection for consideration by Parliament, later to be withdrawn. However, it is increasingly likely that New Zealand will follow international trends to offer people a choice about how their lives should end, and that such a Bill will be resubmitted in the near future. Undoubtedly, the passage of such legislation would have an impact on the day-to-day practices of nurses who work with dying people. This article has been prepared following a comprehensive review of appropriate literature both in New Zealand and overseas. This article aims to highlight the importance of nursing input into any national debates concerning proposed euthanasia or assisted dying laws. The discussion therefore covers New Zealand's experience of such proposed legislation, that is, the draft Bill itself and the implications for nurses, the history of the assisted dying debate in New Zealand, public and professional opinion, and national and international nursing responses to euthanasia. New Zealand nurses will eventually have an opportunity to make their views on proposed euthanasia legislation known, and what such legislation might mean for their practice. Nurses everywhere should seriously consider their own knowledge and viewpoint on this vitally important topic, and be prepared to respond as both individuals and as part of their professional bodies when the time inevitably arrives. The result will be a better informed set of policies, regulations and legislation leading to a more meaningful and dignified experience for dying people and their families. Nurses need to be fully informed about

  14. Health information technology adoption in New Zealand optometric practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarian, Ahmadali; Mason, David

    2013-11-01

    Health information technology (HIT) has the potential to fundamentally change the practice of optometry and the relationship between optometrists and patients and to improve clinical outcomes. This paper aims to provide data on how health information technology is currently being used in New Zealand optometric practices. Also this paper aims to explore the potential benefits and barriers to the future adoption of health information technology in New Zealand. One hundred and six New Zealand optometrists were surveyed about their current use of health information technology and about potential benefits and barriers. In addition, 12 semi-structured interviews were carried out with leaders of health information technology in New Zealand optometry. The areas of interest were the current and intended use of HIT, the potential benefits of and barriers to using HIT in optometric offices and the level of investment in health information technology. Nearly all optometrists (98.7 per cent) in New Zealand use computers in their practices and 93.4 per cent of them use a computer in their consulting room. The most commonly used clinical assessment technology in optometric practices in New Zealand was automated perimeter (97.1 per cent), followed by a digital fundus/retinal camera (82.6 per cent) and automated lensometer (62.9 per cent). The pachymeter is the technology that most respondents intended to purchase in the next one to five years (42.6 per cent), followed by a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (36.8 per cent) and corneal topographer (32.9 per cent). The main benefits of using health information technology in optometric practices were improving patient perceptions of ‘state of the art’ practice and providing patients with information and digital images to explain the results of assessment. Barriers to the adoption of HIT included the need for frequent technology upgrades, cost, lack of time for implementation, and training. New Zealand optometrists are using HIT

  15. New Zealand: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, N.D.; Keevill, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    The New Zealand energy sector has undergone significant changes in the past few years. Reform and deregulation came to New Zealand in large doses and at a rapid pace. Unlike Japan where deregulation was designed for a five-year phase-in period or even Australia where the government was fully geared up to handle deregulation, deregulation occurred in New Zealand almost with no phase-in period and very little planning. Under fast-paced Rogernomics,'' the energy sector was but one more element of the economy to be deregulated and/or privatized. While the New Zealand energy sector deregulation is generally believed to have been successful, there are still outstanding questions as to whether the original intent has been fully achieved. The fact that a competent energy bureaucracy was mostly lost in the process makes it even more difficult to find those with long enough institutional memories to untangle the agreements and understandings between the government and the private sector over the previous decade. As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Resources Programs at the East-West Center has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy, Assistant Secretary for International Affairs and Energy Emergencies, have covered Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various counties. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics.

  16. New Zealand = Maori, New Zealand = Bicultural: Ethnic Group Differences in a National Sample of Maori and Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Jessica F.; Sibley, Chris G.; Robertson, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand (NZ) Europeans show a unique implicit bicultural effect, with research using the Implicit Association Test consistently showing that they associate Maori (the Indigenous peoples) and their own (dominant/advantaged majority) group as equally representative of the nation. We replicated and extended this NZ = bicultural effect in a small…

  17. Entanglement of New Zealand fur seals in man-made debris at Kaikoura, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boren, Laura J; Morrissey, Mike; Muller, Chris G; Gemmell, Neil J

    2006-04-01

    New Zealand fur seals in the Kaikoura region breed near a town with expanding tourist and fishing industries and commonly come ashore entangled in nets and plastic debris. However, the rate at which entanglement occurs was previously unknown. A decade of Department of Conservation seal callout data was analysed to determine the level of entanglement in the region and the most common debris type. Monitoring of adult female fur seals released from entanglement provided information on the potential for serious wounds to heal and survivorship of released individuals. Entanglement rates of pinnipeds in Kaikoura are some of the highest reported world-wide (average range: 0.6-2.8%) with green trawl net (42%), and plastic strapping tape (31%) together contributing the most to debris types. Nearly half of the reported entangled seals are successfully released (43%) and post-release monitoring shows that with appropriate intervention the chance of an individual surviving even with a significant entanglement wound is high. Our study demonstrates that while entanglement in the region is high, a successful intervention protocol may help reduce the potential for entanglement-related mortality in the region.

  18. Osteossíntese das fraturas diafisárias da criança com hastes intramedulares flexíveis Osteosynthesis of children shaft fractures with flexible intramedullary nails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Batista Volpon

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O tratamento de algumas das fraturas da criança tem sofrido modificações nos últimos anos, com o objetivo de obtenção de resultados mais satisfatórios, restrição do tempo de incapacidade e para melhor corresponder às expectativas da família. Isso é especialmente válido para as fraturas diafisárias de alguns ossos longos com o tratamento feito por hastes intramedulares elásticas. Esse tratamento é de baixa morbidade, respeita a biologia e a biomecânica da fratura e permite consolidação óssea por mecanismo secundário, com a formação de calo ósseo. Entretanto, requer implantes, instrumental e conhecimento técnico do cirurgião, pois os maus resultados relacionam-se diretamente com falhas técnicas. Atualmente, os ossos que mais se prestam para esse tipo de fixação, em relação à prioridade, são: fêmur, rádio, ulna, tíbia e úmero. O objetivo deste texto de atualização foi analisar a literatura e fornecer informações fundamentais para o conhecimento do método.The treatment of some fractures in children has changed over the last years aiming at improving results, shortening the time of physical limitation, and meeting family expectations. This is particularly true when long bone shaft fractures are involved and when treatment is carried out with elastic nails. This technique carries low morbidity, respects the biology and the biomechanics of the reparative process and allows secondary healing with osseous callus formation. Nevertheless, the technique requires adequate surgical implants, proper instruments and trained surgeons, since complications are related mainly to technical pitfalls. The technique has been used for the following bones: femur, radius and ulna, tibia and humerus. The objective of the present update was to review and to analyze the literature so as to present basic information about the treatment of diaphyseal fractures of some long bones of children with flexible nails.

  19. High Altitude Supersonic Target (HAST), Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    maneuverable and recoverable rocket powered target system carrying state-of-the- art augmentation and sconng systems. Meeting S dSm requuements for the...O O w UJ a. -J U Q 110 The radio commands, recovery inhibit and oxidizer throttle valve (OTV) shutdown, art provided to help control the...It is composed of one 45 x 20 multiplexer and microminiature voltage controlled oscillators. Scoring data is presented on a 450 KHz subcamer

  20. hast palmipuudest / Urmas Petti

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Petti, Urmas, 1965-

    2013-01-01

    Inimeste teadvustatud ja teadvustamata kujutlustest religiooni kohta; autor tsiteerib kirjanikke: Claude Duneton (jutustus "Punaste metsade taga", orig. "Loin des forêts rouges"), Kurt Vonnegut, Peter Stamm (romaan "Agnes")

  1. Adventure tourism and adventure sports injury: the New Zealand experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim A; Page, Stephen J; Macky, Keith A

    2007-11-01

    The primary aims of this study were to establish a client injury baseline for the New Zealand adventure tourism and adventure sport sector, and to examine patterns and trends in claims for injury during participation in adventure activities. Content analysis of narrative text data for compensated injuries occurring in a place for recreation and sport over a 12-month period produced over 15,000 cases involving adventure tourism and adventure sport. As found in previous studies in New Zealand, highest claim counts were observed for activities that are often undertaken independently, rather than commercially. Horse riding, tramping, surfing and mountain biking were found to have highest claim counts, while hang gliding/paragliding/parasailing and jet boating injuries had highest claim costs, suggesting greatest injury severity. Highest claim incidence was observed for horse riding, with female claimants over-represented for this activity. Younger male claimants comprised the largest proportion of adventure injuries, and falls were the most common injury mechanism.

  2. Arcobacter species in diarrhoeal faeces from humans in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandisodza, Owen; Burrows, Elizabeth; Nulsen, Mary

    2012-04-20

    To determine the prevalence, genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Arcobacter spp in faecal samples from humans with diarrhoea in New Zealand. An enrichment method was used to isolate Arcobacter spp from diarrhoeal human faeces submitted to a community laboratory in Hawke's Bay. The identity of isolates was confirmed by PCR and their diversity was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Antibiotic susceptibility was established with E test strips. Arcobacter spp were isolated from 12 of 1380 diarrhoeal faecal samples examined (0.9%), including 7 A. butzleri and 5 A. cryaerophilus. Additional enteric pathogens were detected in four of these diarrhoeal faecal samples. All the Arcobacter isolates were genetically distinct and susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Most were also susceptible to erythromycin (92%) but fewer to tetracycline (67%) and ampicillin(50%). A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus cause a small proportion of cases of diarrhoea in humans resident in New Zealand.

  3. Authorship Issues at a New Zealand Academic Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mitcheson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Authorship of peer-reviewed publications can create conflict among academics. Objective: To document authorship conflicts of academics at a tertiary faculty. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire eliciting authorship conflicts and knowledge of authorship criteria was administered online to 154 academic staff members at a New Zealand university. Results: 43 academics responded, a response rate of 27.9%. About half of the academics reported authorship conflicts, mainly regarding ownership of data, gift authorship and academic competition. Of the 43 academics, 31 were aware of formal authorship criteria but only 21 could identify the appropriate source. 23 academics correctly identified all the appropriate criteria for authorship according to the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors guidelines. Conclusion: Authorship conflicts are prevalent in a New Zealand university that may be related to lack of knowledge of authorship criteria.

  4. Commercialisation in the provision of meteorological services in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, J. Thomas; Martin, John R.; Gordon, Neil D.; Grant, Malcolm A.

    1997-09-01

    There have been significant reforms in New Zealand of government management in general and of the science and transport sectors in particular. The impact of the reforms on the provision of meteorological services is discussed as an example of the application of the general reform thrust to a specialist technical area. The eventual outcome was the establishment of Meteorological Service of New Zealand Ltd (MetService) as a commercial company, trading in the weather forecasting market but remaining under Crown ownership. At the same time the National Institute of Water and Atmosphere (NIWA) was established. It includes the climatic responsibilities and much of the scientific research component of the former NZMS. It too operates commercially and is Crown owned. Unlike MetService, NIWA is not required to return a dividend to its owners. The procedures leading to the establishment of these new organisations, their mode of operation and their initial successful performance are described.

  5. Art’s histories in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Mané Wheoki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the text of an illustrated paper presented at ‘Art History’s History in Australia and New Zealand’; a joint symposium organised by the Australian Institute of Art History in the University of Melbourne and the Australian and New Zealand Association of Art Historians (AAANZ; held on 28 – 29 August 2010. Responding to a set of questions framed around the ‘state of art history in New Zealand’; this paper reviews the ‘invention’ of a nationalist art history and argues that there can be no coherent; integrated history of art in New Zealand that does not encompass the timeframe of the cultural production of New Zealand’s indigenous Maori; or that of the Pacific nations for which the country is a regional hub; or the burgeoning cultural diversity of an emerging Asia-Pacific nation.

  6. New Zealand early childhood curriculum: The politics of collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Farquhar Sandy

    2015-01-01

    The New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whāriki (Ministry of Education [MoE],1996), is frequently hailed as a community inspired curriculum, praised nationally and internationally for its collaborative development, emancipatory spirit and bicultural approach. In its best form community can be collaborative, consultative, democratic, responsive and inclusive. But community and collaboration can also be about exclusion, alienation and loss. This paper engages with Te Whāriki as a contest...

  7. VOLCANIC EMISSIONS AND DISTAL PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS IN NEW ZEALAND

    OpenAIRE

    GILES, TERESA MARY

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is a palaeoenviromnental investigation into possible non-climatic effects on the environment from volcanic ash fall and toxic emissions outside the blast zone of a volcanic eruption. These effects are determined from palynological and geochemical changes following tephra fall at a range of sites across the North Island of New Zealand which were located at increasing distances from the main volcanic source, the Taupo Volcanic Zone. These sites collectively covered a wid...

  8. Family Farms’ Conversions and Resilience in Southland, New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Forney Jérémie; Stock Paul V.

    2014-01-01

    The well known deregulation of New Zealand agriculture prompted the growth of dairy farming particularly in the region of Southland. The formation of the giant cooperative Fonterra only exacerbated the conversion of sheep farms into dairy farms that challenged both farmers’ and the region’s traditional identity as sheep country. Interviews with converted farmers show that farming families convert to dairy primarily in an attempt to preserve what is important for them: farm succession and a pr...

  9. Rheumatology around the world: perspectives from Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    McQueen, Fiona M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatology continues to be an exciting and vibrant specialty for specialists practising in New Zealand and Australia. Clinicians follow treat-to-target regimens to manage peripheral and axial inflammatory arthritides using conventional and biological agents, which have revolutionised management of rheumatic disease over the past two decades. However, optimal clinical practice has significant pharmacoeconomic implications which impact on health funding at a national level, and the advent of ...

  10. Measuring Snow Precipitation in New Zealand- Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, J. A.; Zammit, C.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring plays a pivotal role in determining sustainable strategy for efficient overall management of the water resource. Though periodic monitoring provides some information, only long-term monitoring can provide data sufficient in quantity and quality to determine trends and develop predictive models. These can support informed decisions about sustainable and efficient use of water resources in New Zealand. However the development of such strategies is underpinned by our understanding and our ability to measure all inputs in headwaters catchments, where most of the precipitation is falling. Historically due to the harsh environment New Zealand has had little to no formal high elevation monitoring stations for all climate and snow related parameters outside of ski field climate and snow stations. This leads to sparse and incomplete archived datasets. Due to the importance of these catchments to the New Zealand economy (eg irrigation, hydro-electricity generation, tourism) NIWA has developed a climate-snow and ice monitoring network (SIN) since 2006. This network extends existing monitoring by electricity generator and ski stations and it is used by a number of stakeholders. In 2014 the network comprises 13 stations located at elevation above 700masl. As part of the WMO Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (SPICE), NIWA is carrying out an intercomparison of precipitation data over the period 2013-2015 at Mueller Hut. The site was commissioned on 11 July 2013, set up on the 17th September 2013 and comprises two Geonor weighing bucket raingauges, one shielded and the other un-shielded, in association with a conventional tipping bucket raingauge and conventional climate and snow measurements (temperature, wind, solar radiation, relative humidity, snow depth and snow pillow). The presentation aims to outline the state of the current monitoring network in New Zealand, as well as the challenge and opportunities for measurement of precipitation in alpine

  11. Incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Wajih; Prain, Kerri M; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; O'Gorman, Cullen M; Clarke, Laura; Silvestrini, Roger A; Bundell, Christine S; Abernethy, David; Bhuta, Sandeep; Blum, Stefan; Boggild, Mike; Boundy, Karyn; Brew, Bruce J; Brown, Matthew; Brownlee, Wallace J; Butzkueven, Helmut; Carroll, William M; Chen, Celia; Coulthard, Alan; Dale, Russell C; Das, Chandi; Dear, Keith; Fabis-Pedrini, Marzena J; Fulcher, David; Gillis, David; Hawke, Simon; Heard, Robert; Henderson, Andrew P D; Heshmat, Saman; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Jimenez-Sanchez, Sofia; Killpatrick, Trevor; King, John; Kneebone, Christopher; Kornberg, Andrew J; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lin, Ming-Wei; Lynch, Christpher; Macdonell, Richard; Mason, Deborah F; McCombe, Pamela A; Pender, Michael P; Pereira, Jennifer A; Pollard, John D; Reddel, Stephen W; Shaw, Cameron; Spies, Judith; Stankovich, James; Sutton, Ian; Vucic, Steve; Walsh, Michael; Wong, Richard C; Yiu, Eppie M; Barnett, Michael H; Kermode, Allan G; Marriott, Mark P; Parratt, John D E; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce V; Willoughby, Ernest; Wilson, Robert J; Vincent, Angela; Broadley, Simon A

    2017-08-01

    We have undertaken a clinic-based survey of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) in Australia and New Zealand to establish incidence and prevalence across the region and in populations of differing ancestry. NMOSD is a recently defined demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The incidence and prevalence of NMOSD in Australia and New Zealand has not been established. Centres managing patients with demyelinating disease of the CNS across Australia and New Zealand reported patients with clinical and laboratory features that were suspicious for NMOSD. Testing for aquaporin 4 antibodies was undertaken in all suspected cases. From this group, cases were identified who fulfilled the 2015 Wingerchuk diagnostic criteria for NMOSD. A capture-recapture methodology was used to estimate incidence and prevalence, based on additional laboratory identified cases. NMOSD was confirmed in 81/170 (48%) cases referred. Capture-recapture analysis gave an adjusted incidence estimate of 0.37 (95% CI 0.35 to 0.39) per million per year and a prevalence estimate for NMOSD of 0.70 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.78) per 100 000. NMOSD was three times more common in the Asian population (1.57 (95% CI 1.15 to 1.98) per 100 000) compared with the remainder of the population (0.57 (95% CI 0.50 to 0.65) per 100 000). The latitudinal gradient evident in multiple sclerosis was not seen in NMOSD. NMOSD incidence and prevalence in Australia and New Zealand are comparable with figures from other populations of largely European ancestry. We found NMOSD to be more common in the population with Asian ancestry. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. New Zealand Freshwater Management: Changing Policy for a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, H. L.; Norton, N.

    2014-12-01

    Fresh water is essential to New Zealand's economic, environmental, cultural and social well-being. In line with global trends, New Zealand's freshwater resources are under pressure from increased abstraction and changes in land-use which contribute contaminants to our freshwater systems. Recent central government policy reform introduces greater national direction and guidance, to bring about a step-change in freshwater management. An existing national policy for freshwater management introduced in 2011 requires regional authorities to produce freshwater management plans containing clear freshwater objectives (measurable statements about the desired environmental state for water bodies) and associated limits to resource use (such as environmental flows and quantity allocation limits, and loads of contaminants to be discharged). These plans must integrate water quantity and quality management, consider climate change, and incorporate tangata whenua (New Zealand māori) roles and interests. In recent (2014) national policy amendments, the regional authorities are also required to implement national 'bottom-line' standards for certain attributes of the system to be managed; undertake accounting for all water takes and all sources of contaminants; and to develop and implement their plans in a collaborative way with communities. This rapid change in national policy has necessitated a new way of working for authorities tasked with implementation; many obstacles lie in their path. The scientific methods required to help set water quantity limits are well established, but water quality methods are less so. Collaborative processes have well documented benefits but also raise many challenges, particularly for the communication of complex and often uncertain scientific information. This paper provides background on the national policy changes and offers some early lessons learned by the regional authorities implementing collaborative freshwater management in New Zealand.

  13. Coeliac disease and gluten avoidance in New Zealand children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanpowpong, Pornthep; Ingham, Tristram R; Lampshire, Phillipa K; Kirchberg, Franca F; Epton, Michael J; Crane, Julian; Camargo, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    Although gluten avoidance is thought to be common among New Zealanders, the prevalence of gluten avoidance and of actual coeliac disease (CD) in children is uncertain. Our aims were: (1) to determine the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed CD and of gluten avoidance in New Zealand children; and (2) among children without CD, to identify independent predictors of gluten avoidance. The New Zealand Asthma and Allergy Cohort Study has detailed information on participants' demographic, pregnancy-related and neonatal factors. The authors surveyed parents regarding their child's history of lactose intolerance and gluten-related issues (eg, gluten avoidance, history of wheat or gluten allergy in first degree relatives, testing and doctor diagnosis of CD). After excluding children with doctor-diagnosed CD, the authors identified independent predictors of gluten avoidance. Among 916 children, most (78%) were of European ethnicity. The authors identified nine (1.0%, 95% CI 0.5% to 1.9%) who had doctor-diagnosed CD, while 48 (5.2%, 95% CI 4.0% to 6.9%) avoided gluten. Among children without diagnosed CD, significant independent predictors for gluten avoidance were Christchurch site (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.02 to 4.7), prior testing for CD (OR 9.0, 95% CI 4.1 to 19.5) and doctor-diagnosed lactose intolerance (OR 5.2, 95% CI 2.0 to 13.9). CD affected 1% of these New Zealand children, but 5% reported gluten avoidance. The predictors of gluten avoidance in children without doctor-diagnosed CD suggest important regional differences in community belief or medical practice regarding implementation of gluten avoidance and the contributory role of non-specific subjective abdominal complaints.

  14. HIV and the decriminalization of sex work in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Catherine

    2006-12-01

    The decriminalization of sex work in New Zealand will protect the rights of sex workers and improve their working conditions and general well-being. It will also improve HIV prevention programs. In this article, which is based on a presentation at a "learning from practice" session at the conference, Catherine Healy describes the situation prior to decriminalization, and discusses the features of the new law and accompanying guidelines.

  15. Surface erosion assessment using 137 Cs: examples from New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Basher, L. R.

    2000-01-01

    The 137Cs technique has provided the first quantitative, medium-term data on rates of soil redistribution by surface erosion on both cropland and rangeland in New Zealand. Use of the technique has demonstrated: high rates of soil redistribution by water erosion at two cropland sites under intensive vegetable production; a slow rate of net loss of soil by wind erosion associated with arable farming; a strong association between vegetation depletion and wind erosion on grazed rangeland. Re...

  16. NH3 column abundances over Lauder, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcray, Frank J.; Goldman, Aaron; Matthews, Andrew; Johnston, Paul; Rinsland, Curtis

    1989-01-01

    Gaseous NH3 has been observed in the atmosphere over central New Zealand with infrared absorption spectra. The amount of NH3 shows marked variability, which is strongly correlated with time of day and season. The pattern is similar to data obtained in Denver, Colorado, but is much more variable than data from Hampton, Virginia. The rapid variability indicates a residence time of 8 hours in some cases.

  17. New Zealand's Fiscal Policy Framework: Experience and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    John Janssen

    2001-01-01

    Fiscal policy in New Zealand has seen a consolidation of the Government’s position and continuing refinements to the institutional framework and Budget processes. The key institutional change has been the introduction of the Fiscal Responsibility Act 1994. The paper sets out the background to the fiscal policy framework, including fiscal history and various institutional changes in the public sector. This paper is a companion paper to Treasury Working Paper 01/24 by Angela Barnes and Steve Le...

  18. Hangi Magnetism: first Archaeomagnetic Results from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. M.; McFadgen, B.; Alfheid, M.; Ingham, M.

    2012-12-01

    Holocene secular variation data, particularly palaeointensities, from the New Zealand region are critical to models of the global field and the geodynamo, but to date are few and far between. New Zealand's early Maori settlers did not make pottery - they steamed their food in flax baskets in earth ovens called umu or hangi. These ovens were pits in the ground into which were placed hot stones, covered with baskets of food and layers of fern fronds soaked in water. The whole was covered with soil and left to cook for several hours. Hangi stones were carefully chosen, prized possessions, and were used many times. Andesite boulders from the Central North Island were highly favoured. We have shown that hangi stones have the potential to be reliable recorders of both the intensity and direction of the palaeomagnetic field at the time of their last use. In collaboration with Maori tangata whenua we laid and fired an experimental hangi using traditional methods. We included volcanic and sedimentary rocks from different regions of New Zealand. The rocks reached temperatures in excess of 1000 degrees C and cooled very slowly, with minimal physical disturbance. A sampling method was devised, and on separate subsets of samples, we were able to accurately retrieve both the direction and intensity of the local geomagnetic field, from most lithologies. We are in the early stages of sampling archaeological hangi sites from throughout New Zealand, which span the past 600-700 years. Palaeomagnetic data from these sites will complement directional secular variation records from lake and marine sediments, and will provide crucial absolute palaeointensities.

  19. Sleep and adolescence. Do New Zealand teenagers get enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofaeff, Tavey F; Denny, Simon

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the sleep patterns of secondary school students in New Zealand. This study uses data from a national secondary school youth health survey conducted in 2001. A total of 9567 students completed the survey with an overall response rate of 64.3%. Students were asked if they felt they got enough sleep and the numbers of sleep hours were estimated from self-reported bedtimes and awakening times during the week and weekend. A significant proportion (21%) of students reported not getting enough sleep. Inadequate sleep was more common among older students and female students of Maori and New Zealand European ethnicity. The average amount of sleep secondary school students report in New Zealand is 8 h and 40 min during the week and 9 h and 23 min during the weekend. There was a shift towards later bedtimes and fewer total sleep hours among older students. Increasing hours of extracurricular activities and employment were generally associated with less sleep, especially among students engaging in more than 5 h a day of these activities. Significant numbers of secondary school students report inadequate sleep. Given the importance of adequate sleep on healthy adolescent development, parents and health professionals should be wary of the amount of extracurricular activities that young people engage in, especially part-time employment and the potential negative impact it may have on the adequacy of their sleep.

  20. New Zealand community attitudes toward people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Michael D; MacKenzie, Hamish C

    2002-12-01

    International surveys on knowledge and attitudes toward people with epilepsy suggest that public opinion is improving in many countries. This study aimed to discover how New Zealand compared with other countries, and how subgroups within the New Zealand population compared with each other, by conducting a survey of community knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy. Telephone interviews were conducted on a random sample of 400 persons older than 17 years, drawn from a mid-sized provincial town and its hinterland. Ninety-five percent of respondents had heard or read about epilepsy; 73% knew someone with epilepsy; and 67% had seen an epileptic seizure. Somewhat less knowledgeable were young people, the less educated, lower socioeconomic status (SES), and those of Maori or non-European ethnicity. Attitudes toward people with epilepsy were favorable, with only 5% objecting to their child marrying a person who sometimes had seizures. Less-positive attitudes were found among some older people. Compared with those in other Western countries, New Zealanders are well informed about epilepsy, and their attitudes toward it are mainly positive. Continuing public education about epilepsy is still necessary, especially among the young, the non-European, and older people.

  1. Species Radiation of Carabid Beetles (Broscini: Mecodema) in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Julia; Knapp, Michael; Emberson, Rowan M.; Townsend, J. Ian; Trewick, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    New Zealand biodiversity has often been viewed as Gondwanan in origin and age, but it is increasingly apparent from molecular studies that diversification, and in many cases origination of lineages, postdate the break-up of Gondwanaland. Relatively few studies of New Zealand animal species radiations have as yet been reported, and here we consider the species-rich genus of carabid beetles, Mecodema. Constrained stratigraphic information (emergence of the Chatham Islands) and a substitution rate for Coleoptera were separately used to calibrate Bayesian relaxed molecular clock date estimates for diversification of Mecodema. The inferred timings indicate radiation of these beetles no earlier than the mid-Miocene with most divergences being younger, dating to the Plio-Pleistocene. A shallow age for the radiation along with a complex spatial distribution of these taxa involving many instances of sympatry implicates recent ecological speciation rather than a simplistic allopatric model. This emphasises the youthful and dynamic nature of New Zealand evolution that will be further elucidated with detailed ecological and population genetic analyses. PMID:24465949

  2. Sedation practices for Australian and New Zealand paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C; Downie, P; Chalkiadis, G; Camilleri, S; Monagle, P; Waters, K

    2002-04-01

    Paediatric oncology patients often require repeated bone marrow aspirates and lumbar punctures. These procedures commonly require sedation and analgesia. The Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and the American Academy of Pediatrics have published guidelines that provide recommendations on monitoring and staffing requirements during sedation of paediatric patients. A survey was conducted of the oncology units in Australia and New Zealand in order to compare current practices with published guidelines. Telephone interviews were conducted with nursing or medical staff members. Fourteen oncology units collectively perform approximately 130 procedures each week, of which 74% are performed under general anaesthesia. Of the remainder, most are performed using conscious sedation. Most units adhere to published recommendations regarding equipment and staffing during procedures performed under sedation. Only a minority of units follow guidelines regarding documentation; fasting requirements; observation and documentation of vital signs during and after the procedure; and obtaining informed consent for procedures performed using sedation. Sedation practices among paediatric oncology units in Australia and New Zealand vary. None of the units fully adhere to published guidelines on childhood sedation. Paediatric oncology units should be familiar with the content of these guidelines and make an informed decision as to their usefulness, both in directing best clinical practice, and in supporting current practice in the event of medico-legal challenge.

  3. New Zealand's drug development industry--strengths and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Michelle M; Babar, Zaheer U-D; Garg, Sanjay

    2010-06-25

    Globally the traditional model of drug development is changing and the large pharmaceutical companies are looking externally for innovative compounds, new technologies and cost-effective drug development services. New Zealand (NZ) can capitalise on its expertise in innovative drug discovery and development but needs to be able to define and promote its capabilities to the global drug development industry. An approach that will enable a ready assessment of NZ's expertise is presented. Interviews will be carried out with key senior personnel from NZ drug discovery groups, drug development companies and organisations that provide a wide range of research and development services. The resulting data will be collated to document current capabilities and expertise, as well as limitations, in NZ's industry and assess their potential for the future. Participants will be asked to identify factors that support and factors that limit their organisation's progress in drug development and to suggest policies that could be implemented to positively influence future performance. A formal assessment of New Zealand's capabilities, strengths and limitations in drug development will aid in the promotion of its expertise to overseas organisations and enhance the economic benefits that could accrue to New Zealand.

  4. Why New Zealand must rapidly halve its greenhouse gas emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Scott; Woodward, Alistair; Macmillan, Alexandra; Baker, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Lindsay, Graeme; Hales, Simon; Sinclair, David; Jaine, Richard; Springford, Liz; Holmes, Andrew; Laking, George; Jones, Rhys; Carr, Harriette; Edwards, Richard; Shaw, Caroline; Wells, Susan; Hosking, Jamie; Forde, Andrea; Bismark, Marie; Palmer, Stephen; Keating, Gay; Simpson, Jenny; Highton, Rachel; Dhar, Divya; Kane, Penny

    2009-10-09

    New Zealand must commit to substantial decreases in its greenhouse gas emissions, to avoid the worst impacts of climate change on human health, both here and internationally. We have the fourth highest per capita greenhouse gas emissions in the developed world. Based on the need to limit warming to 2 degrees C by 2100, our cumulative emissions, and our capability to mitigate, New Zealand should at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 (i.e. a target of at least 40% less than 1990 levels). This target has a strong scientific basis, and if anything may be too lenient; reducing the risk of catastrophic climate change may require deeper cuts. Short-term economic costs of mitigation have been widely overstated in public debate. They must also be balanced by the far greater costs caused by inertia and the substantial health and social benefits that can be achieved by a low emissions society. Large emissions reductions are achievable if we mobilise New Zealand society and let technology follow the signal of a responsible target.

  5. Antarctic air over New Zealand following vortex breakdown in 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ajtic

    Full Text Available An ozonesonde profile over the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC site at Lauder (45.0° S, 169.7° E, New Zealand, for 24 December 1998 showed atypically low ozone centered around 24 km altitude (600 K potential temperature. The origin of the anomaly is explained using reverse domain filling (RDF calculations combined with a PV/O3 fitting technique applied to ozone measurements from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instrument. The RDF calculations for two isentropic surfaces, 550 and 600 K, show that ozone-poor air from the Antarctic polar vortex reached New Zealand on 24–26 December 1998. The vortex air on the 550 K isentrope originated in the ozone hole region, unlike the air on 600 K where low ozone values were caused by dynamical effects. High-resolution ozone maps were generated, and their examination shows that a vortex remnant situated above New Zealand was the cause of the altered ozone profile on 24 December. The maps also illustrate mixing of the vortex filaments into southern midlatitudes, whereby the overall mid-latitude ozone levels were decreased.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere composition and chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  6. Demographic and psychological correlates of New Zealanders support for euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carol Hj; Duck, Isabelle M; Sibley, Chris G

    2017-01-13

    To explore the distribution of New Zealanders' support towards the legalisation of euthanasia and examine demographic and psychological factors associated with these attitudes. 15,822 participants responded to the 2014/15 New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS) survey. This survey included an item on people's attitudes towards euthanasia, and information on their demographic and psychological characteristics. The majority of New Zealanders expressed support for euthanasia, which was assessed by asking "Suppose a person has a painful incurable disease. Do you think that doctors should be allowed by law to end the patient's life if the patient requests it?" Non-religious, liberal, younger, employed, non-parents and those living in rural areas were more supportive. Those of Pacific or Asian ethnicity, with lower income and higher deprivation, education and socio-economic status were less supportive. Furthermore, those high on extraversion, conscientiousness and neuroticism showed more support, while those high on agreeableness and honesty-humility exhibited less support. There is strong public support for euthanasia when people are asked whether doctors should be allowed by law to end the life of a patient with a painful incurable disease upon their request. There are reliable demographic and personality differences in support for euthanasia.

  7. Antarctic air over New Zealand following vortex breakdown in 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ajtic

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available An ozonesonde profile over the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC site at Lauder (45.0° S, 169.7° E, New Zealand, for 24 December 1998 showed atypically low ozone centered around 24 km altitude (600 K potential temperature. The origin of the anomaly is explained using reverse domain filling (RDF calculations combined with a PV/O3 fitting technique applied to ozone measurements from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instrument. The RDF calculations for two isentropic surfaces, 550 and 600 K, show that ozone-poor air from the Antarctic polar vortex reached New Zealand on 24–26 December 1998. The vortex air on the 550 K isentrope originated in the ozone hole region, unlike the air on 600 K where low ozone values were caused by dynamical effects. High-resolution ozone maps were generated, and their examination shows that a vortex remnant situated above New Zealand was the cause of the altered ozone profile on 24 December. The maps also illustrate mixing of the vortex filaments into southern midlatitudes, whereby the overall mid-latitude ozone levels were decreased.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (middle atmosphere composition and chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics

  8. Estimating Free and Added Sugar Intakes in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibblewhite, Rachael; Nettleton, Alice; McLean, Rachael; Haszard, Jillian; Fleming, Elizabeth; Kruimer, Devonia; Te Morenga, Lisa

    2017-11-27

    The reduction of free or added sugar intake (sugars added to food and drinks as a sweetener) is almost universally recommended to reduce the risk of obesity-related diseases and dental caries. The World Health Organisation recommends intakes of free sugars of less than 10% of energy intake. However, estimating and monitoring intakes at the population level is challenging because free sugars cannot be analytically distinguished from naturally occurring sugars and most national food composition databases do not include data on free or added sugars. We developed free and added sugar estimates for the New Zealand (NZ) food composition database (FOODfiles 2010) by adapting a method developed for Australia. We reanalyzed the 24 h recall dietary data collected for 4721 adults aged 15 years and over participating in the nationally representative 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey to estimate free and added sugar intakes. The median estimated intake of free and added sugars was 57 and 49 g/day respectively and 42% of adults consumed less than 10% of their energy intake from free sugars. This approach provides more direct estimates of the free and added sugar contents of New Zealand foods than previously available and will enable monitoring of adherence to free sugar intake guidelines in future.

  9. Veterinary Pharmaceutics: An Opportunity for Interprofessional Education in New Zealand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Arlene; Beard, Rebekah; Brightmore, Anna; Lu, Lisa W; McKay, Amelia; Mistry, Maadhuri; Owen, Kate; Swan, Emma; Young, Jessica

    2017-07-26

    Globally pharmacists are becoming increasingly involved in veterinary medicine; however, little is known about the level of interest for pharmacists playing a larger role in animal treatment in New Zealand. A key stakeholder in any progression of pharmacists becoming more involved in the practice of veterinary pharmacy is the veterinary profession. The aim of this study was to investigate views of veterinarians and veterinary students on the role of pharmacists supporting veterinarians with advice on animal medicines. Open interviews were conducted with veterinarians in Dunedin, New Zealand. Veterinary students at Massey University completed an online survey. Most veterinarians do not have regular communication with pharmacists regarding animal care, but believe it may be beneficial. In order to support veterinarians, pharmacists would need further education in veterinary medicine. Veterinary students believe there is opportunity for collaboration between professions provided that pharmacists have a better working knowledge of animal treatment. Most of the veterinary students surveyed perceive a gap in their knowledge concerning animal medicines, specifically pharmacology and compounding. While there is support for pharmacists contributing to veterinary medicine, particularly in the area of pharmaceutics, this is currently limited in New Zealand due to a lack of specialized education opportunities.

  10. A feather precipitation hydrogen isoscape for New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. M.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Soto, D. X.; Bartle, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Forensic isotopic assays of feathers from historical Maori cloaks are a potential tool to link historical artefacts back to their native locales (Iwi) in New Zealand. In order to test this approach, we sampled feathers from extant museum archived birds of known origin for their feather hydrogen isotopes (δyHf) to assign their regional origin and location over time. We obtained feathers from two non-migratory bird species widely distributed around New Zealand, tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) and quail (Callipepla californica). Feathers were sampled from archived birds collected between 1880-2002 held in 3 New Zealand museum collections. We determined regression coefficients of δ2H on location, latitude, δ2Hprecipitation, and age. The data showed that ground dwelling quail had higher regression coefficients with respect to latitude (r2=0.46) than the nectar feeding tui (r2=0.39). On the whole, both resident birds showed promise as regional geographical indicators of their habitat (r2=0.58). Year of collection had no meaningful effect on isotopic composition. We conclude that isotopic assays may therefore be used to aid in regional assignments relevant to the interpretation of historical artefacts.

  11. New Zealand dentists' views on community water fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S M; Dawson, S K; Thomson, W M

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether New Zealand general dental practitioners support community water fluoridation (CWF), and to gauge their opinions on its possible systemic side-effects. An online survey was conducted in 2010, involving the 1174 general dental practitioners who had email addresses on the Dental Register and were contactable in New Zealand. A total of 465 dentists (39.6%) participated. Most practitioners (93.5%) reported supporting community water fluoridation; the other 6.5% either were unsure or did not support it. Higher proportions of more recent graduates supported CWF. Some 85.6% of practitioners thought that drinking fluoridated water was a harmless way to prevent dental caries, but 6.2% felt that fluoridated water may cause other health problems. There were no systematic differences by sociodemographic and practice characteristics, except that a higher proportion of males and more experienced practitioners reported being confident in discussing CWF-related issues. Most New Zealand dental practitioners support community water fluoridation, although a very small proportion believe that it is harmful and/or does not prevent caries.

  12. Species radiation of carabid beetles (broscini: mecodema in new zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Goldberg

    Full Text Available New Zealand biodiversity has often been viewed as Gondwanan in origin and age, but it is increasingly apparent from molecular studies that diversification, and in many cases origination of lineages, postdate the break-up of Gondwanaland. Relatively few studies of New Zealand animal species radiations have as yet been reported, and here we consider the species-rich genus of carabid beetles, Mecodema. Constrained stratigraphic information (emergence of the Chatham Islands and a substitution rate for Coleoptera were separately used to calibrate Bayesian relaxed molecular clock date estimates for diversification of Mecodema. The inferred timings indicate radiation of these beetles no earlier than the mid-Miocene with most divergences being younger, dating to the Plio-Pleistocene. A shallow age for the radiation along with a complex spatial distribution of these taxa involving many instances of sympatry implicates recent ecological speciation rather than a simplistic allopatric model. This emphasises the youthful and dynamic nature of New Zealand evolution that will be further elucidated with detailed ecological and population genetic analyses.

  13. Procedures and toolsused in the investigationof New Zealand's historical earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Downes

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available New Zealand?s tectonic setting, astride an obliquely convergent tectonic boundary, means that it has experienced many large earthquakes in its 200-year written historical records. The task of identifying and studying the largest early instrumental and pre-instrumental earthquakes, as well as identifying the smaller events, is being actively pursued in order to reduce gaps in knowledge and to ensure as complete and comprehensive a catalogue as is possible. The task of quantifying historical earthquake locations and magnitudes is made difficult by several factors. These include the range of possible earthquake focal depths, and the sparse, temporally- and spatially-variable historical population distribution which affects the availability of felt intensity information, and hence, the completeness levels of the catalogue. This paper overviews the procedures and tools used in the analysis, parameterisation, and recording of historical New Zealand earthquakes, with examples from recently studied historical events. In particular, the 1855 M 8+ Wairarapa earthquake is discussed, as well as its importance for the eminent 19th century British geologist, Sir Charles Lyell, and for future global understanding of the connection between large earthquakes and sudden uplift, tilting and faulting on a regional scale.

  14. Exploring the history of New Zealand astronomy trials, tribulations, telescopes and transits

    CERN Document Server

    Orchiston, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Professor Orchiston is a foremost authority on the subject of New Zealand astronomy, and here are the collected papers of his fruitful studies in this area, including both those published many years ago and new material.  The papers herein review traditional Maori astronomy, examine the appearance of nautical astronomy practiced by Cook and his astronomers on their various stopovers in New Zealand during their three voyagers to the South Seas, and also explore notable nineteenth century New Zealand observatories historically, from significant telescopes now located in New Zealand to local and international observations made during the 1874 and 1882 transits of Venus and the nineteenth and twentieth century preoccupation of New Zealand amateur astronomers with comets and meteors. New Zealand astronomy has a truly rich history, extending from the Maori civilization in pre-European times through to the years when explorers and navigators discovered the region, up to pioneering research on the newly emerging fie...

  15. Productiv Index of Meat Rabbits of White New Zealand Breed Californian and their Crossbreeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macari Angela

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The researches had been held at the rabbits farm of STE Maximovca on the rabbits of White New Zealandand Californian meat breeds, crossbreds of the first generation received after the breeding (♀White NewZealand x ♂ Californian and ♀Californian x ♂ White New Zealand. After the rabbits slaughtering fromfour analysed groups, there was established the received meat quantity after the carcass boning ofcrossbreds of ♀White New Zealand x ♂ Californian which was 80.1±0.2%, and the same analysed indexat crossbreds of ♀Californian x ♂ White New Zealand was 77.0±0.1%. The total amount of ratiobone/meat in the carcass there was received at crossbreds of ♀White New Zealand x ♂ Californian whichwas 1:4.05, and at crossbreds of ♀Californian x ♂ White New Zealand this index was 1:3.38.

  16. Managing and eradicating wildlife tuberculosis in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, B; Livingstone, P

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) due to Mycobacterium bovis infection was first identified in brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand in the late 1960s. Since the early 1970s, possums in New Zealand have been controlled as part of an ongoing strategy to manage the disease in livestock. The TB management authority (TBfree New Zealand) currently implements three strategic choices for disease-related possum control: firstly TB eradication in areas selected for eradication of the disease from livestock and wildlife, secondly Free Area Protection in areas in which possums are maintained at low densities, normally along a Vector Risk Area (VRA) boundary, and thirdly Infected Herd Suppression, which includes the remaining parts of VRA where possums are targeted to minimise the infection risk to livestock. Management is primarily through a range of lethal control options. The frequency and intensity of control is driven by a requirement to reduce populations to very low levels (usually to a trap-catch index below 2%), then to hold them at or below this level for 5–10 years to ensure disease eradication.Lethal possum control is implemented using aerial- and ground-based applications, under various regulatory and operational constraints. Extensive research has been undertaken aimed at improving the efficacy and efficiency of control. Aerial applications use sodium fluoroacetate (1080) bait for controlling possums over extensive and rugged areas of forest that are difficult to access by foot. Ground-based control uses a range of toxins (primarily, a potassium cyanide-based product) and traps. In the last 5 years there has been a shift from simple possum population control to the collection of spatial data on possum presence/absence and relative density, using simple possum detection devices using global positioning system-supported data collection tools, with recovery of possum carcasses for diagnostic necropsy. Such data provide information subsequently used in

  17. Is New Zealand vegetation really 'problematic'? Dansereau's puzzles revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Bastow; Lee, William G

    2012-05-01

    Over four decades ago, Pierre Dansereau, the noted North American ecologist, proposed six features of New Zealand vegetation as being problematic or unusual in a global context. We examine his propositions in the light of current ecological knowledge to determine whether or not these can still be considered unusual characteristics of New Zealand vegetation. (1) 'Climatic change is still progressing' resulting in disequilibrium between species' distributions and the present climate. New data and methods of analysis now available have removed the impression that Dansereau gained of imprecise zonation, unclear vegetation/climate relations and missing vegetation types. Communities cited as having regeneration failure can now be seen as even-aged stands that developed after major disturbance, although there are other, also non-climatic, explanations. However, the cause of the Westland 'Nothofagus gap' has become more, rather than less, controversial. (2) 'Continuity of community composition defies classification' and 'Very few New Zealand associations have faithful species' are correct observations, but perhaps equally true of vegetation elsewhere. Dansereau's assertion of low species richness in New Zealand is not supported by the comparative data available. (3) 'Lack of intolerant [i.e. mid-seral] trees …' is not evident with newer information. The order of species in succession, seen as unclear by Dansereau, has been determined by a range of approaches, largely confirming each other. (4) 'Discrepancies of form and function …' in divaricate shrubs and widespread heteroblasty are still controversial, with many more explanations. Several abiotic explanations have failed to stand up to investigation. Explanations in terms of herbivory have been well supported, although the extinction of the large avian herbivores makes certainty impossible. (5) 'Incidence of hybridization …' remains problematic. We do not know whether the incidence is unusually high, as Dansereau

  18. Why has Australia Done Better than New Zealand? Good Luck or Good Management?

    OpenAIRE

    Graeme Davis; Robert Ewing

    2005-01-01

    The relative performance of the Australian and New Zealand economies has been the subject of many questions. Why, if New Zealand reformed so much, has the Australian economy performed so much better? Why are average incomes in Australia so much higher than in New Zealand? This paper explores some of the potential explanations for the different levels of labour productivity in the two countries and attempts to quantify the effects on productivity of a range of possible causal factors. Potentia...

  19. Agricultural Policy Reform and Industry Adjustment in Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, David N.; Rae, Allan N.

    2004-01-01

    Some sectors of Australian and New Zealand farming have been heavily assisted in the past. New Zealand underwent an economy-wide deregulation in the mid-to-late 980s that included abrupt removal of practically all agricultural assistance. Policy reform in Australia has been more gradual and is industry focused, but in some cases substantial industry assistance has been withdrawn. Deregulation of the Australian dairy industry, and that of the sheep and beef sector in New Zealand, are discussed...

  20. Evidence for the continued presence in New Zealand of Homotrysis macleayi (Borchmann, 1909) ( Coleoptera : Tenebrionidae : Alleculinae )

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Thorpe

    2014-01-01

    The first detailed specimen records are presented for the Australian beetle Homotrysis macleayi (Borchmann, 1909) in New Zealand. Evaluation of this evidence clearly indicates that the species is fully established in the wild in New Zealand. It is therefore recommended that the species be added to the New Zealand Organisms Register (NZOR), as exotic and present in the wild. Some general comments are offered on the importance of data and evidence in faunistics.

  1. Evidence for the continued presence in New Zealand of Homotrysis macleayi (Borchmann, 1909 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae: Alleculinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thorpe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The first detailed specimen records are presented for the Australian beetle Homotrysis macleayi (Borchmann, 1909 in New Zealand. Evaluation of this evidence clearly indicates that the species is fully established in the wild in New Zealand. It is therefore recommended that the species be added to the New Zealand Organisms Register (NZOR, as exotic and present in the wild. Some general comments are offered on the importance of data and evidence in faunistics.

  2. The impact of the Hand Hygiene New Zealand programme on hand hygiene practices in New Zealand's public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Joshua; Dawson, Louise; Jowitt, Deborah; White, Margo; Callard, Hayley; Sieczkowski, Christine; Kuriyan, Ron; Roberts, Sally

    2016-10-14

    To detail the progress made by Hand Hygiene New Zealand (HHNZ) since 2011 and also describe the challenges experienced along the way and the factors required for delivery of a successful hand hygiene programme at a national level. HHNZ is a multimodal culture-change programme based on the WHO '5 moments for hand hygiene' approach. The key components of the programme include clinical leadership, auditing of hand hygiene compliance with thrice yearly reporting of improvement in hand hygiene practice, biannual reporting of the outcome marker, healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (HA-SAB), effective communication with key stakeholders and the use of the front-line ownership (FLO) principles for quality improvement. The nationally aggregated hand hygiene compliance has increased from 62% in June 2012 to 81% in March 2016. There has been improvement across all 'moments', all healthcare worker groups and a range of different clinical specialties. The rate of HA-SAB has remained stable. The HHNZ programme has led to significant improvements in hand hygiene practice in DHBs throughout New Zealand. The principles of FLO are now widely used to drive hand hygiene improvement in New Zealand DHBs.

  3. Magma sources during Gondwana breakup: chemistry and chronology of Cretaceous magmatism in Westland, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Quinten Har Adriaan; Waight, Tod Earle; Scott, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Cretaceous-Paleogene rifting of the Eastern Gondwana margin thinned the continental crust of Zealandia and culminated in the opening of the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand and the Southern Ocean, separating both from Antarctica. The Western Province of New Zealand consists of a succe......Cretaceous-Paleogene rifting of the Eastern Gondwana margin thinned the continental crust of Zealandia and culminated in the opening of the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand and the Southern Ocean, separating both from Antarctica. The Western Province of New Zealand consists...

  4. The Australian and New Zealand cardiac pacemaker and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator survey: calendar year 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mond, Harry G; Crozier, Ian

    2015-03-01

    A pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) survey was undertaken in Australia and New Zealand for calendar year 2013. For 2013, PMs sold as new implants in Australia was 15,203 (12,523 in 2009) and implanted in New Zealand were 1,641 (1,277 in 2009). The number of new PM implants per million population 652 for Australia (565 were in 2009) and 367 for New Zealand (299 in 2009). Although PM replacements rose in New Zealand, there was a fall in Australia as a result of improved power source service life. Pulse generator types sold in Australia were predominantly dual chamber 74% (71% in 2009) and implanted in New Zealand 59% (54% in 2009). There were 661 biventricular PMs implanted in Australia (446 in 2009) and 83 in New Zealand (45 in 2009). Transvenous pacing leads were overwhelmingly bipolar with preferences for active fixation leads, although, since 2009, there has been a minor resurgence in Australia of passive fixation lead usage in the atrium from 20 to ∼24%. There was also a marked increase in the ICD implants with 3904 new implants in Australia (3555 in 2009) and 423 in New Zealand (329 in 2009). The new ICD implants per million population were 167 for Australia (160 in 2009) and 95 for New Zealand (77 in 2009). Biventricular ICD implants increased significantly in both Australia (2211) and New Zealand (118). Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Consistent multi-level trophic effects of marine reserve protection across northern New Zealand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graham J Edgar; Rick D Stuart-Smith; Russell J Thomson; Debbie J Freeman

    2017-01-01

    Through systematic Reef Life Survey censuses of rocky reef fishes, invertebrates and macroalgae at eight marine reserves across northern New Zealand and the Kermadec Islands, we investigated whether...

  6. Inclusive education strategies in New Zealand, a leader in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mitchell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1989, the New Zealand education system has undergone extensive reforms to become one of the most devolved systems in the world. The article analyses the extent to which the educational situation in New Zealand complies with the ten features of inclusive education: vision, placement, curriculum, assessment, teaching, acceptance, access, support, resources, and leadership. This paper will briefly explain these features and illustrate them with references to the situation in New Zealand and, finally, come to the conclusion that with all of these criteria New Zealand performs at a high level.

  7. Open data on fungi and bacterial plant pathogens in New Zealand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, P. R; Weir, B. S; Cooper, J. A

    2017-01-01

    .... This article focuses on data provided for New Zealand's non-lichenised fungi and plant pathogenic bacteria, through the NZFungi nomenclatural and bibliographic database and the associated specimen...

  8. A nationwide classification of New Zealand aquifer properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Rogier; Tschritter, Constanze; Rawlinson, Zara; White, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater plays an essential role in water provision for domestic, industrial and agricultural use. Groundwater is also vital for ecology and environment, since it provides baseflow to many streams, rivers and wetlands. As groundwater is a 'hidden' resource that is typically poorly understood by the public, simple and informative maps can assist to enhance awareness for understanding groundwater and associated environmental issues. The first national aquifer map for New Zealand (2001) identified 200 aquifers at a scale of approximately 1:5 Million. Subsequently, regional councils and unitary authorities have updated their aquifer boundaries using a variety of methods. However, with increasing demand of groundwater in New Zealand and drought impacts expected to be more significant in the future, more consistent and more advanced aquifer characterisation and mapping techniques are needed to improve our understanding of the available resources. Significant resources have gone into detailed geological mapping in recent years, and the New Zealand 1:250,000 Geological Map (QMAP) was developed and released as a seamless GIS database in 2014. To date, there has been no national assessment of this significant data set for aquifer characterisation purposes. This study details the use of the QMAP lithological and chrono-stratigraphic information to develop a nationwide assessment of hydrogeological units and their properties. The aim of this study is to map hydrogeological units in New Zealand, with a long-term goal to use this as a basis for a nationally-consistent map of aquifer systems and aquifer properties (e.g., hydraulic conductivity estimates). Internationally accepted aquifer mapping studies were reviewed and a method was devised that classifies hydrogeological units based on the geological attributes of the QMAP ArcGIS polygons. The QMAP attributes used in this study were: main rock type; geological age; and secondary rock type. The method was mainly based on

  9. The scientific value and potential of New Zealand swamp kauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorrey, Andrew M.; Boswijk, Gretel; Hogg, Alan; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Turney, Christian S. M.; Fowler, Anthony M.; Ogden, John; Woolley, John-Mark

    2018-03-01

    New Zealand swamp kauri (Agathis australis) are relic trees that have been buried and preserved in anoxic bog environments of northern New Zealand for centuries through to hundreds of millennia. Kauri are massive in proportion to other native New Zealand trees and they can attain ages greater than 1000 years. The export market for swamp (subfossil) kauri has recently been driven by demand for a high-value workable timber, but there are concerns about the sustainability of the remaining resource, a situation exacerbated in recent years by the rapid extraction of wood. Economic exploitation of swamp kauri presents several unique opportunities for Quaternary science, however the scientific value of this wood is not well understood by the wider research community and public. Here, we summarise the history of scientific research on swamp kauri, and explore the considerable potential of this unique resource. Swamp kauri tree-ring chronologies are temporally unique, and secondary analyses (such as radiocarbon and isotopic analyses) have value for improving our understanding of Earth's recent geologic history and pre-instrumental climate history. Swamp kauri deposits that span the last interglacial-glacial cycle show potential to yield "ultra-long" multi-millennia tree-ring chronologies, and composite records spanning large parts of MIS3 (and most of the Holocene) may be possible. High-precision radiocarbon dating of swamp kauri chronologies can improve the resolution of the global radiocarbon calibration curve, while testing age modelling and chronologic alignment of other independent long-term high-resolution proxy records. Swamp kauri also has the potential to facilitate absolute dating and verification of cosmogenic events found in long Northern Hemisphere tree-ring chronologies. Future efforts to conserve these identified values requires scientists to work closely with swamp kauri industry operators, resource consent authorities, and export regulators to mitigate

  10. Glacier retreat in New Zealand during the Younger Dryas stadial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Michael R; Schaefer, Joerg M; Denton, George H; Barrell, David J A; Chinn, Trevor J H; Putnam, Aaron E; Andersen, Bjørn G; Finkel, Robert C; Schwartz, Roseanne; Doughty, Alice M

    2010-09-09

    Millennial-scale cold reversals in the high latitudes of both hemispheres interrupted the last transition from full glacial to interglacial climate conditions. The presence of the Younger Dryas stadial (approximately 12.9 to approximately 11.7 kyr ago) is established throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, but the global timing, nature and extent of the event are not well established. Evidence in mid to low latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, in particular, has remained perplexing. The debate has in part focused on the behaviour of mountain glaciers in New Zealand, where previous research has found equivocal evidence for the precise timing of increased or reduced ice extent. The interhemispheric behaviour of the climate system during the Younger Dryas thus remains an open question, fundamentally limiting our ability to formulate realistic models of global climate dynamics for this time period. Here we show that New Zealand's glaciers retreated after approximately 13 kyr bp, at the onset of the Younger Dryas, and in general over the subsequent approximately 1.5-kyr period. Our evidence is based on detailed landform mapping, a high-precision (10)Be chronology and reconstruction of former ice extents and snow lines from well-preserved cirque moraines. Our late-glacial glacier chronology matches climatic trends in Antarctica, Southern Ocean behaviour and variations in atmospheric CO(2). The evidence points to a distinct warming of the southern mid-latitude atmosphere during the Younger Dryas and a close coupling between New Zealand's cryosphere and southern high-latitude climate. These findings support the hypothesis that extensive winter sea ice and curtailed meridional ocean overturning in the North Atlantic led to a strong interhemispheric thermal gradient during late-glacial times, in turn leading to increased upwelling and CO(2) release from the Southern Ocean, thereby triggering Southern Hemisphere warming during the northern Younger Dryas.

  11. Health promotion funding, workforce recruitment and turnover in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Sarah A; Egan, Richard; Robertson, Lindsay; Hicks, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Almost a decade on from the New Zealand Primary Health Care Strategy and amidst concerns about funding of health promotion, we undertook a nationwide survey of health promotion providers. To identify trends in recruitment and turnover in New Zealand's health promotion workforce. Surveys were sent to 160 organisations identified as having a health focus and employing one or more health promoter. Respondents, primarily health promotion managers, were asked to report budget, retention and hiring data for 1 July 2009 through 1 July 2010. Responses were received from 53% of organisations. Among respondents, government funding for health promotion declined by 6.3% in the year ended July 2010 and health promoter positions decreased by 7.5% (equalling 36.6 full-time equivalent positions). Among staff who left their roles, 79% also left the field of health promotion. Forty-two organisations (52%) reported employing health promoters on time-limited contracts of three years or less; this employment arrangement was particularly common in public health units (80%) and primary health organisations (57%). Among new hires, 46% (n=55) were identified as Maori. Low retention of health promoters may reflect the common use of limited-term employment contracts, which allow employers to alter staffing levels as funding changes. More than half the surveyed primary health organisations reported using fixed-term employment contracts. This may compromise health promotion understanding, culture and institutional memory in these organisations. New Zealand's commitment to addressing ethnic inequalities in health outcomes was evident in the high proportion of Maori who made up new hires.

  12. New Zealand nurses' views on preceptoring international nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riden, H; Jacobs, S; Marshall, B

    2014-06-01

    New Zealand encourages internationally educated nurses to seek registration in New Zealand to reduce local nursing shortages. Internationally educated nurses must meet requirements of the Health Practitioners Competency Assurance Act 2003, and demonstrate competency to practise through a clinical competency assessment programme. The purpose was to establish whether preceptors believe they are adequately prepared to assess nurses for whom English is a second language, and to determine the support and recognition received in the role. Preceptor training, workload, understanding of ethical and legal accountability, and perceived organizational values, support and attitudes were evaluated via an anonymous internet survey. Some preceptors do not meet Nursing Council of New Zealand standards and some work environments require nurses to preceptor international nurses. Many nurses believe the role is not valued despite the high workload requirements. Training increased preceptor confidence and preparedness for clinical assessment but additional education is required to understand ethical and legal accountability within the role. Many preceptors indicated they felt pressured into recording assessments they were uncomfortable with. Enhancing preceptorship acceptance could be achieved through institutional recognition of the role's value via workload consideration, institutional recognition or financial means. Increased preceptorship training, particularly around ethical and legal issues, would encourage preceptor confidence. Organizations must find ways of meeting these challenges while recognizing they are responsible for the work environment of both preceptors and internationally registered nurses for whom English is a second language. A register of preceptors could provide a platform for audit and quality assurance principles, ensuring adequate education and preparation of preceptors. Effective preceptorship requires training, recognition and support. Successful

  13. Adult food-induced anaphylaxis hospital presentations in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Bridget; Chandra, Devika; Fitzharris, Penny

    2016-04-06

    Food allergy including anaphylaxis is an increasing clinical problem in many countries. Little information is available regarding prevalence, causative foods and time trends in the New Zealand adult population. This cross-sectional study investigated the incidence of hospital presentation with food-induced anaphylaxis in New Zealand among adults and adolescents over a 10-year period. Ministry of Health hospital discharge data from 2002 to 2011 were analysed using food allergy and anaphylaxis-related International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes to identify acute hospital presentations. There was an average annualised rate of hospital food-induced anaphylaxis presentations of 4.8 per 100 000 adults (aged ≥15 years) for the period reviewed. Subgroup analyses revealed significant differences by gender, age group and ethnicity, notably higher rates in females, younger adults (15-34 years) and Pacific Island populations. Seafood was the most common food allergen group, followed by nuts. Time trend analysis revealed a 1.7-fold increase in the 10-year period, mainly attributable to an increase in rates in the Pacific Island population. These data confirm food-induced anaphylaxis as an increasing problem in New Zealand and show significant differences in incidence of hospital presentation in different ethnic populations. Future research will be required to understand and address disparities in the incidence of these conditions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Long term Geomagnetically Induced Current observations from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divett, T.; Rodger, C. J.; Mac Manus, D. H.; Dalzell, M.; Thomson, A. W. P.; Clarke, E.; Petersen, T.; Clilverd, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Transpower New Zealand Limited have measured DC currents at transformers in the New Zealand electrical network at multiple South Island locations . Near continuous archived DC current data exist since 2001, starting with 11 different substations, and expanding from 2012 to include 17 substations. In some cases multiple measurements are made at different transformers inside the same substation. Primarily the measurements were to monitor the impact of the High Voltage DC system linking the North and South Islands when it is operating in "Earth return" mode. The 2012 expansion in measurement locations was specifically undertaken to better monitor the Geomagnetically Induced Current (GIC) Space Weather risk. It is recognised that GIC caused the loss of a South Island transformer in November 2001, during a storm that caused multiple alarms on GIC monitors across that island. The long time period spanned by the monitoring and the relatively dense spatial coverage make this an internationally important dataset for GIC studies.In this poster we will therefore present preliminary analysis of current and magnetic field data measured during large geomagnetic storms. During storms we find some locations report GIC of many tens of amps, with strong variation across the South Island. Of particular importance to operators, the GIC magnitude varies inside substations, depending on the local electrical setup. Due to the number of GIC measurements during large geomagnetic storms (e.g., for >40 nT/min local magnetic field rate of change) in our dataset we are able to make rough estimates of the extreme GIC values likely in a worst case scenario. As the extreme level is many hundred's of amps, GIC is clearly a hazard to the New Zealand electrical transmission system, despite the countries geomagnetic mid-latitude location.

  15. Glaciation in New Zealand — the first century of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Maxwell

    The year 1965 is seen as the end of a prolonged pioneering stage in New Zealand Quaternary studies. Description of evidence of formerly extended glaciers began in 1861, and by 1965 about 138 relevant publications had appeared. The following factors and developments in particular influenced directions and progress: (1) initially, ongoing 19th century interest in the 'Glacial Controversy' and consequently in 'Ice Age' manifestations in the large, isolated, middle-latitude islands of New Zealand; (2) from 1864, vigorous gold-mining excavations in Quaternary morainic deposits; (3) throughout the period, domestic disputes about the extent of glacierisation, the number and dates of glacial events; (4) especially after 1917, consistent extension of sound stratigraphic terminology throughout New Zealand; (5) in 1944, recognition of evidence for temperature fluctuations in fossiliferous Late Tertiary/Pleistocene marine strata in North Island, with prospects for correlation with South Island glacial events; (6) after World War II, more overseas contacts and experience, giving confidence to those developing independent criteria for distinguishing and evaluating successive ice advances and non-glacial interludes; (7) also mainly since the War, facilities for aerial mapping, radiocarbon dating and palynology; (8) a new 1:250,000-scale mapping programme by the Geological Survey begun in 1957, which raised many nomenclatural questions. From 1957, internal glacial correlations and progress towards an essentially climate-stratigraphic classification culminated in Suggate's 1965 scheme, embodying a Holocene subdivision preceded by four Late Pleistocene glacial stages with non-glacial interludes and by an Early Pleistocene glaciation. Despite some correlation problems and questions as to the status of certain intervals, the scheme has been widely accepted and used. Recent work, however, suggests that the time for substantial revision is at hand.

  16. Control of clinical paratuberculosis in New Zealand pastoral livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, M; Ridler, A; Wilson, P R; Heuer, C

    2018-01-01

    This review summarises current control measures for clinical paratuberculosis (Johne's disease; JD) in New Zealand pastoral livestock. Most New Zealand sheep, deer, beef and dairy cattle herds and flocks are infected by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map). Dairy cattle and deer are mostly infected with bovine (Type II), and sheep and beef cattle with ovine (Type I) strains. Control in all industries is voluntary. While control in sheep and beef cattle is ad hoc, the dairy and deer industries have developed resources to assist development of farm-specific programmes. The primary target for all livestock is reduction of the incidence rate of clinical disease rather than bacterial eradication per se. For dairy farms, a nationally instituted JD-specific programme provides guidelines for risk management, monitoring and testing clinically suspect animals. While there is no formal programme for sheep farms, for those with annual prevalences of clinical disease >2%, especially fine wool breeds, vaccination may be a cost effective control option. The deer industry proactively monitors infection by a national abattoir surveillance programme and farmers with an apparent high disease incidence are encouraged to engage with a national network of trained consultants for management and control advice. Evaluation of the biological and economic effectiveness of control in all industries remains to be undertaken. Nevertheless, opportunities exist for farmers, who perceive significant JD problems in their herds/flocks, to participate in systematic best-practice activities that are likely to reduce the number of clinical infections with Map on their farms, and therefore the overall prevalence of JD in New Zealand's farming industries.

  17. CAS – A Journey Has Begun in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Smith

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a journey through hand-held technology changes in mathematics teaching and learning and raises questions we as mathematics educators should be considering in the shorter and longer term. New Zealand is embarking on a Computer Algebraic Systems (CAS Pilot Programme in secondary school mathematics. The Ministry of Education and the New Zealand Qualifications Authority have selected secondary schools to be part of a pilot programme in the use of CAS technology in mathematics classes. The aim of the pilot programme is to improve teaching and learning of mathematics through the use of this technology. Six schools in 2005 used CAS technology with Year 9 (13-14 year olds students and, an additional 16 schools joined the programme in 2006. The pilot is planned to continue with an increasing number of schools in subsequent years. By the time students in the pilot schools reach Years 11, 12 and 13, alternative external assessments using the CAS technology will be available. Professional development support and assistance in obtaining and using the technology will be provided to the pilot schools. The project's emphasis in 2005 was on the Geometry and Algebra strands; the Statistics strand was added in 2006. By 2010 the first cohort of project programme students will have been through their secondary mathematics education via a CAS environment. New Zealand teachers have only a finite time to get into CAS technology and integrate it into their teaching practice. This paper discusses a research project based on a mathematics department professional development that is linked to the pilot.

  18. Sistemas osso-implante ex vivo utilizando haste intramedular polimérica para imobilização de fraturas femorais em bovinos jovens Ex vivo bone-implant systems using polymeric intramedullary nails for fixation of femoral fractures in young calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odael Spadeto Junior

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento de novos aparatos usando materiais disponíveis e de baixo custo pode ser uma alternativa viável para o tratamento cirúrgico de fraturas em ossos longos de bovinos. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência mecânica de fêmures de bovinos jovens com fratura diafiseal, imobilizados com hastes intramedulares bloqueadas, compostas por diferentes polímeros. Para tanto, testes físicos de compressão e flexão, por meio de uma máquina universal de ensaios foram realizados em quatro grupos distintos de seis fêmures obtidos de bovinos jovens. Em um dos grupos, os ossos foram mantidos íntegros (grupo controle, enquanto que os outros os ossos, foram fraturados e imobilizados com uma haste intramedular bloqueada, composta por polipropileno, poliacetal ou poliamida (uma para cada grupo. Independente do polímero utilizado, nenhuma das hastes estudadas ofereceu aos fêmures fraturados resistência comparável ao osso íntegro, quando consideradas em conjunto as forças de flexão e compressão. A concordância desses achados com resultados in vivo previamente publicados, demonstra que a metodologia utilizada para testes ex vivo pode ser útil na seleção de materiais mais resistentes para confecção de novos modelos.The development of new devices using available and low cost materials may be an useful alternative for the treatment of long bone fractures in large animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical strength of young bovine femur with diaphyseal fracture fixed with different polymeric intramedullary nails. Bending and compression tests using a universal machine were carried out in 4 distinct groups of 6 femurs from young calves. In one of the groups bones were intact while in the other three fractured bones were fixed using an intramedullary nail made of polypropylene, polyacetal or polyamide (one for each group. Considering bending and compression tests together, none of the used polymers offered

  19. New Zealand Asia-Pacific energy series country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, N.D.; Keevill, H.D.

    1992-03-01

    This report on New Zealand is one of a series of country studies intended to provide a continuous, long-term source of energy sector analysis for the Asia-Pacific region. This report addresses significant changes occurring due to the reform, deregulation, and privatization of the economy in general and the energy sector in particular; provides the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation; petroleum and gas issues are highlighted, particularly the implications of foreign trade in oil and gas; provides the latest available statistics and insights to energy policy that are not generally available elsewhere.

  20. Moral foundations predict religious orientations in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bulbulia

    Full Text Available The interplay between religion, morality, and community-making is a core theme across human experience, yet scholars have only recently begun to quantify these links. Drawing on a sample of 1512 self-identified religious - mainly Christian (86.0% - New Zealanders, we used structural equation modeling to test hypothesized associations between Religious Orientations (Quest, Intrinsic, Extrinsic Personal, Extrinsic Social and Moral Foundations (Care/Harm, Fairness/Cheating, Loyalty/Betrayal, Authority/Subversion, Sanctity/Degradation. Our results show, for the first time in a comprehensive model, how different ways of valuing communities are associated with different ways of valuing religion.

  1. Tobacco imagery on New Zealand television 2002–2004

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Rob; Ketchel, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    Considerable emphasis has been placed on the importance of tobacco imagery in the movies as one of the “drivers” of smoking among young people. Findings are presented from a content analysis of 98 hours of prime‐time programming on New Zealand television 2004, identifying 152 scenes with tobacco imagery, and selected characteristics of those scenes. About one in four programmes contained tobacco imagery, most of which might be regarded as “neutral or positive”. This amounted to about two scen...

  2. Critical health psychology in New Zealand: Developments, directions and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Kerry; Lyons, Antonia C; Stephens, Christine

    2017-10-01

    We examine how critical health psychology developed in New Zealand, taking an historical perspective to document important influences. We discuss how academic appointments created a confluence of critical researchers at Massey University, how interest in health psychology arose and expanded, how the critical turn eventuated and how connections, both local and international, were important in building and sustaining these developments. We discuss the evolution of teaching a critical health psychology training programme, describe the research agendas and professional activities of academic staff involved and how this sustains the critical agenda. We close with some reflections on progress and attainment.

  3. Sub-aqueous sulfur volcanos at Waiotapu, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, S.; Rickard, D. [University of Wales, Cardiff (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Browne, P.; Simmons, S. [University of Auckland (New Zealand). Geothermal Institute and Geology Dept.; Jull, T. [University of Arizona, Tucson (United States). AMS Facility

    1999-12-01

    Exhumed, sub-aqueous sulfur mounds occur in the Waiotapu geothermal area, New Zealand. The extinct mounds are < 2 m high and composed of small (< 0.5 cm) hollow spheres, and occasional teardrop-shaped globules. They are located within a drained valley that until recently was connected to Lake Whangioterangi. They were formed a maximum of 820 {+-} 80 years BP as a result of the rapid sub-aqueous deposition of sulfur globules, formed when fumarolic gases discharged through molten sulfur pools. Similar globules are now being formed by the discharge of fumarolic gases through a sub-aqueous molten sulfur pool in Lake Whangioterangi. (author)

  4. Analysis of milking characteristics in New Zealand dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J P; Jago, J G; Lopez-Villalobos, N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the variation in milking characteristics, and factors associated with these traits, in grazing dairy cows milked without premilking stimulation. Milk yield, duration, and average and maximum milk flow rate data were collected from 38 farms in New Zealand at 2 time points (spring and autumn) during the 2010 to 2011 season. Subsequently, a second data set, allowing the generation of daily milk flow profiles, was collected from 2 farms in the 2011 to 2012 season. Corresponding animal data, such as breed, date of birth, and ancestry information, were extracted from the New Zealand Dairy Industry Good Animal Database (New Zealand Animal Evaluation Ltd., Hamilton, New Zealand). Residual milking duration (deviation from the regression line of milk yield on milking duration) was calculated, allowing the identification of fast-milking cows independent of milk yield. Variance components for the milking characteristics traits were estimated using an animal linear mixed model. The average milk yield was 10 kg/milking and the average milking duration was 360 s. The average milk flow rate was 1.8 kg/min and maximum milk flow 3.3 kg/min, with 44% of milk flow curves being classified as bimodal. Primiparous animals exhibited different milk flow profiles, with a lower maximum flow, than multiparous animals, possibly due to differences in cisternal capacity. Residual milking duration was shortest (-10s) in mid-lactation (121-180 d) and was 13s longer for Jersey compared with Friesian cows; however, it was 19s shorter when adjusted for energy content. Residual milking duration had a negligible genetic correlation (-0.07) with milk yield, indicating that selection for cows with shorter residual milking duration should have a negligible effect on milk yield. A heritability of 0.27 indicated that residual milking duration could be valuable as part of a breeding program. Knowledge of the distribution of milking durations for a given milk yield

  5. Unemployment in a Small Open Economy: Finland and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Mayes, David; Vilmunen, Jouko

    1999-01-01

    Unemployment is now the key issue for economic policy in the OECD and Europe in particular. By examining data from the period 1962–1996 for two highly different small open OECD economies, Finland and New Zealand, in a VEC model this paper seeks to cast light on three questions: the degree to which unemployment has been the result of slow adjustment to large external shocks; the degree to which differences in labour market structures can lead to different responses to shocks; the importance of...

  6. BIM IMPLEMENTATION IN A NEW ZEALAND CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYING PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis Harrison; Derek Thurnell

    2015-01-01

    5D BIM – generating cost data via the building information modelling (BIM) process- has the potential to be used by quantity surveyors (QSs) to streamline their workflows and increase their provision of quality service. Consultant QSs experienced in the use 5D BIM, from the New Zealand office of one large global practice, were interviewed on their perceptions of the benefits of, and barriers to, 5D BIM implementation within their firm. Findings suggest that 5D BIM has numerous benefits over t...

  7. The P-Star Model in Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Ramya Hewarathna

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies the usefulness of the P-star model in the analysis of the behaviour of prices in Australia and New Zealand. The P-star model is based on the quantity theory of money and the belief that the price level tends to move towards the equilibrium price level. The main contribution of this model is the use of the price gap - the difference between current price and the equilibrium price (P-star) - to forecast inflation. Hence, if the equilibrium price is greater than the current pr...

  8. Ancient Egypt to modern ophthalmology: via Otago, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, Douglas J

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the contribution of two New Zealanders, Barrie Jones and Rowland Wilson, to the development of modern ophthalmology. Their related contribution was made over a period of 80 years; it began in Egypt with Wilson, developed when they worked together in Dunedin and where they created the foundations for the brilliant career that Jones was to go on to in London. Their story emphasizes the impact of teaching and mentorship. It highlights the extended reach of teaching and the power of continuity in research.

  9. Drawing conclusions: perceptions of the New Zealand agricultural landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Amy West

    1996-01-01

    When I made the decision to finish my undergraduate education in New Zealand, I was barraged with comments about 'the beautiful natural landscapes', 'Oh you'll love the natural beauty' and 'They have such a diverse wild landscape'. However it was the aversion to comments about the agriculture which interested me. 'There are more sheep than people' is what I heard, yet where was the talk about the land which these sheep occupied? So began my quest, both as a landscape architect and as an artis...

  10. Developing a New Zealand casemix classification for mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, Kathy; Gaines, Phillipa; Burgess, Philip; Green, Janette; Bower, Alison; Buckingham, Bill; Mellsop, Graham

    2004-10-01

    This study aimed to develop a casemix classification of characteristics of New Zealand mental health services users. Over a six month period, patient information, staff time and service costs were collected from 8 district health boards. This information was analysed seeking the classification of service user characteristics which best predicted the cost drivers of the services provided. A classification emerged which explained more than two thirds of the variance in service user costs. It can be used to inform service management and funding, but it is premature to have it determine funding.

  11. Corynebacterium ovis (pseudo-tuberculosis) lymphadenitis in a sheep farmer: a new occupational disease in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, R W; Schousboe, M; Allen, J P; Grant, C C

    1986-09-10

    Corynebacterium ovis lymphadenitis is a common disease in high country sheep in New Zealand and has previously been reported in humans overseas. The first human case is reported in New Zealand with a sheep confirmed as the infection source.

  12. Artists in Schools: "Kick Starting" or "Kicking Out" Dance from New Zealand Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, Barbara; Buck, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    New Zealand primary school teachers have access to a comprehensive arts curriculum that includes dance, drama, music, and visual arts. This research focused on several teachers' reality of implementing the dance curriculum in New Zealand primary schools, drawing on Snook's (2012) study in this field. Our research valued the voices of teachers,…

  13. Synopsis of Grimmia Hedw. in New Zealand, including Grimmia wilsonii sp. nov

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, H.C.

    1998-01-01

    The New Zealand Grimmia Hedw. specimens from AK, AKU, BM, CHR, OTA and WELT have been revised and a bryological field trip to the New Zealand Southern Alps was made to study specimens in their natural habitats. As a result of the revision and the field trip, G. anodon, G. austrofunalis, G.

  14. Using Mixed Methods to Build Research Capacity within the Spinal Cord Injured Population of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Martin; Derrett, Sarah; Paul, Charlotte; Beaver, Carolyn; Stace, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, a 4-year longitudinal study of all people admitted to the two New Zealand spinal units commenced. It aims to (a) explore interrelationship(s) of body, self, and society for people with spinal cord injury (SCI) and (b) investigate how entitlement to rehabilitation and compensation through New Zealand's Accident Compensation Corporation…

  15. Using Co-innovation to Stimulate Innovation in the New Zealand Agricultural Sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, N.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Small, B.; Turner, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently implemented research and development program; Co-learning and Coinnovation to Achieve Impact in New Zealand’s Biological Industries (Primary Innovation for short) aims to stimulate innovation in the New Zealand agricultural sector, which is an important contributor to the New Zealand

  16. Text-Bullying: Associations with Traditional Bullying and Depression among New Zealand Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskauskas, Juliana

    2010-01-01

    Bullying via mobile phone text messages (text-bullying) is a growing problem in New Zealand. Little research exists on this important issue. This study examined the nature and prevalence of text-bullying among adolescents. A total of 1,530 students ages 11-18 from three schools in New Zealand participated in this research. Students completed…

  17. Reply to O'Neill: The Privatisation of Public Schooling in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathdee, Rob

    2011-01-01

    In a recent contribution to this journal, John O'Neill (2011) argues that recent privatisation practices in New Zealand public schooling are evidence of a small, but growing, influence of neo-liberalism on New Zealand's public education. The focus in his paper is on the active enablement of non-government provision of public education through, for…

  18. A Philosophy of Geography for New Zealand Schools. Foreword: Clark on a Philosophy of Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Provides background information on Andrew Clark specifically addressing his work in geography while in New Zealand in order to place Clark's 1941 paper entitled "A Philosophy of Geography for New Zealand Schools" into intellectual context by emphasizing links between this paper and his later work. Provides his 1941 paper in full. (CMK)

  19. Curriculum Development in New Zealand: New Directions, Opportunities and Challenges for School Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastier, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Geography as a senior subject in New Zealand secondary schools has been long overdue for curriculum change. The 2007 New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) currently being implemented at the senior school level provides geography with the mechanisms for positive curriculum change, giving teachers the opportunity to refocus on existing teaching, learning and…

  20. The Critical Success Factors for School and Community (Joint Use) Libraries in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Vivienne Kaye D.; Calvert, Philip J.

    2007-01-01

    Joint use libraries in New Zealand are generally found in the form of School and Community Libraries, primarily in rural areas, but there is little information available about their effectiveness or success. Research was undertaken by surveying all identified joint use libraries in New Zealand and then following this with detailed Case Studies of…

  1. Notes on the Emerging Accreditation Regimes in Australia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Kristian; Blyth, Sue; Scott, Fionna

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, new higher education regulatory regimes have emerged in both New Zealand and Australia. In Australia, the new Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) employs a risk management approach while the New Zealand Quality Agency (NZQA) has adopted an evaluative approach. In practice, these varying approaches create real…

  2. Equity in New Zealand University Graduate Outcomes: Maori and Pacific Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Reremoana; Taumoepeau, Mele; Kokaua, Jesse; Tustin, Karen; Gollop, Megan; Taylor, Nicola; Hunter, Jackie; Kiro, Cynthia; Poulton, Richie

    2018-01-01

    Higher education confers significant private and social benefits. Maori and Pacific peoples are under-represented within New Zealand universities and have poorer labour market outcomes (e.g., lower wages, under-represented in skilled professions). A New Zealand tertiary education priority is to boost Maori and Pacific success in an effort to…

  3. An Evaluation of the Team-Teach Behaviour Support Training Programme in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, James; Walker, Lawrence; Hornby, Garry

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of teachers and other professionals of Team-Teach behaviour support training in New Zealand. Analysis of course evaluations, questionnaires, interviews and documents provide the findings. Comparisons are made with Team-Teach training in the UK and similarities and differences between New Zealand training…

  4. Assessing New Zealand High School Science Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Kofi Acheaw; Conner, Lindsey; Astall, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) is the knowledge required for effective technology integration in teaching. In this study, New Zealand high school science teachers' TPACK was assessed through an online survey. The data and its analysis revealed that New Zealand's high school science teachers in general had a high perception of…

  5. Tertiary Teachers' Perspectives on Their Role in Student Engagement: A Snapshot from Aotearoa New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Linda; Zepke, Nick; Butler, Philippa

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on data from a large mixed method research project funded by the Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) in Aotearoa New Zealand. The article addresses the question: how do tertiary teachers in Aotearoa New Zealand perceive their role in student engagement? Quantitative data revealed both similarities and differences…

  6. An Analysis of New Zealand's Changing History, Policies and Approaches to Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Claire

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand has an internationally unique approach to early childhood education, which includes a bicultural early childhood curriculum, a robust infrastructure of organisation and management overseen by the New Zealand Ministry of Education, and a growing reputation for innovation in early childhood teaching and learning. This paper examines how…

  7. Collective Skill Formation: A Historical Analysis of the Least-Likely Case New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trampusch, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article is the first study investigating New Zealand's early legislation in apprenticeship from the perspective of historical institutionalism. It shows that, between 1865 and the 1940s, New Zealand's apprenticeship system was less liberal in character than it is today, because a collective skill formation regime, involving dual training, was…

  8. Research in the Work of New Zealand Teacher Educators: A Cultural-Historical Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, David A. G.; Gunn, Alexandra C.; Hill, Mary F.; Haigh, Mavis

    2016-01-01

    In this article we use cultural-historical activity theory to explore the place of research in the work of New Zealand university-based teacher educators (TEs). We consider how aspirations for a research-informed initial teacher education are served by New Zealand universities' recruitment practices and TEs' actual work. We suggest that TEs value…

  9. Cultural Invariance of Goal Orientation and Self-Efficacy in New Zealand: Relations with Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissel, Kane; Rubie-Davies, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is substantial evidence indicating that various psychological processes are affected by cultural context, but such research is comparatively nascent within New Zealand. As there are four large cultural groups in New Zealand, representing an intersection of individualist, collectivist, indigenous, colonial, and immigrant cultures,…

  10. Assessment for, of and as Learning: Developing a Sustainable Assessment Culture in New Zealand Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In line with international trends, assessment policies and practices have increased in importance in New Zealand over the last two decades. The focus in this article is on examining the contested nature of the development of an assessment culture in New Zealand--one that meets the needs of the government by providing information on school…

  11. Influences on Children's Environmental Cognition: A Comparative Analysis of New Zealand and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Bielschowsky, Ikerne; Freeman, Claire; Vass, Eva

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates Mexican and New Zealand children's conception of the environment and their understandings of environmental issues, focusing on how personal experiences, culture and school-based environmental education (EE) programmes influence their perspectives. Sixty Year 5 children (age 9-11) from three schools in Dunedin (New Zealand)…

  12. Negotiating Differences in Learning and Intercultural Communication: Ethnic Chinese Students in a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Prue

    2004-01-01

    Research on ethnic Chinese students studying in a Western (New Zealand) learning environment exposed differences in communication and learning between their first culture and the host culture. Thirteen ethnic Chinese students in a New Zealand university business school participated in an 18-month ethnographic study. The findings indicate that…

  13. The isoflavone content of commercially-available feline diets in New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, K.M.; Rutherfurd, S.M.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    To identify and quantify concentrations of the isoflavones genistein, daidzein, biochanin A and formononetin in commercially-prepared feline diets sold in New Zealand. METHODS: Feline diets (n=138) were collected from supermarkets, pet stores and veterinary clinics in New Zealand. Diets were

  14. Development of a New Zealand database of plant virus and virus-like organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, J.D.; Lister, R.A.; Clover, G.R.G.; Horner, M.B.; Thomas, J.E.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.; MacDiarmid, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    The recent 8th Australasian plant virology workshop in Rotorua, New Zealand, discussed the development of a New Zealand database of plant virus and virus-like organisms. Key points of discussion included: (i) the purpose of such a database; (ii) who would benefit from the information in a database;

  15. High-frequency precursors to P-wave arrivals in New Zealand : implications for slab structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, R.D. van der; Snieder, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report revisits the very early high-frequency slab phases from earthquakes in the Kermadec slab (between −25°S and −37°S) that arrive as a precursor to the P wave onset at stations in New Zealand. The analysis of short-period digital records for station SNZO (South Karori New Zealand) for the

  16. Immigrant Parents' Perceptions of Their Children's Language Practices: Afrikaans Speakers Living in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Gary

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study which investigated the language-related experiences of Afrikaans-speaking South African immigrants living in New Zealand. In-depth narrative interviews with 14 parents of children aged 18 and under were conducted in various geographical locations across New Zealand. The focus was on their perceptions of their…

  17. Macro-Level Policy and Micro-Level Planning: Afrikaans-Speaking Immigrants in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Gary; Knoch, Ute

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on a study which investigated the language lives of Afrikaans-speaking South African immigrants in New Zealand. Particularly, it focuses on their awareness of and attitudes to language policy in both South Africa and New Zealand, and how these influence their own and their family's language practices. Narrative interviews with…

  18. Towards a Pre-Service Technology Teacher Education Resource for New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forret, Michael; Fox-Turnbull, Wendy; Granshaw, Bruce; Harwood, Cliff; Miller, Angela; O'Sullivan, Gary; Patterson, Moira

    2013-01-01

    The Pre-service Technology Teacher Education Resource (PTTER) was developed as a cross-institutional resource to support the development of initial technology teacher education programmes in New Zealand. The PTTER was developed through collaboration involving representatives from each of the six New Zealand university teacher education providers,…

  19. Building a Future-Oriented Science Education System in New Zealand: How Are We Doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jane; Bull, Ally

    2013-01-01

    This paper makes the case for deep and radical change to New Zealand's approach to science education. It discusses the implications of recent science education research and policy work, and argues New Zealand still has a long way to go to developing a future-oriented science education system. It explores what needs to change and contains…

  20. Language Attitudes and Speech Behavior: New Zealand English and Standard American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, George B.; Zahn, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Analyzed attitudes of 617 New Zealand listeners toward a New Zealand English speaker and a Standard American English speaker. Speakers altered pitch and rate in their delivery. On balance, the impact of paralinguistic behaviors was greater than that of accent. (Author/SLD)

  1. A Survey of New Zealand Academic Reference Librarians: Current and Future Skills and Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawner, Brenda; Oliver, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    A survey of New Zealand academic subject/reference librarians was conducted in mid-2011 to identify the most highly valued knowledge, skills and competencies of reference librarians working in libraries in the tertiary sector. The project was part of an international collaborative project involving 13 countries. The results from New Zealand show…

  2. Research in Applied Linguistics and Language Teaching and Learning in New Zealand (2006-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, Alastair; Adams, Rebecca; Skyrme, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    This survey gives an overview of research into language teaching and learning in New Zealand over a five-year period, including the context of that research. The majority of New Zealanders are monolingual English speakers, yet the country faces complex linguistic challenges arising from its bicultural foundations and the multicultural society it…

  3. Engaging Dairy Farmers to Improve Water Quality in the Aorere Catchment of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jodie; Edgar, Nick; Tyson, Ben

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, dairy farmers in the Aorere Catchment of New Zealand began to investigate allegations that they had a pollution problem affecting the viability of the community's shellfish industry. From 2007 to 2010, the New Zealand Landcare Trust's Aorere Catchment Project (ACP) helped farmers engage in actions to improve conditions in their waterways.…

  4. Takina te Kawa: Laying the Foundation, a Research Engagement Methodology in Aotearoa (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwhati, Marama; Toia, Rawiri; Te Maro, Pania; McRae, Hiria; McKenzie, Tabitha

    2010-01-01

    In the bi-cultural context of Aotearoa (New Zealand), engagement with stakeholders that is transparent and culturally responsive is a priority for educational research. More common research approaches in New Zealand have followed a Western euro-centric model of engagement with research participants resulting in interventions and initiatives that…

  5. Applying Funds of Knowledge Theory in a New Zealand High School: New Directions for Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Linda

    2016-01-01

    In New Zealand teacher practice is expected to be inclusive and supportive of all learners (Ministry of Education, 2007). However, diverse evidence highlights inequitable school experiences for Maori and Pasifika students. This study explored the application of funds of knowledge (FoK) theory within a New Zealand high school, with a focus on…

  6. Promoting the Maori Language to Non-Maori: Evaluating the New Zealand Government's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bres, Julia

    2011-01-01

    New Zealand's two main government Maori language planning agencies, the Maori Language Commission and the Ministry of Maori Development, have engaged for some time in language planning targeting the attitudes and behaviours of non-Maori New Zealanders towards the Maori language. This activity is undertaken on the basis that the attitudes and…

  7. Scutellista caerulea (Fonscolombe, 1832) ( Hymenoptera : Pteromalidae ), new to New Zealand for the second time!

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Thorpe

    2013-01-01

    In 1921, Scutellista caerulea was imported and released in Nelson, New Zealand, for the biological control of pest scale insects. It was thought to have failed to establish, and is therefore currently considered to be absent from the New Zealand fauna. On 17 April 2013, a live specimen was captured in the wild in Auckland.

  8. Scutellista caerulea (Fonscolombe, 1832 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, new to New Zealand for the second time!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thorpe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1921, Scutellista caerulea was imported and released in Nelson, New Zealand, for the biological control of pest scale insects. It was thought to have failed to establish, and is therefore currently considered to be absent from the New Zealand fauna. On 17 April 2013, a live specimen was captured in the wild in Auckland.

  9. Schools "as" Communities and "for" Communities: Learning from the 2010-2011 New Zealand Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The author followed five primary (elementary) schools over three years as they responded to and began to recover from the 2010-2011 earthquakes in and around the city of Christchurch in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. The purpose was to capture the stories for the schools themselves, their communities, and for New Zealand's historical…

  10. Women in Education, Science and Leadership in New Zealand: A Personal Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    In global terms, the position of women in New Zealand society is relatively strong and at one stage in the early 2000s many senior roles were occupied by women. Equality of opportunity for women in leadership in science and the community has been a focus of attention in New Zealand in government, education, and the sciences for at least two…

  11. Moving backwards, moving forward: the experiences of older Filipino migrants adjusting to life in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montayre, Jed; Neville, Stephen; Holroyd, Eleanor

    2017-12-01

    To explore the experiences of older Filipino migrants adjusting to living permanently in New Zealand. The qualitative descriptive approach taken in this study involved 17 individual face-to-face interviews of older Filipino migrants in New Zealand. Three main themes emerged from the data. The first theme was "moving backwards and moving forward", which described how these older Filipino migrants adjusted to challenges they experienced with migration. The second theme was "engaging with health services" and presented challenges relating to the New Zealand healthcare system, including a lack of knowledge of the nature of health services, language barriers, and differences in cultural views. The third theme, "new-found home", highlighted establishing a Filipino identity in New Zealand and adjusting to the challenges of relocation. Adjustment to life in New Zealand for these older Filipino migrants meant starting over again by building new values through learning the basics and then moving forward from there.

  12. Globalisation, localisation and implications of a transforming nursing workforce in New Zealand: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Paul; Badkar, Juthika; Didham, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Severe staff and skill shortages within the health systems of developed countries have contributed to increased migration by health professionals. New Zealand stands out among countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in terms of the high level of movements in and out of the country of skilled professionals, including nurses. In New Zealand, much attention has been given to increasing the number of Māori and Pacific nurses as one mechanism for improving Māori and Pacific health. Against a backdrop of the changing characteristics of the New Zealand nursing workforce, this study demonstrates that the globalisation of the nursing workforce is increasing at a faster rate than its localisation (as measured by the growth of the Māori and New Zealand-born Pacific workforces in New Zealand). This challenges the implementation of culturally appropriate nursing programmes based on the matching of nurse and client ethnicities. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. The last deglaciation in New Zealand ; revisiting the Misery moraines at Arthur's Pass in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, David; Rother, Henrik; Woodward, Craig; Shulmeister, James; Wilcken, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Recent debate on mid-latitude New Zealand glaciation has focused on reconstructing paleo-climate conditions leading into the (global) Last Glacial Maximum and subsequent deglaciation dynamics during the last termination. Paleo-environmental evidence coupled with reliable glacial chronologies supporting a Southern Hemisphere glacial readvance commensurate with Younger Dryas timing ( 11.5-12.5 ka) showing similar cooling as observed in the Northern Hemisphere has also been hotly debated. Many New Zealand lake and pollen records suggest a minor cooling or hiatus in warming during the period from 14.5 - 12.0 ka which pre-dates YD onset and is more commonly associated with the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR) (14.7 - 13.0 ka). Achieving the required sub-millennial temporal differentiation using in-situ cosmogenic exposure dating comes with numerous difficulties. The Arthur's Pass Moraine complex, deposited by an alpine glacier advancing out of the Otira Gorge splaying east and westward over the divide of the Southern Alps in New Zealand ( 950 masl), exhibits a full post-LGM glacial chronology. The moraines consist of multiple cross-valley terminal, lobate and discontinuous latero-terminal moraines up to 3 kilometres down valley from the proximal Misery moraines at the outlet of Otira Gorge. Within the gorge towards the headwall only 1 km up-valley from the Misery sequence, no other moraines are evident. We have determined paired 10-Be and 26-Al exposure ages from 58 greywacke samples taken from all major moraines, including repeat sampling from the Misery moraines. The new exposure ages show that the Arthur's Pass moraine system spans a period of 19.5 ka to 12.0 ka (Putnam local NZ production rate) with mean recessional moraine ages in chrono-stratigraphic sequence. The overall timing of deglaciation after peak LGM conditions is similar to that observed at down-valley terminal positions of the larger outlet river systems of the Rakaia, Waimakariri and Rangitata Valleys

  14. A Case Study of Two Sign Language Interpreters Working in Post-Secondary Education in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Denise

    2013-01-01

    A case study of two qualified New Zealand Sign Language interpreters working in a post-secondary education setting in New Zealand was undertaken using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educational sign language interpreting at the post-secondary level requires a different set of skills and is a reasonably new development in New Zealand.…

  15. 9 CFR 98.10a - Embryos from sheep in regions other than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. 98.10a Section 98.10a Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... Asses § 98.10a Embryos from sheep in regions other than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. (a) Except for embryos from sheep in Australia, Canada, or New Zealand, embryos from sheep may only be imported...

  16. 9 CFR 98.21 - Embryos from sheep in regions other than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. 98.21 Section 98.21 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... in regions other than Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. Except for embryos from sheep in Australia, Canada, or New Zealand, embryos from sheep may only be imported into the United States if they comply...

  17. "Healthy Eating - Healthy Action": evaluating New Zealand's obesity prevention strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Rachael M; Hoek, Janet A; Buckley, Sue; Croxson, Bronwyn; Cumming, Jacqueline; Ehau, Terry H; Tanuvasa, Ausaga Fa'asalele; Johnston, Margaret; Mann, Jim I; Schofield, Grant

    2009-12-06

    New Zealand rates of obesity and overweight have increased since the 1980s, particularly among indigenous Māori people, Pacific people and those living in areas of high deprivation. New Zealand's response to the obesity epidemic has been The Healthy Eating-Healthy Action: Oranga Kai - Oranga Pumau (HEHA) Strategy ('the Strategy'), launched in 2003. Because the HEHA Strategy explicitly recognises the importance of evaluation and the need to create an evidence base to support future initiatives, the Ministry of Health has commissioned a Consortium of researchers to evaluate the Strategy as a whole. This paper discusses the Consortium's approach to evaluating the HEHA Strategy. It includes an outline of the conceptual framework underpinning the evaluation, and describes the critical components of the evaluation which are: judging to what extent stakeholders were engaged in the process of the strategy implementation and to what extent their feedback was incorporated in to future iterations of the Strategy (continuous improvement), to what extent the programmes, policies, and initiatives implemented span the target populations and priority areas, whether there have been any population changes in nutrition and/or physical activity outcomes or behaviours relating to those outcomes, and to what extent HEHA Strategy and spending can be considered value for money. This paper outlines our approach to evaluating a complex national health promotion strategy. Not only does the Evaluation have the potential to identify interventions that could be adopted internationally, but also the development of the Evaluation design can inform other complex evaluations.

  18. Regional Issue: Social Policy Developments in Australia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In his celebrated work of comparative policy, Francis Castles argued that a radical wage-earning model of welfare had evolved in Australia and New Zealand over the course of the 20th century. The Castles' thesis is shown to have two parts: first, the ‘fourth world of welfare’ argument that rests upon protection of workers; and, second, an emphasis on the path-dependent nature of social policy. It is perfectly possible to accept the second premise of the argument without the first, and indeed many do so. It is also possible to accept the importance of wage level protection concerns in Australasian social policy without accepting the complete fourth world thesis. This article explores the path of social democracy in Australia and New Zealand and the continuing importance of labour market regulation, as well as considering the extent to which that emphasis still makes Australasian social policy distinctive in the modern age. The argument focuses on the data and policies relating to labour market protection and wages, as well the systems of welfare and social protection, and the comparative information on poverty and inequality. PMID:24436502

  19. Metazoan parasites from odontocetes off New Zealand: new records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kristina; Randhawa, Haseeb; Poulin, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Information about the parasite fauna of spectacled porpoises and cetaceans from New Zealand waters in general is scarce. This study takes advantage of material archived in collections of the Otago Museum in Dunedin and Massey University in Auckland, sampled from cetacean species found stranded along the New Zealand coastline between 2007 and 2014. Parasites from seven species of cetaceans (spectacled porpoise, Phocoena dioptrica (n = 2 individuals examined); pygmy sperm whale (n = 1); long-finned pilot whale, Globicephala melas (n = 1); Risso's dolphin, Grampus griseus (n = 1); short-beaked common dolphin, Delphinus delphis (n = 7); striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba (n = 3) and dusky dolphin, Lagenorhynchus obscurus (n = 2)) from the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract, cranial sinus, liver, urogenital and mammary tract, fascia and blubber were investigated. Ten parasite species were identified, belonging to the Nematoda (Stenurus minor, Stenurus globicephalae, Halocercus sp. (Pseudaliidae), Anisakis sp. (Anisakidae), Crassicauda sp. (Crassicaudidae)), Cestoda (Phyllobothrium delphini and Monorygma grimaldii (Phyllobothriidae)), Trematoda (Brachicladium palliata and Brachicladium delphini (Brachicladiidae)) and Crustacea (Scutocyamus antipodensis (Cyamidae)). Some of the parasite species encountered comprises new records for their host. Although the material was not sampled within a systematic parasitological survey, the findings contain valuable new information about the parasite fauna of rare, vagile and vulnerable marine wildlife from a remote oceanic environment.

  20. Trampolines in New Zealand: a decade of injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, D J; Hume, P A; Wilson, B D

    1994-01-01

    Despite international concern about the safety of trampolines, they have become increasingly popular in New Zealand. While internationally attention has centred on a relatively few cases of catastrophic cervical spine injury, little research effort has been directed at placing these incidents in a wider context. To redress this, a descriptive epidemiological study of trampoline-related injury in New Zealand was undertaken. National hospitalization and mortality data for a 10-year period revealed 2098 hospitalizations and two deaths. The incidence rate for hospitalizations increased from 3.1 per 100,000 population per year in 1979 to 9.3 in 1988. Of the hospitalized victims, 71% were injured on home trampolines and 80% fell from the trampoline to the surrounding surface. Fractures were the commonest type of injury (68%), and the body site most frequently involved was the upper limb (53%). There was no evidence of a high incidence of severe head and neck injuries. It was concluded that, although existing trampoline standards addressed many of the issues raised by this research, measures to reduce the impact of falls from trampolines to the ground and to prohibit the provision of trampolines as 'play equipment' are required. PMID:7894953

  1. Housing and Health of Kiribati Migrants Living in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Teariki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Settlement is a complex process of adjustment for migrants and refugees. Drawing on recent research on the settlement experiences of Kiribati migrants and their families living in New Zealand, this article examines the role of housing as an influencer of the settlement and health of Kiribati migrants. Using qualitative methodology, in-depth interviews were conducted with fourteen Kiribati migrants (eight women and six men representing 91 family members about the key issues and events that shaped their settlement in New Zealand. The stories told by participants affirm the association between housing and health. The study serves as an important reminder that children bear a great cost from living in poorly insulated and damp housing, and adults bear the mental costs, including social isolation resulting from inadequate rental housing. Detailed information about how this migrant group entered the private rental housing market, by taking over the rental leases of other Kiribati migrants vacating their rental properties, indicated some of the unintended consequences related to a lack of incentives for landlords to make improvements. With the most vulnerable families most at risk from inadequate housing, this research concludes that there is a need for minimum housing standards to protect tenants.

  2. Regional Issue: Social Policy Developments in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Christopher

    2013-12-01

    In his celebrated work of comparative policy, Francis Castles argued that a radical wage-earning model of welfare had evolved in Australia and New Zealand over the course of the 20th century. The Castles' thesis is shown to have two parts: first, the 'fourth world of welfare' argument that rests upon protection of workers; and, second, an emphasis on the path-dependent nature of social policy. It is perfectly possible to accept the second premise of the argument without the first, and indeed many do so. It is also possible to accept the importance of wage level protection concerns in Australasian social policy without accepting the complete fourth world thesis. This article explores the path of social democracy in Australia and New Zealand and the continuing importance of labour market regulation, as well as considering the extent to which that emphasis still makes Australasian social policy distinctive in the modern age. The argument focuses on the data and policies relating to labour market protection and wages, as well the systems of welfare and social protection, and the comparative information on poverty and inequality.

  3. Chapter 48: history of neurology in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Paul B; Storey, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    In comparison with most Western countries, neurology as a recognized medical specialty has a relatively brief history in Australia: the national body for neurologists, the Australian (since 2006: and New Zealand) Association of Neurologists, was founded only in 1950. The development of neurology in both countries was heavily influenced by British neurology, and until recently a period in the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London was regarded as essential to specialist training in neurology. Nevertheless, Australians have made significant contributions to international neurology since the early 20th century, commencing with the neuroanatomical research of the colorful expatriate Grafton Elliot Smith (1871-1937). Other Australian physicians who attracted early international attention through their work in clinical neuroscience included William John Adie (1886-1935), the anatomist John Irvine Hunter (1898-1924) and the surgeon Norman Royle (1888-1944). The first Australian physician to unambiguously commit himself to neurology was Alfred Walter Campbell (1868-1938), a remarkable personality who established an imposing reputation as neurocytologist and neuropathologist. The chapter provides a concise overview of the development of neurology as a clinical and academic specialty in Australia and New Zealand.

  4. Sleep disorders among high school students in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Antonio T; Samaranayake, Chinthaka B; Blank, Christopher J; Roberts, Gareth; Arroll, Bruce

    2013-12-01

    Adolescents are known to have high risk factors for sleep disorders, yet the youth rates of sleep disturbances are unknown. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders among New Zealand high school students. The Auckland Sleep Questionnaire (ASQ) was administered to high school students at six schools in the North Island. Schools were chosen to reflect a range of ethnicities and school deciles, which identify the socioeconomic status of households in the school catchment area. A total of 1388 students completed the ASQ. The median age was 17 years (range 14-23) and females represented 43.5% (n=604) of the total group. A total of 37.2% of the students surveyed reported having significant sleep symptoms lasting longer than one month. Depression and anxiety were present in 51.7% and 44.8% of students reporting a sleep problem, respectively. A moderate correlation was observed between sleep problems and depression (r=0.34, psleep problems and anxiety (r=0.31, pstudents with sleep symptoms (12.2% and 5.5% respectively). No difference was found in the rate of sleep problems reported by different ethnic groups. A considerable proportion of students surveyed reported significant sleep symptoms. This study has the potential to aid physicians within New Zealand in better appreciating the burden of sleep disorders faced by young people and in effectively assessing and managing different causes of sleep symptoms in this demographic.

  5. Exposure to fumes in typical New Zealand welding operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryson, E W; Rogers, D A

    1991-08-28

    Sixteen welders, welding under typical New Zealand conditions, had ambient air within their welding helmets sampled and analysed for ozone, nitrogen oxides, fluoride, carbon monoxide, aluminium, chromium, iron, nickel, zinc and total dust. Postshift urinary metals were also analysed, and a respiratory questionnaire completed for each welder. Levels above the New Zealand Workplace Exposure Standard (WES) were found for nitrogen dioxide in four welders (two TIG, one MMA and one plasma cutter), and for total chromium in one plasma cutter, who also had a nickel level of 24% of the WES. Dust levels were highest in the plasma cutters, with one reaching 8.67 mg/m3 (WES = 5 mg/m3). Urinary levels however did not indicate excessive short or long term uptake. Where efficient fume extraction was in use, levels of air contaminants were lower than with natural ventilation. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 67% of welders, 38% meeting criteria for chronic bronchitis (relative risk = 2.0). Smoking welders reported more symptoms than nonsmoking welders.

  6. Econometric Analysis of Landscape Preferences in Canterbury, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The landscape of rural Canterbury, New Zealand, has evolved from tussock grasslands to one of the most productive dairying areas in the world. While these changes represent a boon for Canterbury’s economy, the visual impact of land-use change has been dramatic. In this paper, we evaluate which changes to the Canterbury landscape have been most pronounced, how people react to those changes, which aspects of the rural landscape are of greatest importance to both urban and rural residents of Canterbury, and whether cost-effective means of mitigating visual changes to the landscape exist. We find that the majority of Cantabrians hold unfavourable views of recent changes to the landscape—particularly with regard to dairying—a finding that is consistent across both urban and rural survey respondents. Using a visual assessment study with cross-classified random effect, we find that dairy cows, irrigators, and silage bales significantly reduce viewers’ subjective evaluations of landscapes while shelterbelts dramatically increase their subjective evaluations. Moreover, native New Zealand shelterbelts are preferred to exotic shelterbelts, but both are preferred to having no shelterbelts, suggesting that the negative visual impacts of dairy farming may be ameliorated by intensified tree planting.

  7. MANAGING CONFLICT IN ENGINEERING PROJECTS: NEW ZEALAND EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Naismith

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a wealth of knowledge concerning conflict management and its resolution in the workplace, however there is a dearth of information relating to conflict management and its resolution in engineering project management. This paper set out to examine the reality of conflict management in engineering project management in New Zealand. This was achieved through a review of credible literature sources and the completion of a pilot study to gain subject matter expert perspectives. The research suggests that conflicts can be destructive, resulting in anxiety and strong emotional responses leading to reflexive reactions including avoidance, aggression, fight, hostility and a breakdown in communications and relationships. Findings indicate that managing a project structure is synonymous with handling conflict and these disagreements can be detrimental to the success of a project. The initial results suggest that a number of factors act as drivers of conflict in engineering projects in New Zealand. These drivers are: power, personality, group dynamics and organisation culture. The conflict resolution tools cited as being widely used for engineering projects are collaboration and negotiation. The paper also offers recommendations for future research.

  8. Ecological distribution of protosteloid amoebae in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Zahn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the period of March 2004 to December 2007, samples of aerial litter (dead but still attached plant parts and ground litter (dead plant material on the ground were collected from 81 study sites representing a wide range of latitudes (34°S to 50°S and a variety of different types of habitats throughout New Zealand (including Stewart Island and the Auckland Islands. The objective was to survey the assemblages of protosteloid amoebae present in this region of the world. Twenty-nine described species of protosteloid amoebae were recorded by making morphological identifications of protosteloid amoebae fruiting bodies on cultured substrates. Of the species observed, Protostelium mycophaga was by far the most abundant and was found in more than half of all samples. Most species were found in fewer than 10% of the samples collected. Seven abundant or common species were found to display significantly increased likelihood for detection in aerial litter or ground litter microhabitats. There was some evidence of a general correlation between environmental factors - annual precipitation, elevation, and distance from the equator (latitude - and the abundance and richness of protosteloid amoebae. An increase in each of these three factors correlated with a decrease in both abundance and richness. This study provides a thorough survey of the protosteloid amoebae present in New Zealand and adds to a growing body of evidence which suggests several correlations between their broad distributional patterns and environmental factors.

  9. "Healthy Eating - Healthy Action": evaluating New Zealand's obesity prevention strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background New Zealand rates of obesity and overweight have increased since the 1980s, particularly among indigenous Māori people, Pacific people and those living in areas of high deprivation. New Zealand's response to the obesity epidemic has been The Healthy Eating-Healthy Action: Oranga Kai - Oranga Pumau (HEHA) Strategy ('the Strategy'), launched in 2003. Because the HEHA Strategy explicitly recognises the importance of evaluation and the need to create an evidence base to support future initiatives, the Ministry of Health has commissioned a Consortium of researchers to evaluate the Strategy as a whole. Methods This paper discusses the Consortium's approach to evaluating the HEHA Strategy. It includes an outline of the conceptual framework underpinning the evaluation, and describes the critical components of the evaluation which are: judging to what extent stakeholders were engaged in the process of the strategy implementation and to what extent their feedback was incorporated in to future iterations of the Strategy (continuous improvement), to what extent the programmes, policies, and initiatives implemented span the target populations and priority areas, whether there have been any population changes in nutrition and/or physical activity outcomes or behaviours relating to those outcomes, and to what extent HEHA Strategy and spending can be considered value for money. Discussion This paper outlines our approach to evaluating a complex national health promotion strategy. Not only does the Evaluation have the potential to identify interventions that could be adopted internationally, but also the development of the Evaluation design can inform other complex evaluations. PMID:19961625

  10. The antioxidant potential of the New Zealand surf clams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeleye, Tinu; Li, Yan; White, William Lindsey; Nie, Shaoping; Chen, Shuping; Wang, Junqiao; Lu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The antioxidant action of three New Zealand surf clams was evaluated for the first time. Aqueous (cd) and ethanolic extracts from Diamond shell - Crassula aequilatera, Storm shell - Mactra murchisoni, and Tua tua - Paphies donacina were studied for their antioxidant potentials using two in vitro assays. The ethanolic extracts were further fractioned into four parts; petroleum ether (pe), ethyl acetate (ea), n-butanol (nb), and the final aqueous fraction (w). Comparing among all fractions tested, the ea fraction of P. donacina showed the strongest free radical scavenging power, with a radical scavenging activity of 76.14% at 20μg/mL. The ea fraction of C. aequilatera had the highest copper reducing activity with an absorbance of 1.596 at 20μg/mL. Results from this study suggest that some bioactive compounds with significant antioxidant effects may exist in the New Zealand surf clams, and could potentially reduce oxidative stress to deliver health benefits or to produce functional foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yielder, Jill, E-mail: j.yielder@auckland.ac.nz [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen [University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  12. Iodine and Selenium Intakes of Postmenopausal Women in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brough, Louise; Gunn, Caroline A; Weber, Janet L; Coad, Jane; Jin, Ying; Thomson, Jasmine S; Mauze, Mathilde; Kruger, Marlena C

    2017-03-09

    Iodine and selenium are required for thyroid function. This study investigated iodine and selenium intakes in healthy, women aged 50-70 years (n = 97) from three cities in the North Island of New Zealand, after mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt. Iodine and selenium concentrations were determined in 24-h urine samples; daily intakes were extrapolated from amounts in urine (90% and 55% of daily intake, respectively). Three day diet diaries (3DDD) also estimated selenium and iodine (excluding iodised salt) intake. Median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was 57 (41, 78) µg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency. Estimated median iodine intake based on urine was 138 (100, 172) µg/day, below Recommended Dietary Intake (RDI) (150 µg/day) with 25% below Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) (100 µg/day). Estimated median selenium intake was 50 (36, 71) µg/day based on urine and 45 (36, 68) µg/day using 3DDD, below RDI (60 µg/day) with 49%-55% below EAR (50 µg/day). Median bread intakes were low at 1.8 (1.1, 2.7) serves/day; 25% consumed ≤1 serve/day. Although population iodine intakes improved following mandatory fortification, some had low intakes. Selenium intakes remain low. Further research should investigate thyroid function of low consumers of iodine fortified bread and/or selenium in New Zealand.

  13. The impact of patient's complaints on New Zealand dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Tania; Cunningham, Wayne

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of receiving a patient complaint on dentists in New Zealand. A qualitative research method was chosen to investigate the experience of dentists in receipt of a complaint. Nine dentists practising in New Zealand who had received complaints from a variety of sources were interviewed. All volunteered having responded to requests and advertisements seeking participants for the study. In-depth interviews with line-by-line transcript analysis allowed the discovery of themes and subthemes related to the impact of complaints. Receiving a complaint was a stressful experience for these dentists. Anxiety, loss of confidence, fear of loss of income and altered relationships with complainants characterised respondents' personal responses. Dentists were distracted from family time by the complaint, and their families experienced upset and anxiety. Anxiety spread within the practice to colleagues and staff. Respondents and their staff had to cope with difficult and at times abusive behaviour from complainants and their families. Dentists reported feeling helpless, struggling with lack of timeliness, the need for a satisfactory and meaningful resolution and the impact of third parties, particularly in the genesis of the complaint. They were aware of costs incurred by patients. They sought meaningful support but sometimes late in the process. For these respondents the complaint led to few changes in their practice. Receiving a complaint is a stressful experience and dentists need appropriate emotional as well as legal support. The responsibility for this lies with the wider profession.

  14. Sun Protection Among New Zealand Primary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Ryan; Leung, William; Stanley, James; Reeder, Anthony; Mackay, Christina; Smith, Moira; Barr, Michelle; Chambers, Tim; Signal, Louise

    2017-12-01

    Schools are an important setting for raising skin cancer prevention awareness and encouraging sun protection. We assessed the clothes worn and shade used by 1,278 children in eight schools in the Wellington region of New Zealand. These children were photographed for the Kids'Cam project between September 2014 and March 2015 during school lunch breaks. Children's mean clothing coverage (expressed as a percentage of body area covered) was calculated. Data on school sun-safety policies were obtained via telephone. Mean total body clothing coverage was 70.3% (95% confidence interval = 66.3%, 73.8%). Body regions with the lowest mean coverage were the head (15.4% coverage), neck (36.1% coverage), lower arms (46.1% coverage), hands (5.3% coverage), and calves (30.1% coverage). Children from schools with hats as part of the school uniform were significantly more likely to wear a hat (52.2%) than children from schools without a school hat (2.7%). Most children (78.4%) were not under the cover of shade. Our findings suggest that New Zealand children are not sufficiently protected from the sun at school. Schools should consider comprehensive approaches to improve sun protection, such as the provision of school hats, sun-protective uniforms, and the construction of effective shade.

  15. Constraining fault growth rates and fault evolution in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Geoffroy; Bull, Jonathan M.; Barnes, Phil M.; Taylor, Susanna K.; Horgan, Huw

    2000-10-01

    Understanding how faults propagate, grow, and interact in fault systems is important because they are primarily responsible for distributing strain in the upper crust. They localize deformation and stress release, often producing surface displacements that control sedimentation and fluid flow, either by acting as conduits or barriers. Identifying fault spatial distribution, quantifying activity, evaluating linkage mechanisms, and estimating fault growth rates are key components in seismic risk evaluation. Scientists from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), New Zealand, and the Southampton Oceanography Centre, United Kingdom, are working on a collaborative project that aims to improve understanding of faulting processes in the Earth's crust.The program comprises two research cruises to survey the Whakatane Graben, New Zealand, which is a zone of intense seismicity active extensional faulting, and rapid subsidence within the back-arc region of the Pacific-Australia plate boundary zone (Figure 1). Few places in the world offer the same opportunity to study the mechanisms by which major crustal faults have grown from small- to large-scale structures capable of generating moderate to large-magnitude earthquakes.

  16. Flower color influences insect visitation in alpine New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Diane R; Bischoff, Mascha; Lord, Janice M; Robertson, Alastair W

    2010-09-01

    Despite a long-standing belief that insect pollinators can select for certain flower colors, there are few experimental demonstrations that free-flying insects choose between natural flowers based on color. We investigated responses of insect visitors to experimental manipulations of flower color in the New Zealand alpine. Native syrphid flies (Allograpta and Platycheirus) and solitary bees (Hylaeus and Leioproctus) showed distinct preferences for visiting certain flower species. These responses were determined, in part, by flower color, as insects also responded to experimental manipulations of visible petal color in 7 out of 11 tests with different combinations of flower species and insect type. When preferences were detected, syrphid flies chose yellow over white petals regardless of flower species, whereas Hylaeus chose white over yellow Ourisia glandulosa. In some cases, the strength and direction of color preference depended on the context of other floral traits, in which case the response usually favored the familiar, normal combination of traits. Syrphid flies also visited in response to floral morphological traits but did not show preference based on UV reflectance. The unusually high preponderance of white flowers in the New Zealand alpine is not explained by complete generalization of flower color choice. Instead, the insect visitors show preferences based on color, including colors other than white, along with other floral traits. Furthermore, they can respond in complex ways to combinations of floral cues, suggesting that traits may act in nonadditive ways in determining pollinator visitation.

  17. Estudo prospectivo e randomizado de pacientes com fraturas expostas da diáfise do fêmur submetidos a osteossíntese com placa e haste intramedular bloqueada a foco aberto Prospective and randomized study of patients with open fractures of the femoral shaft, treated with plate or open intramedullary locked nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Marcos Ferracini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de um estudo prospectivo e randomizado de duas técnicas de osteossíntese no tratamento das fraturas expostas diafisárias do fêmur, realizado entre janeiro de 2002 a abril de 2004. Haste intramedular bloqueada fresada realizada a foco aberto e placa e parafusos foram empregadas no tratamento de 20 pacientes em cada grupo. De acordo com a classificação de Gustilo, 26 (65% foram tipo I, 10 (25% tipo II e 4 (10% tipo IIIA. Quanto ao mecanismo das fraturas, 21 por trauma contuso e 19 por ferimentos de arma de fogo.Três pacientes foram excluídos nas avaliação final. Houve complicação em 12 (32,4%,sendo 4 no grupo de placas e 8 no grupo das hastes. O grupo de haste bloqueada apresentou 2 (10% infecções profundas, 2 infecções superficiais (10%, 1 falha de consolidação (5%.O grupo de placa e parafusos resultou em 1 infecção profunda associada à falha de consolidação (5,8%, 1 infecção superficial (5,8%. Pela classificação de resultados de Thorensen obteve-se bons e excelentes resultados em 28 (75,7% fraturas, 3 (7.5% casos regulares e 6 (15% casos ruins. A estabilização com placas e parafusos, trouxe menores taxas de complicações, quando comparadas com o uso de hastes fresadas a foco aberto,embora sem significado estatístico.We assessed the complications and treatment outcomes in a prospective and randomized study of two osteosynthesis techniques in open femoral shaft fractures. Between January 2002 and April 2004, 40 patients with open fractures of the femoral shaft were assessed, with 20 being treated with open reamed intramedullary locked nail and 20 with plate. Twenty-six (65% fractures were classified as Gustilo type -I open fractures; ten (25% as type II and four (10%, as type IIIA. There were 21 blunt injuries and 19 gunshot injuries. Three patients were excluded from the final assessment. Complications were observed in 12 (32.4% patients, 4 in the plate group and 8 in the nail group. Reamed intramedullary

  18. Incidence and characteristics of vitamin D deficiency rickets in New Zealand children: a New Zealand Paediatric Surveillance Unit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Benjamin J; Dickson, Nigel P; Houghton, Lisa A; Ward, Leanne M; Taylor, Barry J

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the incidence and characteristics of vitamin D deficiency rickets in New Zealand (NZ). Prospective surveillance among paediatricians of Vitamin D Deficiency Rickets was conducted by the New Zealand Paediatric Surveillance Unit (NZPSU) for 36 months, from July 2010 to June 2013, inclusive. Inclusion criteria were: children and adolescents rickets (defined by low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and elevated alkaline phosphatase levels, and/or radiological rickets). Fifty-eight children with confirmed vitamin D deficiency rickets were identified. Median age was 1.4 (range 0.3-11) years, 47% were male, and 95% of the children were born in NZ; however, the majority of the mothers (68%) were born outside NZ. Overall annual incidence of rickets in children aged children. Key risk factors identified were: darker skin pigment, Indian and African ethnicity, age rickets remains a problem for NZ children. Key risk factors remain similar to those identified in the international literature. Preventative targeted vitamin D supplementation, as per existing national guidelines, was lacking in all cases reported. Vitamin D deficiency rickets is the most significant manifestation of vitamin D deficiency in growing children. To reduce the incidence of this disease among those at high risk, increasing awareness and implementation of current public health policies for targeted maternal, infant and child supplementation are required. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  19. New Zealand Pacific peoples' drinking style: too much or nothing at all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huakau, John; Asiasiga, Lanuola; Ford, Michael; Pledger, Megan; Casswell, Sally; Suaalii-Sauni, Tamasailau; Lima, Ieti

    2005-06-03

    To describe the alcohol consumption patterns and related harms of some Pacific peoples (Samoan, Cook Islands Maori, Tongan, Niuean, Fijian, and Tokelauan) living in Aotearoa (New Zealand), and to draw comparisons with measures from the general New Zealand population. The Pacific Drugs and Alcohol Consumption Survey (PDACS) was carried out with 1103 randomly selected Pacific peoples aged between 13 and 65 years old who were resident in households throughout New Zealand. The survey used computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) and computer assisted cell-phone interviewing (CACI). The interviews were carried out in 2002/03. We descriptively compare findings from the PDACS with those from the 2000 National Alcohol Survey (NAS). Fifty-seven percent of Pacific peoples were drinkers (males 61%, females 51%), compared with 85% of the general New Zealand population (males 88%, females 83%). The average annual consumption of absolute alcohol was 21 litres for Pacific drinkers (males 28 litres, females 14 litres) compared with 11 litres for general New Zealand population drinkers (males 16 litres, females 7 litres). The typical occasional quantity consumed by Pacific drinkers was eight drinks (males: nine drinks, females: five drinks) compared with four drinks for drinkers in the general New Zealand population (males: five drinks, females: around four drinks). Thirty-three percent of Pacific drinkers consumed enough to feel drunk at least weekly (males 41%, females 25%) compared with 9% of drinker in the general New Zealand population (males 13%, females 6%). Eighteen percent of Pacific males and 10% of Pacific females reported being physically assaulted by someone who had been drinking compared with 8% and 5% of national males and females respectively. Twenty-three percent of Pacific males and 16% of Pacific females got drunk when there was an important reason to stay sober, compared with 8% and 5% of general New Zealand males and females respectively. Nineteen

  20. Measuring the 'obesogenic' food environment in New Zealand primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Mary-Ann; Swinburn, Boyd

    2004-03-01

    Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem in New Zealand and many other countries. Information is needed to guide interventions that reduce the 'obesogenic' (obesity-promoting) elements of school environments. The aim of this study was to identify and measure the obesogenic elements of the school environment and the canteen sales of energy-dense foods and drinks. A self-completion questionnaire was developed for assessing each school's nutrition environment and mailed to a stratified random sample of New Zealand schools. The responses from primary schools (n = 200, response rate 61%) were analysed. Only 15.5% of schools had purpose-built canteen facilities and over half ran a food service for profit (31% profit to the school, 24.5% profit for the contractors). Only 16.5% of schools had a food policy, although 91% of those rated the policy as effective or very effective. The most commonly available foods for sale were pies (79%), juice (57%) and sausage rolls (54.5%). Filled rolls were the most expensive item (mean dollars 1.79) and fruit the least expensive (mean dollars 0.47). The ratio of 'less healthy' to 'more healthy' main choices was 5.6:1, for snacks it was 9.3:1 and for drinks it was 1.4:1. In contrast, approximately 60% of respondents said that nutrition was a priority for the school. Only 50% felt there was management support for healthy food choices and only 39% agreed that mainly nutritious food was offered by the food service. 'Less healthy' choices dominated food sales by more than 2:1, with pies being the top selling item (>55000 per week). We found that the food environment was not conducive to healthy food choices for the children at New Zealand schools and that this was reflected in the high sales of relatively unhealthy foods from the school food services. Programmes that improve school food through policies, availability, prices and school ethos are urgently needed.

  1. New Zealand phylogeography: evolution on a small continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Graham P; Trewick, Steven A

    2009-09-01

    New Zealand has long been a conundrum to biogeographers, possessing as it does geophysical and biotic features characteristic of both an island and a continent. This schism is reflected in provocative debate among dispersalist, vicariance biogeographic and panbiogeographic schools. A strong history in biogeography has spawned many hypotheses, which have begun to be addressed by a flood of molecular analyses. The time is now ripe to synthesize these findings on a background of geological and ecological knowledge. It has become increasingly apparent that most of the biota of New Zealand has links with other southern lands (particularly Australia) that are much more recent than the breakup of Gondwana. A compilation of molecular phylogenetic analyses of ca 100 plant and animal groups reveals that only 10% of these are even plausibly of archaic origin dating to the vicariant splitting of Zealandia from Gondwana. Effects of lineage extinction and lack of good calibrations in many cases strongly suggest that the actual proportion is even lower, in keeping with extensive Oligocene inundation of Zealandia. A wide compilation of papers covering phylogeographic structuring of terrestrial, freshwater and marine species shows some patterns emerging. These include: east-west splits across the Southern Alps, east-west splits across North Island, north-south splits across South Island, star phylogenies of southern mountain isolates, spread from northern, central and southern areas of high endemism, and recent recolonization (postvolcanic and anthropogenic). Excepting the last of these, most of these patterns seem to date to late Pliocene, coinciding with the rapid uplift of the Southern Alps. The diversity of New Zealand geological processes (sinking, uplift, tilting, sea level change, erosion, volcanism, glaciation) has produced numerous patterns, making generalizations difficult. Many species maintain pre-Pleistocene lineages, with phylogeographic structuring more similar to

  2. Survey of domestic food handling practices in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, S E; Whyte, R; Bayne, G; Paulin, S M; Lake, R J; van der Logt, P

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this survey was to obtain information on the domestic meat and poultry handling practices of New Zealanders in order to support the development of quantitative risk models, as well as providing data to underpin food safety campaigns to consumers. A sample of 1000 New Zealand residents, over 18 years of age, were randomly selected from the electoral roll and asked to participate in a national postal food safety study during 2005. Three hundred and twenty six respondents completed and returned questionnaires containing usable answers, and most of these respondents 'always' prepared the main meal within the household. The majority of meat (84.6%) and poultry (62.9%) purchased by New Zealanders was fresh (rather than frozen), and most consumers (94.4%) claimed that the time taken from food selection to reaching their home was 1 h or less. The majority (approximately 64%) of fresh meat and poultry was frozen in the home and the most favoured method of thawing was at room temperature for up to 12 h. The most common time period for storing cooked or raw meat and poultry in domestic refrigerators was up to 2 days. Most survey respondents preferred their meat and poultry to be cooked either medium or well done. The most popular cooking method for chicken was roasting or baking, while most respondents preferred to pan-fry steak/beef cuts, minced beef or sausages/hamburgers. The potential for undercooking was greatest with pan-fried steak with 19.8% of respondents preferring to consume this meat raw or rare. In answer to questions relating to food handling hygiene practices, 52.2% of respondents selected a hand washing sequence that would help prevent cross contamination. However, it was estimated that 41% and 28% of respondents would use knives and kitchen surfaces respectively in a manner that could allow cross contamination. The data in this survey are self-reported and, particularly for the hygiene questions, respondents may report an answer that they

  3. Archaeomagnetic studies of Maori Hangi Stones from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinger, R.; Turner, G. M.; McFadgen, B.

    2014-12-01

    Global palaeosecular variation models still suffer from a paucity of high quality data from the SW Pacific region. Over the past two years we have worked to fill this gap with archaeomagnetic data - directions and palaeointensities - by studying the thermoremanent magnetization of Maori hangi cooking stones. Used as heat retainers, these stones are heated, frequently above the Curie temperatures of constituent magnetic minerals, before being buried in earth ovens. After removal of the food, hangi sites are often abandoned with the stones still in situ, carrying a record of the magnetic field in which they were last cooled. We have sampled a range of archaeological hangi sites throughout New Zealand, dating to early prehistoric times (ca 700 BP). The stones vary in lithology from andesites, originating from the central North Island volcanoes, favoured by Maori for their durability and with NRM intensities up to 30 A/m, to greywackes and schists from the main axial ranges, with NRMs as weak as 10-4A/m. In all cases, we have independently oriented and retrieved several stones, and we have made several specimens from each stone, either by drilling (standard cylindrical specimens) or sawing (pseudo-cubes) in the laboratory. We have calculated site mean palaeomagnetic directions from principal component analysis of thermal demagnetization data, discarding the data of stones that show evidence of disturbance. We have carried out palaeointensity experiments using a Coe/Thellier method with pTRM and tail checks, and with selection criteria modified to the situation. Rock magnetic experiments contribute to our understanding of the mineralogy, domain state and blocking temperature spectra. The palaeodirections fall between declinations of 348o and 24.5o, and inclinations of -46.4o and -72.4o, with palaeointensities between 43.7±1.4 and 81.3±6.1 mT. Most fall within the expected range of secular variation for New Zealand. However the palaeointensity of 81.34±6.08mT, from an

  4. Challenges of the New Zealand healthcare disaster preparedness prior to the Canterbury earthquakes: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Gauld, Robin; Lovell, Sarah; McBride, David; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Al-Harthy, Abdullah

    2013-03-15

    Disasters are a growing global phenomenon. New Zealand has suffered several major disasters in recent times. The state of healthcare disaster preparedness in New Zealand prior to the Canterbury earthquakes is not well documented. To investigate the challenges of the New Zealand healthcare disaster preparedness prior to the Canterbury earthquakes. Semi-structured interviews with emergency planners in all the District Health Boards (DHBs) in New Zealand in the period between January and March 2010. The interview protocol revolved around the domains of emergency planning adopted by the World Health Organization. Seventeen interviews were conducted. The main themes included disinterest of clinical personnel in emergency planning, the need for communication backup, the integration of private services in disaster preparedness, the value of volunteers, the requirement for regular disaster training, and the need to enhance surge capability of the New Zealand healthcare system to respond to disasters. Prior to the Canterbury earthquakes, healthcare disaster preparedness faced multiple challenges. Despite these challenges, New Zealand's healthcare response was adequate. Future preparedness has to consider the lessons learnt from the 2011 earthquakes to improve healthcare disaster planning in New Zealand.

  5. Climate change and infectious diseases in New Zealand: a brief review and tentative research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Slaney, David; Baker, Michael G; Hales, Simon; Britton, Emma

    2011-01-01

    To review the literature on infectious diseases and meteorological and climate change risk factors in the New Zealand context and to describe a tentative research agenda for future work. We performed literature searches in May 2010 using Medline and Google Scholar. We also searched five health-related government agencies in New Zealand for documentation on climate change and health. The effect of climate variability and change on vector-borne disease has been considered in more detail than any other infectious disease topic (n=20+ journal articles and reports relating to New Zealand). Generally, concern has arisen around the risk of new mosquito incursions and increased risks of dengue and Ross River fevers in the long term. For enteric diseases, the picture from five New Zealand publications is somewhat mixed, although the data indicate that salmonellosis notifications increase with higher monthly temperatures. One interpretation of the New Zealand data is that communities without reticulated water supplies could be more vulnerable to the effects of climate change-mediated increases in protozoan diseases. This information informed a tentative research agenda to address research gaps. Priorities include the need for further work on a more integrated surveillance framework, vector-borne diseases, enteric diseases, skin infections, and then work on topics for which we found no published New Zealand work (such as influenza and leptospirosis). Finally, we found that health-related government agencies in New Zealand have relatively little 'climate change and health' information on their websites. Although some informative work has been done to date, much scope remains for additional research and planning to facilitate prevention, mitigation, and adaptation responses in the New Zealand setting around climate change and infectious disease risks. The tentative research agenda produced could benefit from a wider critique, and government agencies in New Zealand could

  6. New Zealand and Australia wind energy in a non subsidised market environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieshout, P. van [DesignPower New Zealand Ltd., Wellington (New Zealand)

    1996-12-31

    Significant preliminary work has been undertaken by New Zealand and Australian Power/Generation Companies regarding Wind Power. Turbines are installed in Australia and New Zealand to test the wind and the technical applicability in the Australian wind diesel and the New Zealand high wind speed environment. Projects in Esperance, Thursday Island and King Island illustrate hybrid wind diesel applications. A single Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) has been successfully operated in New Zealand for the last 3 years. A new 3.5 MW wind farm is operational and Resource Consent has been granted for a 65 MW wind farm in New Zealand. Design Power is very proud to be involved in many of the New Zealand and Australian projects. It is obvious that wind power is just starting here, however the start has been promising and it is expected that wind power is here to stay. This paper will address some of the issues associated with wind power in New Zealand and Australia, particularly those that are different from Europe and America. It shows the opportunities and challenges regarding the operation of WTGs in these countries. It addresses the non subsidized electrical pricing structure and the influence of the economically necessary high wind speeds or diesel systems on the choice of technology, particularly the control algorithm of WTGs and the subsystems. It reviews several of the issues associated with predicting the amount of energy that a WTG can generate, again taking into account the high wind speed control algorithms. It further addresses the issue of embedded generation and the influence that a wind farm might have on the electrical network. It continues to address issues associated with wind diesel systems. The paper concludes that wind power will be viable in the near future both in New Zealand and Australia, but also that care should be taken with data analysis and hardware choices during the next phase of implementation of wind power in New Zealand and Australia. 7 figs.

  7. Poles Apart: Comparing Trends of Alien Hymenoptera in New Zealand with Europe (DAISIE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Ward

    Full Text Available Developing generalisations of invasive species is an important part of invasion biology. However, trends and generalisations from one part of the world may not necessarily hold elsewhere. We present the first inventory and analysis of all Hymenoptera alien to New Zealand, and compare patterns from New Zealand with those previously published from Europe (DAISIE. Between the two regions there was broad correlation between families with the highest number of alien species (Braconidae, Encyrtidae, Pteromalidae, Eulophidae, Formicidae, Aphelinidae. However, major differences also existed. The number of species alien to New Zealand is higher than for Europe (334 vs 286, and major differences include: i the much lower proportion of intentionally released species in New Zealand (21% vs 63% in Europe; and ii the greater proportion of unintentionally introduced parasitoids in New Zealand (71.2% vs 22.6%. The disharmonic 'island' nature of New Zealand is shown, as a high proportion of families (36% have no native representatives, and alien species also represent >10% of the native fauna for many other families. A much larger proportion of alien species are found in urban areas in New Zealand (60% compared to Europe (~30%, and higher numbers of alien species were present earlier in New Zealand (especially <1950. Differences in the origins of alien species were also apparent. Unlike Europe, the New Zealand data reveals a change in the origins of alien species over time, with an increasing dominance of alien species from Australasia (a regional neighbour during the past 25 years. We recommend that further effort be made towards the formation, and analysis, of regional inventories of alien species. This will allow a wider range of taxa and regions to be examined for generalisations, and help assess and prioritise the risk posed by certain taxa towards the economy or environment.

  8. Transgender Health: New Zealand's Innovative Statistical Standard for Gender Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pega, Frank; Reisner, Sari L; Sell, Randall L; Veale, Jaimie F

    2017-02-01

    The implementation of the New Zealand government's recently developed statistical standard for gender identity has led to, and will stimulate further, collection of gender identity data in administrative records, population surveys, and perhaps the census. This will provide important information about the demographics, health service use, and health outcomes of transgender populations to allow evidence-based policy development and service planning. However, the standard does not promote the two-question method, risking misclassification and undercounts; does promote the use of the ambiguous response category "gender diverse" in standard questions; and is not intersex inclusive. Nevertheless, the statistical standard provides a first model for other countries and international organizations, including United Nations agencies, interested in policy tools for improving transgender people's health.

  9. Oil and Gas Emergency Policy: New Zealand 2010 update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This publication provides a detailed look at the specific systems in New Zealand for responding to an oil supply crisis. In 2007, the IEA published ''Oil Supply Security: Emergency Response of IEA Countries''. Rather than waiting for the completion of the current review cycle to renew this full publication, the IEA will provide updates to the country chapters as these become available following the specific country's review. The aim of series of publications is to provide an overview of the IEA oil emergency response system and a detailed look at the specific systems in each IEA country for responding to an oil supply crisis. The 2007 publication represented the findings of a five year review cycle of the emergency response mechanisms in IEA member countries. Since the 2007 publication, the IEA has started a new cycle of reviews which now includes reviewing gas emergency policies.

  10. Persist and cope: New Zealand women in computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Hunter

    Full Text Available New Zealand has a thriving computing industry but further growth is hampered by a skills shortage. A lack of women in the industry exacerbates this problem. Women are under-represented in the industry, and those who do take up computing careers experience conditions of discrimination and marginalisation. This paper reports on a qualitative study of the strategies used by women to cope with their marginalisation. Using multi-sited ethnographic methodology, data were collected using semi-structured interviews with twenty-nine computing professionals. Despite some women denying any marginalisation, all were found to employ some form of coping strategy. Seven different strategies were identified. The women interviewed were more inclined to join organisations directly relating to their roles rather than support initiatives which might improve conditions for women.

  11. No worries, mate: a forensic psychiatry sabbatical in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Susan Hatters

    2013-01-01

    Sabbaticals were initially intended to take place one year of every seven and to provide an opportunity for study or travel. Psychiatrists rarely take sabbaticals, but they can be of tremendous value in widening professional and personal horizons. It is not merely the psychiatrist taking the sabbatical who reaps the benefits, but also the home institution and patients. Sabbatical-takers have an opportunity to learn across cultures, to experience a new system of medical care, and to develop a less provincial view of their work and indeed their place in the world. A sabbatical can be a time of substantial accomplishments, such as writing or reorganizing programs. In this article, the benefits of a forensic psychiatry sabbatical experience in New Zealand are described.

  12. Tobacco imagery on New Zealand television 2002–2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Rob; Ketchel, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    Considerable emphasis has been placed on the importance of tobacco imagery in the movies as one of the “drivers” of smoking among young people. Findings are presented from a content analysis of 98 hours of prime‐time programming on New Zealand television 2004, identifying 152 scenes with tobacco imagery, and selected characteristics of those scenes. About one in four programmes contained tobacco imagery, most of which might be regarded as “neutral or positive”. This amounted to about two scenes containing such imagery for every hour of programming. A comparison with our earlier content analysis of programming in 2002 indicated little change in the level of tobacco imagery. The effect of this imagery in contributing to young viewers taking up smoking, and sustaining the addiction among those already smoking, deserves more research attention. PMID:16998178

  13. Vector competence of New Zealand mosquitoes for selected arboviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Laura D; Chin, Pam; Cane, Rachel P; Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Mackereth, Graham

    2011-07-01

    New Zealand (NZ) historically has been free of arboviral activity with the exception of Whataroa virus (Togaviridae: Alphavirus), which is established in bird populations and is transmitted by local mosquitoes. This naive situation is threatened by global warming, invasive mosquitoes, and tourism. To determine the threat of selected medically important arboviruses to NZ, vector competence assays were conducted using field collected endemic and introduced mosquito species. Four alphaviruses (Togaviridae): Barmah Forest virus, Chikungunya virus, Ross River virus, and Sindbis virus, and five flaviviruses (Flaviviridae): Dengue virus 2, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, and Yellow fever virus were evaluated. Results indicate some NZ mosquito species are highly competent vectors of selected arboviruses, particularly alphaviruses, and may pose a threat were one of these arboviruses introduced at a time when the vector was prevalent and the climatic conditions favorable for virus transmission.

  14. The climate change challenge for general practice in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Rochelle; Randerson, Rebecca; Blashki, Grant

    2011-04-29

    Climate change is one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. Despite some inherent uncertainties in making predictions about climate change, there is wide scientific consensus that global warming is occurring; that it is largely due to manmade greenhouse gas emissions; and that it will have substantial health implications for the future. The predicted health impacts of climate change are now clearer for New Zealand, and general practitioners can take action to mitigate these impacts and adapt to the future environment. Actions required involve a combination of 'top-down' and 'ground-up' approaches; effective leadership and policy from our health institutions and, importantly, individual practice initiatives that transform these goals into practical outcomes.

  15. Control and eradication of animal diseases in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, R M

    2002-01-01

    New Zealand is free from all the major epidemic (Office International des Epizooties List A) diseases of animals and other important diseases, such as rabies and the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The once endemic conditions of sheep scab (Psoroptes ovis), bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), hydatids (Echinococcus granulosus) and Aujeszky's disease have been eradicated. Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) is no longer considered endemic and Pullorum disease (Salmonella Pullorum) has effectively been eradicated from commercial poultry flocks. There are current control programmes for bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis), enzootic bovine leucosis in dairy cattle, infectious bursal disease, ovine epididymitis (Brucella ovis), and caprine arthritis encephalitis. Historically, incursions by three important non-endemic diseases, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, classical swine fever and scrapie, have been successfully eliminated. Any new occurrence of a serious exotic disease would be dealt with swiftly using powerful legislative authorities available for the purpose.

  16. Deep Fault Drilling Project—Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Sutherland

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The Alpine Fault, South Island, New Zealand, constitutes a globally significant natural laboratory for research into how active plate-bounding continental faults work and, in particular, how rocks exposed at the surface today relate to deep-seated processes of tectonic deformation, seismogenesis, and mineralization. The along-strike homogeneity of the hanging wall, rapid rate of dextral-reverse slip on an inclined fault plane, and relatively shallow depths to mechanical and chemical transitions make the Alpine Fault and the broader South Island plate boundary an important international site for multi-disciplinary research and a realistic target for an ambitious long-term program of scientific drilling investigations.

  17. New Zealand Coals - A Potential Feedstock for Deep Microbial Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glombitza, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades of biogeochemical and microbiological research the widespread occurrence of microorganisms was demonstrated in deep marine and terrestrial sediments. With this discovery inevitably the question of potential carbon and energy sources for this deep subsurface microbial life...... metabolism. Thus, lithologies containing accumulated sedimentary organic matter (e.g. lignites and coals) may provide a large feedstock for deep microbial life releasing LMWOAs into the pore water during maturation. In this thesis, lignite and coal samples from sedimentary basins of New Zealand covering...... a broad and almost continuous maturity range representing diagenetic to catagenetic coalification levels were investigated to estimate their feedstock potential for deep microbial life using a novel developed analytical procedure to analyse kerogen-bound LMWOAs liberated by selective chemical degradation...

  18. Copper toxicosis in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, C J; Kim, D Y; Hanks, B C; Evans, T J

    2013-11-01

    Six 12- to 14-month-old New Zealand White rabbits were diagnosed with copper toxicosis. These rabbits were part of a group of 110 purchased and shipped overnight for research purposes. On arrival, the group experienced an abrupt diet change. Eight died over 3 weeks and 6 were submitted for postmortem examination. Microscopic findings included severe centrilobular to midzonal hepatocellular necrosis with rhodanine stain-positive copper granules in the remaining hepatocytes. Mild periportal fibrosis and biliary hyperplasia, hemoglobinuric nephrosis, and splenic erythrophagocytosis were also observed. Hepatic copper concentrations were elevated, ranging from 319 to 997 ppm. Clinical disease was not previously observed in younger rabbits gradually transitioned from the supplier's copper-supplemented diet. Copper toxicosis likely occurred in these rabbits from a combination of (1) increased duration of copper supplementation leading to increased hepatocellular stores and (2) stress leading to anorexia and release of hepatocellular copper stores similar to chronic copper toxicosis as described in sheep.

  19. Predictors of vitamin D status in New Zealand preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairncross, C T; Stonehouse, W; Conlon, C A; Grant, C C; McDonald, B; Houghton, L A; Eyles, D; Camargo, C A; Coad, J; von Hurst, P R

    2017-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has adverse health effects in young children. Our aims were to determine predictors of vitamin D status and then to use these factors to develop a practical tool to predict low 25(OH)D concentrations in preschool New Zealand children. A cross-sectional sample of 1329 children aged 2 to  75 nmol/L in 146(11%) of children. Factors independently associated with the risk of 25(OH)D Children who drank toddler milk (vitamin D fortified cow's milk formula marketed to young children) had a zero risk of 25(OH)D children at risk of 25(OH)D children. The tool had insufficient predictive ability for use in clinical situations, and suggests a need to promote safe, inexpensive testing to determine vitamin D status in preschool children. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Rickets in alpacas (Lama pacos) in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, F I; Thompson, K G; Grace, N D

    1994-12-01

    Rickets was diagnosed in two weaner alpacas from a flock showing ill thrift and lameness during the winter of 1992. Both animals had abnormally shaped ribs with occasional healing fractures, irregular thickening of growth plates and metaphyseal haemorrhages. The mean serum phosphorus concentrations of the alpacas fell during June and July, even though lambs grazing the same pasture had normal serum phosphorus concentrations and the phosphorus concentration of the pasture was considered adequate. Vitamin D deficiency may also have contributed to the osteodystrophy. The alpacas had a thick fleece during the winter, and diurnal Vitamin D, synthesis resulting from solar irradiation is likely to have been minimal, especially considering the reduced sunshine hours recorded during the 1992 winter. Surviving alpacas recovered after treatment with monosodium phosphate and an oral Vitamin D supplement. It is possible alpacas are more susceptible to deficiencies of phosphorus and Vitamin D than other grazing animals in New Zealand.

  1. Diagenetic quartz and amorphous silica in New Zealand coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, R.; Lindqvist, J.K. (Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, Dunedin (New Zealand))

    1993-08-01

    New Zealand coal seams (Late Cretaceous-Miocene, lignite-semi-anthracite) contain numerous and varied occurrences of diagenetic quartz and amorphous silica. Early diagenetic silicifications include: sub-horizontal and laterally extensive, quartz-mineralized bands; micro- and megascopic, euhedral quartz crystals, dispersed or concentrated in layers; and silicified in situ tree stumps. Late diagenetic forms include: sub-horizontal, quartz-mineralized bands, mostly [lt] 1 m in length; and fracture-infillings. The origins of the silica remain uncertain but leached basement rocks and coal measure sediments, and siliceous phytoliths within the coal-forming plants, are possible sources. The silicification of coal seams may have significant implications for exploration, mining and geological studies. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 plates.

  2. Opportunities and barriers for mobile health in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Farhaan; Norris, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Ownership and the use of mobile technologies greatly exceed those of personal desktop computer systems and countries throughout the world are beginning to understand how these technologies can enhance the delivery of healthcare (m-health). This paper reviews the opportunities and barriers for m-health and describes a study to understand its potential in New Zealand. A survey consisting of a questionnaire and in-depth interviews was used to reveal clinician and service provider attitudes to m-health. The general perception is that m-health will be an increasing component of future healthcare with many opportunities for empowering patients, delivering convenience care, and supporting carers as well as offering the potential for more effective public health and lifestyle broadcasting. Participants recognised several barriers to the acceptance and sustainability of m-health, identifying privacy of information and device form factor as major concerns.

  3. Software Development Methods and Tools: a New Zealand study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Phillips

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is a more detailed follow-up to a preliminary investigation of the practices of software engineers in New Zealand. The focus of this study is on the methods and tools used by software developers in their current organisation. The project involved detailed questionnaires being piloted and sent out to several hundred software developers. A central part of the research involved the identification of factors affecting the use and take-up of existing software development tools in the workplace. The full spectrum of tools from fully integrated I-CASE tools to individual software applications, such as drawing tools was investigated. This paper describes the project and presents the findings.

  4. [Chronic stress model in New Zealand white rabbit with hyperlipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z M; Wang, M; Chen, K; Xiao, L Y; Deng, X T; Gong, T

    2017-02-21

    Objective: To establish and evaluate chronic stress model in New Zealand white rabbit with hyperlipidemia. Methods: A total of 45 clearing grade male New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four groups with random number table method: control (CON), normal diet combined with chronic stress for 8 weeks (CON+ CS), high fat diet (HFD) and high fat diet for 4 weeks combined with chronic stress for 8 weeks (HFD+ CS). Both social stress and physical stress methods were adopted.One-way ANOVA was used for comparison among groups. Results: (1) Chronic stress model assessments: ①body weight, the weight gain of stress groups was significantly reduced; ②behavioral assessment, rabbits exposed to stress in CON+ CS and HFD+ CS group [54%±7%, 55%±5%] exhibited more inactivity behavior than CON and HFD group [27%±5.28%, 34%±6%, Pstress regime for 4 weeks, cortisol of HFD+ CS was higher than HFD group [(60±5) ng/ml vs (38±4) ng/ml, P=0.001]. After 8 weeks, the serum levels of hs-CRP and IL-6 also elevated. (2) The effect of hyperlipidemia on chronic stress: compared with CON+ CS, HFD+ CS group showed more inactivity behavior and rising levels of cortisol, hs-CRP and IL-6. (3) Blood lipids: chronic stress induced raised serum total cholesterol. Conclusions: (1)Chronic stress model in rabbit with hyperlipidemia could be successfully established with 4-week high lipid feed followed by social stress combined with physical stress for 8 weeks.(2) Hyperlipidemia and chronic stress influences each other.

  5. Coniform stromatolites from geothermal systems, North Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.; Renaut, R.W.; Rosen, Michael R.; Ansdell, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    Coniform stromatolites are found in several sites in the Tokaanu and Whakarewarewa geothermal areas of North Island, New Zealand. At Tokaanu, silicification of these stromatolites is taking place in Kirihoro, a shallow hot springfed pool. At Whakarewarewa, subfossil silicified coniform stromatolites are found on the floor of "Waikite Pool" on the discharge apron below Waikite Geyser, and in an old sinter succession at Te Anarata. The microbes in the coniform stromatolites from Tokaanu, Waikite Pool, and Te Anarata have been well preserved through rapid silicification. Nevertheless, subtle differences in the silicification style induced morphological variations that commonly mask or alter morphological features needed for identification of the microbes in terms of extant taxa. The coniform stromatolites in the New Zealand hotspring pools are distinctive because (1) they are formed of upward tapering (i.e., conical) columns, (2) neighboring columns commonly are linked by vertical sheets or bridges, (3) internally, they are formed of alternating high- and low-porosity laminae that have a conical vertical profile, and (4) Phormidium form more than 90% of the biota. As such, they are comparable to modern coniform mats and stromatolites found in the geothermal systems of Yellowstone National Park and ice-covered lakes in Antarctica. Formation of the coniform stromatolites is restricted to pools that are characterized by low current energy and a microflora that is dominated by Phormidium. These delicate and intricate stromatolites could not form in areas characterized by fast flowing water or a diverse microflora. Thus, it appears that the distribution of these distinctive stromatolites is controlled by biological constraints that are superimposed on environmental needs.

  6. Does geography explain ethnic inequalities in health in New Zealand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Martin; Searle, Paula

    2006-10-01

    To quantify the potential contribution of inter-district relative to intradistrict variation to the Maori disparity in life expectancy in 2000-02, by counterfactual modelling. SETTING, DATA SOURCES AND METHODS: The setting was New Zealand's 21 health districts (District Health Boards, DHBs). All data (population estimates and life expectancy estimates) were sourced from Statistics New Zealand and relate to the 2000-02 period. Maori life expectancy (nationally) was recalculated under the counterfactual that Maori life expectancy in each DHB did not differ from total population life expectancy in the corresponding DHB (so eliminating intra-district variation). The difference between the observed total population and counterfactual Maori life expectancies therefore represents the contribution of inter-district variation to the Maori life expectancy disparity. Observed total population and Maori life expectancies at birth in 2000-02, pooling sexes, were 78.7 and 71.1 years respectively, giving a total disparity of 7.6 years. Under the counterfactual, Maori life expectancy increased to 78.4 years (and total population life expectancy to 79.0 years). Inter-district variation was therefore estimated to potentially contribute only 0.6 years or 8% to the total Maori disparity. Allowing for imprecision, inter-district variation almost certainly accounts for less than 10.5% of the total disparity. Inter-district or geographic variation makes only a small contribution to the total Maori disparity in life expectancy. Adjustment or standardisation for district is not necessary when comparing Maori and non-Maori health outcomes. If the policy goal is to reduce ethnic inequalities in health, then the focus of policy (e.g. funding formulae) needs to be on factors directly linked to ethnicity, rather than on geographic variations in health and health care that have an impact on all ethnic groups more-or-less alike.

  7. Suicide research and adolescent suicide trends in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmasebi, Said

    2008-03-17

    In recent years, there have been a number of claims and counterclaims from suicide research using time series and longitudinal data; in particular, the linkage of increased antidepressant prescriptions to a decrease in suicide rates. Suicide time series appear to have a memory compounded with seasonal and cyclic effects. Failure to take into account these properties may lead to misleading conclusions, e.g., a downward blip is interpreted as the result of current knowledge and public health policies, while an upward blip is explained as suicide being complex depending on many variables requiring further research. In previous publications, I argued that this misuse of time series data is the result of an uncritical acceptance of a medical model that links mental ill-health to suicide. The consequences of such research behaviour are further increases in antidepressant prescriptions and medications to those who should not be prescribed them, with adverse effects showing across the population, e.g., the prescription of antidepressants to very young children (some under 1 year of age) in New Zealand. Moreover, the New Zealand Evidence-based Health Care Bulletin recommends an authoritarian approach for every interaction with a young person to check their psychosocial well-being. When viewed holistically, this kind of human behaviour makes researchers, policy makers (politicians), treatment, and practitioners, and society in general part of the problem rather than the solution. This paper explores some dynamic aspects of suicide, using only official data with particular reference to youth suicide, and suggests that the medical model of suicide is only an attempt to treat depression without addressing suicide, and recommends the creation of a unified database through understanding the society that individuals live in. It is hoped that this paper will stimulate debate and the collaboration of international experts regardless of their school of thought.

  8. International Perspectives of Ethical Approval: The New Zealand scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette McCallin Ph.D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper “Navigating the process of ethical approval” (Carey, 2010 raises many issues about the influence Institutional Ethics Committees have on research methodology and what can or cannot take place in research. Carey draws attention to the ethical challenges classic grounded theory researchers face when an ethical proposal that follows the principles of the methodology is presented to an Ethics Committee, whose main responsibility is the protection of participants. Ethics committees not only guide researchers on acceptable ethical practice, but are charged with monitoring ethical standards and ensuring researchers act in accordance with professional expectations for researchers within the jurisdiction. These committees aim to ensure consistency of ethical practice in research. While there is generally some flexibility in the review process researchers often find ethical requirements constraining, as guidelines are primarily prescriptive and are designed to ensure consistency in the application of universal ethical principles in research. In New Zealand, consistency includes paying attention to broader socio-cultural responsibilities to society that includes promoting awareness of the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumer Rights 1996, the Health Information Privacy Code 1994, and promoting ethical practices which involve Maori (the local indigenous people in research proposals as much as possible (Ministry of Health, 2006. So while researchers in training assume that their prime interest concerns the management of a research topic and methodology, they quickly find out that ethical guidelines influence research design. Even though there is an international code of ethics (Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 2005 that defines ethical standards for researchers around the world, each country has its own specific requirements depending on the context. In this paper, ethical drivers in the New Zealand context are outlined and

  9. "Healthy Eating - Healthy Action": evaluating New Zealand's obesity prevention strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuvasa Ausaga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New Zealand rates of obesity and overweight have increased since the 1980s, particularly among indigenous Māori people, Pacific people and those living in areas of high deprivation. New Zealand's response to the obesity epidemic has been The Healthy Eating-Healthy Action: Oranga Kai - Oranga Pumau (HEHA Strategy ('the Strategy', launched in 2003. Because the HEHA Strategy explicitly recognises the importance of evaluation and the need to create an evidence base to support future initiatives, the Ministry of Health has commissioned a Consortium of researchers to evaluate the Strategy as a whole. Methods This paper discusses the Consortium's approach to evaluating the HEHA Strategy. It includes an outline of the conceptual framework underpinning the evaluation, and describes the critical components of the evaluation which are: judging to what extent stakeholders were engaged in the process of the strategy implementation and to what extent their feedback was incorporated in to future iterations of the Strategy (continuous improvement, to what extent the programmes, policies, and initiatives implemented span the target populations and priority areas, whether there have been any population changes in nutrition and/or physical activity outcomes or behaviours relating to those outcomes, and to what extent HEHA Strategy and spending can be considered value for money. Discussion This paper outlines our approach to evaluating a complex national health promotion strategy. Not only does the Evaluation have the potential to identify interventions that could be adopted internationally, but also the development of the Evaluation design can inform other complex evaluations.

  10. General practitioners and preconception weight management in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldwick, Diana; Smith, Alesha; Paterson, Helen

    2017-08-01

    Childhood obesity is a growing concern internationally and a top priority for the World Health Organization. Preconception overweight, obesity and excess gestational weight gain significantly increase childhood obesity risk. Optimising preconception weight is a key preventative measure toward reducing childhood obesity. In 2014, the New Zealand (NZ) Ministry of Health released guidance for health practitioners on healthy weight gain in pregnancy in an effort to reduce the burden of childhood obesity. To explore the knowledge and practice of NZ general practitioners (GPs) regarding preconception and gestational weight management. A nationwide survey was conducted on a randomly selected sample of NZ GPs using a mixed methods approach. Descriptive statistics were used for survey responses and a general inductive approach was applied to the free text data. A total of 200 GPs (42.5%) responded. The majority of GPs were aware of the risks of obesity in pregnancy. Over 50% of GPs reported practice that was not consistent with recommended standards of care. Ministry of Health guidance was known to only 12% of participants. Themes emerging from the free text data included: lack of opportunity for, and awareness of, preconception care; recognition of the importance of this area; and need for further learning. General practitioners in NZ are not providing optimal preconception care. This research highlights the need for a public health message encouraging preconception counselling and better education of GPs on the topic. This should start with promotion of the Ministry of Health guidance. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. The use of ethanol in paediatric formulations in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirskis, Darren; Toh, Meiyen; Ram, Sanyogita

    2013-07-01

    Children's right to access safe and effective medicines is recognised globally. Ethanol, used in paediatric liquid formulations as a solvent and preservative, is associated with safety concerns with respect to both acute ingestion and chronic exposure. In addition, families may have cultural or religious values making ethanol use inappropriate when alternatives are available. International guidelines aim to reduce, and if possible eliminate, the use of ethanol in paediatric medicines. Guidelines on labelling vary globally, limiting the ability of health professionals and patients to make informed decisions on appropriate medicines. This study aimed to explore the availability of ethanol-containing medicines for use in the paediatric population in New Zealand and to discuss findings alongside international guidelines. Forty-seven paediatric liquid medicines were identified containing ethanol. The ethanol concentration could be determined in 35 of these medicines and ranged from 0.6 % v/v to an alarming 76 % v/v ethanol. If recommended dosing instructions are followed, the ethanol consumed per dose is not expected to cause acute toxic effects. The medicines identified are indicated for both acute and chronic use, including digoxin (10.1-11.4 % v/v ethanol) which is used in patients of all ages, including preterm neonates. Stronger guidance should be provided to reduce the use of ethanol in paediatric medicines, in New Zealand and globally. If ethanol is used, full disclosure of its presence and concentration on the product label is essential to enable prescribers and patients to make informed decisions on the most suitable pharmaceutical formulations.

  12. Suicide Research and Adolescent Suicide Trends in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Shahtahmasebi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been a number of claims and counterclaims from suicide research using time series and longitudinal data; in particular, the linkage of increased antidepressant prescriptions to a decrease in suicide rates. Suicide time series appear to have a memory compounded with seasonal and cyclic effects. Failure to take into account these properties may lead to misleading conclusions, e.g., a downward blip is interpreted as the result of current knowledge and public health policies, while an upward blip is explained as suicide being complex depending on many variables requiring further research. In previous publications, I argued that this misuse of time series data is the result of an uncritical acceptance of a medical model that links mental ill-health to suicide. The consequences of such research behaviour are further increases in antidepressant prescriptions and medications to those who should not be prescribed them, with adverse effects showing across the population, e.g., the prescription of antidepressants to very young children (some under 1 year of age in New Zealand. Moreover, the New Zealand Evidence-based Health Care Bulletin recommends an authoritarian approach for every interaction with a young person to check their psychosocial well-being. When viewed holistically, this kind of human behaviour makes researchers, policy makers (politicians, treatment, and practitioners, and society in general part of the problem rather than the solution. This paper explores some dynamic aspects of suicide, using only official data with particular reference to youth suicide, and suggests that the medical model of suicide is only an attempt to treat depression without addressing suicide, and recommends the creation of a unified database through understanding the society that individuals live in. It is hoped that this paper will stimulate debate and the collaboration of international experts regardless of their school of thought.

  13. Drinking concordance and relationship satisfaction in New Zealand couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiklejohn, Jessica; Connor, Jennie L; Kypri, Kypros

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine alcohol consumption patterns in New Zealand couples and the associations of these patterns with time spent drinking together and the level of satisfaction with the relationship. Cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of New Zealand residents aged 18-70 on the combined electoral roll in 2007. Using reports of the respondents' own drinking patterns and their reports of their partners' drinking, couples were classified as concordant, mildly discordant or discordant for both their drinking frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion. The level of concordance was compared by demographic characteristics and relationship type. Ordinal logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between levels of concordance and both time spent drinking as a couple and level of happiness in the relationship (both reported by the respondent). The largest proportion of couples was classified as concordant for both frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion regardless of the relationship type. For both drinking frequency and quantity per occasion, couples identified as discordant or mildly discordant were less likely to report having spent a large amount of time drinking with their partner (odds ratio 0.2-0.5). Reported level of happiness with the relationship was also associated with the degree of concordance of both drinking frequency and quantity. These findings suggest that drinking frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed per typical drinking occasion are concordant in most intimate partnerships and that discordance in either is associated with a lower level of happiness within the relationship.

  14. Arsenic speciation of geothermal waters in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Gillian; Kim, Nick; Ward, Neil I

    2012-12-01

    Total arsenic and four arsenic species; arsenite (iAs(III)), arsenate (iAs(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and monomethylarsonic acid (MA(V)), are reported in 28 geothermal features from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) and Waikato region of New Zealand. Samples were collected for arsenic speciation analysis via a solid phase extraction (SPE) kit allowing the separation, stabilisation and pre-concentration of the species at the time of sample collection in the field. This is the first research to present data for arsenic species collected by this technique in geothermal waters from New Zealand. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), ranged from 0.008 to 9.08 mg l⁻¹ As. The highest levels were discovered in three features in Tokaanu (Taumatapuhipuhi, Takarea #5 and #6), with arsenic concentrations of 8.59, 8.70 and 9.08 mg l⁻¹ As, respectively. Inorganic arsenic species were predominant in the geothermal waters, with arsenite contributing to more than 70% of the total arsenic in the majority of samples. Organic species were also determined in all samples, indicating the presence of microbial activity. A potential risk to human health was highlighted due to the high levels of arsenic, mainly as arsenite, in geothermal features linked to bathing pools. Further research is needed into dermal absorption as a potential route of arsenic exposure whilst bathing in these hot pools, as it may contribute to an occurrence of acute arsenic-related health problems.

  15. Delineating advanced practice nursing in New Zealand: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carryer, J; Wilkinson, J; Towers, A; Gardner, G

    2017-12-20

    A variety of advanced practice nursing roles and titles have proliferated in response to the changing demands of a population characterized by increasing age and chronic illness. Whilst similarly identified as advanced practice roles, they do not share a common practice profile, educational requirements or legislative direction. The lack of clarity limits comparative research that can inform policy and health service planning. To identify advanced practice roles within nursing titles employed in New Zealand and practice differences between advanced practice and other roles. Replicating recent Australian research, 3255 registered nurses/nurse practitioners in New Zealand completed the amended Advanced Practice Delineation survey tool. The mean domain scores of the predominant advanced practice position were compared with those of other positions. Differences between groups were explored using one-way ANOVA and post hoc between group comparisons. Four nursing position bands were identified: nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, domain-specific and registered nurse. Significant differences between the bands were found on many domain scores. The nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist bands had the most similar practice profiles, nurse practitioners being more involved in direct care and professional leadership. Similar to the position of clinical nurse consultant in Australia, those practicing as clinical nurse specialists were deemed to reflect the threshold for advanced practice nursing. The results identified different practice patterns for the identified bands and distinguish the advanced practice nursing roles. By replicating the Australian study of Gardener et al. (2016), this NZ paper extends the international data available to support more evidence-based nursing workforce planning and policy development. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  16. (Non)regulation of marketing of unhealthy food to children in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Caroline

    2009-01-23

    Three and a half years ago an editorial in the NZMJ called for restrictions on marketing of unhealthy food to New Zealand children. This paper discusses progress since then. There has been a seemingly relentless documentation of adverse health consequences of the obesity epidemic in the intervening years, increasing evidence that marketing of unhealthy food contributes to the epidemic, growing knowledge about New Zealand children's exposure to marketing of unhealthy food, and evidence of public support to decrease children's exposure to marketing of unhealthy food. Yet there is still a lack of substantive action on the restriction of marketing of unhealthy food to children in New Zealand.

  17. A common language of landscape representation: New Zealand and California painting in the nineteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Schenker

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available In the nineteenth century, landscape painters in California and New Zealand shared a common language of landscape representation, looking at untamed coasts and rugged mountains through a lens shaped by two centuries of European artistic tradition. Explored in this paper is the influence of the picturesque tradition in New Zealand and California art in the nineteenth century. Ideological functions of landscape painting are identified: that is, ways artists in both New Zealand and California appropriated the landscape to support certain cultural, political and social agendas. Their work represents not only the land but the myths inscribed upon it by bourgeois culture.

  18. Notes on the biology, distribution, biosecurity status and history in New Zealand of Macrotrachelia nigronitens (Stål, 1860) (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Thorpe

    2014-01-01

    Macrotrachelia nigronitens (Stål, 1860) (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae) is permanently present in the wild in Auckland (AK), New Zealand. It should therefore be added to the New Zealand Organisms Register (NZOR). It is a specialised predator of thrips inside leaf-roll galls. It has been present in New Zealand since at least the 1980s. Aspects of its biology, distribution, biosecurity status and history in New Zealand are discussed. The first detailed specimen records from New Zealand are provided...

  19. Avaliação do uso de haste bloqueada e bloqueio transcortical no reparo de fraturas diafisárias de fêmur em felinos Evaluation of the use of interlocking nail and transcortical blockade for the repair of diaphyseal fractures of the femur in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Romano

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available As hastes bloqueadas além de permitirem estabilização rígida de fraturas, possuem vantagens biomecânicas quando comparadas a outras técnicas de imobilização, por atuar ao longo do eixo mecânico central do osso, além de preservar os conceitos de padrões biológicos de osteossíntese . O uso limitado de hastes bloqueadas em gatos se atribui ao fato da cavidade intramedular ser pequena, limitando o tamanho e diâmetro dos pinos. Relatam-se casos de 10 felinos que apresentavam fraturas fechadas simples ou múltiplas da diáfise femoral. Os animais pesavam entre 3,5 e 5 kg, o que permitiu a utilização de hastes de 4,0mm e 4,7mm de diâmetro. Para inserção da haste, adotou-se a via retrógrada ou a normógrada e foram realizados bloqueios com quatro parafusos de titânio de 2,0 mm de diâmetro. Complicações intra-operatórias não ocorreram, entretanto um animal sofreu fratura de colo femoral e fratura transversa distal ao implante, três dias após o ato cirúrgico, devido a novo trauma. Os animais foram submetidos a exames radiográficos até quatro meses após a intervenção, evidenciando-se formação de calo ósseo secundário e consolidação óssea em período de 61-89 dias. Clinicamente, ocorreu esporadicamente alteração na marcha por leve claudicação de apoio definida por escala de claudicação, entretanto os animais iniciaram o apoio adequado entre três e oito dias após o ato operatório. Complicações pósoperatórias ocorreram referentes ao animal que sofreu novo trauma, entretanto notou-se consolidação do foco primário tratado pelo implante com 61 dias e consolidação da nova fratura num período total de 150 dias do início do tratamento conservativo por penso esparadrapado e tala. Conclui-se que o uso de haste bloqueada em felinos foi adequado uma vez que houve consolidação óssea em todos os casos, com retorno precoce da função do membro, permitindo a deambulação.Interlocking nails allow rigid

  20. Evolution of New Zealand alpine and open-habitat plant species during the late Cenozoic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter B. Heenan; Matt S. McGlone

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history and biogeography of the New Zealand alpine flora has been impeded by the lack of an integrated model of geomorphology and climate events during the Late Miocene...

  1. Geography in an Urban Age: Trials of High School Geography Project Materials in New Zealand Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, John; Slater, Frances

    1974-01-01

    The High School Geography Project was used and evaluated by 15-year old students in New Zealand. The program, highly innovative in approaches in teaching Geography, is found to be highly adapted to Australian needs in Geography instruction. (JR)

  2. Why change the name of the College from Australasian to Australian and New Zealand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardagh, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Australasian is the adjectival version of the name of a geographical region. The region is defined differently by different people. It includes islands other than Australia and New Zealand and variably includes or excludes New Guinea. It has nothing to do with Asia. The adjective is often misunderstood, it leaves New Zealand invisible to many readers and it is an incorrect description of who we are as a college. Australian and New Zealand describes who we are - fellows from two sovereign nations - Australia and New Zealand. Changing the name is not about secession, division nor ingratitude and does not undermine the College's commitment to helping other nations in the greater region. It is a positive acknowledgement of who we are and a strong foundation for a united College's future growth. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  3. Corynactis denhartogi (Anthozoa: Corallimorpharia) a new species of soft hexacoral from New Zealand waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocaña, O.

    2003-01-01

    A new species of Corrallimorpharia from New Zealand, Corynactis denhartogi is described and depicted. The species is compared with other species of the genus, particularly with the intertidal C. australis.

  4. Two new species of Maritrema Nicoll, 1907 (Digenea: Microphallidae) from New Zealand: morphological and molecular characterisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Presswell, B.; Blasco-Costa, I.; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 5 (2014), s. 1641-1656 ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Maritrema * Microphallidae * taxonomy * phylogeny * New Zealand Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.098, year: 2014

  5. Time-capsule: Explorations of Concepts of Time and Law in Colonial New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Barrett

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Postcolonial legal culture in New Zealand (Aotearoa has sought to revise the past by reinterpreting Victorian legal contexts in the light of contemporary understandings of inter-cultural differences. This article develops an argument that demonstrates the relationship between cultural and legal notions of time during nineteenth century New Zealand. It examines the way in which Victorian attitudes were expressed in the expansion of colonial empire and the discursive ideologies which may have informed them. It explores the notion of time as expressed in lawmaking in colonial New Zealand through an examination of legal and philosophical commentary derived from contemporary jurisprudence and para-legal literature. The article is concerned with presenting an argument for the way in which colonial law and lawmakers manipulated the symbolic notion of time to the possible occlusion of indigenous interests in colonial New Zealand.

  6. Extinction and recolonization of coastal megafauna following human arrival in New Zealand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collins, Catherine J; Rawlence, Nicolas J; Prost, Stefan; Anderson, Christian N K; Knapp, Michael; Scofield, R Paul; Robertson, Bruce C; Smith, Ian; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A; Chilvers, B Louise; Waters, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    .... New Zealand was the world's last large landmass to be colonized by humans, and its exceptional archaeological record documents a vast number of vertebrate extinctions in the immediate aftermath...

  7. Occupational risk factors for chronic respiratory disease in a New Zealand population using lifetime occupational history.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansell, A.; Ghosh, R.E.; Poole, S.; Zock, J.P.; Weatherall, M.; Vermeulen, R.; Kromhout, H.; Travers, J.; Beasley, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate associations between respiratory disease and occupational exposures in a New Zealand urban population, the Wellington Respiratory Survey. Methods: Multiple regression analyses in a population sample of 1017 individuals aged 25 to 74 years with spirometry and questionnaire

  8. Aquifer permeability change caused by a near‐field earthquake, Canterbury, New Zealand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rutter, H. K; Cox, S. C; Dudley Ward, N. F; Weir, J. J

    2016-01-01

    The M W 7.1 Darfield (Canterbury) earthquake, 4 September 2010, generated widespread hydrological effects in New Zealand ranging from instantaneous changes of piezometric levels, to more sustained postseismic changes in spring flow...

  9. The New Zealand Labour Movement and Migration: A Short Historical Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    The labor movement in New Zealand was heavily influenced by British unions and migration policies. Other factors were union opposition to further immigration and the treatment of the Maori people. (SK)

  10. Socio-economic drivers of freshwater fish declines in a changing climate: a New Zealand perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, N

    2010-11-01

    New Zealand has a freshwater fish fauna characterized by high levels of national and local endemism and which is threatened by anthropogenic stressors including habitat destruction or deterioration, commercial harvest, pollution and interactions with invasive exotic species. Significant expansion of New Zealand's dairy production has recently created further deterioration of lowland water quality and greater pressure for water allocation in drier eastern regions of the South Island. New Zealand has large freshwater resources and its climate is predicted to experience less dramatic changes in mean annual temperature and precipitation than many other regions of the world as a result of anthropogenic climate change. Predicted changes in regional climate and further expansion of the dairy industry, however, will impose similar pressures on freshwater resources in northern New Zealand to those already acting to threaten freshwater biodiversity in the eastern South Island. © 2010 The Author. Journal of Fish Biology © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. Dispensing patterns for antidiabetic agents in New Zealand: are the guidelines being followed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Peter; Norris, Hew; Metcalfe, Scott; Betty, Bryan; Young, Vanessa; Locke, Bronwyn

    2017-11-10

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a significant public health issue in New Zealand. Effective management and glycaemic control is critical for reducing diabetes-related complications. Treatment guidelines are well established in New Zealand. Using dispensing data as a proxy for prescribing data, this paper aims to describe the pattern of first- and second-line antidiabetic agent (AA) dispensing for T2DM in New Zealand and assess adherence with treatment guidelines. Analysis of national dispensing data for AA medications using the Pharmaceutical Collection database from 2007/08 to 2015/16. Metformin monotherapy remains the most commonly prescribed first-line T2DM medication prescribed, accounting for 85% of initial agents prescribed. Sulfonylureas are the most common second-line agents used, accounting for 70% of all second-line agents. There is a high degree of adherence with the T2DM treatment guidelines in New Zealand.

  12. Geologic Provinces of Australia and New Zealand, 2000 (prv3cl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons and polygon labels that describe U.S. Geological Survey defined geologic provinces of the Australia and New Zealand area...

  13. Language loss and language processing : three generations of Dutch migrants in New Zealand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsen, Madeleine Elisabeth Helena

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the relationship between language shift, language loss, and language processing. Three generations of Dutch immigrants to New Zealand were tested to investigate intra- and intergenerational patterns of language use, social networks, perceived ethnolinguistic vitality,

  14. Use of aspirin and statins for cardiovascular risk reduction in New Zealand: the residential care story

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hong, Jae Bon; Hoem, Jae Bon; Kerse, Ngaire; Scahill, Shane; Moyes, Simon; Chen, Charlotte; Peri, Kathy; Hughes, Carmel

    2009-01-01

    ...) in residential care facilities in Auckland, New Zealand are reported here. A representative sample of residential care facilities, all residents over age 65 years and their GPs in one district health board region in Auckland were recruited...

  15. Derivation of a new lamb survival trait for the New Zealand sheep industry 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Vanderick; B Auvray; S-A Newman; K G Dodds; N Gengler; J M Everett-Hincks

    2015-01-01

      Previous research identified that a review of the current industry New Zealand lamb survival trait was necessary as its recording accuracy was reliant on farmers notifying their Sheep Improvement...

  16. A case of a sheep-goat hybrid in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Scott, I A; Pearce, P D; Dewes, H F; Thompson, J W

    1990-04-01

    The natural mating of a doe with a ram produced a female hybrid which had 57 chromosomes, including three metacentric autosomes. We believe this to be the first authenticated report of a sheep-goat hybrid in New Zealand.

  17. A record of Anzygina billi Fletcher & Larivière, 2009 (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae from New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thorpe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence in New Zealand of the typhlocybine cicadellid Anzygina billi Fletcher & Larivière, 2009 is confirmed, based on new material from Auckland. Rubus sp. is confirmed as a host plant.

  18. New Zealand's National Health and Disability Advocacy Service: A successful model of advocacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drage, Jean

    2012-01-01

    .... This paper, in exploring both the debate and practice of advocacy, uses the National Health and Disability Advocacy Service in New Zealand to describe a successful model of advocacy that is based...

  19. A targeted rural postgraduate education programme - linking rural doctors across New Zealand and into the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Katharina; Nixon, Garry; Gutenstein, Marc; Davey, Emma

    2017-11-01

    This article describes the University of Otago Rural Postgraduate medical programme, established in 2002 to provide a targeted rural education option for medical practitioners working in rural and remote areas of New Zealand. With both faculty and participants dispersed throughout New Zealand and the Cook Islands embedded in day to day rural clinical practice, this programme uniquely reflects the national and international clinical networks it has been developed to support. It now provides the academic component of two vocational training programmes: the New Zealand Rural Hospital Medicine Training Programme and The Cook Islands General Practice Training Programme. We describe the journey the Rural Postgraduate programme has taken over the last decade: the opportunities, learnings and challenges. The programme is continuing to expand and is creating a growing community of rural and remote practitioners throughout New Zealand and the Pacific.

  20. Observations, process studies, and modeling of seasonal snow in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, J.; Clark, M. P.; Slater, A. G.; Tait, A. B.

    2007-12-01

    Variability of seasonal snow in New Zealand directly affects the sectors of energy, agriculture and tourism, but intensive research and monitoring programs have only been developed recently. This paper will discuss observations, process studies, and modeling of snow in New Zealand: · Observations. Observations of snow in New Zealand have recently been significantly enhanced with the establishment of the National Institute for Water and Atmospheric Research snow and ice monitoring network. This network includes multiple new permanent high elevation stations that measure a large suite of micrometeorological variables as well as snow depth. Additional instrumentation to allow for the accurate measurement of solid and liquid precipitation and SWE are being investigated. We will discuss the establishment of the monitoring network, and outline problems encountered in measuring snow and climate in an extreme maritime alpine environment. · Process Studies. There have only been a few process studies of snow in New Zealand. However, new process studies are needed because there are notable differences between snow in New Zealand and snow in many other countries: Accumulation processes in New Zealand are unique because most of the snow is above treeline and a large amount of snow is redeposited by the wind; melt processes in New Zealand are unique because melt is largest in windy humid conditions when turbulent heat fluxes of sensible and latent heat dominate the radiative heat fluxes. We will summarize results from an intensive measurement campaign aimed at documenting and understanding spatial variability of snow water equivalent. · Modelling. Building an appropriate model to simulate snow in New Zealand requires defining a model with complexity that is justified in light of the available data, the problem we are trying to solve, and processes dominant where the model is applied. Additional model complexity comes at the expense of additional model parameters (many of

  1. Body size changes in passerine birds introduced to New Zealand from the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Blackburn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One feature of global geographic variation in avian body sizes is that they are larger on isolated islands than on continental regions. Therefore, this study aims to assess whether there have been changes in body size following successful establishment for seven passerine bird species (blackbird Turdus merula, song thrush T. philomelos, house sparrow Passer domesticus, chaffinch Fringilla coelebs, greenfinch Chloris chloris, goldfinch Carduelis carduelis, yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella introduced from the continental islands of the UK to the more isolated oceanic landmass of New Zealand in the middle of the nineteenth century. Measures of tarsus length were taken from individuals from contemporary UK and New Zealand populations of these species, and from historical specimens collected around the time that individuals were translocated from the UK to New Zealand. Analysis of Variance was used to test for size differences between contemporary UK and New Zealand populations, and between historical UK and contemporary UK and New Zealand populations. Historical UK populations have longer tarsi, on average, than 12 (7 UK and 5 New Zealand of the 14 contemporary populations. Significant decreases in tarsus length relative to the historical populations have occurred in the UK for blackbird, chaffinch and greenfinch, and in the New Zealand blackbird population. Contemporary New Zealand house sparrows have significantly longer tarsi, on average, than both historical and contemporary UK populations. Exposure to novel environments may be expected to lead to changes in the morphology and other traits of exotic species, but changes have also occurred in the native range. In fact, contrary to expectations, the most common differences we found were between contemporary and historical UK populations. Consideration of contemporary populations alone would underestimate the true scale of morphological change in these species over time, which may be due to

  2. Campylobacteriosis in New Zealand: results of a case-control study.

    OpenAIRE

    Eberhart-Phillips, J.; Walker, N.; Garrett, N; Bell, D; Sinclair, D; Rainger, W; Bates, M.

    1997-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To identify and assess the contributions of major risk factors for campylobacteriosis in New Zealand. DESIGN: Case-control study. Home interviews were conducted over nine months using a standardised questionnaire to assess recent food consumption and other exposures. SETTING: Four centres in New Zealand with high notification rates of campylobacter infections--Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, and Christchurch. PARTICIPANTS: Case patients were 621 people notified between 1 June...

  3. Curriculum Development in New Zealand: New Directions, Opportunities and Challenges for School Geography

    OpenAIRE

    FASTIER, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Geography as a senior subject in New Zealand secondary schools has been long overdue for curriculum change. The 2007 New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) currently being implemented at the senior school level provides geography with the mechanisms for positive curriculum change, giving teachers the opportunity to refocus on existing teaching, learning and assessment practices. Important paradigm shifts include devolving curriculum making to schools, embracing student ownership of learning, emphasizin...

  4. Three new species of the genus Austrophthiracarus from New Zealand (Acari: Oribatida: Phthiracaridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-03-24

    Three new species of Austrophthiracarus (Oribatida: Phthiracaridae) from New Zealand are described: Austrophthiracarus matuku sp. nov. from the Bethells Matuku Reserve, Auckland, Austrophthiracarus notoporosus sp. nov. from the Tutoko Bench, Fiordland and Austrophthiracarus karioi sp. nov. from the Mt. Karioi, Waikato. Holotype specimens are deposited in the New Zealand Arthropod Collection, Landcare Research and paratypes are deposited in the Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Genetic structure of an introduced paper wasp, Polistes chinensis antennalis (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Koji; Kudô, Kazuyuki; Ishiguro, Norio

    2014-08-01

    Several eusocial wasps are prominent invaders to remote islands. The paper wasp Polistes chinensis antennalis is native to East Asia, was introduced to New Zealand in 1979 and has expanded its distribution there. This provides an excellent opportunity to examine the impacts of an initial bottleneck and subsequent expansion on genetic structure. We analysed and compared the genetic population structures of the native (Japan and South Korea) and invasive New Zealand populations. Although 94% of individuals had shared haplotypes detected across both populations, the remaining 6% had private haplotypes identified in only one of the three countries. The genetic variation at microsatellite loci was lower in New Zealand than in native countries, and the genetic structure in New Zealand was clearly distinct from that in its native range. Higher frequencies of diploid-male- and triploid-female-producing colonies were detected in New Zealand than in the native countries, showing the reduction in genetic variation via a genetic bottleneck. At least two independent introductions were suggested, and the putative source regions for New Zealand were assigned as Kanto (central island) and Kyushu (south island) in Japan. Serial founder events following the initial introduction were also indicated. The estimated dispersal distance between mother and daughter in New Zealand was twice that in Japan. Thus, the introduction history of P. chinensis antennalis in New Zealand is probably the result of at least two independent introductions, passing through a bottleneck during introduction, followed by population expansion from the point of introduction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Characterization and Calibration of the 12-m Antenna in Warkworth, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, Sergei; Natusch, Tim; Wilson, David

    2010-01-01

    The New Zealand 12-m antenna is scheduled to start participating in regular IVS VLBI sessions from the middle of 2010. Characterization procedures and results of calibration of the New Zealand 12- m radio telescope are presented, including the main reflector surface accuracy measurement, pointing model creation, and the system equivalent flux density (SEFD) determination in both S and X bands. Important issues of network connectivity, co-located geodetic systems, and the use of the antenna in education are also discussed.

  7. The timing and sources of intraplate magmatism related to continental breakup in southern New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Meer, Quinten

    The long history of New Zealand as Gondwana’s eastern active margin ended at ~110 Ma when extensional tectonics initiated. In New Zealand’s inboard Western Province this is expressed in the formation of metamorphic core complexes and the syn-tectonic intrusion of the latest large scale subduction...... of lithospheric mantle with HIMU-type enriched veins. Chemical similarities suggest that contemporaneous and younger intraplate magmatism in New Zealand may also be derived from the same or similar sources...

  8. Differences in patients' perceptions of Schizophrenia between Māori and New Zealand Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Deanna; Kydd, Robert; Morunga, Eva; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2011-06-01

    Māori (the Indigenous people of New Zealand) are disproportionately affected by mental illness and experience significantly poorer mental health compared to New Zealand Europeans. It is important to understand cultural differences in patients' ideas about mental illness in treatment settings. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in illness perceptions between Māori and New Zealand Europeans diagnosed with schizophrenia. A total of 111 users of mental health services (68 Māori, 43 New Zealand European) in the greater Auckland and Northland areas who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorder were interviewed using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Drug Attitude Inventory. District Health Board staff completed the Global Assessment of Functioning for each patient. Māori with schizophrenia believed that their illness would continue significantly less time than New Zealand European patients did. Chance or spiritual factors were listed as causes of mental illness by only five Māori patients and no New Zealand European patients. Other illness perceptions, as well as attitudes towards medication, were comparable between groups. Across groups, the top perceived causes were drugs/alcohol, family relationships/abuse, and biological causes. Illness perceptions provide a framework to assess patients' beliefs about their mental illness. Differences between Māori and New Zealand European patients' beliefs about their mental illness may be related to traditional Māori beliefs about mental illness. Knowledge of differences in illness perceptions provides an opportunity to design effective clinical interventions for both Māori and New Zealand Europeans.

  9. Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) and human factors training: What Air New Zealand is doing about it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Milligan, Fionna; Wyness, Bryan

    1987-01-01

    The authors have played an integral role in Air New Zealand's evaluation of CRM and Human Factors training options available to date. As the final decision as to which course is best suited to Air New Zealand's needs has yet to be made, briefly outlined are: (1) why this form of training was considered necessary; (2) the approach taken to evaluating the options available; (3) some of the problems encountered on the way; and (4) some plans for the future.

  10. Evidence against a significant younger dryas cooling event in new zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer; Shulmeister; McLea

    1998-08-07

    Pollen records of deglacial sequences from northwest Nelson, New Zealand, demonstrate that there was no significant temperature decline associated with the Younger Dryas in New Zealand. Records of glacial advances at this time were either the product of increased snow accumulation under enhanced precipitation regimes or random variation rather than the result of a regional thermal decline. This finding supports those models of Younger Dryas initiation that require neither enhanced westerly circulation nor significant thermal decline in the Southern Hemisphere.

  11. Eyes wide shut? UK consumer perceptions on aviation climate impacts and travel decisions to New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Scott; Higham, James

    2011-01-01

    The purview of climate change concern has implicated air travel, as evidenced in a growing body of academic literature concerned with aviation CO2 emissions. This article assesses the relevance of climate change to long haul air travel decisions to New Zealand for United Kingdom consumers. Based on 15 semi-structured open-ended interviews conducted in Bournemouth, UK during June 2009, it was found that participants were unlikely to forgo potential travel decisions to New Zealand because of co...

  12. Estimated Impacts of New Zealand Agriculture Climate Policy: A Tale of Two Catchments

    OpenAIRE

    Daigneault, Adam J.; Greenhalgh, Suzie; Samarasinghe, Oshadhi

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural and forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a key feature of New Zealand’s emissions profile, and New Zealand is the only country, to date, to have indicated that agricultural and forestry emissions will be covered under their domestic climate policy – the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZETS). Forestry entered the NZETS in 2008 while agricultural emissions are expected to enter in 2015. Coupled with climate policy development is the increasing scrutiny of agricultural...

  13. Using Co-innovation to Stimulate Innovation in the New Zealand Agricultural Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, N.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Small, B.; Turner, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently implemented research and development program; Co-learning and Coinnovation to Achieve Impact in New Zealand’s Biological Industries (Primary Innovation for short) aims to stimulate innovation in the New Zealand agricultural sector, which is an important contributor to the New Zealand economy, mainly through exports. The program is attempting to implement co-innovation principles, based on an Agricultural Innovation Systems (AIS) approach, in five Innovation Platforms (IPs), evaluat...

  14. An ethnomycological review of psychoactive agarics in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J W; Merlin, M D; Jansen, K L

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive review is presented of the recreational and accidental ingestion of psychoactive mushrooms in Australia and New Zealand; 15 recognized species are considered from Australia and eight from New Zealand. Common epithets, potency levels, and methods of ingestion are discussed. Legal aspects involving the use of these psychoactive fungi are noted. In addition, medical and psychoactive effects of these mushrooms and treatment for psilocybian mushroom poisoning are described. Numerous case reports, with commentary, are also presented.

  15. The development of Playcentre movement in New Zealand : Its philosophy and education for children

    OpenAIRE

    七木田, 敦

    2004-01-01

    Playcentres are the third largest type of provider of early childhood education in New Zealand. Eleven percent (17,596) of all children enrolled in early childhood services. Playcentres, therefore, continue to be a significant provider of one of a diverse range of early childhood services for New Zealand pre-school children. Within this diverse early childhood sector, playcentres have special attributes - in particular they are managed and staffed by parents. The playcentre movement sees its ...

  16. Pyropia plicata sp. nov. (Bangiales, Rhodophyta: naming a common intertidal alga from New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Nelson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A commonly found red alga of the upper intertidal zone of New Zealand rocky coasts is described for the first time as Pyropia plicata sp. nov. This species has been incorrectly known as Porphyra columbina Mont. (now Pyropia columbina (Mont. W.A.Nelson for many years. Pyropia plicata is widespread and common, and it is readily distinguished from other species of bladed Bangiales in New Zealand by its distinctive morphology, with pleated blades attached by a central rhizoidal holdfast.

  17. Pyropia plicata sp. nov. (Bangiales, Rhodophyta): naming a common intertidal alga from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wendy A

    2013-01-01

    A commonly found red alga of the upper intertidal zone of New Zealand rocky coasts is described for the first time as Pyropia plicata sp. nov. This species has been incorrectly known as Porphyra columbina Mont. (now Pyropia columbina (Mont.) W.A.Nelson) for many years. Pyropia plicata is widespread and common, and it is readily distinguished from other species of bladed Bangiales in New Zealand by its distinctive morphology, with pleated blades attached by a central rhizoidal holdfast.

  18. Pyropia plicata sp. nov. (Bangiales, Rhodophyta): naming a common intertidal alga from New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Wendy Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A commonly found red alga of the upper intertidal zone of New Zealand rocky coasts is described for the first time as Pyropia plicata sp. nov. This species has been incorrectly known as Porphyra columbina Mont. (now Pyropia columbina (Mont.) W.A.Nelson) for many years. Pyropia plicata is widespread and common, and it is readily distinguished from other species of bladed Bangiales in New Zealand by its distinctive morphology, with pleated blades attached by a central rhizoidal holdfast.

  19. Yellow flag scores in a compensable New Zealand cohort suffering acute low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Grimmer-Somers; Mathew Prior; Jim Robertson

    2008-01-01

    Karen Grimmer-Somers1, Mathew Prior1, Jim Robertson21Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, City East Campus, North Tce, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 2New Zealand Accident Compensation Corporation, Auckland, New ZealandBackground: Despite its high prevalence, most acute low back pain (ALBP) is nonspecific, self-limiting with no definable pathology. Recurrence is prevalent, as is resultant chronicity. Psychosocial factors (yellow flags comprising depression ...

  20. Three new species of Myrsidea (Phthiraptera: Menoponidae) from New Zealand passerines (Aves: Passeriformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychra, Oldrich; Kolencik, Stanislav; Palma, Ricardo L

    2016-06-20

    Myrsidea ivanliteraki new species, M. novaeseelandiae new species, and M. hihi new species are described and illustrated from New Zealand birds, with Gymnorhina tibicen, Anthornis melanura and Notiomystis cincta as type hosts respectively. Also, Myrsidea vincula is redescribed and illustrated from one sample ex Strepera fuliginosa from Australia. Keys for the identification of females and males of the five species of Myrsidea recorded from New Zealand are also given.