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Sample records for harriota raleighiana chondrichthyes

  1. Primer registro de Harriota raleighiana (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Rhinochimaeridae en la costa del Pacífico central de México First record of Harriota raleighiana (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Rhinochimaeridae in the central Pacific coast of Mexico

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    José Luis Castro-Aguirre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Este es el primer registro de la quimera narizona, Harriota raleighiana Goode y Bean 1895, en el litoral del Pacífico central de México, con base en una hembra moribunda, recolectada en la superficie del océano sobre agua muy profunda cerca de Manzanillo, Colima. También constituye el segundo registro de su existencia en el océano Pacífico oriental, lo que podría comprobar su patrón distribucional que la calificaría como cosmopolita. Se proporcionan sus medidas y algunos datos biológicos.This is the first record in Mexican central Pacific of the "longnosed chimaera" Harriota raleighiana Goode and Bean 1895, based on a nearly dead female specimen collected at sea surface over very deep water of Manzanillo, Colima. Also, it is the second published report on the occurrence of this species in the eastern Pacific ocean, and seems to support its geographical distribution pattern, which has been classified as cosmopolitan-like type. Morphometric and some biological data are also offered.

  2. The systematics of the Mongolepidida (Chondrichthyes) and the Ordovician origins of the clade.

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    Andreev, Plamen; Coates, Michael I; Karatajūtė-Talimaa, Valentina; Shelton, Richard M; Cooper, Paul R; Wang, Nian-Zhong; Sansom, Ivan J

    2016-01-01

    The Mongolepidida is an Order of putative early chondrichthyan fish, originally erected to unite taxa from the Lower Silurian of Mongolia. The present study reassesses mongolepid systematics through the examination of the developmental, histological and morphological characteristics of scale-based specimens from the Upper Ordovician Harding Sandstone (Colorado, USA) and the Upper Llandovery-Lower Wenlock Yimugantawu (Tarim Basin, China), Xiushan (Guizhou Province, China) and Chargat (north-western Mongolia) Formations. The inclusion of the Mongolepidida within the Class Chondrichthyes is supported on the basis of a suite of scale attributes (areal odontode deposition, linear odontocomplex structure and lack of enamel, cancellous bone and hard-tissue resorption) shared with traditionally recognized chondrichthyans (euchondrichthyans, e.g., ctenacanthiforms). The mongolepid dermal skeleton exhibits a rare type of atubular dentine (lamellin) that is regarded as one of the diagnostic features of the Order within crown gnathostomes. The previously erected Mongolepididae and Shiqianolepidae families are revised, differentiated by scale-base histology and expanded to include the genera Rongolepisand Xinjiangichthys, respectively. A newly described mongolepid species (Solinalepis levis gen. et sp. nov.) from the Ordovician of North America is treated as family incertae sedis, as it possesses a type of basal bone tissue (acellular and vascular) that has yet to be documented in other mongolepids. This study extends the stratigraphic and palaeogeographic range of Mongolepidida and adds further evidence for an early diversification of the Chondrichthyes in the Ordovician Period, 50 million years prior to the first recorded appearance of euchondrichthyan teeth in the Lower Devonian.

  3. New data on Karksiodus (Chondrichthyes from the Main Devonian Field (East European Platform

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    Alexander Ivanov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New teeth belonging to Karksiodus mirus Ivanov & Märss (Chondrichthyes were found together with putative chondrichthyan scales in five new localities of the Leningrad Region, northwestern Russia, within the Aruküla and Burtnieki regional stages, Givetian, Middle Devonian. The teeth exhibit variability in the number of cusps, angles between the lateral cusps, base curvature, length of lateral parts and the prominence of the wall of the transversal basal canal. Karksiodus tooth material collected from these sites suggests that this taxon possesses an heterodont dentition and a specific, complex vascularization system affecting the dental base and the crown. Enameloid tissue seems to be absent, thus the surface striations on the cusps are presumably made up by orthodentine. The fish fauna from these localities is listed.

  4. The systematics of the Mongolepidida (Chondrichthyes) and the Ordovician origins of the clade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Michael I.; Karatajūtė-Talimaa, Valentina; Shelton, Richard M.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    The Mongolepidida is an Order of putative early chondrichthyan fish, originally erected to unite taxa from the Lower Silurian of Mongolia. The present study reassesses mongolepid systematics through the examination of the developmental, histological and morphological characteristics of scale-based specimens from the Upper Ordovician Harding Sandstone (Colorado, USA) and the Upper Llandovery–Lower Wenlock Yimugantawu (Tarim Basin, China), Xiushan (Guizhou Province, China) and Chargat (north-western Mongolia) Formations. The inclusion of the Mongolepidida within the Class Chondrichthyes is supported on the basis of a suite of scale attributes (areal odontode deposition, linear odontocomplex structure and lack of enamel, cancellous bone and hard-tissue resorption) shared with traditionally recognized chondrichthyans (euchondrichthyans, e.g., ctenacanthiforms). The mongolepid dermal skeleton exhibits a rare type of atubular dentine (lamellin) that is regarded as one of the diagnostic features of the Order within crown gnathostomes. The previously erected Mongolepididae and Shiqianolepidae families are revised, differentiated by scale-base histology and expanded to include the genera Rongolepisand Xinjiangichthys, respectively. A newly described mongolepid species (Solinalepis levis gen. et sp. nov.) from the Ordovician of North America is treated as family incertae sedis, as it possesses a type of basal bone tissue (acellular and vascular) that has yet to be documented in other mongolepids. This study extends the stratigraphic and palaeogeographic range of Mongolepidida and adds further evidence for an early diversification of the Chondrichthyes in the Ordovician Period, 50 million years prior to the first recorded appearance of euchondrichthyan teeth in the Lower Devonian. PMID:27350896

  5. The systematics of the Mongolepidida (Chondrichthyes and the Ordovician origins of the clade

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    Plamen Andreev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mongolepidida is an Order of putative early chondrichthyan fish, originally erected to unite taxa from the Lower Silurian of Mongolia. The present study reassesses mongolepid systematics through the examination of the developmental, histological and morphological characteristics of scale-based specimens from the Upper Ordovician Harding Sandstone (Colorado, USA and the Upper Llandovery–Lower Wenlock Yimugantawu (Tarim Basin, China, Xiushan (Guizhou Province, China and Chargat (north-western Mongolia Formations. The inclusion of the Mongolepidida within the Class Chondrichthyes is supported on the basis of a suite of scale attributes (areal odontode deposition, linear odontocomplex structure and lack of enamel, cancellous bone and hard-tissue resorption shared with traditionally recognized chondrichthyans (euchondrichthyans, e.g., ctenacanthiforms. The mongolepid dermal skeleton exhibits a rare type of atubular dentine (lamellin that is regarded as one of the diagnostic features of the Order within crown gnathostomes. The previously erected Mongolepididae and Shiqianolepidae families are revised, differentiated by scale-base histology and expanded to include the genera Rongolepisand Xinjiangichthys, respectively. A newly described mongolepid species (Solinalepis levis gen. et sp. nov. from the Ordovician of North America is treated as family incertae sedis, as it possesses a type of basal bone tissue (acellular and vascular that has yet to be documented in other mongolepids. This study extends the stratigraphic and palaeogeographic range of Mongolepidida and adds further evidence for an early diversification of the Chondrichthyes in the Ordovician Period, 50 million years prior to the first recorded appearance of euchondrichthyan teeth in the Lower Devonian.

  6. Mesobathic chondrichthyes of the Juan Fernández seamounts: are they different from those of the central Chilean continental slope?

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    Isabel Andrade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared the geographic distribution of groups of chondrychthid fishes of two physically proximal, although geographically different, regions that include the Juan Fernández seamounts and the central Chilean continental slope, both sampled at mesopelagic and mesobenthonic depths. The ridge is in the Nazca Plate, while the slope region in on the South American Plate, and is closer to the South American continent. We found six species of Chondrichthyes for the seamounts (four orders, four families. The slope sampling produced ten species of Chondrichthyes, of which Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959, was the only species in common with the Juan Fernández area. There are clear differences between the Chondrichthyes of the two regions. These fisheries require adequate administrative modes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 181-190. Epub 2008 March 31.

  7. Early Pliocene fishes (Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes from Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain

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    J. F. Betancort

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fossil fish teeth are contained in marine deposits dated at ca 4.8 Ma found on the islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain. These islands, situated in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, can be considered a mid-way stopover point between the Caribbean Sea, with the Central American Seaway about to close in this epoch, and the Mediterranean, in the first stage of its post-Messinian Gibraltar Seaway period. Accordingly, there existed extensive pantropical communication, particularly for nektonic animals capable of travelling large distances. In this paper, we present a number of fossil fishes, most of which are identified for the first time on the basis of their teeth: the Chondrichthyes species Carcharocles megalodon, Parotodus benedeni, Cosmopolitodus hastalis, Isurus oxyrinchus, Carcharias cf. acutissima, Carcharhinus cf. leucas, Carcharhinus cf. priscus, Galeocerdo cf. aduncus, and the Osteichthyes species Archosargus cinctus, Labrodon pavimentatum, and Diodon scillae. Coincidences are observed between these ichthyofauna and specimens found in the Azores Islands, the Pacific coast of America and the Mediterranean Sea.

  8. Early Pliocene fishes (Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes) from Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain)

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    Betancort, J.F.; Lomoschitz, A.; Meco, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fossil fish teeth are contained in marine deposits dated at ca 4.8 Ma found on the islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain). These islands, situated in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, can be considered a mid-way stopover point between the Caribbean Sea, with the Central American Seaway about to close in this epoch, and the Mediterranean, in the first stage of its post-Messinian Gibraltar Seaway period. Accordingly, there existed extensive pantropical communication, particularly for nektonic animals capable of travelling large distances. In this paper, we present a number of fossil fishes, most of which are identified for the first time on the basis of their teeth: the Chondrichthyes species Carcharocles megalodon, Parotodus benedeni, Cosmopolitodus hastalis, Isurus oxyrinchus, Carcharias cf. acutissima, Carcharhinus cf. leucas, Carcharhinus cf. priscus, Galeocerdo cf. aduncus, and the Osteichthyes species Archosargus cinctus, Labrodon pavimentatum, and Diodon scillae. Coincidences are observed between these ichthyofauna and specimens found in the Azores Islands, the Pacific coast of America and the Mediterranean Sea. (Author)

  9. Morfometria de raias continentais (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae do alto rio Paraná, Brasil = Morphometry of upper Paraná river freshwater stingrays (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae

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    Antonio Guilherme Cândido da Silva

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Potamotrygonidae constitui o único grupo recente de Chondrichthyes cujo habitat está restrito, exclusivamente, a águas continentais. Na planície de inundação do Alto rio Paraná, espécies desta família estabeleceram-se após o fechamento das comportas da usina hidrelétrica de Itaipu, a jusante. O objetivo deste trabalho foi, utilizando medidas corporais, identificar diferenças morfométricas entre indivíduos de Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 e Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 capturadosnesta região, bem como estimar o tamanho com que machos destas espécies atingem a maturidade gonadal. Machos de P. falkneri e P. cf. motoro das populações avaliadas atingem a maturidade gonadal com largura do disco variando em torno de 26 cm e 23 cm, respectivamente. Na comparação das espécies, P. cf. motoro apresentou maior distânciaproporcional entre as narinas e maior comprimento proporcional da cauda e dos espiráculos. Identificou-se dimorfismo sexual secundário para P. falkneri, consistindo da presença de fileiras laterais de espinhos na cauda das fêmeas. Estudos futuros de morfologiafuncional e ecomorfologia poderão esclarecer o significado das diferenças morfométricas para o modo de vida destas espécies.Potamotrygonidae is the only extant chondrichthyan group restricted exclusively to freshwater. This family invaded the UpperParaná river system after the closing of Itaipu Dam. This study aimed to identify morphometric differences between Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 and Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 sampled in that area, and estimate male size at gonadal maturation. P. falkneri and P. cf. motoro males reach gonadal maturation at 26 cm and 23 cm disc width, respectively. Comparing both species, P. cf. motoro presented larger tail, spiracles and distance between nostrils. Lateral small stings on tails ofP. falkneri females were observed as secondary

  10. Lista patrón de los tiburones, rayas y quimeras (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii, Holocephali de México

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    Del Moral-Flores, L. F.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Checklist of sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii, Holocephali from Mexico We present an annotated checklist of the species of sharks, rays and chimaeras (chondrichthyan fishes occurring in Mexican waters, based on a thorough review of the literature and electronic database searches, examination of museum collection specimens, and unpublished records obtained during fieldwork conducted in the last four years. The checklist contains information of at least 214 species of chondrichthyan fishes that occur in Mexican marine and brackish waters, assigned to 84 genera, 40 families and 14 orders. It includes eight species of chimaeras, 95 batoids and 111 sharks. Condrichthyan fauna in Mexico is one of the richest in the world, with almost 17.3% of the known species. An additional 16 species are included as their occurrence in Mexican marine waters is probable according to distributional patterns.

  11. Lista patrón de los tiburones, rayas y quimeras (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii, Holocephali de México

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    Del Moral-Flores, L. F.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Checklist of sharks, rays and chimaeras (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii, Holocephali from Mexico We present an annotated checklist of the species of sharks, rays and chimaeras (chondrichthyan fishes occurring in Mexican waters, based on a thorough review of the literature and electronic database searches, examination of museum collection specimens, and unpublished records obtained during fieldwork conducted in the last four years. The checklist contains information of at least 214 species of chondrichthyan fishes that occur in Mexican marine and brackish waters, assigned to 84 genera, 40 families and 14 orders. It includes eight species of chimaeras, 95 batoids and 111 sharks. Condrichthyan fauna in Mexico is one of the richest in the world, with almost 17.3% of the known species. An additional 16 species are included as their occurrence in Mexican marine waters is probable according to distributional patterns. Data published through GBIF [doi:10.15470/hrl1kv

  12. The marine leech Stibarobdella loricata (Harding, 1924 (Hirudinea, Piscicolidae, parasitic on the angel shark Squatina spp. and sandtiger shark Carcharias taurus Rafinesque, 1810 (Chondrichthyes: Squatinidae, Carchariidae in Southern Brazilian waters

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    Soto J. M. R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the marine leech, Stibarobdella loricata (Harding, 1924 (Hirudinea, Piscicolidae, is reported on the southern coast of Brazil, based on seven lots with 47 specimens, between 71 and 182 mm in total length, collected on the dorsal region of angel sharks, Squatina argentina (Marini, 1930; S. guggenheim Marini, 1936; S. punctata Marini, 1936 (Chondrichthyes, Squatinidae; and on the head of a sandtiger shark, Carcharias taurus Rafinesque, 1810 (Chondrichthyes, Carchariidae. This is the first record of S. loricata in the western Atlantic and of its parasitic association with S. argentina, S. guggenheim, S. punctata, and C. taurus.

  13. Mesobathic chondrichthyes of the Juan Fernández seamounts: are they different from those of the central Chilean continental slope?

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    Isabel Andrade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared the geographic distribution of groups of chondrychthid fishes of two physically proximal, although geographically different, regions that include the Juan Fernández seamounts and the central Chilean continental slope, both sampled at mesopelagic and mesobenthonic depths. The ridge is in the Nazca Plate, while the slope region in on the South American Plate, and is closer to the South American continent. We found six species of Chondrichthyes for the seamounts (four orders, four families. The slope sampling produced ten species of Chondrichthyes, of which Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959, was the only species in common with the Juan Fernández area. There are clear differences between the Chondrichthyes of the two regions. These fisheries require adequate administrative modes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 181-190. Epub 2008 March 31.Se realizó un estudio de distribución geográfica comparativa entre conjuntos de peces condrictios de dos sectores geográficamente cercanos, pero geológicamente distintos, el sector este de la cordillera sumergida de Juan Fernández y el talud continental de Chile central, a profundidades mesopelágicas y mesobentónicas. La cordillera está sobre la placa de Nazca, el talud en la Sudamericana. Comparamos familias, géneros y especies, mediante el índice de Jaccard. Hay seis especies de condrictios en los montes submarinos (cuatro órdenes y cuatro familias. El talud tiene diez especies, y únicamente comparte con la cordillera a Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959. Estos condrictios requieren modos administrativo-pesqueros adecuados.

  14. Digenea, Nematoda, Cestoda, and Acanthocephala, parasites in Potamotrygonidae (Chondrichthyes from the upper Paraná River floodplain, states of Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

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    Pavanelli, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper represents the first study on the endoparasitic fauna of Potamotrygon falkneri and P.motoro in the upper Paraná River floodplain. Fishes were collected by fishing rod and gillnetting in different stations ofthe floodplain, from March, 2005 to September, 2006. Parasites were sampled, fixed and preserved according tospecialized literature. About half of the analyzed fish were parasitized by at least one of the following species ofendoparasites: Clinostomum complanatum, Genarchella sp. and Tylodelphys sp. (metacercaria (Digenea;Acanthobothrium regoi, Rhinebothrium paratrygoni, Paroncomegas araya and Potamotrygonocestus travassosi(Cestoidea; Brevimulticaecum sp. (larva, Cucullanus sp., Echinocephalus sp. and Spinitectus sp. (Nematoda; andQuadrigyrus machadoi (Acanthocephala. Some species were already registered in Chondrichthyes and others werepreviously recorded in Osteichthyes from the study area. The study listed ten new records of parasites in the host P.falkneri, one new record in the host P. motoro and five new records in the locality upper Paraná River.

  15. Catálogo dos Peixes Marinhos do Laboratório de Ictiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Parte I: Chondrichthyes (Rajiformes). Teleostei (Elopiformes a Dactylopteriformes)

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    Paulo Roberto Duarte Lopes

    1989-01-01

    The present paper is the first part of the catalogue of marine fishes belonging to the collection of the Laboratory of Ichthyology (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro-RJ) to be published. Here are included Chondrichthyes (Rajiformes) and part of Osteichthyes, Teleostei (Elopiformes to Dactylopteriformes) in a total amount of 30 families, 52 genera and 62 species. The most part of the material have been collected at the littoral of the State of Rio de Janeiro. For each species considered i...

  16. Catálogo dos Peixes Marinhos do Laboratório de Ictiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Parte I: Chondrichthyes (Rajiformes. Teleostei (Elopiformes a Dactylopteriformes

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    Paulo Roberto Duarte Lopes

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is the first part of the catalogue of marine fishes belonging to the collection of the Laboratory of Ichthyology (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro-RJ to be published. Here are included Chondrichthyes (Rajiformes and part of Osteichthyes, Teleostei (Elopiformes to Dactylopteriformes in a total amount of 30 families, 52 genera and 62 species. The most part of the material have been collected at the littoral of the State of Rio de Janeiro. For each species considered is given the vulgar name (when known in Southeastern Brazil, the known distribution (in Western Atlantic Ocean and some data as collecting locality, total number of collected specimens and the register number in the collection. Scorpaena isthmensis Meek & Hildebrand, 1928 (Scorpaenidae is for the first time mentioned for the Southern littoral of Brazil.

  17. Morfometria de raias continentais (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae do alto rio Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.885 Morphometry of upper Paraná river freshwater stingrays (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v29i4.885

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    Erivelto Goulart

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Potamotrygonidae constitui o único grupo recente de Chondrichthyes cujo habitat está restrito, exclusivamente, a águas continentais. Na planície de inundação do Alto rio Paraná, espécies desta família estabeleceram-se após o fechamento das comportas da usina hidrelétrica de Itaipu, a jusante. O objetivo deste trabalho foi, utilizando medidas corporais, identificar diferenças morfométricas entre indivíduos de Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 e Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 capturados nesta região, bem como estimar o tamanho com que machos destas espécies atingem a maturidade gonadal. Machos de P. falkneri e P. cf. motoro das populações avaliadas atingem a maturidade gonadal com largura do disco variando em torno de 26 cm e 23 cm, respectivamente. Na comparação das espécies, P. cf. motoro apresentou maior distância proporcional entre as narinas e maior comprimento proporcional da cauda e dos espiráculos. Identificou-se dimorfismo sexual secundário para P. falkneri, consistindo da presença de fileiras laterais de espinhos na cauda das fêmeas. Estudos futuros de morfologia funcional e ecomorfologia poderão esclarecer o significado das diferenças morfométricas para o modo de vida destas espécies.Potamotrygonidae is the only extant chondrichthyan group restricted exclusively to freshwater. This family invaded the Upper Paraná river system after the closing of Itaipu Dam. This study aimed to identify morphometric differences between Potamotrygon cf. motoro (Natterer in Müller & Henle, 1841 and Potamotrygon falkneri Castex & Maciel, 1963 sampled in that area, and estimate male size at gonadal maturation. P. falkneri and P. cf. motoro males reach gonadal maturation at 26 cm and 23 cm disc width, respectively. Comparing both species, P. cf. motoro presented larger tail, spiracles and distance between nostrils. Lateral small stings on tails of P. falkneri females were observed as

  18. Eocene squalomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from Antarctica

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    Engelbrecht, Andrea; Mörs, Thomas; Reguero, Marcelo A.; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    Rare remains of predominantly deep-water sharks of the families Hexanchidae, Squalidae, Dalatiidae, Centrophoridae, and Squatinidae are described from the Eocene La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula, which has yielded the most abundant chondrichthyan assemblage from the Southern Hemisphere to date. Previously described representatives of Hexanchus sp., Squalus weltoni, Squalus woodburnei, Centrophorus sp., and Squatina sp. are confirmed and dental variations are documented. Although the teeth of Squatina sp. differ from other Palaeogene squatinid species, we refrain from introducing a new species. A new dalatiid taxon, Eodalatias austrinalis gen. et sp. nov. is described. This new material not only increases the diversity of Eocene Antarctic elasmobranchs but also allows assuming that favourable deep-water habitats were available in the Eocene Antarctic Ocean off Antarctica in the Eocene. The occurrences of deep-water inhabitants in shallow, near-coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula agrees well with extant distribution patterns.

  19. Hifalomicose em Mustelus schmitti (Springer (Chondrichthyes, Triakidae Hyphalomycosis in Mustelus schmitii (Springer (Chondrichthyes, Triakidae

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    Manoel Mateus Bueno Gonzalez

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Both fungai and algal infections have been reported in elasmobranchs. This study describes the first record of hyphalomycosis infection in Mustelus schmitii (Springer, 1940. The data was obtained through the examination of one animal in captivity and ninety five in their natural environment. Was also detected four cases of Fusarium solani infection. The impact of these diseases on the wild population is unknown.

  20. Bransonelliformes – a new order of the Xenacanthimorpha (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii

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    O. Hampe

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The order Bransonelliformes is erected for the genera Bransonella Harlton, 1933 and Barbclabornia Johnson, 2003 based on the distinct characters of an inverted "V"-nested pattern of ornamentation preliminary on the labial aspect at the tooth cusps, the presence of labial foramina, and the occasional occurrence of a centrally positioned lingual opening of a main nutrient canal at the bases of the teeth. The Bransonelliformes comprises the primitive sister group to the Xenacanthiformes within the Xenacanthimorpha. Für die Gattungen Bransonella Harlton, 1933 und Barbclabornia Johnson, 2003 wird die neue Ordnung Bransonelliformes eingeführt basierend auf den Merkmalen von bevorzugt auf der labialen Seite der Zahnspitzen auftretenden, dachziegelartig ineinander geschachtelten Skulpturleisten, dem Vorhandensein labialer Foramina sowie dem häufigen Auftreten einer größeren lingualen Öffnung an der Zahnbasis, dem Durchtritt eines zentralen Nährkanals. Die Bransonelliformes stellen die ursprünglichere Schwestergruppe zu den Xenacanthiformes innerhalb der Xenacanthimorpha dar. doi:10.1002/mmng.200700005

  1. Mitochondrial genome of longheaded eagle ray Aetobatus flagellum (Chondrichthyes: Myliobatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Baojuan; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Furumitsu, Keisuke; Zhang, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Aetobatus flagellum is 20,201 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region (CR). The base composition of the genome is 30.9% A, 28.2% T, 27.1% C and 13.8% G. Comparing mtDNA of elasmobranchs submitted in NCBI, our study not only identified the longest mitochondrial genome with 4490 bp CR in A. flagellum, but also strongly revealed that records in the northwest Pacific may belong to a separate species from those distributed in Indonesia.

  2. Occurrence of Hydrolagus macrophthalmus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Chimaeridae in the northeastern Pacific Presencia de Hydrolagus macrophthalmus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Chimaeridae en el Pacífico nororiental

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    Adrián F. González-Acosta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The southeastern Pacific chimaeroid Hydrolagus macrophthalmus De Buen, 1959, is reported for the first time in the northeastern Pacific on the basis of 1 male specimen (945 mm TL caught on 13 April 1995 off Manzanillo, Colima (Mexico: 18° 30'N, 104° 15'W at the surface above deep water (2 000 m. The first occurrence of this species increases the number of chimaeroid species known in the northeastern Pacific and expands their known range.Se registra por primera vez la presencia de la quimera Hydrolagus macrophthalmus De Buen, 1959, en aguas del Pacífico nororiental; especie cuya distribución se consideraba como exclusiva del Pacífico sur oriental. El 13 de abril de 1995, se recolectó 1 ejemplar macho (945 mm TL en la superficie del mar frente a Manzanillo, Colima (México: 18° 30'N, 104° 15'O, en una zona de gran profundidad (2 000 m. Su presencia, incrementa el número de quimeras del Pacífico nororiental y asimismo, amplía su distribución hacia el hemisferio norte.

  3. Reproductive biology of the scalloped Hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (Chondrichthyes: Sphyrnidae) off southwest Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Bejarano-Álvarez, Marcela; Galván Magaña, Felipe; Ochoa Báez, Rosa Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini is the most important species in the artisanal shark fishery in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico. The knowledge about their reproductive biology in the area is nonexistent, despite their being listed worldwide as endangered by the IUCN. To determine the basic biology of reproduction in this shark would give important data to establish management or conservation plans for this species in Mexico. Samples were collected of 991 hammerhead sharks (342 f...

  4. Multiple prismatic calcium phosphate layers in the jaws of present-day sharks (Chondrichthyes; Selachii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingerkus, G; Séret, B; Guilbert, E

    1991-01-15

    Jaws of large individuals, over 2 m in total length, of the shark species Carcharodon carcharias (great white shark) and Isurus oxyrinchus (mako shark) of the family Lamnidae, and Galeocerdo cuvieri (tiger shark) and Carcharhinus leucas (bull shark) of the family Carcharhinidae were found to have multiple, up to five, layers of prismatic calcium phosphate surrounding the cartilages. Smaller individuals of these species and other known species of living chondrichthyans have only one layer of prismatic calcium phosphate surrounding the cartilages, as also do most species of fossil chondrichthyans. Two exceptions are the fossil shark genera Xenacanthus and Tamiobatis. Where it is found in living forms, this multiple layered calcification does not appear to be phylogenetic, as it appears to be lacking in other lamnid and carcharhinid genera and species. Rather it appears to be functional, only appearing in larger individuals and species of these two groups, and hence may be necessary to strengthen the jaw cartilages of such individuals for biting.

  5. Mandibular and hyoid muscles of Galeomorph sharks (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii), with remarks on their phylogenetic intrarelationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Mateus C; de Carvalho, Marcelo R

    2013-10-01

    The superorder Galeomorph comprises the orders Heterodontiformes, Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes. Recent morphological and molecular support that it is a monophyletic taxon. The phyletic relationship within the Galeomorphi are also well resolved. However, only few morphological characters of the mandibular and hyoid muscles have been employed, and a detailed description of these muscles and their variations may contribute new interpretations of homology and to the discussion of different hypothesis of intrarelationships. This paper provides a detailed description of mandibular and hyoid arch muscles in galeomorph sharks, within a comparative elasmobranch framework, with the objective to discuss putative homologies that may elucidate our understanding of galeomorph evolution. Twenty-eight galeomorph species were dissected, described, illustrated and compared with other elasmobranchs and with data from the literature. The Galeomorphi are supported as monophyletic by presenting the m. levator labii superioris attached directly to the neurocranium, different from the attachment through a tendon in basal squalomorphs. Heterodontiformes and Orectolobiformes share particular variations in the position and insertion of the m. levator labii superioris and the presence of a well-defined m. levator hyomandibulae. Lamniformes and Carcharhiniformes show similar patterns in the position and attachment of the m. levator labii superioris, subdivision of the m. adductor mandibulae, and the presence of an almost indivisible m. levator hyomandibulae and m. constrictor hyoideus dorsalis, similar to the condition, albeit independently, in basal squalomorphs. No specific mandibular or hyoid arch muscle character was found to support the clade composed of Orectolobiformes, Lamniformes, and Carcharhiniformes, as advocated by recent phylogenetic analyses. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Morphology of lateral line canals in Neotropical freshwater stingrays (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae from Negro River, Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akemi Shibuya

    Full Text Available The relationship between the distribution of the lateral line canals and their functionality has not been well examined in elasmobranchs, especially among Neotropical freshwater stingrays of the family Potamotrygonidae. The spatial distribution of the canals and their tubules and the quantification of the neuromasts were analyzed in preserved specimens of Potamotrygon motoro, P. orbignyi, Potamotrygon sp. "cururu", and Paratrygon aiereba from the middle Negro River, Amazonas, Brazil. The hyomandibular, infraorbital, posterior lateral line, mandibular, nasal and supraorbital canals were characterized and their pores and neuromasts quantified. The ventral canals are known to facilitate the accurate localization of prey items under the body, and our results indicate that the dorsal canals may be employed in identifying the presence of predators or potential prey positioned above the stingray's body. The presence of non-pored canals in the ventral region may be compensated by the high concentration of neuromasts found in the same area, which possibly allow the accurate detection of mechanical stimuli. The concentration of non-pored canals near the mouth indicates their importance in locating and capturing prey buried in the bottom substrate, possibly aided by the presence of vesicles of Savi.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Fang, Yi-Chiao; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2014-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the great white shark having 16,744 bp and including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the great white shark is the same as the one observed in the most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (30.6%), T (28.7%), C (26.9%) and G (13.9%).

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the crocodile shark, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Ho, Hsuan-Ching

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the crocodile shark consists of 16,688 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region, and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the crocodile shark is the same as that of most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (32.0%), T (31.0%), C (23.7%) and G (13.3%).

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sand tiger shark, Carcharias taurus (Chondrichthyes, Odontaspididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Jabado, Rima W; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the sand tiger shark consists of 16,773 bp and including 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the sand tiger shark is the same as the one observed in most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (31.8%), T (28.7%), C (26.3%) and G (13.2%).

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the big-eye thresher shark, Alopias superciliosus (Chondrichthyes, Alopiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Liao, Yun-Chih

    2014-08-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the big-eye thresher shark was sequenced using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 16,719 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the big-eye thresher shark is the same as the one observed in the most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (31.8%), T (28.9%), C (25.8%) and G (13.5%).

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the salmon shark, Lamna ditropis (Chondrichthyes, Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Hao; Jang-Liaw, Nian-Hong; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Carlisle, Aaron; Hsu, Hua Hsun; Liao, Yun-Chih; Shao, Kwang-Tsao

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the salmon shark consists of 16,699 bp and includes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 1 replication origin region and 1 control region. The mitochondrial gene arrangement of the salmon shark is the same as that of most vertebrates. Base composition of the genome is A (29.6%), T (28.6%), C (27.1%), and G (14.8%).

  12. From coexistence to competitive exclusion: can overfishing change the outcome of competition in skates (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia L Ruocco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for food could be a major force driving changes in the community structure of skates (Rajidae subjected to fishing exploitation. Under this hypothesis, small skates are released from competition with larger skates after fishing has depleted the larger species. Here, we compare the abundance patterns of two sympatric skates with similar niches but different life histories, Bathyraja albomaculata (larger and slow-reproducing and Bathyraja macloviana (smaller and faster-reproducing, before (1971, 1978 and after (1998-2004 a 108% increase in industrial bottom trawling on the southeastern South American shelf in order to test the prediction that B. macloviana should competitively exclude B. albomaculata after the increase in fishing mortality. In 1971 and 1978, there was no relationship between the abundance of both species, indicating that they coexisted over large scales. In 1998-2004, the relationship between the abundances of these skates was bell-shaped, indicating that both species increased in abundance at low densities until peaking, after which B. albomaculata decreased when B. macloviana became more abundant, consistent with resource competition. We tested whether food may be a potential limiting resource by comparing the diet of both species. The two species consumed mostly polychaetes, differing only in the consumption of polychaetes from the family Nephthyidae, which was much higher for B. macloviana. Bathyraja macloviana could replace B. albomaculata at high densities when food resources may become scarce. These results support the hypothesis that competition release is an important factor explaining the changes in skate communities in overexploited areas.

  13. Body plan convergence in the evolution of skates and rays (Chondrichthyes: Batoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschliman, Neil C; Nishida, Mutsumi; Miya, Masaki; Inoue, Jun G; Rosana, Kerri M; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2012-04-01

    Skates, rays and allies (Batoidea) comprise more than half of the species diversity and much of the morphological disparity among chondrichthyan fishes, the sister group to all other jawed vertebrates. While batoids are morphologically well characterized and have an excellent fossil record, there is currently no consensus on the interrelationships of family-level taxa. Here we construct a resolved, robust and time-calibrated batoid phylogeny using mitochondrial genomes, nuclear genes, and fossils, sampling densely across taxa. Data partitioning schemes, biases in the sequence data, and the relative informativeness of each fossil are explored. The molecular phylogeny is largely congruent with morphology crownward in the tree, but the branching orders of major batoid groups are mostly novel. Body plan convergence appears to be widespread in batoids. A depressed, rounded pectoral disk supported to the snout tip by fin radials, common to skates and stingrays, is indicated to have been derived independently by each group, while the long, spiny rostrum of sawfishes similarly appears to be convergent with that of sawsharks, which are not batoids. The major extant batoid lineages are inferred to have arisen relatively rapidly from the Late Triassic into the Jurassic, with long stems followed by subsequent radiations in each group around the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. The fossil record indicates that batoids were affected with disproportionate severity by the end-Cretaceous extinction event. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reproductive biology of the southern thorny skate Amblyraja doellojuradoi (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpiani, G

    2016-04-01

    The total lengths (L(T)) of 193 males (209-556 mm) and 130 females (275-515 mm) of Amblyraja doellojuradoi, a commercial by-catch species on the Argentinean continental shelf, which are increasingly retained, were analysed. No sexual dimorphism was observed in the L(T) at which 50% of individuals were sexually mature; males matured at 448 mm and females at 411 mm, c. 80 and 82% of maximum L(T). The hepato-somatic index was similar among sexes, but significantly different between maturity stages, being lower in mature than immature specimens. Males had no seasonal difference in the hepato-somatic index and females had the lowest index in autumn. The gonado-somatic index was lower in males than in females and significantly higher in mature than immature specimens of both sexes. Males had the highest index in autumn and females had no seasonal difference. Collectively, these results would indicate that A. doellojuradoi breeds in autumn. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. Development and evolution of dentition pattern and tooth order in the skates and rays (batoidea; chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Charlie J; Johanson, Zerina; Welten, Monique; Metscher, Brian; Rasch, Liam J; Fraser, Gareth J; Smith, Moya Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Shark and ray (elasmobranch) dentitions are well known for their multiple generations of teeth, with isolated teeth being common in the fossil record. However, how the diverse dentitions characteristic of elasmobranchs form is still poorly understood. Data on the development and maintenance of the dental patterning in this major vertebrate group will allow comparisons to other morphologically diverse taxa, including the bony fishes, in order to identify shared pattern characters for the vertebrate dentition as a whole. Data is especially lacking from the Batoidea (skates and rays), hence our objective is to compile data on embryonic and adult batoid tooth development contributing to ordering of the dentition, from cleared and stained specimens and micro-CT scans, with 3D rendered models. We selected species (adult and embryonic) spanning phylogenetically significant batoid clades, such that our observations may raise questions about relationships within the batoids, particularly with respect to current molecular-based analyses. We include developmental data from embryos of recent model organisms Leucoraja erinacea and Raja clavata to evaluate the earliest establishment of the dentition. Characters of the batoid dentition investigated include alternate addition of teeth as offset successional tooth rows (versus single separate files), presence of a symphyseal initiator region (symphyseal tooth present, or absent, but with two parasymphyseal teeth) and a restriction to tooth addition along each jaw reducing the number of tooth families, relative to addition of successor teeth within each family. Our ultimate aim is to understand the shared characters of the batoids, and whether or not these dental characters are shared more broadly within elasmobranchs, by comparing these to dentitions in shark outgroups. These developmental morphological analyses will provide a solid basis to better understand dental evolution in these important vertebrate groups as well as the general plesiomorphic vertebrate dental condition.

  16. Structure and mechanical implications of the pectoral fin skeleton in the Longnose Skate (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Hongjamrassilp, Watcharapong; Jung, Jae-Young; Hastings, Philip A; Lubarda, Vlado A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2017-03-15

    Animal propulsion systems are believed to show high energy and mechanical efficiency in assisting movement compared to artificial designs. As an example, batoid fishes have very light cartilaginous skeletons that facilitate their elegant swimming via enlarged wing-like pectoral fins. The aim of this work is to illustrate the hierarchical structure of the pectoral fin of a representative batoid, the Longnose Skate (Raja rhina), and explain the mechanical implications of its structural design. At the macro level, the pectoral fins are comprised of radially oriented fin rays, formed by staggered mineralized skeletal elements stacked end-to-end. At the micro level, the midsection of each radial element is composed of three mineralized components, which consist of discrete segments (tesserae) that are mineralized cartilage and embedded in unmineralized cartilage. The radial elements are wrapped with aligned, unmineralized collagen fibers. This is the first report of the detailed structure of the ray elements, including the observation of a 3-chain mineralized tesserae. Structural analyses demonstrate that this configuration enhances stiffness in multiple directions. A two-dimensional numerical model based on the morphological analysis demonstrated that the tessera structure helps distributing shear, tensile and compressive stress more ideally, which can better support both lift and thrust forces when swimming without losing flexibility. Batoid fishes have very light cartilaginous skeletons that facilitate their elegant swimming by applying their enlarged wing-like pectoral fins. Previous studies have shown structural features and mechanical properties of the mineralized cartilage skeleton in various batoid fishes. However, the details of the pectoral fin structure at different length scales, as well as the relationship between the mechanical properties and structural design remains unknown. The present work illustrates the hierarchical structure of the pectoral fin of the Longnose Skate (a representative batoid fish) and verifies the materials configuration and structural design increases the stiffness of fin skeleton without a loss in flexibility. These results have implications for the design of strong but flexible materials and bio-inspired autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clasper morphology of skates of the tribe Riorajini (Chondrichthyes: Rajiformes: Arhynchobatidae) and its systematic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Renan A; Gomes, Ulisses L; de Carvalho, Marcelo R

    2017-09-01

    Claspers of adult specimens of the skate tribe Riorajini, family Arhynchobatidae, comprising Atlantoraja and Rioraja, are described, compared, and systematically reinterpreted based on material collected off southeastern and southern Brazil. For the first time the external components and musculature of the clasper of members of this tribe are described and related to internal (skeletal) structures. The component pecten is present in all species of Atlantoraja but absent in Rioraja. The new external component grip, an autapomorphy of A. cyclophora fully developed in adults, is described. Rioraja presents dorsal terminals 1 and 2, ventral marginal distally extended and ventral terminal cartilages. Dorsal terminals 1 and 2, ventral marginal distally extended, accessory terminals 2 and 3, and ventral terminal cartilages occur in Atlantoraja. A new interpretation of the ventral marginal distally extended is discussed. The dorsal terminal 1 of Atlantoraja has an inverted U shape but is triangular in Rioraja. The accessory terminal 2 cartilage is reported for the first time in Atlantoraja cyclophora. The accessory terminal 3 is present only in A. platana and A. cyclophora, and absent in Rioraja and A. castelnaui. Many of our findings concerning the clasper skeleton do not agree with previous interpretations. The arrangement, distribution and systematic significance of many of the terminal clasper components are discussed among rajoids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A review of the genus Apristurus (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes: Scyliorhinidae) from Taiwanese waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Junro

    2013-01-01

    Sharks of the genus Apristurus from Taiwanese waters are reviewed for the first time, and incorrect scientific names and wrong taxonomic information given in the literature are corrected. After extensive examination of specimens deposited in various museums, universities and fisheries institutions in Taiwan, Japan and China, the following five species are recognized from Taiwanese waters: Apristurus herklotsi (Fowler, 1934), A. longicephalus Nakaya, 1975, A. gibbosus Meng, Chu & Li, 1985, A. macrostomus Chu, Meng & Li, 1985, and A. platyrhynchus (Tanaka, 1909). Apristurus herklotsi, A. longicephalus, A. gibbosus and A. macrostomus are reported from Taiwanese waters for the first time, and the presence of A. platyrhynchus is formally recognized based on a single voucher specimen. Each species is fully described, and a key to the species of Apristurus in Taiwanese waters is provided. Morphological and biological information of each species is also provided.

  19. Revision of the Xenacanthida (Chondrichthyes : Elasmobranchii) from the Carboniferous of the British Isles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampe, O. [Humboldt University, Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Xenacanthids were a very successful group of elasmobranchs that ranged from the Lower Carboniferous to the Upper Triassic. The history of discovery of the xenacanthids, which is closely connected with the history of coal prospecting in England, began with the finding of the type specimen of Xenacanthus laevissimus in the Westphalian B of the West Midlands. In this first review of British Carboniferous xenacanthids, the number of taxa, mainly erected during Victorian times, is reduced to 14 species distributed among six genera. Determinable remains are recorded from at least 96 localities in the British Isles. Unique characteristics of the Dinantian Diplodoselache suggest that the lineage to which this taxon belongs marks a dead end in xenacanthid evolution. This investigation also shows that the Pendleian Dicentrodus, formerly described as Cladodus, belongs to the xenacanthids. The occurrence of Orthacanthus cf. kounoviensis in the Pennines, also known from the German Saar-Nahe basin, the Saale depression and from Bohemia, indicates a faunal exchange between these intramontainous basins during the Carboniferous. The genus Triodus is identified from British deposits for the first time. A cladistic analysis of the xenacanthids suggests that they evolved from phoebodontid elasmobranchs. This analysis also confirms separation of the Middle Devonian Antarctilamna from a relationship with xenacanthid sharks.

  20. Conhecimento e conservacao dos peixes marinhos e estuarinos (Chondrichthyes e Teleostei) da costa norte do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Marceniuk,Alexandre Pires; Caires,Rodrigo Antunes; Wosiacki,Wolmar Benjamin; Dario,Fabio Di

    2013-01-01

    The tropical western South Atlantic, which includes a substantial portion of the Brazilian Exclusive Economic Zone, is a region of endemism broadly recognized as being of prime importance for the conservation of the marine biodiversity. The north coast of Brazil, which comprises the states of Amapá, Pará and Maranhão from the mouth of the rio Oiapoque to the mouth of the rio Parnaíba, harbors the largest continuous mangrove in the world, with approximately 8,900 km2. The h...

  1. Historical and contemporary records of the angular rough shark Oxynotus centrina (Chondrichthyes; Oxynotidae in Turkish waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. KABASAKAL

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last 58 years, only 12 angular rough sharks were recorded in Turkish waters. Rare captures of the species in the area needs an immediate action for the conservation of O. centrina. To protect the habitat of O. centrina, strict regulations should be implemented for diving in the localities, where the angular rough sharks occur regularly. Protecting the habitat of the angular rough shark is an urgent need before subjecting O. centrina to 100% protection in the seas of Turkey.

  2. Shark tales: a molecular species-level phylogeny of sharks (Selachimorpha, Chondrichthyes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Zuazo, Ximena; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2011-02-01

    Sharks are a diverse and ecologically important group, including some of the ocean's largest predatory animals. Sharks are also commercially important, with many species suffering overexploitation and facing extinction. However, despite a long evolutionary history, commercial, and conservation importance, phylogenetic relationships within the sharks are poorly understood. To date, most studies have either focused on smaller clades within sharks, or sampled taxa sparsely across the group. A more detailed species-level phylogeny will offer further insights into shark taxonomy, provide a tool for comparative analyses, as well as facilitating phylogenetic estimates of conservation priorities. We used four mitochondrial and one nuclear gene to investigate the phylogenetic relationships of 229 species (all eight Orders and 31 families) of sharks, more than quadrupling the number of taxon sampled in any prior study. The resulting Bayesian phylogenetic hypothesis agrees with prior studies on the major relationships of the sharks phylogeny; however, on those relationships that have proven more controversial, it differs in several aspects from the most recent molecular studies. The phylogeny supports the division of sharks into two major groups, the Galeomorphii and Squalimorphii, rejecting the hypnosqualean hypothesis that places batoids within sharks. Within the squalimorphs the orders Hexanchiformes, Squatiniformes, Squaliformes, and Pristiophoriformes are broadly monophyletic, with minor exceptions apparently due to missing data. Similarly, within Galeomorphs, the orders Heterodontiformes, Lamniformes, Carcharhiniformes, and Orectolobiformes are broadly monophyletic, with a couple of species 'misplaced'. In contrast, many of the currently recognized shark families are not monophyletic according to our results. Our phylogeny offers some of the first clarification of the relationships among families of the order Squaliformes, a group that has thus far received relatively little phylogenetic attention. Our results suggest that the genus Echinorhinus is not a squaliform, but rather related to the saw sharks, a hypothesis that might be supported by both groups sharing 'spiny' snouts. In sum, our results offer the most detailed species-level phylogeny of sharks to date and a tool for comparative analyses. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Early Pliocene fishes (Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes) from Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    J. F. Betancort; A. Lomoschitz; Meco, J.

    2016-01-01

    Fossil fish teeth are contained in marine deposits dated at ca 4.8 Ma found on the islands of Gran Canaria and Fuerteventura (Canary Islands, Spain). These islands, situated in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, can be considered a mid-way stopover point between the Caribbean Sea, with the Central American Seaway about to close in this epoch, and the Mediterranean, in the first stage of its post-Messinian Gibraltar Seaway period. Accordingly, there existed extensive pantropical communicatio...

  4. The use of pelvic fins for benthic locomotion during foraging behavior in Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akemi Shibuya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized bipedal movements of the pelvic fins provide propulsion (punting during displacement on the substrate in batoids with benthic locomotion. In skates (Rajidae this mechanism is mainly generated by the crural cartilages. Although lacking these anatomical structures, some stingray species show modifications of their pelvic fins to aid in benthic locomotion. This study describes the use of the pelvic fins for locomotory performance and body re-orientation in the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 during foraging. Pelvic fin movements of juvenile individuals of P. motoro were recorded in ventral view by a high-speed camera at 250-500 fields/s-1. Potamotrygon motoro presented synchronous, alternating and unilateral movements of the pelvic fins, similar to those reported in skates. Synchronous movements were employed during straightforward motion for pushing the body off the substrate as well as for strike feeding, whereas unilateral movements were used to maneuver the body to the right or left during both locomotion and prey capture. Alternating movements of the pelvic fins are similar to bipedal movements in terrestrial and semi-aquatic tetrapods. The pelvic fins showed coordinated movements during feeding even when stationary, indicating that they have an important function in maintaining body posture (station holding during prey capture and manipulation. The use of pelvic fins during prey stalking may be advantageous because it results in less substrate disturbance when compared to movements generated by pectoral fin undulation. The range of pelvic fin movements indicates more complex control and coordination of the pelvic radial muscles.

  5. Development and evolution of dentition pattern and tooth order in the skates and rays (batoidea; chondrichthyes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlie J Underwood

    Full Text Available Shark and ray (elasmobranch dentitions are well known for their multiple generations of teeth, with isolated teeth being common in the fossil record. However, how the diverse dentitions characteristic of elasmobranchs form is still poorly understood. Data on the development and maintenance of the dental patterning in this major vertebrate group will allow comparisons to other morphologically diverse taxa, including the bony fishes, in order to identify shared pattern characters for the vertebrate dentition as a whole. Data is especially lacking from the Batoidea (skates and rays, hence our objective is to compile data on embryonic and adult batoid tooth development contributing to ordering of the dentition, from cleared and stained specimens and micro-CT scans, with 3D rendered models. We selected species (adult and embryonic spanning phylogenetically significant batoid clades, such that our observations may raise questions about relationships within the batoids, particularly with respect to current molecular-based analyses. We include developmental data from embryos of recent model organisms Leucoraja erinacea and Raja clavata to evaluate the earliest establishment of the dentition. Characters of the batoid dentition investigated include alternate addition of teeth as offset successional tooth rows (versus single separate files, presence of a symphyseal initiator region (symphyseal tooth present, or absent, but with two parasymphyseal teeth and a restriction to tooth addition along each jaw reducing the number of tooth families, relative to addition of successor teeth within each family. Our ultimate aim is to understand the shared characters of the batoids, and whether or not these dental characters are shared more broadly within elasmobranchs, by comparing these to dentitions in shark outgroups. These developmental morphological analyses will provide a solid basis to better understand dental evolution in these important vertebrate groups as well as the general plesiomorphic vertebrate dental condition.

  6. Claves taxonómicas para el reconocimiento dentario en taxa del superorden Rajomorphii de Chile (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea Taxonomic dental keys for the Chilean taxa of the superorder Rajomorphii (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Sáez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta claves taxonómicas basadas en características morfológicas dentarias externas e internas, que permiten el reconocimiento de cada orden, familia y género de los batoídeos conocidos en Chile. En algunos casos, como en las familias Rhinobatidae, Torpedinidae, Narcinidae, Myliobatidae, Mobulidae, Dasyatidae y Urotrygonidae, las claves permiten el reconocimiento específico pero, en otros casos, sólo se puede discriminar hasta género, dadas las limitaciones impuestas por los conocimientos existentes. Estas claves son una herramienta complementaria a la diagnosis de rayas y están orientadas al reconocimiento de fragmentos dentales, hallazgos paleontológicos de dientes así como para las piezas dentales asociadas con la mandíbula. De esta manera, se entrega un apoyo taxonómico nuevo con características dentales diferentes a las consideradas actualmente para este superorden.A series of keys with external and internal dental morphologic features for the identification of each order, family and genus of rays and skates of the batoids known in Chile, are presented. In the case of families Rhinobatidae, Torpedinidae, Narcinidae, Myliobatidae, Mobulidae, Dasyatidae and Urotrygonidae, an identification at the species level is possible. In other cases, due to limitations imposed by the existing knowledge, only discrimination up to genus is allowed. These keys are a complementary tool for the diagnosis of rays suitable for the identification of dental fragments, paleontological discoveries of teeth as well as for jaw teeth. This tool offers a novel taxonomic support, which includes dental features different from those considered nowadays for this superorder.

  7. New specimens and records of chondrichthyan fishes (Vertebrata: Chondrichthyes off the Mexican Pacific coast Nuevos ejemplares y nuevos registros de peces cartilaginosos (Vertebrata: Chondrichthyes de la costa del Pacífico mexicano

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    Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available New specimens and new records of occurrence for 10 species of chondrichthyan (elasmobranch and chimaeroid fishes previously unknown or little documented for the continental shelf of the Mexican Pacific are reported. This contribution provides the first record of Centroscyllium nigrum, Isurus paucus, and Bathyraja trachura for the Mexican Pacific, as well as new specimens of Hydrolagus colliei, Hexanchus griseus, Echinorhinus cookei, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai, and Raja velezi for the western coast of the Baja California Peninsula, including the intermediate record within the known distribution range for Apristurus kampae, and the southernmost record for Raja inornata.Se reportan nuevos ejemplares y nuevos registros de concurrencia para 10 especies de elasmobranquios previamente desconocidos o con muy poca documentación en aguas del Pacífico mexicano. Esta contribución ofrece el primer registro de Centroscyllium nigrum, Isurus paucus, y Bathyraja trachura en el Pacífico mexicano; así como nuevos ejemplares de Hydrolagus colliei, Hexanchus griseus, Echinorhinus cookei, Pseudocarcharias kamoharai y Raja velezi en la costa occidental de la península de Baja California, con la inclusión del registro intermedio en el ámbito de distribución conocida para Apristurus kampae, y el registro más meridional para Raja inornata.

  8. Diet of the freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae on Marajó Island (Pará, Brazil Dieta da raia de água doce Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae na Ilha de Marajó (Pará, Brasil

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    MP. Almeida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The stomach contents of 137 examples of Potamotrygon motoro caught in 3 locations (Muaná, Afuá and Lake Arari on Marajó Island were analysed. The values of the Index of Relative Importance (IRI and its respective percentage (%IRI were calculated. The level of repletion 1 (¼ full was the most representative for both sexes, as well as for immature and mature specimens. Most of the food items found were well-digested. The food items identification indicated the presence of 15 orders, including insects, mollusks, crustaceans, annelids and fish. Differences in diet were observed among the locations studied when comparing %IRI, crustaceans being the most preferred in Afuá, fish in Lake Arari and mollusks in Muaná.O conteúdo estomacal de 137 exemplares de Potamotrygon motoro provenientes de 3 localidades (Muaná, Afuá e Lago Arari na ilha de Marajó foi analisado. Os valores do Índice Relativo de Importância (IRI e respectiva porcentagem (%IRI foram calculados. O nível de repleção 1 (¼ cheio foi o mais representativo para ambos os sexos, assim como para exemplares imaturos e maduros. A maioria dos itens alimentares analisados encontrava-se bastante digerido. A identificação dos itens alimentares indicou a presença de 15 ordens, incluindo insetos, moluscos, crustáceos, anelídeos e peixes. Diferenças na dieta entre os locais amostrados foram observadas ao se comparar as %IRI, sendo crustáceos o item preferencial em Afuá, peixes no Lago Arari e moluscos em Muaná.

  9. Evolution of Two Short Interspersed Elements in Callorhinchus milii (Chondrichthyes, Holocephali) and Related Elements in Sharks and the Coelacanth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Plazzi, Federico; Mantovani, Barbara

    2017-06-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous retrotransposons. Although they usually show fast evolutionary rates, in some instances highly conserved domains (HCDs) have been observed in elements with otherwise divergent sequences and from distantly related species. Here, we document the life history of two HCD-SINE families in the elephant shark Callorhinchus milii, one specific to the holocephalan lineage (CmiSINEs) and another one (SacSINE1-CM) with homologous elements in sharks and the coelacanth (SacSINE1s, LmeSINE1s). The analyses of their relationships indicated that these elements share the same 3'-tail, which would have allowed both elements to rise to high copy number by exploiting the C. milii L2-2_CM long interspersed element (LINE) enzymes. Molecular clock analysis on SINE activity in C. milii genome evidenced two replication bursts occurring right after two major events in the holocephalan evolution: the end-Permian mass extinction and the radiation of modern Holocephali. Accordingly, the same analysis on the coelacanth homologous elements, LmeSINE1, identified a replication wave close to the split age of the two extant Latimeria species. The genomic distribution of the studied SINEs pointed out contrasting results: some elements were preferentially sorted out from gene regions, but accumulated in flanking regions, while others appear more conserved within genes. Moreover, data from the C. milii transcriptome suggest that these SINEs could be involved in miRNA biogenesis and may be targets for miRNA-based regulation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Functional analysis of the musculo-skeletal system of the gill apparatus in Heptranchias perlo (Chondrichthyes: Hexanchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukova, Nadezhda V

    2017-08-01

    Musculo-skeletal morphology is an indispensable source for understanding functional adaptations. Analysis of morphology of the branchial apparatus of Hexanchiform sharks can provide insight into aspects of their respiration that are difficult to observe directly. In this study, I compare the structure of the musculo-skeletal system of the gill apparatus of Heptranchias perlo and Squalus acanthias in respect to their adaptation for one of two respiratory mechanisms known in sharks, namely, the active two-pump (oropharyngeal and parabranchial) ventilation and the ram-jet ventilation. In both species, the oropharyngeal pump possesses two sets of muscles, one for compression and the other for expansion. The parabranchial pump only has constrictors. Expansion of this pump occurs only due to passive elastic recoil of the extrabranchial cartilages. In Squalus acanthias the parabranchial chambers are large and equipped by powerful superficial constrictors. These muscles and the outer walls of the parabranchial chambers are much reduced in Heptranchias perlo, and thus it likely cannot use this pump. However, this reduction allows for vertical elongation of outer gill slits which, along with greater number of gill pouches, likely decreases branchial resistance and, at the same time, increases the gill surface area, and can be regarded as an adaptation for ram ventilation at lower speeds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Morphological study of the oviductal gland in the smallnose fanskate Sympterygia bonapartii (Müller and Henle, 1841 (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae

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    EJ Galíndez

    Full Text Available The oviductal gland is an exclusive structure of cartilaginous fishes that produces the egg jelly, forms the tertiary egg envelopes and stores sperm. The biological importance of this structure is related to the special features of the reproductive strategy of the group and to its phylogeny, considering that egg-laying is the ancestral condition in this fish (Dulvy and Reynolds, 1997. This gland of the smallnose fanskate shows four morphofunctional zones. The lining epithelium along the gland is columnar with secretory and ciliated cells. Secretions are mucous and/or proteic according to the zone, and to their specific functions. This is the first report about the microanatomy of the female reproductive tract of S. bonapartii with evidence of sperm storage in the genus.

  12. An unusual nine-ocellated common torpedo, Torpedo torpedo(Linnaeus, 1758) (Chondrichthyes: Torpedinidae), from southern France

    OpenAIRE

    CAPAPÉ, Christian; GUÉLORGET, Olivier; VERGNE, Yvan; QUIGNARD, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    A nine-ocellated Torpedo torpedo, caught off the Languedoc coast in southern France (northern Mediterranean) is described in this paper. This is the greatest number of ocellae recorded to date in this species.

  13. Stomach contents and notes on the reproduction of the Onefin Skate Gurgesiella dorsalifera (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae off Southern Brazil

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    Getulio Rincon

    Full Text Available The Brazilian endemic deep-water onefin skate (Gurgesiella dorsalifera is a rare small species recently described in the 80's. No biological information is available on this species and its extremely restricted geographic distribution has been used to classify it as a vulnerable species under IUCN red list criteria. Twenty four specimens (115 to 207 mm disc width were captured off southern Brazilian coast at the region of Cape Santa Marta Grande (State of Santa Catarina by deep-water otter trawl (430-524 m. The analysis of stomach contents revealed an apparent opportunistic predation on juveniles of Urophycis brasiliensis (IRI = 6944, with an average total length of 21 mm, followed by mysidaceans (IRI = 2938, unidentified teleosts (IRI = 1969, the copepod Bradyidius plinioi (IRI = 393, and decapod crustaceans (IRI = 297. One mature female with 207 mm DW had two egg cases in its uteri.

  14. Food habits of the broad nose skate, Bathyraja brachyurops (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae, in the south-west Atlantic

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    Mauro Belleggia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Food habits of Bathyraja brachyurops were studied based on stomach content analyses of 346 specimens collected from research cruises carried out from 2003 to 2005 on the Argentinean continental shelf (36ºS-55ºS. A total of 265 stomachs (76.6% contained food, and thirty-five taxonomic levels of prey were identified. The most important prey were fishes followed by isopods. Trophic level analysis revealed that B. brachyurops is a tertiary consumer throughout its life history. There were no differences between sexes and regions in the diet composition, but dietary shifts with ontogeny were found. The Levins’ standardized index indicated wider niche breadth for small skates, whereas larger skate specimens showed a narrow niche breadth with a specialization in fishes.

  15. DNA barcoding unveils skate (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae species diversity in ‘ray’ products sold across Ireland and the UK

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    Andrew Mark Griffiths

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Skates are widely consumed across the globe, but many large species are subject to considerable concern regarding their conservation and management. Within Europe such issues have recently driven policy changes so that, for the first time, reports of skate landings now have to be made under species-specific names. Total allowable catches have also been established for many groups, which have been set to zero for a number of the most vulnerable species (e.g., Dipturus batis, Raja undulata and Rostoraja alba. Whilst accurate species identification has become an important issue for landings, the sale of skates is still usually made under a blanket term of “skate” or “ray”. The matter of identifying species of skate is further complicated by their morphologically conservative nature and the fact that they are commercially valued for their wings. Thus, before sale their bodies are usually discarded (i.e., “winged” and often skinned, making morphological identification impossible. For the first time, DNA barcoding (of the mitochondrial COI gene was applied to samples of skate wings from retail outlets across the British Isles, providing insight into which species are sold for consumption. A total of 98 wing samples were analysed, revealing that six species were sold; blonde ray (Raja brachyura, spotted ray (Raja montagui, thornback ray (Raja clavata, cuckoo ray (Leucoraja naevus small-eyed ray (Raja microocellata and shagreen ray (Leucoraja fullonica. Statistical testing demonstrated that there were significant differences in the species sold in the distinct retail groups which suggests complex drivers behind the patterns of sale in skates. The results also indicate that endangered species are not commonly being passed on to consumers. In addition, the practice of selling skate wings under ambiguous labels is highlighted as it makes it extremely difficult for consumers to exercise a right to avoid species of conservation concern. Interestingly, a single retailer chain labelled their wings as originating from three smaller-growing species (generally to be considered of lower conservation concern; of the six samples analysed from this company a third were mislabelled and originated from the thornback ray (a larger species that is currently undergoing population declines.

  16. DNA barcoding unveils skate (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae) species diversity in ‘ray’ products sold across Ireland and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Aaron; Fox, Jennifer; Greenfield, Adam; Mariani, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Skates are widely consumed across the globe, but many large species are subject to considerable concern regarding their conservation and management. Within Europe such issues have recently driven policy changes so that, for the first time, reports of skate landings now have to be made under species-specific names. Total allowable catches have also been established for many groups, which have been set to zero for a number of the most vulnerable species (e.g., Dipturus batis, Raja undulata and Rostoraja alba). Whilst accurate species identification has become an important issue for landings, the sale of skates is still usually made under a blanket term of “skate” or “ray”. The matter of identifying species of skate is further complicated by their morphologically conservative nature and the fact that they are commercially valued for their wings. Thus, before sale their bodies are usually discarded (i.e., “winged”) and often skinned, making morphological identification impossible. For the first time, DNA barcoding (of the mitochondrial COI gene) was applied to samples of skate wings from retail outlets across the British Isles, providing insight into which species are sold for consumption. A total of 98 wing samples were analysed, revealing that six species were sold; blonde ray (Raja brachyura), spotted ray (Raja montagui), thornback ray (Raja clavata), cuckoo ray (Leucoraja naevus) small-eyed ray (Raja microocellata) and shagreen ray (Leucoraja fullonica). Statistical testing demonstrated that there were significant differences in the species sold in the distinct retail groups which suggests complex drivers behind the patterns of sale in skates. The results also indicate that endangered species are not commonly being passed on to consumers. In addition, the practice of selling skate wings under ambiguous labels is highlighted as it makes it extremely difficult for consumers to exercise a right to avoid species of conservation concern. Interestingly, a single retailer chain labelled their wings as originating from three smaller-growing species (generally to be considered of lower conservation concern); of the six samples analysed from this company a third were mislabelled and originated from the thornback ray (a larger species that is currently undergoing population declines). PMID:24024082

  17. Reproductive biology of Sympterygia bonapartii (Chondrichthyes: Rajiformes: Arhynchobatidae in San Matías Gulf, Patagonia, Argentina

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    María L. Estalles

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study estimates and analyses the reproductive parameters and cycle of Sympterygia bonapartii in San Matías Gulf, northern Patagonia, Argentina. A total of 827 males and 1,299 females were analysed. Males ranged from 185 to 687 mm of total length (TL and females from 180 to 742 mm TL. Sexual dimorphism was detected; females were larger, heavier, exhibited heavier livers, wider discs and matured at lager sizes than males. Immature females ranged from 180 to 625 mm TL, maturing females from 408 to 720 mm TL, mature ones from 514 to 742 mm TL and females with egg capsules from 580 to 730 mm TL. Immature males ranged from 185 to 545 mm TL, maturing ones from 410 to 620 mm TL and mature males from 505 to 687 mm TL. Size at which 50% of the skates reached maturity was estimated to be 545 mm TL for males and 594 mm TL for females. According to the reproductive indexes analysed, S. bonapartii exhibited a seasonal reproductive pattern. Mating may occur during winter-early spring and the egg-laying season, during spring and summer.

  18. Taxonomic research on Squalus megalops (Macleay, 1881 and Squalus blainvillei (Risso, 1827 (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae in Tunisian waters (central Mediterranean Sea

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    Sondes Marouani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Two species of spurdog of the genus Squalus occur in the Gulf of Gabès (southern Tunisia, central Mediterranean: the longnose spurdog Squalus blainvillei (Risso, 1827 and a short-snout spurdog of the Squalus megalops-cubensis group. Morphometric and meristic data as well as a genetic analyses (DNA inter-simple sequence repeat markers and molecular barcoding methods support the assignation of this short-snout spurdog to Squalus megalops (Macleay, 1881. Squalus megalops occurs commonly in temperate and tropical Australian waters, and is also thought to occur in the eastern Atlantic, southern Indian Ocean and western North Pacific although these records need to be confirmed. Our study confirms that it occurs in the Mediterranean Sea. Populations of both S. blainvillei and S. megalops are described based on Tunisian material.

  19. A new species of Neotropical freshwater stingray (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae) from the Rio Negro, Amazonas, Brazil: the smallest species of Potamotrygon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marcelo R De; Rosa, Ricardo S; Araújo, Maria Lúcia G De

    2016-05-04

    A new species of Potamotrygon is described from the Rio Negro drainage, Amazonas, Brazil. In spite of being cited or pictured several times in the scientific and aquarium fish literature since the 19th Century, it had been misidentified and still lacked a scientific name. Potamotrygon wallacei, n. sp., is diagnosed by the following characters: dorsal surface of disc light brown, with black irregularly-shaped vermiculate markings forming an amphora- or Ω-shaped figure on mid-disc, delimiting light brown reniform areas at disc center, and with subcircular light brown ocellate markings on disc margins; small body size (smallest known Potamotrygon species; largest examined specimen measured 310 mm DW); dorsal spines on tail usually rather low, without broad bases, in one to rarely three irregular rows, but extending posteriorly only to tail mid-length and not to caudal stings, with altogether relatively few spines; denticles on posterior mid-disc and tail base Y-shaped, with a central, anterior, bulbous cusp and usually two posterior pairs of smaller, rounded cusps; and single (anterior) angular cartilage. The new species is similar to P. orbignyi and other "reticulated" species in having a single (anterior) angular cartilage and in the color pattern of the tail, but is easily distinguished based on its size, dorsal tail spine arrangement, and specific details of color pattern.

  20. Taxonomic review and comparative morphology of the species of the genus Isistius Gill, 1864 (Chondrichthyes, Squaliformes: Dalatiidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia de Figueiredo Petean

    2015-01-01

    The genus Isistius Gill, 1864, which belongs to the family Dalatiidae, currently has three valid species: Isistius brasiliensis Quoy & Gaimard, 1824, I. plutodus Garrick & Springer, 1964 and I. labialis Meng, Zhu & Li, 1985. The most common species, I. brasiliensis, has a wide geographic distribution, and can be found in subtemperate and tropical seas; a comparative analysis of specimens from different localities has never been done. This study has thoroughly analyzed the morphological variat...

  1. Redescription of Paraleptus chiloscyllii Yin et Zhang, 1983 (Nematoda: Physalopteridae) from the Arabian carpetshark Chiloscyllium arabicum (Chondrichthyes: Hemiscylliidae) off Iraq

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    González-Solís, David; Ali, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2015), s. 759-766 ISSN 1230-2821 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Arabian Gulf * elasmobranchs * nematode Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2015

  2. A new paleozoic Symmoriiformes (Chondrichthyes from the late Carboniferous of Kansas (USA and cladistic analysis of early chondrichthyans.

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    Alan Pradel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationships of cartilaginous fishes are discussed in the light of well preserved three-dimensional Paleozoic specimens. There is no consensus to date on the interrelationship of Paleozoic chondrichthyans, although three main phylogenetic hypotheses exist in the current literature: 1. the Paleozoic shark-like chondrichthyans, such as the Symmoriiformes, are grouped along with the modern sharks (neoselachians into a clade which is sister group of holocephalans; 2. the Symmoriiformes are related to holocephalans, whereas the other Paleozoic shark-like chondrichthyans are related to neoselachians; 3. many Paleozoic shark-like chondrichthyans, such as the Symmoriiformes, are stem chondrichthyans, whereas stem and crown holocephalans are sister group to the stem and crown neoselachians in a crown-chondrichthyan clade. This third hypothesis was proposed recently, based mainly on dental characters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On the basis of two well preserved chondrichthyan neurocrania from the Late Carboniferous of Kansas, USA, we describe here a new species of Symmoriiformes, Kawichthys moodiei gen. et sp. nov., which was investigated by means of computerized X-ray synchrotron microtomography. We present a new phylogenetic analysis based on neurocranial characters, which supports the third hypothesis and corroborates the hypothesis that crown-group chondrichthyans (Holocephali+Neoselachii form a tightly-knit group within the chondrichthyan total group, by providing additional, non dental characters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results highlight the importance of new well preserved Paleozoic fossils and new techniques of observation, and suggest that a new look at the synapomorphies of the crown-group chondrichthyans would be worthwhile in terms of understanding the adaptive significance of phylogenetically important characters.

  3. Systemic rhabdomyolysis induced by venom of freshwater stingrays Plesiotrygon iwamae and Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes-Potamotrygonidae) from the Amazon Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameiras, Juliana Luiza Varjão; da Costa, Oscar Tadeu Ferreira; Moroni, Fábio Tonissi; Araújo, José de Ribamar; Caranhas, Sandra Maria Evangelista; Marques, Carlos Melquiades Almeida; Dos-Santos, Maria Cristina; Duncan, Wallice Luiz Paxiúba

    2014-01-01

    Injuries caused by freshwater stingrays are characterized by intense pain and pathological changes at the lesion site, including oedema, erythema and, in most cases, necrosis. In this study, the systemic myotoxic activity induced by mucus extracts from the dorsal region and stinger of the stingrays Plesiotrygon iwamae and Potamotrygon motoro was described, analysed and quantified. Twenty-four hours after injection of 400 μg of the extracts into the gastrocnemius muscle of mice, the following effects were observed: coagulative necrosis of the muscle tissue, muscle fibre regeneration and the presence of inflammatory infiltrates, including neutrophils, macrophages, and a reduced number of eosinophils and lymphocytes. These changes were also observed, although to a lesser extent, in the gastrocnemius muscles of the contralateral limbs, demonstrating that the extracts from the two species could induce systemic rhabdomyolysis. Based on morphometric analysis, it was observed that the stinger extract of P. motoro was more potent in inducing local and systemic myotoxic activity, followed by the dorsal extract from P. motoro and stinger and dorsal extracts from P. iwamae, which induced similar effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Conhecimento e conservação dos peixes marinhos e estuarinos (Chondrichthyes e Teleostei) da costa norte do Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Marceniuk,Alexandre Pires; Caires,Rodrigo Antunes; Wosiacki,Wolmar Benjamin; Dario,Fabio Di

    2013-01-01

    The tropical western South Atlantic, which includes a substantial portion of the Brazilian Exclusive Economic Zone, is a region of endemism broadly recognized as being of prime importance for the conservation of the marine biodiversity. The north coast of Brazil, which comprises the states of Amapá, Pará and Maranhão from the mouth of the rio Oiapoque to the mouth of the rio Parnaíba, harbors the largest continuous mangrove in the world, with approximately 8,900 km2. The high discharge of fre...

  5. Parasite fauna and community structure of bathydemersal fishes: Notacanthus bonaparte (Osteichthyes), Etmopterus spinax and Deania profundorum (Chondrichthyes)

    OpenAIRE

    Isbert, Wolf

    2017-01-01

    Resumen El mar profundo es el mayor bioma de la tierra y el menos estudiado (Ramirez-Llodra et al. 2010). Si bien inicialmente el mar profundo se consideró como un ambiente muy estable con variaciones muy leves por debajo de la termoclina permanente, los estudios realizados en las últimas décadas indican que el mar profundo es un ambiente más dinámico de lo que se pensaba (Gage 2003, Ramirez-Llodra et al. 2010). La variabilidad natural de los procesos que tiene lugar en los hábitats de...

  6. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of the Amazonian freshwater stingray Paratrygon aiereba Müller & Henle, 1841 (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae

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    Renata G. Frederico

    Full Text Available The family Potamotrygonidae is monophyletic comprising three genera: Paratrygon Duméril, Potamotrygon Garman and Plesiotrygon Rosa, Castello & Thorson. The distribution of most species in this family is restricted to a single basin or fluvial system. Only Potamotrygon motoro, Potamotrygon orbignyi and Paratrygon aiereba are found in more than one river basin. In this study we investigate genetic structuring of Paratrygon aiereba, from five rivers of the Amazon region: Negro, Solimões-Amazon-Estuary system, Tapajós, Xingu and Araguaia. Sixty-three individuals were sequenced for ATPase 6, and a representative subsample of 27 individuals was sequenced for COI. The COI dataset analysis indicated that Paratrygon is sister to all other potamotrygonid genera and species. Population parameters inferred from the analysis of ATPase 6 sequences revealed that the populations of this species are structured within each river, with no or nearly non-existent gene flow occurring between rivers and a positive correlation between geographic and genetic distances. Paratrygon aiereba is comprised of three geographically restricted clades with K2P interclade distances of at least 2%. Intraspecific divergence within P. aiereba is similar to the interspecific divergence observed in Potamotrygon spp. sampled throughout the same geographic area. Using the premises of COI barcoding and the allopatric distribution of the three P. aiereba clades, the taxon P. aiereba most likely comprises three distinct biological species. Since freshwater stingrays of the family Potamotrygonidae are highly exploited for the aquarium trade, management and conservation strategies need to be implemented at the level of each river basin, rather than at the level of the Amazon basin.

  7. A new Middle Miocene selachian assemblage (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) from the Central Paratethys (Nyirád, Hungary): implications for temporal turnover and biogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Márton; Kocsis, László

    2016-12-01

    A new Middle Miocene (Langhian - early Serravallian) assemblage with shark and ray teeth from Nyirád (Hungary, Transdanubia, Veszprém County) consists of nine families, with 15 different species. The assemblage shares many common genera with other Middle Miocene assemblages in the Paratethys (Notorynchus, Carcharias, Otodus, Cosmopolitodus, Hemipristis, Galeocerdo, Carcharhinus, and Aetobatus), and reflects a subtropical climate and a close connection with the Mediterranean Sea. However, a detailed faunal compilation of Miocene selachians reveals that several taxa that were still present in the Mediterranean or lived in the Paratethys during the Lower Miocene disappeared or became very rare by the Middle Miocene in the Central Paratethys (e.g., Isistius, Centrophorus, Mitsukurina, Carcharoides, Parotodus, Alopias). The taxa that went locally extinct in the Paratethys are mainly represented by deep-water or pelagic forms. Their disappearance is most probably related to the gradual separation of the Paratethys from the Mediterranean. The common presence of some large, rather pelagic sharks (e.g., Otodus, Cosmopolitodus) in the Central Paratethys during the Middle Miocene is explained here by the widespread occurrence of their potential prey represented by marine mammals (e.g., whales and dolphins).

  8. Review of the enigmatic Eocene shark genus Xiphodolamia (Chondrichthyes, Lamniformes) and description of a new species recovered from Angola, Iran and Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnet, S.; Hosseinzadeh, R.; Antunes, M. T.; Balbino, A. C.; Kozlov, V. A.; Cappetta, H.

    2009-10-01

    Little is known about the extinct Xiphodolamia, a peculiar lamnid shark which inhabited the Eocene seas. The reexamination of a large set of fossilized teeth specimens from the Ypresian of Kazakhstan has enabled the reconstitution of the tooth series of this enigmatic taxa of lamnid shark. Five distinct tooth morphologies seem to occur in X. ensis Leidy [Leidy, J., 1877. Description of vertebrate remains, chiefly from the phosphate beds of South Carolina. Journal of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 8, 209-261] species revealing a weak ontogenetic variation. Such specific variation in tooth shape means that the other described species may be their junior synonyms. Dental morphology perfectly conforms with a Lamniforme but does not prove the current attribution to the Lamnidae family due to some inconsistent dental features observed, such as the presence of symphysial teeth. This genus could be regarded as an old lineage branched from the stem group of Lamnidae, close to the Isuroids sharks. Several Xiphodolamia teeth, originating both from old collections and new acquisitions, are reported and illustrated in order to provide information about a new species described here: Xiphodolamia serrata nov. sp. This species, currently limited to deposits in Angola, Jordan and Iran and dated at the Late Eocene, is easily distinguishable from the Early-Middle Eocene material belonging to the genus by the presence of serrated cutting edges. Adding to the type species considered here as the only valid taxa during the Early-Middle Eocene period, the temporal range of this genus extends to the Late Eocene, thus setting its upper stratigraphic limit prior to its disappearance as enigmatic as its appearance in the Early Eocene was.

  9. Reproductive biology and diet of Mustelus punctulatus (Risso, 1826 (Chondrichthyes: Triakidae from the Gulf of Gabès, central Mediterranean Sea

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    Bechir Saïdi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Specimens of Mustelus punctulatus were collected between January 2002 and December 2005 from commercial fisheries in the Gulf of Gabès (central Mediterranean Sea. Males and females reached a maximum total length (TL of 111 and 122 cm respectively. Males matured between 76 and 88.5 cm TL, with a size at maturity (TL50 of 81.4 cm TL. Females matured between 88 and 100 cm TL with a TL50 of 95.6 cm. Females had an annual reproductive cycle. Mating occurred through late-May and June. Ovulation occurred from early July to mid-August with parturition occurring from mid-May to early June, after a gestation period of 11 months. The size at birth was estimated to be 24.5 to 30.5 cm TL. Positive linear relationships were detected between the TL of mature females and ovarian and uterine fecundities. Mustelus punctulatus is an opportunistic predator that consumes a wide range of demersal and benthic prey items. It preys mainly on crustaceans, teleosts and molluscs. Polychaetes, sipunculids, echinoderms and tunicates are also consumed. The species change their main food item as they grow, from crustaceans to teleosts then to molluscs.

  10. Redescription and sexual dimorphism of Andaman leg-skate Cruriraja andamanica (Chondrichthyes: Rajiformes) with comments on the zoogeography of the genus Cruriraja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinu, J; Rajeeshkumar, M P; Parmeswaran, U V; Sumod, K S; Akhilesh, K V; Manjebrayakath, H; Sanjeevan, V N

    2017-08-01

    This paper redescribes sexually dimorphic Cruriraja andamanica based on five juvenile (four males, one female) and four adult specimens (three males, one female) collected from Andaman waters. Morphometric comparison of the present specimens with a female specimen collected off the coast of Tanzania reveals considerable dissimilarities between them. These findings, along with the wide geographical distance between collection locations, support a need for revision of the Tanzanian specimen, which, in all probability, represents a new species in the genus. The paper also addresses zoogeography of genus Cruriraja across the world's oceans and provides a revised key to the species. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. Ecological patterns, distribution and population structure of Prionace glauca (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhinidae) in the tropical-subtropical transition zone of the north-eastern Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögler, Rodolfo; Beier, Emilio; Ortega-García, Sofía; Santana-Hernández, Heriberto; Valdez-Flores, J Javier

    2012-02-01

    Regional ecological patterns, distribution and population structure of Prionace glauca were analyzed based on samples collected on-board two long-line fleets operating in oceanic waters (1994-96/2000-02) and in coastal oceanic waters (2003-2009) of the eastern tropical Pacific off México. Generalized additive models were applied to catch per unit of effort data to evaluate the effect of spatial, temporal and environmental factors on the horizontal distribution of the life stages (juvenile, adult) and the sexes at the estimated depth of catch. The presence of breeding areas was explored. The population structure was characterized by the presence of juveniles' aggregations and pregnant females towards coastal waters and the presence of adult males' aggregations towards oceanic waters. The species exhibited horizontal segregation by sex-size and vertical segregation by sex. Distribution of the sex-size groups at oceanic waters was seasonally affected by the latitude; however, at coastal oceanic waters mainly females were influenced by the longitude. Latitudinal changes on the horizontal distribution were coupled to the seasonal forward and backward of water masses through the study area. Adult males showed positive relationship with high temperatures and high-salinities waters (17.0°-20.0 °C; 34.2-34.4) although they were also detected in low-salinities waters. The distribution of juvenile males mainly occurred beyond low temperatures and low-salinities waters (14.0°-15.0 °C; 33.6-34.1), suggesting a wide tolerance of adult males to explore subartic and subtropical waters. At oceanic areas, adult females were aggregated towards latitudes distribution of juvenile females indicated its preference by lower temperatures and more saline waters. Presence of pregnant females suggests that the eastern tropical Pacific off México represents an ecological key region to the reproductive cycle of P. glauca. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geo(Im)pulseBite marks on early Holocene Tursiops truncatus fossils from the North Sea indicate scavenging by rays (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, H.H. van; Reumer, J.W.F.

    A number of Tursiops truncatus mandibles in the collection of fossil marine mammals in the Rotterdam Natural History Museum have marks consisting of several parallel linear grooves. These marks are also found on four atlas complexes, a scapula and on one vertebra. The hypothesis that they are bite

  13. Quantitative Classification of Cerebellar Foliation in Cartilaginous Fishes (Class: Chondrichthyes) Using Three-Dimensional Shape Analysis and Its Implications for Evolutionary Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopak, Kara E; Galinsky, Vitaly L; Berquist, Rachel M; Frank, Lawrence R

    2016-01-01

    A true cerebellum appeared at the onset of the chondrichthyan (sharks, batoids, and chimaerids) radiation and is known to be essential for executing fast, accurate, and efficient movement. In addition to a high degree of variation in size, the corpus cerebellum in this group has a high degree of variation in convolution (or foliation) and symmetry, which ranges from a smooth cerebellar surface to deep, branched convexities and folds, although the functional significance of this trait is unclear. As variation in the degree of foliation similarly exists throughout vertebrate evolution, it becomes critical to understand this evolutionary process in a wide variety of species. However, current methods are either qualitative and lack numerical rigor or they are restricted to two dimensions. In this paper, a recently developed method for the characterization of shapes embedded within noisy, three-dimensional data called spherical wave decomposition (SWD) is applied to the problem of characterizing cerebellar foliation in cartilaginous fishes. The SWD method provides a quantitative characterization of shapes in terms of well-defined mathematical functions. An additional feature of the SWD method is the construction of a statistical criterion for the optimal fit, which represents the most parsimonious choice of parameters that fits to the data without overfitting to background noise. We propose that this optimal fit can replace a previously described qualitative visual foliation index (VFI) in cartilaginous fishes with a quantitative analog, i.e. the cerebellar foliation index (CFI). The capability of the SWD method is demonstrated in a series of volumetric images of brains from different chondrichthyan species that span the range of foliation gradings currently described for this group. The CFI is consistent with the qualitative grading provided by the VFI, delivers a robust measure of cerebellar foliation, and can provide a quantitative basis for brain shape characterization across taxa. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. [An intriguing model for 5S rDNA sequences dispersion in the genome of freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, V P; Oliveira, C; Foresti, F

    2015-01-01

    5S rDNA genes of the stingray Potamotrygon motoro were PCR replicated, purified, cloned and sequenced. Two distinct classes of segments of different sizes were obtained. The smallest, with 342 bp units, was classified as class I, and the largest, with 1900 bp units, was designated as class II. Alignment with the consensus sequences for both classes showed changes in a few bases in the 5S rDNA genes. TATA-like sequences were detected in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) regions of class I and a microsatellite (GCT) 10 sequence was detected in the NTS region of class II. The results obtained can help to understand the molecular organization of ribosomal genes and the mechanism of gene dispersion.

  15. A partial braincase and other skeletal remains of Oligocene angel sharks (Chondrichthyes, Squatiniformes) from northwest Belgium, with comments on squatinoid taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollen, F.H.; Bakel , van B.W.M.; Jagt, J.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed redescription of a chondrocranium from the basal Boom Clay Formation (Rupelian, Upper Oligocene) at the SVK clay pit, Sint-Niklaas (province of Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium), previously assigned to the sawshark Pristiophorus rupeliensis, is presented. The chondrocranium is re-identified as

  16. Catch and size selectivity of small-scale fishing gear for the smooth-hound shark Mustelus mustelus (Linnaeus, 1758 (Chondrichthyes: Triakidae from the Aegean Turkish coast

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    T. CEYHAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catch rate, CPUE, biomass ratios and size selectivity from traditional longline and trammel nets of Turkish coastal small-scale fisheries were investigated in order to describe the Smooth-hound shark (Mustelus mustelus fishery. The SELECT method was used to estimate the selectivity parameters of a variety of models for the trammel nets inner panel of 150 and 170 mm mesh sizes. Catch composition and proportion of the species were significantly different in longline and trammel nets. While mean CPUE of longline was 119.2±14.3 kg/1000 hooks, these values for 150 and 170 mm trammel nets were 5.3±1.2 kg/1000 m of net and 12.7±3.9 kg/1000 m of net, respectively. Biomass ratios of the by catch to Smooth-hound catch were found to be 1:0.32 for 150 mm trammel net, 1:0.65 for longline and 1:0.73 for 170 mm trammel net. The estimated modal lengths and spreads were found to be 91.1 and 16.2 cm for 150 mm and 103.2 and 18.4 cm for 170 mm, respectively. The modal lengths of the species as well as the spread values increased with mesh size.

  17. Distribution of radioactivity in the chondrichthyes Squalus acanthias and the osteichthyes salmo gairdneri following intragastric administration of (9-/sup 14/C)phenanthrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solbakken, J.E.; Palmork, K.H.

    1980-12-01

    The fate of polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAH) in marine animals has received increasing attention in the last decade. The present studies dealing with spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) are part of a series of experiments with different marine organisms. All the experiments were performed under the same laboratory conditions using intragastric administration of the PAH-component, /sup 14/C-labelled phenanthrene. Thus it is possible to compare species differences of disposition of PAH in various marine organisms. The most pronounced differences in the disposition of phenanthrene between bony fish and cartilaginous fish in our studies are that the maximum value of radioactivity in the liver of cartilaginous fish occurred several days later than the corresponding value in bony fish. Furthermore, the radioactivity in cartilaginous fish was retained at a high level beyond 672 h (28 days), a time at which the radioactivity in bony fish is near the background values.

  18. Digenea, Nematoda, Cestoda, and Acanthocephala, parasites in Potamotrygonidae (Chondrichthyes) from the upper Paraná River floodplain, states of Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil.

    OpenAIRE

    G. C. PAVANELLI; Takemoto,R.M.; LACERDA, A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper represents the first study on the endoparasitic fauna of Potamotrygon falkneri and P. motoro in the upper Paraná River floodplain. Fishes were collected by fishing rod and gillnetting in different stations of the floodplain, from March, 2005 to September, 2006. Parasites were sampled, fixed and preserved according to specialized literature. About half of the analyzed fish were parasitized by at least one of the following species of endoparasites: Clinostomum complanatum, Gen...

  19. Hábitos alimentares e sobreposição trófica das raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, Brasil = Feeding habitats and trophic overlap of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae in the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil

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    Milza Celi Fedatto Abelha

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro foram avaliadas em relação à composição de suas dietas e a sobreposição do nicho trófico nos períodos de seca (agosto/2004 e cheia (janeiro/2005 na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, em três estações de coleta próximas à ilha Mutum. Foram analisados 49 conteúdos estomacais de P. falkneri e 16 de P. motoro, obtidos de espécimes capturados através de pesca com anzol, fisga (arpão e espinhel. Os conteúdos estomacais foram analisados de acordo com os métodos de freqüência volumétrica e de ocorrência. A similaridade da dieta foi quantificada pelo índicede sobreposição de Pianka. As espécies revelaram flexibilidade alimentar, com ambas consumindo predominantemente moluscos na cheia, enquanto na seca a dieta de P. falkneri foi composta principalmente por peixes e a de P. motoro por insetos aquáticos. Os valores doíndice de sobreposição de nicho variaram entre 0,38 na seca (moderado e 0,94 na cheia (acentuado. A variação da composição das dietas foi atribuída às oscilações na disponibilidade dos recursos alimentares no ambiente.Feeding habits and trophic overlap of freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro were evaluated in the upper Paraná river floodplain. Samples were collected during periods of drought (August/2004 and flood (January/2005 near Mutum island. Fishhook, harpoon and long line were used to capture the individuals and a total of 49 stomach contents of P. falkneri and 16 of P. motorowere analyzed. Diet composition was analyzed by the relative occurrence and volumetric frequencies. The trophic overlap was quantified by the index of niche overlap of Pianka. Results indicated that both species predominantly consumed mollusks during the floodseason, while in the drought season the diet of P. falkneri was composed mainly by fish and P. motoro for aquatic insects. The values of the index of niche overlap varied from 0.38, in drought (moderate, to 0.94 in flood (accentuated. The seasonal variation of the composition of the diets was attributed to fluctuations in the availability of food resources in the floodplain.

  20. First record of Hydrolagus melanophasma James, Ebert, Long & Didier, 2009 (Chondrichthyes, Chimaeriformes, Holocephali from the southeastern Pacific Ocean Primer registro de Hydrolagus melanophasma James, Ebert, Long & Didier, 2009 (Chondrichthyes, Chimaeriformes, Holocephali en el Océano Pacífico suroriental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Bustamante

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The eastern Pacific black ghost shark, Hydrolagus melanophasma is reported from deep waters off Chile and is described from specimens collected off Valdivia at depths of 1150 to 1720 m. This species is distinguished from all other members of the genus by its large, curved dorsal fin spine, which extends beyond the dorsal fin apex; a second dorsal fin of uniform height along the caudal peduncle; large pectoral fins extending beyond the pelvic fin insertion; and a uniform black color of the body. Catch records of this species in Chile suggest a discontinuous distribution along the continental slope of the eastern Pacific Ocean, restricted to the Middle America and Atacama trenches. These observations elevate the number of chimaeroid fishes inhabiting Chile to five species.La quimera negra del Pacífico este, Hydrolagus melanophasma es reportada desde aguas profundas frente a Chile y se describe a partir de especímenes colectados en Valdivia en profundidades ente 1150 y 1720 m. Esta especie se diferencia de los otros miembros del género por su larga y curvada espina dorsal, la cual se extiende más allá del ápice de la aleta dorsal; presenta una segunda aleta dorsal de altura uniforme a lo largo del pedúnculo caudal; grandes aletas pectorales que se proyectan sobre la inserción de las aletas pélvicas, además de su coloración negra uniforme en el cuerpo. Los registros de captura de esta especie en Chile sugieren una distribución discontinua a lo largo del talud continental del océano Pacifico este, restringido a las fosas oceánicas de Atacama y Mesoamérica. Estas observaciones aumentan a cinco el número de especies de peces Chimaeriformes que habitan aguas chilenas.

  1. From coexistence to competitive exclusion: can overfishing change the outcome of competition in skates (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae? De la coexistencia a la exclusión competitiva: ¿Puede la sobrepesca cambiar el resultado de la competencia en rayas (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae?

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    Natalia L Ruocco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for food could be a major force driving changes in the community structure of skates (Rajidae subjected to fishing exploitation. Under this hypothesis, small skates are released from competition with larger skates after fishing has depleted the larger species. Here, we compare the abundance patterns of two sympatric skates with similar niches but different life histories, Bathyraja albomaculata (larger and slow-reproducing and Bathyraja macloviana (smaller and faster-reproducing, before (1971, 1978 and after (1998-2004 a 108% increase in industrial bottom trawling on the southeastern South American shelf in order to test the prediction that B. macloviana should competitively exclude B. albomaculata after the increase in fishing mortality. In 1971 and 1978, there was no relationship between the abundance of both species, indicating that they coexisted over large scales. In 1998-2004, the relationship between the abundances of these skates was bell-shaped, indicating that both species increased in abundance at low densities until peaking, after which B. albomaculata decreased when B. macloviana became more abundant, consistent with resource competition. We tested whether food may be a potential limiting resource by comparing the diet of both species. The two species consumed mostly polychaetes, differing only in the consumption of polychaetes from the family Nephthyidae, which was much higher for B. macloviana. Bathyraja macloviana could replace B. albomaculata at high densities when food resources may become scarce. These results support the hypothesis that competition release is an important factor explaining the changes in skate communities in overexploited areas.La competencia por el alimento podría ser una fuerza importante detrás de los cambios en la estructura de las comunidades de rayas (Rajidae bajo explotación pesquera. Según esta hipótesis, las rayas pequeñas son liberadas de la competencia por las rayas de mayor tamaño, al disminuir la abundancia de éstas últimas por la pesca. En este trabajo, se comparan los patrones de abundancia de dos rayas simpátricas con nichos similares pero con diferentes historias de vida, Bathyraja albomaculata (mayor y de reproducción lenta y Bathyraja macloviana (más pequeña y de reproducción más rápida, antes (1971, 1978 y después (1998-2004 de un incremento del 108% en el arrastre de fondo industrial en la plataforma sudeste de América del Sur, para evaluar la predicción que B. macloviana excluiría competitivamente a B. albomaculata después del aumento en la mortalidad por pesca. En 1971 y 1978, no hubo relación entre las abundancias de ambas especies, indicando que, a escalas grandes, coexistían. En 1998-2004, la relación entre las abundancias de ambas especies tuvo forma de campana, indicando que ambas incrementaron su abundancia a densidades bajas hasta alcanzar un máximo, a partir del cual la abundancia de B. albomaculata disminuyó a medida que aumentaba la de B. macloviana, patrón consistente con la competencia por uso de recursos. Se evaluó si el alimento puede ser un recurso limitante mediante la comparación de la dieta de ambas especies. Ambas especies consumieron predominantemente poliquetos y difirieron sólo en el consumo de poliquetos Nephthyidae, mucho mayor en B. macloviana. B. macloviana remplazaría a B. albomaculata a altas densidades, cuando el alimento podría ser escaso. Estos resultados apoyan la hipótesis de que la liberación de la competencia es un factor importante en los cambios en las comunidades de rayas sobreexplotadas.

  2. Record of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon brachyura and P. motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae in the lower Uruguay river, South America Registro das raias de água doce Potamotrygon brachyura e P. motoro (Potamotrygonidae no baixo rio Uruguai, America do Sul

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    María Cristina Oddone

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater stingrays, or potamotrygonids, are restricted to Neotropical river drainages. These elasmobranchs are well adapted to freshwater environments and the number of described species gradually increases as further research is carried out. Some of the first studies on their systematics and natural history were carried out in the 1960s and 1970s in southern South America. However, there is no new published data on potamotrygonids from Uruguayan waters since then (except for local journal reports from sportive fishermen and specimens deposited in Uruguayan collections. The present study aims to record the recent occurrence of two species of potamotrygonids caught by sport fishermen, with comments on other published historical records for the same area. As many other elasmobranchs, these species have an important, but not always well understood, role in the Uruguayan rivers ecosystems.As raias de água doce ou potamotrigonídeos estão restritas às drenagens dos rios Neotropicais. Estas raias tem se adaptado bem aos ambientes de água doce e o número de espécies descritas aumenta gradualmente conforme as pesquisas na área se intensificam. Alguns dos primeiros estudos sobre a sistemática e a historia natural deste grupo foram realizados nas décadas de 1960 e 1970 na região Sul de América do Sul. Porém, há poucos dados publicados sobre potamotrigonídeos em águas uruguaias desde então (com exceção de registros de pescadores esportivos publicados em jornais locais, e espécimes depositados em coleções uruguaias. O presente estudo, portanto, tem como objetivo registrar a ocorrência de duas espécies de potamotrigonídeos no Uruguai capturados por pescadores esportivos assim como realizar uma compilação de ocorrências anteriores presentes na literatura. Como muitos outros elasmobrânquios, estas espécies possuem um papel importante nos ecossistemas dos rios uruguaios, embora não completamente compreendido.

  3. Morphological and ultrastructural redescription of Chloromyxum leydigi Mingazzini, 1890 (Myxozoa: Myxosporea), type species of the genus, infecting the gall bladder of the marine cartilaginous fish Torpedo marmorata Risso (Chondrichthyes: Torpedinidae), from the Portuguese Atlantic Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sónia; Casal, Graça; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Azevedo, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Chloromyxum leydigi Mingazzini, 1890, the type species of Chloromyxum Mingazzini, 1890, is redescribed based on material found in the gall bladder of the cartilaginous fish Torpedo marmorata Risso collected from the Portuguese Atlantic coast and its sporogonic development is described. Plasmodia and mature spores were floating free in the bile. Plasmodia are polysporic and highly polymorphic in shape and organization. Mature spores are spherical to subspherical with a pointed anterior end, measuring 12.3 +/- 0.5 microm in length and 9.0 +/- 0.5 microm in width. The spore wall is composed of two asymmetric shell valves, each bearing 4-5 elevated surface ridges. A bundle of 40-50 tapering caudal filaments extends from the basal portion of the shell valves. Four pyriform equal-sized polar capsules, measuring about 5.3 x 3.2 microm, are observed at the same level in the anterior pole of the spores, each containing a polar filament coiled in 8-9 (rarely 10) turns. Spore morphology, tissue tropism, host species and sequences of the SSU rRNA gene supported species identification. Since its discovery, this species has been dubiously reported from several cartilaginous hosts, namely due to the poor description of its features.

  4. Description of a new species of skate of the genus Malacoraja Stehmann, 1970: the first species from the southwestern Atlantic Ocean, with notes on generic monophyly and composition (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae

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    Marcelo R. de Carvalho

    Full Text Available The first report of a western South Atlantic soft skate, genus Malacoraja Stehmann, 1970, is described as Malacoraja obscura, new species, from the southeastern Brazilian continental slope off the states of Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro, in depths ranging from 808-1105 m. The new species is known from five specimens and is distinguished from congeners by its unique dorsal coloration with small, faded white spots on disc and pelvic fins, by retaining in larger specimens an irregular row of thorns along dorsal midline of tail (extending from tail base to two-thirds of tail length in 680 mm total length female, and by presenting a ventral tail midline devoid of small denticles only at base (naked region not extending posterior to pelvic fin rear margin. Further diagnostic characters in combination include the lack of scapular thorns in larger specimens, elevated number of tooth rows (64/62 tooth rows in subadult male of 505 mm TL, and 76/74 in large female of 680 mm TL and vertebrae (27-28 Vtr, 68-75 Vprd, ventral disc and tail with a uniform dark brown coloration, paired postventral fenestrae on scapulocoracoid, enlarged posterior postventral fenestra, circular foramen magnum and paired internal carotid foramina on braincase floor. Adult males were unavailable for study, but an anatomical description of M. obscura, n. sp., is provided. Comparisons are made with all known material of M. kreffti, literature accounts of M. senta, and with abundant material of South African M. spinacidermis; M. obscura, n. sp., most closely resembles M. spinacidermis from the eastern South Atlantic in squamation, coloration and size. Malacoraja is monophyletic due to its unique squamation and rostral appendices, and apparently comprises two species-groups, one for M. obscura and M. spinacidermis, and the other for M. kreffti and M. senta, but clarification of species-level relationships must await more anatomical information, particularly of the latter two species.

  5. Grupos tróficos de peixes demersais da plataforma continental interna de Ubatuba, Brasil: I. Chondrichthyes Throphic groups of demersal fish community from the continental shelf: Ubatuba, Brazil. I. Chrondrichthyes

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    Lucy Satiko Hashimoto Soares

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de detectar grupos tróficos, foram analisadas amostras de conteúdos estomacais de sete espécies de peixes cartilaginosos. Os exemplares foram coletados no período de Outubro/85 a Julho/87 na plataforma interna de Ubatuba, SP, Brasil (da costa, até a isóbata de 50 m. A importância dos itens alimentares foi analisada através da freqüência numérica (FN e da freqüência de ocorrência (FO. As espécies foram agrupadas em três grupos distintos: Piscívoros: Squalus cubensis; comedores de peixes e crustáceos bentônicos: Raja castelnaui, Raja cyclophora, Raja agassizi; comedores de invertebrados bentônicos: Psammobatis glansdissimilis, Rhinobatos horkelii, Zapteryx brevirostris.Stomach contents of seven cartilaginous fish species were analysed with the aim to detect trophic groups. Sampling was effectuated between October/85 and July/87 off the coast of Ubatuba (São Paulo, Brazil in waters up 50 m depth. The relative importance of different components of the diet was expressed as a percentage frequency of occurrence and percentage number. The seven species were grouped in: fish feeders - Squalus cubensis; benthonic crustacean and fish feeders - Raja castelnaui, Raja cyclophora, Raja agassizi; benthonic invertebrate feeders - Rhinobatos horkelii, Zapteryx brevirostris, Psammobatis glansdissimilis.

  6. Systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin, with description of two new ocellated species (Chondrichthyes: Myliobatiformes: Potamotrygonidae

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    Thiago Silva Loboda

    Full Text Available A systematic revision of the Potamotrygon motoro (Müller & Henle, 1841 species complex in the Paraná-Paraguay basin based on morphological characters was undertaken. Morphological systems analyzed include external morphology, coloration, dermal denticles, and spines, canals of the ventral lateral-line system, and skeletal components. Potamotrygon motoro is widely distributed in the Paraná-Paraguay basin and some of its diagnostic characters are: ocelli present on dorsal disc tricolored, well-defined and evenly distributed, with diameter similar or greater than eye-length; ventral coloration with relatively large whitish central region, with gray or brown area predominant on outer ventral disc margins; dermal denticles well-developed and star-shaped over central disc; labial grooves absent; monognathic heterodonty present in upper and lower jaws of adults. Potamotrygon pauckei Castex, 1963 and Potamotrygon labradori Castex, Maciel & Achenbach, 1963, are synonymized with P. motoro; Potamotrygon alba Castex, 1963, is a nomen dubium in accordance with previous authors. Additionally, two new ocellated species of Potamotrygon from the Paraná-Paraguay basin are described: Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. and Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. These are described and compared with P. motoro and other congeners. Potamotrygon pantanensis, sp. nov. is described from the northern Pantanal region; Potamotrygon amandae, sp. nov. is widespread in the Paraná-Paraguay basin.

  7. Claves para el reconocimiento taxonómico dentario en taxa del Superorden Squalomorphi de Chile (Chondrichthyes: Elasmobranchii Taxonomic dental keys for the Chilean taxa of the Superorder Squalomorphi (Chondricthyes: Elasmobranchii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Sáez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una serie de claves para el reconocimiento dentario de diferentes taxa del Superorden Squalomorphi de Chile. Se seleccionaron características dentarias externas que permitan obtener una observación más expedita que conduzcan a un estudio más acabado, de la diagnosis de los diferentes taxa constituyentes de este grupo de peces, haciéndolas extensibles para estudios de piezas dentales fósiles.A series of taxonomic dental keys is presented for the Chilean taxa of the Superorder Squalomorphi. External dental characteristics were selected for easier observation, leading to more thorough studies. This allows diagnoses of the different taxa comprising this group of fishes and, moreover, can be extended to studies of fossil teeth.

  8. Population structure, distribution and abundance patterns of the patagonian smoothhound Mustelus schmitti Springer, 1939 (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii, Triakidae in the rio de La Plata and inner continental shelf , sw Atlantic ocean (34º30'-39º30'S

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    María Cristina Oddone

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A total number of 4824 Mustelus schmitti was sampled. Females ranged from 25 to 93 cm in spring and from 28 to 90 cm in summer. Males ranged from 34 to 82 and from 28 to 77 cm, respectively. Length composition of the population showed significant differences between spring and summer being females larger than males. Total length distribution did not show significant differences between cruises. Males density varied significantly between cruises while for the females no significant variation was observed. In the spring cruise, both sexes occurred at depths lower than 50 m. Females occurred in the whole area with adult occurrence only above 35°30'S. Mature males occurred throughout the area, immature males occurring in two trawls in Samborombón Bay. The summer cruise showed a discontinuous distribution of the species along the study area resulting in spatial segregation in two groups with immature females predominating in both of them.Um total de 4824 Mustelus schmitti foi amostrado. As fêmeas apresentaram comprimento total de 25-93 cm na primavera e 28-90 cm no verão enquanto os machos apresentaram 34-82 e de 28-77 cm, respectivamente. A composição de comprimentos da população mostrou diferenças significativas entre primavera e verão sendo as fêmeas maiores do que os machos. A distribuição de comprimento total não variou significativamente entre cruzeiros. A densidade variou significativamente entre cruzeiros nos machos sendo que a variação não foi expressiva nas fêmeas. No cruzeiro da primavera, ambos os sexos ocorreram em profundidades menores do que 50 m, as fêmeas ocorrendo em toda a área de estudo, as adultas somente acima da latitude 35°30'S. Os machos adultos foram observados em toda a área sendo que os imaturos somente em dois arrastos na Bahia de Samborombón. O cruzeiro de verão mostrou uma distribuição descontínua da espécie ao longo da área de estudo, resultando na segregação espacial em dois grupos, com predominância de fêmeas imaturas em ambos.

  9. Exposure to 3,3’,4,4’,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126) impacts multiple organ systems in developing little skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of exposure to coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other dioxin-like chemicals on developing vertebrates involve many organ systems, including the skeletal and cardiovascular systems. Apex predators, including those from the class Chondrichthyes (sharks, skates,...

  10. Hábitos alimentares e sobreposição trófica das raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, Brasil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.208 Feeding habitats and trophic overlap of the freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes, Potamotrygonidae in the upper Paraná river floodplain, Brazil - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.208

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Fontes de Oliveira

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As raias Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro foram avaliadas em relação à composição de suas dietas e a sobreposição do nicho trófico nos períodos de seca (agosto/2004 e cheia (janeiro/2005 na planície alagável do alto rio Paraná, em três estações de coleta próximas à ilha Mutum. Foram analisados 49 conteúdos estomacais de P. falkneri e 16 de P. motoro, obtidos de espécimes capturados através de pesca com anzol, fisga (arpão e espinhel. Os conteúdos estomacais foram analisados de acordo com os métodos de freqüência volumétrica e de ocorrência. A similaridade da dieta foi quantificada pelo índice de sobreposição de Pianka. As espécies revelaram flexibilidade alimentar, com ambas consumindo predominantemente moluscos na cheia, enquanto na seca a dieta de P. falkneri foi composta principalmente por peixes e a de P. motoro por insetos aquáticos. Os valores do índice de sobreposição de nicho variaram entre 0,38 na seca (moderado e 0,94 na cheia (acentuado. A variação da composição das dietas foi atribuída à s oscilações na disponibilidade dos recursos alimentares no ambiente.Feeding habits and trophic overlap of freshwater stingrays Potamotrygon falkneri e Potamotrygon motoro were evaluated in the upper Paraná river floodplain. Samples were collected during periods of drought (August/2004 and flood (January/2005 near Mutum island. Fishhook, harpoon and long line were used to capture the individuals and a total of 49 stomach contents of P. falkneri and 16 of P. motoro were analyzed. Diet composition was analyzed by the relative occurrence and volumetric frequencies. The trophic overlap was quantified by the index of niche overlap of Pianka. Results indicated that both species predominantly consumed mollusks during the flood season, while in the drought season the diet of P. falkneri was composed mainly by fish and P. motoro for aquatic insects. The values of the index of niche overlap varied from 0.38, in drought (moderate, to 0.94 in flood (accentuated. The seasonal variation of the composition of the diets was attributed to fluctuations in the availability of food resources in the floodplain.

  11. Brain and Liver Glutamine Synthetase of Rana catesbeiana and Rana cancrivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    ammonia into urea in marine Chondrichthyes liver 7 Table 1--Liver and brain glutamine synthetase of urea-retaining and non-urea-retaining amphibians 8... Osteichthyes , is a marine fish that also retains urea as an osmolyte (3,12). It too has a relatively high level of glu- tamine synthetase in its liver (16...for assimilation of ammonia into urea in marine Chondrichthyes liver (from Webb (15)) C1 klA IWE LO, AT? VH3 tLt TKATICAkMUIYL PUOSPULArL I CflALLLINE

  12. An Assessment and Annotated Bibliography of Marine Bioluminescence Research: 1979-1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Chordata. Vertebrata, 0. pteropus 95, 199, 271, 647, 740 0. cophocerca 184 Osteichthyes (Teleostei)] 95, 190. 246, 247, Ommastrephidse sp. 264 0. dioica...Archamia sp. 270. 461 T. megalops 271 CARTILAGINOUS FISH [Chordata. A. fucata 220, 221,282. 646 "l•dhdiodeuthis sp. 2 6 4 Vertebrata, Chondrichthyes A

  13. A Silurian placoderm with osteichthyan-like marginal jaw bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Yu, Xiaobo; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Choo, Brian; Lu, Jing; Qiao, Tuo; Qu, Qingming; Zhao, Wenjin; Jia, Liantao; Blom, Henning; Zhu, You'an

    2013-10-10

    The gnathostome (jawed vertebrate) crown group comprises two extant clades with contrasting character complements. Notably, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish) lack the large dermal bones that characterize Osteichthyes (bony fish and tetrapods). The polarities of these differences, and the morphology of the last common ancestor of crown gnathostomes, are the subject of continuing debate. Here we describe a three-dimensionally preserved 419-million-year-old placoderm fish from the Silurian of China that represents the first stem gnathostome with dermal marginal jaw bones (premaxilla, maxilla and dentary), features previously restricted to Osteichthyes. A phylogenetic analysis places the new form near the top of the gnathostome stem group but does not fully resolve its relationships to other placoderms. The analysis also assigns all acanthodians to the chondrichthyan stem group. These results suggest that the last common ancestor of Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes had a macromeric dermal skeleton, and provide a new framework for studying crown gnathostome divergence.

  14. Virgin birth in a hammerhead shark

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, D. D.; Shivji, M.S.; Louis, E.; Sommer, J; Fletcher, Hugh; PRODOHL Paulo

    2007-01-01

    Parthenogenesis has been documented in all major jawed vertebrate lineages except mammals and cartilaginous fishes (class Chondrichthyes: sharks, batoids and chimeras). Reports of captive female sharks giving birth despite being held in the extended absence of males have generally been ascribed to prior matings coupled with long-term sperm storage by the females. Here, we provide the first genetic evidence for chondrichthyan parthenogenesis, involving a hammerhead shark (Sphyrna tiburo). This...

  15. Comparative physiological selectivity of Pennsylvanian to Jurassic extinction in bony fish, sharks and invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Priscilla Rose

    2015-01-01

    The end-Permian and end-Triassic extinctions coincided with flood basalt eruptions that would have released large quantities of CO2 into the atmosphere, leading to ocean warming, anoxia, and perhaps acidification. Multiple stresses present during these extinction events provide analogues for anthropogenic CO2 emissions and can help us understand which taxonomic groups will be threatened by ocean acidification and warming. Bony fish and sharks (Actinoptyergii and Chondrichthyes) have cellular ...

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the endangered spotback skate, Atlantoraja castelnaui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, Drew J L; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2016-05-01

    Chondrichthyes are a highly threatened class of organisms, largely due to overfishing and other human activities. The present study describes the complete mitochondrial genome (16,750 bp) of the endangered spotback skate, Atlantoraja castelnaui. The mitogenome is arranged in a typical vertebrate fashion, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region.

  17. [Preliminary molecular phylogeny of the fishes based on sequence analysis of 28S ribosomal RNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, H L; Perasso, R; Billard, R

    1989-01-01

    "Fish" phylogeny has been studied using partial 28 S ribosomal RNA sequences of 14 species among which 12 are "fish" ranging from lamprey to perciforms. Our results are in good agreement with generally accepted cladograms based on anatomical and paleontological data. Two interesting conclusions emerged: a) Polypterus is the sister-group of all other actinopterygians; b) the divergences of the Clasdistia, Tetrapoda and Chondrichthyes seem to have occurred during a relatively short period of time.

  18. New Record of the Rare Shark Parmaturus melanobranchius (Scyliorhinidae from Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Feng Lee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The specimen of Parmaturus melanobranchius (Chondrichthyes: Carcharhiniformes was collected in the waters off south-western Taiwan. After the description in 1966, only three specimens of P. melanobranchius were collected, one from South China Sea, one from Philippines and the other from Aragusuku Island of Japan. In this study, the fourth specimen was reported and its diagnostic characters, color photos and distribution map are given.

  19. The complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    OpenAIRE

    Delarbre, C; Spruyt, N; Delmarre, C; Gallut, C.; Barriel, V; Janvier, P.; Laudet, V; Gachelin, G

    1998-01-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula. The 16,697-bp-long mtDNA possesses a gene organization identical to that of the Osteichthyes, but different from that of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. The main features of the mtDNA of osteichthyans were thus established in the common ancestor to chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. The phylogenetic analysis confirms that the Chondrichthyes are the sister group of th...

  20. The CXC chemokine receptors of fish: Insights into CXCR evolution in the vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Redmond, Anthony K; Qi, Zhitao; Dooley, Helen; Secombes, Chris J

    2015-05-01

    This article will review current knowledge on CXCR in fish, that represent three distinct vertebrate groups: Agnatha (jawless fishes), Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) and Osteichthyes (bony fishes). With the sequencing of many fish genomes, information on CXCR in these species in particular has expanded considerably. In mammals, 6 CXCRs have been described, and their homologues will be initially reviewed before considering a number of atypical CXCRs and a discussion of CXCR evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Basal Jawed Vertebrate Phylogenomics Using Transcriptomic Data from Solexa Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Chen; Ming Zou; Lei Yang; Shunping He

    2012-01-01

    The traditionally accepted relationships among basal jawed vertebrates have been challenged by some molecular phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial sequences. Those studies split extant gnathostomes into two monophyletic groups: tetrapods and piscine branch, including Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii and sarcopterygian fishes. Lungfish and bichir are found in a basal position on the piscine branch. Based on transcriptomes of an armored bichir (Polypterus delhezi) and an African lungfish ...

  2. Contribuição ao conhecimento da ictiofauna do Manguezal de Cacha Pregos, Ilha de Itaparica, Baía de Todos os Santos, Bahia Contribution to knowledge of ichthyofauna of Mangrove Cacha Pregos, Itaparica island, Todos os Santos bay, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Duarte Lopes

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A check-list of fishes collected in a mangrove in Cacha Pregos, south of ltaparic Island, State of Bahia, Brazil (about 13o07'S,38o48'W from 1988-1989 and 1991-1992 is presented. Fifteen orders, 46 families and 85 species (Teleostei except one Chondrichthyes were identified, represented specimens whose adults live in different marine ecossystems.

  3. Suspension and optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of basal vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Ronald H H; Gustafsson, Ola S E; Tuminaite, Inga

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the apparatus suspending the crystalline lens in the eyes of basal vertebrates. Data are presented for Holocephali (Chondrichthyes) and the actinopterygians Polypteriformes, Polyodontidae (Acipenseriformes), Lepisosteiformes, Amiiformes, and one teleost species, the banded archerfish (Toxotes jaculatrix). We also studied the optical properties of the lens in Polypteriformes, Lepisosteiformes, and the archerfish. Together with previously published results, our findings show that there are three basic types of lens suspension in vertebrates. These are i) a rotationally symmetric suspension (Petromyzontida, lampreys; Ceratodontiformes, lungfishes; Tetrapoda), ii) a suspension with a dorso-ventral axis of symmetry and a ventral papilla (all Chondrichthyes and Acipenseriformes), and iii) an asymmetric suspension with a ventral muscle and a varying number of ligaments (all Actinopterygii except for Acipenseriformes). Large eyes with presumably high spatial resolution have evolved in all groups. Multifocal lenses creating well-focused color images are also present in all groups studied. Stable and exact positioning of the lens, in many cases in combination with accommodative changes in lens position or shape, is achieved by all three types of lens suspension. It is somewhat surprising that lens suspensions are strikingly similar in Chondrichthyes and Acipenseriformes (Actinopterygii), while the suspension apparatus in Polypteriformes, usually being regarded as an actinopterygian group more basal than Acipenseriformes, are considerably more teleostean-like. This study completes a series of investigations on lens suspensions in nontetrapod vertebrates, covering all major groups except for the rare and highly derived coelacanths. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Geology and taphonomy of the base of the Taquaral Member, Irati Formation (Permian, Paraná Basin), Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahud, Artur; Petri, Setembrino

    2015-09-01

    The taphonomy of Early Permian vertebrates from a sandy facies at the base of the Taquaral Member, Irati Formation, was surveyed in order to acquire data for the interpretation of the sedimentary processes and paleoenvironment of deposition. Six outcrops from the Rio Claro municipality and surrounding areas, from the Brazilian State of São Paulo, were investigated. The vertebrate groups are Chondrichthyes (Xenacanthiformes, Ctenacanthiformes and Petalodontiformes), Osteichthyes (Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii) and Tetrapodomorpha. They occur as loose teeth, scales, spines and bone remains. The sandy facies is characterized by fining upward deposition. The coarser sandstone immediately above the underlying Tatuí Formation is rich in Chondrichthyes. However, the fine sandstone above, immediately beneath the silty shale facies, is devoid of Chondrichthyes, though Osteichthyes scales, teeth and bones were present. The taphonomy is important for inferring sedimentary processes and then the paleoenvironments. The poor sorting of the sandstone and the presence of fossils that are mostly abraded or worn are indicative of a high energy environment. In contrast, the presence of fossils in a good state of preservation, some without abrasion and breakages are indicative of only limited transport. Differences of fossil spatial density, numbers of specimens and taxa may be explained by the dynamics of deposition, from details of the palaeoenvironment can be obtained.

  5. Virgin birth in a hammerhead shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Demian D; Shivji, Mahmood S; Louis, Ed; Sommer, Julie; Fletcher, Hugh; Prodöhl, Paulo A

    2007-08-22

    Parthenogenesis has been documented in all major jawed vertebrate lineages except mammals and cartilaginous fishes (class Chondrichthyes: sharks, batoids and chimeras). Reports of captive female sharks giving birth despite being held in the extended absence of males have generally been ascribed to prior matings coupled with long-term sperm storage by the females. Here, we provide the first genetic evidence for chondrichthyan parthenogenesis, involving a hammerhead shark (Sphyrna tiburo). This finding also broadens the known occurrence of a specific type of asexual development (automictic parthenogenesis) among vertebrates, extending recently raised concerns about the potential negative effect of this type of facultative parthenogenesis on the genetic diversity of threatened vertebrate species.

  6. Data from the ichthyological collection of the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Timóteo Monteiro; Dos Santos, Juliana Corrêa; Ferreira, Victor Amazonas Viegas; Ramos, Lorran Alves da Cruz; Wosiacki, Wolmar Benjamin; de Sousa, Marcos Paulo Alves

    2017-01-01

    This dataset contains information on the occurrence of Neotropical fishes (Actinopterygii, Chondrichthyes, Sarcopterygii) collected in South America, mostly from the Brazilian Amazon. The ichthyology collections of the Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi (MPEG: http://www.museu-goeldi.br/) include specimens collected between 1900 and 2014. The dataset is now available for public consultation on the Global Biodiversity Information Facility portal (http://www.gbif.org/dataset/b0059a3a-5cab-4a08-8d14-d92c23378e43), and through Sistema de Informação sobre a Biodiversidade Brasileira (http://gbif.sibbr.gov.br/explorador/pt/recurso/62).

  7. The complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarbre, C; Spruyt, N; Delmarre, C; Gallut, C; Barriel, V; Janvier, P; Laudet, V; Gachelin, G

    1998-09-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the dogfish, Scyliorhinus canicula. The 16,697-bp-long mtDNA possesses a gene organization identical to that of the Osteichthyes, but different from that of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. The main features of the mtDNA of osteichthyans were thus established in the common ancestor to chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. The phylogenetic analysis confirms that the Chondrichthyes are the sister group of the Osteichthyes.

  8. Digenea trematodes in fish of the North Adriatic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Vesna PARADIŽNIK; Branko RADUJKOVIĆ

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an overview of trematodes that have been isolated from the north Adriatic Sea , during a 10-year research program. A total of 63 marine fish species of pelagic and benthic of the classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes were analyzed. We found that 21 fish species ted digenean trematodes (33.33% prevalence), and 12 fish species are reported as hosts for the t time. During our research, 63 species of fish (total of 2659 fish) were examined and 25.16 % e found invaded by endohelm...

  9. Coevolution of the Monogenoidea (Platyhelminthes) based on a revised hypothesis of parasite phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeger, W A; Kritsky, D C

    1997-12-01

    A revised hypothesis for the phylogeny of the Subclass Polyonchoinea (Monogenoidea) was constructed employing phylogenetic systematics. The Acanthocotylidae (formerly of the Order Capsalidea) is transferred to the Order Gyrodactylidea based on this analysis. The new phylogeny is used to determine coevolutionary relationships of the familial taxa of Monogenoidea with their hosts. The coevolutionary analysis suggests that the Monogenoidea apparently underwent sympatric speciation or dispersal while parasitic on ancestral Gnathostomata, resulting in two primary clades: the Polyonchoinea and the Oligonchoinea + Polystomatoinea. The two parasite clades apparently cospeciated independently with divergence of the Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes. In the Polyonchoinea, the clade associated with Chondrichthyes experienced primary extinction within the Holocephala, but coevolved into the Loimoidae and Monocotylidae in the Galeomorphii and Squalea (Elasmobranchii), respectively. Within the Osteichthyes, polyonchoineans experienced primary extinction with the divergence of Sarcopterygii, Polypteriformes and Acipenseriformes. They demonstrate primary dispersal from the Neopterygii into the Squalea (as Amphibdellatinea), Actinistia (as Neodactylodiscinea) and Urodela (as Lagarocotylidea). Secondary dispersals of polyonchoineans occurred in the Gyrodactylidae to the Polypteriformes, Urodela and Anura; in the Acanthocotylidae to the Myxinoidea and Squalea; in the Capsalidae to the Acipenseriformes and Elasmobranchii; and in the Monocotylidae to the Holocephala. The Oligonchoinea and Polystomatoinea developed upon divergence of the Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes. Oligonchoineans cospeciated within the Chondrichthyes, with the Chimaericolidea developing within the Holocephala and the ancestor of the Diclybothriidea + Mazocraeidea within the Elasmobranchii. Two cases of primary dispersal occurred within this clade: the Diclybothriidae to the Acipenseriformes and the ancestor of

  10. TRABZON KIYILARINDA (DOĞU KARADENİZ) DİP TROLÜ İLE AVLANAN BALIK FAUNASI ÜZERİNE BİR ARAŞTIRMA

    OpenAIRE

    AK, Orhan; KUTLU, Sebahattin; AYDIN, İlhan

    2008-01-01

    Araştırma, Ocak-Aralık 2007 tarihleri arasında Trabzon (Doğu Karadeniz) kıyılarında dip trolü ile avlanan balık faunası üzerine yapılmıştır. Örnekleme periyodu boyunca 2 sınıf, 8 takım ve 25 familyaya ait 28 tür belirlenmiştir. Bunlardan 3 tanesi kıkırdaklı (Chondrichthyes) ve 25 tanesi de kemikli balıklara (Osteichthyes) aittir.

  11. The inorganic content of pleromin in tooth plates of the living holocephalan, Chimaera phantasma, consists of a crystalline calcium phosphate known as beta-Ca3(PO4)2 (whitlockite).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, M; Sasagawa, I; Akai, J

    1984-03-01

    The tooth plates in the living Holocephalan, Chimaera phantasma were studied by various techniques. They consisted of osteodentin and hypermineralized pleromin (kosmin). The degree of mineralization on the latter was as much as in the enameloid of Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes. Scanning electron microscope observation indicated that the pleromin consisted of large and granular crystals. X-ray powder diffractometry, electron microprobe analysis and analytical electron microscopy revealed that the inorganic constituent of pleromin included, as an essential element, a beta-Ca3(PO4)2 (whitlockite) structure containing a small amount of Mg.

  12. Découverte d'un gisement à vertébrés dans le Maastrichtien supérieur des Petites-Pyrénées

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Yves; Cavin, Lionel; Bilotte, Michel

    1999-06-01

    A new Late Maastrichtian locality from the Petites-Pyrénées has yielded an important vertebrate fauna. It includes Chondrichthyes (undetermined neoselachian), Osteichthyes (Lepisosteidae, Phyllodontinae, Sparidae?), Chelonia (Pleurodira), Crocodylia, and Dinosauria (Theropoda, Hadrosauridae, Nodosauridae). It is the first mention of a Cretaceous phyllodontine and the first mention of an ankylosaur in the French Late Maastrichtian. Lestaillats is the richest Late Maastrichtian locality in southern France because of the occurrence of both a microfauna and macrovertebrates. It offers new perspectives for the knowledge of the diversity and the evolution of the European vertebrate assemblages in the Latest Cretaceous.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of early vertebrates: monophyly of the agnathans as revealed by sequences of 35 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezaki, Naoko; Figueroa, Felipe; Zaleska-Rutczynska, Zofia; Klein, Jan

    2003-02-01

    Extant vertebrates are divided into three major groups: hagfishes (Hyperotreti, myxinoids), lampreys (Hyperoartia, petromyzontids), and jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). The phylogenetic relationships among the groups and within the jawed vertebrates are controversial, for both morphological and molecular studies have rendered themselves to conflicting interpretations. Here, we use the sequences of 35 nuclear protein-encoding genes to provide definitive evidence for the monophyly of the Agnatha (jawless vertebrates, a group encompassing the hagfishes and lampreys). Our analyses also give a strong support for the separation of Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) before the divergence of Osteichthyes (bony fishes) from the other gnathostomes.

  14. Structure related phylogenetic variations in brain gangliosides of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, R

    1984-01-01

    The concentration and composition of brain gangliosides from five brain structures of vertebrate species belonging to the classes of Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia were investigated. The complexity of brain ganglioside composition is strikingly reduced over phyletic lines. In lower vertebrates there is only little variation in the ganglioside pattern between the different brain structures, whereas in higher vertebrates differences distinctly occurred. A similarity over phyletic lines of ganglioside pattern was only noted in phylogenetically old brain structures as for instance in the medulla oblongata and the brain stem.

  15. Phytosphingosine is a characteristic component of the glycolipids in the vertebrate intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K

    1987-01-01

    Sphingoids in the intestinal lipids of an agnatha, a chondrichthyes, two osteichthyes, three amphibia, three reptiles and two avian species were analyzed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. The glycolipid fraction of all the samples studied contained 4-D-hydroxysphinganine as the major component together with sphingosine and sphinganine. While the trihydroxy base was not found in their sphingomyelin fraction. The trihydroxy base was considered to be a characteristic component of the intestinal glycolipids for the vertebrates in general. Its concentration in the intestinal tissue had little correlation with the food habitat of the animals.

  16. Gnathostome phylogenomics utilizing lungfish EST sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Björn M; Janke, Axel

    2009-02-01

    The relationship between the Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes), the Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes), and the piscine Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fishes) and how the Tetrapoda (four-limbed terrestrial vertebrates) are related to these has been a contentious issue for more than a century. A general consensus about the relationship of these vertebrate clades has gradually emerged among morphologists, but no molecular study has yet provided conclusive evidence for any specific hypothesis. In order to examine these relationships on the basis of more extensive sequence data, we have produced almost 1,000,000 bp of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the African marbled lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus. This new data set yielded 771 transcribed nuclear sequences that had not been previously described. The lungfish EST sequences were combined with EST data from two cartilaginous fishes and whole genome data from an agnathan, four ray-finned fishes, and four tetrapods. Phylogenomic analysis of these data yielded, for the first time, significant maximum likelihood support for a traditional gnathostome tree with a split between the Chondrichthyes and remaining (bone) gnathostomes. Also, the sister group relationship between Dipnoi (lungfishes) and Tetrapoda received conclusive support. Previously proposed hypotheses, such as the monophyly of fishes, could be rejected significantly. The divergence time between lungfishes and tetrapods was estimated to 382-388 Ma by the current data set and six calibration points.

  17. SkateBase, an elasmobranch genome project and collection of molecular resources for chondrichthyan fishes [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/445

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wyffels

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chondrichthyan fishes are a diverse class of gnathostomes that provide a valuable perspective on fundamental characteristics shared by all jawed and limbed vertebrates. Studies of phylogeny, species diversity, population structure, conservation, and physiology are accelerated by genomic, transcriptomic and protein sequence data. These data are widely available for many sarcopterygii (coelacanth, lungfish and tetrapods and actinoptergii (ray-finned fish including teleosts taxa, but limited for chondrichthyan fishes.  In this study, we summarize available data for chondrichthyes and describe resources for one of the largest projects to characterize one of these fish, Leucoraja erinacea, the little skate.  SkateBase (http://skatebase.org serves as the skate genome project portal linking data, research tools, and teaching resources.

  18. Osteognathostomata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Hans-Peter

    Noch häufig, vor allem im englischen Sprachraum, wird für die fischartigen Wirbeltiere mit Knochenskelett, also die Actinopterygii und Sarcopterygii, der Begriff "Osteichthyes" (Knochenfische) verwendet. Da sich jedoch aus einem Subtaxon der Sarcopterygier die Tet rapoda entwickelten (S. 322), würde diese Gruppierung ein paraphyletisches Taxon darstellen. Hier wird daher dem Vorschlag W. Hennigs (1983) gefolgt und die Schwestergruppe der Chondrichthyes Osteognathostomata genannt: Sie enthält alle weiteren kiefertragenden Wirbeltiere mit Knochenskelett (Name!) (Abb. 201). Die Sarcopterygii umfassen demnach verschiedene fossile Gruppen, die rezenten Reliktgruppen der Dipnoi (Lungenfische) und Actinistia (Hohlstachler) sowie die Tetrapoda und ihre Stammgruppenvertreter. (Neuerdings wird in der Literatur aus denselben Gründen einer konsequent phylogenetischen Systematisierung wieder die Gruppierung Osteichthyes, aber unter Einschluss der Tetrapoda, verwendet!).

  19. X-ray computed tomography library of shark anatomy and lower jaw surface models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamminga, Pepijn; De Bruin, Paul W; Geleijns, Jacob; Brazeau, Martin D

    2017-04-11

    The cranial diversity of sharks reflects disparate biomechanical adaptations to feeding. In order to be able to investigate and better understand the ecomorphology of extant shark feeding systems, we created a x-ray computed tomography (CT) library of shark cranial anatomy with three-dimensional (3D) lower jaw reconstructions. This is used to examine and quantify lower jaw disparity in extant shark species in a separate study. The library is divided in a dataset comprised of medical CT scans of 122 sharks (Selachimorpha, Chondrichthyes) representing 73 extant species, including digitized morphology of entire shark specimens. This CT dataset and additional data provided by other researchers was used to reconstruct a second dataset containing 3D models of the left lower jaw for 153 individuals representing 94 extant shark species. These datasets form an extensive anatomical record of shark skeletal anatomy, necessary for comparative morphological, biomechanical, ecological and phylogenetic studies.

  20. Migratory appendicular muscles precursor cells in the common ancestor to all vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Eri; Kusakabe, Rie; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Hyodo, Susumu; Robert-Moreno, Alexandre; Onimaru, Koh; Sharpe, James; Kuratani, Shigeru; Tanaka, Mikiko

    2017-11-01

    In amniote embryos, skeletal muscles in the trunk are derived from epithelial dermomyotomes, the ventral margin of which extends ventrally to form body wall muscles. At limb levels, ventral dermomyotomes also generate limb-muscle precursors, an Lbx1-positive cell population that originates from the dermomyotome and migrates distally into the limb bud. In elasmobranchs, however, muscles in the paired fins were believed to be formed by direct somitic extension, a developmental pattern used by the amniote body wall muscles. Here we re-examined the development of pectoral fin muscles in catsharks, Scyliorhinus, and found that chondrichthyan fin muscles are indeed formed from Lbx-positive muscle precursors. Furthermore, these precursors originate from the ventral edge of the dermomyotome, the rest of which extends towards the ventral midline to form body wall muscles. Therefore, the Lbx1-positive, de-epithelialized appendicular muscle precursors appear to have been established in the body plan before the divergence of Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes.

  1. Conservation of all three p53 family members and Mdm2 and Mdm4 in the cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David P; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Lee, Alison P; Tay, Boon-Hui; Verma, Chandra; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2011-12-15

    Analysis of the genome of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii), a member of the cartilaginous fishes (Class Chondrichthyes), reveals that it encodes all three members of the p53 gene family, p53, p63 and p73, each with clear homology to the equivalent gene in bony vertebrates (Class Osteichthyes). Thus, the gene duplication events that lead to the presence of three family members in the vertebrates dates to before the Silurian era. It also encodes Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes but does not encode the p19(Arf) gene. Detailed comparison of the amino acid sequences of these proteins in the vertebrates reveals that they are evolving at highly distinctive rates, and this variation occurs not only between the three family members but extends to distinct domains in each protein.

  2. Chicken GnRH II occurs together with mammalian GnRH in a South American species of marsupial (Monodelphis domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Hinds, L A; Mehl, A E; Saunders, N R; Millar, R P

    1990-01-01

    Two molecular forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were demonstrated in hypothalamic extracts of M. domestica using high performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay with specific GnRH antisera. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH and was quantified equally by two mammalian GnRH antisera, while the second form coeluted with synthetic chicken GnRH II and was quantified equally with two chicken GnRH II antisera. The finding of chicken GnRH II in a South American species of marsupial, which has previously been reported in some Australian species of marsupial and in species of Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  3. [Medical treatment during fish envenomation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satora, Leszek; Gawlikowski, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Expositions to fish venoms should be treated as a separate group of intoxications because of their different diagnostic procedure. Until now, there are over 220 venomous fish species described, but skin excretions are potentially toxic for humans. Cases of fish envenomations (37), consulted by Poison Information Centres in Poland, as well as described in literature and contained in Micromedex database were analyzed. The course of envenomation, medical management during exposition to venomous of Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, freshwater and marine fishes were resolved. Injuries caused by venoms fishes were similarly treated, usually symptomatic. Specific antivenoms are available only for two fish species. Each patient exposed to sting or bite should be examined and observed. If characteristic sings and symptoms of envenomation are present, proper medical management should be proceed.

  4. [Parasitic Crustacea of fishes from the north-east Atlantic Ocean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaevskaja, A V

    1991-01-01

    Fish from the north-east Atlantic, including neighbouring aquens are host of 3 species of Branchiura, 163 Copepoda, 37 Isopoda, 2 Amphipoda, and 1 of parasitic Cirripedia. Chondrichthyes have more species of parasitic crustaceans than Osteichthyes. Many specific parasites of Osteichthyes and the facultative parasites of fish include species of crustaceans to fish of both classes. 165 species of parasitic crustaceans are found in benthic and near-benthic fish, and 55 in pelagic fish. The greatest variety of species parasitic crustaceans is found in fishes in the North Sea (139); it is much smaller in the Baltic Sea (15). Endemic species constitute 15% of the total number of parasitic crustacean. The irregular distribution of parasitic crustaceans is among others connected with the biology and ecology of both hosts and their parasites.

  5. Biochemistry of fish stomach chitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Mana; Kakizaki, Hiromi; Matsumiya, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Fish are reported to exhibit chitinase activity in the stomach. Analyses of fish stomach chitinases have shown that these enzymes have the physiological function of degrading chitinous substances ingested as diets. Osteichthyes, a group that includes most of the fishes, have several chitinases in their stomachs. From a phylogenetic analysis of the chitinases of vertebrates, these particular molecules were classified into a fish-specific group and have different substrate specificities, suggesting that they can degrade ingested chitinous substances efficiently. On the other hand, it has been suggested that coelacanth (Sarcopterygii) and shark (Chondrichthyes) have a single chitinase enzyme in their stomachs, which shows multiple functions. This review focuses on recent research on the biochemistry of fish stomach chitinases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Demersal fish and megafaunal assemblages on the Cretan continental shelf and slope (NE Mediterranean): seasonal variation in species density, biomass and diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianiotis, A.; Sophronidis, K.; Vidoris, P.; Tselepides, A.

    2000-08-01

    The demersal fish and megafaunal assemblages in the area of Heraklion Bay, Crete, were sampled during four research cruises from September 1994 to September 1995 within the framework of the CINCS project, using a stratified trawl survey at depths ranging from 50 to 1000 m. The sampling at 1000 m depth was the deepest ever made in Greek waters, using a bottom otter trawl. Species density and biomass were found to vary between depths and seasons, with higher values occurring at the shallow stations. Species distribution and communities are also reported. A total of 127 species of osteichthyes, chondrichthyes, crustaceans, and cephalopods were recorded, four of which were found for the first time in Greek waters. Percent similarity index (PSI) was used to assess the differences in the relative abundance of species pairs between depth zones and seasons. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to examine station variability statistically.

  7. Analysis and functional annotation of expressed sequence tags from in vitro cell lines of elasmobranchs: Spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and little skate (Leucoraja erinacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Angela; Bayne, Christopher J; Barnes, David W

    2010-09-01

    Elasmobranchs are the most commonly used experimental models among the jawed, cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes). Previously we developed cell lines from embryos of two elasmobranchs, Squalus acanthias the spiny dogfish shark (SAE line), and Leucoraja erinacea the little skate (LEE-1 line). From these lines cDNA libraries were derived and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) generated. From the SAE cell line 4303 unique transcripts were identified, with 1848 of these representing unknown sequences (showing no BLASTX identification). From the LEE-1 cell line, 3660 unique transcripts were identified, and unknown, unique sequences totaled 1333. Gene Ontology (GO) annotation showed that GO assignments for the two cell lines were in general similar. These results suggest that the procedures used to derive the cell lines led to isolation of cell types of the same general embryonic origin from both species. The LEE-1 transcripts included GO categories "envelope" and "oxidoreductase activity" but the SAE transcripts did not. GO analysis of SAE transcripts identified the category "anatomical structure formation" that was not present in LEE-1 cells. Increased organelle compartments may exist within LEE-1 cells compared to SAE cells, and the higher oxidoreductase activity in LEE-1 cells may indicate a role for these cells in responses associated with innate immunity or in steroidogenesis. These EST libraries from elasmobranch cell lines provide information for assembly of genomic sequences and are useful in revealing gene diversity, new genes and molecular markers, as well as in providing means for elucidation of full-length cDNAs and probes for gene array analyses. This is the first study of this type with members of the Chondrichthyes. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of revolutionizing biomaterials substituting various mammalian organs by means of sintered bioceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, T. [West Saitama National Central Hospital, Tokorozawa (Japan); Hirota, K. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishihara, K. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Development of biomaterials substituting various mammalian organs can be carried out by means of experimental evolutionary studies using collagen -hydroxyapatite composite, derived from adult cattle. The revolution of the tissue-immune system can be studies by compound-ceramics of collagen-hydroxyapatite composite. Collagen-hydroxyapatite composite was sintered by high-pressure technique using collagen extracted from cattle skin, which had antigenicity. Artificial bone marrow chambers were fabricated with the sintered collagen-hydroxyapatite composite. Experimental evolutionary studies using mammals (dogs) and chondrichthyes (sharks) were carried out implanting the chambers into their muscles. The result showed that around the collagen composed chambers implanted into dorsal muscle of dogs, marked cell differentiation as well as dedifferentiation with atypia could be observed, which resembled a part the digestive tract of intestine histologically. Around the chambers implanted into dorsal muscle of sharks hemopoietic nests could be observed, which were quite similar to those induced by the chambers of conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite. Hemopoiesis and osteoid formation 4 months after surgery were observed around the collagen-apatite chamber implanted in the shark muscle as well as in upper site of vertebral cartilage of the spinal cord. No bone marrow in the cartilaginous tissue in upper site of the spinal cord is evident in control sharks. Xenotransplantation of skin, i.e., skin grafts between sharks of different kinds of species, as well as between sharks and xenopus (amphibian), sharks and mammals (rat) are carried out. All of them are successful and chimera placoids between them are developed. After that, the author successfully carried out xenotransplantation of various organs of chondrichthyes into those of dogs. (orig.)

  9. Origin of the response to adrenal and sex steroids: Roles of promiscuity and co-evolution of enzymes and steroid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael E; Nelson, David R; Studer, Romain A

    2015-07-01

    Many responses to adrenal and sex steroids are mediated by receptors that belong to the nuclear receptor family of transcription factors. We investigated the co-evolution of these vertebrate steroid receptors and the enzymes that synthesize adrenal and sex steroids through data mining of genomes from cephalochordates [amphioxus], cyclostomes [lampreys, hagfish], chondrichthyes [sharks, rays, skates], actinopterygii [ray-finned fish], sarcopterygii [coelacanths, lungfishes and terrestrial vertebrates]. An ancestor of the estrogen receptor and 3-ketosteroid receptors evolved in amphioxus. A corticoid receptor and a progesterone receptor evolved in cyclostomes, and an androgen receptor evolved in gnathostomes. Amphioxus contains CYP11, CYP17, CYP19, 3β/Δ5-4-HSD and 17β-HSD14, which suffice for the synthesis of estradiol and Δ5-androstenediol. Amphioxus also contains CYP27, which catalyzes the synthesis of 27-hydroxy-cholesterol, another estrogen. Lamprey contains, in addition, CYP21, which catalyzes the synthesis of 11-deoxycortisol. Chondrichthyes contain, in addition, CYP11A, CYP11C, CYP17A1, CYP17A2. Coelacanth also contains CYP11C1, the current descendent from a common ancestor with modern land vertebrate CYP11B genes, which catalyze the synthesis of cortisol, corticosterone and aldosterone. Interestingly, CYP11B2, aldosterone synthase, evolved from separate gene duplications in at least old world monkeys and two suborders of rodents. Sciurognathi (including mice and rats) and Hystricomorpha (including guinea pigs). Thus, steroid receptors and steroidogenic enzymes co-evolved at key transitions in the evolution of vertebrates. Together, this suite of receptors and enzymes through their roles in transcriptional regulation of reproduction, development, homeostasis and the response to stress contributed to the evolutionary diversification of vertebrates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Basal jawed vertebrate phylogenomics using transcriptomic data from Solexa sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zou, Ming; Yang, Lei; He, Shunping

    2012-01-01

    The traditionally accepted relationships among basal jawed vertebrates have been challenged by some molecular phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial sequences. Those studies split extant gnathostomes into two monophyletic groups: tetrapods and piscine branch, including Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii and sarcopterygian fishes. Lungfish and bichir are found in a basal position on the piscine branch. Based on transcriptomes of an armored bichir (Polypterus delhezi) and an African lungfish (Protopterus sp.) we generated, expressed sequences and whole genome sequences available from public databases, we obtained 111 genes to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree of basal jawed vertebrates and estimated their times of divergence. Our phylogenomic study supports the traditional relationship. We found that gnathostomes are divided into Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes, both with 100% support values (posterior probabilities and bootstrap values). Chimaeras were found to have a basal position among cartilaginous fishes with a 100% support value. Osteichthyes were divided into Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii with 100% support value. Lungfish and tetrapods form a monophyletic group with 100% posterior probability. Bichir and two teleost species form a monophyletic group with 100% support value. The previous tree, based on mitochondrial data, was significantly rejected by an approximately unbiased test (AU test, p = 0). The time of divergence between lungfish and tetrapods was estimated to be 391.8 Ma and the divergence of bichir from pufferfish and medaka was estimated to be 330.6 Ma. These estimates closely match the fossil record. In conclusion, our phylogenomic study successfully resolved the relationship of basal jawed vertebrates based on transtriptomes, EST and whole genome sequences.

  11. Basal jawed vertebrate phylogenomics using transcriptomic data from Solexa sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    Full Text Available The traditionally accepted relationships among basal jawed vertebrates have been challenged by some molecular phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial sequences. Those studies split extant gnathostomes into two monophyletic groups: tetrapods and piscine branch, including Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii and sarcopterygian fishes. Lungfish and bichir are found in a basal position on the piscine branch. Based on transcriptomes of an armored bichir (Polypterus delhezi and an African lungfish (Protopterus sp. we generated, expressed sequences and whole genome sequences available from public databases, we obtained 111 genes to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree of basal jawed vertebrates and estimated their times of divergence. Our phylogenomic study supports the traditional relationship. We found that gnathostomes are divided into Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes, both with 100% support values (posterior probabilities and bootstrap values. Chimaeras were found to have a basal position among cartilaginous fishes with a 100% support value. Osteichthyes were divided into Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii with 100% support value. Lungfish and tetrapods form a monophyletic group with 100% posterior probability. Bichir and two teleost species form a monophyletic group with 100% support value. The previous tree, based on mitochondrial data, was significantly rejected by an approximately unbiased test (AU test, p = 0. The time of divergence between lungfish and tetrapods was estimated to be 391.8 Ma and the divergence of bichir from pufferfish and medaka was estimated to be 330.6 Ma. These estimates closely match the fossil record. In conclusion, our phylogenomic study successfully resolved the relationship of basal jawed vertebrates based on transtriptomes, EST and whole genome sequences.

  12. Predominance of genetic monogamy by females in a hammerhead shark, Sphyrna tiburo: implications for shark conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Demian D; Prodöhl, Paulo A; Gelsleichter, James; Manire, Charles A; Shivji, Mahmood S

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in the mating systems of sharks and their relatives (Class Chondrichthyes) because these ancient fishes occupy a key position in vertebrate phylogeny and are increasingly in need of conservation due to widespread overexploitation. Based on precious few genetic and field observational studies, current speculation is that polyandrous mating strategies and multiple paternity may be common in sharks as they are in most other vertebrates. Here, we test this hypothesis by examining the genetic mating system of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo, using microsatellite DNA profiling of 22 litters (22 mothers, 188 embryos genotyped at four polymorphic loci) obtained from multiple locations along the west coast of Florida. Contrary to expectations based on the ability of female S. tiburo to store sperm, the social nature of this species and the 100% multiple paternity observed in two other coastal shark species, over 81% of sampled bonnethead females produced litters sired by a single male (i.e. genetic monogamy). When multiple paternity occurred in S. tiburo, there was an indication of increased incidence in larger mothers with bigger litters. Our data suggest that sharks may exhibit complex genetic mating systems with a high degree of interspecific variability, and as a result some species may be more susceptible to loss of genetic variation in the face of escalating fishing pressure. Based on these findings, we suggest that knowledge of elasmobranch mating systems should be an important component of conservation and management programmes for these heavily exploited species.

  13. Bright spots of sustainable shark fishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpfendorfer, Colin A; Dulvy, Nicholas K

    2017-02-06

    Sharks, rays and chimeras (class Chondrichthyes; herein 'sharks') today face possibly the largest crisis of their 420 million year history. Tens of millions of sharks are caught and traded internationally each year, many populations are overfished to the point where global catch peaked in 2003, and a quarter of species have an elevated risk of extinction [1-3]. To some, the solution is to simply stop taking them from our oceans, or prohibit carriage, sale or trade in shark fins [4]. Approaches such as bans and alternative livelihoods for fishers (e.g. ecotourism) may play some role in controlling fishing mortality but will not solve this crisis because sharks are mostly taken as incidental catch and play an important role in food security [5-7]. Here, we show that moving to sustainable fishing is a feasible solution. In fact, approximately 9% of the current global catch of sharks, from at least 33 species with a wide range of life histories, is biologically sustainable, although not necessarily sufficiently managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Global marine protected areas to prevent extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lindsay N K; Dulvy, Nicholas K

    2017-01-23

    One goal of global marine protected areas (MPAs) is to ensure they represent a breadth of taxonomic biodiversity. Ensuring representation of species in MPAs, however, would require protecting vast areas of the global oceans and does not explicitly prioritize species of conservation concern. When threatened species are considered, a recent study found that only a small fraction of their geographic ranges are within the global MPA network. Which global marine areas, and what conservation actions beyond MPAs could be prioritized to prevent marine extinctions (Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Target 12), remains unknown. Here, we use systematic conservation planning approaches to prioritize conservation actions for sharks, rays and chimaeras (class Chondrichthyes). We use chondrichthyans as they have the highest proportion of threatened species of any marine class. We find that expanding the MPA network by 3% in 70 nations would cover half of the geographic range of 99 imperilled endemic chondrichthyans. Our hotspot analysis reveals that just 12 nations harbour more than half (53) of the imperilled endemics. Four of these hotspot nations are within the top ten chondrichthyan fishing nations in the world, but are yet to implement basic chondrichthyan fisheries management. Given their geopolitical realities, conservation action for some countries will require relief and reorganization to enable sustainable fisheries and species protection.

  15. The fish tail as a derivation from axial musculoskeletal anatomy: an integrative analysis of functional morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, B E

    2014-02-01

    The adult morphology of the tail varies greatly among extant fishes despite sharing both ontogenetic similarities and the functional need to propel the body through a fluid medium. Both sharks (Chondrichthyes) and ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) control caudal fin musculature independently of axial body myomere activity to modify the stiffness and shape of their tails. For example, sharks and bony fishes possess different structural elements and muscles and move their tails in different ways, resulting in different locomotory hydrodynamic effects and a range of performance variables including speed and maneuverability. The stiffness of the heterocercal, lobate tail of the shark can be modulated during the tail beat resulting in nearly continuous thrust production. In contrast, the highly flexible tail of ray-finned fishes can be manipulated into many different shape conformations enabling increased maneuverability for these fishes. Consequently, the developmental, morphological, and functional derivation of the tail from the axial trunk has resulted in a diversity of form, the attributes of which may be of ecological and evolutionary significance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Hedgehog signaling patterns the outgrowth of unpaired skeletal appendages in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlberg Per

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the control of the development of vertebrate unpaired appendages such as the caudal fin, one of the key morphological specializations of fishes. Recent analysis of lamprey and dogshark median fins suggests the co-option of some molecular mechanisms between paired and median in Chondrichthyes. However, the extent to which the molecular mechanisms patterning paired and median fins are shared remains unknown. Results Here we provide molecular description of the initial ontogeny of the median fins in zebrafish and present several independent lines of evidence that Sonic hedgehog signaling emanating from the embryonic midline is essential for establishment and outgrowth of the caudal fin primordium. However, gene expression analysis shows that the primordium of the adult caudal fin does not harbor a Sonic hedgehog-expressing domain equivalent to the Shh secreting zone of polarizing activity (ZPA of paired appendages. Conclusion Our results suggest that Hedgehog proteins can regulate skeletal appendage outgrowth independent of a ZPA and demonstrates an unexpected mechanism for mediating Shh signals in a median fin primordium. The median fins evolved before paired fins in early craniates, thus the patterning of the median fins may be an ancestral mechanism that controls the outgrowth of skeletogenic appendages in vertebrates.

  17. Basal Gnathostomes provide unique insights into the evolution of vitamin B12 binders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Ruivo, Raquel; Delgado, Inês; Wilson, Jonathan M; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Castro, L Filipe C

    2014-12-31

    The uptake and transport of vitamin B12 (cobalamin; Cbl) in mammals involves a refined system with three evolutionarily related transporters: transcobalamin 1 (Tcn1), transcobalamin 2 (Tcn2), and the gastric intrinsic factor (Gif). Teleosts have a single documented binder with intermediate features to the human counterparts. Consequently, it has been proposed that the expansion of Cbl binders occurred after the separation of Actinopterygians. Here, we demonstrate that the diversification of this gene family took place earlier in gnathostome ancestry. Our data indicates the presence of single copy orthologs of the Sarcopterygii/Tetrapoda duplicates Tcn1 and Gif, and Tcn2, in Chondrichthyes. In addition, a highly divergent Cbl binder was found in the Elasmobranchii. We unveil a complex scenario forged by genome, tandem duplications and lineage-specific gene loss. Our findings suggest that from an ancestral transporter, exhibiting large spectrum and high affinity binding, highly specific Cbl transporters emerged through gene duplication and mutations at the binding pocket. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Gross anatomy and histology of the olfactory rosette of the shark Heptranchias perlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Sara; Gallus, Lorenzo; Amaroli, Andrea; Gambardella, Chiara; Waryani, Baradi; Di Blasi, Davide; Vacchi, Marino

    2017-06-01

    Sharks belonging to the family Hexanchidae have six or seven gill slits, unlike all other elasmobranchs, which have five gill slits. Their olfactory organs have a round shape, which is common for holocephalans, but not for elasmobranchs. Thus, the shape of the olfactory organ represents a further, less striking, peculiarity of this family among elasmobranchs. Despite that, the microscopic anatomy and histology of the olfactory organ have not yet been studied in any species of this family. Here, an anatomical and histological description of the olfactory organ of the sharpnose sevengill shark Heptranchias perlo is given. The organ is a rosette, with a central raphe and 31-34 primary lamellae, which bear secondary lamellae with a more or less branched shape. The elastic connective capsule which envelops the olfactory rosette possibly changes its shape along with water influx. In the olfactory epithelium, the supporting cells also have a secretory function, while no specialized mucous cells are visible; regarding this feature the olfactory epithelium of H. perlo differs from that of other chondrichthyan species. The immunohistochemical investigation of the sensory epithelium shows the absence of immunoreactivity for Gαolf in receptor neurons, which confirms previous observations in Chondrichthyes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Oldest near-complete acanthodian: the first vertebrate from the Silurian Bertie Formation Konservat-Lagerstätte, Ontario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole J Burrow

    Full Text Available The relationships between early jawed vertebrates have been much debated, with cladistic analyses yielding little consensus on the position (or positions of acanthodians with respect to other groups. Whereas one recent analysis showed various acanthodians (classically known as 'spiny sharks' as stem osteichthyans (bony fishes and others as stem chondrichthyans, another shows the acanthodians as a paraphyletic group of stem chondrichthyans, and the latest analysis shows acanthodians as the monophyletic sister group of the Chondrichthyes.A small specimen of the ischnacanthiform acanthodian Nerepisacanthus denisoni is the first vertebrate fossil collected from the Late Silurian Bertie Formation Konservat-Lagerstätte of southern Ontario, Canada, a deposit well-known for its spectacular eurypterid fossils. The fish is the only near complete acanthodian from pre-Devonian strata worldwide, and confirms that Nerepisacanthus has dentigerous jaw bones, body scales with superposed crown growth zones formed of ondontocytic mesodentine, and a patch of chondrichthyan-like scales posterior to the jaw joint.The combination of features found in Nerepisacanthus supports the hypothesis that acanthodians could be a group, or even a clade, on the chondrichthyan stem. Cladistic analyses of early jawed vertebrates incorporating Nerepisacanthus, and updated data on other acanthodians based on publications in press, should help clarify their relationships.

  20. The toxinology of stingrays

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    Gholamhossein Mohebbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stingrays belong to Chondrichthyes class.They live in freshwaters and oceans all over the world. They have venomous spines next to the root of the tail. Their barbed stingers covered with secretory cells that cause a large number of serious human injuries. In this review, we evaluate the toxinology of these venomous animals. Results: Some of inoculated venom symptoms included the immediate and intense pain, inflammation and skin necrosis, bleeding wounds, acute edema, salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, headaches, muscle cramps, tremors, paralysis, dyspnea, cardiovascular collapse, local vasoconstriction, seizures, coma, and rarely death. The venom contains 5-HT, 5-nucleotidase, acetylcholine , phosphodiesterase, proteolytic enzymes against casein, gelatin, and fibrinogen, and several toxins such as cystatins, galectin, peroxiredoxin 6, orpotrin and porflan, and other peptids and proteins including alpha subunit haemoglobin, ganglioside GM2 activator, glutathione s-transferase µ, leukocyte elastase inhibitor, transaldolase, ATP synthase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase and type III intermediate filament. Galectin has a diverse functions including anticoagulant, procoagulant, platelet-modulating, myotoxic and haemagglutination activities. Cystatins are potent inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, including papain and the cathepsins. Hydrolysis of lipids through PLA2 activity is one of the most important functions of peroxiredoxin-6. Orpotrin and porflan have vasoconstrictive and inflammatory effects, respectively. Conclusion: Stingray venoms have different toxins and bioactive molecules with diverse mechanisms of toxicities. A thorough understanding of the toxicities mechanisms and clinical manifestations of stingrays’ venoms will provide the ability to treat effectively and manage injuries with this animals by clinicians and toxinologists.

  1. Runx family genes in a cartilaginous fish, the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii.

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    Giselle Sek Suan Nah

    Full Text Available The Runx family genes encode transcription factors that play key roles in hematopoiesis, skeletogenesis and neurogenesis and are often implicated in diseases. We describe here the cloning and characterization of Runx1, Runx2, Runx3 and Runxb genes in the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii, a member of Chondrichthyes, the oldest living group of jawed vertebrates. Through the use of alternative promoters and/or alternative splicing, each of the elephant shark Runx genes expresses multiple isoforms similar to their orthologs in human and other bony vertebrates. The expression profiles of elephant shark Runx genes are similar to those of mammalian Runx genes. The syntenic blocks of genes at the elephant shark Runx gene loci are highly conserved in human, but represented by shorter conserved blocks in zebrafish indicating a higher degree of rearrangements in this teleost fish. Analysis of promoter regions revealed conservation of binding sites for transcription factors, including two tandem binding sites for Runx that are totally conserved in the distal promoter regions of elephant shark Runx1-3. Several conserved noncoding elements (CNEs, which are putative cis-regulatory elements, and miRNA binding sites were identified in the elephant shark and human Runx gene loci. Some of these CNEs and miRNA binding sites are absent in teleost fishes such as zebrafish and fugu. In summary, our analysis reveals that the genomic organization and expression profiles of Runx genes were already complex in the common ancestor of jawed vertebrates.

  2. Biometric characterization of sharks of the genus Sphyrna (Griffith & Smith, 1834 on the coast of Sergipe

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    Jéssica Barros Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sharks, rays and chimeras belonging to the subclass Elasmobranchii of the class Chondrichthyes have a slow maturation and development, and they are animals often caught as by-catch, making them vulnerable to extinction. Six species of the genus Sphyrna are found in Brazil, in the coastal-oceanic zone, three of which were studied: Sphyrna lewini, S. mokarran and S. tiburo. This study aimed to evaluate the biometrics, sex and stage of sexual development of the genus Sphyrna in artisanal fishing in Aracaju (SE. The animals used included specimens from the GEES collection and fresh ones acquired from local fisheries. S. tiburo was found only in the collection. The species S. mokarran and S. lewini included more newborn individuals and males and S. tiburo more females and juveniles. In fresh species, pectoral-pelvic length was greater in females, and pelvic-anal length was greater in males of S. lewini. Weight was greatest in S. lewini, while there was no difference in total length, head width and interdorsal length between specimens. The parameters measured did not show significant results that could be related to by-catch with many immature individuals.

  3. Lesser known aquarium fish tumor models.

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    Harshbarger, J C; Slatick, M S

    2001-06-01

    The repeated use of particular species for experimental oncology in fish increases their future value by accumulating background information for these models and justifies the establishment of genetic stock centers. However, the wide diversity that exists within the class Osteichthyes and Chondrichthyes suggests that the ideal surrogate models for studying some types of neoplasms might be found among lesser known species. To help assess cultured fish as surrogates for some other types of human neoplasia, we examined cases in the archives of the Registry of Tumors in Lower Animals and reviewed reports in the literature. Spontaneous and induced neoplasms originating from a spectrum of cell types were seen in more than 215 fish species commonly raised in aquaria or cultured for study among 69 families. Prominent families include the Poeciliidae (livebearers), Cyprinidae (carps and minnows), Cichlidae (cichlids), Cyprinodontidae (killifish), Characidae (tetras), Adrianichthyidae (medakas), Aplocheilidae (rivulins), and Salmonidae (salmon and trout). The following are examples of potential fish tumor models that have received less consideration than some others: papilloma and carcinoma of the urinary bladder in oscar (Astronotus ocellatus); osteogenic neoplasms, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and ependymoblastoma in coho salmon fingerlings (Oncorhynchus kisutch); and nephroblastoma resembling Wilms' tumor in Japanese eels (Anguilla japonica).

  4. Devonian arthrodire embryos and the origin of internal fertilization in vertebrates.

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    Long, John A; Trinajstic, Kate; Johanson, Zerina

    2009-02-26

    Evidence of reproductive biology is extremely rare in the fossil record. Recently the first known embryos were discovered within the Placodermi, an extinct class of armoured fish, indicating a viviparous mode of reproduction in a vertebrate group outside the crown-group Gnathostomata (Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes). These embryos were found in ptyctodontids, a small group of placoderms phylogenetically basal to the largest group, the Arthrodira. Here we report the discovery of embryos in the Arthrodira inside specimens of Incisoscutum ritchiei from the Upper Devonian Gogo Formation of Western Australia (approximately 380 million years ago), providing the first evidence, to our knowledge, for reproduction using internal fertilization in this diverse group. We show that Incisoscutum and some phyllolepid arthrodires possessed pelvic girdles with long basipterygia that articulated distally with an additional cartilaginous element or series, as in chondrichthyans, indicating that the pelvic fin was used in copulation. As homology between similar pelvic girdle skeletal structures in ptyctodontids, arthrodires and chondrichthyans is difficult to reconcile in the light of current phylogenies of lower gnathostomes, we explain these similarities as being most likely due to convergence (homoplasy). These new finds confirm that reproduction by internal fertilization and viviparity was much more widespread in the earliest gnathostomes than had been previously appreciated.

  5. Distribution of immunoreactive Tamm-Horsfall protein in various species in the vertebrate classes.

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    Howie, A J; Lote, C J; Cunningham, A A; Zaccone, G; Fasulo, S

    1993-10-01

    A sheep antibody to human Tamm-Horsfall protein, the major protein in normal urine, was used in an immunohistological study of organs of 48 species of vertebrate animals, representing the classes Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes and Chondrichthyes. Immunoreactivity was shown in the thick limb of the loop of Henle in the kidney of mammals, but there was no reactivity with tissues of birds or reptiles. Superficial layers of the skin of several amphibians and fish, superficial layers of the oral mucosa and gills of fish, and the distal tubules of the kidney of some amphibians, reacted with the antibody. Immunoreactivity with mammalian kidney was removed by passage of the antibody down an immunoadsorption column coated with human Tamm-Horsfall protein, and amphibian immunoreactivity was removed by incubation of the antibody with material prepared from frogs in the same way as Tamm-Horsfall protein. These findings suggest that immunoreactive Tamm-Horsfall protein appeared early in vertebrate phylogeny, initially in skin and gills and later in kidney, and that although conserved in evolution, it shows antigenic differences between amphibians and mammals. Its distribution is consistent with the hypothesis that is acts as a waterproofing agent.

  6. Placoderm fishes, pharyngeal denticles, and the vertebrate dentition.

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    Johanson, Zerina; Smith, Moya M

    2003-09-01

    The correlation of the origin of teeth with jaws in vertebrate history has recently been challenged with an alternative to the canonical view of teeth deriving from separate skin denticles. This alternative proposes that organized denticle whorls on the pharyngeal (gill) arches in the fossil jawless fish Loganellia are precursors to tooth families developing from a dental lamina along the jaw, such as those occurring in sharks, acanthodians, and bony fishes. This not only indicates that homologs of tooth families were present, but also illustrates that they possessed the relevant developmental controls, prior to the evolution of jaws. However, in the Placodermi, a phylogenetically basal group of jawed fishes, the state of pharyngeal denticles is poorly known, tooth whorls are absent, and the presence of teeth homologous to those in extant jawed fishes (Chondrichthyes + Osteichthyes) is controversial. Thus, placoderms would seem to provide little evidence for the early evolution of dentitions, or of denticle whorls, or tooth families, at the base of the clade of jawed fishes. However, organized denticles do occur at the rear of the placoderm gill chamber, but are associated with the postbranchial lamina of the anterior trunkshield, assumed to be part of the dermal cover. Significantly, these denticles have a different organization and morphology relative to the external dermal trunkshield tubercles. We propose that they represent a denticulate part of the visceral skeleton, under the influence of pharyngeal patterning controls comparable to those for pharyngeal denticles in other jawed vertebrates and Loganellia. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Peptides related to insulin-like growth factor 1 in the gastro-entero-pancreatic system of bony and cartilaginous fish.

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    Reinecke, M; Drakenberg, K; Falkmer, S; Sara, V R

    1992-01-23

    Evidence for the presence of peptides, related to insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has been obtained in serum and various organs of representatives of osteichthyes and chondrichthyes, i.e., the bony fish Myoxocephalus (Cottus) scorpius and the cartilaginous fish Raja clavata. The peptides were identified by means of gel chromatography and an IGF-1 radioimmunoassay. IGF-1-like immunoreactivity was detected in three different apparent molecular mass forms, i.e., 17 kDa, 6 kDa and 4 kDa, the occurrence of which seemed to depend on the species. When the same antiserum was used immunohistochemically, IGF-1-like immunoreactivity was observed in endocrine cells of the open type in the intestinal mucosal epithelium. These cells exhibited distinct and species-specific distribution patterns. Endocrine cells of the pancreas as well as epithelial cells of the pancreatic duct also showed IGF-1-like immunoreactivity. Occasionally, IGF-1-like immunoreactivity was observed also in interstitial cells. The distribution patterns and densities of the IGF-like immunoreactive cells correlated with the results obtained by radioimmunoassay of the crude extracts. Absorption studies indicated that the IGF-1-like peptides observed differ from mammalian and submammalian insulins as well as from mammalian IGF-1.

  8. Effect of serum from various animal species on erythrocyte attachment of endotoxins and other bacterial antigens.

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    Praino, M; Neter, E

    1977-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide O antigens (endotoxins) and other bacterial antigens readily attach to erythrocytes in vitro. This attachment is prevented by certain mammalian and avian sera. In this study, the inhibitory capacity of sera from lower animals was compared with that of higher animals for a total of 30 species. Antigens and the corresponding antisera included both crude O antigens and purified lipopolysaccharide preparations, the common enterobacterial antigen from Escherichia coli O14, the Vi antigen from Citrobacter ballerup, the polyribose-phosphate antigen from Haemophilus influenzae type b, and the crude teichoic acid antigen from Staphylococcus aureus. Antigen and serum mixtures were incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min and used for erythrocyte modification; failure of hemagglutination by homologous bacterial antiserum provided evidence of inhibitory capacity. Sera from the classes Mammalia and Aves were very strong inhibitors; those of Reptilia and Osteichthyes were moderate in activity, displaying variation within the classes; those of Amphibia and Chondrichthyes were minimal inhibitors; and those of Merostomata, Crustacea, and Lamellibranchiata displayed questionable or no inhibitory capacity. Inhibitory sera were active with all antigens tested. The findings suggest evolution of inhibitory factors consistent with the theory of two diverging lines of animal phylogeny based on embryological criteria and closely parallel the observations of an endotoxin-altering capacity in vertebrate sera that is not found in invertebrate sera or hemolymph.

  9. A checklist of Digenea parasitic helminths from the North Adriatic Sea.

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    Paradiznik, V; Radujković, B

    2007-06-01

    The author presents an overview of isolated trematodes along their morphological description, isolated from the hosts that are for the first time reported in the North Adriatic Sea. The endohelminth parasites invasion of Northern Adriatic fish was studied during a 10-year research program. A total of 63 marine fish species of pelagic and bentic fish of the classes Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes were analysed. Twenty-two fish species were found to host Digenean trematodes (33.33% prevalence), and 12 new host fish were reported for this class. During this endohelminths parasitofauna research work 63 species of sea-fish from Northern Adriatic (total of 2659 fish) were examined and 25.16% found invaded by some of endohelminths. The presence of 22 different species of flukes (Trematoda, Digenea) was found. Flukes were present in 33.33% of invaded fish. Furthermore 12 new fish hosts for Trematodes were found and this is the object of the present paper. The names of the investigated species of Trematodes together with those of their new hosts are listed in Table 1. The data referring to each parasite are given in the specific part of this study.

  10. Chromatographic and immunological evidence for mammalian GnRH and chicken GnRH II in eel (Anguilla anguilla) brain and pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Dufour, S; Fontaine, Y A; Millar, R P

    1990-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptides in the brain and pituitary of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) were investigated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radioimmunoassay with region-specific antisera. Two GnRH molecular forms were demonstrated in brain and pituitary extracts. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was recognized by antibodies directed against the NH2 and COOH termini of mammalian GnRH as well as by antibodies to the middle region. The second form eluted in the same position as synthetic chicken GnRH II and was recognized by specific antibodies to this molecule. Salmon GnRH and chicken GnRH I were not detected. The occurrence of mammalian GnRH in teleost fish suggests that this molecular form is more ancient than was previously suspected and arose earlier than in primitive tetrapods, or that it has arisen in the eel through random mutation of salmon GnRH. The lack of salmon GnRH in the eel brain indicates that this molecular form is not common to all teleost species. The finding in eel brain of chicken GnRH II, which has previously been described in species of Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes, and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  11. Distribution of interstitial retinol-binding protein (IRBP) in the vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, C D; Liou, G I; Alvarez, R A; Landers, R A; Landry, A M; Fong, S L

    1986-09-01

    Immunoblots of interphotoreceptor matrix preparations from 20 species belonging to six vertebrate classes were probed with antibodies against bovine interstitial retinol-binding protein (b-IRBP). Each preparation displayed an immunoreactive protein band. In the Osteichthyes, the apparent Mr of this band was 67,600 +/- 2,700 (mean +/- SD, n = 8). In two of the Osteichthyes, the band was resolved into a closely spaced doublet. Including previously published data for five mammals and one amphibian, species from the other classes (Chondrichthyes, one species; Amphibia, four species; Reptilia, one species; Aves, one species; Mammalia, nine species) had IRBPs with Mr that averaged 2.0 times that of the Osteichthyes, namely 134,200 +/- 8,600 (mean +/- SD, n = 17). Frog IRBP was very similar to mammalian IRBP in terms of its immunohistochemical distribution (determined with rabbit anti-frog IRBP antibodies), its molecular weight (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel-filtration chromatography), retinol- and concanavalin A-binding ability, and because it was synthesized and secreted in vitro by the isolated retina but not by the pigmented layers of eye. Goldfish IRBP apparently binds exogenous (3H)-retinol but does not bind concanavalin A and has about half the Mr of frog IRBP. The occurrence of IRBP-like proteins cross-reacting with anti b-IRBP antibodies in the interphotoreceptor matrix of all six major vertebrate classes is consistent with the hypothesis that IRBP is an important element in the vertebrate visual cycle.

  12. The in situ distribution of glycoprotein-bound 4-O-Acetylated sialic acids in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamelfot, Maria; Dale, Ole Bendik; Weli, Simon Chioma; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Falk, Knut

    2014-05-01

    Sialic acids are located at the terminal branches of the cell glycocalyx and secreted glycan molecules. O-Acetylation is an important modification of the sialic acids, however very few studies have demonstrated the in situ distribution of the O-Acetylated sialic acids. Here the distribution of glycoprotein bound 4-O-Acetylated sialic acids (4-O-Ac sias) in vertebrates was determined using a novel virus histochemistry assay. The 4-O-Ac sias were found in the circulatory system, i.e. on the surface of endothelial cells and RBCs, of several vertebrate species, though most frequently in the cartilaginous fish (class Chondrichthyes) and the bony fish (class Osteichthyes). The O-Acetylated sialic acid was detected in 64 % of the examined fish species. Even though the sialic acid was found less commonly in higher vertebrates, it was found at the same location in the positive species. The general significance of this endothelial labelling pattern distribution is discussed. The seemingly conserved local position through the evolution of the vertebrates, suggests an evolutionary advantage of this sialic acid modification.

  13. Structural and functional comparison of the proboscis between tapirs and other extant and extinct vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Antoni V; Dierenfeld, Ellen S

    2013-03-01

    Tapirs (Perissodactyla: Tapiridae) are the only living vertebrates, beyond the order Proboscidea, found to possess a true proboscis, defined as a flexible tubular extension of the joint narial and upper labial musculature that serves, at least in part, to grasp food. Tapirs show only partial homology and analogy with elephants in the narial and upper labial structures, as well as in the skull bones and teeth. However, superficially similar extensions in other extant vertebrates differ greatly in anatomy and function. Therefore, they deserve new names: prorhiscis (e.g. Mammalia: Saiga tatarica), prorhinosis (e.g. Chondrichthyes: Callorhinchus spp.), prorhynchis (e.g. Osteichthyes: Campylomormyrus spp.) and progeneiontis (e.g. Osteichthyes: Gnathonemus spp.). Among non-mammalian vertebrates, no bird or reptile is known to possess a proboscis. Among fishes, there are various extensions of the rostrum, jaws, 'nose' and 'chin' that lack the required narial involvement. The skulls of extinct mammals within (e.g. deinotheres) and beyond (e.g. astrapotheres) the Proboscidea confirm that a proboscis evolved independently in several mammalian lineages before the Pliocene. This convergence with tapirs presumably reflects, in part, the advantages of concentrating the olfactory sensor on what is, effectively, the tip of a long mobile upper lip. However, the proboscis does not appear to have arisen de novo in any vertebrate post-Pliocene, and its continued evolution has apparently depended on the further development of its length, flexibility and innervations, as epitomized by elephants. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd, ISZS and IOZ/CAS.

  14. The flagellar apparatus of spermatozoa in fish. Ultrastructure and evolution.

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    Mattei, X

    1988-01-01

    Chondrichthyes possess an evolved type of spermatozoa. Their flagellar apparatus is characterized by the presence of flagellar roots which form the axis of the midpiece, and the existence of one or two lateral elements associated with the axoneme. Osteichthyes, mainly teleosteans, show a great diversity of spermatic forms. The primitive spermatozoon with a 9 + 2 pattern flagellum is common. The primitive spermatozoon has evolved along different lines. The spermatic diversity which results from this is mainly evident in the structure of the flagellar apparatus. In the animal kingdom the primitive spermatozoon with a 9 + 2 pattern flagellum, present in primitive metazoa, is retained in phyla where external fertilization is maintained. The main evolutionary tendencies--elongation, aflagellarity or biflagellarity--are generally connected with the acquisition of internal fertilization. These evolutionary tendencies are found in teleosteans. It is not possible to link aflagellarity or biflagellarity of the gamete in certain fishes to this method of fertilization. Only the elongation of the spermatozoon is connected, in certain cases, with internal fertilization, but this cannot be taken as general.

  15. Chordate muscle actins differ distinctly from invertebrate muscle actins. The evolution of the different vertebrate muscle actins.

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    Vandekerckhove, J; Weber, K

    1984-11-05

    A total of 30 actins from various chordate and invertebrate muscle sources were either characterized by full amino acid sequence data or typed by those partial sequences in the NH2-terminal tryptic peptide which are known to be specific markers for different actin isoforms. The results show that most, if not all, invertebrate muscle actins are homologous to each other and to the isoforms recognized as vertebrate cytoplasmic actins. In contrast the actin forms typically found in muscle cells of warm-blooded vertebrates are noticeably different from invertebrate muscle actins and seem to have appeared in evolution already with the origin of chordates. During subsequent vertebrate evolution there has been a high degree of sequence conservation similar or stronger than that seen in histone H4. Urochordates, Cephalochordates and probably also Agnathes express only one type of muscle actin. Two types, a striated muscle-specific form and a smooth muscle form, are already observed in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes. Later in evolution, with the origin of reptiles, both muscle actins seem to have duplicated again; the striated muscle type branched into a skeletal- and cardiac-specific form, while the smooth muscle form duplicated into a vascular- and stomach-specific type. These findings support the hypothesis that each of the four muscle actins of warm-blooded vertebrates are coded for by a small number and possibly only one functional gene.

  16. Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J N; Sharp, M F; Ruethers, T; Taki, A; Campbell, D E; Lopata, A L

    2017-03-01

    Allergy to bony fish is common and probably increasing world-wide. The major heat-stable pan-fish allergen, parvalbumin (PV), has been identified and characterized for numerous fish species. In contrast, there are very few reports of allergic reactions to cartilaginous fish despite widespread consumption. The molecular basis for this seemingly low clinical cross-reactivity between these two fish groups has not been elucidated. PV consists of two distinct protein lineages, α and β. The α-lineage of this protein is predominant in muscle tissue of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), while β-PV is abundant in muscle tissue of bony fish (Osteichthyes). The low incidence of allergic reactions to ingested rays and sharks is likely due to the lack of molecular similarity, resulting in reduced immunological cross-reactivity between the two PV lineages. Structurally and physiologically, both protein lineages are very similar; however, the amino acid homology is very low with 47-54%. Furthermore, PV from ancient fish species such as the coelacanth demonstrates 62% sequence homology to leopard shark α-PV and 70% to carp β-PV. This indicates the extent of conservation of the PV isoforms lineages across millennia. This review highlights prevalence data on fish allergy and sensitization to fish, and details the molecular diversity of the two protein lineages of the major fish allergen PV among different fish groups, emphasizing the immunological and clinical differences in allergenicity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Relação dos peixes coletados nos limites da plataforma continental e nas montanhas submarinas Vitória, Trindade e Martin Vaz, durante a campanha oceanográfica MD-55 Brasil List of fishes collected at the continental shelf limits Vitória, Trinidade and Martin Vaz seamounts during the MD-55 Brazil oceanographic campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José V. Andreata

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The result of an agreement between Universidade Santa Ursula, Rio de Janeiro and the Museum of Natural History of Paris, was the oceanographic campaign MD-55 Brasil which took place between May 6th and June 2nd of 1987, aboard the R/V "Marion Dufresne" of the Terres Australes et Antartique Françaises (TAAF. Samples were collected between latitudes 23º36'40"S and 18º49'S. Ichthyofauna sampled was relatively low, and comprised of just one family of Chondrichthyes (three species and 50 families of Osteichthyes (104 species. Zenion hololepsis (Goode & Bean, 1895 (Zeniodontidae is recorded for the first time from the western South Atlantic, as well as is extended the geographic limits for Myrophis frio Jordan & Davis. 1892 (Ophichthidae and Prionotus nudigula Ginshurg, 1950 (Triglidae. Even though relatively not very representative, the species collected from the seamount chain Vitoria/Trindade and Martin Vay suggest being identical to those which occur along the Brazilian continental platform.

  18. Acanthodes and shark-like conditions in the last common ancestor of modern gnathostomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Samuel P; Finarelli, John A; Coates, Michael I

    2012-06-13

    Acanthodians, an exclusively Palaeozoic group of fish, are central to a renewed debate on the origin of modern gnathostomes: jawed vertebrates comprising Chondrichthyes (sharks, rays and ratfish) and Osteichthyes (bony fishes and tetrapods). Acanthodian internal anatomy is primarily understood from Acanthodes bronni because it remains the only example preserved in substantial detail, central to which is an ostensibly osteichthyan braincase. For this reason, Acanthodes has become an indispensible component in early gnathostome phylogenies. Here we present a new description of the Acanthodes braincase, yielding new details of external and internal morphology, notably the regions surrounding and within the ear capsule and neurocranial roof. These data contribute to a new reconstruction that, unexpectedly, resembles early chondrichthyan crania. Principal coordinates analysis of a character-taxon matrix including these new data confirms this impression: Acanthodes is quantifiably closer to chondrichthyans than to osteichthyans. However, phylogenetic analysis places Acanthodes on the osteichthyan stem, as part of a well-resolved tree that also recovers acanthodians as stem chondrichthyans and stem gnathostomes. As such, perceived chondrichthyan features of the Acanthodes cranium represent shared primitive conditions for crown group gnathostomes. Moreover, this increasingly detailed picture of early gnathostome evolution highlights ongoing and profound anatomical reorganization of vertebrate crania after the origin of jaws but before the divergence of living clades.

  19. Evolution of the Vertebrate Resistin Gene Family.

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    Qingda Hu

    Full Text Available Resistin (encoded by Retn was previously identified in rodents as a hormone associated with diabetes; however human resistin is instead linked to inflammation. Resistin is a member of a small gene family that includes the resistin-like peptides (encoded by Retnl genes in mammals. Genomic searches of available genome sequences of diverse vertebrates and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to determine the size and origin of the resistin-like gene family. Genes encoding peptides similar to resistin were found in Mammalia, Sauria, Amphibia, and Actinistia (coelacanth, a lobe-finned fish, but not in Aves or fish from Actinopterygii, Chondrichthyes, or Agnatha. Retnl originated by duplication and transposition from Retn on the early mammalian lineage after divergence of the platypus, but before the placental and marsupial mammal divergence. The resistin-like gene family illustrates an instance where the locus of origin of duplicated genes can be identified, with Retn continuing to reside at this location. Mammalian species typically have a single copy Retn gene, but are much more variable in their numbers of Retnl genes, ranging from 0 to 9. Since Retn is located at the locus of origin, thus likely retained the ancestral expression pattern, largely maintained its copy number, and did not display accelerated evolution, we suggest that it is more likely to have maintained an ancestral function, while Retnl, which transposed to a new location, displays accelerated evolution, and shows greater variability in gene number, including gene loss, likely evolved new, but potentially lineage-specific, functions.

  20. A Severe Accident Caused by an Ocellate River Stingray (Potamotrygon motoro in Central Brazil: How Well Do We Really Understand Stingray Venom Chemistry, Envenomation, and Therapeutics?

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    Nelson Jorge da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater stingrays cause many serious human injuries, but identification of the offending species is uncommon. The present case involved a large freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae, in the Araguaia River in Tocantins, Brazil. Appropriate first aid was administered within ~15 min, except that an ice pack was applied. Analgesics provided no pain relief, although hot compresses did. Ciprofloxacin therapy commenced after ~18 h and continued seven days. Then antibiotic was suspended; however, after two more days and additional tests, cephalosporin therapy was initiated, and proved successful. Pain worsened despite increasingly powerful analgesics, until debridement of the wound was performed after one month. The wound finally closed ~70 days after the accident, but the patient continued to have problems wearing shoes even eight months later. Chemistry and pharmacology of Potamotrygon venom and mucus, and clinical management of freshwater stingray envenomations are reviewed in light of the present case. Bacterial infections of stingray puncture wounds may account for more long-term morbidity than stingray venom. Simultaneous prophylactic use of multiple antibiotics is recommended for all but the most superficial stingray wounds. Distinguishing relative contributions of venom, mucus, and bacteria will require careful genomic and transcriptomic investigations of stingray tissues and contaminating bacteria.

  1. Mechanics of biting in great white and sandtiger sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, T L; Clausen, P; Huber, D R; McHenry, C R; Peddemors, V; Wroe, S

    2011-02-03

    Although a strong correlation between jaw mechanics and prey selection has been demonstrated in bony fishes (Osteichthyes), how jaw mechanics influence feeding performance in cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) remains unknown. Hence, tooth shape has been regarded as a primary predictor of feeding behavior in sharks. Here we apply Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to examine form and function in the jaws of two threatened shark species, the great white (Carcharodon carcharias) and the sandtiger (Carcharias taurus). These species possess characteristic tooth shapes believed to reflect dietary preferences. We show that the jaws of sandtigers and great whites are adapted for rapid closure and generation of maximum bite force, respectively, and that these functional differences are consistent with diet and dentition. Our results suggest that in both taxa, insertion of jaw adductor muscles on a central tendon functions to straighten and sustain muscle fibers to nearly orthogonal insertion angles as the mouth opens. We argue that this jaw muscle arrangement allows high bite forces to be maintained across a wider range of gape angles than observed in mammalian models. Finally, our data suggest that the jaws of sub-adult great whites are mechanically vulnerable when handling large prey. In addition to ontogenetic changes in dentition, further mineralization of the jaws may be required to effectively feed on marine mammals. Our study is the first comparative FEA of the jaws for any fish species. Results highlight the potential of FEA for testing previously intractable questions regarding feeding mechanisms in sharks and other vertebrates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  3. First shark from the Late Devonian (Frasnian Gogo Formation, Western Australia sheds new light on the development of tessellated calcified cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Long

    Full Text Available Living gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates comprise two divisions, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes, including euchondrichthyans with prismatic calcified cartilage, and extinct stem chondrichthyans and Osteichthyes (bony fishes including tetrapods. Most of the early chondrichthyan ('shark' record is based upon isolated teeth, spines, and scales, with the oldest articulated sharks that exhibit major diagnostic characters of the group--prismatic calcified cartilage and pelvic claspers in males--being from the latest Devonian, c. 360 Mya. This paucity of information about early chondrichthyan anatomy is mainly due to their lack of endoskeletal bone and consequent low preservation potential.Here we present new data from the first well-preserved chondrichthyan fossil from the early Late Devonian (ca. 380-384 Mya Gogo Formation Lägerstatte of Western Australia. The specimen is the first Devonian shark body fossil to be acid-prepared, revealing the endoskeletal elements as three-dimensional undistorted units: Meckel's cartilages, nasal, ceratohyal, basibranchial and possible epibranchial cartilages, plus left and right scapulocoracoids, as well as teeth and scales. This unique specimen is assigned to Gogoselachus lynnbeazleyae n. gen. n. sp.The Meckel's cartilages show a jaw articulation surface dominated by an expansive cotylus, and a small mandibular knob, an unusual condition for chondrichthyans. The scapulocoracoid of the new specimen shows evidence of two pectoral fin basal articulation facets, differing from the standard condition for early gnathostomes which have either one or three articulations. The tooth structure is intermediate between the 'primitive' ctenacanthiform and symmoriiform condition, and more derived forms with a euselachian-type base. Of special interest is the highly distinctive type of calcified cartilage forming the endoskeleton, comprising multiple layers of nonprismatic subpolygonal tesserae separated by a cellular matrix

  4. Determination Methods for the Exoskeletal Remains of Early Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Karatajute-Talimaa

    1998-01-01

    üher Vertebraten (Astraspiden, Tesakoviaspiden, Heterostraken, Thelodontier, Mongolepiden, Chondrichthyer und Acanthodier, die im frühen Paläozoikum weit verbreitet sind, werden als Beispiele benutzt. doi:10.1002/mmng.19980010103

  5. Life-history correlates of extinction risk and recovery potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A; Myers, Ransom A; García, Verónica B; Lucifora, Luis O; Kuparinen, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Extinction risk is inversely associated with maximum per capita population growth rate (r(max)). However, this parameter is not known for most threatened species, underscoring the value in identifying correlates of r(max) that, in the absence of demographic data, would indirectly allow one to identify species and populations at elevated risk of extinction and their associated recovery potential. We undertook a comparative life-history analysis of 199 species from three taxonomic classes: Chondrichthyes (e.g., sharks; n = 82), Actinopterygii (teleost or bony fishes; n = 47), and Mammalia (n = 70, including 16 marine species). Median r(max) was highest for (and similar between) terrestrial mammals (0.71) and teleosts (0.43), significantly lower among chondrichthyans (0.26), and lower still in marine mammals (0.07). Age at maturity was the primary (and negative) correlate of r(max). In contrast, although body size was negatively correlated with r(max) in chondrichthyans and mammals, evidence of an association in teleosts was equivocal, and fecundity was not related to r(max) in fishes, despite recurring assertions to the contrary. Our analyses suggest that age at maturity can serve as a universal predictor of extinction risk in fishes and mammals when r(max) itself is unknown. Moreover, in contrast to what is generally expected, the recovery potential of teleost fishes does not differ from that of terrestrial mammals. Our findings are supportive of the application of extinction-risk criteria that are based on generation time and that are independent of taxonomic affinity.

  6. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and a preliminary genome survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Meizhong; Kim, Hyeran; Kudrna, Dave; Sisneros, Nicholas B; Lee, So-Jeong; Mueller, Christopher; Collura, Kristi; Zuccolo, Andrea; Buckingham, E Bryan; Grim, Suzanne M; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Flajnik, Martin F; Wing, Rod A; Ohta, Yuko

    2006-05-03

    Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 x 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6-28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50-90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  7. Forelimb-hindlimb developmental timing changes across tetrapod phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwood Lynne

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetrapods exhibit great diversity in limb structures among species and also between forelimbs and hindlimbs within species, diversity which frequently correlates with locomotor modes and life history. We aim to examine the potential relation of changes in developmental timing (heterochrony to the origin of limb morphological diversity in an explicit comparative and quantitative framework. In particular, we studied the relative time sequence of development of the forelimbs versus the hindlimbs in 138 embryos of 14 tetrapod species spanning a diverse taxonomic, ecomorphological and life-history breadth. Whole-mounts and histological sections were used to code the appearance of 10 developmental events comprising landmarks of development from the early bud stage to late chondrogenesis in the forelimb and the corresponding serial homologues in the hindlimb. Results An overall pattern of change across tetrapods can be discerned and appears to be relatively clade-specific. In the primitive condition, as seen in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, the forelimb/pectoral fin develops earlier than the hindlimb/pelvic fin. This pattern is either retained or re-evolved in eulipotyphlan insectivores (= shrews, moles, hedgehogs, and solenodons and taken to its extreme in marsupials. Although exceptions are known, the two anurans we examined reversed the pattern and displayed a significant advance in hindlimb development. All other species examined, including a bat with its greatly enlarged forelimbs modified as wings in the adult, showed near synchrony in the development of the fore and hindlimbs. Conclusion Major heterochronic changes in early limb development and chondrogenesis were absent within major clades except Lissamphibia, and their presence across vertebrate phylogeny are not easily correlated with adaptive phenomena related to morphological differences in the adult fore- and hindlimbs. The apparently conservative nature of this

  8. Şehir akvaryumlarında ele alınan Türkiye deniz balıkları türlerinin araştırılması.

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    Kemal Burak Gültekin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dünya çapında halk akvaryumlarına ve deniz canlılarına olan ilgi giderek artmaktadır. Bu duruma paralel olarak Türkiye’de de halk akvaryumları ilgi çekmeye başlamıştır. Çalışmada İstanbul, Ankara, Bursa ve Antalya’da bulunan halk akvaryumlarındaki sistemler ve sergilenen türler incelenmiş, yetkilileri ile yüz yüze görüşmeler yapılmıştır. Çalışma sonucunda, Chondrichthyes (kıkırdaklı balıklar grubundan 4 ordo ve 8 familyaya ait 8 tür, Osteichthyes (kemikli balıklar grubundan ise 9 ordo ve 24 familya ait 59 tür olmak üzere toplamda 67 adet Türkiye sularından kayıt edilmiş balık türü tespit edilmiştir. Tespit edilen türlerin habitatları incelendiğinde 57 türle en çok bentik türlerin halk akvaryumlarında tercih edildiği görülmüştür. Bundan başka 6 adet semipelajik, 3 adet epipelajik ve 1 adet pelajik tür tespit edilmiştir. Ayrıca türlerin denizlerimizdeki dağılımı incelendiğinde Karadeniz’de bulunan 40, Marmara Denizi’nde bulunan 48, Ege Denizi’nde ve Akdeniz’de bulunan 62 türün halk akvaryumlarında sergilendiği belirlenmiştir

  9. Draft sequencing and assembly of the genome of the world's largest fish, the whale shark: Rhincodon typus Smith 1828.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Timothy D; Petit, Robert A; Joseph, Sandeep J; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Weil, M Ryan; Ahmad, Maida; Bhimani, Ravila; Vuong, Jocelyn S; Haase, Chad P; Webb, D Harry; Tan, Milton; Dove, Alistair D M

    2017-07-14

    The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) has by far the largest body size of any elasmobranch (shark or ray) species. Therefore, it is also the largest extant species of the paraphyletic assemblage commonly referred to as fishes. As both a phenotypic extreme and a member of the group Chondrichthyes - the sister group to the remaining gnathostomes, which includes all tetrapods and therefore also humans - its genome is of substantial comparative interest. Whale sharks are also listed as an endangered species on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of threatened species and are of growing popularity as both a target of ecotourism and as a charismatic conservation ambassador for the pelagic ecosystem. A genome map for this species would aid in defining effective conservation units and understanding global population structure. We characterised the nuclear genome of the whale shark using next generation sequencing (454, Illumina) and de novo assembly and annotation methods, based on material collected from the Georgia Aquarium. The data set consisted of 878,654,233 reads, which yielded a draft assembly of 1,213,200 contigs and 997,976 scaffolds. The estimated genome size was 3.44Gb. As expected, the proteome of the whale shark was most closely related to the only other complete genome of a cartilaginous fish, the holocephalan elephant shark. The whale shark contained a novel Toll-like-receptor (TLR) protein with sequence similarity to both the TLR4 and TLR13 proteins of mammals and TLR21 of teleosts. The data are publicly available on GenBank, FigShare, and from the NCBI Short Read Archive under accession number SRP044374. This represents the first shotgun elasmobranch genome and will aid studies of molecular systematics, biogeography, genetic differentiation, and conservation genetics in this and other shark species, as well as providing comparative data for studies of evolutionary biology and immunology across the jawed vertebrate lineages.

  10. Identification of mRNAs coding for mammalian-type melanin-concentrating hormone and its receptors in the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusawa, Kanta; Amiya, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Takabe, Souichirou; Amano, Masafumi; Breves, Jason P; Fox, Bradley K; Grau, E Gordon; Hyodo, Susumu; Takahashi, Akiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuromodulator, synthesized in the hypothalamus, that regulates both appetite and energy homeostasis in mammals. MCH was initially identified in teleost fishes as a pituitary gland hormone that induced melanin aggregation in chromatophores in the skin; however, this function of MCH has not been observed in other vertebrates. Recent studies suggest that MCH is involved in teleost feeding behavior, spurring the hypothesis that the original function of MCH in early vertebrates was appetite regulation. The present study reports the results of cDNAs cloning encoding preproMCH and two MCH receptors from an elasmobranch fish, Sphyrna lewini, a member of Chondrichthyes, the earliest diverged class in gnathostomes. The putative MCH peptide is composed of 19 amino acids, similar in length to the mammalian MCH. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that MCH is expressed in the hypothalamus in S. lewini MCH cell bodies and fibers were identified by immunochemistry in the hypothalamus, but not in the pituitary gland, suggesting that MCH is not released via the pituitary gland into general circulation. MCH receptor genes mch-r1 and mch-r2 were expressed in the S. lewini hypothalamus, but were not found in the skin. These results indicate that MCH does not have a peripheral function, such as a melanin-concentrating effect, in the skin of S. lewini hypothalamic MCH mRNA levels were not affected by fasting, suggesting that feeding conditions might not affect the expression of MCH in the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phylogenetic analyses of the hepatic architecture in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Kametani, Harunobu; Ota, Noriaki; Akai, Yusuke; Fukuchi, Tomokazu; Abo, Tomoka; Tanaka, Sho; Sekiguchi, Junri; Matsubara, Sachie; Kawakami, Hayato

    2018-02-01

    The mammalian liver has a structural and functional unit called the liver lobule, in the periphery of which the portal triad consisting of the portal vein, bile duct and hepatic artery is developed. This type of hepatic architecture is detectable in many other vertebrates, including amphibians and birds, whereas intrahepatic bile ducts run independently of portal vein distribution in actinopterygians such as the salmon and tilapia. It remains to be clarified how the hepatic architectures are phylogenetically developed among vertebrates. The present study morphologically and immunohistochemically analyzed the hepatic structures of various vertebrates, including as many classes and subclasses as possible, with reference to intrahepatic bile duct distribution. The livers of vertebrates belonging to the Agnatha, Chondrichthyes, Amphibia, Aves, Mammalia, and Actinopterygii before Elopomorpha, had the portal triad-type architecture. The Anguilliformes livers developed both periportal bile ducts and non-periportal bile ducts. The Otocephala and Euteleostei livers had independent configuration of bile ducts and portal veins. Pancreatic tissues penetrated the liver parenchyma along portal veins in the Euteleostei. The liver of the lungfish, which shares the same origin with amphibians, did not have the portal triad-type architecture. Teleostei and lungfish livers had ductular development in the liver parenchyma similar to oval cell proliferation in injured mammalian livers. Euteleostei livers had penetration of significant numbers of independent portal veins from their intestines, suggesting that each liver lobe might receive a different blood supply. The hepatic architectures of the portal triad-type changed to non-portal triad-type architecture along the evolution of the Actinopterygii. The hepatic architecture of the lungfish resembles that of the Actinopterygii after Elopomorpha in intrahepatic biliary configuration, which may be an example of convergent evolution.

  12. Construction of a nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library and a preliminary genome survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoko Hidetoshi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharks are members of the taxonomic class Chondrichthyes, the oldest living jawed vertebrates. Genomic studies of this group, in comparison to representative species in other vertebrate taxa, will allow us to theorize about the fundamental genetic, developmental, and functional characteristics in the common ancestor of all jawed vertebrates. Aims In order to obtain mapping and sequencing data for comparative genomics, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library for the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Results The BAC library consists of 313,344 clones with an average insert size of 144 kb, covering ~4.5 × 1010 bp and thus providing an 11-fold coverage of the haploid genome. BAC end sequence analyses revealed, in addition to LINEs and SINEs commonly found in other animal and plant genomes, two new groups of nurse shark-specific repetitive elements, NSRE1 and NSRE2 that seem to be major components of the nurse shark genome. Screening the library with single-copy or multi-copy gene probes showed 6–28 primary positive clones per probe of which 50–90% were true positives, demonstrating that the BAC library is representative of the different regions of the nurse shark genome. Furthermore, some BAC clones contained multiple genes, making physical mapping feasible. Conclusion We have constructed a deep-coverage, high-quality, large insert, and publicly available BAC library for a cartilaginous fish. It will be very useful to the scientific community interested in shark genomic structure, comparative genomics, and functional studies. We found two new groups of repetitive elements specific to the nurse shark genome, which may contribute to the architecture and evolution of the nurse shark genome.

  13. Ultrastructure of calcified cartilage in the endoskeletal tesserae of sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, N E; Westrin, S K

    1979-04-01

    The tesserate pattern of endoskeletal calcification has been investigated in jaws, gill arches, vertebral arches and fins of the sharks Carcharhinus menisorrah, Triaenodon obesus and Negaprion brevirostris by techniques of light and electron microscopy. Individual tesserae develop peripherally at the boundary between cartilage and perichondrium. An inner zone, the body, is composed of calcified cartilage containing viable chondroxytes separated by basophilic contour lines which have been called Liesegang waves or rings. The outer zone of tesserae, the cap, is composed of calcified tissue which appears to be produced by perichondrial fibroblasts more directly, i.e., without first differentiating as chondroblasts. Furthermore, the cap zone is penetrated by acidophilic Sharpey fibers of collagen. It is suggested that scleroblasts of the cap zone could be classified as osteoblasts. If so, the cap could be considered a thin veneer of bone atop the calcified cartilage of the body of a tessera. By scanning electron microscopy it was observed that outer and inner surfaces of tesserae differ in appearance. Calcospherites and hydroxyapatite crystals similar to those commonly seen on the surface of bone are present on the outer surface of the tessera adjacent to the perichondrium. On the inner surface adjoining hyaline cartilage, however, calcospherites of variable size are the predominant surface feature. Transmission electron microscopy shows calcification in close association with coarse collagen fibrils on the outer side of a tessera, but such fibrils are absent from the cartilaginous matrix along the under side of tesserae. Calcified cartilage as a tissue type in the endoskeleton of sharks is a primitive vertebrate characteristic. Calcification in the tesserate pattern occurring in modern Chondrichthyes may be derived from an ancestral pattern of a continuous bed of calcified cartilage underlying a layer of perichondral bone, as theorized by Orvig ('51); or the tesserate

  14. Forelimb-hindlimb developmental timing changes across tetrapod phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P; Jeffery, Jonathan E; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Hanken, James; Colbert, Matthew; Pieau, Claude; Selwood, Lynne; Ten Cate, Carel; Raynaud, Albert; Osabutey, Casmile K; Richardson, Michael K

    2007-10-01

    Tetrapods exhibit great diversity in limb structures among species and also between forelimbs and hindlimbs within species, diversity which frequently correlates with locomotor modes and life history. We aim to examine the potential relation of changes in developmental timing (heterochrony) to the origin of limb morphological diversity in an explicit comparative and quantitative framework. In particular, we studied the relative time sequence of development of the forelimbs versus the hindlimbs in 138 embryos of 14 tetrapod species spanning a diverse taxonomic, ecomorphological and life-history breadth. Whole-mounts and histological sections were used to code the appearance of 10 developmental events comprising landmarks of development from the early bud stage to late chondrogenesis in the forelimb and the corresponding serial homologues in the hindlimb. An overall pattern of change across tetrapods can be discerned and appears to be relatively clade-specific. In the primitive condition, as seen in Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes, the forelimb/pectoral fin develops earlier than the hindlimb/pelvic fin. This pattern is either retained or re-evolved in eulipotyphlan insectivores (= shrews, moles, hedgehogs, and solenodons) and taken to its extreme in marsupials. Although exceptions are known, the two anurans we examined reversed the pattern and displayed a significant advance in hindlimb development. All other species examined, including a bat with its greatly enlarged forelimbs modified as wings in the adult, showed near synchrony in the development of the fore and hindlimbs. Major heterochronic changes in early limb development and chondrogenesis were absent within major clades except Lissamphibia, and their presence across vertebrate phylogeny are not easily correlated with adaptive phenomena related to morphological differences in the adult fore- and hindlimbs. The apparently conservative nature of this trait means that changes in chondrogenetic patterns may serve

  15. A comparative SEM study of the vertebrate corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, S P; Collin, H B

    2000-03-01

    The anterior surface of the cornea of mammals, including humans, has numerous folds in the anterior epithelial cell membranes in the form of microvilli and microplicae. The role of these surface irregularities may be to increase cell-surface area and therefore aid in intra- and extracellular movement of nutritional and waste products across the cell membranes in addition to stabilizing the corneal tear film. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the nature of these corneal-surface features in various vertebrate classes residing in different environments. The anterior corneal surfaces of various vertebrates were investigated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy. Cell areas were analyzed by using image-analysis software. Representative species were examined from all the vertebrate classes, with the exception of the Cephalaspidomorphi. The mean epithelial cell density of aquatic vertebrates (17,602 +/- 9,604 cells/mm2) is greater (p = 0.000018) than that of aerial and terrestrial vertebrate species, including amphibians (3,755 +/- 2,067 cells/ mm2). Similarly, the mean epithelial cell density for the marine vertebrates (22,553 +/- 8,878 cells/mm2) is greater (p = 0.0015) than that of the freshwater and estuarine species (10,529 +/- 5,341 cells/mm2). The anterior corneal surfaces of all species examined were found to show a variety of cell-surface structures. Microvilli are predominant in reptiles, birds, and mammals; microridges appear to be characteristic of the Osteichthyes; and microholes were observed only in the Chondrichthyes. The function of these morphologic variations in surface structure appear to be correlated with the range of ecologic environments (marine, aerial, and terrestrial) occupied by each species, corneal phylogeny, and the demands placed on the cornea to ensure clear vision.

  16. An evolutionary tree for invertebrate globin sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M; Pedwaydon, J; Czelusniak, J; Suzuki, T; Gotoh, T; Moens, L; Shishikura, F; Walz, D; Vinogradov, S

    1988-01-01

    A phylogenetic tree was constructed from 245 globin amino acid sequences. Of the six plant globins, five represented the Leguminosae and one the Ulmaceae. Among the invertebrate sequences, 7 represented the phylum Annelida, 13 represented Insecta and Crustacea of the phylum Arthropoda, and 6 represented the phylum Mollusca. Of the vertebrate globins, 4 represented the Agnatha and 209 represented the Gnathostomata. A common alignment was achieved for the 245 sequences using the parsimony principle, and a matrix of minimum mutational distances was constructed. The most parsimonious phylogenetic tree, i.e., the one having the lowest number of nucleotide substitutions that cause amino acid replacements, was obtained employing clustering and branch-swapping algorithms. Based on the available fossil record, the earliest split in the ancestral metazoan lineage was placed at 680 million years before present (Myr BP), the origin of vertebrates was placed at 510 Myr BP, and the separation of the Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes was placed at 425 Myr BP. Local "molecular clock" calculations were used to date the branch points on the descending branches of the various lineages within the plant and invertebrate portions of the tree. The tree divided the 245 sequences into five distinct clades that corresponded exactly to the five groups plants, annelids, arthropods, molluscs, and vertebrates. Furthermore, the maximum parsimony tree, in contrast to the unweighted pair group and distance Wagner trees, was consistent with the available fossil record and supported the hypotheses that the primitive hemoglobin of metazoans was monomeric and that the multisubunit extracellular hemoglobins found among the Annelida and the Arthropoda represent independently derived states.

  17. Devonian (Emsian-Eifelian) fish from the Lower Bokkeveld Group (Ceres Subgroup), South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. E.; Almond, J. E.; Evans, F. J.; Long, J. A.

    1999-07-01

    Four major groups of fish are represented by fragmentary remains from South Africa's Lower Bokkeveld Group of Early to Middle Devonian age: the Acanthodii, Chondrichthyes, Placodermi and Osteichthyes. These represent the oldest known occurrences of these groups in southern Africa, as well as an important addition to the very meagre record of earlier Devonian fish from the Malvinokaffric Province of southwestern Gondwana. Bokkeveld fish material comes from the Gydo (Late Emsian) and Tra Tra (Middle Eifelian) Formations of the Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces. The cosmopolitan marine acanthodian Machæracanthus is represented only by isolated fin spines which may belong to two different species on the basis of their external ornamentation, cross-sectional outline and internal histology. The elasmobranchs are represented by four elements: (1) a flattened chondrocranium which bears affinity to the Late Devonian-Carboniferous symmoriid (protacrodont) 'cladodont' sharks. It is probably the earliest known (Emsian) shark chondrocranium; (2) an isolated, primitive scapulocoracoid with a very short coracoidal ridge; (3) ankylosed and isolated radials, interpreted as parts of pterygial plates of a paired fin of an unknown chondrichthyan bearing affinity to the Middle Devonian Zamponiopteron from Bolivia; and (4) isolated barlike structures, perhaps gill arch or a jaw elements, thought to be from the same taxon as (3). The placoderms are represented by an incomplete trunk armour and fragmentary, finely ornamented plates of a primitive antiarch. The Osteichthyes are represented by a single large scale of an unidentified dipnoan from the Eifelian of the Cedarberg range, as well as a probable sarcopterygian dermal plate from the Emsian of the Prince Albert area. These are among the earliest sarcopterygian remains recorded from the Malvinokaffric Province.

  18. Evolution of developmental pattern for vertebrate dentitions: an oro-pharyngeal specific mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Gareth J; Smith, Moya Meredith

    2011-03-15

    Classically the oral dentition with teeth regulated into a successional iterative order was thought to have evolved from the superficial skin denticles migrating into the mouth at the stage when jaws evolved. The canonical view is that the initiation of a pattern order for teeth at the mouth margin required development of a sub-epithelial, permanent dental lamina. This provided regulated tooth production in advance of functional need, as exemplified by the Chondrichthyes. It had been assumed that teeth in the Osteichthyes form in this way as in tetrapods. However, this has been shown not to be true for many osteichthyan fish where a dental lamina of this kind does not form, but teeth are regularly patterned and replaced. We question the evolutionary origin of pattern information for the dentition driven by new morphological data on spatial initiation of skin denticles in the catshark. We review recent gene expression data for spatio-temporal order of tooth initiation for Scyliorhinus canicula, selected teleosts in both oral and pharyngeal dentitions, and Neoceratodus forsteri. Although denticles in the chondrichthyan skin appear not to follow a strict pattern order in space and time, tooth replacement in a functional system occurs with precise timing and spatial order. We suggest that the patterning mechanism observed for the oral and pharyngeal dentition is unique to the vertebrate oro-pharynx and independent of the skin system. Therefore, co-option of a successional iterative pattern occurred in evolution not from the skin but from mechanisms existing in the oro-pharynx of now extinct agnathans. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. The evolution from asparagine or threonine to cysteine in position 146 contributes to generation of a more efficient and stable form of muscle creatine kinase in higher vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong-Jin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zhao; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2006-01-01

    Creatine kinase, a key enzyme in vertebrate excitable tissues that require large energy fluxes, catalyzes the reversible transfer of phosphate between adenosine triphosphate and creatine. Sequence alignment indicated that the 146th amino acid is cysteine in the muscle creatine kinase of higher vertebrates including Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. In fishes, it is cysteine in Agnatha and Chondrichthyes, and asparagine or threonine in Osteichthyes, which is the ancestor of Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. To explore the structural and functional role of this special residue, a series of site-directed mutants of rabbit muscle creatine kinase were constructed, including C146S, C146N, C146T, C146G, C146A, C146D and C146R. A detailed comparison was made between wild-type creatine kinase and the mutants in catalytic activity, physico-chemical properties and structural stability against thermal inactivation and guanidine hydrochloride denaturation. It was found that except for C146S, the mutants had relatively lower catalytic activity and structural stability than Wt-CK. Wt-CK and C146S were the most stable ones, followed by C146N and C146T, and then C146G and C146A, and C146D and C146R were the least stable mutants. These results suggested that the 146th residue plays a crucial role in maintaining the structural stability of creatine kinase, and that the evolution in this amino acid from asparagine or threonine to cysteine contributes to the generation of a more efficient and more stable form of creatine kinase in higher vertebrates.

  20. Evolutionary history of glucose-6-phosphatase encoding genes in vertebrate lineages: towards a better understanding of the functions of multiple duplicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandel, Lucie; Panserat, Stéphane; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Arbenoits, Eva; Soengas, José Luis; Bobe, Julien

    2017-05-02

    Glucose-6-phosphate (G6pc) is a key enzyme involved in the regulation of the glucose homeostasis. The present study aims at revisiting and clarifying the evolutionary history of g6pc genes in vertebrates. g6pc duplications happened by successive rounds of whole genome duplication that occurred during vertebrate evolution. g6pc duplicated before or around Osteichthyes/Chondrichthyes radiation, giving rise to g6pca and g6pcb as a consequence of the second vertebrate whole genome duplication. g6pca was lost after this duplication in Sarcopterygii whereas both g6pca and g6pcb then duplicated as a consequence of the teleost-specific whole genome duplication. One g6pca duplicate was lost after this duplication in teleosts. Similarly one g6pcb2 duplicate was lost at least in the ancestor of percomorpha. The analysis of the evolution of spatial expression patterns of g6pc genes in vertebrates showed that all g6pc were mainly expressed in intestine and liver whereas teleost-specific g6pcb2 genes were mainly and surprisingly expressed in brain and heart. g6pcb2b, one gene previously hypothesised to be involved in the glucose intolerant phenotype in trout, was unexpectedly up-regulated (as it was in liver) by carbohydrates in trout telencephalon without showing significant changes in other brain regions. This up-regulation is in striking contrast with expected glucosensing mechanisms suggesting that its positive response to glucose relates to specific unknown processes in this brain area. Our results suggested that the fixation and the divergence of g6pc duplicated genes during vertebrates' evolution may lead to adaptive novelty and probably to the emergence of novel phenotypes related to glucose homeostasis.

  1. Spatiotemporal variability of fish assemblage in the Shatt Al-Arab River, Iraq

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    Abdul-Razak M. Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study spatial and temporal variability of fish assemblage in the Shatt Al-Arab River. Methods: This study was conducted from December 2011 to November 2012. Water temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and transparency were measured from three sites in the river. Several fishing methods were adopted to collect fish including gill nets, cast net, electro-fishing and hook and lines. Associations between the distribution of fish species and the environmental variables were quantified by using canonical correspondence analysis. Results: The results showed that the fish assemblage consisted of 58 species representing 46 genera and 27 families belong to Osteichthyes except one (Carcharhinus leucas relate to Chondrichthyes. Number of species increased in summer and autumn months and sharply decreased in winter. Tenualosa ilisha was the most abundant species comprising 27.4% of the catch, followed by Carassius auratus (23.7% and Liza klunzingeri (10.6%. The dominance (D3 value for the main three abundant species was 61.7%. Nine species were caught for the first times from the river include eight marine. The overall values of diversity index ranged from 0.67 in March to 2.57 in October, richness index from 2.64 in January to 3.71 in September and evenness index from 0.22 in March to 0.73 in August. Conclusions: Spatially, the fish assemblages of Shatt Al-Arab River can be divided into three ecological fish guilds, namely, common species, seasonal species and occasional species.

  2. Compositional patterns in the nuclear genome of cold-blooded vertebrates.

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    Bernardi, G; Bernardi, G

    1990-10-01

    DNA preparations obtained from 122 species of fishes, 5 species of amphibians, and 13 species of reptiles were investigated in their compositional properties by analytical equilibrium centrifugation in CsCl density gradients. These species represented 21 orders of Osteichthyes, 3 orders of Chondrichthyes, 2 orders of amphibians, and 3 orders of reptiles. Modal buoyant densities of fish DNAs ranged from 1.696 to 1.707 g/cm3, the vast majority of values falling, however, between 1.699 and 1.704 g/cm3, which is the range covered by the DNAs of amphibians and reptiles. In all cases, DNA bands in CsCl were only weakly asymmetrical and only very rarely were accompanied by separate satellite bands (mostly on the GC-rich side). Intermolecular compositional heterogeneities were low in the vast majority of cases, and, like CsCl band asymmetries, at least partially due to cryptic or poorly resolved satellites. The present findings indicate, therefore, that DNAs from cold-blooded vertebrates are characterized by a number of common properties, namely a very wide spectrum of modal buoyant densities, low intermolecular compositional heterogeneities, low CsCl band asymmetries, and, in most cases, small amounts of satellite DNAs. In the case of fish DNAs a negative correlation was found between the GC level and the haploid size (c value) of the genome. If polyploidization is neglected, this phenomenon appears to be mainly due to the fact that increases and decreases in GC are associated with contraction and expansion phenomena, respectively, of intergenic noncoding sequences, which are GC poor relative to coding sequences.

  3. First shark from the Late Devonian (Frasnian) Gogo Formation, Western Australia sheds new light on the development of tessellated calcified cartilage.

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    Long, John A; Burrow, Carole J; Ginter, Michal; Maisey, John G; Trinajstic, Kate M; Coates, Michael I; Young, Gavin C; Senden, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Living gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) comprise two divisions, Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes, including euchondrichthyans with prismatic calcified cartilage, and extinct stem chondrichthyans) and Osteichthyes (bony fishes including tetrapods). Most of the early chondrichthyan ('shark') record is based upon isolated teeth, spines, and scales, with the oldest articulated sharks that exhibit major diagnostic characters of the group--prismatic calcified cartilage and pelvic claspers in males--being from the latest Devonian, c. 360 Mya. This paucity of information about early chondrichthyan anatomy is mainly due to their lack of endoskeletal bone and consequent low preservation potential. Here we present new data from the first well-preserved chondrichthyan fossil from the early Late Devonian (ca. 380-384 Mya) Gogo Formation Lägerstatte of Western Australia. The specimen is the first Devonian shark body fossil to be acid-prepared, revealing the endoskeletal elements as three-dimensional undistorted units: Meckel's cartilages, nasal, ceratohyal, basibranchial and possible epibranchial cartilages, plus left and right scapulocoracoids, as well as teeth and scales. This unique specimen is assigned to Gogoselachus lynnbeazleyae n. gen. n. sp. The Meckel's cartilages show a jaw articulation surface dominated by an expansive cotylus, and a small mandibular knob, an unusual condition for chondrichthyans. The scapulocoracoid of the new specimen shows evidence of two pectoral fin basal articulation facets, differing from the standard condition for early gnathostomes which have either one or three articulations. The tooth structure is intermediate between the 'primitive' ctenacanthiform and symmoriiform condition, and more derived forms with a euselachian-type base. Of special interest is the highly distinctive type of calcified cartilage forming the endoskeleton, comprising multiple layers of nonprismatic subpolygonal tesserae separated by a cellular matrix, interpreted

  4. The main features of the craniate mitochondrial DNA between the ND1 and the COI genes were established in the common ancestor with the lancelet.

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    Delarbre, C; Barriel, V; Tillier, S; Janvier, P; Gachelin, G

    1997-08-01

    We have cloned the mitochondrial DNA fragment extending from tRNA-Leu to the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) genes of Branchiostoma lanceolatum, Myxine glutinosa, Lampetra fluviatilis, and Scyliorhinus caniculus and have determined their respective gene sequences and organization. In all four species, this region contains the ND1 and ND2 genes and the genes coding eight tRNAs, namely, tRNA-Ile, -Gln, -Met, -Trp, -Ala, -Asn, -Cys, and -Tyr. The gene order is the same in the hagfish, lamprey and dogfish. In the lancelet, the location of the tRNA genes is slightly different. The mitochondrial code of Myxine, Lampetra, and Scyliorhinus is identical to that of vertebrates. The code used by the lancelet is the same with the exception of AGA (a stop codon in vertebrates), which codes for glycine in the lancelet. From the comparison of the four maps with already published ones for other species, we propose that the main features of the craniate mtDNA between the ND1 and COI genes were established in the common ancestor to cephalochordates and vertebrates more than 400 MYA. The origin of replication of the light-strand (Ori-L), usually located between the tRNA-Asn and tRNA-Cys genes in vertebrates, was not found in the lancelet, hagfish, or lamprey (Lampetra). In contrast, it was found in the dogfish. Thus the position of Ori-L was established for the first time in the common ancestor to the Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes and remained present in all later-emerging vertebrates.

  5. Evolutionary history and functional characterization of androgen receptor genes in jawed vertebrates.

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    Ogino, Yukiko; Katoh, Hironori; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Yamada, Gen

    2009-12-01

    Vertebrates show diverse sexual characters in sexually attractive and reproductive organs, which are regulated by steroid hormones, particularly androgens. However, the evolutionary history of androgen receptor (AR) gene remains largely unknown on the basis of phylogenic and functional analyses. To elucidate the evolutionary history and functional diversification of AR genes in vertebrates, we cloned the AR cDNAs from a shark, basal ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii), namely bichir and sturgeon (Acipenseriformes), and teleosts including a basal teleost, arowana (Osteoglossiformes). Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that the gene duplication event that gave rise to two different teleost ARs (alpha and beta) likely occurred in the actinopterygian lineage leading to teleosts after the divergence of Acipenseriformes but before the split of Osteoglossiformes, which is compatible with the phylogenetic timing of teleost-specific genome duplication. Searching for AR genes in the medaka genome indicated that the teleost AR gene duplication has been associated with the duplication between chromosomes 10 and 14. Our functional analysis revealed that the shark AR activates the target gene via androgen response element by classical androgens. The teleost ARalpha showed the unique intracellular localization with a significantly higher transactivating capacity than that by teleost ARbeta. These findings indicate that the most ancient type of AR, as activated by the classical androgens as ligands, emerged before the Chondrichthyes-Osteichthyes split, and the AR gene was duplicated during the teleost-specific genome duplication event. We report here for the first time the accurate evolutionary history of AR gene and functional characterization of AR duplicates in teleost lineage.

  6. Vertebrate phylogeny of hydrogen sulfide vasoactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombkowski, Ryan A; Russell, Michael J; Schulman, Alexis A; Doellman, Meredith M; Olson, Kenneth R

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a recently identified endogenous vasodilator in mammals. In steelhead/rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Osteichthyes), H(2)S produces both dose-dependent dilation and a unique dose-dependent constriction. In this study, we examined H(2)S vasoactivity in all vertebrate classes to determine whether H(2)S is universally vasoactive and to identify phylogenetic and/or environmental trends. H(2)S was generated from NaHS and examined in unstimulated and precontracted systemic and, when applicable, pulmonary arteries (PA) from Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stouti, Agnatha), sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus, Agnatha), sandbar shark (Carcharhinus milberti, Chondrichthyes), marine toad (Bufo marinus, Amphibia), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis, Reptilia), Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus, Aves), and white rat (Rattus rattus, Mammalia). In otherwise unstimulated vessels, NaHS produced 1) a dose-dependent relaxation in Pacific hagfish dorsal aorta; 2) a dose-dependent contraction in sea lamprey dorsal aorta, marine toad aorta, alligator aorta and PA, duck aorta, and rat thoracic aorta; 3) a threshold relaxation in shark ventral aorta, dorsal aorta, and afferent branchial artery; and 4) a multiphasic contraction-relaxation-contraction in the marine toad PA, duck PA, and rat PA. Precontraction of these vessels with another agonist did not affect the general pattern of NaHS vasoactivity with the exception of the rat aorta, where relaxation was now dominant. These results show that H(2)S is a phylogenetically ancient and versatile vasoregulatory molecule that appears to have been opportunistically engaged to suit both organ-specific and species-specific homeostatic requirements.

  7. Grades of 43 fish species in Japan based on IgE-binding activity.

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    Koyama, Harumi; Kakami, Michiko; Kawamura, Makiko; Tokuda, Reiko; Kondo, Yasuto; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yamada, Kazue; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Urisu, Atsuo

    2006-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to fish are a common food allergy, but IgE-binding activity to fish species have not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to identify fish with high binding activity to IgE in sera from Japanese fish-hypersensitive individuals. 38 children with a history of at least one episode of hypersensitivity after ingestion of fish were enrolled and 34 children with no history of reactions and negative IgE results for at least five kinds of fish antigen were included as controls. Using a radioallergosorbent test, we examined IgE-binding to each fish species using sera from fish-hypersensitive subjects. Fish were then graded according to IgE-binding activity. Many fish species, including red salmon, silver salmon, yellowfin tuna, big eyed tuna, Atlantic tuna, saurel, skipper, yellowtail, Japanese sardine, bonita and mackerel had high IgE-binding activity. All of these fish are abundantly consumed in Japan. The hypersensitivity reactions experienced by many subjects occurred after ingestion of species with high IgE-binding activity. Only halibut (Osteichthyes) and sharks (Chondrichthyes) had low IgE-binding activity. A correlation was observed between IgE levels and expression of symptoms after fish ingestion. High consumption of salmon, tuna, scad (including saurel), skipper, yellowtail, sardine, bonita and mackerel in Japan might be the cause of the high IgE-binding activity of these species. The grades of fish species consumed widely in Japan are likely to be useful for nutritional instruction of fish-allergic patients.

  8. Immunoreactive atriopeptin in plasma of fishes: its potential role in gill hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D H; Chipouras, E; Payne, J A

    1989-10-01

    With the use of antibodies raised against human atriopeptin (AP), immunoreactive AP (APir) was quantified in the plasma of five species of marine fishes, including members of the Agnatha, Chondrichthyes, and Osteichthyes. Concentrations of APir in fish plasma are in the same range as those described for mammalian species, indicating that AP was present in the earliest vertebrates and has retained at least partial structural similarity during the course of vertebrate evolution. Acclimation of two species to very dilute seawater was associated with a significant reduction in plasma APir, suggesting that salt loading, rather than volume expansion, may be the primary stimulus for AP release in fishes. Heterologous rat atriopeptin (AP101-126) vasodilated preconstricted, perfused gills and unstimulated isolated vascular rings from the ventral aorta of the marine teleost Opsanus beta with an apparent half maximum effective concentration (EC50) of 3-4 x 10(-9) M, similar to sensitivities to AP described for mammalian vascular smooth muscle. Acclimation of toadfish to approximately 5% seawater (hyposmotic to plasma) did not alter the sensitivity of the perfused gills but reduced the apparent EC50 of rat AP on aortic rings to 3 x 10(-10) M. Extracts from O. beta atrium, ventricle, and brain also produced dilation of aortic rings, with ventricular extracts producing the greatest effect per milligram extracted tissue, suggesting that the ventricle may be a major site source of atriopeptin in fishes. An atriopeptin-induced increase in blood flow to the fish gill would theoretically have detrimental osmotic consequences, but may stimulate salt transport, again suggesting that a putative atriopeptin may be involved in salt, rather than osmotic, balance in fishes.

  9. Hormones, ionic regulation and kidney function in fishes.

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    Henderson, I W; Hazon, N; Hughes, K

    1985-01-01

    Renal osmoregulatory mechanisms in the context of hormones is considered in three types of fish: the Agnatha, the Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes. Particular reference is made to endocrine status and hormonal interplay in renal homeostatic mechanisms. Among Agnatha, hagfishes display atypical osmoregulatory characteristics and their endocrine repertoire is poorly understood. Hormonal actions are unclear although the kidney appears to act as a regulator of extracellular fluid volume. Lampreys show many similarities with teleost fish with respect to osmoregulation, but again their endocrine system requires further definition. Chondricthyean fishes have a number of unique hormones, among them 1-alpha-hydroxycorticosterone from the adrenocortical homologue (interrenal gland). Their complex kidneys have not been extensively studied with respect to hormonal regulation, but a key role is certainly the maintenance of high plasma levels of urea and trimethylamine oxide. The importance of the ratio of these two compounds with respect to urea tolerance is discussed. Evidence is presented and discussed that points to 1-alpha-hydroxycorticosterone playing a role in osmoregulation, although its sites and mechanisms of action are not known. The presence of a non-hypophysial control of interrenal function (a renin-angiotensin system) is indicated. The largest group of fishes, the Teleostei, are considered with respect to renal mechanisms involved in euryhalinity. Highly selective reference is made to the renin-angiotensin system and arginine vasotocin. In fresh water eels a clear negative feedback relationship exists between angiotensin II and arginine vasotocin, while in seawater-adapted animals the interplay is less clear. It is suggested that the observed increases in both arginine vasotocin and angiotensin II in eels adapted to environments hyperosmotic to their extracellular fluid in some way affects the "setting" of the feedback between the two. The possible interactions

  10. A second form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with chicken GnRH II-like properties, occurs together with mammalian GnRH in marsupial brains.

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    King, J A; Mehl, A E; Tyndale-Biscoe, C H; Hinds, L; Millar, R P

    1989-11-01

    GnRH peptides in the hypothalami of marsupials (tammar wallaby, short-nosed bandicoot, and eastern quoll) and a monotreme (echidna) were investigated by reverse phase HPLC and RIA with region-specific antisera. In the wallaby hypothalamic extract, a single form of GnRH was present, which eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was recognized by antibodies directed against the NH2- and COOH-termini of mammalian GnRH as well as by antibodies to the middle region. Two GnRH molecular forms were demonstrated in the bandicoot and quoll hypothalamic extracts. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was quantified equally by two mammalian GnRH antisera. The second form eluted in the same position as synthetic chicken GnRH II and was recognized by specific antibodies to this molecule. Quantification of this immunoreactive peak with two chicken GnRH II antisera was not equal, suggesting that the peptide has similar properties to, but may not be identical to, chicken GnRH II. Immunoreactive GnRH was also detected in the echidna hypothalamic extract. These findings demonstrate that in some mammals more than one form of GnRH is present in the brain of a single species, as has previously been found in species from all nonmammalian vertebrate classes. The finding in marsupial brain of a peptide with properties of chicken GnRH II, which has previously been reported in species of Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes, and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  11. Distributional shift of urea production site from the extraembryonic yolk sac membrane to the embryonic liver during the development of cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Wataru; Kajimura, Makiko; Tanaka, Hironori; Hasegawa, Kumi; Ogawa, Shuntaro; Hyodo, Susumu

    2017-09-01

    Urea is an essential osmolyte for marine cartilaginous fishes. Adult elasmobranchs and holocephalans are known to actively produce urea in the liver, muscle and other extrahepatic organs; however, osmoregulatory mechanisms in the developing cartilaginous fish embryo with an undeveloped urea-producing organ are poorly understood. We recently described the contribution of extraembryonic yolk sac membranes (YSM) to embryonic urea synthesis during the early developmental period of the oviparous holocephalan elephant fish (Callorhinchus milii). In the present study, to test whether urea production in the YSM is a general phenomenon among oviparous Chondrichthyes, we investigated gene expression and activities of ornithine urea cycle (OUC) enzymes together with urea concentrations in embryos of the elasmobranch cloudy catshark (Scyliorhinus torazame). The intracapsular fluid, in which the catshark embryo develops, had a similar osmolality to seawater, and embryos maintained a high concentration of urea at levels similar to that of adult plasma throughout development. Relative mRNA expressions and activities of catshark OUC enzymes were significantly higher in YSM than in embryos until stage 32. Concomitant with the development of the embryonic liver, the expression levels and activities of OUC enzymes were markedly increased in the embryo from stage 33, while those of the YSM decreased from stage 32. The present study provides further evidence that the YSM contributes to embryonic urea homeostasis until the liver and other extrahepatic organs become fully functional, and that urea-producing tissue shifts from the YSM to the embryonic liver in the late developmental period of oviparous marine cartilaginous fishes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Primera ictiofauna marina del Cretácico Superior (Formación Jaguel, Maastrichtiano de la provincia de Río Negro, Argentina First marine ichthyofauna from the Upper Cretaceous (Jaguel Formation; Maastrichtian from Río Negro province, Argentina

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    Sergio Bogan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Se describe un conjunto de dientes fósiles que proceden de sedimentos marinos de la Formación Jagüel (Maastrichtiano, de la localidad de Bajo Trapalcó, provincia de Río Negro, Patagonia, Argentina. La ictiofauna aquí descripta es la primera para la Formación y se compone de unos seis taxones diferentes de Chondrichthyes (Serratolamna serrata, Squalicorax pristodontus, Cretalamna appendiculata, Carcharias sp., Odontaspis sp. y cf. Pseudohypolophus mcnultyi y dos Teleostei del género Enchodus (aff. E. ferox y aff. E. gladiolus. Serratolamna serrata es el taxón mejor representado del conjunto, y constituye la cita más austral conocida en la distribución de esta especie y el primer registro fósil para Argentina. Los registros de Enchodus, Squalicorax pristodontus y cf. Pseudohypolophus mcnultyi, representan las primeras descripciones de estos taxones para Argentina. Todos los taxones descriptos constituyen un ensamblaje de especies que caracterizan las paleoictiofaunas de los mares del Cretácico Superior de distintas partes del globo, aportando novedosa información para la comprensión de las ictiofaunas Mesozoicas del cono sur sudamericano.This paper describes several fossil teeth coming from marine sediments from the Bajo Trapalcó locality, Río Negro province, Patagonia, Argentina. The ichthyofauna described here is composed by six different chondrichtyan taxa (Serratolamna serrata, Squalicorax pristodontus, Cretalamna appendiculata, Carcharias sp., Odontaspis sp. and cf. Pseudohypolophus mcnultyi and two Teleostei of the genus Enchodus (aff. E. ferox and aff. E. gladiolus. Serratolamna serrata is the most abundant species, and it represents the southernmost record for the species and the first record for Argentina. The records of Enchodus, Squalicorax pristodontus and cf. Pseudohypolophus mcnultyi, constitute the first mention for these taxa in Argentina. The taxa described here characterize the paleoichthyofaunas of the Upper

  13. The phylogenetics of Anguillicolidae (Nematoda: Anguillicoloidea, swimbladder parasites of eels

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    Laetsch Dominik R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anguillicolidae Yamaguti, 1935 is a family of parasitic nematode infecting fresh-water eels of the genus Anguilla, comprising five species in the genera Anguillicola and Anguillicoloides. Anguillicoloides crassus is of particular importance, as it has recently spread from its endemic range in the Eastern Pacific to Europe and North America, where it poses a significant threat to new, naïve hosts such as the economic important eel species Anguilla anguilla and Anguilla rostrata. The Anguillicolidae are therefore all potentially invasive taxa, but the relationships of the described species remain unclear. Anguillicolidae is part of Spirurina, a diverse clade made up of only animal parasites, but placement of the family within Spirurina is based on limited data. Results We generated an extensive DNA sequence dataset from three loci (the 5' one-third of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA, the D2-D3 region of the nuclear large subunit ribosomal RNA and the 5' half of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I gene for the five species of Anguillicolidae and used this to investigate specific and generic boundaries within the family, and the relationship of Anguillicolidae to other spirurine nematodes. Neither nuclear nor mitochondrial sequences supported monophyly of Anguillicoloides. Genetic diversity within the African species Anguillicoloides papernai was suggestive of cryptic taxa, as was the finding of distinct lineages of Anguillicoloides novaezelandiae in New Zealand and Tasmania. Phylogenetic analysis of the Spirurina grouped the Anguillicolidae together with members of the Gnathostomatidae and Seuratidae. Conclusions The Anguillicolidae is part of a complex radiation of parasitic nematodes of vertebrates with wide host diversity (chondrichthyes, teleosts, squamates and mammals, most closely related to other marine vertebrate parasites that also have complex life cycles. Molecular analyses do not support the recent

  14. PCNA immunoreactivity revealing normal proliferative activity in the brain of an adult Elasmobranch, Torpedo marmorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margotta, Vito

    2007-01-01

    The brain of adult heterothermic vertebrates can be already provided of quiescent cells, scattered ("matrix cells") and/or clustered ("matrix areas"). These typical cells, in some regions located at or near ventricular surfaces and at peri-ependymal layers, in other territories populating their framework, maintain some embryonic properties and are responsible of normal or variously experimentally induced proliferative activities. On these topics there are a great number of reports concerning Teleostean Osteichthyes, Urodele and Anuran Amphibians, Lacertilian Reptiles. At the contrary, only few are the contributions regarding the Petromyzontidae. Involving an immunocytochemical marker, the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), revealing proliferative events, in the last years we have undertaken a reappraisal focused on these encephalic performances in normal adult poikilothermal vertebrates. To provide a valid comparison between our results and the literature data, our choice of the specimens was based on the desire to employ organisms belonging to the same or phylogenetically close species used by previous Authors in similar studies. In our immunocytochemical panorama there is a substantial agreement between our contributions and bibliographic references concerning natural encephalic proliferative phenomena in these vertebrates. At this point of our study, the last missing piece was represented by the Chondrichthyes about which the literature data are lacking. In order to fill this gap, the aim of the present research is to investigate, involving the same PCNA test, whether proliferative events also persist in the brain of adult cartilaginous fishes. The immunostaining images obtained in the Elasmo branch Torpedo marmorata, well-known for the emission of high electrical discharges, exhibit undifferentiated cells in relationship with the ependymal epithelium lining the cavities of all cerebral districts; some other neuroblasts are scattered in the mesencephalic

  15. Peculiarities of hemopoisis in sturgeons species (Acipenseridae (a review

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    I. Hrytsyniak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To analyze data from scientific sources of information regarding the species-specific features of the hematopoietic and histo-morphological characteristics of hematopoietic tissues and organs of sturgeons (Acipenseridae. Consider the general aspects of their structure at different stages of ontogeny. To present the general features of differentiation and proliferation of blood elements. Findings. A review of scientific papers and literature has revealed that hematopoiesis in sturgeon species of fish differs significantly from that of mammals (Mammalia, but also from other fish from cartilaginous (Chondrichthyes and bony (Osteichthyes classes. Moreover, sturgeon fishes are characterized by a species-specificity in the development of hemopoiesis organs on each stage of ontogenesis. The age-related changes of the developing blood cells, ranging from blast elements (erythroblasts, lymphoblasts, monoblasts, myeloblasts to the appearance of mature (definitive forms, are marked. The specific heterochrony is revealed in the development of sturgeon blood cells. The organs of hemopoiesis are: hemopoietic cranial or lymphoid organ, gills, spleen, heart, thymus, gastrointestinal tract (anterior part of the digestive canal, pyloric gland, middle intestine, spiral valve and liver and kidneys (pronephros and mesonephros. Hepatic hematosis begins to be realized during the larval period of development from a massive spread near the vascular connective tissue. A little bit later in the age of 15 days of active feeding, a similar spread covers practically all area of the body. At this time in liver hepatocytes and reticular cells with developing blood corpuscle are precisely allocated. In this period, proliferation of all cellular lines: erythropoietic, lymphocytopoietic, myelocytopoietic, and also thrombocytopoiesis take place in liver. The plasmocyte differentiation occurs in cranial haematogenic organ of sturgeon. In reticular tissue of lymphoid organ

  16. Permian-Triassic Osteichthyes (bony fishes): diversity dynamics and body size evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Carlo; Koot, Martha B; Kogan, Ilja; Brayard, Arnaud; Minikh, Alla V; Brinkmann, Winand; Bucher, Hugo; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    significant reduction in osteichthyan body size. Neopterygii, the clade that encompasses the vast majority of extant fishes, underwent another diversification phase in the Late Triassic. The Triassic radiation of Osteichthyes, predominantly of Actinopterygii, which only occurred after severe extinctions among Chondrichthyes during the Middle-Late Permian, resulted in a profound change within global fish communities, from chondrichthyan-rich faunas of the Permo-Carboniferous to typical Mesozoic and Cenozoic associations dominated by actinopterygians. This turnover was not sudden but followed a stepwise pattern, with leaps during extinction events. © 2014 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  17. The neuroecology of cartilaginous fishes: sensory strategies for survival.

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    Collin, Shaun P

    2012-01-01

    As apex predators, chondrichthyans, or cartilaginous fishes, hold an important position within a range of aquatic ecosystems and influence the balance between species' abundance and biodiversity. Having been in existence for over 400 million years and representing the earliest stages of the evolution of jawed vertebrates, this group also covers a diverse range of eco-morphotypes, occupying both marine and freshwater habitats. The class Chondrichthyes is divided into two subclasses: the Elasmobranchii (sharks, skates, and rays) and the Holocephali (elephant sharks and chimaeras). However, many of their life history traits, such as low fecundity, the production of small numbers of highly precocious young, slow growth rates, and late maturity, make them highly susceptible to human exploitation. To mitigate the negative effects of human impacts, it is important that we understand the sensory strategies that elasmobranchs use for navigating within their environment, forming reproductive aggregations, feeding, and even communicating. One approach to investigate the sensory bases of their behavior is to examine the peripheral sense organs mediating vision, olfaction, gustation, lateral line, electroreception, and audition in a large range of species in order to identify specific adaptations, the range of sensitivity thresholds, and the compromise between sensory spatial resolution and sensitivity. In addition, we can quantitatively assess the convergence of sensory input to the central nervous system and the relative importance of different sensory modalities. Using a comparative approach and often a combination of anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular techniques, significant variation has been identified in the spatial and chromatic sampling of the photoreceptors in the eye, the surface area and the number of olfactory lamellae within the nasal cavity, the level of gustatory sampling within the oral cavity, the type and innervation of neuromasts of the lateral

  18. Güneydoğu Marmara'da Algarna ile Karides Avcılığında Av Kompozisyonu ve Hedef Dışı Av.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Kenan Bayhan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bir yıl süre ile yürütülen bu çalışma, Kasım 2000 - Ekim 2001 tarihleri arasında Güneydoğu Marmara’da gerçekleştirilmiştir. Çalışmada, algarna ile avcılıkta hedef tür olan derin su pembe karidesi (Parapenaeus longirostris’in ağırlık ve sayısal miktarları ile bunun dışındaki av kompozisyonu, türlerin boy dağılımları ve toplam av içerisindeki sayısal oranları araştırılmıştır. Yapılan çekimler sonucunda, toplam avın sayısal olarak % 64.5’ni hedef tür olan Parapenaeus longirostris, % 35.5’ini hedef dışı av oluşturmuştur. 50 türün bulunduğu hedef dışı avın % 17.16’sını Kemikli balıklar (Osteichthyes, % 8.58’ini Kabuklular (Crustacea-Decapoda, % 4.94’ünü Derisi Dikenliler (Echinodermata, % 2.53’ünü Yumuşakçalar (Mollusca, % 2.14’ünü Cnidaria ve % 0.13’ünü kıkırdaklı balıklar (Chondrichthyes oluşturmuş, toplam av içerisinde Parapenaeus longirostris’in dışında sayısal olarak en çok yakalanan türlerin başında ise Kaya balığı, Mezgit, Kancaağız pisi, Yengeç, Deniz yıldızı ve Deniz hıyarı’nın geldiği belirlenmiştir

  19. The corneal surface of aquatic vertebrates: microstructures with optical and nutritional function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, H B; Collin, S P

    2000-09-29

    The anterior surface of the mammalian cornea plays an important role in maintaining a smooth optical interface and consequently a sharp retinal image. The smooth surface is produced by a tear film, which adheres to a variety of microprojections, which increase the cell surface area, improve the absorbance of oxygen and nutrients and aid in the movement of metabolic products across the outer cell membrane. However, little is known of the structural adaptations and tear film support provided in other vertebrates from different environments. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy; this study examines the density and surface structure of corneal epithelial cells in representative species of the classes Cephalaspidomorphi, Chondrichthyes, Osteichthyes, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia, including some Marsupialia. Variations in cell density and the structure and occurrence of microholes, microridges, microplicae and microvilli are described with respect to the demands placed upon the cornea in different aquatic environments such as marine and freshwater. A progressive decrease in epithelial cell density occurs from marine (e.g. 29348 cells mm(-2) in the Dover sole Microstomius pacficus) to estuarine or freshwater (e.g. 5999 cells mm(-2) in the black bream Acanthopagrus butcheri) to terrestrial (e.g. 2126 cells mm(-2) in the Australian koala Phascolarctos cinereus) vertebrates, indicating the reduction in osmotic stress across the corneal surface. The microholes found in the Southern Hemisphere lampreys, namely the pouched lamprey (Geotria australis) and the shorthead lamprey (Mordacia mordax) represent openings for the release of mucus, which may protect the cornea from abrasion during their burrowing phase. Characteristic of marine teleosts, fingerprint-like patterns of corneal microridges are a ubiquitous feature, covering many types of sensory epithelia (including the olfactory epithelium and the oral mucosa). Like microplicae and microvilli

  20. Early vertebrate origin and diversification of small transmembrane regulators of cellular ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkmajer, Sergej; Kirchner, Henriette; Lundell, Leonidas S; Zelenin, Pavel V; Zierath, Juleen R; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Chibalin, Alexander V

    2017-07-15

    Small transmembrane proteins such as FXYDs, which interact with Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase, and the micropeptides that interact with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase play fundamental roles in regulation of ion transport in vertebrates. Uncertain evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships among these regulators of ion transport have led to inconsistencies in their classification across vertebrate species, thus hampering comparative studies of their functions. We discovered the first FXYD homologue in sea lamprey, a basal jawless vertebrate, which suggests small transmembrane regulators of ion transport emerged early in the vertebrate lineage. We also identified 13 gene subfamilies of FXYDs and propose a revised, phylogeny-based FXYD classification that is consistent across vertebrate species. These findings provide an improved framework for investigating physiological and pathophysiological functions of small transmembrane regulators of ion transport. Small transmembrane proteins are important for regulation of cellular ion transport. The most prominent among these are members of the FXYD family (FXYD1-12), which regulate Na(+) ,K(+) -ATPase, and phospholamban, sarcolipin, myoregulin and DWORF, which regulate the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase (SERCA). FXYDs and regulators of SERCA are present in fishes, as well as terrestrial vertebrates; however, their evolutionary origins and phylogenetic relationships are obscure, thus hampering comparative physiological studies. Here we discovered that sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a representative of extant jawless vertebrates (Cyclostomata), expresses an FXYD homologue, which strongly suggests that FXYDs predate the emergence of fishes and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata). Using a combination of sequence-based phylogenetic analysis and conservation of local chromosome context, we determined that FXYDs markedly diversified in the lineages leading to cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) and

  1. A Late Eocene age proposal for the Loreto Formation (Brunswick Peninsula, southernmost Chile, based on fossil cartilaginous fishes, paleobotany and radiometric evidence Una edad eocena tardía propuesta para la Formación Loreto (península de Brunswick, extremo sur de Chile, basada en peces cartilaginosos fósiles, paleobotánica y evidencia radiógena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo A Otero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present new data on the paleoichthyology, paleobotany and radiometric results of the Loreto Formation in the Brunswick Peninsula of southernmost Chile, that allow us to propose a Late Eocene age. The rich diversity of fossil cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii recognized in upper levels of this unit includes the taxa Carcharías aff. 'hopef (Agassiz, Odontaspis sp., Carcharoides catticus (Philippi, Striatolamia macrota (Agassiz, Anomotodon sp., Macrorhizoduspraecursor (Leriche, Galeorhinus sp., Abdounia sp., Hexanchus sp., Squatina sp., Hexanchidae indet.,Myliobatis sp., Myliobatoidea indet., and Ischyodus dolloi Leriche. This assemblage has clear ecological affinities with Eocene Tethyan fauna previously described in the Northern Hemisphere, and also has common elements with Eocene cartilaginous fishes from Antarctica. Additionally, a paleobotanic study of this unit identified leaf imprints ofAsplenium sp., Pteris sp., Podocarpus sp., and abundant angiosperms including Nothofagus lanceolata Dusén, N. simplicidens Dusén, N. variabilis Dusén, N. cf. alessandri Espinosa, N. subferruginea (Dusén, Hydrangea sp. and Phyllites spp. Wood remains of Nothofagoxylon scalariforme Gothan and Araucariaceae cf. Araucarioxylon Kraus were also identified. Additionally, pollen grains indicate gymnosperms and angiosperms: Podocarpidites otagoensis Couper, Retitricolpites sp., Tricolpites sp., Liliacidites sp., Polyporina sp., Nothofagidites cincta Cookson, and Nothofagidites cranwellae Couper, having affinities with Eocene florae, and being consistent with the age of the fossil fishes. Finally, a SHRIMP U-Th-Pb analysis of two samples collected from the studied beds provided thirty-eight and sixty zircon grains, indicating a clear main peak at 36.48±0.47 Ma (MSWD=1.5 and 36,73±0.50 Ma (MSWD=0.65. The integrated results indicate that the upper part of the Loreto Formation has a minimum Priabonian age, supporting previous reassignations of

  2. Origin and evolution of gnathostome dentitions: a question of teeth and pharyngeal denticles in placoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerina, Johanson; Smith, Moya M

    2005-05-01

    The fossil group Placodermi is the most phylogenetically basal of the clade of jawed vertebrates but lacks a marginal dentition comparable to that of the dentate Chondrichthyes, Acanthodii and Osteichthyes (crown-group Gnathostomata). The teeth of crown-group gnathostomes are part of an ordered dentition replaced from, and patterned by, a dental lamina, exemplified by the elasmobranch model. A dentition recognised by these criteria has been previously judged absent in placoderms, based on structural evidence such as absence of tooth whorls and typical vertebrate dentine. However, evidence for regulated tooth addition in a precise spatiotemporal order can be observed in placoderms, but significantly, only within the group Arthrodira. In these fossils, as in other jawed vertebrates with statodont, non-replacing dentitions, new teeth are added at the ends of rows below the bite, but in line with biting edges of the dentition. The pattern is different on each gnathal bone and probably arises from single odontogenic primordia on each, but tooth rows are arranged in a distinctive placoderm pattern. New teeth are made of regular dentine comparable to that of crown-gnathostomes, formed from a pulp cavity. This differs from semidentine previously described for placoderm gnathalia, a type present in the external dermal tubercles. The Arthrodira is a derived taxon within the Placodermi, hence origin of teeth in placoderms occurs late in the phylogeny and teeth are convergently derived, relative to those of other jawed vertebrates. More basal placoderm taxa adopted other strategies for providing biting surfaces and these vary substantially, but include addition of denticles to the growing gnathal plates, at the margins of pre-existing denticle patches. These alternative strategies and apparent absence of regular dentine have led to previous interpretations that teeth were entirely absent from the placoderm dentition. A consensus view emerged that a dentition, as developed

  3. A Middle-Late Devonian fish fauna from the Sierra de Perijá, western Venezuela, South America

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    G. C. Young

    2002-01-01

    palaeomagnetic data. Es wird eine neue devonische Fischfauna aus dem Gebiet zwischen Caño Colorado und Rio Socuy, Sierra de Perijá, beschrieben. Die Funde stammen aus zwei Lokalitäten und mehreren Horizonten innerhalb der Campo Chico Formation, die auf Grundlage von Untersuchungen der Pflanzen- und Sporenfunde dem Zeitabschnitt Givetium-Frasnium zugeordnet werden. Placodermen sind durch den Antiarchen Bothriolepis perija n. sp. häufig vertreten. Sie sind mit Arten der Aztec-Fischfauna von Viktoria Land, Antarktis, verwandt. Ein zweiter Antiarche, der Venezuelepis mingui n. g. n. sp. ist eng mit einer Spezies aus der Antarktis verwandt, die ebenfalls dieser neuen Gattung zugeschrieben wird. Fragmentarische Reste eines phyllolepiden Placodermen weisen Ähnlichkeiten mit der Gattung Austrophyllolepis aus dem Südosten Australiens auf. Wirbel eines Chondrichthyer werden vorläufig den Antarctilamnidae zugeschrieben. Acanthodir-Reste schließen das weitverbreitete Taxon Machaeracanthus ein. Osteichthyer sind durch Schuppen und Zähne osteolepider Sarcopterygier und Dipnoi vertreten. Andere Schuppen, denen die Cosminschicht fehlt, gehören vermutlich zu einem anderen Haupttaxon. Damit ist durch diese Fauna der erste Nachweis für das Vorkommen der drei Hauptfischgruppen Antiarchi, phyllolepide Placodermi und Dipnoi im Devon Südamerikas erbracht. Sie sind auch auf den meisten anderen Kontinenten weit verbreitet. Obwohl Invertebraten und Pflanzen aus derselben Zeit sehr denen aus dem Osten Nordamerikas ähneln, weisen die endemischen Elemente in der Fischfauna auf eine Affinität zu Gondwana hin. Phyllolepide Placodermen sind im Givetium-Frasnianium Australiens verbreitet, aber erst aus dem Famennium in der Nordhemisphere bekannt. Das Auftreten eines neuen Phyllolepiden weitet den Vorkommensbereich über die nördliche Linie des paläozoischen Gondwanas hinaus aus. Alter und Verwandtschaftsbeziehungen dieser neuen Fischfauna stimmen mit dem Modell der biotischen Verbreitung