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Sample records for harare zimbabwe 22-29

  1. Options for wastewater management in Harare, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nhapi, I.

    2004-01-01

    The capital city of Zimbabwe, has adopted an urban water cycle that is geared towards high level service provision. Water supply and sewerage/sanitation coverage amounts to over 98%, which makes Harare with the highest coverage. The city's high volume of water abstraction from its main water

  2. Brain aneurysm patients seen in Harare, Zimbabwe: cases review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals and Avenues Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe. Subjects: Adult intracranial aneurysm patients. Interventions: Craniotomy and aneurysm clipping. Results: Seventeen patients were seen during the period of study. Twelve were female patients while five were male with a male to female ratio ...

  3. Enhancing psychosocial support for HIV positive adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe.

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    Webster Mavhu

    Full Text Available There is a recognized gap in the evidence base relating to the nature and components of interventions to address the psycho-social needs of HIV positive young people. We used mixed methods research to strengthen a community support group intervention for HIV positive young people based in Harare, Zimbabwe.A quantitative questionnaire was administered to HIV positive Africaid support group attendees. Afterwards, qualitative data were collected from young people aged 15-18 through tape-recorded in-depth interviews (n=10, 3 focus group discussions (FGDs and 16 life history narratives. Data were also collected from caregivers, health care workers, and community members through FGDs (n=6 groups and in-depth interviews (n=12. Quantitative data were processed and analysed using STATA 10. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis.229/310 young people completed the quantitative questionnaire (74% participation. Median age was 14 (range 6-18 years; 59% were female. Self-reported adherence to antiretrovirals was sub-optimal. Psychological well being was poor (median score on Shona Symptom Questionnaire 9/14; 63% were at risk of depression. Qualitative findings suggested that challenges faced by positive children include verbal abuse, stigma, and discrimination. While data showed that support group attendance is helpful, young people stressed that life outside the confines of the group was more challenging. Caregivers felt ill-equipped to support the children in their care. These data, combined with a previously validated conceptual framework for family-centred interventions, were used to guide the development of the existing programme of adolescent support groups into a more comprehensive evidence-based psychosocial support programme encompassing caregiver and household members.This study allowed us to describe the lived experiences of HIV positive young people and their caregivers in Zimbabwe. The findings contributed to the enhancement of

  4. Economic Analysis of Urban Fuelwood Demand - The case of Harare in Zimbabwe

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    Chambwera, M.

    2004-01-01

    This study carries out an economic analysis of the demand for fuelwood in urban areas using Harare, the capital city of Zimbabwe, as a case study. The demand for fuelwood in urban areas is one of the causes of several environmental and health problems in Africa, where the up to 90% of energy

  5. Risk factors associated with cholera in Harare City, Zimbabwe, 2008 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Two suspected cholera cases at Beatrice Road Infectious Diseases Hospital were reported to Harare City Health on 14 October 2008 setting in motion investigation and control measures. We determined the extent of the epidemic and risk factors for contracting cholera. Methods: An unmatched 1:1 case-control ...

  6. Yield analysis at a poultry processing plant in Harare, Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This investigation was conducted to establish the yield of parts or organs of chickens brought for slaughter at a poultry processing plant in Harare. Results of the study will furnish management and other poultry farmers with information that will enable them to identify yield losses and sustainable ways of minimizing resultant ...

  7. Decentralized domestic wastewater systems in developing countries: the case study of Harare (Zimbabwe)

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    Chirisa, Innocent; Bandauko, Elmond; Matamanda, Abraham; Mandisvika, Gladys

    2017-06-01

    Until recently there has been little, if any, concern over revamping let alone improving wastewater management system in Zimbabwe's urban areas given the dominance and institutionalised water-borne system. Yet, the current constraints in this system and the immensity of urbanisation in the country begs and compels planners, engineers and systems thinkers to rethink what best can work as a sustainable wastewater system. With particular reference to the ever-expanding Harare metropolitan region, this article provides an evaluative analysis on the potentiality, risks and strategies that can be adopted by Harare and its satellites in addressing the problems of the conventional wastewater management system. The suggested framework of operation is a decentralised domestic wastewater collection and treatment system which however has its own multifarious risks. Using systems dynamics conceptualisation of the potentiality, opportunities, risks and strategies, the paper seeks to model the path and outcomes of this decentralised domestic wastewater collection and treatment system and also suggests a number of policy measures and strategies that the city of Harare and its satellites can adopt.

  8. When did HIV incidence peak in Harare, Zimbabwe? Back-calculation from mortality statistics.

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    Ben Lopman

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available HIV prevalence has recently begun to decline in Zimbabwe, a result of both high levels of AIDS mortality and a reduction in incident infections. An important component in understanding the dynamics in HIV prevalence is knowledge of past trends in incidence, such as when incidence peaked and at what level. However, empirical measurements of incidence over an extended time period are not available from Zimbabwe or elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. Using mortality data, we use a back-calculation technique to reconstruct historic trends in incidence. From AIDS mortality data, extracted from death registration in Harare, together with an estimate of survival post-infection, HIV incidence trends were reconstructed that would give rise to the observed patterns of AIDS mortality. Models were fitted assuming three parametric forms of the incidence curve and under nine different assumptions regarding combinations of trends in non-AIDS mortality and patterns of survival post-infection with HIV. HIV prevalence was forward-projected from the fitted incidence and mortality curves. Models that constrained the incidence pattern to a cubic spline function were flexible and produced well-fitting, realistic patterns of incidence. In models assuming constant levels of non-AIDS mortality, annual incidence peaked between 4 and 5% between 1988 and 1990. Under other assumptions the peak level ranged from 3 to 8% per annum. However, scenarios assuming increasing levels of non-AIDS mortality resulted in implausibly low estimates of peak prevalence (11%, whereas models with decreasing underlying crude mortality could be consistent with the prevalence and mortality data. HIV incidence is most likely to have peaked in Harare between 1988 and 1990, which may have preceded the peak elsewhere in Zimbabwe. This finding, considered alongside the timing and location of HIV prevention activities, will give insight into the decline of HIV prevalence in Zimbabwe.

  9. Artistic activities and cultural activism as responses to HIV/AIDS in Harare, Zimbabwe.

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    Pietrzyk, Susan

    2009-12-01

    Over the last two decades both the number and types of civil-society-led organisations involved in addressing HIV and AIDS have increased dramatically. In many cases, the work undertaken is thoughtfully researched, appropriately focused, and as a result produces positive outcomes. Yet questions can be raised about what civil society engagements involve, particularly at a micro level. An important element concerns the role of the arts in efforts to understand and address HIV and AIDS. This article examines ways that insight, analysis, and action around HIV and AIDS have unfolded through the purview of artistic activities undertaken by cultural activists in Harare, Zimbabwe-that is, arts-oriented engagements occurring beyond the boundaries of formally structured organisations. Artistic expressions, which often concern lived experiences, make clear the complex circumstances surrounding HIV and AIDS, and at the same time seek to act upon those circumstances. Understanding and addressing HIV and AIDS requires more than one form of knowledge. Drawing on data from 21 months of ethnographic research in Harare, I examine artistic expressions as legitimate forms of knowledge and as strategies for intervention.

  10. A conceptual framework for the sustainable management of wastewater in Harare, Zimbabwe.

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    Nhapi, I; Gijzen, H J; Siebel, M A

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate an integrated wastewater management model for Harare, Zimbabwe, based on current thinking. This implies that wastewater is treated/disposed of as close to the source of generation as possible. Resource recovery and reuse in a local thriving urban agriculture are integrated into this model. Intervention strategies were considered for controlling water, nitrogen and phosphorus flows to the lake. In the formulation of strategies, Harare was divided into five major operational areas of high-, medium-, and low-density residential areas, and also commercial and industrial areas. Specific options were then considered to suit landuse, development constraints and socio-economic status for each area, within the overall criteria of limiting nutrient inflows into the downstream Lake Chivero. Flexible and differential solutions were developed in relation to built environment, population density, composition of users, ownership, future environmental demands, and technical, environmental, hygienic, social and organisational factors. Options considered include source control by the users (residents, industries, etc.), using various strategies like implementation of toilets with source separation, and natural methods of wastewater treatment. Other possible strategies are invoking better behaviour through fees and information, incentives for cleaner production, and user responsibility through education, legislative changes and stricter controls over industry.

  11. Serological survey of Brucella canis in dogs in urban Harare and selected rural communities in Zimbabwe

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    Simbarashe Chinyoka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted in order to detect antibodies for Brucella canis (B. canis in dogs from urban Harare and five selected rural communities in Zimbabwe. Sera from randomly selected dogs were tested for antibodies to B. canis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Overall, 17.6% of sera samples tested (57/324, 95% CI: 13.5–21.7 were positive for B. canis antibodies. For rural dogs, seroprevalence varied from 11.7% – 37.9%. Rural dogs recorded a higher seroprevalence (20.7%, 95% CI: 15.0–26.4 compared with Harare urban dogs (12.7%, 95% CI: 6.9–18.5 but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07. Female dogs from both sectors had a higher seroprevalence compared with males, but the differences were not significant (p > 0.05. Five and two of the positive rural dogs had titres of 1:800 and 1:1600, respectively, whilst none of the positive urban dogs had a titre above 1:400. This study showed that brucellosis was present and could be considered a risk to dogs from the studied areas. Further studies are recommended in order to give insight into the epidemiology of brucellosis in dogs and its possible zoonotic consequences in Zimbabwe. Screening for other Brucella spp. (Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis other than B. canis is also recommended.

  12. Dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease risk profiles of patients attending an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Zhou DT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Danai Tavonga Zhou,1,2 Vitaris Kodogo,1 Kudzai Fortunate Vongai Chokuona,1 Exnevia Gomo,1 Olav Oektedalen,3 Babill Stray-Pedersen21Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Zimbabwe; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: The chronic inflammation induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV contributes to increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD in HIV-infected individuals. HIV-infected patients generally benefit from being treated with antiretroviral drugs, but some antiretroviral agents have side effects, such as dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia. There is general consensus that antiretroviral drugs induce a long-term risk of CHD, although the levels of that risk are somewhat controversial. The intention of this cross-sectional study was to describe the lipid profile and the long-term risk of CHD among HIV-positive outpatients at an HIV treatment clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe. Two hundred and fifteen patients were investigated (females n=165, mean age 39.8 years; males n=50; mean age 42.0 years. Thirty of the individuals were antiretroviral-naïve and 185 had been on antiretroviral therapy (ART for a mean 3.9±3.4 years. All participants had average lipid and glucose values within normal ranges, but there was a small difference between the ART and ART- for total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein (HDL.Those on a combination of D4T or ZDV/NVP/3TC and PI-based ART were on average oldest and had the highest TC levels. Framingham risk showed 1.4% prevalence of high CHD risk within the next ten years. After univariate analysis age, sex, TC/HDL ratio, HDL, economic earnings and systolic BP were associated with medium to high risk of CHD. After multivariate regression analysis and adjusting for age or sex only age, sex and economic earnings

  13. HIV and AIDS knowledge and sexual behaviours amongst secondary school learners in Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Margaret Mlingo

    2012-07-01

    Most learners had obtained their HIV and AIDS knowledge from schools, but some did so from their parents, community activities, the radio or television. No learner had commenced with sexual activities and all had heard about HIV, but not all knew what HIV was, and even fewer could define AIDS. Less than one-third of the learners could mention the three most important HIV preventive measures. Most learners were willing to undergo voluntary counselling and testing (VCT, but few had done so. As no learner had commenced sexual activities, opportunities existed to empower Grade 8 (Form 1 learners with adequate HIV and AIDS knowledge. Generally the learners’ HIV and AIDS knowledge levels were high but some misconceptions existed. Schools should engage with radio and television programmes to address misconceptions about HIV and AIDS. Learners should be enabled to access VCT services. More effective HIV prevention education in Zimbabwe’s schools, could enable more youth to remain HIV negative. Opsomming Pogings om die Menslike Immuniteitsgebrekvirus (MIV en Verworwe immuniteits-gebreksindroom (VIGS pandemiese golf in Afrika te stuit, beklemtoon die noodsaaklikheid dat leerders ingeligte besluite moet kan neem. Alhoewel leerders in Zimbabwe se skole onderrig word oor MIV en VIGS, behoort die omvang van die kennis vasgestel te word. Die hoofdoelwit was om sekondêre skool leerders van Harare, Zimbabwe, se MIV en VIGS kennis te bepaal. Gestruktureerde onderhoude is gevoer met 75 Graad 8 (Vorm 1 sekondêre skool leerders van vier skole in Harare. Die meeste leerders het hulle MIV and VIGS kennis by skole opgedoen terwyl ‘n paar dit van hulle ouers, gemeenskapsaktiwiteite, die radio en televisie gekry het. Geen leerders het met seksuele aktiwiteite begin nie, almal het van MIV gehoor, maar nie almal het geweet wat MIV is nie, en nog minder kon VIGS definieer. Minder as een-derde kon die drie belangrikste MIV voorkomende maatreëls noem. Die meeste leerders was gewillig om

  14. Descriptive epidemiology of typhoid fever during an epidemic in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2012.

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    Polonsky, Jonathan A; Martínez-Pino, Isabel; Nackers, Fabienne; Chonzi, Prosper; Manangazira, Portia; Van Herp, Michel; Maes, Peter; Porten, Klaudia; Luquero, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains a significant public health problem in developing countries. In October 2011, a typhoid fever epidemic was declared in Harare, Zimbabwe - the fourth enteric infection epidemic since 2008. To orient control activities, we described the epidemiology and spatiotemporal clustering of the epidemic in Dzivaresekwa and Kuwadzana, the two most affected suburbs of Harare. A typhoid fever case-patient register was analysed to describe the epidemic. To explore clustering, we constructed a dataset comprising GPS coordinates of case-patient residences and randomly sampled residential locations (spatial controls). The scale and significance of clustering was explored with Ripley K functions. Cluster locations were determined by a random labelling technique and confirmed using Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic. We analysed data from 2570 confirmed and suspected case-patients, and found significant spatiotemporal clustering of typhoid fever in two non-overlapping areas, which appeared to be linked to environmental sources. Peak relative risk was more than six times greater than in areas lying outside the cluster ranges. Clusters were identified in similar geographical ranges by both random labelling and Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic. The spatial scale at which typhoid fever clustered was highly localised, with significant clustering at distances up to 4.5 km and peak levels at approximately 3.5 km. The epicentre of infection transmission shifted from one cluster to the other during the course of the epidemic. This study demonstrated highly localised clustering of typhoid fever during an epidemic in an urban African setting, and highlights the importance of spatiotemporal analysis for making timely decisions about targetting prevention and control activities and reinforcing treatment during epidemics. This approach should be integrated into existing surveillance systems to facilitate early detection of epidemics and identify their spatial range.

  15. Trends in the incidence of cancer in the black population of Harare, Zimbabwe 1991-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokunonga, E; Borok, M Z; Chirenje, Z M; Nyakabau, A M; Parkin, D M

    2013-08-01

    Incidence rates of different cancers have been calculated for the black population of Harare, Zimbabwe for a 20-year period (1991-2010) coinciding with continuing social and lifestyle changes, and the peak, and subsequent wane, of the HIV-AIDS epidemic. The overall risk of cancer increased during the period in both sexes, with rates of cervix and prostate cancers showing particularly dramatic increases (3.3% and 6.4% annually, respectively). By 2004, prostate cancer had become the most common cancer of men. The incidence of cancer of the esophagus, formerly the most common cancer of men, has remained relatively constant, whereas rates of breast and cervix cancers, the most common malignancies of women, have shown significant increases (4.9% and 3.3% annually, respectively). The incidence of Kaposi sarcoma increased to a maximum around 1998-2000 and then declined in all age groups, and in both sexes The incidence of squamous cell cancers of the conjunctiva is relatively high, with temporal trends similar to those of Kaposi sarcoma. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the fifth most common cancer of men and fourth of women, showed a steady increase in incidence throughout the period (6.7-6.9% annually), although rates in young adults (15-39) have decreased since 2001. Cancer control in Zimbabwe, as elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, involves meeting the challenge of emerging cancers associated with westernization of lifestyles (large bowel, breast and prostate), while the incidence of cancers associated with poverty and infection (liver, cervix and esophagus) shows little decline, and the residual burden of the AIDS-associated cancers remains significant. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  16. Health status of the children in a high density town near Harare, Zimbabwe.

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    Watts, T E; Siziya, S

    1998-01-01

    To determine the health status of the children for conditions associated with poverty. Cross sectional. Households in Chitungwiza, a dormitory town of Harare, Zimbabwe. 181 children less than five years of age in 1990 and 162 in 1993. Nutritional status and illness experienced by children. A total of 191 (90.0%) mothers breast fed for more than a year. Thirty two (24.2%) children more than six months old in 1990 and 24 (18.9%) in 1993 were offered less than three meals a day. Illnesses were most common (90.9%) in children aged six to 11 months old and decreased after this. Diarrhoea and coughs accounted for most of this excess (87.9%). Coughs alone affected 33.8% of children of all ages. Knowledge of making rehydration sugar/salt solution was wrong in 23.9% of mothers. Appropriate immunization was given to 85% of children in 1993. Twenty one (14.9%) children in 1990 and 15(12.2%) in 1993 were under 80% weight for age. Thirteen (8.7%) children in 1990 and 16 (10.8%) in 1993 were stunted. Breast feeding was generally satisfactory but the number of meals offered to a fifth of the children aged more than six months was inadequate. Instructions for making rehydration sugar/salt solution, on composition and quantity to be given should be made easily available so that the rate of mothers with wrong knowledge of making the sugar salt solution could be decreased. Children of age six to 11 months need to be kept warm to avoid coughs and need to be brought up in hygienic conditions to avoid diarrhoea.

  17. The religious-spiritual self-image and behaviours among adolescent street children in Harare, Zimbabwe.

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    Mhizha, Samson

    2015-02-01

    The present study sought to explore the relationship between street childhood and adolescent religious-spiritual self-image. In Zimbabwe, there has been a rise in street children population in the urban centres. The current study investigated whether adolescent street children live and work in an eco-developmentally risky context for the development of positive religious-spiritual self-image. This rise in street children population has been in the context of a socio-politico-economic crisis, which was marked by record inflation rates and the HIV and AIDS pandemic. The research objectives were to investigate the nature of religious-spiritual self-image for street-living adolescent children, and to determine the effects of self-image on the behaviour of street-living adolescent children. A psycho-ethnographic research design was employed in this study. This involved collection of data for a sustained period in the context within which the participants live. The participants were 16 street-living adolescent children aged between 12 and 18 years and six key informants all in Harare in Zimbabwe. A total of 22 participants took part in this study. Snowballing was used to recruit key informant interviewees, while purposive sampling was used to recruit participants for focus group discussions, in-depth interview, and participant and non-participant observations. Key informant interviews, focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and participant and non-participant observations were the data collection methods. Thematic content analysis was used for analysing the data. This thematic content analytic method helped to identify themes on the religious-spiritual self-image that emerged from the data. Data analysis revealed that the adolescent street children's religious-spiritual self-image is largely negative. Most street-living adolescent children believed that they were controlled and influenced by evil spirits and that their relatives were casting bad spells on them

  18. Understanding Conceptualizations of Pregnancy and Planning for Pregnancy Among Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinago, Chiwoneso B; Ingram, Lucy Annang; Frongillo, Edward A; Blake, Christine E; Engelsmann, Barbara; Simmons, David

    2018-07-01

    Zimbabwe has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality, yet little is understood about adolescent girls' and young women's perspectives on pregnancy or planning for pregnancy. The research study took an emic approach to understand and describe how adolescent girls and young women (14-24 years) in Harare, Zimbabwe, conceptualize pregnancy and planning for pregnancy and how these conceptualizations inform pregnancy decisions. Semi-structured, in-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted with adolescent girls and young women ( N = 48) and data were analyzed thematically using NVivo 10. Pregnancy was conceptualized across nine themes: carrying a child and oneself, growing a family, motherhood, the best time for pregnancy, pregnancy decision makers, who is responsible for the pregnancy, pregnancy burden, pregnancy dangers, and increase in social status with pregnancy. Planning for pregnancy was conceptualized during the prepregnancy, pregnancy, and postpregnancy phases. Findings emphasize considering sociocultural views concerning pregnancy and including social networks in maternal health efforts.

  19. Individual and structural environmental influences on utilization of iron and folic acid supplementation among pregnant women in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinago, Chiwoneso B; Annang Ingram, Lucy; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A

    2017-07-01

    Micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent among Zimbabweans with serious health and social implications. Due to a lack of a national micronutrient food fortification policy, the Zimbabwe Ministry of Health and Child Care established a policy for the prevention of maternal micronutrient deficiencies, which centres on pregnant women receiving daily iron and folic acid (IFA) at their first antenatal care visit and throughout pregnancy. Despite these efforts, utilization of IFA supplementation in pregnancy in Zimbabwe is low. This study aimed to understand the experiences and knowledge of IFA supplementation among pregnant women and healthcare workers in Harare, Zimbabwe, and the influence of health-service and social environments on utilization. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted in Shona and English, with pregnant women (n = 24) and healthcare workers (n = 14) providing direct antenatal care services to pregnant women in two high-density community clinics. Data were analysed thematically using NVivo 10. Influences on utilization were at the individual and structural environmental levels. Reasons for low utilization of IFA supplementation included forgetting to take IFA, side effects, misconceptions about IFA, limited access to nutrition information, delayed entry or non-uptake of antenatal care and social norms of pregnant women for IFA supplementation. Utilization was enhanced by knowledge of risks and benefits of supplementation, fear of negative health complications with non-utilization, family support and healthcare worker recommendation for supplementation. Study findings can inform approaches to strengthen micronutrient supplementation utilization to improve the micronutrient status of pregnant women to decrease maternal mortality and improve overall maternal and child health in Zimbabwe. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Impacts of alum residues from Morton Jaffray Water Works on water quality and fish, Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Muisa, Norah; Hoko, Zvikomborero; Chifamba, Portia

    Metal pollution of freshwater due to human activities is a major problem confronting most urban centres in developing countries. This study determined the extent to which aluminium in the residues from Morton Jaffray Water Works in Harare were affecting the water quality of Manyame River and Lake Manyame. The study also measured aluminium bioaccumulation in Nile Tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus) which is of importance to the commercial fisheries industry in Zimbabwe. Depth integrated water, and sediment grab samples and adult fish were collected per site in January and March, 2010. A total of six sites were selected on the Manyame River and in Lake Manyame. The levels of Total Aluminium (Al) were determined in sediments, water and fish tissues (liver, kidney, gill and muscle). Total solids, total dissolved solids, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen and temperature were also determined in water and residues. The texture of the sediments was also assessed. Aluminium concentration in water ranged from 2.19 mg/L to 68.93 mg/L during both sampling campaigns surpassing permissible maximum concentration limits of 0.087 to 0.75 mg/L suggested by the Environmental Protection Agency and African Union. The site upstream of the discharge point of the residues always had the lowest levels though it was higher than acceptable levels indicated above, thus suggesting the existence of other sources of aluminium in the catchment besides Morton Jaffray Water Works. However, there was a 10-fold and 100-fold increase in levels of aluminium in water and sediments, respectively, at the site 100 m downstream of the discharge point on the Manyame River. Mean aluminium concentrations in water and sediments at this site averaged 68.93 ± 61.74 mg/L and 38.18 ± 21.54 mg/L in water and 103.79 ± 55.96 mg/L and 131.84 ± 16.48 mg/L in sediments in sampling campaigns 1 and 2, respectively. These levels were significantly higher than levels obtained from all the other sites during both sampling

  1. Risk factors for HIV infection at enrollment in an urban male factory cohort in Harare, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bassett, M. T.; McFarland, W. C.; Ray, S.; Mbizvo, M. T.; Machekano, R.; van de Wijgert, J. H.; Katzenstein, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    Between March 1993 and March 1995, volunteers at 40 Harare factories were interviewed regarding sociodemographic characteristics and behavior; HIV serostatus was also determined. Among 2,691 men enrolled, HIV prevalence was 19.4%. Prevalence rose 2-fold with each year of age in young men ( <23

  2. Factors Influencing Womens Career Progression To Leadership Positions In Harare City Council Zimbabwe

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    Anella Tendai Machiridza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the factors influencing womens career progression to leadership positions in Harare City Council. The specific objective was to determine the influence of gender roles on womens career progression to leadership positions in Harare City Council. The target population included management team and permanent staff in the Harare City Council. Data was collected using questionnaires as well as semi structured interviews. A sample size of 116 was determined by using 33 of the population. Data from interviews was analyzed by means of establishing recurring themes and providing narratives of key findings. The collected data from the questionnaires was analyzed using SPSS. The findings revealed that traditional gender roles made the balance between work and family difficult in such a way that some women would prioritize family responsibilities at the expense of focusing on their careers. Furthermore it was revealed that gender roles affected the careers choices they make thus influencing the gender compositions in departments and divisions and consequently those in leadership positions. As a result of study findings the researcher recommends that civil society organizations implement gender deconstruction programs in societies such that women will not be confined to the traditionally expected roles. The researchers expectation is that it will lead to society accepting the concept of stay-at home- dads thus encouraging the acceptance of women as serious career women. It is also recommended that family friendly policies should be put in place in order to minimize the pressure that women experience in trying to balance between work and family. These policies should enable employees especially women to work from home without being physically present at their workplace but monitoring mechanisms should be in place to ensure that work deadlines are met. Furthermore women are encouraged to implement personal strategies that will help them

  3. Effect of handrubbing using locally-manufactured alcohol-based handrubs in paediatric wards in Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Muchaneta Gudza-Mugabe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We assessed bacterial contamination of hands of adults present in paediatric wards in two tertiary-care hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe and the microbiologic efficacy of locally-manufactured alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR. During unannounced visits, samples were collected using hand-print and hand-rinse methods. Samples were collected from 152 individuals (16 nurses, 10 doctors, 28 students, 86 parents/guardians, 12 others. Contamination of hands with Gram-negative bacteria was found in 91% of adults tested with a mean of 14.6 CFU (hand-rinse method; IQR 3–65, representing a high risk for transmission of pathogens potentially leading to nosocomial infections. A single application of ABHR under controlled conditions achieved an average of 82% (or 0.72 log reduction in detectable counts. Amongst 49 Enterobacteriaceae isolates from hands, 53% were resistant to gentamicin and 63% were resistant to cefpodoxime. Use of ABHR represents an attractive intervention for reducing nosocomial infections in this setting.

  4. Factors associated with late presentation for HIV/AIDS care in Harare City, Zimbabwe, 2015

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    Howard Nyika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite widespread awareness and publicity concerning Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV care and advances in treatment, many patients still present late in their HIV disease. Preliminary review of the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART registers at Wilkins and Beatrice Road Hospitals, both located in Harare, indicated that 67 and 71 % of patients enrolled into HIV/AIDS care presented late with baseline CD4 of 18 years with a baseline CD4 of 18 years who had a baseline CD4 of >200/uL or WHO clinical stage 1 or 2 at first presentation in 2014. Written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. Results A total of 268 participants were recruited (134 cases and 134 controls. Independent risk factors for late presentation for HIV/AIDS care were illness being reason for test (Adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] =7.68, 95 % CI = 4.08, 14.75; Being male (aOR = 2.84, 95 % CI = 1.50, 5.40 and; experienced HIV stigma (aOR = 2.99, 95 % CI = 1.54, 5.79. Independent protective factors were receiving information on HIV (aOR = 0.37, 95 % CI = 0.18, 0.78 and earning more than US$250 per month (aOR = 0.32, 95 % CI = 0.76, 0.67. Median duration between first reported HIV positive test result and enrolment into pre-ART care was 2 days (Q1 = 1 day; Q3 = 30 days among cases and 30 days (Q1 = 3 days; Q3 = 75 days among controls. Conclusion Late presentation for HIV/AIDS care in Harare City was a result of factors that relate to the patient’s sex, reason for getting a test, receiving HIV related information, experiencing stigma and monthly income. Based on this evidence we recommended targeted interventions to optimize early access to testing and enrolment into care.

  5. False-negative HIV tests using oral fluid tests in children taking antiretroviral therapy from Harare, Zimbabwe.

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    Olaru, Ioana D; McHugh, Grace; Dakshina, Suba; Majonga, Edith; Dauya, Ethel; Bandason, Tsitsi; Kranzer, Katharina; Mujuru, Hilda; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2017-08-29

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for HIV infection have high sensitivity and specificity, but in the setting of longstanding antiretroviral therapy (ART), can give false results that can lead to misinterpretation, confusion and inadequate management. The objective of this study was to evaluate the proportion of falsely negative results of a RDT performed on oral fluid in HIV-infected children on longstanding ART. One hundred and twenty-nine children with known HIV infection and receiving ART were recruited from the HIV Clinic at the Harare Central Hospital, Zimbabwe. HIV testing was performed on oral fluid and on finger-stick blood. Children included in the study had a median age of 12 years (IQR 10-14) and 67 (51.9%) were female. Median age at HIV diagnosis was 5 years (IQR 3-6) and the median time on ART was 6.3 years (IQR 4.3-8.1). The oral fluid test was negative in 11 (8.5%) patients and indeterminate in 2 (1.6%). Finger-stick blood test was negative in 1 patient. Patients with a negative oral fluid test had a higher CD4 cell count (967 vs. 723 cells/mm 3 , p  = 0.016) and a longer time on ART (8.5 vs. 6 years, p  = 0.016). This study found that a substantial proportion of false-negative HIV test results in children on longstanding ART when using an oral fluid test. This could lead to misinterpretation of HIV test results and in the false perception of cure or delayed diagnosis.

  6. A survey of feline leukaemia virus infection of domestic cats from selected areas in Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Francis Muchaamba

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted to detect the feline leukaemia virus (FeLV p27 antigen and to determine risk factors and the haematological changes associated with infection in domestic cats in Zimbabwe. Sera were collected for detection of the p27 antigen, urea, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels, whilst whole blood was collected for haematology. FeLV p27 antigen was detected using a rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA test kit. Data on risk factors were analysed using a logistic regression model. Of the 100 cats tested, 41% (95% CI: 31.19% – 50.81% (41/100 were positive for the FeLV p27 antigen. Sex and health status of cats were not significantly (p > 0.05 associated with infection. Intact cats (OR = 9.73, those living in multicat housing (OR = 5.23 and cats that had access to outdoor life (OR = 35.5 were found to have higher odds of infection compared with neutered cats, those living in single-cat housing, and without access to outdoor life, respectively. Biochemistry and haematology revealed no specific changes. The results showed that FeLV infection was high in sampled cats, providing evidence of active infection. Thus, it would be prudent to introduce specific control measures for FeLV infection in Zimbabwe.

  7. Pesticide management practices among rural market gardening farmers near Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Moses Zimba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, we carried out a survey in Chinamhora and Chihota communal lands on the outskirts of Harare city, with the aim of understanding pesticide management practices among market gardening farmers. The farmers grew vegetables that mostly included tomatoes, cabbages, rape, cucumbers, onions and carrots, and they used mainly organophosphates and pyrethroids to control pests. A questionnaire was administered to 119 male heads of households across both study areas. The questionnaire contained 13 closed-ended questions in three sections: source and quality of pesticides, handling and use, and storage and disposal of pesticides used to protect crops. The study identified numerous gaps related to the handling of pesticides. Although the quality of labelling and packaging can largely identify the quality of pesticide, most of the farmers (77.3% could not distinguish between genuine and counterfeit pesticides; approximately half (47.9% of the farmers were not concerned about expiry dates; 27% did not observe post-spray periods; and 63% did not take precautions according to colour-coding of the pesticides. Also of concern were the large numbers of farmers who were not using protective coveralls (54.3%; a substantial number who were not using knapsacks for spraying (21.8%; poor storage of the pesticides, as shown by the variation in storage facilities; the use of empty pesticide containers for domestic purposes (20.2%; and lack of strict adherence to recommended dose levels, with some farmers (28.6% merely estimating the dilution of pesticides. Training through outreach programmes is recommended.

  8. Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Zimbabwe is a land-locked plateau country of 151,000 square miles, divided into 8 provinces, in Southeastern Africa, bordered by South Africa, Botswana, Zambia and Mozambique. Its population consists of 8.8 million blacks, divided between the Shona-speaking Mashona (80%) and the Sindebele-speaking Matabele (19%), 100,000 whites, 20,000 coloreds, and 10,000 Asians. Many of the blacks are Christians. More than 1/2 the whites migrated to Zimbabwe after the Second World War at a rate of about 1000 a year until the mid-1970s; since then 12,000 whites have left the country. The official language is English, and education is free. Most African children 5-19 years old attend school, and literacy is between 40% and 50%. The University of Zimbabwe is located in Harare, the capital, and there are several technical institutes and teacher-training colleges. Zimbabwe has been inhabited since the stone age, and evidence of a high indigenous civilization remains in the "Great Zimbabwe Ruins" near Masvingo. The present black population is descended from later migrations of Bantu people from central Africa. Cecil Rhodes was granted concessions for mineral rights in the area in 1888, and the territory, which administered by the British South Africa Company, was called Rhodesia. Southern Rhodesia became a self-governing entity within the British Empire in 1913. In 1953 Southern Rhodesia was joined with the British protectorates of Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland in the Central African Federation, but this dissolved in 1963, and Northern Rhodesia and Nyasaland became independent as Zambia and Malawi in 1964. Independence was withheld from Rhodesia because Prime Minister Ian Smith refused to give Britain assurances that the country would move toward majority rule. In 1965 Smith issued a Unilateral Declaration of Independence (UDI) from the UK. In 1966 the UN Security Council imposed mandatory economic sanctions on Rhodesia. Within Rhodesia the major African nationalist groups -- the

  9. ‘Not My Child’: Parents’ Denial About Adolescent Sexuality in Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Manase Kudzai Chiweshe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out adult views on adolescent sexualities in Zimbabwe and how adults construct sexual cultures that deny adolescence access to sex.Materials and methods: The paper uses qualitative methodologies, with purposively selected parents and key informants. A total of ten in depth interviews, four focus groups and six key informant interviews with purposively sampled male and female respondents were conducted. Key informants included a headmaster, teacher, social worker, nurses and a member of traditional healers association.Results: Parents that were interviewed denied that their adolescent children were sexually active. This denial of adolescent sexuality was seen throughout the interviews. The denial of adolescent sexuality was linked to the other themes that emerged including sexual surveillance and sexual communication, school pregnancy, STIs and sexual education, and adult anxiety on adolescent sex.Conclusion: The denial of youth sexuality has serious impacts on youths’ access to information and ability to protect themselves from sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. We argue that government policies and lack of comprehensive sex education in schools are based on this denial of adolescent sexuality and should be addressed.

  10. Fractionation of wastewater characteristics for modelling of Firle Sewage Treatment Works, Harare, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muserere, Simon Takawira; Hoko, Zvikomborero; Nhapi, Innocent

    Varying conditions are required for different species of microorganisms for the complex biological processes taking place within the activated sludge treatment system. It is against the requirement to manage this complex dynamic system that computer simulators were developed to aid in optimising activated sludge treatment processes. These computer simulators require calibration with quality data input that include wastewater fractionation among others. Thus, this research fractionated raw sewage, at Firle Sewage Treatment Works (STW), for calibration of the BioWin simulation model. Firle STW is a 3-stage activated sludge system. Wastewater characteristics of importance for activated sludge process design can be grouped into carbonaceous, nitrogenous and phosphorus compounds. Division of the substrates and compounds into their constituent fractions is called fractionation and is a valuable tool for process assessment. Fractionation can be carried out using bioassay methods or much simpler physico-chemical methods. The bioassay methods require considerable experience with experimental activated sludge systems and associated measurement techniques while the physico-chemical methods are straight forward. Plant raw wastewater fractionation was carried out through two 14-day campaign periods, the first being from 3 to 16 July 2013 and the second was from 1 to 14 October 2013. According to the Zimbabwean Environmental Management Act, and based on the sensitivity of its catchment, Firle STW effluent discharge regulatory standards in mg/L are COD (<60), TN (<10), ammonia (<0.2), and TP (<1). On the other hand Firle STW Unit 4 effluent quality results based on City of Harare records in mg/L during the period of study were COD (90 ± 35), TN (9.0 ± 3.0), ammonia (0.2 ± 0.4) and TP (3.0 ± 1.0). The raw sewage parameter concentrations measured during the study in mg/L and fractions for raw sewage respectively were as follows total COD (680 ± 37), slowly biodegradable COD

  11. Understanding the experience and manifestation of depression in adolescents living with HIV in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavhu, Webster; Wogrin, Carol; Mutsinze, Abigail; Kagee, Ashraf

    2018-01-01

    Background Studies have found that adolescents living with HIV are at risk of depression, which in turn affects adherence to medication. This study explored the experience and manifestation of depression in adolescents living with HIV in Zimbabwe in order to inform intervention development. Methods We conducted a body mapping exercise with 21 HIV positive 15–19 years olds who had been diagnosed with major depressive disorder. Participants created a painted map of their body to assist them in expressing their somatic and emotional experiences in qualitative interviews. The interviews were transcribed and thematically coded using NVivo 10. Results Participants attributed their experiences of depression to their relationships and interactions with significant people in their lives, primarily family members and peers. A sense of being different from others was common among participants, both due to their HIV status and the impact HIV has had on their life circumstances. Participants described a longing to be important or to matter to the people in their lives. A sense of isolation and rejection was common, as well as grief and loss, including ambiguous and anticipated loss. Participants’ idioms of distress included ‘thinking deeply’ (‘kufungisisa’), ‘pain’, darkness, ‘stress’ or a lack of hope and ambiguity for the future. Suicidal ideation was described, including slow suicide through poor adherence. Supportive factors were also relational, including the importance of supportive relatives and peers, clinic staff and psychosocial support programmes. Conclusions An understanding of HIV positive adolescents’ own narratives around depression can inform the development and integration of appropriate mental health interventions within HIV care and treatment programmes. Study findings suggest that family and peer-led interventions are potentially useful in the prevention and management of depression in adolescents living with HIV. PMID:29298326

  12. Typhoid outbreak investigation in Dzivaresekwa, suburb of Harare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typhoid outbreak investigation in Dzivaresekwa, suburb of Harare City, Zimbabwe, 2011. Monica Muti, Notion Gombe, Mufuta Tshimanga, Lucia Takundwa, Donewell Bangure, Stanley Mungofa, Prosper Chonzi ...

  13. A Feasibility Study of Biogas Technology to Solving Peri-urban Sanitation Problems in Developing Countries. A Case for Harare, Zimbabwe

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    G Sibanda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the feasibility of converting organic waste into energy using biogas technology to address sanitation problems in peri-urban suburbs of Harare, Zimbabwe.These suburbs with an estimated population of 156.975 are unique in that they are not connected to the Harare main water sewer system. A baseline survey was conducted to determine the quantity of biodegradable human and kitchen waste (N=60. Biodigester sizing and costing was done for various scenarios mainly household standalone, single centralised suburb and combined suburbs centralised biogas models. In addition potential biogas conversion to electricity was done for single centralised suburb and combined suburbs centralised biogas models. This was followed by a cost benefit analysis of employing combined suburbs biogas technology. A combined suburbs centralised biogas model was found to be the most feasible scenario producing 7378 m3 of biogas per day with electricity production capacity of 384 kW .There was a potential of wood savings of 6129 tonnes/year, paraffin savings of 2.556 tonnes/year and greenhouse benefits of 980 tonnes of CO2 equivalent emissions/ year and which would attract U$2940 from carbon credits sales per year. The study recommended the adoption of the biogas technology because of its potential toaddress both economic and sanitation challenges being faced by local authorities in developing countries particularly, improved hygienic conditions, energy supply chronic epidemics and sewerreticulation.

  14. Zimbabwe se strukturele en politieke geweld gelees deur die troop van die onbenoembare en naamlose in Brian Chikwava se roman Harare North

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    Gugulethu Siziba

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Die artikel lees Brian Chikwava se benutting van ’n naamlose protagonist-verteller in sy roman Harare North as ’n allegorie vir die duister figure van buite-regtelike geweld, ontkenning van en stilswye oor geweld, sowel as verskeie verdoeselings wat post-koloniale Zimbabwe onder ZANU-PF heerskappy kenmerk. Die naamlose en onnoembare kom op verskillende vlakke voor en tipeer beide die staat en sy burgers wat beide tuis en oorsee in ongemaklike verhoudings verstrengel is. Die artikel maak gebruik van sosiologiese en literêre insigte oor name en benaming om sin te maak van die belang van die verteller en sy posisie in die ervaring van Zimbabwiërs.

  15. The effect of long-term irrigation using wastewater on heavy metal contents of soils under vegetables in Harare, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapanda, F.; Mangwayana, E.N.; Nyamangara, J.; Giller, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    The magnitude of contamination, regulatory compliance and annual loadings of soils with copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) were determined at three sites in Harare where wastewater was used to irrigate vegetable gardens for at least 10 years. Heavy metal

  16. Elevation and cholera: an epidemiological spatial analysis of the cholera epidemic in Harare, Zimbabwe, 2008-2009

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    Luque Fernandez Miguel A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In highly populated African urban areas where access to clean water is a challenge, water source contamination is one of the most cited risk factors in a cholera epidemic. During the rainy season, where there is either no sewage disposal or working sewer system, runoff of rains follows the slopes and gets into the lower parts of towns where shallow wells could easily become contaminated by excretes. In cholera endemic areas, spatial information about topographical elevation could help to guide preventive interventions. This study aims to analyze the association between topographic elevation and the distribution of cholera cases in Harare during the cholera epidemic in 2008 and 2009. Methods We developed an ecological study using secondary data. First, we described attack rates by suburb and then calculated rate ratios using whole Harare as reference. We illustrated the average elevation and cholera cases by suburbs using geographical information. Finally, we estimated a generalized linear mixed model (under the assumption of a Poisson distribution with an Empirical Bayesian approach to model the relation between the risk of cholera and the elevation in meters in Harare. We used a random intercept to allow for spatial correlation of neighboring suburbs. Results This study identifies a spatial pattern of the distribution of cholera cases in the Harare epidemic, characterized by a lower cholera risk in the highest elevation suburbs of Harare. The generalized linear mixed model showed that for each 100 meters of increase in the topographical elevation, the cholera risk was 30% lower with a rate ratio of 0.70 (95% confidence interval=0.66-0.76. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the risk reduction with an overall estimate of the rate ratio between 20% and 40%. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of considering topographical elevation as a geographical and environmental risk factor in order to plan cholera preventive

  17. Evaluation of the adverse events following immunizations surveillance system in Harare City, Zimbabwe, 2016: a descriptive cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvanaka, Sithole; Tsitsi, Juru; Chonzi, Prosper; Shambira, Gerald; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Tshimanga, Mufuta

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines safety are monitored by looking for Adverse Events Following Immunizations (AEFIs). A review of the 2014 Harare City consolidated monthly return form (T5) revealed that 28 AEFIs were seen in 2014. However, only 21 were reported through the system. We therefore evaluated the Harare City AEFI surveillance system to assess its usefulness. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted. Twenty one of 41 clinics were randomly selected and 51 health workers were randomly recruited. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to collect data. Epi info 7 was used to generate frequencies, means and proportions. Out of 51 respondents, 50 (98%) knew the purpose of AEFI system, 48 (94%) knew at least two presenting symptoms of AEFIs and 39 (77%) knew the correct date of form submission to the next level. Receiving no feedback 24 (47.1%), fear of victimisation 16 (31.4%) and work overload 11 (21.6%) were the major reasons for under reporting. Eighty six percent perceived the system to be simple and 43 (84%) were willing to continue participating. Fifty three percent (27) reported taking public health actions (such as awareness campaigns & making follow ups) basing on AEFI data collected. All 46 reviewed forms were completely filled and submitted in time. All 21 clinics had written AEFI guidelines and case definitions. Only 14 of 21 clinics had adequately stocked emergency drugs. The total cost for a single notification was estimated at US$22.30. The system was useful, simple, acceptable, timely, stable, representative but costly. The good performance of the system reported in this evaluation could be attributed to high health worker knowledge. Following this evaluation, replenishment of out of stock drugs and follow up of missing 2014 AEFI feedback from MCAZ were done. In addition, making the system electronic is recommended.

  18. The Driving Forces for the Practice of Strategic Planning in SMEs: Evidence from Harare Metropolitan Province, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell Sandada; Raynold Tinomudaishe Chikwama

    2016-01-01

    Despite Zimbabwe sharing with the rest of the world, the notion that SMEs are the impeccable engines to economic revival, growth and development, many of the nation`s SMEs are plagued with high failure rates. Previous studies carried out in most foreign countries suggested that the high failure rate of SMEs was attributable to lack of strategic planning among a host of other factors. Against this backdrop, the purpose of this study was to examine the driving forces for the practic...

  19. The Driving Forces for the Practice of Strategic Planning in SMEs: Evidence from Harare Metropolitan Province, Zimbabwe

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    Maxwell Sandada

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite Zimbabwe sharing with the rest of the world, the notion that SMEs are the impeccable engines to economic revival, growth and development, many of the nation`s SMEs are plagued with high failure rates. Previous studies carried out in most foreign countries suggested that the high failure rate of SMEs was attributable to lack of strategic planning among a host of other factors. Against this backdrop, the purpose of this study was to examine the driving forces for the practice of strategic planning in SMEs. A quantitative cross sectional study was conducted among active SMEs who are registered with the Ministry of Small and Medium Enterprises and Cooperative Development in Zimbabwe. The study revealed that globalisation, business ownership motivations, environmental dynamism and innovation & technological advancement have a positive and statistically significant influence on the adoption or practice of strategic planning among SMEs. The study has important implications for the practice and implementation of strategic planning among SMEs especially in the context of a developing country such as Zimbabwe.

  20. Performance and Logistical Challenges of Alternative HIV-1 Virological Monitoring Options in a Clinical Setting of Harare, Zimbabwe

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    Pascale Ondoa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24. The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0, served as the gold standard. Using a cutoff of 5,000 copies/mL, the plasma VFA had a sensitivity of 94.5% and specificity of 92.7% and was largely superior to the VFA on DBS (sensitivity = 61.9%; specificity = 99.0% or to the p24 (sensitivity = 54.3%; specificity = 82.3% when tested on 302 HIV treated and untreated patients. However, among the 202 long-term ART-exposed patients, the sensitivity of the VFA decreased to 72.7% and to 35.7% using a threshold of 5,000 and 1,000 RNA copies/mL, respectively. We show that the VFA (either on plasma or on DBS and the p24 are not reliable to monitor long-term treated, HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, achieving acceptable assay sensitivity using DBS proved technically difficult in a less-experienced laboratory. Importantly, the high level of virological suppression (93% indicated that quality care focused on treatment adherence limits virological failure even when PCR-based viral load monitoring is not available.

  1. Care requirements for clients who present after rape and clients who presented after consensual sex as a minor at a clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe, from 2011 to 2014.

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    Rebecca E Harrison

    Full Text Available To describe the differences between clients presenting after rape and clients who have consented to sex as a minor to an SGBV clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe, and how these differences affect their care requirements.Adolescents and adults presenting at the specialized Sexual and Gender Based Violence clinic in Harare are offered a standardised package of free medical and psychosocial care. Zimbabwe has an HIV prevalence of 14%, so prevention of HIV infection using PEP for those that present within 72 hours is a key part of the response. STI treatment, emergency contraceptive pills, referral for termination of pregnancy, psychological, social and legal support is also provided.This is a retrospective descriptive study of routine programmatic data collected at the Edith Opperman polyclinic in Mbare SGBV clinic from 2011 to 2014. Chi-square tests and logistic regression were used to describe the different experiences and the differences in uptake of care between clients presenting for rape compared to those who consented to sex as a minor.During the study period a total of 3617 clients presented to the clinic. 2242 (62% sought care after rape, 602 (17% for having consented to sex as a minor and 395 (11% for suspected sexual abuse. 1615 (45% of people presenting were 12-15 year olds. Minors who consented to sex compared to survivors of rape were less likely to report within 72 hours- 156 (26% vs 894 (40% p<0.001; less likely to report that they delayed due to fear- 68 (17% vs 472 (40% p<0.001, less likely to have experienced accompanying violence- 9 (1% vs 176 (8% p<0.001 or physical trauma-34 (6% vs 427 (19% p<0.001; and less likely to display psychological symptoms at presentation 51 (8% vs 411 (18% p<0.001. Minors who consented to sex compared to those who were raped were less likely to start PEP if eligible-123 (80% vs 751 (93% p<0.001, less likely to take emergency contraceptives if eligible-125 (81% vs 598 (88% p<0.001, more likely to be pregnant

  2. Improving epidemic malaria planning, preparedness and response in Southern Africa. Report on the 1st Southern African Regional Epidemic Outlook Forum, Harare, Zimbabwe, 26-29 September, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaSilva, Joaquim; Garanganga, Brad; Teveredzi, Vonai; Marx, Sabine M; Mason, Simon J; Connor, Stephen J

    2004-10-22

    following is a report on the 1st Southern African Regional Epidemic Outlook Forum, which was held in Harare, Zimbabwe, 26th-29th September, 2004.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of co-infection with hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among adult patients in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudi, Ian; Iijima, Sayuki; Chin'ombe, Nyasha; Mtapuri-Zinyowera, Sekesai; Murakami, Shuko; Isogawa, Masanori; Hachiya, Atsuko; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of co-infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the genetic characteristics of both viruses among pre-HIV-treatment patients in Harare, Zimbabwe. This cross-sectional survey involved 176 remnant plasma samples collected from consenting HIV patients (median age 35 [18-74]) between June and September 2014. HBV seromarkers were determined by high-sensitivity chemiluminescence assays. Molecular evolutionary analyses were conducted on the basal core promoter/precore (BCP/PC) and S regions of HBV, as well as part of the HIV pol region. Of the 176 participants (65.7% female), 19 (10.8%) were positive for HBsAg (median 0.033 IU/ml (IQR 0.01-415). The HBsAg incidence was higher in men than women (P = 0.009). HBsAg-positive subjects had lower median CD4 counts (P = 0.016). HBV DNA was detectable in 12 HBsAg-positive samples (median 3.36 log cp/ml (2.86-4.51), seven being amplified and sequenced. All isolates were subgenotype A1 without HBV drug resistance mutations but each had at least one BCP/PC mutation. PreS deletion mutants and small S antigen variants M133I/T and D144G were identified. Of the 164 HIV isolates successfully genotyped, 163 (99.4%) were HIV-1 subtype C and only one was HIV-1 subtype F1. Sixteen (9.8%) had at least one drug resistance mutation, predominantly non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-related mutations, observed mostly among female participants. This study shows that co-infection with HBV is present among HIV patients enrolling into HIV care in Zimbabwe, suggesting that HBV screening and monitoring programmes be strengthened in this context. J. Med. Virol. 89:257-266, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Price and availability survey of essential medicines in the Harare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their innovator and/or generic equivalents) in both private retail and public pharmacies. Setting: Private and public sector retail pharmacies in Harare metropolitan province, Zimbabwe. Materials and Methods: Forty medicines were selected for ...

  5. Characterisation of raw sewage and performance assessment of primary settling tanks at Firle Sewage Treatment Works, Harare, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muserere, Simon Takawira; Hoko, Zvikomborero; Nhapi, Innocent

    The need for more stringent effluent discharge standards as prescribed by the Environmental Management Act 20:27 to protect the environment can be sustainably achieved with the aid of Activated Sludge Models. Thus, the researchers believe it is time to re-evaluate wastewater characteristics at Firle Sewage Treatment Works (STW) and make use of activated sludge simulators to address pollution challenges caused by the sewage plant. Therefore, this paper characterizes raw sewage and assesses settled and unsettled sewage in order to evaluate the performance of the primary treatment system and the suitability of the settled sewage for treatment by the subsequent Biological Nutrient Removal (BNR) system at Firle STW. Parameters studied included COD, BOD, TKN, TP, NH3, TSS, pH and Alkalinity. Composite samples were collected over a 9-day campaign period (27 June to 6 July 2012), hourly grab samples over 24 hrs and composite samples on 6 March 2012 which were then analysed in the lab in accordance with Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater to support the City of Harare 2004-2012 lab historical records. Concentrations for unsettled sewage in mg/L were COD (527 ± 32), BOD (297 ± 83) TKN (19.0 ± 2.0), TP (18 ± 3), NH3 (24.0 ± 12.9), TSS (219 ± 57), while pH was 7.0 ± 0 and Alkalinity 266 ± 36 mg/L. For settled sewage the corresponding values in mg/L were COD (522 ± 15), BOD (324 ± 102), TKN (21.0 ± 3.0), TP (19.0 ± 2.0), NH3 (25.6 ± 11.2), TSS (250 ± 66), while pH was 7.0 ± 0 and Alkalinity 271 ± 17 mg/L. The plant design values for raw sewage are COD (650 mg/L), BOD (200 mg/L), TKN (40 mg/L) and TP (11 mg/L). Thus, COD and nitrogen were within the plant design range while BOD and TP were higher. Treatability of sewage in BNR systems is often inferred from the levels of critical parameters and also the ratios of TKN/COD and COD/TP. The wastewater average settled COD/BOD, COD/TP and TKN/COD ratio were 1.7 ± 0.5, 27.1 ± 3.1 and 0.04 ± 0

  6. Incidence of stillbirth and perinatal mortality and their associated factors among women delivering at Harare Maternity Hospital, Zimbabwe: a cross-sectional retrospective analysis

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    Welch Kathy

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Death of an infant in utero or at birth has always been a devastating experience for the mother and of concern in clinical practice. Infant mortality remains a challenge in the care of pregnant women worldwide, but particularly for developing countries and the need to understand contributory factors is crucial for addressing appropriate perinatal health. Methods Using information available in obstetric records for all deliveries (17,072 births at Harare Maternity Hospital, Zimbabwe, we conducted a cross-sectional retrospective analysis of a one-year data, (1997–1998 to assess demographic and obstetric risk factors for stillbirth and early neonatal death. We estimated risk of stillbirth and early neonatal death for each potential risk factor. Results The annual frequency of stillbirth was 56 per 1,000 total births. Women delivering stillbirths and early neonatal deaths were less likely to receive prenatal care (adjusted relative risk [RR] = 2.54; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 2.19–2.94 and RR = 2.52; 95% CI 1.63–3.91, which for combined stillbirths and early neonatal deaths increased with increasing gestational age (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 3.98, HR = 7.49 at 28 and 40 weeks of gestation, respectively. Rural residence was associated with risk of infant dying in utero, (RR = 1.33; 95% CI 1.12–1.59, and the risk of death increased with increasing gestational age (HR = 1.04, HR = 1.69, at 28 and 40 weeks of gestation, respectively. Older maternal age was associated with risk of death (HR = 1.50; 95% CI 1.21–1.84. Stillbirths were less likely to be delivered by Cesarean section (RR = 0.64; 95% CI 0.51–0.79, but more likely to be delivered as breech (RR = 4.65; 95% CI 3.88–5.57, as were early neonatal deaths (RR = 3.38; 95% CI 1.64–6.96. Conclusion The frequency of stillbirth, especially macerated, is high, 27 per 1000 total births. Early prenatal care could help reduce perinatal death linking the woman to the health

  7. Challenges faced by franchise entrepreneurs operating in a volatile business environment: a case of the fast food industry in Harare, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Knowledge Shumba; Stanislous Zindiye; Gift Donga

    2017-01-01

    Franchising plays a pivotal role in sustainable economic development through employment creation, improving the standards of living and increasing the growth of entrepreneurship worldwide. However, the volatile business environment in Zimbabwe has a negative impact on the growth of franchising in the fast food industry. The aim of the study was to uncover the challenges of franchising in a volatile business environment in Zimbabwe. The study focused on an under studied area of franchising in ...

  8. Neurodevelopmental Impairment among Infants Born to Mothers Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Uninfected Mothers from Three Peri-Urban Primary Care Clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandawasvika, Gwendoline Q.; Ogundipe, Enitan; Gumbo, Felicity Z.; Kurewa, Edith N.; Mapingure, Munyaradzi P.; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article is to document the risk of neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) among infants enrolled in a programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) in Zimbabwe using the Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener (BINS). Method: We prospectively followed up infants at three…

  9. First aid practices, beliefs, and sources of information among caregivers regarding paediatric burn injuries in Harare, Zimbabwe: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirongoma, Farai; Chengetanai, Samson; Tadyanemhandu, Cathrine

    2017-06-01

    While burns take seconds to occur, injuries incurred result in pain and undesirable long term effects that might take a lifetime to overcome. The study was carried out to determine the measures of first aid delivered by caregivers after a burn injury and sources of the information. A cross- sectional study was carried out over a period of 3 months at two central hospitals in Harare. A questionnaire was administered to the caregivers of children within the age group of 0-60 months admitted in burns wards to elicit information on the circumstances of the burn injury and the first aid methods which were administered. Out of the 50 children who were recruited, 54.0% were females and the mean age was 29.5 months (SD= 15.5). After the burn injury 30(60.0%) of the caregivers, cooled the burn injury with cold running water whilst some caregivers also applied eggs, margarine and some traditional herbs as first aid. The other practices reported by the caregivers included use of urine and crushed cockroaches after burn injury in 40 (80.0%) whilst 20 (40.0%) reported used aloe vera gel after a burn injury. About half of the caregivers got first aid information mainly from family members and very few indicated that the information was obtained from mass media, 3 (6.0%). The first aid measures used by the majority of caregivers were either incomplete or inadequate. Although some caregivers had adequate knowledge of what to do after an injury, there still was widespread use of alternatives therapies in burn management.

  10. Consistent use of a combination product versus a single product in a safety trial of the diaphragm and microbicide in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straten, Ariane; Moore, Jie; Napierala, Sue; Clouse, Kate; Mauck, Christine; Hammond, Nii; Padian, Nancy

    2008-06-01

    We examined the use and acceptability of a combination product (diaphragm and gel) compared to a single product (gel) during a 6-month safety trial in Zimbabwe. Women were randomized to the use of a diaphragm with gel or the use of gel alone, in addition to male condoms. Ever use and use of study product on the last act of sexual intercourse were assessed monthly by Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interviewing. Acceptability, correct use and consistent use (use at every sexual act during the previous 3 months) were measured on the last visit by face-to-face interview. Predictors of consistent use were examined using multivariate logistic regression analyses. In this sample of 117 sexually active, monogamous, contracepting women, rates of consistent use were similar in both groups (59.7% for combination method vs. 56.4% for gel alone). Product acceptability was high, but was not independently associated with consistent use. Independent predictors of consistent use included age [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.08; 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.01-1.16], consistent condom use (AOR=3.85; 95% CI=1.54-9.63) and having a partner who approves of product use (AOR=2.66; 95% CI=1.10-6.39). Despite high reported acceptability and few problems with the products, the participants reported only moderate product adherence levels. Consistent use of condoms and consistent use of products were strongly associated. If observed in other studies, this may bias the estimation of product effectiveness in future trials of female-controlled methods.

  11. Sewage discharges and nutrient levels in Marimba River, Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sewage discharges and nutrient levels in Marimba River, Zimbabwe. ... Population distribution, land-use, industrial activity, urban agricultural ... River, one of the major inflow rivers into the Lake Chivero, Harare city\\'s main water supply source.

  12. A Study of the Association of Attitudes to the Philosophy of Science with Classroom Contexts, Academic Qualification and Professional Training, amongst A-Level Biology Teachers in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwimbi, Eric; Monk, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the association between attitude towards the philosophy of science and academic qualification professional training. Analyzes responses from 33 A-level biology teachers to a questionnaire and reports from teachers in Harare on their school contexts. Suggests that the differential distribution of facilities and resources across school…

  13. Options for wastewater management in Harare, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nhapi, I.

    2004-01-01

    The sustainable management of wastewater should aim at pollution prevention and reduction first, followed by resource recovery and reuse. This thesis shows that substantial water quality improvements could be achieved through a so-called 3-Step Strategic Approach to wastewater management. This

  14. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal - Vol 35, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of intestinal helminth parasites in stray dogs in urban Harare and selected rural areas in Zimbabwe · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Ashley-Kate Davidson, Kalnisha Bhikha, George D. Vassilev, Solomon Dhliwayo ...

  15. Alcohol use among school-going adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors associated with consumption of alcohol use were being worried, bullied, smoking cigarettes, truant, and lack of parental supervision. Students who were never worried were 49% (AOR=0.51 [95%CI (0.36, 0.72)]) less likely to consume alcohol compared to students who were most of the time or always worried.

  16. Plants of Zimbabwe used as anti-fertility agents. | Sewani-Rusike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ethnomedicine has gained a lot of recognition in post-independence Zimbabwe and yet little research on anti-fertility medicines has been done. Information on plants used as anti-fertility medicines was obtained by interviewing women, men, traditional healers and traditional midwives in urban Harare and surrounding rural ...

  17. Country watch: Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laver, S

    1999-01-01

    Tsungirirai is a counseling and information service developed during 1994 in response to the growing problem of HIV/AIDS in the small town of Norton, southwest of Harare, Zimbabwe. The objectives of the project include identification of key leaders in the area, determination of the setting in which HIV was spreading, and community consultation in program design and implementation. Tsungirirai's initial activities included a series of workshops on participatory techniques particularly the LADA (Listening-Appraisal-Dialogue-Action) method for key leaders, community men, women, and adolescents. Workshop participants demonstrated different views concerning HIV/AIDS problems. Key leaders viewed the HIV/AIDS problem within the context of existing laws that contradict traditional mores, while the youth linked the problem of HIV to the issue of unemployment and lack of recreation. Lessons learned include the following: 1) stop talking and listen; 2) start where people are at instead of telling them what they already know; 3) let the people decide; 4) turn a dream into reality; and 5) facilitate awareness process instead of leading it.

  18. HIV in Harare: the role and relevance of social stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen; Broom, Alex

    2014-01-01

    HIV is a significant social, political and economic problem in Zimbabwe. However, few researchers have explored peoples' experiences of living with HIV in that country. Drawing on 60 qualitative interviews conducted with Zimbabweans living in Harare in 2010, this paper focuses on how people from four different urban communities cope with HIV-related social stigma. To provide theoretical context to this issue, we utilised the ideas of Erving Goffman for exploring the individual experience of stigma and the concept of structural violence to understand stigma as a social phenomenon. This paper considers the relevance and role of stigma in the context of a country undergoing significant social, political and economic crisis. We investigated the strategies adopted by the Zimbabwean state and the influence of traditional and religious interpretations to appreciate the historical roots of HIV-related stigma. We took into account the ways in which the articulation of HIV with gender has caused women to experience stigma differently than men, and more intensely, and how grassroots activism and biomedical technologies have transformed the experience of stigma.

  19. Impact of HIV/AIDS to the tourism sector human resources: Case of selected hotels in Harare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengeni, D.M.F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the impacts of HIV/AIDS on human resources in the tourism sector in Zimbabwe’s capital city, Harare. Harare Hotels were used as a case study establishing how HIV/AIDS affects the workforce in the tourism sector and the consequent effects on service delivery. Visitors’ inflows into Zimbabwe have declined since the year 2000. To understand the reasons and related aspects, data was collected by way of questionnaires which were administered to 9 human resources managers and 9 marketing managers from hotels in Harare during the period of 2008 and 2009. These questionnaires were individually distributed and collected which resulted in 100% return rate. Human resources managers were used because they are involved directly with the social welfare of employees and marketing managers were used because they work in customer care and analyse service delivery. The findings of the study were that HIV/AIDS impact negatively to the hotel sector through deaths of skilled members. This was said to consequently leading to the reduction in service delivery and inconsistence in service delivery. Besides losing skilled members through death it was also discovered that the hotels were now moving HIV/AIDS effected victims to the back of the house to minimise their contact with guests. It was also discovered that hotels were using lot of funds to implement mitigation measures.

  20. Perceptions on the use of bottled water in restaurants in Harare's Central Business District (CBD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juba, Olivia Sakhile; Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai

    2018-06-01

    Bottled water use continues to expand worldwide and in the last two decades, a significant number of consumers have shifted from tap water to bottled water due to Cryptosporidium outbreaks. Bottled water consumption has increased in Harare due to erratic tap water supplies. Since 2011, forty bottled water brands have been banned because of failure to meet safety and quality standards due to contamination, unsuitable packaging, and wrong labelling. Nevertheless, the bottled water industry continues to thrive as local authorities fail to adequately purify municipal water. The study assessed the perceptions on drinking bottled water in restaurants within Harare's CBD. Demographic and social factors associated with bottled water users were established and the role and influence of stakeholders in bottling and distribution of water documented. A field survey through the administration of questionnaires to fifty restaurant users was carried out to assess the perceptions of people on the use of bottled water in terms of its safety and potential health benefits. Key informant interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview with ten local water bottling companies as well as representatives from the Environmental Management Agency (EMA) and Standards Association of Zimbabwe (SAZ). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Standard descriptive statistics were generated, with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Consumers used bottled water as their primary drinking water source when they perceived that tap water was not safe. Perceptions of purity of water, bottled water convenience, and tap water unavailability seemed to determine consumption patterns among users. Females in the 18-48 age groups were more likely to think that bottled water was cleaner, safer, tasted better and was more convenient than tap water. Consumers regularly purchased bottled water for drinking and used bottled water as their primary drinking water

  1. Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -disciplinary and semi-popular. The Zimbabwe Science News has ceased publication. ... An overview of solar and solar-related technologies in Zimbabwe · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  2. Experiences from Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meaningful impact at the grassroots. The establishment of .... Post-colonial peace in Zimbabwe was short-lived, as the Zimbabwe National. Army unit ... protest against the ZANU-PF establishment in post-colonial Zimbabwe. ... although there was of course a much longer and more complex history ..... social configurations.

  3. Infant, maternal, and geographic factors influencing gastroschisis related mortality in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfeld, Jordan C; Wren, Sherry M; Macheka, Nyasha; Mbuwayesango, Bothwell A; Bruzoni, Matias; Sylvester, Karl G; Kastenberg, Zachary J

    2015-12-01

    Survival for infants with gastroschisis in developed countries has improved dramatically in recent decades with reported mortality rates of 4-7%. Conversely, mortality rates for gastroschisis in sub-Saharan Africa remain as great as 60% in contemporary series. This study describes the burden of gastroschisis at the major pediatric hospital in Zimbabwe with the goal of identifying modifiable factors influencing gastroschisis-related infant mortality. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all cases of gastroschisis admitted to Harare Children's Hospital in 2013. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to describe infant, maternal, and geographic factors influencing survival. A total of 5,585 neonatal unit admissions were identified including 95 (1.7%) infants born with gastroschisis. Gastroschisis-related mortality was 84% (n = 80). Of infants with gastroschisis, 96% (n = 91) were born outside Harare Hospital, 82% (n = 78) were born outside Harare Province, and 23% (n = 25) were home births. The unadjusted odds of survival for these neonates with gastroschisis were decreased for low birth weight infants (age; OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01-0.50), and for those born to teenage mothers (age; OR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.01-0.46). There was also a trend toward decreased odds of survival for home births (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.02-1.34) and for those born outside Harare Province (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.10-1.22). Gastroschisis-related infant mortality in Zimbabwe is associated with well-known risk factors, including low birth weight, prematurity, and teenage mothers. However, modifiable factors identified in this study signify potential opportunities for developing innovative approaches to perinatal care in such a resource-constrained environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV in (and out of) the clinic: biomedicine, traditional medicine and spiritual healing in Harare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen; Broom, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary lived experiences of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are shaped by clinical and cultural encounters with illness. In sub-Saharan countries such as Zimbabwe, HIV is treated in very different ways in various therapeutic contexts including by biomedical experts, traditional medicine and faith healers. The co-existence of such expertise raises important questions around the potencies and limits of medicalisation and alternative healing practices in promoting HIV recovery. First, in this study, drawing on in-depth qualitative interviews with 60 people from poor urban areas in Harare, we explore the experiences of people living with and affected by HIV. Specifically, we sought to document, interrogate and reflect on their perceptions and experiences of biomedicine in relation to traditional medicine and spiritual healing. Their accounts indicate that traditional medicine and spiritual beliefs continue to significantly influence the way in which HIV is understood, and the forms of help and care people seek. Second, we observe the dramatic and overwhelmingly beneficial impact of Antiretroviral Therapy and conclude through Zimbabwean's own stories that limitations around delivery and wider structural inequalities impede its potential. Lastly, we explore some practical implications of the biomedical clinic (and alternative healing practices) being understood as sites of ideological and expert contestation. This paper aimed to add to our knowledge of the relationships between traditional medicine and spiritual healing in connection with biomedicine and how this may influence HIV treatment and prevention.

  5. Typhoid outbreak investigation in Dzivaresekwa, suburb of Harare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-08-18

    Aug 18, 2014 ... Abstract. Introduction: Typhoid fever is a systemic infection caused by a Gram negative bacterium, Salmonella typhi. Harare City reported 1078 cases of suspected typhoid fever cases from October 2011 to January 2012. We initiated an investigation to identify possible source of transmission so as to.

  6. Typhoid outbreak investigation in Dzivaresekwa, suburb of Harare

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2014-08-18

    Aug 18, 2014 ... typhoid fever carry the bacteria in their bloodstream and intestinal tract [1,2]. ... preparedness and response of the Harare City Health Department. Records of .... Treated shallow well water had residual chlorine of 0.1 mg/litre.

  7. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal contains original and review papers on all aspects of animal health in Zimbabwe and SADC countries, including articles by non-veterinarians. This journal did not publish any issues between 2002 and 2015 but has been revived and and it actively accepting papers ...

  8. Importation of canid rabies in a horse relocated from Zimbabwe to South Africa : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T. Sabeta

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In July 2003 a 2-year-old Thoroughbred colt was imported from Harare, Zimbabwe to the Ashburton Training Centre, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Five months after importation, the colt presented with clinical signs suggestive of rabies: it was uncoordinated, showed muscle tremors and was biting at itself. Brain tissue was submitted for analysis and the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the fluorescent antibody test and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the cytoplasmic domain of the glycoprotein and the G-L intergenic region of the rabies virus confirmed it to be an infection with a canid rabies virus, originating from an area in Zimbabwe endemic for the domestic dog (Canis familiaris and side-striped jackal (Canis adustus rabies.

  9. TREATMENT OF DIARRHOEA USING TRADITIONAL MEDICINES: CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH IN SOUTH AFRICA AND ZIMBABWE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders, diarrhoea in particular remain a major concern in South Africa and Zimbabwe resulting in high mortality rates when left untreated. This investigation was aimed at documenting herbal medicines used in the treatment of diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe. A review of literature on plant species used as remedies for diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe was undertaken by the use of different electronic databases such as Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, Scopus as well as library searches at the University of Fort Hare, South Africa and the National Herbarium of Zimbabwe (SRGH) in Harare, Zimbabwe. This study reported ten plant species most widely used to treat diarrhoea in South Africa and Zimbabwe. Of the lot, Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich.) Hochst. was the most popular medicinal plant used as antidiarrhoeal remedy (11 literature citations) in South Africa and Zimbabwe, followed by Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels and Schotia brachypetala Sond. with eight literature citations each. The roots (47.4%) are the most frequently used plant parts, followed by bark (26.3%), leaves (21.1%) and rhizomes (5.3%). The documented antidiarrhoeal activities of this repository of selected plant species against diarrhoea causing agents such as rotavirus, Escherichia coli , Shigella , Campylobacter , Giardia , Entamoeba histolytica , Salmonella , Yersinia and Vibrio cholerae calls for further investigation aimed at isolating phytochemical compounds responsible for antidiarrhoeal activities, their mode of action, and also establish their safety and efficacy. This cross-cultural acceptance of antidiarrhoeal herbal medicines and the use of the same plant species in different geographical zones serve as an indication of the importance of herbal medicines in primary healthcare of local communities.

  10. An Optimal Cost Effectiveness Study on Zimbabwe Cholera Seasonal Data from 2008–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Tridip; Mukhopadhyay, Soumalya; Bhowmick, Amiya Ranjan; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of cholera outbreak is a serious issue in underdeveloped and developing countries. In Zimbabwe, after the massive outbreak in 2008–09, cholera cases and deaths are reported every year from some provinces. Substantial number of reported cholera cases in some provinces during and after the epidemic in 2008–09 indicates a plausible presence of seasonality in cholera incidence in those regions. We formulate a compartmental mathematical model with periodic slow-fast transmission rate to study such recurrent occurrences and fitted the model to cumulative cholera cases and deaths for different provinces of Zimbabwe from the beginning of cholera outbreak in 2008–09 to June 2011. Daily and weekly reported cholera incidence data were collected from Zimbabwe epidemiological bulletin, Zimbabwe Daily cholera updates and Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Zimbabwe (OCHA, Zimbabwe). For each province, the basic reproduction number () in periodic environment is estimated. To the best of our knowledge, this is probably a pioneering attempt to estimate in periodic environment using real-life data set of cholera epidemic for Zimbabwe. Our estimates of agree with the previous estimate for some provinces but differ significantly for Bulawayo, Mashonaland West, Manicaland, Matabeleland South and Matabeleland North. Seasonal trend in cholera incidence is observed in Harare, Mashonaland West, Mashonaland East, Manicaland and Matabeleland South. Our result suggests that, slow transmission is a dominating factor for cholera transmission in most of these provinces. Our model projects cholera cases and cholera deaths during the end of the epidemic in 2008–09 to January 1, 2012. We also determine an optimal cost-effective control strategy among the four government undertaken interventions namely promoting hand-hygiene & clean water distribution, vaccination, treatment and sanitation for each province. PMID:24312540

  11. An initial study of insect succession on decomposing rabbit carrions in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyasha Mabika

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Of the dipteran species collected during the study, L. cuprina and C. albiceps could be important for further forensic studies since they were collected from the carcasses and also observed from the rearing units.

  12. Composting of selected organic wastes from peri-urban areas of Harare, Zimbabwe

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhindu, RL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available of selected o e a se f pi d degradation, atmospheric pollution, soil health, soil bio- waste and rely on agriculture as a source of livelihood. Mhindu et al. International Journal Of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture 2013, : http... is an important source of organic matter. Soil organic matter improves physico-chemical and biological properties and Composting as a waste management strategy has multiple benefits for peri-urban agriculture considering the scarcity of animal manures among small...

  13. The changing economic role of women in the urbanization process: a preliminary report from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakakis-smith, D W

    1984-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a survey, conducted to collect information on the present economic situation of women and the constraints they face in the choice of work in Zimbabwe, which has recently witnessed a steady growth in its urbanization. Questionnaires were administered to women in 3 district areas of the city of Harare--a middle class suburb within easy commuting distance to the main white collar employment in the city, a low income area of site-and-service housing in the semiperiphery of the city, and a densely populated, lower income, inner city district. There are clear contrasts among the economic activities of women in the 3 areas studied, but the factors which influence the activities seem to vary between and within the social groups, relating somewhat uneasily to the generalized concepts on the female labor market. The occupational analysis of Harare reveals not only the inadequacy of conventional dualistic theories on the labor market, but the somewhat limited utility of westernized concepts on the domestic role of women. The survey also showed strong spatial and geographic influence on women's work and the different opportunities that arise from particular residential locations in Harare. However, this was clearly tempered by social contacts and migrational histories, especially in the inner city areas, where proximity to potential employment was not exploited by many recent migrants. Political factors too were found to play an important role, in the particular circumstance of Zimbabwe, in affecting the residential and economic opportunities for households. In the middle class suburb and low income area studied, the allocation of site and service plots or mortgages was strongly influenced by one's previous combatant status during the struggle for independence. For instance, families with such a status which could be earned by men as well as women), and who are also members of the ruling ZANU-PF party have been favored since 1980.

  14. Antimicrobial resistence of Shigella species isolated during 2004 and 2005 from selected sites in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, N; Tarupiwa, A; Mudzori, J T

    2006-01-01

    To determine the predominant serotype and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Shigella isolates during 2004 and 2005 in Zimbabwe. Cross sectional study. National Microbiology Reference Laboratory (NMRL), Harare, Zimbabwe. 259 clinical isolates of Shigella species isolated during 2004 and 2005 in Zimbabwe were studied. These samples had been referred to the NMRL for further testing. Serotype and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Shigella species. Of the 259 clinical isolates of Shigella tested the following species were serotyped; 141 (54.4%) were S. flexneri; 70 (27%) S. sonnei; 38 (14.7%) S. dysenteriae and 10 (3.9%) S. boydii. About 4% of all Shigella isolates tested showed full sensitivity to commonly used antibiotics, 20.8% were resistant to one antibiotic only while 75.3% were resistant to at least two antibiotics. The most common resistance among Shigella species was to cotrimoxazole (89%), tetracycline (73%), ampicillin (49%) and chloramphenicol (41%). High susceptibility among Shigella species was observed to nalidixic acid (86%), ciprofloxacin (99%) and ceftazidine (99%). There was a low drug resistance of Shigella species to nalidixic acid, a drug of choice in Zimbabwe, except among Shigella dysenteriae type 1 strains. Continuous monitoring of the susceptibility patterns of Shigella species is important in order to detect the emergence of drug resistance and to update guidelines for antibiotic treatment in shigellosis.

  15. African Journals Online: Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 12 of 12 ... SAFERE: Southern African Feminist Review. SAFERE provides women with a writing platform which is feminist in content and ... The Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research comprised of four sections: Scholarly articles ...

  16. Migrant remittances and household wellbeing in urban Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracking, Sarah; Sachikonye, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    Evidence from household surveying in December 2005 in Harare and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, indicates that a wide network of international migrant remitters are ameliorating the economic crisis in Zimbabwe by sending monetary and in-kind transfers to over 50 per cent of urban households. The research combines quantitative measurement of scale and scope, with demographic and qualitative narrative to build a holistic picture of the typography of receiving and non-receiving households. A complex set of interrelated variables helps to explain why some households do and others do not receive income and goods from people who are away, and the economic and social extent of their subsequent benefit from them. Moreover, the mixed methods approach is designed to capture inter-household and likely macroeconomic effects of how households receive their goods and money; and of how they subsequently exchange (if applicable), store and spend it. Evidence emerges of a largely informal, international social welfare system, but one which is not without adverse inter-household effects for some. These include suffering exclusion from markets suffering from inflationary pressures, not least as a result of other people’s remittances. This paper explores the role of remittances, within this internationalised informal welfare system which we can map from our household survey, in reframing vulnerability and marginalization differentially among and between our subject households.

  17. Gender, culture and changing attitudes: experiences of HIV in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen; Broom, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This paper draws on a series of qualitative interviews with 60 people living in economically poor communities of Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe, to provide new insight into the cultural landscape of HIV. While there has been extensive exploration of gender, sexuality, culture and HIV in Zimbabwe, there is a need to revisit these issues given the country's recent political and economic history. These questions have shaped the meanings that have been created around HIV (i.e., notions of HIV-as-death and as being produced by promiscuity) and the gendered mediation of cultural practices (i.e., forms of sexual expression and treatment uptake). Drawing on the accounts from a group directly affected by HIV, we illustrate the persistence of gendered and spiritualised ideas about 'blame', 'transmission' and 'treatment' and the disproportionate burden that still falls on Zimbabwean women. We conclude with an exploration of how everyday understandings of HIV may be shifting and the ways in which marginality, discrimination and stigma may be being challenged by openness, dialogue and attitude change.

  18. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research comprised of four sections: Scholarly articles ... A Requiem Too Soon or a Landing Strand Too Far? ... Mathematics (STEM) Education in Zimbabwe Secondary Schools: Access, Quality, Policy ...

  19. Enumeration of CD4 and CD8 T-cells in HIV infection in Zimbabwe using a manual immunocytochemical method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomo, E; Ndhlovu, P; Vennervald, B J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To enumerate CD4 and CD8 T-cells using the simple and cheap immuno-alkaline phosphatase (IA) method and to compare it with flow cytometry (FC); and to study the effects of duration of sample storage on the IA method results. DESIGN: Method comparison study. SETTING: Blair Research...... Laboratory, Harare, Zimbabwe. SUBJECTS: 41 HIV positive and 11 HIV negative men and women from Harare participating in HIV studies at Blair Research Laboratory, Zimbabwe. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CD4 and CD8 T-cell counts by FC and the IA method. RESULTS: The IA method and FC were highly correlated for CD4...... counts (Spearman rs = 0.91), CD4 percentage (rs = 0.84), CD8 count (rs = 0.83), CD8 percentage (rs = 0.96) and CD4/CD8 ratio (rs = 0.89). However, CD4 cell counts and percentage measured by the IA method were (mean difference +/- SE) 133 +/- 24 cells/microL [corrected] and 6.7 +/- 1.1% higher than those...

  20. Cholera in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruyt, E.

    2009-01-01

    By the end of December 2008, alarming reports and articles concerning the cholera outbreak in Zimbabwe received plenty of international media coverage. By that time nearly 30000 cases of cholera infections and 1600 cholera deaths had been reported. In the first week of January 2009, a System

  1. The Determinants of the Compliance to Public Procurement Policy Requirements among Public Enterprises in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Sandada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Many public entities in Zimbabwe are operating in a very volatile environment characterised by public procurement systems open to abuse. Zimbabwe is one of the first countries in Africa to have a Procurement Act however non-compliance issues are still a challenge. Public procurement scandals have been a hot topic with the media and also with the Report of the Auditor General for the financial year ended December 31, 2014 having picked on a lot of issues relating to non-compliance with procurement regulations in a number of public enterprises. The purpose of the study was to assess the influence selected factors (enforcement, professionalism, political interferences, familiarity with Procurement Act regulations and ethics on compliance to procurement regulations within the public entities. A quantitative survey research approach was used to collect data from 144 public procurement professionals in public entities in Harare, Zimbabwe. SPSS software version 21 was used to process the data that were later analysed through correlation and regression analyses. Familiarity with procurement regulations, enforcement and political interference were found to be statistically significant predictors of compliance. The managerial implications and direction for future research are provided.

  2. Children living and/or working on the streets in Harare: Issues and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children living and/or working on the streets in Harare: Issues and challenges. ... Journal of Social Development in Africa ... had, perhaps as a result of the prevailing socioeconomic hardships, abrogated this crucial responsibility, and in some ...

  3. Harare Shona slang: A linguistic study | Mawadza | Zambezia: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 27, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Changes in coronary heart disease risk profiles of HIV patients in Zimbabwe over 9 months: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou DT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Danai Tavonga Zhou,1,2 Olav Oektedalen,3 Sandra Shawarira-Bote,4 Babill Stray-Pedersen5 1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe; 2Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 4Newlands Clinic, Harare, Zimbabwe; 5Institute of Clinical Medicine, University in Oslo and Womens Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Abstract: Dyslipidemia, hypertension, inflammation, and coronary heart disease (CHD are adverse events in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients even if they are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. Yet, data on CHD risk induced by HIV or ART in sub-Saharan Africa are limited. The aim of this longitudinal study was to describe changes in CHD risk profiles measured by lipids, inflammatory markers, and Framingham scores among HIV-positive patients previously reported from Harare, Zimbabwe. Patients were grouped into ART-experienced patients (n=147 and ART-naïve patients (n=23 and followed up for 9 months. Generalized least squares random-effects modeling was applied to explain changes in total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, low-density lipoprotein, TC/HDL ratio, myeloperoxidase, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, and Framingham scores over the 9-month period. Independent variables included age, sex, monthly earning, body mass index, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure, duration of HIV diagnosis, duration of ART, viral load, and CD4 count. In ART-experienced patients, there was a substantial decrease in TC over time, ART-negative patients showed a significant increase in TC and HDL over time, and the increase in TC was associated with high viral load and low duration of HIV diagnosis, while increase in HDL was associated with young age, low body mass index, and low SBP. Framingham risk scores increased with time in

  5. Fuel switching in Harare: An almost ideal demand system approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambwera, Muyeye; Folmer, Henk

    2007-01-01

    In urban areas several energy choices are available and the amount of (a given type of) fuel consumed is based on complex household decision processes. This paper analyzes urban fuel (particularly firewood) demand in an energy mix context by means of an Almost Ideal Demand System based on a survey carried out among 500 households in Harare in 2003. Using a multi-stage budgeting approach, the model estimates the share of energy in total household expenditure and the shares of firewood, electricity and kerosene in total energy expenditure. Using the model results simulations show that the main policy handles to reduce the demand for firewood and to mitigate environmental degradation such as deforestation include decreasing prices of alternative fuels, notably kerosene. Moreover, in the long run sound economic policy will positively impact on the energy budget whereas education and the degree of electrification will contribute to a reduction of the use of firewood

  6. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal contains original and review papers on all aspects of animal health in Zimbabwe and SADC countries, including articles by non-veterinarians. Section Policies. Articles. Checked Open Submissions, Checked Indexed, Checked Peer Reviewed. Publication Frequency.

  7. Is fertility falling in Zimbabwe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udjo, E O

    1996-01-01

    With an unequalled contraceptive prevalence rate in sub-Saharan Africa, of 43% among currently married women in Zimbabwe, the Central Statistical Office (1989) observed that fertility has declined sharply in recent years. Using data from several surveys on Zimbabwe, especially the birth histories of the Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey, this study examines fertility trends in Zimbabwe. The results show that the fertility decline in Zimbabwe is modest and that the decline is concentrated among high order births. Multivariate analysis did not show a statistically significant effect of contraception on fertility, partly because a high proportion of Zimbabwean women in the reproductive age group never use contraception due to prevailing pronatalist attitudes in the country.

  8. The influence of culture on female entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomusa B. Mazonde

    2016-12-01

    Aim: The aim of this paper was to contribute to an understanding of how female entrepreneurs in a patriarchal African society can work within cultural constraints to achieve success within their own terms of reference. Setting: The study took place in Zimbabwe among female entrepreneurs who had recently formalised their businesses Methods: Using a qualitative interpretive research design, in-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 43 African female entrepreneurs running their own businesses in the Zimbabwean cities of Harare and Bulawayo. Results: The complex interplay of macro- (national cultural characteristics, meso- (institutional and social factors, and micro- (individual identity level factors shaped the ways in which the women dealt with the shackles of patriarchy, inequality and high power distance that had historically impeded their economic participation. Through their own agency, they mobilised their public and private identities separately, balancing the seemingly incompatible roles of home-maker vs entrepreneur. Conclusion: Zimbabwean women successfully managed the interaction between their different social roles and identities to balance domestic obligations with income generation to better the lives of their families.

  9. Data on introduced plants in Zimbabwe: Floristic changes and patterns of collection based on historical herbarium records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Maroyi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available National herbaria with significant historical plant collections are critical to tracking floristic changes and patterns, which include the introduction and spread of non-native plant species. To explore the importance of herbarium specimen data in understanding floristic changes in Zimbabwe, the plant collections housed by the National Herbarium (SRGH in Harare, Zimbabwe were utilized with historical specimens dating back to 1870. A list of naturalised plant taxa and collection data were compiled. A total of 2916 plant specimens were recorded, comprising of 401 taxa, 237 genera and 76 plant families. Twenty eight specimens (1.0% were collected between 1870 and 1908, prior to the establishment of the National Herbarium in 1909 and 123 specimens (4.2% were collected in the first 25 years of the establishment of the institute (1909–1934. Intensive collection of herbarium specimens of casual, naturalised and invasive alien plant species occurred between 1950 and 1970. This data demonstrates the utility of plant species data housed in the National Herbaria and how such data can be used to map floristic changes and patterns. Keywords: Casual, Floristic changes, Invasive, Naturalised, National herbarium, Zimbabwe

  10. Greywater reuse: A strategy for water demand management in Harare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madungwe, Emaculate; Sakuringwa, Saniso

    Greywater is wastewater from baths, sinks and washing machines, accounting for about 60% of the outflow from homes. It contains little pathogens and 90% less nitrogen than toilet water, so does not require the same treatment process. With the increasing demand for freshwater, its use may reduce irrigation water needs, increasing its availability of freshwater for other primary uses. Agriculture is the main water consumer in Africa, which cannot be compromised due to its role in domestic food security and export supplies. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate findings of the research done on benefits of greywater reuse in some countries, applicable to African countries. In Australia, greywater reuse has reduced freshwater demand, strain on wastewater treatment plants and energy consumption. Aquifer recharge has improved due to increased infiltration flows from greywater uses. In Lebanon, greywater is a valuable resource for encouraging plant growth from nutrients that may otherwise have been wasted. Palestine shares similar climate and water scarcity conditions with most arid sub-Saharan African countries, yet utilizes grey water in production of crops and citrus fruits. Thus use of grey water should be possible in African cities such as Harare, where nearly two thirds of the population rely on agriculture for livelihoods. The problem of blue green algae in sewerage ponds and water reservoirs is significantly reduced by household reuse of grey water in Mexico. Water savings are increased and expenses reduced, as illustrated by the reduction in consumption of municipality freshwater supplies in South African urban areas. Rural communities and schools in Namibia and Egypt have raised funds from grey water reuse in banana plantations. A possible constraint to this strategy could be the unavailability of appropriate technology for primary treatment of grey water before reuse. This strategy may pose health risks where water quality tests are unknown or unavailable

  11. Transactions of the Zimbabwe Scientific Association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Zimbabwe Scientific Association was founded in Bulawayo in 1899 (called the Rhodesia Scientific Assocation at the time) to promote the study and advancement of science in Zimbabwe and to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of scientific knowledge. Its journal, Transactions of the Zimbabwe Scientific ...

  12. Back to School: The Quality of Citizenship Education in Harare - An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review. Back to School: The Quality of Citizenship Education in Harare - An Evaluation of the Implementation of the Citizenship Curriculum at Primary School by Oswell Namasasu. Scholar's Press (2013); ISBN: 978-3-639-70132-6; pp. 303. Reviewed by Professor F. Zindi (Editor-in-Chief, ZJER). “The ideas displayed ...

  13. A serosurvey of bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease in a convenience sample of sheep and cattle herds in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Stuart J G; Bolwell, Charlotte; Rogers, Chris W; Musuka, Godfrey; Kelly, Patrick; Guthrie, Alan; Mellor, Philip S; Hamblin, Chris

    2017-11-14

    A convenience sample of sheep and cattle herds around the cities of Harare, Kwekwe and Bulawayo, located in the Highveld region of Zimbabwe, was used to estimate the seroprevalence and sero-incidence of bluetongue virus (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) antibodies. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to identify serum antibodies against BTV and EHDV across three rainy seasons. The median sero-prevalence of BTV and EHDV antibodies in cattle was 62% (interquartile range [IQR]: 30-89) and 56% (IQR: 5-77), respectively. In sheep, the median sero-prevalence of BTV and EHDV was 41% (IQR: 19-63) and 0% (IQR: 0-21), respectively. Median sero-incidences of BTV and EHDV antibodies in cattle of 43% (IQR: 22-67) and 27% (IQR: 9-57) respectively were recorded. The median sero-incidence of BTV in sheep was 14% (IQR: 6-23). Based on these preliminary findings, animal health workers in Zimbabwe should continue to monitor the exposure rates of cattle and sheep to BTV and consider the possibility of strains emerging with increased pathogenicity. There are no previous published reports of antibodies against EHDV in Zimbabwe so the possibility of epizootic haemorrhagic disease existing in domestic livestock should now be considered by Zimbabwean animal health officials. Seroconversions to BTV and EHDV occurred predominantly at the end of each rainy season (March and April), which generally corresponds to high numbers of the Culicoides vectors. BTV isolations were made from three individual cows in two of the sentinel herds and all three were identified as serotype 3. This is the first time BTV serotype 3 has been recorded in Zimbabwe, although its presence in neighbouring South Africa is well documented.

  14. Serotype markers in a Streptococcus agalactiae strain collection from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavenyengwa R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Group B streptococci (GBS from Southern African areas have been less well characterized. Our objective was to study serotype and serovariant distribution of carrier GBS strains as part of a study of the epidemiology of GBS carriage in pregnant women from Zimbabwe. Materials and Methods: We studied GBS isolated from 121 healthy pregnant women living in Harare and surrounding areas, Zimbabwe. Capsular polysaccharide (CPS testing for serotype determination and surface-anchored protein testing for serosubtype determination were done by gene-based serotyping (PCR, except for the proteins R3 and a novel protein called Z, which were detected by antibody-based methods. Results: Strains of the CPS types Ia (15.7%, Ib (11.6%, II (8.3%, III (38.8%, V (24.0% and NT (1.7% were detected along with the strain-variable proteins Cί (15.7% of isolates, Cα (19.8%, Alp1 (epsilon-22.3%, Alp3 (5.0%, R4/Rib (46.3%, R3 (27.3%, Z (27.3%, and SAR5 (28.9%, which encodes the R5 protein. Up to four of the protein genes could be possessed or the gene product expressed by one and the same isolate. A total of 32 serovariants were detected. The findings assessed by us as most important were the very low prevalence of the gene Alp3 (Alp3 - 4.9%, high prevalence of R4 (Rib - 46.2%, the proteins R3 (27.3%, Z (27.3%, and of SAR5 (R5 - 28.9%. The low prevalence of Alp3, notably in GBS type V strains, differed from findings with CPS type V GBS from non-African areas. Bacteria of the various CPS types showed distinct CPS/protein-marker associations. Conclusion: The results are of importance in relation to regional variations of GBS phenotypes and genotypes and thus, of importance in planning and research in the context of future vaccine formulations.

  15. What transitional justice in Zimbabwe? Women of Zimbabwe Arise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Originally from Canada, she married a Zimbabwean nationalist in exile in Zambia and ... been frequently subject to abuse by the police, including being beaten, arrested, incarcerated ... 'peace' and 'reconciliation' in the new Zimbabwe. ... the banking system, agricultural production, industry and mining, and even retailing, in ...

  16. Overview | Kowero | Zimbabwe Science News

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articles presented in this special issue are drawn from research findings of the project “Management of Miombo Woodlands”. This is being implemented in five Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) countries (Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania) by the Center for International Forestry Research ...

  17. The Jerusarema Dance of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Kariamu Welsh

    1985-01-01

    Traces the historical development of the Jerusarema, a traditional dance of the Shona of Zimbabwe, from its origins as a form of military defense to its present role in recreation and ceremony. Describes the Jerusarema, classifies it in relation to other African dance forms, and discusses how it is learned. (KH)

  18. Teacher Efficacy in Rural Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Judy K.; Song'ony, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The need to address contextual variables, such as cultural bias and cultural norms, is a common challenge for researchers in international education. This article highlights societal conditions and cultural issues that could have impacted teacher efficacy data in Zimbabwe, a country known for its ongoing economic crisis, political repression, and…

  19. Zimbabwe Journal of Technological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Zimbabwe Journal of Technological Sciences receives and publishes articles that address issues in Technology as a developmental field in Africa. The aim is to develop new technological knowledge that is geared to enhance the lives of the African people through solving pertinent problems that affect them.

  20. Individual resilience as a strategy to counter employment barriers for people with epilepsy in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugumbate, Jacob; Gray, Mel

    2017-09-01

    Understanding individual resilience helps to improve employment opportunities of people with epilepsy. This is significant because, in Zimbabwe, as in many other countries in the Global South, people with epilepsy encounter several barriers in a context of less-than-ideal public services. Despite this disadvantage, some people with epilepsy have better employment outcomes for reasons including level of seizure control, social background, employment support services, and individual resilience. This article reports on data from participants (n=8), who were part of a larger study (n=30) on employment experiences of people with epilepsy in Harare. The study used in-depth interviews with the participants, who were all service users and members of the Epilepsy Support Foundation (ESF) in Harare. The eight resilient participants comprised four males and four females aged between 26-48years, who were selected because, unlike the remaining 22 participants, they had overcome chronic unemployment. Seven of the eight participants were employed, while one had recently become unemployed. Views of service providers (n=7) were sought on the experiences of people with epilepsy through a focus group discussion. The service providers included two health workers, three social service workers, and two disability advocacy workers. Data were analysed using NVivo, a computer-assisted qualitative data analysis package. The study found that participants experienced barriers, such as a lack of medical treatment, yet this was important for education and training, lack of finances for training, and negative attitudes at workplaces. Despite these barriers, participants had overcome chronic unemployment due to their individual resilience characterised by: (i) a 'fighting spirit', (ii) being their own advocates, and (iii) having a mastery over, and acceptance of, their epilepsy. The research concluded that, where people with epilepsy faced barriers, as in Zimbabwe, individual resilience acted as

  1. Data on introduced plants in Zimbabwe: Floristic changes and patterns of collection based on historical herbarium records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2017-12-01

    National herbaria with significant historical plant collections are critical to tracking floristic changes and patterns, which include the introduction and spread of non-native plant species. To explore the importance of herbarium specimen data in understanding floristic changes in Zimbabwe, the plant collections housed by the National Herbarium (SRGH) in Harare, Zimbabwe were utilized with historical specimens dating back to 1870. A list of naturalised plant taxa and collection data were compiled. A total of 2916 plant specimens were recorded, comprising of 401 taxa, 237 genera and 76 plant families. Twenty eight specimens (1.0%) were collected between 1870 and 1908, prior to the establishment of the National Herbarium in 1909 and 123 specimens (4.2%) were collected in the first 25 years of the establishment of the institute (1909-1934). Intensive collection of herbarium specimens of casual, naturalised and invasive alien plant species occurred between 1950 and 1970. This data demonstrates the utility of plant species data housed in the National Herbaria and how such data can be used to map floristic changes and patterns.

  2. Effectiveness of conservation agriculture practices on soil erosion processes in semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikwari, Emmanuel; Mhaka, Luke; Gwandu, Tariro; Chipangura, Tafadzwa; Misi Manyanga, Amos; Sabastian Matsenyengwa, Nyasha; Rabesiranana, Naivo; Mabit, Lionel

    2016-04-01

    - The application of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) in soil erosion and redistribution studies has gained popularity since the late 1980s. In Zimbabwe, soil erosion research was mostly based on conventional methods which included the use of erosion plots for quantitative measurements and erosion models for predicting soil losses. Only limited investigation to explore the possibility of using Caesium-137 (Cs-137) has been reported in the early 1990s for undisturbed and cultivated lands in Zimbabwe. In this study, the Cs-137 technique was applied to assess the impact of soil conservation practices on soil losses and to develop strategies and support effective policies that help farmers in Zimbabwe for sustainable land management. The study was carried out at the Makoholi research station 30 km north of the Masvingo region which is located 260 km south of Harare. The area is semi-arid and the study site comprises coarse loamy sands, gleyic lixisols. The conservation agriculture (CA) practices used within the area since 1988 include (i) direct seeding (DS) with mulch, (ii) CA basins with mulch, and (iii) 18 years direct seeding, left fallow for seven years and turned into conventional tillage since 2012 (DS/F/C). The Cs-137 reference inventory was established at 214 ± 16 Bq/m2. The mean inventories for DS, CA basins and DS/F/C were 195, 190 and 214 Bq/m2 respectively. Using the conversion Mass Balance Model 2 on the Cs-137 data obtained along transects for each of the practices, gross erosion rates were found to be 7.5, 7.3 and 2.6 t/ha/yr for direct seeding, CA basins and the DS/F/C while the net erosion rates were found to be 3.8, 4.6 and 0 t/ha/yr respectively. Sediment delivery ratios were 50%, 63% and 2% in the respective order. These preliminary results showed the effectiveness of DS over CA basins in erosion control. The efficiency of fallowing in controlling excessive soil loss was significant in the plot that started as DS for 18 years but left fallow for 7

  3. Escherichia coli Contamination across Multiple Environmental Compartments (Soil, Hands, Drinking Water, and Handwashing Water) in Urban Harare: Correlations and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navab-Daneshmand, Tala; Friedrich, Max N D; Gächter, Marja; Montealegre, Maria Camila; Mlambo, Linn S; Nhiwatiwa, Tamuka; Mosler, Hans-Joachim; Julian, Timothy R

    2018-03-01

    Escherichia coli pathotypes (i.e., enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic) have been identified among the pathogens most responsible for moderate-to-severe diarrhea in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Pathogenic E. coli are transmitted from infected human or animal feces to new susceptible hosts via environmental reservoirs such as hands, water, and soil. Commensal E. coli , which includes nonpathogenic E. coli strains, are widely used as fecal bacteria indicator, with their presence associated with increased likelihood of enteric pathogens and/or diarrheal disease. In this study, we investigated E. coli contamination in environmental reservoirs within households ( N = 142) in high-population density communities of Harare, Zimbabwe. We further assessed the interconnectedness of the environmental compartments by investigating associations between, and household-level risk factors for, E. coli contamination. From the data we collected, the source and risk factors for E. coli contamination are not readily apparent. One notable exception is the presence of running tap water on the household plot, which is associated with significantly less E. coli contamination of drinking water, handwashing water, and hands after handwashing. In addition, E. coli levels on hands after washing are significantly associated with handwashing water contamination, hand contamination before washing, and diarrhea incidence. Finally, we observed that animal ownership increases E. coli contamination in soil, and E. coli in soil are correlated with contamination on hands before washing. This study highlights the complexity of E. coli contamination in household environments within LMICs. More, larger, studies are needed to better identify sources and exposure pathways of E. coli -and enteric pathogens generally-to identify effective interventions.

  4. Within-Gender Changes in HIV Prevalence among Adults between 2005/6 and 2010/11 in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Gonese

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe has reported significant declines in HIV prevalence between 2005/06 and 2010/11 Demography and Health Surveys; a within-gender analysis to identify the magnitude and factors associated with this change, which can be masked, is critical for targeting interventions.We analyzed change in HIV prevalence for 6,947 women and 5,848 men in the 2005/06 survey and 7,313 women and 6,250 men in 2010/11 surveys using 2005/06 as referent. The data was analyzed taking into consideration the survey design and therefore the svy, mean command in Stata was used in both linear and logistic regression.There were similar proportional declines in prevalence at national level for males (15% p=0.011 and females (16%,p=0.008. However, there were variations in decline by provincial setting, demographic variables of age, educational level and some sexual risk behaviours. In logistic regression analysis, statistically significant declines were observed among men in Manicaland, Mashonaland East and Harare (p<0.01 and for women in Manicaland, Mashonaland Central and Harare (p<0.01. Although not statistically significant, numerical increases were observed among men in Matebeleland North, Matebeleland South, Midlands and for both men and women in Bulawayo. Young women in the age range 15-34 experienced a decline in prevalence (p<0.01 while older men 30-44 had a statistically significant decline (p<0.01. Having a secondary and above education, regardless of employment status for both men and women recorded a significant decline. For sexual risk behaviours, currently in union for men and women and not in union for women there was a significant decline in prevalence.Zimbabwe has reported a significant decline among both men and women but there are important differentials across provinces, demographic characteristics and sexual risk behaviours that suggest that the epidemic in Zimbabwe is heterogeneous and therefore interventions must be targeted in order to achieve

  5. Cultural adaptation of a cognitive-behavioural intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe: Nzira Itsva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bere, Tarisai; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Magidson, Jessica F; Chibanda, Dixon; Chingono, Alfred; Munjoma, Ronald; Macpherson, Kirsty; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Kidia, Khameer; Safren, Steven A; Abas, Melanie

    2017-09-01

    Few evidence-based interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy have been adapted for use in Africa. We selected, culturally adapted and tested the feasibility of a cognitive-behavioural intervention for adherence and for delivery in a clinic setting in Harare, Zimbabwe. The feasibility of the intervention was evaluated using a mixed-methods assessment, including ratings of provider fidelity of intervention delivery, and qualitative assessments of feasibility using individual semi-structured interviews with counsellors (n=4) and patients (n=15). The intervention was feasible and acceptable when administered to 42 patients and resulted in improved self-reported adherence in a subset of 15 patients who were followed up after 6months.

  6. Overpopulation and unemployment in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufuka, K; Iverson, S

    1996-02-01

    The size of Zimbabwe's African population has grown dramatically over the past 50 years, with 5.7 children on average being born per woman. The following factors are responsible for the rapid population growth in Zimbabwe: the country's economic prosperity during the period of the Central African Federation from 1953 to 1963, and its successful food policy before and after independence; the success of the health system, also in both periods; and the fact that women have not been incorporated into the economy as wage-earners. A brief historical overview is presented, followed by sections on the food policy and health system, reasons for the persistence of large families, and the relationship between wage-earning by women and the birth rate. The author also describes some of the problems caused by overpopulation. Engaging more women in regular wage-earning employment is the key to controlling the birth rate in Zimbabwe. Current government policies encouraging female employment in government services and the economy in general, along with the expansion of contraceptive services, could influence female fertility over the long term.

  7. Child Sexual Abuse in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantula, Fennie; Saloojee, Haroon

    2016-01-01

    Although child sexual abuse is a significant public health problem globally, its incidence, prevention, and management is less well described in resource-poor settings. In poorer settings prevention initiatives assume even more importance since resources for managing abused children are severely limited. This article examines the current status of policy and practice related to the prevention of child sexual abuse in Zimbabwe. It identifies implementation challenges and highlights opportunities that could be embraced to reduce CSA in Zimbabwe, based on evidence synthesized from recent work. Although Zimbabwe has a well-established legal and regulatory framework to protect children from child sexual abuse, implementation of existing policies is weak. Financial, human, and material resource constraints are frequently cited to explain limited prevention activity. Effective strategies for the prevention of child sexual abuse should focus on implementing existing legislation, targeting schoolchildren, and getting community involvement. A dedicated budget would help entrench these strategies, but gains can be achieved even in the absence of this.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance was high for most widely used drugs in Zimbabwe with high sensitivity to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin. Conclusion: Although there are no recent reports in the literature of the presence of MRSA in Zimbabwe, this study documented a 7.0% prevalence. Resistance to common antibiotics is high and ...

  9. Correlations between Geomagnetic Disturbances and Field-Aligned Currents during the 22-29 July 2004 Storm Time Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R.; Woodroffe, J. R.; Morley, S.; Aruliah, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Using the CHAMP fluxgate magnetometer to calculate field-aligned current (FAC) densities and magnetic latitudes, with SuperMAG ground magnetometers analogously providing ground geomagnetic disturbances (GMD) magnetic perturbations and latitudes, we probe FAC locations and strengths as predictors of GMD locations and strengths. We also study the relationships between solar wind drivers and global magnetospheric activity, and both FACs and GMDs using IMF Bz and the Sym-H index. We present an event study of the 22-29 July 2004 storm time interval, which had particularly large GMDs given its storm intensity. We find no correlation between FAC and GMD magnitudes, perhaps due to CHAMP orbit limitations or ground magnetometer coverage. There is, however, a correlation between IMF Bz and nightside GMD magnitudes, supportive of their generation via tail reconnection. IMF Bz is also correlated with dayside FAC and GMD magnetic latitudes, indicating solar wind as an initial driver. The ring current influence increases during the final storm, with improved correlations between the Sym-H index and both FAC magnetic latitudes and GMD magnitudes. Sym-H index correlations may only be valid for higher intensity storms; a statistical analysis of many storms is needed to verify this.

  10. Electricity from bagasse in Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbohwa, C.; Fukuda, S.

    2003-01-01

    Zimbabwe has suffered electrical power shortages resulting in electrical energy imports rising to between 40% and 50% of total energy needs. Electricity generation capacity has stagnated at around 2000 Megawatts (MW e ) since 1985, when two thermal units totaling 440 MW e were completed at Hwange. The effective capacity is 1.75 GW e . The current plan is to increase capacity by installing 600 MW e at Hwange at a cost of at least US $ 600 million. Raising this level of capital is difficult hence over the last 15 years there has been a failure to increase capacity. This article is based on a study of bagasse cogeneration in Zimbabwe and Mauritius conducted over a two-year period. It discusses technology improvements that can be made in the sugar sector to improve process and energy efficiency for the purposes of becoming an independent power producer that supplies power to the grid continuously throughout the year. Power plant investment in the sugar industry offers a bridging and realizable alternative for electricity generation in Zimbabwe. Investment in a 35 MW e bagasse (moisturized fiber left when sugar has been extracted from sugarcane) system would require a capital of about US$ 35 million using modern technology based on experiences in Mauritius and Reunion. A technical and economic evaluation and analysis reveals that bagasse power development is technically and economically feasible if electricity is priced at the long-term marginal cost. At current import prices, financial assistance from the global environment facility and/or the clean development mechanism of the Kyoto protocol would be necessary. The solving of the current political and economic problems in the country would pave the way for attracting a technical partner and development, of bagasse power using domestic and international financing

  11. Social protection initiatives for Zimbabwe's vulnerable groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan African region. ... especially for vulnerable groups. At independence in 1980, Zimbabwe pledged to promote a viable social protection system that would be predicated on the principles of social justice and equality of opportunity.

  12. REFORMATIONS IN ZIMBABWE'S JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    1996-05-23

    May 23, 1996 ... The article is based on a desk review of existing literature on juvenile crime in the country. ... that Zimbabwe's juvenile justice system is transforming from being ... recommendations include expanding the Pre-trial Diversion ...

  13. Zimbabwes vahistati tuhandeid poodnikke / Arko Olesk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Olesk, Arko, 1981-

    2007-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 9. august lk. 7. Zimbabwe võimud vahistasid 7600 poodnikku, kes ei allunud valitsuse korraldusele alandada kaupade hindu poole võrra, et ohjeldada hüperinflatsiooni

  14. Zimbabwe's Exodus: Crisis, Migration, Survival | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Jul 1, 2010 ... ... of exile and return, we can glimpse the extraordinary people behind the ... The book explores the relationship between Zimbabwe's economic and ... partnering on a new initiative, aimed at reducing the emerging risk that.

  15. World Small Hydropower Development Report 2013 - Zimbabwe

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jonker Klunne, W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available in 2006. With the current economic and political situation in Zimbabwe improving, the drive by the Government to encourage independent power producers, the prospects for the development of small hydropower are promising....

  16. Zimbabwe Journal of Technological Sciences: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The editorial policy of the Zimbabwe Journal Technological Sciences is to review and publish high ... attrition and retention in technological institutions and research issues and concerns in technology. ... Chinhoyi University of Technology

  17. Zimbabwe | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... for research and higher education when we began supporting research there in 1981. ... indigenous vegetables, helping raise awareness of their nutritional value. ... In 2011, Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health and Child Welfare adopted some of ...

  18. Dental caries and oral health practice among 12 year old school children from low socio-economic status background in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuvadze, Brighton Tasara; Mahachi, Lovemore; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases affecting children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Previous studies show a higher prevalence of dental caries in children from low socio-economic status backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of dental caries among 12 year old children in urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe and establish preliminary baseline data. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 12 year old children at primary schools in Harare and Bikita district. A Pre-tested questionnaire was administered to elicit information from the participants on tooth cleaning, dietary habits and dental experience. Dental caries status was assessed using the DMFT index following World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Our results showed a high prevalence of dental caries in both urban (59.5%) and rural (40.8%) children. The mean DMFT in urban and rural areas was 1.29 and 0.66, respectively. Furthermore, our data showed a general lack of knowledge on oral health issues by the participants. There is high prevalence of dental caries among 12 years old school children in both urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe. This calls for early preventive strategies and treatment services. We recommend incorporation of oral health education in the elementary school curricula.

  19. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research - Vol 30, No 1 (2018)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research. ... A Requiem Too Soon or a Landing Strand Too Far? ... and Mathematics (STEM) Education in Zimbabwe Secondary Schools: Access, Quality, Policy · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  20. Electoral Politics in Zimbabwe: Authoritarianism Versus the People

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2006-08-31

    Aug 31, 2006 ... ZANU-PF party. Human rights groups in Zimbabwe report that the majority of .... both the Zimbabwe Constitution and the Electoral Act (1990) have been ... The political environment did not accord the eligible voters their basic.

  1. The burden and risk factors of Sexually Transmitted Infections and Reproductive Tract Infections among pregnant women in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjoma Marshal W

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually transmitted infections (STIs and Reproductive tract infections (RTIs are responsible for high morbidity among women. We aim to quantify the magnitude of the burden and risk factors of STI/RTI s among pregnant women in Zimbabwe. Methods A cross sectional study of pregnant women enrolled at 36 weeks of gestation from the national PMTCT program. Study was conducted from three peri-urban clinics around Harare Zimbabwe offering maternal and child health services. Results A total of 691 pregnant women were enrolled. Prevalence of HSV was (51.1%, HIV (25.6% syphilis (1.2%, Trichomonas vaginalis (11.8%, bacterial vaginosis (32.6% and Candidiasis (39.9%. Seven percent of the women had genital warts, 3% had genital ulcers and 28% had an abnormal vaginal discharge. Prevalence of serological STIs and vaginal infections were 51% and 64% respectively. Risk factors for a positive serologic STI were increasing age above 30 years, polygamy and multigravid; adjusted OR (95% CI 2.61(1.49-4.59, 2.16(1.06-4.39, 3.89(1.27-11.98 respectively, partner taking alcohol and number of lifetime sexual partners. For vaginal infections it was age at sexual debut; OR (95% CI 1.60(1.06-2.42. More than 25% of the women reported previous STI treatment. Fifty two percent reported ever use of condoms and 65% were on oral contraceptives. Mean age gap for sexual partners was 6.3 years older. Conclusions There is a high morbidity of STI/RTIs in this cohort. There is need to continuously screen, counsel, treat and monitor trends of STI/RTIs to assess if behaviour changes lead to reduction in infections and their sustainability.

  2. The Role and Importance of Local Economic Development in Urban Development: A Case of Harare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Mandisvika

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the role and importance of Local Economic Development as a means of enhancing urban development paying particular attention to the regulators of Local Economic Development in Harare. Local Economic Development is a process which encourages partners from the community, public sector, private sector and non-governmental sectors to work collectively to create better conditions for economic growth and employment generation with the aim of improving the locality economic future and the quality of life for all citizens. The study was premised on the theory of competitive advantage which puts up that prosperity and wealth creation is determined by microeconomic factors and that prosperity means increasing the standards of living for the local people and ultimately their quality of life. Primary data for the research was gathered through observation and key informant interviews. Data on key stakeholders understanding on the concept of Local Economic Development, how it is being practised and how the current regulatory framework enhance or impinge on local people’s participation in Local Economic Development was collected. Secondary data was also collected from Harare’s 2014 budget, census and existing forward plans. The study revealed that the practice of Local Economic Development in Harare is biased towards the setting aside of land zoned for industrial and commercial uses and implementation of development control parameters. Small to Medium Enterprises and the informal sector have also been identified as the major forms of Local Economic Development that citizens are involved in. However, the study revealed that proper policy frameworks which guide practice of Local Economic Development initiatives were missing

  3. Zimbabwe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ploch, Lauren

    2007-01-01

    .... Challenges grew in the 1990s, however. Rising inflation and unemployment bred discontent, as evidenced by regular student and labor protests, and led in 1999 to the formation of the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC...

  4. Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    of Pope John Paul II . The EU continues to provide humanitarian and limited development assistance. Commonwealth The Commonwealth of Nations sent a...from ZANU-PF. Critics like Pius Ncube, former Catholic Archbishop of Bulawayo, accused the government of distributing food only in areas where

  5. Post-destructive eye surgery, associated depression at Sekuru Kaguvi Hospital Eye Unit, Zimbabwe: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Kawome

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Destructive eye surgery is associated with more complications than just loss of visual functions of the eye and aesthetics. Currently there is very little published literature on post-destructive eye surgery associated depression. Zimbabwe has been experiencing a surge in the rate of destructive eye surgery done at the National Tertiary Eye Unit. This situation could be churning out lots of unrecognized depressed clients into the community who require assistance in one form or another. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of post-destructive eye surgery associated depression among patients attending Sekuru Kaguvi Hospital Eye Unit and assess if the current management protocol of patients undergoing destructive eye surgery at the Eye Unit addresses the problem adequately. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 28 randomly selected patients who had destructive eye surgeries at Sekuru Kaguvi Hospital was conducted over five months from 1st March 2012 to end of July 2012. A structured questionnaire containing 15 questions on the following items: gender, age, diagnosis, surgical procedure done, expectations before and after surgery, adequacy of counseling given and involvement of family was used to collect data. Nine questions to assess depression were adapted from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Setting:  The study was conducted at SekuruKaguvi Hospital Eye Unit, Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals in Harare. Results:  Twenty-eight patients who underwent destructive eye surgery during the study period were selected using systematic random sampling. The gender ratio was 1:1 and the mean age was 38.7 years with a range from 24 to 65 years. Fifty percent of the patients in the study had orbital exenteration while the rest had enucleation (14% and evisceration (36%. Twenty-eight percent of the study population had depression. Conclusion: Destructive eye surgery is frequently associated with depression and our current management protocol of

  6. In memoriam. Stuart Kenneth Hargreaves, DVM, 1946-2012. The humanist veterinarian from Zimbabwe who was committed to the improvement of animal health in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anon.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe Society for Animal Production Gold Medal Award for outstanding contribution to the livestock industryJ F Kapnek Charitable Trust Award for exceptional managerial commitment to the Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal and contributions to the veterinary professionCommercial Farmers’ Union Farming Oscar for outstanding contribution to the livestock industry and in particular ensuring continued beef exportsResearch Council of Zimbabwe award for distinguished contribution to the agricultural sector in the service of ZimbabweOIE Meritorious Medal, 20112011 World Veterinary Day Commemorative Award from Fellow Veterinary Professionals of Zimbabwe for many years of committed service to the Zimbabwe Veterinary ProfessionNational Liberation War Hero of ZimbabweStuart Kenneth Hargreaves was born in Salisbury, Southern Rhodesia, on 6 August 1946. He attended Routledge and Prince Edward schools in Salisbury. After studying at the University of Natal, South Africa, he graduated in veterinary medicine at Onderstepoort (University of Pretoria in 1970. He passed away on 28 August 2012 in Harare, Zimbabwe.He devoted his entire career to Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Agriculture, initially as a field and provincial veterinary officer (1971-1983: Zvishavane, Bindura and Harare, then Deputy Director (1983-1988 and Director (1988-2002 before being promoted to Principal Director, Livestock and Veterinary Services (2002-2012. He held this position from its inception until his death. He acted as Permanent Secretary within the Ministry of Agriculture on numerous occasions.Dr Hargreaves untiringly defended and argued for the countries of Africa on the international animal health stage and contributed to securing the voice Africa now enjoys in international animal health debates. He was ahead of the times in a number of areas, for example in vigorously defending, with others, the commodity-based trade principle. The success of this approach demonstrated that products could be

  7. The attitudes and activities of pastors and faith leaders in Zimbabwe on the use of family planning methods among their members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Alikali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Faith leaders are important gatekeepers in disseminating reproductive health messages and influencing positive behaviour change within communities. Faith leaders are seen as the most powerful, visible, and reachable form of authority, even trusted more than governments or non-profit organizations. In addition to providing counsel and advice aimed at enhancing health and wellbeing of the worshippers, faith leaders also play an important role in advocating and influencing what is taught in schools and what services are provided in healthcare facilities. Because of this influence, faith leaders often have an unparalleled opportunity—indeed, a moral obligation—to prioritize conversations about family planning, advocating, and closing the contraception gap.The overall objective of this study was to ascertain the attitude and activities of pastors and faith leaders in Zimbabwe on the use of family planning methods among their members. The result revealed that some faith leaders believed that spreading information about family planning education was the responsibility of the government and tended to avoid such responsibility. However, through training on family planning advocacy, much can be achieved. Methods: Qualitative study methods were used to better understand the attitude and activities of pastors and faith leaders in Zimbabwe on the use of family planning methods among their members. The participants of this survey were drawn from 8 of 10 provinces in Zimbabwe, which include: Bulawayo, Harare, Manicaland, Mashonaland Central, Mashonaland East, Mashonaland West, Masvingo, and Matabeleland North.Paper-based questionnaires were answered by 24 pastors and 26 faith leaders in Zimbabwe (Table 1 through personal face-to-face meetings, while interviews were conducted with a select few pastors and faith leaders. The samples were drawn from randomly selected churches in Zimbabwe. Data was analysed using Epi info 7 and Microsoft Excel

  8. Potential for solar water heating in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batidzirai, B.; Lysen, E.H.; van Egmond, S.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the economic, social and environmental benefits from using solar water heating (SWH) in Zimbabwe. By comparing different water heating technology usage in three sectors over a 25-year period, the potential of SWH is demonstrated in alleviating energy and economic problems that

  9. Entrepreneurial Careers of Women in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Lisa B.; Greenan, James P.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathways of entrepreneurial career development and the processes involved for women to become entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe. Women entrepreneurs were studied to gain an understanding of why women chose self-employment and how local enterprise programs should be designed to benefit them. The study…

  10. Consumption Response to Diaspora Remittances in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the impact of remittances on private consumption in Zimbabwe for the period 1980 to 2007. An augmented Keynesian consumption function which incorporates income, remittances, exchange rate, taxation, inflation and an economic and political instability dummy variable is postulated for this purpose.

  11. Hypertension management in Zimbabwe - awareness, treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension management in Zimbabwe - awareness, treatment and blood pressure control. A community-based study. J A Matenga, T J Allain, A 0 Wilson, D J Adamchak,. B 5enzanje, E Mushangi, Z Gomo. Objective. To evaluate the level of awareness of hypertension, treatment and blood pressure control in rural and ...

  12. Contemporary Development Issues: The Women of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucks, Doris

    This preliminary report of a research project in progress briefly outlines Zimbabwe's historical, geographic, and cultural heritage and describes the methodology being used. Traditionally, Zimbabwean women are viewed as inferior and subordinate in a patriarchal society. They perform much of the work but have no political power. This study seeks to…

  13. Towards a Citizenship Education for Zimbabwe | Mavhunga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines post independence Zimbabwe's attempts to introduce a form of citizenship education in the nation's education curricula, first in the name of Political Economy introduced at secondary school level shortly after independence in the early 1980s but abandoned soon afterwards, only to resurface as ...

  14. Special Education Professional Development Needs in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitiyo, Morgan; Hughes, Elizabeth M.; Changara, Darlington M.; Chitiyo, George; Montgomery, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Since 1980 when Zimbabwe obtained political independence, special education has not received the same priority as the entire education system. One of the manifestations of this discrepancy is the shortage of qualified special education teachers in the country. In order to address this trend and promote the development of special education,…

  15. CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE IN ZIMBABWE: PREVENTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jacob Mugumbate

    that social workers in Zimbabwe have a role to play at all the three levels of intervention. KEY TERMS: Child sexual abuse (CSA), social work, prevention,. Meili's model. ..... network/2013/mar/19/world-social-work-day-fair-global- · economy1.

  16. Strategies of smallholder irrigation management in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manzungu, E.

    1999-01-01

    The smallholder irrigation sub-sector in Zimbabwe, according to literature sources, is under threat due to what are called management problems. Poor water management and low crop yields have been cited, as has also been poor financial and economic viability, resulting in heavy government

  17. Reformations in Zimbabwe's juvenile justice system | Ruparanganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children in conflict with the law are often stigmatized and shunned by society as they are perceived as a threat to society. Historically, Zimbabwe's juvenile justice system has been retributive and focused on punishing the juvenile offender. As a result, it has been criticised from a number of viewpoints, including the need to ...

  18. SOCIAL WORK WITH REFUGEES IN ZIMBABWE Johanne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the social work practice with refugees. ... Legal statutes that govern refugee protection in Zimbabwe .... More often than not, unaccompanied minors have been forced out of school at a tender age because of the war .... of this strategy is to achieve gender and age equality.

  19. CONSUMER PERCEPTIONS AND PREFERENCES OF MEAT TYPES IN HARAR AND HARAMAYA TOWNS, ETHIOPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsegay Teklebrhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the acceptability and preference of meat in Harar and Haramaya towns. The study was carried out from January to March, 2012. One hundred twenty (120 questionnaires were randomly distributed, completed and retrieved for analysis. The results showed that gender had no effect on livestock meat consumption. However, religious had impact on the types of meat consumption. Accordingly, pork was not consumed by both Muslim and Christian, camel meat was consumed by Muslim. Majority of consumers had prefer chicken, beef, and chevon meat as their first choice followed by mutton as compared to other meat. In addition, the study showed a high level of acceptability for the meat of middle aged than old aged. Lean and red color meat got highest acceptability by majority of the consumers than fatty and white meat. The result confirmed that religious and socio-cultural taboos as the major variables that would affect meat preference and consumption of a population in the study area. This study suggested that current preference trend of consumers were not inclusive in that some potential meat animals were hardly utilized or totally ignored from the dish. Therefore, professionals and other stakeholders should made intervention and promote widely utilization of this species to meet animal protein requirement of the community.

  20. The incidence of HIV among women recruited during late pregnancy and followed up for six years after childbirth in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirenje Mike Z

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV incidence is a useful tool for improving the targeting of populations for interventions and assessing the effectiveness of prevention strategies. A study in Harare, Zimbabwe reported cumulative incidences of 3.4% (3.0-3.8 and 6.5% (5.7-7.4 among post-partum women followed for 12 and 24 months respectively between 1997 and 2001. According to a Government report on HIV the prevalence of HIV fell from about 30% in 1999 to 14% in 2008. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of HIV-1 among women enrolled during late pregnancy and followed for six years after childbirth and to identify risk factors associated with acquisition of HIV. Methods HIV-uninfected pregnant women around 36 weeks gestation were enrolled from primary health care clinics in peri-urban settlements around Harare and followed-up for up to six years after childbirth. At every visit a questionnaire was interview-administered to obtain socio-demographic data and sexual history since the previous visit. A genital examination was performed followed by the collection of biological samples. Results Of the 552 HIV-uninfected women 444 (80.4% were seen at least twice during the six years follow-up and 39 acquired HIV, resulting in an incidence (95% CI of 2.3/100 woman-years-at-risk (wyar (1.1-4.1. The incidence over the first nine months post-partum was 5.7/100 wyar (3.3-8.1. A greater proportion of teenagers (15.3% contributed to a high incidence rate of 2.9/100 (0.6-8.7 wyar. In multivariate analysis lower education of participant, RR 2.1 (1.1-4.3 remained significantly associated with HIV acquisition. Other risk factors associated with acquisition of HIV-1 in univariate analysis were young age at sexual debut, RR 2.3, (1.0-5.6 and having children with different fathers, RR 2.7(1.3-5.8. Women that knew that their partners had other sexual partners were about four times more likely to acquire HIV, RR 3.8 (1.3-11.2. Conclusion The incidence of HIV

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Zimbabwe's Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission Program: Population-Level Estimates of HIV-Free Infant Survival Pre-Option A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdugan, Raluca; McCoy, Sandra I; Watadzaushe, Constancia; Kang Dufour, Mi-Suk; Petersen, Maya; Dirawo, Jeffrey; Mushavi, Angela; Mujuru, Hilda Angela; Mahomva, Agnes; Musarandega, Reuben; Hakobyan, Anna; Mugurungi, Owen; Cowan, Frances M; Padian, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    We estimated HIV-free infant survival and mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) rates in Zimbabwe, some of the first community-based estimates from a UNAIDS priority country. In 2012 we surveyed mother-infant pairs residing in the catchment areas of 157 health facilities randomly selected from 5 of 10 provinces in Zimbabwe. Enrolled infants were born 9-18 months before the survey. We collected questionnaires, blood samples for HIV testing, and verbal autopsies for deceased mothers/infants. Estimates were assessed among i) all HIV-exposed infants, as part of an impact evaluation of Option A of the 2010 WHO guidelines (rolled out in Zimbabwe in 2011), and ii) the subgroup of infants unexposed to Option A. We compared province-level MTCT rates measured among women in the community with MTCT rates measured using program monitoring data from facilities serving those communities. Among 8568 women with known HIV serostatus, 1107 (12.9%) were HIV-infected. Among all HIV-exposed infants, HIV-free infant survival was 90.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 88.7-92.7) and MTCT was 8.8% (95% CI: 6.9-11.1). Sixty-six percent of HIV-exposed infants were still breastfeeding. Among the 762 infants born before Option A was implemented, 90.5% (95% CI: 88.1-92.5) were alive and HIV-uninfected at 9-18 months of age, and 9.1% (95%CI: 7.1-11.7) were HIV-infected. In four provinces, the community-based MTCT rate was higher than the facility-based MTCT rate. In Harare, the community and facility-based rates were 6.0% and 9.1%, respectively. By 2012 Zimbabwe had made substantial progress towards the elimination of MTCT. Our HIV-free infant survival and MTCT estimates capture HIV transmissions during pregnancy, delivery and breastfeeding regardless of whether or not mothers accessed health services. These estimates also provide a baseline against which to measure the impact of Option A guidelines (and subsequently Option B+).

  2. Geoarchaeology of water management at Great Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulas, Federica; Pikirayi, Innocent; Sagiya, Munyaradzi Elton

    In Africa, research on water management in urban contexts has often focussed rainfall, and the occurrence floods and droughts, whereas small-scale catchment systems and soil moisture regimes have received far less attention. This paper sets out to re-address the issue by examining the occurrence......, distribution and use of multiple water resources at the ancient urban landscape of Great Zimbabwe. Here, the rise and demise of the urban site have been linked to changing rainfall in the 1st mill. AD. Accordingly, rainfall shortages and consequent droughts eventually leading to the decline and abandonment...... of Great Zimbabwe at around 1550 AD. However, new research findings suggest a different scenario. Combining geoarchaeolological investigations, soil micromorphology and geochemistry with the study of historical sources and ethnographic records, new datasets indicate prolonged availability and diversified...

  3. Zimbabwe culture before Mapungubwe: new evidence from Mapela Hill, South-Western Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikure, Shadreck; Manyanga, Munyaradzi; Pollard, A Mark; Bandama, Foreman; Mahachi, Godfrey; Pikirayi, Innocent

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, the emergence of complex societies excites intense academic debate in archaeology and allied disciplines. Not surprisingly, in southern Africa the traditional assumption that the evolution of socio-political complexity began with ideological transformations from K2 to Mapungubwe between CE1200 and 1220 is clouded in controversy. It is believed that the K2-Mapungubwe transitions crystallised class distinction and sacred leadership, thought to be the key elements of the Zimbabwe culture on Mapungubwe Hill long before they emerged anywhere else. From Mapungubwe (CE1220-1290), the Zimbabwe culture was expressed at Great Zimbabwe (CE1300-1450) and eventually Khami (CE1450-1820). However, new fieldwork at Mapela Hill, when coupled with a Bayesian chronology, offers tremendous fresh insights which refute this orthodoxy. Firstly, Mapela possesses enormous prestige stone-walled terraces whose initial construction date from the 11th century CE, almost two hundred years earlier than Mapungubwe. Secondly, the basal levels of the Mapela terraces and hilltop contain élite solid dhaka (adobe) floors associated with K2 pottery and glass beads. Thirdly, with a hilltop and flat area occupation since the 11th century CE, Mapela exhibits evidence of class distinction and sacred leadership earlier than K2 and Mapungubwe, the supposed propagators of the Zimbabwe culture. Fourthly, Mapungubwe material culture only appeared later in the Mapela sequence and therefore post-dates the earliest appearance of stone walling and dhaka floors at the site. Since stone walls, dhaka floors and class distinction are the essence of the Zimbabwe culture, their earlier appearance at Mapela suggests that Mapungubwe can no longer be regarded as the sole cradle of the Zimbabwe culture. This demands not just fresh ways of accounting for the rise of socio-political complexity in southern Africa, but also significant adjustments to existing models.

  4. Zimbabwe's national AIDS levy: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nisha; Kilmarx, Peter H; Dube, Freeman; Manenji, Albert; Dube, Medelina; Magure, Tapuwa

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a case study of the Zimbabwe National AIDS Trust Fund ('AIDS Levy') as an approach to domestic government financing of the response to HIV and AIDS. Data came from three sources: a literature review, including a search for grey literature, review of government documents from the Zimbabwe National AIDS Council (NAC), and key informant interviews with representatives of the Zimbabwean government, civil society and international organizations. The literature search yielded 139 sources, and 20 key informants were interviewed. Established by legislation in 1999, the AIDS Levy entails a 3% income tax for individuals and 3% tax on profits of employers and trusts (which excluded the mining industry until 2015). It is managed by the parastatal NAC through a decentralized structure of AIDS Action Committees. Revenues increased from inception to 2006 through 2008, a period of economic instability and hyperinflation. Following dollarization in 2009, annual revenues continued to increase, reaching US$38.6 million in 2014. By policy, at least 50% of funds are used for purchase of antiretroviral medications. Other spending includes administration and capital costs, HIV prevention, and monitoring and evaluation. Several financial controls and auditing systems are in place. Key informants perceived the AIDS Levy as a 'homegrown' solution that provided country ownership and reduced dependence on donor funding, but called for further increased transparency, accountability, and reduced administrative costs, as well as recommended changes to increase revenue. The Zimbabwe AIDS Levy has generated substantial resources, recently over US$35 million per year, and signals an important commitment by Zimbabweans, which may have helped attract other donor resources. Many key informants considered the Zimbabwe AIDS Levy to be a best practice for other countries to follow.

  5. Area Handbook Series: Zimbabwe: A Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    vii Relations-RELIGIOUS LIFE-Christians, Missions, and Independent Churches-Indigenous Religions - EDUCATION-HEALTH Chapter 3. The Economy...continues in Mozambique as Portuguese protectorate. ca. 1820 Migrations begin, resulting from Zulu ascendancy in Natal. 1822 Mzilikazi leads Ndebele out of...Natal after quarrel with Zulu king. ca. 1835 Great Zimbabwe sacked by Ngoni ( Zulu -spealdng group) moving north. 1838 Branch of Ndebele under Kaliphi

  6. "That pregnancy can bring noise into the family": exploring intimate partner sexual violence during pregnancy in the context of HIV in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simukai Shamu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Globally, studies report a high prevalence of intimate partner sexual violence (IPSV and an association with HIV infection. Despite the criminalisation of IPSV and deliberate sexual HIV infection in Zimbabwe, IPSV remains common. This study explored women's and health workers' perspectives and experiences of sexuality and sexual violence in pregnancy, including in relation to HIV testing. METHODS: This qualitative study was part of a larger study of the dynamics of intimate partner violence and HIV in pregnancy in Zimbabwe. Key informant interviews were conducted with health workers and focus group discussions were held with 64 pregnant or nursing mothers attending antenatal and postnatal care clinics in low-income neighbourhoods of Harare, covering the major thematic areas of validated sexual violence research instruments. Thematic content analysis of audio-recorded and transcribed data was conducted. RESULTS: While women reported some positive experiences of sex in pregnancy, most participants commonly experienced coercive sexual practices. They reported that men failed to understand, or refused to accept, pregnancy and its associated emotional changes, and often forced painful and degrading sexual acts on them, usually while the men were under the influence of alcohol or illicit drugs. Men often refused or delayed HIV testing, and participants reported accounts of HIV-positive men not disclosing their status to their partners and deliberately infecting or attempting to infect them. Women's passive acceptance of sexual violence was influenced by advice they received from other females to subordinate to their partners and to not deprive men of their conjugal sexual rights. CONCLUSIONS: Cultural and societal factors, unequal gender norms and practices, women's economic vulnerability, and men's failure to understand pregnancy and emotional changes, influence men to perpetrate IPSV, leading to high risk of HIV infection.

  7. New Zimbabwe Constitution and the Right to Health Campaign 2010

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New Zimbabwe Constitution and the Right to Health Campaign 2010. In September 2008 the three main political parties in Zimbabwe signed a Global Political Agreement (GPA), undertaking to engage in the development of a new democratic constitution of over the next 24 months. This project will feed into that process by ...

  8. Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zambezia is a bi-annual journal of the University of Zimbabwe. Its focus is humanities in Zimbabwe and the surrounding region but specialist articles of a more general interest are also published. Vol 32, No 1 (2005). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of ...

  9. Gemmology, geology and origin of the Sandawana emerald deposits, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most valuable gemstones, emeralds are known to occur in several countries of the world, such as Colombia, Zambia, Brazil, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Russia, Madagascar and Zimbabwe. The emerald deposits at Sandawana, Zimbabwe, are described, the emeralds from this deposit characterised and

  10. “Jambanja”: Moral Paralysis and Postcolonial Politics in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work focuses on the normative dimension of politics in Zimbabwe over the last decade and draws special interest to the post March 2008 historic harmonised elections, that is, the presidential runoff between president Robert Mugabe of the Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front( ZANU PF) and winner of the ...

  11. Access, attitudes and training in information technologies and evidence-based medicine among medical students at University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parve, Swapnil; Ershadi, Ali; Karimov, Alexandr; Dougherty, Anne; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E; Chidzonga, Midion M; Sadigh, Majid

    2016-09-01

    The Medical Education Partnership Initiative, has helped to mitigate the digital divide in Africa. The aim of the study was to assess the level of access, attitude, and training concerning meaningful use of electronic resources and EBM among medical students at an African medical school. The study involved medical students at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences, Harare. The needs assessment tool consisted of a 21-question, paper-based, voluntary and anonymous survey. A total of 61/67 (91%), responded to the survey. 60% of the medical students were 'third-year medical students'. Among medical students, 85% of responders had access to digital medical resources, but 54% still preferred printed medical textbooks. Although 25% of responders had received training in EBM, but only 7% found it adequate. 98% of the participants did not receive formal training in journal club presentation or analytical reading of medical literature, but 77 % of them showed interest in learning these skills. Lack of training in EBM, journal club presentation and analytical reading skills have limited the impact of upgraded technology in enhancing the level of knowledge. This impact can be boosted by developing a curriculum with skills necessary in using EBM.

  12. HIV status disclosure to perinatally-infected adolescents in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study of adolescent and healthcare worker perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khameer K Kidia

    Full Text Available Due to the scale up of antiretroviral therapy, increasing numbers of HIV-infected children are living into adolescence. As these children grow and surpass the immediate threat of death, the issue of informing them of their HIV status arises. This study aimed to understand how perinatally-infected adolescents learn about their HIV-status as well as to examine their preferences for the disclosure process.In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 (14 male, 17 female perinatally-infected adolescents aged 16-20 at an HIV clinic in Harare, Zimbabwe, and focused on adolescents' experiences of disclosure. In addition, 15 (1 male, 14 female healthcare workers participated in two focus groups that were centred on healthcare workers' practices surrounding disclosure in the clinic. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants. A coding frame was developed and major themes were extracted using grounded theory methods.Healthcare workers encouraged caregivers to initiate disclosure in the home environment. However, many adolescents preferred disclosure to take place in the presence of healthcare workers at the clinic because it gave them access to accurate information as well as an environment that made test results seem more credible. Adolescents learned more specific information about living with an HIV-positive status and the meaning of that status from shared experiences among peers at the clinic.HIV-status disclosure to adolescents is distinct from disclosure to younger children and requires tailored, age-appropriate guidelines. Disclosure to this age group in a healthcare setting may help overcome some of the barriers associated with caregivers disclosing in the home environment and make the HIV status seem more credible to an adolescent. The study also highlights the value of peer support among adolescents, which could help reduce the burden of psychosocial care on caregivers and healthcare workers.

  13. Prevalence of HIV/AIDS and psychiatric disorders and their related risk factors among adults in Epworth, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebit, M B; Tombe, M; Siziya, S; Balus, S; Nkomo, S D A; Maramba, P

    2003-10-01

    To examine the prevalence of HIV infection, neuropsychiatric disorders, psychiatric symptoms/signs, alcohol use/misuse, CD4 cell counts and risk factors in adult patients. Cross-sectional study. Epworth, which is about 15 km on the southeastern part of Harare, Zimbabwe. Two hundred subjects were included in the study out of which six were excluded beacause of HIV-1 indeterminate results. A convenience sample of 200 subjects recruited in a cross-sectional study in Epworth, Zimbabwe. Six subjects had indeterminate HIV-1 antibody results and were excluded from the study. The remaining 194 subjects of whom 101 (52.1%) knew about their sero-status and were consecutively recruited, whereas, 93 (47.9%) did not know about their sero-status and were recruited by a systematic random sampling method (1-in-3). They were then interviewed about neuropsychiatric disorders using BPRS, MADRS, AUDIT and MINI Mental State Test, including the risk factors related to HIV infection. After ELISA tests' results, the two groups were combined and then categorised into HIV positive (n=115) and HIV negative (n=79) subjects. Prevalence, neuropsychiatric disorders, increased CD4 cell counts and risk factors associated with HIV infection. The findings were that the overall point prevalence of the HIV infection was 59.3% (115/194). Comparative analyses between seropositive and seronegative HIV/AIDS subjects showed: over two thirds (71.3%) of the HIV positive subjects suffered from psychiatric disorders, more than those with HIV negative 44.3% (OR=3.12, 95% CI=1.64-5.95, P=0.0002), and subjects aged 35 years and less were mostly HIV seronegatives (n=77.2%, OR=2.34, 95% CI=1.18-4.75, P=0.014). The overall prevalence of alcohol use/misuse was 41 (21.1%), with higher prevalence rate among HIV positive subjects, 28 (24.3%) than those who were HIV negative, 13 (16.5%). The commonest psychiatric symptoms/signs (P<0.05) were emotional withdrawal, depressed mood, suspiciousness, apparent sadness, reduced

  14. Knowledge of HIV-related disabilities and challenges in accessing care: Qualitative research from Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Morgon Banks

    Full Text Available While the rapid expansion in antiretroviral therapy access in low and middle income countries has resulted in dramatic declines in mortality rates, many people living with HIV face new or worsening experiences of disability. As nearly 1 in 20 adults are living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa-many of whom are likely to develop disabling sequelae from long-term infection, co-morbidities and side effects of their treatment-understanding the availability and accessibility of services to address HIV-related disabilities is of vital importance. The aim of this study thus is to explore knowledge of HIV-related disabilities amongst stakeholders working in the fields of HIV and disability and factors impacting uptake and provision of interventions for preventing, treating or managing HIV-related disabilities.In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten stakeholders based in Harare, Zimbabwe, who were working in the fields of either disability or HIV. Stakeholders were identified through a priori stakeholder analysis. Thematic Analysis, complemented by constant comparison as described in Grounded Theory, was used to analyse findings.All key informants reported some level of knowledge of HIV-related disability, mostly from observations made in their line of work. However, they reported no interventions or policies were in place specifically to address HIV-related disability. While referrals between HIV and rehabilitation providers were not uncommon, no formal mechanisms had been established for collaborating on prevention, identification and management. Additional barriers to accessing and providing services to address HIV-related disabilities included: the availability of resources, including trained professionals, supplies and equipment in both the HIV and rehabilitation sectors; lack of disability-inclusive adaptations, particularly in HIV services; heavy centralization of available services in urban areas, without accessible, affordable

  15. THE DAIRY VALUE CHAIN AND FACTORS AFFECTING CHOICE OF MILK CHANNELS IN HARAR AND DIRE DAWA AREAS, EASTERN ETHIOPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengistu KETEMA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at mapping the dairy value chain, assessing constraints and opportunities in the sector, and identifying factors affecting channel choices of producers in Harar and Dire Dawa milkshed areas. Data were collected from 93 producers, six collectors, seven wholesalers, seven retailers, and ten consumers. Both descriptive and econometric analysis were employed. The study revealed that the channel choices available to producers include selling to collectors, wholesalers, retailers, and directly to consumers. The multinomial model output indicated that being in rural areas, breed type, separate milking place, and supply of hay negatively determined the choice to sell to wholesalers, retailers, and consumers. In contrast, education status and milk storage duration positively determined producers’ choice not to sell to collectors. The major recommendations include provision of training, disseminating dairy technologies, encouraging value chain actors to add values; and enhancing collective actions of producers.

  16. Managing public records in Zimbabwe: the road to good governance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MARIA

    Government officers rely on information that is accurate ... to realise their goals of chief amongst them to improve the ... Financial. Management. Information Systems (IFMIS) in Zimbabwe ... records and information play a critical role in fighting ...

  17. Term-creation strategies used by Ndebele translators in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Term-creation strategies used by Ndebele translators in Zimbabwe in the health sector: A corpus-based approach. ... strategies employed by Ndebele translators from a corpus-based approach using ParaConc, ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  18. Women of Zimbabwe Arise (WOZA) prepares for popular participation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    justice had been more developed when Zimbabwe gained independence almost .... as well as targeted victims, not only to participate in any truth-seeking .... have been broken apart, whose breadwinners have died of AIDS due to neglect.

  19. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research - Vol 30, No 1 (2018)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Promoting Sustainable Development through the New/Revised Design and Technology Curriculum in Zimbabwe: With Specific Reference to Food Security · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. P. Kwaira ...

  20. The persistence of gender inequality in Zimbabwe: factors that ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The persistence of gender inequality in Zimbabwe: factors that impede the ... Specifically, we sought to identify the factors perceived by women school heads to be causes ... all other roles; and lack of support from the home and the workplace.

  1. Moving Zimbabwe Forward : an Evidence Based Policy Dialogue ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Moving Zimbabwe Forward : an Evidence Based Policy Dialogue ... levels of poverty, unemployment, inflation and poor service provision in the areas of education, ... International Water Resources Association, in close collaboration with IDRC, ...

  2. Managing Vandalism in Day Secondary Schools in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research ... contributing factors as leads to management strategies to reduce vandalism in day secondary schools. ... window panes, door handles, classroom furniture and writing on toilet walls and furniture.

  3. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research - Vol 27, No 3 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Importance of Play in Early Childhood Development: Implications on Design ... to Ban the use of Contraceptives and Lowering the Age of Consent in Zimbabwe ... Navigating New Horizons: An Analysis of Factors that Influence Computer ...

  4. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research - Vol 20, No 3 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Classroom Tuckshop' Phenomenon In Zimbabwean Urban Primary Schools In Norton ... Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Skills for Bachelor of Education Degree Students at the University of Zimbabwe: Implications for University ...

  5. Inflation dynamics in a dollarised economy: The case of Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the local currency era, inflation dynamics in Zimbabwe were ... era was attributed to excess money supply growth, lagged infl ation and political factors. ... an impact on price formation, might not be applicable in a dollarised economy.

  6. Hydrological modelling of fine sediments in the Odzi River, Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrological modelling of fine sediments in the Odzi River, Zimbabwe. ... An analysis of the model structure and a comparison with the rating curve function ... model validation through split sample and proxy basin comparison was performed.

  7. Cadastral Systems Re-engineering in Urban Zimbabwe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-16

    Nov 16, 2015 ... 1Geomatics Department, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa, ... cadastral information system of all municipalities in Zimbabwe with .... various levels of government, private, non-governmental sector and.

  8. Weighing the legal basis for housing rights in Zimbabwe | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... Weighing the legal basis for housing rights in Zimbabwe ... through the Safe and Inclusive Cities partnership with the UK's Department for International Development. ... Transforming the slum: The case of Mumbai's M-Ward.

  9. zimbabwe children's act alignment with international and domestic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    and Welfare of the Child (ACRWC), Child Protection Model Law, Constitution of ... This Act's foci include providing care and protection to all children in Zimbabwe and establishing .... Kaseke (1993:12) notes the introduction of school fees in.

  10. Derivative Market: An Integral Part Of The Zimbabwe Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Kosmas Njanike

    2010-01-01

    The study assesses the need for a derivative market as an integral of Zimbabwe Stock Exchange. It also aims to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a derivative market as an essential element of Zimbabwe Stock Exchange. The research identifies factors that need to be addressed to facilitate such a market. Views of various fund managers, financial analysts and dealers drawn from asset management firms were used. Changes in market trends are influenced by hyper inflation and acute financial...

  11. Community burden of undiagnosed HIV infection among adolescents in Zimbabwe following primary healthcare-based provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling: A cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Simms

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Children living with HIV who are not diagnosed in infancy often remain undiagnosed until they present with advanced disease. Provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC in health facilities is recommended for high-HIV-prevalence settings, but it is unclear whether this approach is sufficient to achieve universal coverage of HIV testing. We aimed to investigate the change in community burden of undiagnosed HIV infection among older children and adolescents following implementation of PITC in Harare, Zimbabwe.Over the course of 2 years (January 2013-January 2015, 7 primary health clinics (PHCs in southwestern Harare implemented optimised, opt-out PITC for all attendees aged 6-15 years. In February 2015-December 2015, we conducted a representative cross-sectional survey of 8-17-year-olds living in the 7 communities served by the study PHCs, who would have had 2 years of exposure to PITC. Knowledge of HIV status was ascertained through a caregiver questionnaire, and anonymised HIV testing was carried out using oral mucosal transudate (OMT tests. After 1 participant taking antiretroviral therapy was observed to have a false negative OMT result, from July 2015 urine samples were obtained from all participants providing OMTs and tested for antiretroviral drugs to confirm HIV status. Children who tested positive through PITC were identified from among survey participants using gender, birthdate, and location. Of 7,146 children in 4,251 eligible households, 5,486 (76.8% children in 3,397 households agreed to participate in the survey, and 141 were HIV positive. HIV prevalence was 2.6% (95% CI 2.2%-3.1%, and over a third of participants with HIV were undiagnosed (37.7%; 95% CI 29.8%-46.2%. Similarly, among the subsample of 2,643 (48.2% participants with a urine test result, 34.7% of those living with HIV were undiagnosed (95% CI 23.5%-47.9%. Based on extrapolation from the survey sample to the community, we estimated that PITC over 2 years identified

  12. Status of African baobab (Adansonia digitata) across Gonarezhou ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    Tropical Resource Ecology Programme, University of Zimbabwe, P.O. Box MP 167, Mt Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe, ... baobab (Adansonia digitata) across Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe. ..... Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

  13. HIV and schistosomiasis in rural Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotzé, Sebastian Ranzi; Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo; Kallestrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin A has widespread effects on immune function and is therefore interesting in HIV-infection. Retinol-binding protein (RBP or RBP4) is a negative acute-phase protein and a marker of vitamin A status. Our aim was to investigate the association of RBP with HIV progression, infection...... with schistosomiasis, inflammatory cytokines, and mortality. METHODS: The study included 192 HIV-infected and 177 HIV-uninfected individuals from Mupfure in rural Zimbabwe. Of these, 208 were infected with Schistosoma haematobium, 27 with S. mansoni and 48 with both. Plasma RBP, HIV-RNA, CD4 cell count, haemoglobin......, cytokines, clinical staging (CDC category), self-reported level of function (Karnoffsky Performance Score, KPS) and schistosomiasis status were assessed at baseline. Participants were followed up for survival 3-4 years post-enrolment. RESULTS: RBP levels were lower in HIV-infected individuals(p

  14. Fuelwood and stoves: lessons from Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J

    1983-03-01

    Laboratory tests on traditional open fires as methods of cooking give values of thermal efficiency varying from 12-30%. These are significantly higher than values which are widely quoted in the literature. The results of a research visit to Zimbabwe indicated that in three villages fuel efficiency did not appear to be the main determinant of choice of cooking method: villagers had changed from their traditional mode of cooking to stoves which they perceived to consume substantially more fuel. These stoves enable meals to be prepared more quickly which the women found useful during the busy months. The increased labour costs could be borne because the fuel was gathered during the slack season.

  15. Maternal education and child mortality in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grépin, Karen A; Bharadwaj, Prashant

    2015-12-01

    In 1980, Zimbabwe rapidly expanded access to secondary schools, providing a natural experiment to estimate the impact of increased maternal secondary education on child mortality. Exploiting age specific exposure to these reforms, we find that children born to mothers most likely to have benefited from the policies were about 21% less likely to die than children born to slightly older mothers. We also find that increased education leads to delayed age at marriage, sexual debut, and first birth and that increased education leads to better economic opportunities for women. We find little evidence supporting other channels through which increased education might affect child mortality. Expanding access to secondary schools may greatly accelerate declines in child mortality in the developing world today. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Precursor conditions related to Zimbabwe's summer droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangombe, Shingirai; Madyiwa, Simon; Wang, Jianhong

    2018-01-01

    Despite the increasing severity of droughts and their effects on Zimbabwe's agriculture, there are few tools available for predicting these droughts in advance. Consequently, communities and farmers are more exposed, and policy makers are always ill prepared for such. This study sought to investigate possible cycles and precursor meteorological conditions prior to drought seasons that could be used to predict impending droughts in Zimbabwe. The Single Z-Index was used to identify and grade drought years between 1951 and 2010 according to rainfall severity. Spectral analysis was used to reveal the cycles of droughts for possible use of these cycles for drought prediction. Composite analysis was used to investigate circulation and temperature anomalies associated with severe and extreme drought years. Results indicate that severe droughts are more highly correlated with circulation patterns and embedded weather systems in the Indian Ocean and equatorial Pacific Ocean than any other area. This study identified sea surface temperatures in the average period June to August, geopotential height and wind vector in July to September period, and air temperature in September to November period as precursors that can be used to predict a drought occurrence several months in advance. Therefore, in addition to sea surface temperature, which was identified through previous research for predicting Zimbabwean droughts, the other parameters identified in this study can aid in drought prediction. Drought cycles were established at 20-, 12.5-, 3.2-, and 2.7-year cycles. The spectral peaks, 12.5, 3.2, and 2.7, had a similar timescale with the luni-solar tide, El Niño Southern Oscillation and Quasi Biennial Oscillation, respectively, and hence, occurrence of these phenomena have a possibility of indicating when the next drought might be.

  17. ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE OF COMMUNITY GARDEN IN ZIMBABWE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zivenge E.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe has experienced an unprecedented decline of nearly all human development indicators for the past ten years. Despite the introduction of community gardens in drought-prone areas of Zimbabwe, poverty persists amongst the vulnerable groups. The potential to improve household, community and national food and nutrition security through garden activities is high if issues of water availability cost and availability of inputs, marketing and farmer empowerment can be addressed. This paper seeks to assess the community garden's cost structure to sales volume and profitability and the land use efficiency. Primary data were collected through structured questionnaire. A two stage sampling techniques was used to select respondents. The study was conducted in Zaka district. Three major crops namely tomatoes, covo and onion were chosen for the study basing on size of land under that particular crop. Cost-Volume-Profit analysis employed for analysis of cost structure to sales volume and profitability. Land use efficiency was also employed to measure the ratio yield per acre of farm to average yield of locality. The results showed that although the farmers are able to break even the margin of safety is small especially for cove and onion. The study recommends farmers to increase the size of acreage under onion production whilst reduce acreage under production of covo. Farmers should adopt technology that would improve land use efficiency of onion. There is a need for the intervention by the Government and other stakeholders to improve the profitability and efficiency of the community gardeners. Stakeholders' collaboration especially, in terms of farmer training which can improve garden activities as participants lack knowhow.

  18. INTERROGATING THE TEACHING AND LEARNING MODES IN OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING (ODL WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF QUALITY EDUCATION: A Case Study of The Zimbabwe Open University; Department of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington SAMKANGE,

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been concerns about the teaching and learning modes in both conventional and Open and Distance Learning (ODL institutions globally. Such concerns emanate from issues of quality and standards in education. In view of such concerns, the study examined the teaching and learning modes in Open and Distance Learning (ODL. These were examined in relation to how they contribute to quality and standards within the the context of ODL. The study focused on the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU, an ODL university in Zimbabwe. It used the qualitative methodology and the case study design. A purposively selected sample of twenty students on the Bachelor of Education in Educational Management (BEDM programme, another twenty on the Masters of Education in Educational Management (MEDM programme and and thirty students on the teacher development programmes were selected from a population of one hundred and sixty two students in the Department of Education in Harare region. In total, the sample was made up of seventy students and fifteen tutors who were observed teaching. Data was collected through the use of interviews, open-ended questionnaires and analysis of documents. Data was collected from current students in the Faculty of Arts and Education in the Departments of Educational Studies and Teacher Development. Data was also collected through the evaluation instruments and other related documents used at ZOU. Furthermore, students evaluated the different teaching and learning modes used in the university. These included reading material, modules, tutors and tutorials. The study concluded that whilst students expressed satisfaction in areas such as the work and efforts of their tutors and the relevance of the courses to their jobs and promotion prospects, they were concerns about the non-availability of learning materials in some cases, the coverage of some topics in some modules and the language of instruction used by the tutors. The cases observed

  19. Factors affecting acceptance of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling services among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar Town, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurahman S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sami Abdurahman,1 Berhanu Seyoum,2 Lemessa Oljira,2 Fitsum Weldegebreal2 1Harari Regional Health Bureau, 2Haramaya University, College of Health and Medical Sciences, Harar, Ethiopia Purpose: To improve the slow uptake of HIV counseling and testing, the World Health Organization (WHO and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS have developed draft guidelines on provider-initiated testing and counseling (PITC. Both in low- and high-income countries, mainly from outpatient clinics and tuberculosis settings, indicates that the direct offer of HIV testing by health providers can result in significant improvements in test uptake. In Ethiopia, there were limited numbers of studies conducted regarding PITC in outpatient clinics. Therefore, in this study, we have assessed the factors affecting the acceptance of PITC among outpatient clients in selected health facilities in Harar, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. Materials and methods: Institutional-based, cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative studies were conducted from February 12–30, 2011 in selected health facilities in Harar town, Harari Region State, Ethiopia. The study participants were recruited from the selected health facilities of Harar using a systematic random sampling technique. The collected data were double entered into a data entry file using Epi Info version 3.5.1. The data were transferred to SPSS software version 16 and analyzed according to the different variables. Results: A total of 362 (70.6% clients accepted PITC, and only 39.4% of clients had heard of PITC in the outpatient department service. Age, occupation, marital status, anyone who wanted to check their HIV status, and the importance of PITC were the variables that showed significant associations with the acceptance of PITC upon bivariate and multivariate analyses. The main reasons given for not accepting the tests were self-trust, not being at risk for HIV, not being ready, needing to consult their

  20. A General Legislative Analysis of "Torture" as a Human Rights Violation in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Chitimira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several challenges involving torture-related human rights violations have been reported in Zimbabwe from the late 1970s to date. Notably, these torture-related human rights violations were problematic during the liberation war era in Zimbabwe. Regrettably, such violations are allegedly still prevalent, especially prior to and/or during general political elections in Zimbabwe. Accordingly, this article investigates torture as a human rights violation in Zimbabwe, inter alia by focusing on the role of selected law enforcement agencies in the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe. The article also discusses the legal position on torture and the perpetration of torture against ordinary people prior to as well as after independence in Zimbabwe. This is done to investigate the adequacy of the legal framework in Zimbabwe with regard to the combatting of torture. In relation to this, selected regional and international legal frameworks against torture are briefly discussed in order to determine possible measures that could be utilised in Zimbabwe. The authors submit that although the Constitution of Zimbabwe Amendment (No 20 Act, 2013 (Zimbabwe Constitution, 2013 prohibits torture, more may still need to be done to enhance the combatting of torture in Zimbabwe. For instance, apart from the prohibition contained in the Zimbabwe Constitution, 2013, there is no legislation that expressly outlaws torture in Zimbabwe. Moreover, Zimbabwe has not ratified the United Nations (UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment of 1984 (UN Convention against Torture to date. Lastly, concluding remarks and possible recommendations that could be employed to discourage torture-related human rights abuses in Zimbabwe are provided.

  1. "I don't feel shy because I will be among others who are just like me…": The role of support groups for children perinatally infected with HIV in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupambireyi, Zivai; Bernays, Sarah; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsa; Cowan, Frances M

    2014-10-01

    As access to paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) continues to improve in sub-Saharan Africa, a new historically specific cohort of HIV-perinatally infected children surviving into adolescent has emerged. Although remarkable successes have been made clinically in keeping this cohort alive and in reasonable health, their social support experiences are still unknown. The research being reported here sought to explore peer social support experiences of HIV-perinatally infected children in Harare, Zimbabwe. In this article, we draw on 56 repeat in-depth interviews (IDIs) conducted in three phases and two focus group discussions (FGDs) with HIV-infected children (11-13 years). Additional interviews were held with 10 carers. Study findings suggested that both children and carers perceive support groups as a safe social space for learning and acquiring HIV information as well as gaining confidence. Additionally, findings highlighted the importance of consistency of participation. Structural and personal barriers to access and participation in support group were also identified. We conclude that support groups are a useful resource for HIV-infected children and therefore should be supported by stable funding.

  2. Factors Affecting Parent-Adolescent Discussion on Reproductive Health Issues in Harar, Eastern Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Assebe Yadeta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Open family discussion on reproductive health (RH issues often leads to increased awareness on RH matters and reduces risky behaviors among adolescents. This study was conducted to assess factors affecting parent-adolescent discussion on RH issues in Harar, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional survey using face to face interview supplemented with focus group discussion (FGD was conducted on 751 randomly selected parents of 10–19-year-old adolescents. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results. More than one-fourth (28.76% of parents reported discussing RH issues with their adolescents during the last six months. In the logistic regression, parents who have demonstrated good RH knowledge and positive attitude towards RH were almost six times and seventy percent (AOR 5.69, 95% CI: 3.67–8.82; AOR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.08–2.68 higher in discussing RH with their adolescents than their counterparts, respectively. Conclusion. Parent-adolescent discussion about RH issues rarely occurs and is bounded by lack of knowledge, sociocultural norms, and parental concern that discussion would encourage premarital sex. Reproductive health programs should target on improving awareness of parents and addressing sociocultural norms surrounding reproductive health issues.

  3. Influence of the Trojan Nickel Mine on surface water quality, Mazowe valley, Zimbabwe: Runoff chemistry and acid generation potential of waste rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupankwa, Keretia; Love, David; Mapani, Benjamin; Mseka, Stephen; Meck, Maideyi

    The impacts of mining on the environment depend on the nature of the ore body, the type of mining and the size of operation. The focus of this study is on Trojan Nickel Mine which is located 90 km north of Harare, Zimbabwe. It produces nickel from iron, iron-nickel and copper-nickel sulphides and disposes of waste rock in a rock dump. Surface water samples were taken at 11 points selected from a stream which drains the rock dump, a stream carrying underground water and the river into which these streams discharge. Samples were analysed for metals using atomic absorption spectrometry, for sulphates by gravitation and for carbonates and bicarbonates by back titration. Ninteen rock samples were collected from the dump and static tests were performed using the Sobek acid base accounting method. The results show that near neutral runoff (pH 7.0-8.5) with high concentrations of sulphate (over 100 mg/L) and some metals (Pb > 1.0 mg/L and Ni > 0.2 mg/L) emanates from the dump. This suggests that acid mine drainage is buffered in the dump (probably by carbonates). This is supported by the static tests, which show that the fine fraction of dump material neutralises acid. Runoff from the dump flows into a pond. Concentrations of sulphates and metals decrease after the dump runoff enters the pond, but sufficient remains to increase levels of calcium, sulphate, bicarbonate, iron and lead in the Pote River. The drop in concentrations at the pond indicates that the settling process has a positive effect on water quality. This could be enhanced by treating the pond water to raise pH, thus precipitating out metals and decreasing their concentrations in water draining from the pond.

  4. The effects of progressive-resisted exercises on muscle strength and health-related quality of life in persons with HIV-related poly-neuropathy in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandla, Khumbula; Myezwa, Hellen; Musenge, Eustasius

    2016-01-01

    Distal symmetrical poly-neuropathy (DSP) is a neurological complication associated with HIV/AIDS and stavudine (d4T) containing antiretroviral therapy. People with DSP experience pain, numbness and muscle weakness, which affect their quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this study was to establish the effect of a progressive-resisted exercise (PRE) intervention on health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in people living with HIV/AIDS-related DSP. An assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial was conducted, with participants sourced from 10 clinics with HIV services, the family care clinic at Wilkins Hospital and 2 large hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe. A 12-week PRE intervention was conducted twice weekly for 80 participants, while the control group with 80 participants continued with usual daily activities. The main outcome variable was HR-QOL for which we controlled for demographic and clinical measures in generalised estimating equation population-averaged models. Data were summarised and analysed using an intention to treat analysis approach using the Stata v10 program. Mean age of participants was 42.2 years (SD = 8.5). While d4T was used by 59% (n = 94), an equal proportion of the participants also had moderate to severe neuropathy. PRE was found to significantly improve HR-QOL in the intervention group based on the mean difference between the intervention group mean change and the mean change in the control group (F ratio 4.24; p = .04). This study established that PREs have positive effects on HR-QOL for people living with HIV/AIDS-related DSP.

  5. Acceptability of lifelong treatment among HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+) in selected health facilities in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadambuka, Addmore; Katirayi, Leila; Muchedzi, Auxilia; Tumbare, Esther; Musarandega, Reuben; Mahomva, Agnes I; Woelk, Godfrey

    2017-07-25

    Zimbabwe's Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC) adopted 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) guidelines recommending initiation of HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (PPBW) on lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART) irrespective of clinical stage (Option B+). Option B+ was officially launched in Zimbabwe in November 2013; however the acceptability of life-long ART and its potential uptake among women was not known. A qualitative study was conducted at selected sites in Harare (urban) and Zvimba (rural) to explore Option B+ acceptability; barriers, and facilitators to ART adherence and service uptake. In-depth interviews (IDIs), focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs) were conducted with PPBW, healthcare providers, and community members. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated; data were coded and analyzed in MaxQDA v10. Forty-three IDIs, 22 FGDs, and five KIIs were conducted. The majority of women accepted lifelong ART. There was however, a fear of commitment to taking lifelong medication because they were afraid of defaulting, especially after cessation of breastfeeding. There was confusion around dosage; and fear of side effects, not having enough food to take drugs, and the lack of opportunities to ask questions in counseling. Participants reported the need for strengthening community sensitization for Option B+. Facilitators included receiving a simplified pill regimen; ability to continue breastfeeding beyond 6 months like HIV-negative women; and partner, community and health worker support. Barriers included distance of health facility, non-disclosure of HIV status, poor male partner support and knowing someone who had negative experience on ART. This study found that Option B+ is generally accepted among PPBW as a means to strengthen their health and protect their babies. Consistent with previous literature, this study demonstrated the

  6. Carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in HIV-infected children in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, S M S; Kranzer, K; Williams, A; Makamure, B; Nhidza, A F; Mayini, J; Bandason, T; Metcalfe, J; Nicol, M P; Balakrishnan, I; Ellington, M J; Woodford, N; Hopkins, S; McHugh, T D; Ferrand, R A

    2017-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is an emerging global health issue. Data on the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant organisms are scarce for Africa, especially in HIV-infected individuals who often have frequent contact with healthcare. We investigated the prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) carriage in stool among HIV-infected children attending an HIV outpatient department in Harare, Zimbabwe. We recruited children who were stable on antiretroviral therapy (ART) attending a HIV clinic from August 2014 to June 2015. Information was collected on antibiotic use and hospitalization. Stool was tested for ESBL-E through combination disc diffusion. API20E identification and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed on the positive samples followed by whole genome sequencing. Stool was collected from 175/202 (86.6 %) children. Median age was 11 [inter-quartile range (IQR) 9-12] years. Median time on ART was 4.6 years (IQR 2.4-6.4). ESBL-Es were found in 24/175 samples (13.7 %); 50 % of all ESBL-Es were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate, 100 % to co-trimoxazole, 45.8 % to chloramphenicol, 91.6 % to ceftriaxone, 20.8 % to gentamicin and 62.5 % to ciprofloxacin. ESBL-Es variously encoded CTX-M, OXA, TEM and SHV enzymes. The odds of ESBL-E carriage were 8.5 times (95 % CI 2.2-32.3) higher in those on ART for less than one year (versus longer) and 8.5 times (95 % CI 1.1-32.3) higher in those recently hospitalized for a chest infection. We found a 13.7 % prevalence of ESBL-E carriage in a population where ESBL-E carriage has not been described previously. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in Africa merits further study, particularly given the high HIV prevalence and limited diagnostic and therapeutic options available.

  7. The costs of producing a unit of blood in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Nyoni, Herbert; Nkomo, Sisodwa Z; Jacob, Jeffery S; Chikwereti, Radhi; Musekiwa, Zamile; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A; Emmanuel, Jean C; Postma, Maarten J; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is lack of published data on the costs of blood and blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to assess the unit costs of producing blood in Zimbabwe using an activity-based costing (ABC) method. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A management accounting approach, based on

  8. Review Essay : Music in Zimbabwe | Chitando | Zambezia: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 29, No 1 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Zimbabwe Children's act alignment with international and domestic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper identifies shortfalls in the Children's Act (Zimbabwe) which reduce its alignment with the international and domestic legal instruments such as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (ACRWC), Child Protection Model Law, ...

  10. Traditional processing of masau fruits (Ziziphus mauritiana) in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Gadaga, T.H.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    A survey of the traditional processing techniques of masau was conducted using a questionnaire and two focus group discussions in Mudzi, Mt. Darwin, and Muzarabani districts in Zimbabwe. Masau fruits form part of the family diet and generate additional income by selling at local markets. Surplus

  11. The Zimbabwe Exiles Forum: Campaigning for freedom in the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-31

    Jan 31, 2011 ... Complicating the prospects for peaceful change is the fact that Mugabe has appointed not one but two vice-presidents, which raises the spectre of political chaos in the event of a sudden handover of power. “Such a cauldron of potential explosion!” says Shumba with a wry laugh. Should Zimbabwe collapse ...

  12. Challenges of communicating integrated water resource management in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marimbe, S.; Manzungu, E.

    2003-01-01

    With the promulgation of the 1998 Water Act the Government of Zimbabwe took a decisive step to reform the country's water sector, to bring it in line with contemporary socio-political realities obtaining in the country, and in tune with the philosophy of integrated water resources management.

  13. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal - Vol 30, No 3 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seroprevalence of leptospiral antibodies in commercial pigs in the Mashonaland East Province of Zimbabwe · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Mavenyengwa, E Keller, T Munyombwe, 85-92. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/zvj.v30i3.5349 ...

  14. An assessment of illegal fishing in Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.; Zisadza-Gandiwa, P.; Mutandwa, M.; Sandram, S.

    2012-01-01

    Illegal fishing is a worldwide problem. In this study we present the first assessment of illegal fishing in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), Zimbabwe. Information on illegal fishing was gathered from a total of 39 illegal fishers who were arrested within GNP between February and October 2011. Data

  15. Agroforestry Systems in Zimbabwe: Promoting Trees in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukasin, Helen L., Ed.

    Agroforestry has been defined as a sustainable crop management system which combines the production of forest crops with field crops. In June, 1987, an agroforestry workshop took place in Nyanga, Manicaland, Zimbabwe. This document was prepared to share the information presented at this workshop with other non-government organizations around the…

  16. Rangelands in Zimbabwe's initial resettlement schemes: Spatial and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Change in size and extent of cultivation and vegetation cover was analysed in three villages of an initial resettlement scheme in Zimbabwe using change detection depicted on serial aerial photographs taken at eight-year intervals from inception in 1981 to 1997. A geographic information system was used as an analytical ...

  17. Language in education and language development in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses the language in education policy of Zimbabwe. It attempts to highlight the factors that informed the formulation of this policy, as well as the challenges and constraints that have affected its implementation. The country's language in education policy can be traced back to the colonial history of the country, ...

  18. Private Universities in Zimbabwe: The Case of Africa University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whilst many of these challenges are shared with other private universities in Zimbabwe, a few are peculiar to Africa University. This paper discusses Africa University's experience with regard to establishment, nature, institutional marketing and student recruitment, programmes, governance, finding and other external factors ...

  19. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods. Data on

  20. The marketing landscape of universities in Zimbabwe: Perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper synthesizes findings based on a wide ranging research on university marketing in Zimbabwe. The research was primarily aimed at determining university Vice Chancellors' and internal marketers' perceptions of marketing, how the marketing function was organized and how specific university customer groups ...

  1. AfSBT Congress Abstracts: Zimbabwe 2014 | Adewuyi | Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AfSBT Congress Abstracts: Zimbabwe 2014. James Ola-Banji Adewuyi. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  2. Informal sector labour demand: Evidence from Zimbabwe's urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siphambe H (Prof)

    during the country's economic structural adjustment programme (ESAP) and the ... The study of informal labour demand is important for Zimbabwe which faces .... is assumed to be identically and independently distributed, that is, ..... The labour demand equation's low Chi-square statistic (1.91) and its probability value of.

  3. New Zimbabwe Constitution and the Right to Health Campaign 2010

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In September 2008 the three main political parties in Zimbabwe signed a Global Political Agreement (GPA), undertaking to engage in the development of a new democratic constitution of over the next 24 months. This project will feed into that process by promoting the inclusion of right to health in the new constitution.

  4. Electoral Politics in Zimbabwe: Authoritarianism Versus the People ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of Zimbabweans are now accustomed to electoral fraud as practised by the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front (ZANU-PF) led by President Mugabe. Elections are generally not conducted in a manner that can be deemed to be free, fair and transparent. The major electoral malpractices ...

  5. Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe: Advanced Search ... Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR conference) NOT theses); Search for an exact phrase by ...

  6. Internal Displacement and Forced Migration within Zimbabwe: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper argues that, contrary to the picture portrayed by the government of Zimbabwe, internal displacement, as one form of (forced) migration within a country's borders, is more prevalent in the country than is at first discernable. The paper offers an overview of the current scholarship on the forced mobility of particular ...

  7. Measuring the second economy in Zimbabwe Albert Makochekanwa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SIPHAMBE, H.K. (PROF.)

    of the informal production activities to Zimbabwe's GDP has been growing over the ... respect to the informal sector it can be argued that GDP figures for the country are biased .... on tax audits and voluntary responses, among other sources of data ..... and average tax rate (ATR) data series were obtained from the Reserve ...

  8. Managing public records in Zimbabwe: the road to good governance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability by government departments to attain effective service delivery, accountability and good governance is largely determined by their records management practices. Delays and failure to access services due to missing or misplaced records from public institutions is a common challenge in Zimbabwe.

  9. Zambezia: The Journal of Humanities of the University of Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Democratic discourse? Realising alternatives in Zimbabwe political discourse · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. A. Love, 27-46. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/zjh.v27i1.6742 ...

  10. The Future of Higher Education in Zimbabwe: A Constantly Moving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The common brick and mortar institutions associated with modern education are now disrupted and at the same time complemented by new technologies. This disruption began with open distance learning. This article proffers insights into how the higher education (HE) system in Zimbabwe should continuously tap into this ...

  11. Can a New Export Promotion Strategy Revitalise Zimbabwe's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After years of political and economic upheavals and disappointing trade performance, Zimbabwe sorely needs to revitalise its economy. An important step towards this outcome is to grow and strengthen the country's export sector. This article looks at whether an export promotion strategy, based on the application of a ...

  12. Zimbabwe Journal of Technological Sciences - Vol 1, No 1 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employee Identification and their Perceived Customer Satisfaction: A 2008 Case Study of Chinhoyi University Hotel – Zimbabwe. EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. F Chimutingiza, 31-44. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/zjts.v1i1.65217 ...

  13. The Etiology of Vaginal Discharge Syndrome in Zimbabwe Results from the Zimbabwe STI Etiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirenje, Z Mike; Dhibi, Nicholas; Handsfield, H Hunter; Gonese, Elizabeth; Barr, Beth Tippett; Gwanzura, Lovemore; Latif, Ahmed S; Maseko, Dumisili Venessa; Kularatne, Ranmini S; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Kilmarx, Peter H; Machiha, Anna; Mugurungi, Owen; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2017-11-29

    Symptomatic vaginal discharge is a common gynecological condition managed syndromically in most developing countries. In Zimbabwe, women presenting with symptomatic vaginal discharge are treated with empirical regimens that commonly cover both sexually transmitted infections (STI) and reproductive tract infections, typically including a combination of an intramuscular injection of kanamycin, and oral doxycycline and metronidazole regimens. This study was conducted to determine the current etiology of symptomatic vaginal discharge and assess adequacy of current syndromic management guidelines. We enrolled 200 women with symptomatic vaginal discharge presenting at 6 STI clinics in Zimbabwe. Microscopy was used to detect bacterial vaginosis and yeast infection. Nucleic acid amplifications tests were used to detect Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma genitalium. In addition, serologic testing was performed to detect HIV infection. Of the 200 women, 146 (73%) had an etiology detected, including bacterial vaginosis (24.7%); N. gonorrhoeae (24.0%); yeast infection (20.7%); T. vaginalis (19.0%); C. trachomatis (14.0%) and M. genitalium (7.0%). Among women with STIs (N=90), 62 (68.9%) had a single infection, 18 (20.0%) had a dual infection and 10 (11.1%) had three infections.Of 158 women who consented to HIV testing, 64 (40.5%) were HIV infected.The syndromic management regimen covered 115 (57.5%) of the women in the sample who had gonorrhea, chlamydia, M. genitalium, or bacterial vaginosis, while 85 (42.5%) of women were treated without such diagnosis. Among women presenting with symptomatic vaginal discharge, bacterial vaginosis was the most common etiology and gonorrhea was the most frequently detected STI. The current syndromic management algorithm is suboptimal for coverage of women presenting with symptomatic vaginal discharge; addition of point of care testing could compliment the effectiveness of the syndromic approach.

  14. Prevalence and patterns of prenatal use of traditional medicine among women at selected harare clinics: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mureyi Dudzai D

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prenatal use of traditional medicine or complementary and alternative medicine is widespread globally despite the lack of evidence of the effectiveness of these therapeutic options. Documentation on the prevalence and patterns of this maternal practice in the Zimbabwean setting was also lacking. Methods A cross sectional survey of 248 women at selected health centres in Harare was carried out to address the need for such data using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results Fifty-two (52% (95% C.I. 44%-60% of the participants reported to have used at least one traditional medicine intervention during the third trimester of their most recent pregnancy to induce labour, avoid perineal tearing and improve the safety of their delivery process. The study found prenatal use of traditional medicine to be significantly associated with nulliparity and nulligravidity. Such practice was also significant among participants residing in a particular high density suburb located in close proximity to informal traders of traditional medicines. Prenatal traditional medicine use was not significantly linked to experiencing an obstetrics-related adverse event. Instead, participants who reported not using any traditional medicine during pregnancy reported experiencing significantly more adverse events, mainly perineal tearing during delivery. Conclusions The practice of prenatal use of traditional medicine was significant in the study setting, with a prevalence of 52%. A variety of products were used in various dosage forms for differing indications. Nulliparity, nulligavidity and possible accessibility of these products were the factors significantly associated with prenatal use of traditional medicine. Prenatal use of traditional medicine was not significantly associated with any obstetric adverse event.

  15. Brand equity and willingness to pay for condoms in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas; Taruberekera, Noah; Longfield, Kim; Snider, Jeremy

    2011-10-26

    Zimbabwe suffers from one of the greatest burdens of HIV/AIDS in the world that has been compounded by social and economic instability in the past decade. However, from 2001 to 2009 HIV prevalence among 15-49 year olds declined from 26% to approximately 14%. Behavior change and condom use may in part explain this decline.PSI-Zimbabwe socially markets the Protector Plus (P+) branded line of condoms. When Zimbabwe converted to a dollar-based economy in 2009, the price of condoms was greatly increased and new marketing efforts were undertaken. This paper evaluates the role of condom marketing, a multi-dimensional scale of brand peceptions (brand equity), and price in condom use behavior. We randomly sampled sexually active men age 15-49 from 3 groups - current P+ users, former users, and free condom users. We compared their brand equity and willingness to pay based on survey results. We estimated multivariable logistic regression models to compare the 3 groups. We found that the brand equity scale was positive correlated with willingness to pay and with condom use. Former users also indicated a high willingness to pay for condoms. We found differences in brand equity between the 3 groups, with current P+ users having the highest P+ brand equity. As observed in previous studies, higher brand equity was associated with more of the targeted health behavior, in this case and more consistent condom use. Zimbabwe men have highly positive brand perceptions of P+. There is an opportunity to grow the total condom market in Zimbabwe by increasing brand equity across user groups. Some former users may resume using condoms through more effective marketing. Some free users may be willing to pay for condoms. Achieving these objectives will expand the total condom market and reduce HIV risk behaviors.

  16. Education policy and gender in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R

    1994-01-01

    It is concluded that equality for women in education, which was a state aim in 1980, is no longer a state concern in Zimbabwe. It is argued that protection of the patriarchal order has been the operating principle of both colonial and post-colonial periods, and education is used to maintain the gender imbalance. Black women under colonialism were subjected to both sexism and racism. The socioeconomic order was maintained by ensuring that Blacks remained uneducated and unskilled. Colonial policy was race specific. Education was free and compulsory for Whites only. Black parents paid fees for a son's education. Post colonialism and in 1971, only 43.5% of Black children were enrolled in school, of which 3.9% were in secondary school. Only 19 girls with at the highest level in school. School curriculum was gender based, which meant girls were taught cooking and typing. During independence, education policy was instituted, and education was considered as a human right and gender neutral. Tuition fees in primary grades were eliminated, and education was expanded. However, changes after independence did not result in equal advantage for girls. By 1985-91, girls had lower enrollments at all grade levels. The widest gaps in enrollment were at the highest levels. School curriculum changed very little, and girls were directed to the "feminine" courses of study. Girls performed poorly in math and sciences. Girls were underenrolled in technical and vocational institutions. After 1989, structural adjustment programs negatively impacted on women. There was reduced access to employment, limited access to services, and increased demands on women's time in order to compensate for gaps created by cuts in services. New changes in education policy are expected to negatively impact on girl's education. Fees for primary school were reintroduced in urban areas, and secondary school fees were increased. The government dropped the requirement of certification for technical and commercial

  17. The Lion and the Snake: A Strategic View of South Africa and Zimbabwe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peters, Ralph

    2003-01-01

    .... A decade ago, the situation appeared to be reversed, with South Africa bleeding from the tribal and political violence of Apartheid's death throes, while Zimbabwe was portrayed internationally...

  18. Implementing new public management in Zimbabwe: Challenges and obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chigudu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an exploratory study of the new public management (NPM’s implementation in Zimbabwe. The data presented is a review of the government’s policy initiatives and research publications. Findings suggest fragmented implementation of NPM reforms without requisite administrative skills, lack of resources, ill timing, and political inertia. This research’s underlying significance is that it provides insights to improve NPM and future public sector reforms. It contributes to relevant literature by filling gaps in the research on NPM in Zimbabwe The paper provides policy recommendations necessary for addressing public sector reforms in developing economies particularly in African countries that have a history of political instability.

  19. The political economy of power generation in Zimbabwe since 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederholm, P.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents a historical analysis of the power generation choices in Zimbabwe since independence in 1980; their causes and consequences. In the early 1980s, the electricity supply choices of the country were dictated by a policy of self-sufficiency, and least-cost supply options (e.g. imports and hydropower) were rejected at a not negligible economic cost. At the end of the 1980s, a new political environment and pressures from the World Bank prompted substantial changes towards least-cost alternatives. In the early 1990s, security of supply motives still played an important role and financial constraints were severe. At present, however, there is little evidence that imported power is still as cheap a source of electricity as it was about 15 years ago. This situation together with the ongoing trend towards higher discount rates imply that thermal power, in particular coal-fired power, will dominate future electricity supply investments in Zimbabwe. (author)

  20. The Trend of Women in Nuclear Security in Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sithole, P.; Chipuru, J.

    2015-01-01

    With the increase in the use of radiation technologies, each country now has a potential risk from nuclear related offenses or malicious use of radioactive material. Despite the major advancements women have made in becoming a significant part of the workforce in all the other fields, women in the field of Nuclear Security are underrepresented in Zimbabwe. Nuclear security contributes to global security and there are a number of things that constitute this field. In the past 10 years, in developing countries, a few women have been taking part in Nuclear Security activities at Major Public events. Less than 1% of women in Zimbabwe are employed and take part in Nuclear Security related work. This study provides the trend in statistics of women employed in the field of Nuclear Security in Zimbabwe and it has identified possible factors why women are underrepresented in that field. It shows the trend of women taking part in Nuclear Security related activities for the past 10 years. Women’s experiences of employment and career development in nuclear security were studied. The factors which hinder or support the career development of women employees in Nuclear Security or related work were identified. Practices which encourage and support women’s involvement in Nuclear Security were explored. A statistical analysis of local authority employment, using the Ministry of Labour, census of women in science and nuclear security related studies in the Population of Zimbabwe, and other relevant sources was carried out. This was to describe the wider context of women’s employment in Nuclear Security. A self-completion questionnaire to get information on personal attributes, age and preferred career paths for women was used. Solutions to the trend are suggested in the study. (author)

  1. Prospects for tobacco control in Zimbabwe: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, G; Mtisi, S; Vaughan, J P

    2001-09-01

    Using a historical and political economy perspective, this paper explores the prospects for tobacco control in Zimbabwe, the world's sixth largest producer and third largest tobacco exporter. Tobacco production, which first began in the former Rhodesia in the early 1900s, is closely associated with colonial history and land occupation by white settlers. The Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) Tobacco Association was formed in 1928 and soon became a powerful political force. Although land redistribution has always been a central issue, it was not adequately addressed after independence in 1980, largely due to the need for Zimbabwe to gain foreign currency and safeguard employment. However, by the mid-1990s political pressures forced the government to confront the mainly white, commercial farmers with a new land acquisition policy, but intense national and international lobbying prevented its implementation. With advent of global economic changes, and following the start of a structural adjustment programme in 1991, manufacturing began to decline and the government relied even more on the earnings from tobacco exports. Thus strengthening tobacco control policies has always had a low national and public health priority. Recent illegal occupation of predominantly white owned farms, under the guise of implementing the former land redistribution policy, was politically motivated as the government faced its first major challenge at the general elections in June 2000. It remains unclear whether this will lead to long term reductions in tobacco production, although future global declines in demand could weaken the tobacco lobby. However, since Zimbabwe is only a minor consumer of tobacco, a unique opportunity does exist to develop controls on domestic cigarette consumption. To achieve this the isolated ministry of health would need considerable support from international agencies, such as the World Health Organisation and World Bank.

  2. The Army of Zimbabwe: A Role Model for Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-02

    centuries. A limited sense of nationhood started to exist. Further south on the African continent Zulu dissidents broke from the main empire and in...International Crises: Lessons from Zimbabwe. Muscatine: The Stanley Foundation, 1983. 31. Day, John. "The Insignificance of Tribe in the African Politics of...40 Early Years .... .............. 40 The Europeans .... ............. 40 African Nationalism .. .......... 42 The United Nations and the West .... 43

  3. Debate on the legalization of abortion in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    In Zimbabwe, where over 70,000 illegal abortions are performed each year and complications from clandestine abortion are a leading cause of maternal mortality, the abortion law debate has been re-opened. Under the present law, abortion is legal only to save the life of the mother and women who undergo illegal abortion face strict criminal sanctions. Timothy Stamps, the Minister of Health and Child Welfare, has stated, "The first rights of a child are to be desired, to be wanted, and to be planned." Dr. Illiff, of the University of Zimbabwe's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, has noted, "We cannot stop abortion. The choice is how safe it is." Illiff pointed out that urban Zimbabwe women run a 262 times greater risk of dying of abortion complications than their counterparts in the UK where abortion is legal. As the Women's Action Group has observed, men have dominated the current debate on abortion. The group has issued an appeal to women to enter into this debate that concerns their bodies to ensure that another law is not imposed on them. The group's appeal for action states: "We as Women's Action Group believe that every woman should decide what's right and what's wrong in her life. She and only she should be the master of her destiny. Her voice should be heard louder than anyone else's."

  4. Current Status of Mycotoxin Contamination of Food Commodities in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Nleya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural products, especially cereal grains, serve as staple foods in sub-Saharan Africa. However, climatic conditions in this region can lead to contamination of these commodities by moulds, with subsequent production of mycotoxins posing health risks to both humans and animals. There is limited documentation on the occurrence of mycotoxins in sub-Saharan African countries, leading to the exposure of their populations to a wide variety of mycotoxins through consumption of contaminated foods. This review aims at highlighting the current status of mycotoxin contamination of food products in Zimbabwe and recommended strategies of reducing this problem. Zimbabwe is one of the African countries with very little information with regards to mycotoxin contamination of its food commodities, both on the market and at household levels. Even though evidence of multitoxin occurrence in some food commodities such as maize and other staple foods exist, available published research focuses only on Aspergillus and Fusarium mycotoxins, namely aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON, trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone (ZEA. Occurrence of mycotoxins in the food chain has been mainly associated with poor agricultural practices. Analysis of mycotoxins has been done mainly using chromatographic and immunological methods. Zimbabwe has adopted European standards, but the legislation is quite flexible, with testing for mycotoxin contamination in food commodities being done voluntarily or upon request. Therefore, the country needs to tighten its legislation as well as adopt stricter standards that will improve the food safety and security of the masses.

  5. Current Status of Mycotoxin Contamination of Food Commodities in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nleya, Nancy; Adetunji, Modupeade Christianah; Mwanza, Mulunda

    2018-05-03

    Agricultural products, especially cereal grains, serve as staple foods in sub-Saharan Africa. However, climatic conditions in this region can lead to contamination of these commodities by moulds, with subsequent production of mycotoxins posing health risks to both humans and animals. There is limited documentation on the occurrence of mycotoxins in sub-Saharan African countries, leading to the exposure of their populations to a wide variety of mycotoxins through consumption of contaminated foods. This review aims at highlighting the current status of mycotoxin contamination of food products in Zimbabwe and recommended strategies of reducing this problem. Zimbabwe is one of the African countries with very little information with regards to mycotoxin contamination of its food commodities, both on the market and at household levels. Even though evidence of multitoxin occurrence in some food commodities such as maize and other staple foods exist, available published research focuses only on Aspergillus and Fusarium mycotoxins, namely aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone (ZEA). Occurrence of mycotoxins in the food chain has been mainly associated with poor agricultural practices. Analysis of mycotoxins has been done mainly using chromatographic and immunological methods. Zimbabwe has adopted European standards, but the legislation is quite flexible, with testing for mycotoxin contamination in food commodities being done voluntarily or upon request. Therefore, the country needs to tighten its legislation as well as adopt stricter standards that will improve the food safety and security of the masses.

  6. The potential for energy production from crop residues in Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingura, R.M.; Matengaifa, R. [School of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Chinhoyi University of Technology, P. Bag 7724, Chinhoyi (Zimbabwe)

    2008-12-15

    There is increasing interest in Zimbabwe in the use of renewable energy sources as a means of meeting the country's energy requirements. Biomass provides 47% of the gross energy consumption in Zimbabwe. Energy can be derived from various forms of biomass using various available conversion technologies. Crop residues constitute a large part of the biomass available from the country's agriculture-based economy. The potential for energy production of crop residues is examined using data such as estimates of the quantities of the residues and their energy content. The major crops considered are maize, sugarcane, cotton, soyabeans, groundnuts, wheat, sorghum, fruits and forestry plantations. Quantities of residues are estimated from crop yields by using conversion coefficients for the various crops. Long-term crop yields data from 1970 to 1999 were used. Total annual residue yields for crops, fruits and forestry plantations are 7.805 Mt, 378 kt and 3.05 Mt, respectively. The crops, fruits and forestry residues have energy potential of 81.5, 4.9 and 44.3 PJ per year, respectively. This represents about 44% of the gross energy consumption in Zimbabwe. The need to balance use of crop residues for both energy purposes and other purposes such as animal feeding and soil fertility improvement is also highlighted. (author)

  7. Towards improvement of ethics in the public sector in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Chigudu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In Zimbabwe reports of abuse of public office have manifested in various forms resulting in public outcry; poor service delivery, and government losing millions of dollars. This study aims to undertake a reflective inquiry on the ethical conduct in the Zimbabwean public sector through content and process analysis in order to provide intervention mechanisms to the problem. Statistical analysis of corruption level is made to benefit the study. Results indicated some legislative gaps and an incapacitated Anti-Corruption Commission which has been unable to execute its mandate fully. Most senior public officials and politicians appear to have too much power and authority with no checks and balances in place. Practical implications of the widespread unethical practices call for the government to plug the glaring legislative gaps; take stern measures against offenders; empowering the Anti-Corruption Commission; term limits for senior public officials as well as for political appointments; and motivating political will to uphold ethical leadership. The recommendations will open a window for the Zimbabwean government and administrators to view how some advanced economies have propped up ethical behaviour in the public sector. It is the way to go for ailing economies like Zimbabwe. The paper demonstrated the importance of ethical awareness in another political and economic setting-Zimbabwe.

  8. The Zimbabwe student movement: Love-hate relationship with government?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blessing Makunike

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to trace the development of student unionism in Zimbabwe.On the basis of a discussion of the nature of the university, the article argues that becausethe university environment tolerates and promotes academic freedom and liberal values, itprovides an environment conducive to critical thought and oppositional politics, while theuniversity quite often itself becomes the target for student attack. Student representationduring the pre-independence period in Zimbabwe sought to engage the institution in itseffort to re-order society at a time of racial struggle and class conflict. After independence,student representation was in support of government efforts to create a better Zimbabweand to consolidate the gains of independence. However, after the first decade ofindependence, the relationship between students and government soured due to students’opposition to the one-party system as well as the University of Zimbabwe AmendmentBill, among other issues. This article thus documents and analyses the relationship betweenstudents and government with reference to three periods and two key moments: the 1973protests against racial discrimination in the pre-independence phase and the post-1990developments in Zimbabwean national and university politics.

  9. Gender Discrimination in Educational Personnel: A Case Study of Gweru Urban District Secondary Schools, Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matope, Nogget

    2012-01-01

    Gender discrimination in educational institutions persists, despite the vigorous pursuit of policies and programmes to reduce the varying degrees of gender inequity in Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe is a signatory to international agreements and conventions which promote gender equity with a thrust towards increased access to education for girls and females.…

  10. An overview of solar and solar-related technologies in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zimbabwe, being away from the screening effect of tropical humidity, desert dust, and the clouds of temperate areas receives more sunshine or solar radiation, also known as insolation, than almost any other country in the world (Johnston, 1977). The Zimbabwe Science News Volume 33(1) January-March 1999 ...

  11. The casual, naturalised and invasive alien flora of Zimbabwe based on herbarium and literature records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Maroyi

    2012-10-01

    Conservation implications: This research provides baseline information and historical invasion patterns of casual, naturalised and invasive alien flora in Zimbabwe. This inventory is a crucial starting point in trying to understand and initiate the management of biological invasions. This is also important for monitoring new introductions and management of existing alien plants in Zimbabwe.

  12. Yield gap analysis and resource footprints of Irish potato production systems in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svubure, O.; Struik, P.C.; Haverkort, A.J.; Steyn, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Irish potato is the third most important carbohydrate food crop in Zimbabwe after maize and wheat. In 2012, the Government of Zimbabwe declared it a strategic national food security crop. In this study, we examine the country's potential for increasing Irish potato yield and help ease the nation's

  13. Rethinking the language of politics in 21st century Zimbabwe: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The struggle for political supremacy in postcolonial Zimbabwe has of late assumed a new form in which discourse contestations have taken centre-stage. The Zimbabwe African National Union Patriotic Front (ZANU PF) politicians have engaged in discourse construction and discourse manipulation as tools of discrediting, ...

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV types Western blot (WB band profiles as potential surrogate markers of HIV disease progression and predictors of vertical transmission in a cohort of infected but antiretroviral therapy naïve pregnant women in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirenje Mike Z

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expensive CD4 count and viral load tests have failed the intended objective of enabling access to HIV therapy in poor resource settings. It is imperative to develop simple, affordable and non-subjective disease monitoring tools to complement clinical staging efforts of inexperienced health personnel currently manning most healthcare centres because of brain drain. Besides accurately predicting HIV infection, sequential appearance of specific bands of WB test offers a window of opportunity to develop a less subjective tool for monitoring disease progression. Methods HIV type characterization was done in a cohort of infected pregnant women at 36 gestational weeks using WB test. Student-t test was used to determine maternal differences in mean full blood counts and viral load of mothers with and those without HIV gag antigen bands. Pearson Chi-square test was used to assess differences in lack of bands appearance with vertical transmission and lymphadenopathy. Results Among the 64 HIV infected pregnant women, 98.4% had pure HIV-1 infection and one woman (1.7% had dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infections. Absence of HIV pol antigen bands was associated with acute infection, p = 0.002. All women with chronic HIV-1 infection had antibody reactivity to both the HIV-1 envelope and polymerase antigens. However, antibody reactivity to gag antigens varied among the women, being 100%, 90%, 70% and 63% for p24, p17, p39 and p55, respectively. Lack of antibody reactivity to gag p39 antigen was associated with disease progression as confirmed by the presence of lymphadenopathy, anemia, higher viral load, p = 0.010, 0.025 and 0.016, respectively. Although not statistically significant, women with p39 band missing were 1.4 times more likely to transmit HIV-1 to their infants. Conclusion Absence of antibody reactivity to pol and gag p39 antigens was associated with acute infection and disease progression, respectively. Apart from its use in HIV disease diagnosis, WB test could also be used in conjunction with simpler tests like full blood counts and patient clinical assessment as a relatively cheaper disease monitoring tool required prior to accessing antiretroviral therapy for poor resource settings. However, there is also need to factor in the role of host-parasite genetics and interactions in disease progression.

  15. Original Research Correlates of cannabis use among high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Community Medicine, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe ... A descriptive cross-sectional study focusing on the correlates of cannabis use was .... from: https://www.unodc.org/unodc/secured/wdr/wdr2013/World_.

  16. Occupational health risk of working in garages: comparative study on blood pressure and hematological parameters between garage workers and Haramaya University community, Harar, eastern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataro, Zerihun; Geremew, Abraham; Urgessa, Fekadu

    2018-01-01

    Occupational exposure to chemicals in garages causes a wide range of biological effects, depending upon the level and duration of exposure. In Ethiopia, there have been few studies conducted to assess the exposure of garage workers to chemicals. Preceding studies have not explored the effect of working in garage on blood pressure and hematological parameters. Therefore, this study aimed to assess differences in blood pressure and hematological parameters among garage workers compared to the Haramaya University community, Harar, eastern Ethiopia. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in Harar town, eastern Ethiopia. Thirty garage workers were selected and compared with 30 age- and sex-matched controls comprising of teachers and students. Demographic and occupational data were collected by using a structured questionnaire by a trained data collector. Blood pressure was measured using sphygmomanometry. Hematological parameters were measured with an automated hematology analyzer. Data were analyzed using Stata version 13. The majority of the garage workers did not implement effective preventive or control measures for workplace chemical exposure. Statistically significant increases were found in systolic (128.67±18.14 vs 106.33 ±9.27 mmHg, P workers compared to the control group. On the other hand, statistically significant decreases were found in red blood cells (5.13±0.38 vs 5.46±0.36×10 12 cells/L, P =0.0006), hemoglobin (14.89±0.71 vs 15.45±0.87 g/dL, P =0.0062), hematocrit (43.98%±1.99% vs 46.4%3±2.32%, P workers compared to the control group. There were significant differences in blood pressure and hematological parameters between garage workers and the control group. Therefore, appropriate and effective safety measures need to be taken by the workers to prevent possible chemical exposure during routine tasks.

  17. Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women delivering at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier and infectivity status among women delivering at Harare Maternity Hospital. Design: A serological survey study of pregnant women admitted for labour and delivery. Setting: Harare Maternity Hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe between June 1996 and June ...

  18. 29 CFR 22.29 - Sanctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... relate to the severity and nature of the failure or misconduct. (c) When a party fails to comply with an...) Strike any part of the pleadings or other submissions of the party failing to comply with such request...

  19. Acceptability of lifelong treatment among HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+ in selected health facilities in Zimbabwe: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addmore Chadambuka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zimbabwe’s Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC adopted 2013 World Health Organization (WHO prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT guidelines recommending initiation of HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women (PPBW on lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART irrespective of clinical stage (Option B+. Option B+ was officially launched in Zimbabwe in November 2013; however the acceptability of life-long ART and its potential uptake among women was not known. Methods A qualitative study was conducted at selected sites in Harare (urban and Zvimba (rural to explore Option B+ acceptability; barriers, and facilitators to ART adherence and service uptake. In-depth interviews (IDIs, focus group discussions (FGDs and key informant interviews (KIIs were conducted with PPBW, healthcare providers, and community members. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated; data were coded and analyzed in MaxQDA v10. Results Forty-three IDIs, 22 FGDs, and five KIIs were conducted. The majority of women accepted lifelong ART. There was however, a fear of commitment to taking lifelong medication because they were afraid of defaulting, especially after cessation of breastfeeding. There was confusion around dosage; and fear of side effects, not having enough food to take drugs, and the lack of opportunities to ask questions in counseling. Participants reported the need for strengthening community sensitization for Option B+. Facilitators included receiving a simplified pill regimen; ability to continue breastfeeding beyond 6 months like HIV-negative women; and partner, community and health worker support. Barriers included distance of health facility, non-disclosure of HIV status, poor male partner support and knowing someone who had negative experience on ART. Conclusions This study found that Option B+ is generally accepted among PPBW as a means to strengthen their health and protect their babies

  20. Human resource for health reform in peri-urban areas: a cross-sectional study of the impact of policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taderera, Bernard Hope; Hendricks, Stephen James Heinrich; Pillay, Yogan

    2017-12-16

    The need to understand how healthcare worker reform policy interventions impact health personnel in peri-urban areas is important as it also contributes towards setting of priorities in pursuing the universal health coverage goal of health sector reform. This study explored the impact of post 2008 human resource for health reform policy interventions on healthcare workers in Epworth, a peri-urban community in Harare, Zimbabwe, and the implications towards health sector reform policy in peri-urban areas. The study design was exploratory and cross-sectional and involved the use of qualitative and quantitative methods in data collection, presentation, and analysis. A qualitative study in which data were collected through a documentary search, five key informant interviews, seven in-depth interviews, and five focus group discussions was carried out first. This was followed by a quantitative study in which data were collected through a documentary search and 87 semi-structured sample interviews with healthcare workers. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically whilst descriptive statistics were used to examine quantitative data. All data were integrated during analysis to ensure comprehensive, reliable, and valid analysis of the dataset. Three main factors were identified to help interpret findings. The first main factor consisted policy result areas that impacted most successfully on healthcare workers. These included the deployment of community health workers with the highest correlation of 0.83. Policy result areas in the second main factor included financial incentives with a correlation of 0.79, training and development (0.77), deployment (0.77), and non-financial incentives (0.75). The third factor consisted policy result areas that had the lowest satisfaction amongst healthcare workers in Epworth. These included safety (0.72), equipment and tools of trade (0.72), health welfare (0.65), and salaries (0.55). The deployment of community health volunteers impacted

  1. Risky behaviour and HIV/AIDS-related stigma in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Marisa Amarante

    2010-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Economics from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination have been getting more and more attention by researchers and policy-makers. Since stigma has direct impact on the way-of-living of PLHA1 and their decision-making process, it can be an important key in the spread of HIV. Zimbabwe is one of the countries with the highest HIV prevalence rates ...

  2. Female Leadership Dilemmas in Primary Schools: A Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Female Leadership Dilemmas in Primary Schools: A Case Study of Primary Schools in Harare Province in Zimbabwe. ... Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research ... The study sought to explore dilemmas faced by female school leaders in primary schools in Kambuzuma, Warren Park and Kuwadzana areas of Harare ...

  3. Enhancing Schistosomiasis Control Strategy for Zimbabwe: Building on Past Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses J. Chimbari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni are prevalent in Zimbabwe to levels that make schistosomiasis a public health problem. Following three national surveys to map the disease prevalence, a national policy on control of schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminths is being developed. This paper reviews the experiences that Zimbabwe has in the area of schistosomiasis control with a view to influence policy. A case study approach to highlight key experiences and outcomes was adopted. The benefits derived from intersectoral collaboration that led to the development of a model irrigation scheme that incorporates schistosomiasis control measures are highlighted. Similarly, the benefits of using plant molluscicides and fish and duck biological agents (Sargochromis codringtonii and Cairina moschata are highlighted. Emphasis was also placed on the importance of utilizing locally developed water and sanitation technologies and the critical human resource base in the area of schistosomiasis developed over years. After synthesis of the case studies presented, it was concluded that while there is a need to follow the WHO recommended guidelines for schistosomiasis control it is important to develop a control strategy that is informed by work already done in the country. The importance of having a policy and local guidelines for schistosomiasis control is emphasized.

  4. Base line definitions and methodological lessons from Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The UNEP Greenhouse Gas Abatement Costing Studies carried out under the management of the UNEP Collaborating Centre On Energy and Environment at Risoe National Laboratories in Denmark has placed effort in generating methodological approaches to assessing the cost of abatement activities to reduce CO 2 emissions. These efforts have produced perhaps the most comprehensive set of methodological approaches to defining and assessing the cost of greenhouse gas abatement. Perhaps the most importance aspect of the UNEP study which involved teams of researchers from ten countries is the mix of countries in which the studies were conducted and hence the representation of views and concepts from researchers in these countries particularly those from developing countries namely, Zimbabwe, India, Venezuela, Brazil, Thailand and Senegal. Methodological lessons from Zimbabwe, therefore, would have benefited from the interactions with methodological experiences form the other participating countries. Methodological lessons from the Zimbabwean study can be placed in two categories. One relates to the modelling of tools to analyze economic trends and the various factors studied in order to determine the unit cost of CO 2 abatement. The other is the definition of factors influencing the levels of emissions reducible and those realised under specific economic trends. (au)

  5. Challenges of communicating integrated water resource management in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimbe, Simbiso; Manzungu, Emmanuel

    With the promulgation of the 1998 Water Act the Government of Zimbabwe took a decisive step to reform the country’s water sector, to bring it in line with contemporary socio-political realities obtaining in the country, and in tune with the philosophy of integrated water resources management. Researchers have reported a lack of awareness of the reforms, particularly among the black communities, who were considered not just as one of the target of the reforms, but the beneficiaries. This paper analyses why this has been the case. The paper makes a case for differentiating communication from information dissemination. Information refers to a set of data packaged for delivery to a receiver while communication involves a dialogue. This paper critiques communication strategies used to communicate water reforms in Zimbabwe, applying recent developments in communication theories. The argument in the paper is that there was a failure to communicate although there was some success in dissemination information about the reforms. If the situation is to be reversed then methods that involve audience analysis may have to be used. Such methods tend to be expensive and time consuming--however, there is no substitute to this if integrated water resources management is to be institutionalised among the various stakeholders.

  6. What was the population of Great Zimbabwe (CE1000 - 1800)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikure, Shadreck; Moultrie, Thomas; Bandama, Foreman; Dandara, Collett; Manyanga, Munyaradzi

    2017-01-01

    The World Heritage Site of Great Zimbabwe is one of the most iconic and largest archaeological settlements in Africa. It was the hub of direct and indirect trade which internally connected various areas of southern Africa, and externally linked them with East Africa and the Near and Far East. Archaeologists believe that at its peak, Great Zimbabwe had a fully urban population of 20,000 people concentrated in approximately 2.9 square kilometres (40 percent of 720 ha). This translates to a population density of 6,897, which is comparable with that of some of the most populous regions of the world in the 21st century. Here, we combine archaeological, ethnographic and historical evidence with ecological and statistical modelling to demonstrate that the total population estimate for the site's nearly 800-year occupational duration (CE1000-1800), after factoring in generational succession, is unlikely to have exceeded 10,000 people. This conclusion is strongly firmed up by the absence of megamiddens at the site, the chronological differences between several key areas of the settlement traditionally assumed to be coeval, and the historically documented low populations recorded for the sub-continent between CE1600 and 1950.

  7. Issues and prospects for coal utilization in Zimbabwe's rural households

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    The increasing shortage of traditional fuels in Zimbabwe has prompted government to consider seriously the use of coal in rural households. In this regard, both government and the privately owned coal industry have begun pilot projects in selected rural areas to initiate the introduction of coal stoves and coal fuels. These efforts by government and the coal industry need to be informed by knowledge of the financial and economic dimensions of coal diffusion to rural economies, the environmental implications of widespread coal use in rural households, and the general acceptability of coal as a fuel to households with a long tradition of free fuels. This paper summarizes the results of a study undertaken to provide such background information. Conducted over six months during 1988, the study included field surveys of four districts in Zimbabwe: Murewa, Shurugwi, Mberengwa, and Mazoe Citrus Estates. All but the Mazoe district are rural settings with severe shortages of fuelwood. Mazoe Citrus Estates is a semi-urban plantation community which has had over twenty years' experience with coal use in households under a company-sponsored programme which supplies both fuels and stoves free of charge

  8. What was the population of Great Zimbabwe (CE1000 - 1800?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadreck Chirikure

    Full Text Available The World Heritage Site of Great Zimbabwe is one of the most iconic and largest archaeological settlements in Africa. It was the hub of direct and indirect trade which internally connected various areas of southern Africa, and externally linked them with East Africa and the Near and Far East. Archaeologists believe that at its peak, Great Zimbabwe had a fully urban population of 20,000 people concentrated in approximately 2.9 square kilometres (40 percent of 720 ha. This translates to a population density of 6,897, which is comparable with that of some of the most populous regions of the world in the 21st century. Here, we combine archaeological, ethnographic and historical evidence with ecological and statistical modelling to demonstrate that the total population estimate for the site's nearly 800-year occupational duration (CE1000-1800, after factoring in generational succession, is unlikely to have exceeded 10,000 people. This conclusion is strongly firmed up by the absence of megamiddens at the site, the chronological differences between several key areas of the settlement traditionally assumed to be coeval, and the historically documented low populations recorded for the sub-continent between CE1600 and 1950.

  9. Prenatal care utilization in Zimbabwe: Examining the role of community-level factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makate, Marshall; Makate, Clifton

    2017-12-01

    This paper assesses the importance of community-level factors on prenatal care utilization in Zimbabwe. The analysis is performed using data from the two most recent rounds of the nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey for Zimbabwe conducted in 2005/06 and 2010/11 linked with other community-level data. We use logistic, generalized linear regressions as well as multilevel mixed models to examine the factors associated with the frequency, timing and quality of prenatal care. Our results suggest that contraceptive prevalence, religious composition, density of nurses, health expenditures per capita and availability of government hospitals in communities are important predictors of prenatal care use in Zimbabwe. These findings have important implications for public health policy in Zimbabwe - a country with unfavorable maternal and child health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementation strategy to reduce environmental impact of energy related activities in Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1992 UNEP-Collaborating Centre on Energy and Environment (UNEP-CCEE), Denmark and Southern Centre for Energy and Environment (SCEE), Zimbabwe, prepared a country report for Zimbabwe on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Abatement Costing. Abatement technologies for both supply and demand side were identified in order to reduce GHG emission. The present study addresses environmental impacts of the entire energy cycle focusing on coal use in industry and power generation. Zimbabwe has proven coal reserves of more than 700 million tonnes, and the potential of geological coal resources is estimated beyond 30 billion tonnes. The conventional applications of coal include electricity generation, steam traction in railway transport, industrial boilers, tobacco curing and coking. As coal is the major source of energy for Zimbabwe, the present study aims at identification of environmental impacts of the entire coal cycle from mining to end-users of electrical energy. (EG)

  11. Impact of Zimbabwe - South Africa Trade Relations: A Bilateral, Regional, or Multilateral Approach?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayihlome, Levi

    1997-01-01

    .... Whereas a functional bilateral trade agreement or a regional customs union culminating in a common market might improve Zimbabwe's regional competitiveness in the short run' due to South Africa's...

  12. Some insights into the intersection of physical planning and governance in Zimbabwe

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakwizira, J

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some insights into the intersection of physical planning and governance in Zimbabwe. It argues that the major theoretical, policy and practice discourses - explaining the intersection of physical planning and governance - relate...

  13. Community Tourism Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Tourism Management in Southern Africa: Lessons from Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Chiutsi; Boycen Kumira Mudzengi

    2012-01-01

    Zimbabwe tourism development has suffered the pitfalls of uneven development often producing disproportionate distribution of returns. While tourism has been promulgated as a panacea to the socio-economic development challenges Zimbabwe is facing, local and often marginalized rural communities have not meaningfully reaped the benefits through tourism income. In this paper community tourism entrepreneurship is suggested as a viable option to promote sustainable tourism as it places the local c...

  14. Customers’ adoption of electronic banking: An investigation on the commercial banking industry in Zimbabwe.

    OpenAIRE

    Makosana, Musa

    2014-01-01

    The advent of electronic banking offers banking firms a new frontier of opportunities and challenges. This study investigates how social factors, awareness, consumer perceptions and attitudes towards electronic banking influence the adoption of electronic banking in Zimbabwe. In Zimbabwe little is known and understood about the emergence of electronic banking, this is because electronic banking is new, and so consumer acceptance and use of electronic banking is still limited. This study has r...

  15. Limits and opportunities of marketeering tertiary education in post-colonial Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Sibanda

    2016-01-01

    This paper intended to assess the impact of marketeering tertiary education in Zimbabwe. The paper revealed that marketeering of tertiary education in Zimbabwe has drastically impacted on access to higher education and training. Poor and vulnerable students have found it difficult to access tertiary education due to escalating commercialized fees. Literature indicates that, even in developed countries like UK, marketeering tertiary education has led to decreased enrolments, diminishing prospe...

  16. The Determinants of the Compliance to Public Procurement Policy Requirements among Public Enterprises in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell Sandada; Portia Kambarami

    2016-01-01

    Many public entities in Zimbabwe are operating in a very volatile environment characterised by public procurement systems open to abuse. Zimbabwe is one of the first countries in Africa to have a Procurement Act however non-compliance issues are still a challenge. Public procurement scandals have been a hot topic with the media and also with the Report of the Auditor General for the financial year ended December 31, 2014 having picked on a lot of issues relating to non-complian...

  17. The Bright Lights Grow Fainter - livelihoods, migration and a small town in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Agnes

    2002-01-01

    The Aids pandemic and structural adjustment policies (SAP) have had effects on lower income households in Zimbabwe which have been devastating and people have been required to adapt their livelihood strategies. Small towns meahnwhile are growing rapidly in Zimbabwe and mobility towards these towns may be connected with the changes being forged by SAP on the economic landscape. This study seeks to establish how the individual migrant uses mobility tot negotiate this landscape. This involves mo...

  18. "Worse than dogs and pigs?" Attitudes toward homosexual practice in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoko, Tabona

    2010-01-01

    Politicians call them the "festering finger," endangering the body of the nation; churchmen say God wants them dead; the courts send them to jail. Zimbabwe has declared that it will not tolerate homosexuality. Gays and lesbians feel persecuted and their rights are undermined. The controversy that was ignited in 1997 when the Zimbabwean government forced the closure of a fair booth by Gays and Lesbians of Zimbabwe at the Zimbabwe International Book Fair continues to echo. At issue are fundamental questions of the scope of human rights protection in Zimbabwe and other African countries (BBC News, 1998). Such issues have sparked endless debates on homosexuality in religion, politics, and other forums. This article seeks to explore the attitudes of both traditional Shona culture and Christian sectors in Zimbabwe. The goal is to find out if the practice is rooted in Shona tradition or if it can be seen as a new phenomenon emanating from Western political and Judeo-Christian influences on Zimbabwe. The article argues that the Zimbabwean attitudes toward homosexuality combine Christian and traditional morality. Finally, the article will discuss how Christian churches and traditional Shona culture come to terms with homosexual practice today.

  19. The Functions of Selected Human Rights Institutions and Related Role-Players in the Protection of Human Rights in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Chitimira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various violations of the human rights of ordinary people and human rights defenders have been reported in Zimbabwe since the late 1980s. It is widely acknowledged that such violations have been perpetrated mostly by the government through its different organs for political and other related reasons. Human rights violations were also easily committed against ordinary people and human rights defenders because there was no Constitution that adequately protected such people's fundamental human rights (including their civil and political rights and their socio-economic rights in Zimbabwe. Given this background, the article discusses the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe, in the light of the Zimbabwe Constitution Amendment Act 20 of 2013 (Zimbabwe Constitution 2013. This is done in order to investigate whether the promotion, protection, enforcement and respect for human rights in Zimbabwe has now improved. To this end, the functions of selected national human rights institutions and other related role-players, namely civil society, the judiciary, the law enforcement organs and the Zimbabwe Human Rights Commission, are briefly discussed first. Secondly, the functions of selected regional and international institutions, namely the Southern African Development Community, the African Union and the United Nations are discussed in relation to the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe. Thereafter, concluding remarks and possible recommendations that could be utilised to combat human rights violations and enhance the protection of human rights in Zimbabwe are provided.

  20. Can our people afford to live? The effect of changing economic conditions on high density urban dwellers around Harare, March 1992 to June 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, T E

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Community Medicine with the assistance of fourth year medical students have been monitoring the basic cost of living of high density urban dwellers near Harare from March 1992 to June 1993. The cheapest diet able to provide sufficient calories, protein and vitamin A for a standard family of five people was calculated, and also the average cost of rent, rates, essential travel and schooling for a month. Sixty to 80 people were interviewed on each of four occasions. The cost of basic foods increased by over 50 pc from $157.50 in March 1992 to $349.20 in June 1993, and the cost of rents, rate, transport and schooling from $230.63 to $268.43 in the same period. This gave an average total monthly cost of $388.18 in March 1992 and $617.63 in June 1993. Minimum costs were calculated by using the mean cost of rent and rates etc.--2 standard errors. This increase in the basic cost of living is compared with the wages of security guards and the implications regarding the affordability of health care.

  1. Syntactic Aspects in Text Messages of University of Zimbabwe Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslei Kahari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is a syntactic analysis of text messages in English language used by University of Zimbabwe students. The study specifically focuses on sentences where there are omissions of pronouns, auxiliary verbs and where contractions occur. The study also analyzes the impact of sociolinguistic variables on the sentence structure of English language in text messages. The fifty respondents’ forwarded two messages each from their sent items on their cell phones to the researcher and to understand the factors triggering the syntactic structures the researcher carried out unstructured interviews. The data collected showed that cell phone texting has indeed been affected by the socio-economic factors and these factors trigger omissions of important elements of English language sentence structure such as ,pronouns, auxiliary verbs and contraction of phrases.

  2. Gender issues in livestock production: a case study of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupawaenda, Anna C; Chawatama, Shingirai; Muvavarirwa, Plaxidia

    2009-10-01

    The importance of main streaming gender issues in development programmes is now recognized by governments and development agents. This paper evaluates the role of gender in smallholder livestock production using Zimbabwe as a case study. It draws on several studies and assesses the gender dimension in terms of access and control, decision making and, division of labour. It is shown that for mainly traditional and historical reasons men continue to dominate livestock production although the situation is gradually changing. Men eclipse women in terms of ownership of more valuable stock, the making of decisions and the control of livestock production. This suggests that gender is important in livestock production and must be considered among other factors. The complexity of the system is noted but more gender disaggregated quantitative data is required if gender is to be effectively mainstreamed in livestock development programmes.

  3. Artisanal Fisheries in Zimbabwe: Options for Effective Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Mhlanga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The small-scale (artisanal fisheries in Zimbabwe play an important role in income-generation and food security at the household level. This sector has the potential to significantly increase its contribution to household income and food security if more effective fisheries management strategies are put in place. Historically, fisheries management has adopted a centralised “Top-down” approach. This approach has had very limited effectiveness. Over the last decade, efforts have been made to implement co-management in the fisheries sector. Several factors have hampered the success of fisheries co-management in the artisanal fishery. These factors have been institutional, ecological, human and financial. This paper discusses these factors and proposes possible solutions. A more innovative and effective fisheries management approach is also proposed.

  4. Health risk behavior of rural secondary school students in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwede, C K; McDermott, R J; Westhoff, W W; Mushore, M; Mushore, T; Chitsika, E; Majange, C S; Chauke, P

    2001-10-01

    A socioculturally appropriate health risk behavior instrument, modeled after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), was administered to 717 secondary school students in a rural area of Zimbabwe. Comparisons of risk behaviors by gender and school grade were made using univariate procedures and multiple logistic regression. Males were significantly more likely than females to have had sexual intercourse (odds ratio = 5.02, p < .0001) and to report drug use behaviors. Males also were significantly more likely to report early initiation (by age 13 years) of alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. School site violence and drug use behaviors also were prevalent in this sample. An interaction between gender and grade was evident for some behaviors. Additional research may further the understanding of these risk behaviors and facilitate development of effective, culturally relevant risk reduction programs.

  5. A pilot study to delimit tsetse target populations in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Chikowore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse (Glossina sensu stricto are cyclical vectors of human and animal trypanosomoses, that are presently targeted by the Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomiasis Eradication Campaign (PATTEC coordinated by the African Union. In order to achieve effective control of tsetse, there is need to produce elaborate plans to guide intervention programmes. A model intended to aid in the planning of intervention programmes and assist a fuller understanding of tsetse distribution was applied, in a pilot study in the Masoka area, Mid-Zambezi valley in Zimbabwe, and targeting two savannah species, Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes.The field study was conducted between March and December 2015 in 105 sites following a standardized grid sampling frame. Presence data were used to study habitat suitability of both species based on climatic and environmental data derived from MODIS and SPOT 5 satellite images. Factors influencing distribution were studied using an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis (ENFA whilst habitat suitability was predicted using a Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt model at a spatial resolution of 250 m. Area Under the Curve (AUC, an indicator of model performance, was 0.89 for G. m. morsitans and 0.96 for G. pallidipes. We then used the predicted suitable areas to calculate the probability that flies were really absent from the grid cells where they were not captured during the study based on a probability model using a risk threshold of 0.05. Apart from grid cells where G. m. morsitans and G. pallidipes were captured, there was a high probability of presence in an additional 128 km2 and 144 km2 respectively.The modelling process promised to be useful in optimizing the outputs of presence/absence surveys, allowing the definition of tsetse infested areas with improved accuracy. The methodology proposed here can be extended to all the tsetse infested parts of Zimbabwe and may also be useful for other PATTEC national initiatives in other

  6. Instituting dispute resolution procedures in the Apostolic Faith Mission in Zimbabwe church

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    Norman Chivasa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to institute dispute resolution procedures in the Apostolic Faith Mission (AFM in Zimbabwe church informs this study. Remarkably, one of the most critical problems facing the AFM in Zimbabwe church is intrachurch disputes, which manifest in diverse forms such as pastors’ transfers disputes, election disputes and pastors’ performance disputes. Such disputes have produced undesirable consequences not only for pastors but also for the wellbeing of the church in general. Intrachurch disputes require internal mechanisms to manage them so that constructive rather than destructive results are achieved. To do this, internal dispute resolution procedures become critical as they provide a framework for the constructive resolution of disputes. The lived experience of disputes in the AFM in Zimbabwe church confirms the appropriateness of systems theory, which states that social institutions are vulnerable to disharmony owing to differing interacting elements. To mitigate the negative impact associated with disputes, this study proposes the need to institute dispute resolution procedures in the AFM in Zimbabwe, because the church currently relies only on disciplinary procedures to address disputes. The study further emphasises that instituting dispute resolution procedures will help the church handle disputes from within its ranks without necessarily involving local courts, which may have negative financial and relationship implications. Finally, the study develops a model for dispute resolution procedures as an instrument that can assist local churches in AFM in Zimbabwe church to handle disputes as and when they arise.

  7. Implementation of renewable technologies - Opportunities and barriers. Zimbabwe country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies (RETS) have over the years become an integral part of the energy supply chain in most developed countries. Recent projections show that 13.5% of the world's primary energy supply comes from renewable and this figure has an aggregated annual growth rate of 16%. Wind has the highest annual growth rate of 22% while the least annual growth rate of 2% is for hydropower. The main push for renewable like wind in the OECD countries are environmental concerns and the business aspect in power generation. The situation is however completely different in Africa, where the thrust for RETs is developmental based. Although the continent has abundant renewable energy resources like solar, biomass, wind and hydro potential, they have remained largely unexploited. Several efforts have been made to help African countries like Zimbabwe to exploit such resources. The main objectives of this country study included review of Zimbabwe's development of past RETs, establish barriers related lessons learnt from such projects and currently running RETs projects, identify barriers experienced by other projects and then select a few barrier removal projects and then develop them with the help of all stake holders in the country. The methodology of this study involved a review of past RETs projects to establish barriers faced and barriers related lessons learnt. An examination of the policy instruments related to RETs was done to establish how they promote the dissemination of the technologies as well as their adequacy. A survey of all possible RETs projects in the country was carried out and in this survey the end-users were visited and interviewed by the research team. An initial workshop, which was attended by all stake holders, was held in November 1999. An Advisory committee on RETs in Zimbabwe was then set up comprising of various stake holders from government, the private sector, research institutions, interviewed end-users and the NGO community

  8. Tectonic setting of the Great Dyke, Chembadzi, Chewore and Atchiza layered complexes in Zimbabwe and Mozambique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Master, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Great Dyke of Zimbabwe is one of the largest ultramafic-mafic layered igneous complexexs in the world. Because of the economic importance of large layered intrusions like the Great Dyke, their tectonic setting is of great interest. The Chembadzi complex is a 14 km long, dyke-like layered intrusion up to 800m wide. The Chewore complex, which was thought to have the structure of an irregular lopolith, outcrops over an area of about 200 km in horst blocks in the lower Zambezi Valley in northern Zimbabwe. The Atchiza complex is situated just north of the Cahora Bassa lake and the Zambezi River valley in Mozambique. In considering the tectonic setting of the Great Dyke and its correlatives, most attention has been focussed on events in the Limpopo Mobile Belt, which were responsible for producing the fractures in the Zimbabwe craton that is occupied by the intrusives. 39 refs

  9. Duet for menstrual protection: a feasibility study in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbach, Sarah; Sahin-Hodoglugil, Nuriye; Musara, Petina; Chipato, Tsungai; van der Straten, Ariane

    2009-06-01

    Managing menses is a challenge for women in developing countries. Duet is a cervical barrier being developed for contraception and STI prevention. We explored the hypothetical acceptability of using Duet as a menstrual cup, among Zimbabwean women. A survey and focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with 43 women aged 18-45 years to gain information about their menstrual practices and attitudes regarding the use of Duet for menstrual protection. All 43 women reported that if Duet were available, they would "definitely" try it, and that it was "very important" that Duet is low cost and easy to clean; 86% reported that using it would make a difference in their lives. FGD findings highlighted unhygienic practices due to the lack of affordable options for menstrual management and a genuine interest in Duet, including its potential use for multiple purposes (contraception, disease prevention and menstrual protection). Accessing affordable and hygienic menstrual protection was a problem for these Zimbabwean women. Duet appeared acceptable and it would be feasible to conduct a user-acceptability study of Duet as a menstrual cup in Zimbabwe.

  10. An Assessment of SMEs’ Financing by Commercial Banks in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Sachikonye

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs play a key role in the world economy and contribute significantly to an economy’s output, income and employment. This paper seeks to assess the extent to which Zimbabwe’s commercial banks finance SMEs. Document analysis and an extensive review of the literature was undertaken to contextualize and draw a framework of analysis for the study. The literature shows that SMEs are of great socio-economic importance in developing countries but access to financial services for SMEs in Zimbabwe remains low. Zimbabwe’s economic challenges since 2000 to dollarization in 2009, the informalization of the SME sector, customers’ financial illiteracy and lack of training, lack of collateral security for loans, a high non-performing loans ratio, the lack of understanding of SMEs’ needs by banks, the inaccessibility of banks and the general lack of financial innovation are some of the major reasons for the low level of SME financing. A harmonised approach to policy suggestions for SMEs, lending institutions, the central bank and government to ensure the viability and growth of the SME sector are required and outlined. The research helps to formalize the SME sector considering its attendant benefits to the relevant players in the economy.

  11. Domestic biomass burning in rural and urban Zimbabwe: Pt. A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marufu, Lackson; Ludwig, Joerg; Andreae, M.O.; Meixner, F.X.; Helas, Guenter

    1997-01-01

    A questionnaire survey, to estimate biofuel consumption rates in rural and urban households in Zimbabwe, was conducted during the months of March and April 1995. The survey formed part of an integrated campaign aimed at establishing the extent to which domestic biofuel burning in Africa contributes to the atmospheric trace gas budget. Five study areas, four rural and one urban, were covered by the survey. The forms of biofuel used in rural areas were found to be wood, agricultural residues and cow dung, with wood being predominant. When available, agricultural residues were the second most popular form of fuel. Cow dung was only used in situations of severe fuel shortages. On average, rural consumption rates of wood, agricultural residues and cow dung for this time of the year were found to be 3.2, 1.5 and 0.2 kg/capita/day respectively. Wood and agricultural residues were the only biofuels used by urban households and were consumed at rates of 1.6 and > 0.1 kg/capitaday respectively. Across the study areas, consumption rates were a function of fuel availability. (author)

  12. Education of the Peasantry in Zimbabwe as Internal Colonialism

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    Munyaradzi Hwami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article utilizes internal colonial analyses to explore and understand the difficult educational conditions students from peasantry background experience in Zimbabwe’s universities. The article proposes that the subordinate position and related educational experiences of peasantry students since the year 2000 are exploitative and to the advantage of the elite to such an extent that peasants are an internal colony. The analysis is informed by critical anti-colonial perspectives that observe the hegemonic tendencies of global and local capital in collusion with dictatorial elite nationalists. By use of a critical interpretive case study of purposefully sampled students and other relevant members of the university community from one public university, disturbing student experiences were excavated. Student narratives and experiences were analyzed using the constant comparative method and led to the conclusion that there is internal colonialism in Zimbabwe where an alliance of the state and the local and global corporate world are colluding to maintain their economic and political dominance. The article challenges those in education and academics that there is need for the decolonization of education by first identifying contemporary hegemonic forces and recognizing students from the peasantry as victims of the emerging kleptocratic capitalism.

  13. Coal prospects in Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-01

    Increasing demand for coal in Asia is stimulating interest in the potentially large coal resources in Southern African countries such as Botswana, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe and Namibia. These countries have been slow to utilise their coal as local demand has been limited and the means to export coal has been inadequate. The governments in these regions are now recognising coal as a strategically important commodity, capable of earning foreign revenue but also adding value to the economy by generating much needed electricity. This report looks in turn at the role of coal in the energy economies of each of these countries. As in most emerging economies, the provision of a reliable and cost-effective supply of electricity to industries and people is essential for economic growth and the welfare of communities. Demand for Africa's mineral commodities such as diamonds and copper is driving a massive need for electricity and coal will play a major role. Not only does the mining industry need power, but with these growing industries come communities and commerce which are also in need of energy.

  14. Women and AIDS in Zimbabwe: the making of an epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, M T; Mhloyi, M

    1991-01-01

    As the AIDS epidemic in Africa assumes major proportions, the need to understand the social context in which heterosexual transmission occurs takes on urgent importance. In this article we explore how the intersection of traditional culture with the colonial legacy and present-day political economy has influenced family structure and sexual relations, and particularly the social position of women. Drawing on Zimbabwe's historical experience, we show how land expropriation, rural impoverishment, and the forcible introduction of male migrant labor fostered new patterns of sexual relations, characterized by multiple partners. Traditional patriarchal values reinterpreted in European law resulted in further subjugation of women as even limited rights to ownership were withdrawn. For many women, sexual relations with men, either within marriage (for the majority) or outside, become inextricably linked to economic and social survival. In this setting, all sexually transmitted diseases became rampant, including genital ulcer, which facilitates transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Intervention programs to halt the spread of AIDS need to take into the account the epidemic's historical roots and social nature. For example, efforts to reduce risk of HIV transmission should seek to expand women's limited options, both technically (e.g., by providing alternatives to condoms) and socially (e.g., by promoting employment).

  15. Serosurvey for canine distemper virus exposure in dogs in communal lands in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Kelly

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sera from 173 apparently healthy, unvaccinated dogs from 4 widely separated communal lands in Zimbabwe were tested by ELISA for antibodies against canine distemper virus. Overall, 82 % were positive with high prevalences found in each communal land. The highest seroprevalence was in dogs between 1 and 2 years of age (91 %; 49/54. These results show dogs in the communal lands of Zimbabwe are commonly exposed to canine distemper virus and that a substantial number survive infection. The role that the virus might play in the high mortality rate of the dog population on communal land warrants further investigation.

  16. An Assessment of Zimbabwe Secondary School Teachers’ Attitudes towards the Use of Smart Phones in the Classroom: A Case of Midlands Province, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhliwayo Alice

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While technology has been embraced by most of the people, use of smart phones in the classroom has been received with mixed feelings. Some say it enhances learning while others complain that it disturbs instruction. This research wanted to find out the stance of secondary school teachers on this issue in Zimbabwe. A sample of 50 randomly selected teachers from 10 randomly selected secondary schools in Gweru District, Midlands Province in Zimbabwe was used. Data from self-constructed questionnaires were analyzed by SPSS mainly on descriptive statistics and correlation. Findings showed that teachers possess smart phones which they use for researching and other instructional purposes with moderate expertise. Teachers consider smart phones as hand-held computers that can enhance learning for they have high engagement potential and they extend classroom walls allowing students to engage with the global village. A correlation computation showed that there is a significant relationship between perceived problems of smart phones and smart phones integration factors. However, respondents felt that smart phones can cause lower levels of attention during lessons and allows cheating and copying during exams. They also concurred that teachers’ technical skills lag behind those of digital native students. Thus, they foresaw instructional problems on the part of the teachers on the use of smart phones in the classroom and were against their use. They doubted if the use of smart phones can improve the pass rate and whether they wanted their students to bring cell phones and use them during lessons for they perceived problems in controlling students using them. They also doubted if schools in Zimbabwe would ever benefit if students are allowed to use their phones in class. The study concluded that teachers in Zimbabwe are not yet prepared to have students use smart phone in the classroom and recommended for further research on the potential benefits of using

  17. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  18. Optimal water resource allocation modelling in the Lowveld of Zimbabwe

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    D. Mhiribidi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The management and allocation of water from multi-reservoir systems is complex and thus requires dynamic modelling systems to achieve optimality. A multi-reservoir system in the Southern Lowveld of Zimbabwe is used for irrigation of sugarcane estates that produce sugar for both local and export consumption. The system is burdened with water allocation problems, made worse by decommissioning of dams. Thus the aim of this research was to develop an operating policy model for the Lowveld multi-reservoir system.The Mann Kendall Trend and Wilcoxon Signed-Rank tests were used to assess the variability of historic monthly rainfall and dam inflows for the period 1899–2015. The WEAP model was set up to evaluate the water allocation system of the catchment and come-up with a reference scenario for the 2015/2016 hydrologic year. Stochastic Dynamic Programming approach was used for optimisation of the multi-reservoirs releases.Results showed no significant trend in the rainfall but a significantly decreasing trend in inflows (p < 0.05. The water allocation model (WEAP showed significant deficits ( ∼  40 % in irrigation water allocation in the reference scenario. The optimal rule curves for all the twelve months for each reservoir were obtained and considered to be a proper guideline for solving multi- reservoir management problems within the catchment. The rule curves are effective tools in guiding decision makers in the release of water without emptying the reservoirs but at the same time satisfying the demands based on the inflow, initial storage and end of month storage.

  19. Indigenous environmental indicators for malaria: A district study in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macherera, Margaret; Chimbari, Moses J; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-11-01

    This paper discusses indigenous environmental indicators for the occurrence of malaria in ward 11, 15 and 18 of Gwanda district, Zimbabwe. The study was inspired by the successes of use of indigenous knowledge systems in community based early warning systems for natural disasters. To our knowledge, no study has examined the relationship between malaria epidemics and climatic factors in Gwanda district. The aim of the study was to determine the environmental indicators for the occurrence of malaria. Twenty eight key informants from the 3 wards were studied. Questionnaires, focus group discussions and PRA sessions were used to collect data. Content analysis was used to analyse the data. The local name for malaria was 'uqhuqho' literally meaning a fever. The disease is also called, "umkhuhlane wemiyane" and is derived from the association between malaria and mosquitoes. The findings of our study reveal that trends in malaria incidence are perceived to positively correlate with variations in both temperature and rainfall, although factors other than climate seem to play an important role too. Plant phenology and insects are the commonly used indicators in malaria prediction in the study villages. Other indicators for malaria prediction included the perceived noise emanating from mountains, referred to as "roaring of mountains" and certain behaviours exhibited by ostriches. The results of the present study highlight the importance of using climatic information in the analysis of malaria surveillance data, and this knowledge can be integrated into the conventional health system to develop a community based malaria forecasting system. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Population-level impact of Zimbabwe's National Behavioural Change Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdugan, Raluca; Benedikt, Clemens; Langhaug, Lisa; Copas, Andrew; Mundida, Oscar; Mugurungi, Owen; Watadzaushe, Constancia; Dirawo, Jeffrey; Tambashe, Basile O; Chidiya, Samson; Woelk, Godfrey; Cowan, Frances M

    2014-12-15

    To assess the impact of Zimbabwe's National Behavioural Change Programme (NBCP) on biological and behavioral outcomes. Representative household biobehavioral surveys of 18- to 44-year-olds were conducted in randomly selected enumeration areas in 2007 and 2011 to 2012. We examined program impact on HIV prevalence among young women, nonregular partnerships, condom use with nonregular partners, and HIV testing, distinguishing between highly exposed and low-exposed communities and individuals. We conducted (1) difference-in-differences analyses with communities as unit of analysis and (2) analyses of key outcomes by individual-level program exposure. Four thousand seven hundred seventy-six people were recruited in 2007 and 10,059 in 2011 to 2012. We found high exposure to NBCP in 2011. Prevalence of HIV and reported risky behaviors declined between 2007 and 2011. Community-level analyses showed a smaller decline in HIV prevalence among young women in highly exposed areas (11.0%-10.1%) than low-exposed areas (16.9%-10.3%, P = 0.078). Among young men, uptake of nonregular partners declined more in highly exposed areas (25%-16.8%) than low-exposed areas (21.9%-20.7%, P = 0.055) and HIV testing increased (27.2%-46.1% vs. 31.0%-34.4%, P = 0.004). Individual-level analyses showed higher reported condom use with nonregular partners among highly exposed young women (53% vs. 21% of unexposed counterparts, P = 0.037). We conducted the first impact evaluation of a NBCP and found positive effects of program exposure on key behaviors among certain gender and age groups. HIV prevalence among young women declined but could not be attributed to program exposure. These findings suggest substantial program effects regarding demand creation and justify program expansion.

  1. Potential water supply of a small reservoir and alluvial aquifer system in southern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hamer, W.; Love, D.; Owen, R.; Booij, Martijn J.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2008-01-01

    Groundwater use by accessing alluvial aquifers of non-perennial rivers can be an important additional water resource in the semi-arid region of southern Zimbabwe. The research objective of the study was to calculate the potential water supply for the upper-Mnyabezi catchment under current conditions

  2. Potential water supply of a small reservoir and alluvial aquifer system in southern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hamer, W.; Love, D.; Owen, R.; Booij, Martijn J.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2007-01-01

    Groundwater use by accessing alluvial aquifers of non‐perennial rivers can be an important additional water resource in the semi‐arid region of southern Zimbabwe. The research objective of the study was to calculate the potential water supply for the upper‐Mnyabezi catchment under current conditions

  3. Soil fertility management strategies and practices by smallholder farmers in semi-arid areas of Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mapfumo, P.; Giller, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous soil fertility management strategies in semi-arid Communal Areas of Zimbabwe have largely been driven by an extensive use of resources. The shrinking of common property resources (CPRs) due to expansion of cultivated lands, the general loss of productivity in natural ecosystems (e.g.,

  4. Abundance, distribution and population trends of Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) in Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zisadza-Gandiwa, P.; Gandiwa, E.; Jakarasi, J.; Westhuizen, van der H.; Muvengwi, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is an iconic or keystone species in many aquatic ecosystems. In order to understand the abundance, distribution, and population trends of Nile crocodiles in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), southeastern Zimbabwe, we carried out 4 annual aerial surveys, using

  5. The role of the adult literacy organization of Zimbabwe (ALOZ) in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out between October and December 1999. It looks at the nature of the literacy activities, successes and problems faced by the Adult Literacy Organization of Zimbabwe (ALOZ) in its efforts to spread literacy activities in the country. Data was collected by means of interviews and consultation of literature ...

  6. Determinants of Students' Academic Performance in Four Selected Accounting Courses at University of Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyikahadzoi, Loveness; Matamande, Wilson; Taderera, Ever; Mandimika, Elinah

    2013-01-01

    The study seeks to establish scientific evidence of the factors affecting academic performance for first year accounting students using four selected courses at the University of Zimbabwe. It uses Ordinary Least Squares method to analyse the influence of personal and family background on performance. The findings show that variables age gender,…

  7. Wildlife tourism in Gonarezhou National Park, southeast Zimbabwe: opportunities for wildlife viewing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to (i) estimate wild animal abundances, distribution and species diversity and (ii) examine the opportunities for wildlife viewing in major tourist areas in the southern part of Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), southeast Zimbabwe. In this study, road strip counts were used.

  8. The Teaching of African Traditional Religion in Primary Schools in Zimbabwe: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashe, Joel; Ndamba, Gamuchirai Tsitsiozashe; Chireshe, Excellent

    2009-01-01

    Zimbabwe's Education Ministry recommended the teaching of African Traditional Religion in recognition of its multi-religious society. This study sought to establish the extent to which African Traditional Religion is taught in primary schools, the challenges faced by teachers, and opportunities for promoting its teaching. A descriptive survey…

  9. Home-based care for people living with AIDS in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similar to the healthcare systems of other resource-constrained countries with a high prevalence of HIV and AIDS, Zimbabwe's healthcare system encourages communities and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to support the public healthcare sector by initiating home-based care activities and training volunteers to ...

  10. Curriculum Issues: Teaching and Learning for Sustainable Development in Developing Countries--Zimbabwe Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambudzo, Ignatius Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to investigate curriculum issues, teaching and learning for sustainable development in secondary schools in Zimbabwe. Education for sustainable development (ESD) aims at changing the approach to education by integrating principles, values, practices and needs in all forms of learning. Literature has documented the importance of…

  11. Preliminary assessment of illegal hunting by communities adjacent to the northern Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Illegal hunting of wildlife is a major issue in today’s society, particularly in tropical ecosystems. In this study, a total of 114 local residents from eight villages located in four wards adjacent to the northern Gonarezhou National Park, south-eastern Zimbabwe were interviewed in 2009, using

  12. 78 FR 41192 - Publication of General License Related to the Zimbabwe Sanctions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Publication of General License Related to the Zimbabwe Sanctions Program AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice, publication of general license. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets...

  13. Department Involvement in Instructional Materials Development for ODL Study at the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai; Mutambanengwe, Betty

    2015-01-01

    The teaching and designing of modules at Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) is the principal responsibility of a single body of teaching staff, although some authors and content reviewers could be sourced from elsewhere if they are not available in ZOU. This survey, through a case study, examines the involvement of lecturers and staff in the…

  14. An ethnography of knowledge : the production of knowledge in Mupfurudzi resettlement scheme, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudege, N.N.

    2007-01-01

    This study is an extension of an earlier interdisciplinary study on the impact of the adoption of high-yielding varieties of maize on poverty reduction in Mupfurudzi resettlement area in Shamva, Zimbabwe, carried out in 2001. The present study focuses on how farmers in resettlement areas produce and

  15. Experiences of a feasibility study of children with albinism in Zimbabwe: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julie S; Lund, Patricia

    2008-08-01

    Feasibility studies are often a helpful prelude to constructing fundable research proposals. Where the intended research is in a foreign country, focuses on a vulnerable population, and is aggravated by political and pragmatic challenges, feasibility studies become essential. Albinism, a genetic condition of reduced melanin synthesis, is a major public health issue in southern Africa. Whilst much is known about the health needs of children with albinism, little is understood about how to address these effectively in low income countries. Further, the child care and protection needs of children with albinism are largely unexplored. Zimbabwe's current political and economic climate presents additional challenges to research on the topic. The technical, economic, legal, collaborative, operational, schedule and political feasibilities (acronym TELCOSP) to undertaking a study on children with albinism in Zimbabwe were explored over a six week period of fieldwork in the country. Using the TELSCOSP framework allowed a deconstruction of each challenge to provide innovative solutions. The economic and legal feasibility aspects presented some difficulties that will require flexibility and perseverance to overcome. With the assistance of the local communities and people with albinism in Zimbabwe, the obstacles appear surmountable. The feasibility study provided a productive framework for addressing potential challenges in studying the needs of Zimbabwe's children living with albinism.

  16. Barriers and Coping Mechanisms Relating to Agroforestry Adoption by Smallholder Farmers in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitakira, Munyaradzi; Torquebiau, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to investigate agroforestry adoption by smallholder farmers in Gutu District, Zimbabwe. Design/Methodology/Approach: The methodology was based on field data collected through household questionnaires, key informant interviews and direct observations. Findings: Major findings reveal that traditional…

  17. Peace and Conflict in Zimbabwe – A Call for Peace Education (A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Developments in peace studies and peace theory have resulted in two conceptualizations of peace, notably, 'negative / cold' peace and 'positive / hot / stable' peace, respectively. It can be surmised that situations and conditions in most countries internationally and Zimbabwe in particular, seem consistent with negative ...

  18. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Strains Isolated from the Cholera Epidemic in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Mahmud, Zahid H.; Ansaruzzaman, Mohammad; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Alam, Munirul; Islam, Shafiqul; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Mazumder, Ramendra N.; Khan, Azharul I.; Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Iqbal, Anwarul; Chitsatso, Owen; Mudzori, James; Patel, Sheetal; Midzi, Stanley M.; Charimari, Lincoln; Endtz, Hubert P.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    This paper details the phenotypic, genotypic, and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of 88 Vibrio cholerae strains from Zimbabwe. Of the 88 strains, 83 were classified as "altered El Tor" and 5 as "hybrid El Tor" strains. All of the strains were susceptible to tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin,

  19. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: A retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; Van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background. Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and

  20. Biodiversity conservation versus artisanal gold mining: a case study of Chimanimani National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.; Gandiwa, P.

    2012-01-01

    Artisanal gold mining plays an important role in sustainable development of rural communities. The objectives of this study were to: i) assess the environmental impacts of recent artisanal gold mining activities in Chimanimani National Park (CNP), eastern Zimbabwe, and ii) discuss the associated

  1. Looking at Life. Study Guide. Unit A2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide presents activities…

  2. Looking at Life. Teacher's Guide. Unit A2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosking, Bunty

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  3. A hotspot of large branchiopod diversity in south-eastern Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Large branchiopods are considered threatened across much of their global range. However, because several regions, including Zimbabwe in general and its south-eastern lowveld in particular, remain largely unstudied, interpretations of species distribution patterns are often based on limited data. A detailed study of large ...

  4. Infiltration and planting pits for improved water management and maize yield in semi-arid Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakudya, I.W.; Stroosnijder, L.; Nyagumbo, I.

    2014-01-01

    Realising that rainwater harvesting (RWH) improves crop productivity, smallholder farmers in semi-arid Zimbabwe modified contour ridges traditionally used for rainwater management by digging infiltration pits inside contour ridge channels in order to retain more water in crop fields. However,

  5. Challenges of Virtual and Open Distance Science Teacher Education in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, Vongai; Samukange, Tendai; Kusure, Lovemore M.; Zinyandu, Tinoidzwa M.; Denhere, Clever; Huggins, Nyakotyo; Wiseman, Chingombe; Ndlovu, Shakespear; Chiveya, Renias; Matavire, Monica; Mukavhi, Leckson; Gwizangwe, Isaac; Magombe, Elliot; Magomelo, Munyaradzi; Sithole, Fungai; Bindura University of Science Education (BUSE),

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of the implementation of science teacher education through virtual and open distance learning in the Mashonaland Central Province, Zimbabwe. The study provides insight into challenges faced by students and lecturers on inception of the program at four centres. Data was collected from completed evaluation survey forms…

  6. Beyond a Learning Society? It Is All to Be Done Again: Zambia and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David

    2006-01-01

    This article considers the ways in which educators and learning societies in Zambia and Zimbabwe have had to struggle to create independent, democratic and critical curricula in difficult circumstances over the last 50 years in the context of historical shifts in power, a declining British Empire and the re-emergence of reactionary forces at a…

  7. Encounters of Newly Qualified Teachers with Micro-Politics in Primary Schools in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudu, Snodia; Gumbo, Mishack

    2017-01-01

    This article demonstrates, through the example of Zimbabwe, the complexities of micro-political learning during induction. It reports on the experiences of ten newly qualified teachers with micro-politics or power relations in their schools during induction and locates these experiences within the broader context of their professional development.…

  8. The Extent of Teacher Participation in Decision-Making in Secondary Schools in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadesango, Newman

    2010-01-01

    In Zimbabwe, there have been some debates on democratisation and decentralisation, which led to the development of policies meant to increase teacher participation in decision-making in schools. However, despite these developments, teacher participation in decision-making in Zimbabwean schools is regarded as insignificant. Teachers work closely…

  9. Assessments of genetic diversity and anthracnose disease response among Zimbabwe sorghum germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System maintains a Zimbabwe sorghum collection of 1,235 accessions from different provinces. This germplasm has not been extensively employed in U.S. breeding programs due to the lack of phenotypic and genetic characterization. Therefore, 68 accessions from th...

  10. The impact of current visa regime policy on tourism recovery and development in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Zengeni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results on the impact of the current visa regime policy on tourism recovery and development in Zimbabwe. The focus was on finding out how the visa regime could impact on efforts to bring into the country more visitors following the decline in visitor inflows from 2000 to 2008. Data was collected from selected visitors from different member states which require visas to enter into the county in the period between January 2010 and July 2010.The findings shows that visa restrictions play a small part in discouraging visitors to visit Zimbabwe. The visa regime policy was designed in such a way that it was easy for passport holders from traditional markets to have relatively easy passage into Zimbabwe. It was also discovered that visa restrictions were part of international travel conditions but how to get the visa became the competitive advantage or disadvantage a destination can have compared with its competitors. Zimbabwe’s traditional markets believed that the visa was not difficult to get nor was it too expensive as to scare away visitors. However, the emerging markets such as China who are in Group C had problems getting the visa as they were required to apply for the visa before traveling to Zimbabwe.

  11. Neurodevelopmental outcome in babies with a low Apgar score from Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M. J.; Wolf, B.; Bijleveld, C.; Beunen, G.; Casaer, P.

    1997-01-01

    The early identification of neurological dysfunction in the neonatal period, the predictive value of single items of the neonatal neurological examination (NNE) adapted from Prechtl and the developmental outcome at 1 year of age in infants with a low Apgar score in Zimbabwe were studied. One hundred

  12. TRANSFORMING RURAL SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN ZIMBABWE THROUGH TECHNOLOGY: LIVED EXPERIENCES OF STUDENT COMPUTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomba Clifford

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A technological divide exists in Zimbabwe between urban and rural schools that puts rural based students at a disadvantage. In Zimbabwe, the government, through the president donated computers to most rural schools in a bid to bridge the digital divide between rural and urban schools. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to understand the experiences of Advanced Level students using computers at two rural boarding Catholic High Schools in Zimbabwe. The study was guided by two research questions: (1 How do Advanced level students in the rural areas use computers at their school? and (2 What is the experience of using computers for Advanced Level students in the rural areas of Zimbabwe? By performing this study, it was possible to understand from the students’ experiences whether computer usage was for educational learning or not. The results of the phenomenological study showed that students’ experiences can be broadly classified into five themes, namely worthwhile (interesting experience, accessibility issues, teachers’ monopoly, research and social use, and Internet availability. The participants proposed teachers use computers, but not monopolize computer usage. The solution to the computer shortage may be solved by having donors and government help in the acquisitioning of more computers.

  13. Structure and composition of woody vegetation in two important bird areas in southern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, P.; Chinoitezvi, E.; Gandiwa, E.

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the status of woody vegetation structure and composition in two Important Bird Areas (IBA) i.e. Manjinji Pan and Save-Runde Junction located in southeastern Zimbabwe. The objectives of this study were to: (i) determine the woody vegetation structure and composition of the study

  14. Analysis of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) value chain in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svubure, O.; Struik, P.C.; Haverkort, A.J.; Steyn, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    The performance of the Irish potato sector in Zimbabwe is not well understood. Using value chain analysis, this article evaluated the potato industry using quantitative data gathered from stakeholders using structured questionnaires, field observations, local knowledge and expert consultation.

  15. Prediction of base flows from catchment characteristics: a case study from Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazvimavi, D.; Meijerink, A.M.J.; Stein, A.

    2004-01-01

    Base flows make up the flows of most rivers in Zimbabwe during the dry season. Prediction of base flows from basin characteristics is necessary for water resources planning of ungauged basins. Linear regression and artificial neural networks were used to predict the base flow index (BFI) from basin

  16. Human – environment relations in Zimbabwe: the case of land – pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At the Lancaster House Constitutional Conference of 1979, Britain agreed to fund Zimbabwe's resettlement program on a 'willing-seller willing buyer' basis to ... 'fast track' program to speed land acquisition by making amendments to the Constitution to obligate Britain, to pay compensation to farmers with designated land.

  17. An assessment of alien invasive plant species in Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sithole, D.; Zisadza-Gandiwa, P.; Gandiwa, E.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of alien plant species in Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), Zimbabwe. We focused on two main habitat types, namely riparian areas of the major rivers and dry land areas. Sampling was carried out from 42 sampling plots in both habitat types. Variables studied

  18. Kalanchoe lanceolata poisoning in Brahman cattle in Zimbabwe : the first field outbreak : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Masvingwe

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Field outbreaks of Kalanchoe lanceolata poisoning in cattle on a commercial farm in Zimbabwe are reported. The clinical signs and pathological lesions observed in field cases resembled those reproduced in an experimental cow and were consistent with acute cardiac glycoside poisoning.

  19. Vulnerability and resilience of competing land-based livelihoods in south eastern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murungweni, C.

    2011-01-01

    Key words: vulnerability; resilience; livelihood; drought; Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area; south eastern Zimbabwe.

    Vulnerability and resilience have emerged as powerful analytical concepts in the study of socio-ecological systems. In this research these concepts are used

  20. A Survey of Anatomy and Physiology Pedagogy and Lifestyle Factors in Undergraduate Medical Students in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. G.; Chifamba, J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies on health pedagogy in medical students in African universities are lacking. The aim of the current investigation was to assess the following pedagogy influences on second year Zimbabwean medical students' well-being. A group of 100 students studying Physiology and Anatomy in MBChB. II program at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health…

  1. Living with wildlife and associated conflicts in northern Gonarezhou National Park, southeast Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.; Gandiwa, P.; Muboko, N.

    2012-01-01

    Human-wildlife conflicts (HWC) are a common phenomenon world-wide, particularly in areas where humans and wild animal’s requirements overlap. In this study we focused on the nature of HWC in an area occurring within the northern Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), Zimbabwe. We collected data using focus

  2. Teaching with and Learning through ICTs in Zimbabwe's Teacher Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarurwa, Charles

    2011-01-01

    The use of ICTs (information and communication technologies) in Zimbabwe's teacher education colleges is of paramount importance. The teacher trainees have a dual role to play: learning through ICTs and also learning how to teach through them. Interestingly, the rate at which schools have embraced the use of ICTs is unprecedented, but this has not…

  3. Informal waste harvesting in Victoria Falls town, Zimbabwe: Socio-economic benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masocha, M.

    2006-01-01

    Waste harvesting, which occurs mostly but not exclusively at open waste dumps in Zimbabwe, constitutes one of the most important survival options for the urban poor. This paper analyses and discusses socio-economic benefits of informal waste harvesters in Victoria Falls town. Victoria Falls town has

  4. Grappling with Emerging Adulthoods : Youth narratives of coming of age in a frontier town, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Mate (Rekopantswe)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This study is about subjectivities of young people and about coming of age in a frontier town, Beitbridge, in southern Zimbabwe. The study is motivated by the growing attention to African youth as a social-demographic group and a social phenomenon since the

  5. Local economic development and migrant remittances in rural Zimbabwe : Building on sand or solid ground?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ncube (Gracsious); G.M. Gómez (Georgina)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe paper explores the impact of migrant remittances on local economic development in a locality where more than half of the households have been recipients for at least five years. The study has taken place in rural Zimbabwe and uses an ethnographic method devised for this research. The

  6. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SC. MUCHENA. African Center for Fertilizer Development. P.O.Box A469, Avondale, Harare, Zimbabwe. ABSTRACT. The paper provides an account of the present biosafety considerations of Zimbabwe. The draft biotedmolofl regulatory policlw and procedures developed by the Research Council of Zimbabwe are dimmed.

  7. The casual, naturalised and invasive alien flora of Zimbabwe based on herbarium and literature records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Maroyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe’s casual, naturalised and invasive alien plant species were analysed with regard to their habit, origin, mode or purpose of introduction and their invasion status in the country. This alien flora of 391 taxa belonged to 239 genera and 73 families, corresponding to 6.6% of the total flora of Zimbabwe. Of these, 153 (39.1% plant species were casual aliens, 154 (39.4% were naturalised and 84 (21.5% were invasive species. Most invasions in terms of numbers of alien species were in the central and eastern parts of the country. Asteraceae (53 species, Poaceae (48 species and Fabaceae sensu lato (49 species families were prominent in all the floristic regions of the country. Annual and perennial herbaceous species formed the majority of life forms of the casual, naturalised and invasive alien flora of Zimbabwe. Genera with the highest number of alien species were Ipomoea with nine species, Acacia and Euphorbia with eight species each, Chenopodium and Senna with seven species each, Eucalyptus with six species, Oenothera, Physalis and Solanum with five species each. More than 49.6% of the alien plants in Zimbabwe originated primarily from South, Central and North America, followed by Europe (24.6%, Asia (23.8%, Africa (10.5% and Australasia (5.9%.Conservation implications: This research provides baseline information and historical invasion patterns of casual, naturalised and invasive alien flora in Zimbabwe. This inventory is a crucial starting point in trying to understand and initiate the management of biological invasions. This is also important for monitoring new introductions and management of existing alien plants in Zimbabwe.

  8. In Hot Water. A study on sociotechnical intervention models and practices of water use in smallholder agriculture, Nyanyadzi catchment, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolding, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on intervention processes in smallholder agriculture in the Nyanyadzi river catchment, located in Chimanimani district, Manicaland Province Zimbabwe. In particular it concerns itself with sociotechnical interventions that were implemented by Agritex, the local extension and

  9. Drug adherence behavior among hypertensive out-patients at a tertiary health institution in Manicaland province, Zimbabwe, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Fadzai NN; Chadambuka, Elizabeth M

    2013-01-01

    Fadzai NN Mukora-Mutseyekwa, Elizabeth M ChadambukaFaculty of Health Sciences, Africa University, Mutare, ZimbabweObjectives: This study investigated the level of drug adherence among hypertensive outpatients at a tertiary hospital in Zimbabwe. Specific objectives included measurement of blood pressure (BP) control achievement, estimating prevalence of drug adherence behavior, and establishing the association between drug adherence behavior and achievement of BP control.Methods and materials:...

  10. CONFRONTING THE RECKLESS GAMBLING WITH PEOPLE’S HEALTH AND LIVES: URBAN SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN ZIMBABWE

    OpenAIRE

    Enock C.Makwara; Snodia Magudu

    2013-01-01

    Litter has become a common sight along high ways and in many urban and peri-urban communities in Zimbabwe. In spite of the numerous clean-up and anti-litter campaigns that have been initiated by different individuals and organizations coupled with the tremendous effort that has been put in making the public aware of the disadvantages associated with littering, endemic and insistent filth engulfs Zimbabwe as people continue to litter. Zimbabwe’s waste management has virtually collapsed, trigge...

  11. Upholding the Rastafari religion in Zimbabwe: Farai Dzvova v Minister of Education, Sports and Culture and Others

    OpenAIRE

    Mhango, Mtendeweka Owen

    2008-01-01

    This discussion deals with a unanimous decision by the Supreme Court of Zimbabwe, ruling that the expulsion of six year-old Farai Dzvova from the Ruvheneko Government Primary School because of his expression of his religious belief through wearing dreadlocks is a contravention of section 19 of the Constitution of Zimbabwe. This contribution argues that the judgment in Farai is progressive and should be welcomed. It further argues that the reasoning by Cheda J, demonstrating why Rastafari qual...

  12. In memoriam. Stuart Kenneth Hargreaves, DVM, 1946-2012. The humanist veterinarian from Zimbabwe who was committed to the improvement of animal health in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    Zimbabwe Society for Animal Production Gold Medal Award for outstanding contribution to the livestock industryJ F Kapnek Charitable Trust Award for exceptional managerial commitment to the Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal and contributions to the veterinary professionCommercial Farmers’ Union Farming Oscar for outstanding contribution to the livestock industry and in particular ensuring continued beef exportsResearch Council of Zimbabwe award for distinguished contribution to the agricultural sect...

  13. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of bush encroachment on vertical soil organic carbon distribution in a clay loam soil in Shangani ... Chemistry and Soil Research Institute, P.O. Box CY 550, Causeway, Harare, Zimbabwe .... by removal of ammonium ions by distillation.

  14. A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for medical ... The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS), Harare, which ... of community-based activities and the availability of a large teaching platform, ...

  15. Africa Development - Vol 42, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Social networks as anti-revolutionary forces: Facebook and political apathy among youth in urban Harare, Zimbabwe · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Manase Kudzai Chiweshe, 129-147 ...

  16. Technological and cost comparison of cytochrome P450 2B6 (516G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    milcah

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... 1African Institute of Biomedical Science and Technology, P.O. Box 2294, Harare, Zimbabwe. ..... The impact of next-generation sequencing technology ... Ward BA, Gorski JC, Jones DR, Hall SD, Flockhart DA, Desta Z (2003).

  17. Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens causing meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens causing meningitis in children at Harare Central Hospital, Zimbabwe. M Gudza-Mugabe, R.T. Mavenyengwa, M.P. Mapingure, S Mtapuri-Zinyowera, A Tarupiwa, V.J. Robertson ...

  18. Trends in ouTpaTienT malaria cases, following mass long lasTing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    paris, france, Aids and Tb department, Ministry of Health and child care, Harare, Zimbabwe request for reprints to: ... look towards other complimentary malaria prevention strategies. ... in child welfare clinics, 2) social marketing at a subsidised.

  19. Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe. C Chidziva, J Matsekete, T Bandason, S Shamu, T Dzongodza, N Matinhira, HA Mujuru, C Kunzekwenyika, M Wellington, R Luthy, C Prescott, RA Ferrand ...

  20. burden of soil transmitted helminthiases in primary school children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    France, AIDS and TB Department, Ministry of Health and Child Care, Harare, Zimbabwe and Omondi Ogutu, MBChB,. MMed ... provide a cost-effective way of reducing STH-related morbidity (7 ..... threshold recommended by the World Health.

  1. IMPACT OF AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT ON YOUTH EMPLOYMENT IN ZIMBABWE: THE CASE OF MASVINGO PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clainos Chidoko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe is basically endowed in agricultural resources. As a result agricultural activities have a large bearing on developmental issues in the country. Employment is one such economic issue that hinges much on agricultural development. Over the past decade employment levels have reduced as a result of low investment in the country. Masvingo Province has not been spared. This scenario has seen many youths being out of employment as the sector employed less labour. The study found out that economic woes that Zimbabwe experienced over the past half decade have contributed significantly to youth unemployment in agriculture in Masvingo Province as a result of low investment in the sector. The study recommends that heavy investment be put in agriculture and agriculture related projects to enhance employment levels of the Zimbabwean youths in Masvingo province.

  2. Conflict management strategies in settling workplace disputes: The case of air Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandiso Ngcobo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to conduct the analysis of the conflict management strategies that Air Zimbabwe, a service delivery company in Zimbabwe in Southern Africa, employs in settling workplace disputes between it and its employees. The research approach relies mainly on a survey questionnaire that is completed by both the employees and management. The analysis of data is descriptive. The respondents indicate that strategies can move from a positive to a negative approach within a short space of time. The results are often detrimental to the quality of service that the company provides to its clientele. It is recommended that the parties should rely on negotiation and mediation to arrest conflicts before they escalate.

  3. A call to establish a child-centred disaster management framework in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramphal M. Sillah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Disasters have increased in intensity and frequency in recent times. However, disasters do not affect all groups in a society in a similar manner. This article, based mainly on qualitative desk research and document analysis, aims to illuminate the specific vulnerability of children to hazards and disasters. The research showed that owing to their special physiological, psychological, emotional and economic stature, children are an inherently vulnerable group. The paper advocates for existing disaster management structures and systems in Zimbabwe to elevate reduction of disaster risk amongst children within the scope of child protection, which aims to create a protective environment that shelters children from any form of harm or abuse. The paper proffers recommendations on how to design disaster management programmes in Zimbabwe with the needs of children in mind.

  4. Why Do They Stay: Factors Influencing Teacher Retention in Rural Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford Gomba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The attraction and retention of teachers in Zimbabwe is a problem not only unique to Zimbabwean schools, but all over the world. The problem is more pronounced in rural areas where resources are scarce, hence the tendency to repel teachers. Although the problem of teacher turnover is real, there are teachers who have remained in the profession for many years. The aim of the study is to find the factors that have influenced teachers to remain in teaching in rural Zimbabwe. Participants (n = 6 in the study were all practicing as teachers, having taught in the rural areas for at least ten years. Data was collected through interviews which were audio-taped and transcribed. The results from this basic interpretive qualitative study showed that teachers remained in the profession because of need to support their families, job security, unmarketable, support from colleagues and administration, and self-sacrifice leadership by principals.

  5. Near real time water quality monitoring of Chivero and Manyame lakes of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Muchini

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe's water resources are under pressure from both point and non-point sources of pollution hence the need for regular and synoptic assessment. In-situ and laboratory based methods of water quality monitoring are point based and do not provide a synoptic coverage of the lakes. This paper presents novel methods for retrieving water quality parameters in Chivero and Manyame lakes, Zimbabwe, from remotely sensed imagery. Remotely sensed derived water quality parameters are further validated using in-situ data. It also presents an application for automated retrieval of those parameters developed in VB6, as well as a web portal for disseminating the water quality information to relevant stakeholders. The web portal is developed, using Geoserver, open layers and HTML. Results show the spatial variation of water quality and an automated remote sensing and GIS system with a web front end to disseminate water quality information.

  6. Determinants of women's non-family work in Ghana and Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofi D. Benefo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available One objective of this paper is to evaluate the determinants of female non-family work in Africa. Selected labor force participation theories are tested using demographic and health survey data. The traditional kinship-oriented family organization in Africa, along with high fertility, have long been seen as factors that constrain women’s participation in the labor force, particularly in seeking formal sector employment. We use demographic and health survey data from two African countries, Ghana and Zimbabwe. Education emerges as the most important determinant of non-family work. Even if female education levels increase, single women may not gain easy entry into the informal economy managed by kinship-based social networks. A large proportion of these educated women may not find jobs if the formal economy does not expand. Results from Ghana and Zimbabwe are compared.

  7. A survey of anthelmintic resistance on ten sheep farms in Mashonaland East Province, Zimbabwe : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mukaratirwa

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey to detect anthelmintic resistance in nematode parasites of sheep was conducted on 10 randomly-distributed farms in the Chivhu District, Mashonaland East Province, Zimbabwe. Before the survey, a questionnaire was circulated to the farmers concerning nematode parasite control. Results showed that parasite control using anthelmintic treatment was the only method practised and that the benzimidazoles were the most frequently used anthelmintic drugs. The faecal egg count reduction test was used to detect resistance. The anthelmintic groups tested were benzimidazoles, levamisole and ivermectin. Resistance to benzimidazoles was detected on 6 of 10 farms and levamisole resistance on 2 of 3 farms. Ivermectin resistance was not observed on the farms surveyed. Post-treatment larval cultures indicated that Haemonchus contortus survived administration of fenbendazole, albendazole, oxfendazole and levamisole. A Cooperia sp. strain resistant to albendazole was detected and this is the first report in Zimbabwe of a resistant parasite in this genus.

  8. Determinants of infant and child mortality in Zimbabwe: Results of multivariate hazard analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kembo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses important issues in infant and child mortality in Zimbabwe. The objective of the paper is to determine the impact of maternal, socioeconomic and sanitation variables on infant and child mortality. Results show that births of order 6+ with a short preceding interval had the highest risk of infant mortality. The infant mortality risk associated with multiple births was 2.08 times higher relative to singleton births (p<0.001. Socioeconomic variables did not have a distinct impact on infant mortality. Determinants of child mortality were different in relative importance from those of infant mortality. This study supports health policy initiatives to stimulate use of family planning methods to increase birth spacing. These and other results are expected to assist policy makers and programme managers in the child health sector to formulate appropriate strategies to improve the situation of children under 5 in Zimbabwe.

  9. De l'avant au Zimbabwe : dialogue sur les politiques fondé sur des ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Avec la formation d'un gouvernement inclusif en mars 2009, le Zimbabwe émerge de dix ans de déclin socioéconomique marqués par des taux de pauvreté, de chômage et d'inflation élevés, de même que par la prestation de services ... New website will help record vital life events to improve access to services for all.

  10. Handling of pastoral misconduct and discipline: Evidence from the Apostolic Faith Mission in Zimbabwe church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Chivasa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Misconduct has permeated almost every community across the globe and Christian churches have not been spared either. The two basic questions that the current study addresses were what are some of the reported behaviours of male pastors that constitute misconduct in the Apostolic Faith Mission (AFM in Zimbabwe church?; and is there any policy framework in the AFM in Zimbabwe designed to repair distressed relationships between offending pastors and the church? Results showed that in the AFM in Zimbabwe, pastoral misconduct is seen as a negative force that militates against sustaining harmony in the church. As such, whenever a male pastor commits an act of misconduct, disciplinary action is taken against him. It was also found that constructive dialogue to address misconduct is still a blind spot in the church under review. And because there is no policy framework to amend distressed relationships after administering discipline, social interactions between offending pastors and the church remain antagonistic. In view of the identified problem, this study proposed that the AFM in Zimbabwe might need to embrace a peace building framework because it has the propensity to repair broken relationships and to build friendships, social networks and trust between people. This framework can be instrumental in repairing distressed relations between offending pastors and the church at large. The strength of peace building lies in the values of brotherly love, forgiveness, reconciliation and relationship building, which are compatible with Christianity.

  11. WP 97 - An overview of women's work and employment in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten Klaveren; Kea Tijdens; Melanie Hughie Williams; Nuria Ramos Martin

    2010-01-01

    This report provides information on Zimbabwe on behalf of the implementation of the DECISIONS FOR LIFE project in that country. The DECISIONS FOR LIFE project aims to raise awareness amongst young female workers about their employment opportunities and career possibilities, family building and the work-family balance. This report is part of the Inventories, to be made by the University of Amsterdam, for all 14 countries involved. It focuses on a gender analysis of work and employment. History...

  12. Science Teacher Training Programme in Rural Schools: An ODL Lesson from Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Misheck Mhishi; Crispen Erinos Bhukuvhani; Abel Farikai Sana

    2012-01-01

    This case study looked at 76 randomly selected preservice science teachers from Mbire and Guruve districts who were learning at the Mushumbi Centre in Zimbabwe and assessed their motivations for enrolling under the Bindura University of Science Education (BUSE)’s Virtual and Open Distance Learning (VODL) programme. It also looked at the challenges they faced, their views on how instruction under the programme can be improved, and their deployment preferences after graduation. The districts ar...

  13. Cholera in Zimbabwe: Developing an Educational Response to a Health Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandikonza, Caleb; Musindo, Beatrice; Taylor, Jim

    2011-01-01

    In February 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that the cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe had claimed 3,300 lives and infected 66,000 people--greater than the toll of that disease in the whole of Africa in most years. How is it possible that a disease such as cholera can have such a devastating effect in modern times? How should one…

  14. Factors contributing to low institutional deliveries in the Marondera district of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Mugweni

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify factors contributing to low institutional deliveries in the Marondera District, Zimbabwe, among women who attended antenatal clinics, in order to enhance the number of institutional deliveries. A quantitative descriptive survey, gathering data by conducting structured interviews with 80 women, was used in this study. All 80 women attended ante-natal clinics but 40 delivered at home and 40 delivered at an institution.

  15. The rise of patriotic journalism in Zimbabwe and its possible implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ranger, Terence

    2005-01-01

    The article sees the rise of ‘patriotic journalism’ in recent Zimbabwe as representing something qualitatively different from any other forms of patriotism or journalism. The ‘patriotic journalism’ practiced by Jonathan Moyo’s ministry from 2000-5, was narrowly defined and destructive. At a time when Socialism had been abandoned, education and welfare undermined, patriotic journalism emerged as the Zimbabwean government’s last resort. The article unequivocally states that Zimbabweans ought no...

  16. Challenges of Virtual and Open Distance Science Teacher Education in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Vongai Mpofu; Tendai Samukange; Lovemore M Kusure; Tinoidzwa M Zinyandu; Clever Denhere; Nyakotyo Huggins; Chingombe Wiseman; Shakespear Ndlovu; Rennias Chiveya; Monica Matavire; Leckson Mukavhi; Isaac Gwizangwe; Elliot Magombe; Munyaradzi Magomelo; Fungai Sithole

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of the implementation of science teacher education through virtual and open distance learning in the Mashonaland Central Province, Zimbabwe. The study provides insight into challenges faced by students and lecturers on inception of the program at four centres. Data was collected from completed evaluation survey forms of forty-two lecturers who were directly involved at the launch of the program and in-depth interviews. Qualitative data analysis revealed that the ...

  17. Perceptions on climate change and its impact on livelihoods in Hwange district, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Charles Nhemachena; Reneth Mano; Shakespear Mudombi; Virginia Muwanigwa

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated perceptions of rural communities on climate change and its impacts on livelihoods. The research was conducted in the semi-arid Hwange district in Matebelel and North province of Zimbabwe. The perceptions were compared with empirical evidence from climatic studies on trends on temperature and rainfall, and impacts on livelihoods in the country and region. The findings from the current study are generally in agreement with those of other studies that indicate changes in ...

  18. Comparative Economics of Cattle and Wildlife Ranching in the Zimbabwe Midlands

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuter, Urs P.

    1992-01-01

    The economics of ranches in the Zimbabwe Midlands, generating income from cattle, or wildlife, or both, were compared during 1989/90 to test the claim that wildlife ranching can generate greater profits than cattle ranching on semi-arid African savannas. Both financial (market) prices and economic prices (opportunity cost) were used. Financial data were obtained from 15 cattle, 7 wildlife and 13 mixed ranches in four areas with wildlife and from 15 cattle ranches in two areas with sparse w...

  19. A Framework for Monitoring Electricity theft in Zimbabwe using Mobile Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Musungwini

    2016-01-01

    The capabilities of mobile technology paradigm have indicated that almost every infrastructure, system or device has the potential to capture data and report it to the back-end system in real-time. Utilities need to deliver operational analytics by knowing what is happening across their entire infrastructure. The purpose of the study was to develop a framework for mobile technologies in monitoring electricity theft in Zimbabwe. Using a qualitative research in conjunction with the design scien...

  20. Prevalence of mastitis in dairy cows from smallholder farms in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Simbarashe Katsande; Gift Matope; Masimba Ndengu; Davies M. Pfukenyi

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of sub-clinical and clinical mastitis and the associated factors in cows from selected smallholder dairy farms in Zimbabwe. Physical examinations were conducted on all lactating cows for evidence of signs of clinical mastitis. Composite milk samples were collected from all lactating cows for bacterial culture and somatic cell counting. Cows were categorised as clinical if they exhibited clinical features of mastitis, or sub-cli...

  1. Ziziphus mauritiana (masau) fruits fermentation in Zimbabwe: from black-box to starter culture development

    OpenAIRE

    Nyanga, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis reports on studies of microbiological and biochemical properties of masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit fermentation and the development of starter cultures for the production of masau beverages. A survey to document the traditional processing techniques was conducted using a questionnaire and focus group discussions in each of the three districts, i.e., Mudzi, Mt Darwin and Muzarabani in Zimbabwe. The survey results showed that the masau fruit is usually gathered by women and chi...

  2. Population and development problems: a critical assessment of conventional wisdom. The case of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, A E

    1988-01-01

    Conventional wisdom, as reflected in reports by the World Bank and the Whitsun Foundation, maintains that control of population growth is the key strategy for stimulating socioeconomic development and ending widespread poverty. The Witsun Foundation has criticized the Government of Zimbabwe for failing to include specific policies for population control in its National Transitional Development Plan. the report further expressed alarm about future availability of land to contain Zimbabwe's growing population. Communal areas are designed for a maximum of 325,000 families yet presently contain 700-800,000 families. This Malthusian, deterministic emphasis on population growth as the source of social ills ignores the broader, complex set of socioeconomic, historical, and political factors that determine material life. Any analysis of population that fails to consider the class structure of society, the type of division of labor, and forms of property and production can produce only meaningless abstractions. For example, consideration of crowding in communal areas must include consideration of inequitable patterns of land ownership in sub-Saharan Africa. Unemployment must be viewed within the context of a capitalist economic structure that relies on an industrial reserve army of labor to ensure acceptance of low wages and labor-intensive conditions. While it is accepted that population growth is creating specific and real problems in Zimbabwe and other African countries, these problems could be ameliorated by land reform and restructuring of the export-oriented colonial economies. Similarly, birth control should not be promoted as the solution to social problems, yet family planning services should be available to raise the status of women. Literacy, agrarian reform, agricultural modernization, and industrialization campaigns free from the dominance of Western capitalism represent the true solutions to Zimbabwe's problems.

  3. Food Service Quality Survey at the University of Zimbabwe Private Canteens

    OpenAIRE

    C. Benhura; S.F. Nyagura; V. Dakwa; P.E. Gombiro; P. Ngwenyama; R. Matanhire; A.Garamukanwa; N. Mudita; J. Zhangazha; W. Mashavira

    2012-01-01

    A quality survey was conducted at private food outlets at the University of Zimbabwe from June 2007 to October 2011. The objective of the study was to assess services offered in relation to customers’ expectations. The other objectives were to assess the reason for many food service providers on campus and weigh the advantages and limitations of such a system. Data collection was effected through observation and questionnaire interviews. Rice with chicken, rice and sadza with beef and beverag...

  4. A case for a vegetation survey in a developing country based on Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Müller

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for a vegetation survey in Zimbabwe, a developing country, is discussed. It is proposed that such a survey should produce a classification which is based on floristic criteria, and in which the vegetation types relate as nearly as possible to homogeneous environmental units. The practical application of such a classification is outlined with reference to the management of natural vegetation resources, land use planning and the preservation of species diversity.

  5. Tariffs and subsidies in Zimbabwe's reforming electricity industry: steering a utility through turbulent times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangwengwende, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    In 1991, the Government of Zimbabwe adopted a public enterprise reform strategy as part of a World Bank driven Economic Structural Adjustment Programme (ESAP). For the electricity sector, the Government adopted a two-pronged programme of reform - a performance improvement programme (PIP) for the national utility, the Zimbabwe Electricity Supply Authority (ZESA), and a legal and regulatory reform programme for the electricity sector in general. Ten years later, significant success has been achieved in improving the utility's performance in technical operations and customer service. However, there has been very little progress on the legal and regulatory front. This has adversely affected the utility's financial performance, as well as frustrating the Government's efforts in attracting private sector investment. The centrality of the tariff question reflects the importance of the customer or end-user to the power sector reform process. This article outlines the power sector reform experiences in Zimbabwe with special focus on the tariff question. The paper suggests, from the perspective of a utility executive, reasons for the mixed results at ZESA, and lessons for other countries in the region undertaking similar reforms. (Author)

  6. Participatory diagnosis and prioritization of constraints to cattle production in some smallholder farming areas of Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatikobo, P; Choga, T; Ncube, C; Mutambara, J

    2013-05-01

    A participatory epidemiological study was conducted to identify and prioritize constraints to livestock health and production on smallholder farms in Sanyati and Gokwe districts of Zimbabwe. Questionnaires were administered to 294 randomly selected livestock owners across the two districts. Livestock diseases (29% of the respondents), high cost of drugs (18.21%), weak veterinary extension (15.18%), inadequate grazing (13.60%), inadequate water (13.54%), and livestock thefts (10.44%) were the major livestock health and production constraints identified. The number of diseases reported varied (Pdomestic chicken, donkeys, and guinea fowls, respectively. Seven (19.4%) of the 36 diseases including rabies and foot and mouth disease were those listed by the OIE. Thirty-four percent of the respondents rated bovine dermatophilosis as the most important livestock disease. Respondents rated, in descending order, other diseases including tick borne diseases (21%); a previously unreported disease, "Magwiriri" or "Ganda renzou" in vernacular (14%); mastitis (11%); parafilariosis (11%); and blackleg (9%). Cattle skin samples from "Magwiriri" cases had Besnoitia besnoiti parasites. Overall, this study revealed factors and diseases that limit livestock production in Zimbabwe and are of global concern; in addition, the study showed that the skin diseases, bovine dermatophilosis and besnoitiosis, have recently emerged and appear to be spreading, likely a consequence of ectoparasite control demise in smallholder farming areas of Zimbabwe over the last 15 years. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. How Do Board Characteristics Influence Business Performance? Evidence from Non-life Insurance Firms in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Sandada

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to contribute to the corporate governance literature by establishing the relationship between board characteristics and corporate performance within the nonlife insurance firms in Zimbabwe. The study sought to provide some insights on corporate governance since the phenomenon is relatively an emerging discipline in Zimbabwe. The paper sought to complement other corporate governance studies that were conducted in other environments by producing evidence on the phenomenon from a developing country context. A quantitative research approach was adopted and respondents were selected through a stratified random sampling. The results of the study confirm that board characteristics (board composition, diversity, and size exhibit a statistically significant positive predictive relationship with the performance of non-life insurance firms measured by gross premium written and customer retention. However, CEO/Chairman duality showed a negative relationship with business performance. Non-life insurance companies need to be cognizant of board characteristics in order to improve their performance. Moreover , the findings in this research has practical relevance for the selection process of directors as it highlights the importance of having a sizeable number of board members as well as an appropriate mix of competences and qualifications on the board. Although corporate governance is has been extensively researched, there is limited study in this area from a developing country like Zimbabwe with relatively less developed capital markets. It would be wrong to assume that the findings found in other countries can apply here because the conditions are different.

  8. Establishing strategic energy assessment indicators for Zimbabwe: A key to improving electrical energy efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Felix

    In Zimbabwe, there is still very little realization of the potential of demand side management (DSM) to increase industrial energy efficiency. Without clear guidelines that indicate the most economic energy efficiency strategies to implement, it is difficult for industry to easily evaluate the benefits of energy assessments. This research focused on establishing and evaluating indicators that guide correct implementation of energy assessments into Zimbabwean industry. This quantitative and qualitative study used a theoretic approach to develop indicators that identified industrial subsectors that should be targeted for DSM interventions. This may bring about reduction in energy demand in high power consuming Zimbabwean industrial companies, which were compared with energy utility performances of similar industrial companies in countries located in other parts of the world. This research used pattern-matching, categorical aggregation, and stochastic frontier regression analysis for data analysis. In maximizing electrical efficiency, the implications of this study may be used by individual companies in Zimbabwe to perform energy efficiency self-diagnoses, operational efficiency evaluations, and capital resource justifications. From a societal perspective, this study may benefit Zimbabwe because it provides opportunities for the alleviation of both shortages in power supply and the capital constraints of building new generating capacity. This study will also benefit ordinary Zimbabweans by lowering energy costs and providing reliable power. This promotes sustainable economic growth and lowers the need for foreign currency to import power.

  9. Challenges of raising road maintenance funds in developing countries: An analysis of road tolling in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Mbara

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The condition of Zimbabwe's roads has been declining due to insufficient maintenance and rehabilitation. Year on year, budget allocations have compared unfavourably with funding considered adequate to maintain highway networks and conduct modest construction work. Road infrastructure shortcomings have manifested themselves in the form of high vehicle operating costs and rampant potholes, leading to a decline in road safety and a deterioration of service levels for those who use roads to deliver goods or connect to international markets. In order to try and stop this vicious cycle of decline, the Government of Zimbabwe, on 8 August 2009, introduced a new policy of road-user charges, which involved the setting-up of 22 toll gates on the trunk road network. The overall objective was to raise revenue in order to close the funding gap, blamed for declining road quality. Although alternative methods of financing road maintenance have been debated for years, a generally accepted understanding is that road users should pay costs for road provisioning. This paper assesses the implementation of a road tolling system in Zimbabwe and describes matters relating to, inter alia, implementation strategy, initial performance outcomes and sustainability.

  10. UNEP greenhouse gas abatement costing studies. Zimbabwe country study. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakespeare Maya, R. [Southern Centre for Energy and Environment (Zimbabwe); Muguti, E. [Ministry of Transport and Energy. Department of Energy (Zimbabwe); Fenhann, J.; Morthorst, P.E. [Risoe National Laboratory. Systems Analysis Department (Denmark)

    1992-08-01

    The UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) programme of Greenhouse Gas Abatement Costing Studies is intended to clarify the economic issues involved in assessing the costs of limiting emissions of greenhouse gases and to propose approaches to comparable costing studies. Phase 1 of the Zimbabwe country study describes the current energy situation in Zimbabwe related to the national economy, energy supply and demand and amounts of greenhouse gas emissions. Factors regarding the geography, (including a map illustrating the degree and character of land degradation by erosion) population, politics, international relations, land-use and management of the energy sector are dealt with in detail and the text is illustrated with data compiled from the study. It is estimated that Zimbabwe consumed 270.4 Tj of energy during 1988 and emitted 21.7 tonnes of carbon dioxide. An emission intensity of 80.2 tonnes/Tj for the whole economy and 63.6 tonnes/Tj for electric power generation alone was calculated. Forecasting for the year 2020 estimated carbon dioxide emission intensities of 73.5 tonnes/Tj for the whole economy and 43.7 tonnes for power generation. Net carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to be 30-42 tonnes during 2020. (AB).

  11. Characterization of some Brucella species from Zimbabwe by biochemical profiling and AMOS-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skjerve Eystein

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine brucellosis caused by Brucella abortus is endemic in most large commercial and smallholder cattle farms of Zimbabwe, while brucellosis in other domestic animals is rare. The diagnosis of brucellosis is mainly accomplished using serological tests. However, some Brucella spp. have been isolated from clinical cases in the field and kept in culture collection but their biochemical profiles were not documented. We report biochemical profiling and AMOS-PCR characterization of some of these field isolates of Brucella originating from both commercial and smallholder cattle farming sectors of Zimbabwe. Findings Fourteen isolates of Brucella from culture collection were typed using biochemical profiles, agglutination by monospecific antisera, susceptibility to Brucella-specific bacteriophages and by AMOS-PCR that amplifies species- specific IS711. The results of the biochemical profiles for B. abortus biovar 1 (11 isolates and biovar 2 (2 isolates were consistent with those of reference strains. A single isolate from a goat originating from a smallholder mixed animal farm was identified as B. melitensis biovar 1. The AMOS-PCR produced DNA products of sizes 498 bp and 731 bp for B. abortus (biovar 1 and 2 and B. melitensis biovar 1, respectively. Conclusion We concluded that the biochemical profiles and AMOS-PCR characterization were consistent with their respective species and biovars. B. abortus biovar 1 is likely to be the predominant cause of brucellosis in both commercial and smallholder cattle farms in Zimbabwe.

  12. Factors influencing the demand of the service of community based animal health care in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutambara, J; Dube, I; Matangi, E; Majeke, F

    2013-11-01

    This study was done to find out about animal health service providers and factors that determined demand for community based veterinary service delivery in smallholder sector of Zimbabwe. Focus group discussions and a questionnaire was used to collect data on veterinary services providers and socio-economic factors related to animal health from a sample (N=333) smallholder livestock farmers from Gutu district of Masvingo province in Zimbabwe. Analytical techniques used were descriptive statistics, K-mean cluster analysis and Tobit regression model. Results showed that the majority of farmers (45%) obtained services from both Community Based Animal Health Workers (CBAHWs) and Department of Veterinary Service (DVS), 25% DVS only, 20% used CBAHWs while 10% did not seek any services. Further analysis showed that distance to CBAHW, distance to AHMC and employment status were significantly related to demand for CBAHWs with coefficients of -1.5, 0.7 and -10.3, respectively. The study thus concluded that CBAHW is an alternative animal health service delivery approach already practiced in smallholder farming sectors of Zimbabwe. Socio-economic factors significantly influenced the demand for CBAHW services. Given limited resources by state sponsored veterinary services, it is recommended that the CBAHWs approach should be encouraged as supplementary service provider especially in areas further DVS. These community organizations can be empowered by the state to deliver more improved services based on hygiene and modern science at a relatively low cost to farmers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Feasibility and Sustainability of Community Based Health Insurance in Rural Areas Case Study of Musana, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarus MUCHABAIWA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Zimbabwe Demographic Health Survey (ZDHS 2010-11 showed that only 6 percent of the population is covered by health insurance in Zimbabwe. This study investigated the feasibility, acceptability and sustainability of Community Based Health Insurance (CBHI as an alternative to pooling risk and financing social protection in Zimbabwe. Willingness to Pay (WTP for health insurance and socioeconomic data were collected through interviews with 121 household heads selected using a 2-stage sampling procedure on 14 villages in Musana and Domboshava rural areas, a population which is largely unemployed and reliant on subsistence agriculture. A CBHI scheme was established and followed up for 3 years documenting data on visits made, financial contributions from recruited households and their actual health expenditures. Findings indicate that CBHI is generally accepted as a means of health insurance in rural communities. The median willingness to pay for health insurance was $5.43 against monthly expenditures ranging of up to $180. The low WTP is attributable to low incomes as only 3.4 percent of the respondents relied on formal employment. Trust issues, adverse selection, moral hazard, and administration costs were challenges threatening sustainability of CBHI. A financial gap averaging 42% was generally on a downward trend and was closed by the end of the follow-up study as contributions were equivalent to medical expenses. We conclude that CBHI is feasible, has potential for sustainability and should be considered as a springboard for the planned Zimbabwean National Health Insurance.

  14. A Framework for Monitoring Electricity theft in Zimbabwe using Mobile Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Musungwini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The capabilities of mobile technology paradigm have indicated that almost every infrastructure, system or device has the potential to capture data and report it to the back-end system in real-time. Utilities need to deliver operational analytics by knowing what is happening across their entire infrastructure. The purpose of the study was to develop a framework for mobile technologies in monitoring electricity theft in Zimbabwe. Using a qualitative research in conjunction with the design science paradigm, data was collected through semi-structured interviews, participant observation, document review and qualitative questionnaire. The findings of the study revealed that the power utility in Zimbabwe uses very basic methods and techniques in detecting and countering electricity theft. This has made it difficult to deal with all the possible electricity theft strategies that are employed by the consumers. This study recommends that the power utility in Zimbabwe should use a framework for mobile technologies to monitor electricity theft in order to reduce revenue leakages caused by electricity theft.

  15. The Challenges of Using the Communicative Approach (CA) in the Teaching of English as a Second Language (ESL) in Zimbabwe: Implications for ESL Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutekwa, Anias

    2013-01-01

    This article examines studies done on the use of the CA locally, in addition to insights from studies done abroad, as well as critically examining the nature of the CA and the language situation in Zimbabwe, to identify and discuss the main challenges associated with the use of this approach to the teaching of ESL in Zimbabwe and its implications…

  16. Access and Quality in Education in Resettlement Schools: The Case Study of Zvivingwi Secondary School in Gutu District, Masvingo Province in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenjekwa, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    In Zimbabwe, the discourse on access and quality in education has been a raging one since the colonial days of bottlenecks and outright discrimination against black Zimbabweans in education. The doors to education were declared open to all at independence in 1980 with the new Zimbabwe government's enunciated policy of education for all. It is an…

  17. Surges and ebbs: National politics and international influence in the formulation and implementation of IWRM in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Manzungu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, the Government of Zimbabwe undertook water reforms to redress racially defined inequitable access to agricultural water. This paper analyses how a water reform process, seemingly informed by a clear political economy objective, was hijacked by efforts directed at implementing Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM. It uses the notion of policy articulation to analyse why and how IWRM 'travelled' to and in Zimbabwe and with what outcomes. The paper shows that attempts at introducing and implementing IWRM in Zimbabwe have had a chequered history. The efforts of Zimbabwe in pioneering implementation of IWRM in southern Africa, have subsequently waned, and prospects for resurrecting IWRM in its original form are low. Introduced in the 1990s when Western donors jumped on the bandwagon of the liberal economic agenda inspired by the IMF/World Bank, it declined between 2000 and 2009 due to a combination of poor economic performance, national-level politics and international isolation. In 2011 IWRM was reintroduced as the country re-engaged with the international community. The re-emergence of IWRM, however, seems to be largely rhetorical as the focus is now on fixing a crisis-ridden water sector, with a new political dispensation adding another layer of complexity. The paper concludes that the development of IWRM in Zimbabwe mirrors broader national-level socio-political processes and their complex relationship with the international community.

  18. Is there a threshold level of maternal education sufficient to reduce child undernutrition? Evidence from Malawi, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoka, Donald; Masibo, Peninah Kinya

    2015-08-22

    Maternal education is strongly associated with young child nutrition outcomes. However, the threshold of the level of maternal education that reduces the level of undernutrition in children is not well established. This paper investigates the level of threshold of maternal education that influences child nutrition outcomes using Demographic and Health Survey data from Malawi (2010), Tanzania (2009-10) and Zimbabwe (2005-06). The total number of children (weighted sample) was 4,563 in Malawi; 4,821 children in Tanzania; and 3,473 children in Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Surveys. Using three measures of child nutritional status: stunting, wasting and underweight, we employ a survey logistic regression to analyse the influence of various levels of maternal education on child nutrition outcomes. In Malawi, 45% of the children were stunted, 42% in Tanzania and 33% in Zimbabwe. There were 12% children underweight in Malawi and Zimbabwe and 16% in Tanzania.The level of wasting was 6% of children in Malawi, 5% in Tanzania and 4% in Zimbabwe. Stunting was significantly (p values educational level in all the three countries. Higher levels of maternal education reduced the odds of child stunting, underweight and wasting in the three countries. The maternal threshold for stunting is more than ten years of schooling. Wasting and underweight have lower threshold levels. These results imply that the free primary education in the three African countries may not be sufficient and policies to keep girls in school beyond primary school hold more promise of addressing child undernutrition.

  19. The turbulent liquid fuel industry in Zimbabwe: options for resolving the crisis and improving supply to the poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashange, Krispen

    2002-01-01

    Towards the end of the last decade, supplies in petroleum fuel have been erratic to the extent that Zimbabwe has at times operated with as low as 40% of normal supplies. These shortages were attributed mainly to foreign exchange shortages and alleged mismanagement and corruption at the National Oil Company of Zimbabwe (NOCZIM). As shortages intensified, problems of product shortage began to unfold, which adversely impacted on the urban poor. The public began to question the industry's policies on the sustainability of the liquid fuel sector policies in Zimbabwe. Of particular concern was policies regarding regulatory mechanisms, pricing, distribution, utilisation of storage facilities, supply routes and NOCZIM management. This paper evaluates the challenges facing the Zimbabwean petroleum sector and presents recommendations that could assist in ensuring a robust and functional national fuel sector. (Author)

  20. An Information Management Framework for the Support of E-Government in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehluli Masuku

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It has come as a fact that the use of Information and Communication Technologies has come to stay in this world. It aids the implementation of the emerging and irresistible e-government concept that seems to be the in-thing the world over. Zimbabwe has also joined the world by ascertaining its commitment to e-government as witnessed by its promulgation of various e-government services. However, despite the government of Zimbabwe having committed itself to e-government, it is of concern to note that up to this day, the country is operating without a clear information management policy or strategy that will guide and direct all the information management practitioners in the country. This comes as a great weakness in this day and age when the government of Zimbabwe has declared its intentions to subscribe to the e-government concept both in principle and in practice. Although the country has managed to survive without a clearly defined information policy in the pre e-government era, chances of it rolling out an effective and sustainable e-government policy on the same foundation are very slim, given the importance of well managed information as a pillar of sound e-government. The paper employed document analysis as its methodology in which Zimbabwe National Information and Communication Policy (ICT Policy Framework of 2005 and the Ministry of Information Communication Technology’s (MICT Strategic Plan (2010-2014 were reviewed and assessed the extent to which they sufficed to serve as information management frameworks that can support e-governance in Zimbabwe. The study revealed that there are ICT policies that are meant to serve as ICT strategies for the country but none of them has been put to test and such policies are very piecemeal at best as far as their coverage of information management is concerned. The first policy of such nature was the Zimbabwe National Information and Communication Policy (ICT Policy Framework of 2005 that was

  1. Increased incidence of tuberculosis in zimbabwe, in association with food insecurity, and economic collapse: an ecological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Stephen J; Lass, Elliot; Thistle, Paul; Katumbe, Lovemore; Jetha, Arif; Schwarz, Dan; Bolotin, Shelly; Barker, R D; Simor, Andrew; Silverman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Zimbabwe underwent a socioeconomic crisis and resultant increase in food insecurity in 2008-9. The impact of the crisis on Tuberculosis (TB) incidence is unknown. Prospective databases from two mission hospitals, which were geographically widely separated, and remained open during the crisis, were reviewed. At the Howard Hospital (HH) in northern Zimbabwe, TB incidence increased 35% in 2008 from baseline rates in 2003-2007 (pcrisis at HH showed a decrease of 33% in TB incidence between 2009 to 2010 (pcrisis years of 2008/2009 (pcrisis in this high HIV prevalence country.

  2. Community perceptions towards the establishment of an urban forest plantation: a case of Dzivaresekwa, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mureva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The health of urban forest communities not only depend on the government and nongovernmental organizations, but also strongly rely on local community stewardship. A study was carried out to assess community perceptions on the establishment of an urban forest plantation among urban residents in Dzivaresekwa, an urban area in Harare. Randomized systematic sampling was used to select 150 households and one resident per household was interviewed using a pretested questionnaire with both closed and open-ended questions. The objectives of the study were to determine how age and gender and employment status variables, were related to the urban residents’ perceptions towards establishment of a forest plantation in an urban area. Most females (58.3% viewed the plantation as a threat while most men (51.7% viewed the plantation as a recreational area. The highest proportion (61.9% of the middle age group (21-40 years perceived the plantation as a source of employment. There was a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.040 between gender and the general perception of establishing a forest plantation in the urban area. However, there was no statistically significant relationship (p = 0.203 between age groups and the perception of establishing a forest plantation in the urban area. It is concluded that the community had diverse perceptions on urban community forestry.

  3. Malaria incidence trends and their association with climatic variables in rural Gwanda, Zimbabwe, 2005-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Resign; Chimbari, Moses John; Shamu, Shepherd; Sartorius, Benn; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-09-30

    Malaria is a public health problem in Zimbabwe. Although many studies have indicated that climate change may influence the distribution of malaria, there is paucity of information on its trends and association with climatic variables in Zimbabwe. To address this shortfall, the trends of malaria incidence and its interaction with climatic variables in rural Gwanda, Zimbabwe for the period January 2005 to April 2015 was assessed. Retrospective data analysis of reported cases of malaria in three selected Gwanda district rural wards (Buvuma, Ntalale and Selonga) was carried out. Data on malaria cases was collected from the district health information system and ward clinics while data on precipitation and temperature were obtained from the climate hazards group infrared precipitation with station data (CHIRPS) database and the moderate resolution imaging spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite data, respectively. Distributed lag non-linear models (DLNLM) were used to determine the temporal lagged association between monthly malaria incidence and monthly climatic variables. There were 246 confirmed malaria cases in the three wards with a mean incidence of 0.16/1000 population/month. The majority of malaria cases (95%) occurred in the > 5 years age category. The results showed no correlation between trends of clinical malaria (unconfirmed) and confirmed malaria cases in all the three study wards. There was a significant association between malaria incidence and the climatic variables in Buvuma and Selonga wards at specific lag periods. In Ntalale ward, only precipitation (1- and 3-month lag) and mean temperature (1- and 2-month lag) were significantly associated with incidence at specific lag periods (p climatic conditions in the 1-4 month period prior. As the period of high malaria risk is associated with precipitation and temperature at 1-4 month prior in a seasonal cycle, intensifying malaria control activities over this period will likely contribute to lowering

  4. Assessing Progress and Pitfalls of the Millennium Development Goals in Zimbabwe: A Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Mutangabende

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe adopted the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs at their inception in 2000 and it has trends of its progress in its attempt to attain these MDGs as indicated in progress reports since 2004, 2010, 2012 and 2015. In these reports optimistic trends are chiefly found in MDG2 on universal primary education which is Zimbabwe’s pride in Africa, MDG3 regarding gender parity in schools and MDG6 on HIV and AIDS. The country continues to face its biggest challenges in attaining MDG1 which is eliminating extreme poverty and hunger and MDG5 which is increase nurturing mortality, whereas all the objectives under these goals are dubious that would be attained at the cut-off date. It was unfortunate that, the inception of the MDGs coincided with the deepening of socioeconomic, political and environmental crisis in the country which made it very difficult for Zimbabwe to accomplish all of its MDGs. The focal motive of this study was to check the progress, policies, programmes and strategies which were in place to promote the attainment of the MDGs from 2000-2015 and other strategies or policies in place to attain the SDGs 2016-2030. This paper recommended that there is need for institutionalisation of SDGs that is aligning them with Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socioeconomic Transformation (Zim-Asset cluster; for instance, value accumulation and beneficiation, nourishment security, poverty extermination, social services and strengthening partnership with all stakeholders. The research uses intensive secondary data analysis from various sources including government gazette, journal articles, e-books, and government website, reports, published and unpublished books.

  5. "We Are Not Really Marketing Mental Health": Mental Health Advocacy in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Hendler

    Full Text Available Few people with mental disorders in low and middle-income countries (LMICs receive treatment, in part because mental disorders are highly stigmatized and do not enjoy priority and resources commensurate with their burden on society. Advocacy has been proposed as a means of building political will and community support for mental health and reducing stigma, but few studies have explored the practice and promise of advocacy in LMICs.We conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with leaders in health and mental health in Zimbabwe to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the challenges and opportunities of the country's mental health system. We coded the transcripts using the constant comparative method, informed by principles of grounded theory. Few interview questions directly concerned advocacy, yet in our analysis, advocacy emerged as a prominent, cross-cutting theme across participants and interview questions.Two thirds of the respondents discussed advocacy, often in depth, returning to the concept throughout the interview and emphasizing their belief in advocacy's importance. Participants described six distinct components of advocacy: the advocates, to whom they advocate ("targets", what they advocate for ("asks", how advocates reach their targets ("access", how they make their asks ("arguments", and the results of their advocacy ("outcomes".Despite their perception that mental health is widely misunderstood and under-appreciated in Zimbabwe, respondents expressed optimism that strategically speaking out can reduce stigma and increase access to care. Key issues included navigating hierarchies, empowering service users to advocate, and integrating mental health with other health initiatives. Understanding stakeholder perceptions sets the stage for targeted development of mental health advocacy in Zimbabwe and other LMICs.

  6. "We Are Not Really Marketing Mental Health": Mental Health Advocacy in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Reuben; Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Crooks, Megan; Mangezi, Walter; Abas, Melanie; Katz, Craig; Thornicroft, Graham; Semrau, Maya; Jack, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Few people with mental disorders in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) receive treatment, in part because mental disorders are highly stigmatized and do not enjoy priority and resources commensurate with their burden on society. Advocacy has been proposed as a means of building political will and community support for mental health and reducing stigma, but few studies have explored the practice and promise of advocacy in LMICs. We conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with leaders in health and mental health in Zimbabwe to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the challenges and opportunities of the country's mental health system. We coded the transcripts using the constant comparative method, informed by principles of grounded theory. Few interview questions directly concerned advocacy, yet in our analysis, advocacy emerged as a prominent, cross-cutting theme across participants and interview questions. Two thirds of the respondents discussed advocacy, often in depth, returning to the concept throughout the interview and emphasizing their belief in advocacy's importance. Participants described six distinct components of advocacy: the advocates, to whom they advocate ("targets"), what they advocate for ("asks"), how advocates reach their targets ("access"), how they make their asks ("arguments"), and the results of their advocacy ("outcomes"). Despite their perception that mental health is widely misunderstood and under-appreciated in Zimbabwe, respondents expressed optimism that strategically speaking out can reduce stigma and increase access to care. Key issues included navigating hierarchies, empowering service users to advocate, and integrating mental health with other health initiatives. Understanding stakeholder perceptions sets the stage for targeted development of mental health advocacy in Zimbabwe and other LMICs.

  7. Beliefs and practices in using misoprostol for induction of labour among obstetricians in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Madziyire

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Misoprostol is commonly used for induction of labour in term pregnancy. There are different routes and dosing schedules for administering the drug.Objectives. To describe the prescribing pattern (dose, route, duration, beliefs and factors affecting use of misoprostol for inducing term pregnancy among practising obstetricians in Zimbabwe.Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was undertaken among practising obstetricians in Zimbabwe. A questionnaire was sent as an email, WhatsApp or short message service (SMS, or text web link to all practising obstetricians in Zimbabwe using the SurveyMonkey online tool. All consenting practitioners were requested to respond online. The responses were analysed using the SurveyMonkey software.Results. There were 52 responses from the 63 questionnaires, a response rate of 82.5%. Seventy-six percent preferred oral misoprostol for induction of labour. The most common indication for induction was prolonged pregnancy accounting for 58% of respondents. The largest group of the practitioners who responded (36% learnt their misoprostol dosing regimen from WHO/FIGO/NICE guidelines. A composite of highly variable dose regimens referred to as ‘other regimens’ was the dosing regimen preferred by 34% of respondents. Fiftyeight percent of practitioners used two cycles of misoprostol dosing before concluding that induction had failed and 52% would resort to caesarean section immediately if induction failed.Conclusion. The results show marked heterogeneity in the dosing schedules employed by obstetricians for induction of labour with the majority not following standard misoprostol guidelines for labour induction.

  8. Insecticide resistance and role in malaria transmission of Anopheles funestus populations from Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang S; Christian, Riann; Nardini, Luisa; Wood, Oliver R; Agubuzo, Eunice; Muleba, Mbanga; Munyati, Shungu; Makuwaza, Aramu; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Brooke, Basil D; Hunt, Richard H; Coetzee, Maureen

    2014-10-08

    Two mitochondrial DNA clades have been described in Anopheles funestus populations from southern Africa. Clade I is common across the continent while clade II is known only from Mozambique and Madagascar. The specific biological status of these clades is at present unknown. We investigated the possible role that each clade might play in the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum and the insecticide resistance status of An. funestus from Zimbabwe and Zambia. Mosquitoes were collected inside houses from Nchelenge District, Zambia and Honde Valley, Zimbabwe in 2013 and 2014. WHO susceptibility tests, synergist assays and resistance intensity tests were conducted on wild females and progeny of wild females. ELISA was used to detect Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein. Specimens were identified to species and mtDNA clades using standard molecular methods. The Zimbabwean samples were all clade I while the Zambian population comprised 80% clade I and 20% clade II in both years of collection. ELISA tests gave an overall infection rate of 2.3% and 2.1% in 2013, and 3.5% and 9.2% in 2014 for Zimbabwe and Zambia respectively. No significant difference was observed between the clades. All populations were resistant to pyrethroids and carbamates but susceptible to organochlorines and organophosphates. Synergist assays indicated that pyrethroid resistance is mediated by cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases. Resistance intensity tests showed high survival rates after 8-hrs continuous exposure to pyrethroids but exposure to bendiocarb gave the same results as the susceptible control. This is the first record of An. funestus mtDNA clade II occurring in Zambia. No evidence was found to suggest that the clades are markers of biologically separate populations. The ability of An. funestus to withstand prolonged exposure to pyrethroids has serious implications for the use of these insecticides, either through LLINs or IRS, in southern Africa in general and resistance management

  9. Challenges of Communicating Nuclear and Radiation Information: The Case of Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudota, B.

    2015-01-01

    Communication is paramount in all human activities and appears to be a very easy subject. But in actual fact it is a complicated process with a capacity to change perceptions from being negative to positive or vice versa. The issue of communication becomes even more challenging when it involves issues or topics which are generally perceived as complex in various societies. A case in point involves the communication challenges faced in communicating radiation/nuclear issues especially to third world country audiences where the concept is still in its infancy and therefore not well understood by the public. Increasing awareness to the public on issues to do with nuclear/radiation is critical especially in terms of developing and building future competencies which are currently skewed towards males in Zimbabwe. The ratio of female citizens engaged in nuclear/radiation fields is still very low in Zimbabwe. There is therefore need to start communicating nuclear/radiation issues from an early age with a focus on changing women’s perceptions over such issues. The Radiation Protection Authority of Zimbabwe’s Corporate Communications Department presents a study based on the experiences of the Corporate Communications Officer over a period of four years in that capacity. This study provides reasons why third world country publics, especially in Zimbabwe s are showing little interest in nuclear/radiation issues. Experiences are also shared on how the Corporate Communications Officer has managed to increase awareness of /nuclear issues from two percent to five percent over the last four years. The different methods of communication used are also detailed together with the accompanying challenges. (author)

  10. DNA sequence analyses reveal co-occurrence of novel haplotypes of Fasciola gigantica with F. hepatica in South Africa and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucheka, Vimbai T; Lamb, Jennifer M; Pfukenyi, Davies M; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2015-11-30

    The aim of this study was to identify and determine the genetic diversity of Fasciola species in cattle from Zimbabwe, the KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga provinces of South Africa and selected wildlife hosts from Zimbabwe. This was based on analysis of DNA sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and 2) and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) regions. The sample of 120 flukes was collected from livers of 57 cattle at 4 abattoirs in Zimbabwe and 47 cattle at 6 abattoirs in South Africa; it also included three alcohol-preserved duiker, antelope and eland samples from Zimbabwe. Aligned sequences (ITS 506 base pairs and CO1 381 base pairs) were analyzed by neighbour-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Phylogenetic trees revealed the presence of Fasciola gigantica in cattle from Zimbabwe and F. gigantica and Fasciola hepatica in the samples from South Africa. F. hepatica was more prevalent (64%) in South Africa than F. gigantica. In Zimbabwe, F. gigantica was present in 99% of the samples; F. hepatica was found in only one cattle sample, an antelope (Hippotragus niger) and a duiker (Sylvicapra grimmia). This is the first molecular confirmation of the identity Fasciola species in Zimbabwe and South Africa. Knowledge on the identity and distribution of these liver flukes at molecular level will allow disease surveillance and control in the studied areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modelling climate change impact on the spatial distribution of fresh water snails hosting trematodes in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ulrik B; Stendel, Martin; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Soko, White; Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Vennervald, Birgitte J; Mukaratirwa, Samson; Kristensen, Thomas K

    2014-12-12

    Freshwater snails are intermediate hosts for a number of trematodes of which some are of medical and veterinary importance. The trematodes rely on specific species of snails to complete their life cycle; hence the ecology of the snails is a key element in transmission of the parasites. More than 200 million people are infected with schistosomes of which 95% live in sub-Saharan Africa and many more are living in areas where transmission is on-going. Human infection with the Fasciola parasite, usually considered more of veterinary concern, has recently been recognised as a human health problem. Many countries have implemented health programmes to reduce morbidity and prevalence of schistosomiasis, and control programmes to mitigate food-borne fascioliasis. As these programmes are resource demanding, baseline information on disease prevalence and distribution becomes of great importance. Such information can be made available and put into practice through maps depicting spatial distribution of the intermediate snail hosts. A biology driven model for the freshwater snails Bulinus globosus, Biomphalaria pfeifferi and Lymnaea natalensis was used to make predictions of snail habitat suitability by including potential underlying environmental and climatic drivers. The snail observation data originated from a nationwide survey in Zimbabwe and the prediction model was parameterised with a high resolution Regional Climate Model. Georeferenced prevalence data on urinary and intestinal schistosomiasis and fascioliasis was used to calibrate the snail habitat suitability predictions to produce binary maps of snail presence and absence. Predicted snail habitat suitability across Zimbabwe, as well as the spatial distribution of snails, is reported for three time slices representative for present (1980-1999) and future climate (2046-2065 and 2080-2099). It is shown from the current study that snail habitat suitability is highly variable in Zimbabwe, with distinct high- and low

  12. Linking rural community livelihoods to resilience building in flood risk reduction in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Gwimbi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing occurrence of disastrous flooding events and the mounting losses in both life and property values in Zimbabwe have drawn attention to the flooding situation in the country, especially the rural areas. This article explores the resilience of vulnerable rural communities to flood risks associated within increasingly frequent and severe events linked to climate change. Starting by reviewing the current literature on rural livelihoods, resilience and vulnerability research, the paper argues for a coordinated teamwork approach in flood risk mitigation in rural areas. The paper concludes with several recommendations for enhanced resilience to flood hazards.

  13. Urban Displacement and Resettlement in Zimbabwe: The Paradoxes of Propertied Citizenship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammar, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    This article examines what urban displacement and resettlement can reveal about the nature of, and co-constitutive relationships among, property, authority, and citizenship. It focuses on an unusual case in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, where long-term illegal squatters living under constant threat...... of violent displacement by various local and national authorities were formally resettled by the Bulawayo City Council on peri-urban plots with houses. What surfaces are some of the paradoxes of propertied citizenship and of attaining seemingly “proper” lives in conditions of sustained marginality, a result...... that is not entirely unexpected when impoverished squatters are resettled far outside the frame of the city and its possibilities....

  14. Progress towards malaria elimination in Zimbabwe with special reference to the period 2003-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sande, Shadreck; Zimba, Moses; Mberikunashe, Joseph; Tangwena, Andrew; Chimusoro, Anderson

    2017-07-24

    An intensive effort to control malaria in Zimbabwe has produced dramatic reductions in the burden of the disease over the past 13 years. The successes have prompted the Zimbabwe's National Malaria Control Programme to commit to elimination of malaria. It is critical to analyse the changes in the morbidity trends based on surveillance data, and scrutinize reorientation to strategies for elimination. This is a retrospective study of available Ministry of Health surveillance data and programme reports, mostly from 2003 to 2015. Malaria epidemiological data were drawn from the National Health Information System database. Data on available resources, malaria control strategies, morbidity and mortality trends were analysed, and opportunities for Zimbabwe malaria elimination agenda was perused. With strong government commitment and partner support, the financial gap for malaria programming shrank by 91.4% from about US$13 million in 2012 to US$1 million in 2015. Vector control comprises indoor residual house spraying (IRS) and long-lasting insecticidal nets, and spray coverage increased from 28% in 2003 to 95% in 2015. Population protected by IRS increased also from 20 to 96% for the same period. In 2009, diagnostics improved from clinical to parasitological confirmation either by rapid diagnostic tests or microscopy. Artemisinin-based combination therapy was used to treat malaria following chloroquine resistance in 2000, and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in 2004. In 2003, there were 155 malaria cases per 1000 populations reported from all health facilities throughout the country. The following decade witnessed a substantial decline in cases to only 22 per 1000 populations in 2012. A resurgence was reported in 2013 (29/1000) and 2014 (39/1000), thereafter morbidity declined to 29 cases per 1000 populations, only to the same level as in 2013. Overall, morbidity declined by 81% from 2003 to 2015. Inpatient malaria deaths per 100,000 populations doubled in 4 years, from 2

  15. The Rb-Sr geochronology of the Colossus kimberlite pipe, Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allsopp, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Colossus kimberlite is one of several such occurrences situated in central Zimbabwe. A relationship with alluvial diamond deposits in the same area has been suggested, and on this basis a pre-Permian age has been inferred. The general geology and petrography of the Colossus kimberlite pipe are described. Rb-Sr age measurements on somewhat weathered kimberlite micas are reported, and the best estimate for the age of the kimberlite is reported as 502+-47 Ma. A model Rb-Sr age of 2 630 Ma for the Formona granite, which forms the country rock to the kimberlite, is also reported

  16. An appraisal of policies and institutional frameworks impacting on smallholder agricultural water management in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyagumbo, I.; Rurinda, J.

    Policies and institutional frameworks associated with and / or impacting on agricultural water management (AWM) in smallholder farming systems in Zimbabwe were analyzed through literature reviews, feedback from stakeholder workshops, key informant interviews and evaluation of policy impacts on implemented case study projects/programmes. The study showed that Zimbabwe has gone a long way towards developing a water management policy addressing both equity and access, through the Water and ZINWA of 1998. However, lack of incentives for improving efficient management and utilization of water resources once water has reached the farm gate was apparent, apart from punitive economic instruments levied on usage of increased volumes of water. For example, the new water reforms of 1998 penalized water savers through loss of any unused water in their permits to other users. In addition, the ability of smallholder farmers to access water for irrigation or other purposes was influenced by macro and micro-economic policies such as Economic Structural and Adjustment Programme (ESAP), Zimbabwe Programme for Economic and Social Transformation (ZIMPREST), prevailing monetary and fiscal policies, as well as the Land and Agrarian Reform policies. For instance, the implementation of ESAP from 1991 to 95 resulted in a decline in government support to management of communal irrigation schemes, and as a result only gravity-fed schemes survived. Also AWM projects/programmes that were in progress were prematurely terminated. While considerable emphasis was placed on rehabilitation of irrigation infrastructure since the fast track land reform in 1998, the policies remained rather silent on strategies for water management in rainfed systems. The piecemeal nature and fragmentation of policies and institutional frameworks scattered across government ministries and sectors were complex and created difficulties for smallholder farmers to access water resources. Poor policy implementation

  17. Perceived burden of care and reported coping strategies and needs for family caregivers of people with mental disorders in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazondlile D. Marimbe

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Caregivers carry a substantial and frequently unrecognized burden of caring for a family member with mental disorder. Better support is needed from health professionals and social services to help them cope better. Further research is required to quantitatively measure caregiver burden and evaluate potential interventions in Zimbabwe.

  18. To Bind Ties between the School and Tribal Life: Educational Policy for Africans under George Stark in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungazi, Dickson A.

    1989-01-01

    Contends that educational policy in Zimbabwe from 1934 to 1954 served the political purposes of the colonial government and neglected genuine educational development of the colonized Africans. During George Stark's tenure as Director of Native Education, Zimbabweans were consigned to "practical training" programs and were denied access…

  19. Improvement of traditional processing of local monkey orange (Strychnos spp.) fruits to enhance nutrition security in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngadze, Ruth T.; Verkerk, Ruud; Nyanga, Loveness K.; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Linnemann, Anita R.

    2017-01-01

    Although the monkey orange (Strychnos spp.) tree fruit is widely distributed in Southern Africa and particularly in Zimbabwe, it is underutilized and little attention has been given to its potential commercialisation due to limited knowledge and information. Most of the fruits and their products

  20. A Comparative Study of Entrepreneurship Curriculum Development and Review at the University of Zimbabwe and Botho University, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyanyiwa, Takaruza; Svotwa, Douglas; Rudhumbu, Norman; Mutsau, Morgen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to make comparative study of the development and review process of the entrepreneurship curriculum at the University of Zimbabwe (UZ) Faculty of Commerce and Botho University, (BU) Faculty of Business and Accounting in Gaborone, Botswana. The study focused on the processes and influences of curriculum development…

  1. Why are lions killing us? Human-wildlife conflict and social discontent in Mbire District, northern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matema, S.; Andersson, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Early in 2010, lions killed four people and over a hundred livestock in Mbire district, northern Zimbabwe, an area bordering a complex of protected wildlife areas of global conservation importance. The events prompted a local outcry, prominent media coverage, and even calls for the translocation of

  2. Observing Some Life Cycles. Teacher's Guide. Unit E3. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitepo, Thoko; And Others

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the first 2 years of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide contains instructional…

  3. Examination Management as a Way of Achieving Quality Assurance in ODL Institutions: The Case of Zimbabwe Open University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafa, Onias; Gudhlanga, Enna Sukutai

    2012-01-01

    An examination is an important component of any institution that educates people. It is a form of assessment used to measure the students' understanding of the concepts and principles they would have learnt. Zimbabwe Open University, an Open and Distance Learning institution has been setting its own examinations for the academic programmes…

  4. Job Stress and Locus of Control in Teachers: Comparisons between Samples from the United States and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kanyongo, Gibbs Y.; Kolbert, Jered B.; Lipinski, John; Kachmar, Steven P.; Koch, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between educators' locus of control and job stress using samples from the US and Zimbabwe. Multiple regression analyses are used to identify significant relationships in the US sample between teachers' external locus of control and the severity of the job stress that they experience, coupled with the perceived…

  5. Fast track land reform, tenure security and investments in soil conservation: Micro-evidence from Mazowe district in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zikhali, P.

    2010-01-01

    The government of Zimbabwe launched the Fast Track Land Reform Programme (FTLRP) in 2000 as part of its ongoing land reform and resettlement programme which aims to address a racially skewed land distribution. Its goal has been to accelerate both land acquisition and redistribution, targeting at

  6. An ethnography of knowledge : knowledge production and dissemination in land resettlement areas in Zimbabwe: the case of Mupfurudzi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudege, N.

    2005-01-01

    This research is an ethnographic study carried out among farmers inMupfurudziresettlement area inZimbabweover a period of 30 months. The research was carried out in

  7. Vegetation structure and composition across different land use in a semi-arid savanna of southern Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zisadza-Gandiwa, P.; Mango, L.; Gandiwa, E.; Goza, D.; Parakasingwa, C.; Chinoitezvi, E.; Shimbani, J.; Muvengwi, J.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the structure and composition of vegetation communities across different land uses in the northern Gonarezhou National Park and adjacent areas, southeast Zimbabwe. Vegetation data were collected from 60 sample plots using a stratified random sampling technique from April to May 2012.

  8. An Analysis of Female Lecturers' Participation in Civil Engineering Research and Development Activities at One Polytechnic in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikuvadze, Pinias; Matswetu, Vimbai Sharon; Mugijima, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to explore female lecturers' participation in civil engineering research and development activities at one polytechnic in Zimbabwe. Case study design was chosen for this study to make predictions, narration of events, comparisons and drawing of conclusions. The female lecturers were purposively sampled to participate in the…

  9. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Intermittently Flooded (Dambo) Rice under Different Tillage Practices in Chiota Smallholder Farming Area of Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyamadzawo, George; Wuta, Menas; Chirinda, Ngoni

    2013-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the biggest sources of greenhouse gases. Rice production has been identified as one of the major sources of greenhouse gases, especially methane. However, data on the contributions of rice towards greenhouse gas emissions in tropical Africa are limited. In Zimbabwe, as in mo...

  10. Agronomic and environmental studies of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and analysis of its value chain in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svubure, O.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Irish potato, food security, stakeholder analysis, sustainability indicators, Cool Farm Tool-Potato, yield gap, resource use efficiency, LINTUL-POTATO model, Zimbabwe.

    Oniward Svubure (2015). Agronomic and environmental studies of potato (Solanum

  11. Abundance and structure of African baobab (Adansonia digitata) across different soil types in Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashapa, C.; Zisadza-Gandiwa, P.; Gandiwa, E.; Kativu, S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the abundance and structure of African baobab (Adansonia digitata) across soil group strata in Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe. The study was based on a stratified random sampling design composed of the following soil group substrates: (i) granophyres, (ii) malvernia, and

  12. Atoms and Molecules. 'O' Level. Teacher's Guide. Unit 2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandizha, George

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be used in…

  13. Forces. 'O' Level Teacher's Guide. Unit 1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udwin, Martin

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be read in…

  14. Forces. 'O' Level Study Guide. Unit 1. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udwin, Martin

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This ZIM-SCI study guide is a five-part unit…

  15. Local knowledge and perceptions of animal population abundances by communities adjacent to the northern Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gandiwa, E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding animal abundances and population trends is a fundamental goal of ecology. The aim of this study was to examine local ecological knowledge (LEK) held by local people bordering the northern Gonarezhou National Park (GNP), Zimbabwe, concerning domestic and wild animal species abundances

  16. Family planning as part of reproductive health, including the HIV / AIDS aspects, in Zimbabwe and Southern Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuyl, Douwe Arie Anne

    2003-01-01

    This thesis explores the demand for family planning (FP) in the region and demonstrates that just at the time that demand takes off the brain drain and economic situation make it unlikely that the required services will be provided. This, increasingly, results in unsafe abortions. FP in Zimbabwe is

  17. The importance of HIV prevention messaging for orphaned youth in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Erica; Singh, Kavita

    2012-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic has contributed to a drastic increase in the number of orphans in Zimbabwe. Female adolescent orphans are particularly in jeopardy of contracting HIV due to disadvantages including extreme poverty, low education, and the absent of parental oversight which can lead to higher risk-taking sexual behaviors. By understanding where girls receive education about HIV and who they rely on for information, organizations can effectively modify existing programs to better target this at-risk population. For this study a household survey was conducted which included 216 orphans and 324 non-orphans (n=540), aged 12-17 years, in the resource-poor setting of Hwange District, Zimbabwe. The aims of this article were to examine the differences between orphans and non-orphans in HIV prevention message exposure, level of motivation for learning about HIV, and communication with caregivers about safe sex. The household survey revealed that younger orphans, aged 12-15 years, were more motivated to learn about HIV and had greater HIV messaging exposure in school than non-orphans. These exposure and differences in the levels of motivation between groups dissipated at older ages. Our research also discovered less caregiver communication among orphans than non-orphans. Our findings suggest that HIV programs targeting orphans need to do a better job at keeping older orphans interested in HIV prevention at a time when it matters most. Furthermore, intervention strategies that provide caregiver support are instrumental in effectively delivering prevention messages to girls at home.

  18. Is religion the forgotten variable in maternal and child health? Evidence from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Wei; Salama, Peter; Gwavuya, Stanley; Kanjala, Chifundo

    2014-10-01

    The Apostolic faith, a rapidly growing and increasingly influential force in Zimbabwe, has received attention in the literature due to its potential role in shaping its followers' attitudes and behaviours towards health. Existing literature, however, has only examined small cross-section samples from a few confined survey sites or has failed to adequately control for the many factors that may mediate the effects of religion. This paper examines the effects of the Apostolic faith on the usage of maternal health and child immunization services in Zimbabwe. It is based on a nationally representative sample from the 2009 Multi-Indicator Monitoring Survey and employs the established Andersen model on access to health services. Well controlled multivariate logit regression models derived from these data show that an affiliation with the Apostolic faith is a substantial and significant risk factor in reducing the utilization of both maternal and child health services. Moreover, even when the services were least costly and readily available and when gaps along other social and economic factors were limited, as in the case of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination and one visit to antenatal care, women and children from Apostolic faith families still fared significantly worse than others in accessing them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction in Diarrhea- and Rotavirus-related Healthcare Visits Among Children Introduction in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujuru, Hilda A; Yen, Catherine; Nathoo, Kusum J; Gonah, Nhamo A; Ticklay, Ismail; Mukaratirwa, Arnold; Berejena, Chipo; Tapfumanei, Ottias; Chindedza, Kenneth; Rupfutse, Maxwell; Weldegebriel, Goitom; Mwenda, Jason M; Burnett, Eleanor; Tate, Jacqueline E; Parashar, Umesh D; Manangazira, Portia

    2017-10-01

    In Zimbabwe, rotavirus accounted for 41%-56% of acute diarrhea hospitalizations before rotavirus vaccine introduction in 2014. We evaluated rotavirus vaccination impact on acute diarrhea- and rotavirus-related healthcare visits in children. We examined monthly and annual acute diarrhea and rotavirus test-positive hospitalizations and Accident and Emergency Department visits among children introduction (2012-2013) with postvaccine introduction (2015 and 2016) data for 2 of the hospitals. We examined monthly acute diarrhea hospitalizations by year and age group for 2013-2016 from surveillance hospital registers and monthly acute diarrhea outpatient visits reported to the Ministry of Health and Child Care during 2012-2016. Active surveillance data showed winter seasonal peaks in diarrhea- and rotavirus-related visits among children introduction; the percentage of rotavirus test-positive visits followed a similar seasonal pattern and decrease. Hospital register data showed similar pre-introduction seasonal variation and post-introduction declines in diarrhea hospitalizations among children 0-11 and 12-23 months of age. Monthly variation in outpatient diarrhea-related visits mirrored active surveillance data patterns. At 2 surveillance hospitals, the percentage of rotavirus-positive visits declined by 40% and 43% among children 0-11 months of age and by 21% and 33% among children 12-23 months of age in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Initial reductions in diarrheal illness among children introduction are encouraging. These early results provide evidence to support continued rotavirus vaccination and rotavirus surveillance in Zimbabwe.

  20. What was the population of Great Zimbabwe (CE1000 – 1800)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moultrie, Thomas; Bandama, Foreman; Dandara, Collett; Manyanga, Munyaradzi

    2017-01-01

    The World Heritage Site of Great Zimbabwe is one of the most iconic and largest archaeological settlements in Africa. It was the hub of direct and indirect trade which internally connected various areas of southern Africa, and externally linked them with East Africa and the Near and Far East. Archaeologists believe that at its peak, Great Zimbabwe had a fully urban population of 20,000 people concentrated in approximately 2.9 square kilometres (40 percent of 720 ha). This translates to a population density of 6,897, which is comparable with that of some of the most populous regions of the world in the 21st century. Here, we combine archaeological, ethnographic and historical evidence with ecological and statistical modelling to demonstrate that the total population estimate for the site’s nearly 800-year occupational duration (CE1000–1800), after factoring in generational succession, is unlikely to have exceeded 10,000 people. This conclusion is strongly firmed up by the absence of megamiddens at the site, the chronological differences between several key areas of the settlement traditionally assumed to be coeval, and the historically documented low populations recorded for the sub-continent between CE1600 and 1950. PMID:28614397

  1. Antiretroviral therapy outcomes among HIV infected clients in Gweru City, Zimbabwe 2006 - 2011: a cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambira, Gerald; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Hall, Casey Daniel; Park, Meeyoung Mattie; Frimpong, Joseph Asamoah

    2017-01-01

    The government of Zimbabwe began providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in public institutions in 2004. In Midlands province two clinics constituted the most active HIV care service points, with patients being followed up through a comprehensive patient monitoring and tracking system which captured specific patient variables and outcomes over time. The data from 2006 to 2011 were subjected to analysis to answer specific research questions and this case study is based on that analysis. The goal of this case study is to build participants' capacity to undertake secondary data analysis and interpretation using a dataset for HIV antiretroviral therapy in Zimbabwe and to draw conclusions which inform recommendations. Case studies in applied epidemiology allow students to practice applying epidemiologic skills in the classroom to address real-world public health problems. Case studies as a vital component of an applied epidemiology curriculum are instrumental in reinforcing principles and skills covered in lectures or in background reading. The target audience includes Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs), university students, district health executives, and health information officers.

  2. An Analysis of the Factors Leading to Rising Credit Risk in the Zimbabwe Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Sandada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study sought to analyse the factors that lead to rising credit risk in the Zimbabwean banking sector. The objective was to ascertain the impact of macroeconomic, industry and bank specific factors on rising credit risk in in Zimbabwe. The study aimed at contributing to credit risk management literature by providing evidence Sub Saharan context. Being anchored on the positivist quantitative research approach, a survey was carried out gather the data that were analysed using descriptive, correlation and regression analyses. The results revealed that the most significant factors leading to credit risk in the Zimbabwean banking sector were macroeconomic and bank specific factors. The industry factors did not show a significant influence on the rising credit risk. The research findings of this study will a valuable addition to the existing knowledge and provide a platform for further research on how the credit risk problems can be dealt with. While credit risk is known as one of the risks inherent to any banking institutions, the alarming levels of credit risk in the Zimbabwe banking sector has motivated this current study to critically analyse the factors that have led to the high credit risk levels.

  3. Fish farming as an innovative strategy for promoting food security in drought risk regions of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvin Shava

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the implementation of fish farming as an innovative and economic strategy for promoting food security and dietary diversities among vulnerable households in drought risk areas of Zimbabwe. The declining climatic conditions and lack of economic opportunities in Mwenezi district of Zimbabwe attracted the attention of three nongovernmental organisations (NGOs to implement fish farming as an innovative mechanism to stimulate food security and generate employment in the district. The article used a qualitative research approach that includes semi-structured interviews and secondary data. The purposive sampling technique was adopted to interview participants in Mwenezi district who were involved in fish farming to assess and explore the experiences and benefits they derive from such development projects. Results for the article revealed that fish farming was well embraced by local communities as it led to improvements in food security, household income and employment regeneration. The local government including traditional leadership (Chiefs and Headmen’s supported the NGO activities as they benefited local communities. The article concludes that although fish farming was instrumental in regenerating employment, some participants still fail to participate because of laziness and desire to maintain dependency syndrome. The article recommends the NGOs to launch awareness campaigns in rural communities and increase networking with the donor community which is fundamental in attracting sustainable funding. The government can also promote fish farming in vulnerable rural communities by providing funding and capacity building programmes.

  4. The Rise of Mobile Technology on the Financial Sector in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Mupfiga

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of technology has revolted the way that the financial industry operates and the increasing use of mobile gadgets has changed the banking system from the traditional brick and mortar building to a virtual system. The sudden rise in use and innovation of smart mobile phones, mobile personal computers, tablets and various other mobile electronic gadgets has resulted in the rise of mobile financial products. Rapid quickening innovative headways are making completely new business suggestions, for example, crowd financing, shared loaning, advanced monetary forms, versatile managing an account, online speculation and new instalment frameworks. Zimbabwe's mobile technology use is currently on the rise too as mobile service providers like Econet are enabling the connection between consumers and financial related products. Despite the fact that innovation without a doubt brings benefits, prominent specialized disappointments in the money related part lately are disturbing and several negative factors are to some extent affecting production. Drawbacks like cybercrime, resistance to change, and compatibility of mobile gadgets are affecting the information technology environment. This paper highlights the rise of mobile technology in the financial sector in Zimbabwe.

  5. Satellite Based Assessment of Hydroclimatic Conditions Related to Cholera in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antarpreet Jutla

    Full Text Available Cholera, an infectious diarrheal disease, has been shown to be associated with large scale hydroclimatic processes. The sudden and sporadic occurrence of epidemic cholera is linked with high mortality rates, in part, due to uncertainty in timing and location of outbreaks. Improved understanding of the relationship between pathogenic abundance and climatic processes allows prediction of disease outbreak to be an achievable goal. In this study, we show association of large scale hydroclimatic processes with the cholera epidemic in Zimbabwe reported to have begun in Chitungwiza, a city in Mashonaland East province, in August, 2008.Climatic factors in the region were found to be associated with triggering cholera outbreak and are shown to be related to anomalies of temperature and precipitation, validating the hypothesis that poor conditions of sanitation, coupled with elevated temperatures, and followed by heavy rainfall can initiate outbreaks of cholera. Spatial estimation by satellite of precipitation and global gridded air temperature captured sensitivities in hydroclimatic conditions that permitted identification of the location in the region where the disease outbreak began.Satellite derived hydroclimatic processes can be used to capture environmental conditions related to epidemic cholera, as occurred in Zimbabwe, thereby providing an early warning system. Since cholera cannot be eradicated because the causative agent, Vibrio cholerae, is autochthonous to the aquatic environment, prediction of conditions favorable for its growth and estimation of risks of triggering the disease in a given population can be used to alert responders, potentially decreasing infection and saving lives.

  6. Assessment of environmental flow requirements for river basin planning in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazvimavi, D.; Madamombe, E.; Makurira, H.

    There is a growing awareness and understanding of the need to allocate water along a river to maintain ecological processes that provide goods and services. Legislation in Zimbabwe requires water resources management plans to include the amount of water to be reserved for environmental purposes in each river basin. This paper aims to estimate the amount of water that should be reserved for environmental purposes in each of the 151 sub-basins or water management units of Zimbabwe. A desktop hydrological method is used to estimate the environmental flow requirement (EFR). The estimated EFRs decrease with increasing flow variability, and increase with the increasing contribution of base flows to total flows. The study has established that in order to maintain slightly modified to natural habitats along rivers, the EFR should be 30-60% of mean annual runoff (MAR) in regions with perennial rivers, while this is 20-30% in the dry parts of the country with rivers, which only flow during the wet season. The inclusion of EFRs in water resources management plans will not drastically change the proportion of the available water allocated to water permits, since the amount of water allocated to water permit holders is less than 50% of the MAR on 77% of the sub-basins in the country.

  7. Remote sensing of surface water quality in relation to catchment condition in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masocha, Mhosisi; Murwira, Amon; Magadza, Christopher H. D.; Hirji, Rafik; Dube, Timothy

    2017-08-01

    The degradation of river catchments is one of the most important contemporary environmental problems affecting water quality in tropical countries. In this study, we used remotely sensed Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to assess how catchment condition varies within and across river catchments in Zimbabwe. We then used non-linear regression to test whether catchment condition assessed using the NDVI is significantly (α = 0.05) related with levels of Total Suspended Solids (TSS) measured at different sampling points in thirty-two sub-catchments in Zimbabwe. The results showed a consistent negative curvilinear relationship between Landsat 8 derived NDVI and TSS measured across the catchments under study. In the drier catchments of the country, 98% of the variation in TSS is explained by NDVI, while in wetter catchments, 64% of the variation in TSS is explained by NDVI. Our results suggest that NDVI derived from free and readily available multispectral Landsat series data (Landsat 8) is a potential valuable tool for the rapid assessment of physical water quality in data poor catchments. Overall, the finding of this study underscores the usefulness of readily available satellite data for near-real time monitoring of the physical water quality at river catchment scale, especially in resource-constrained areas, such as the sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Investigating the Impact of Dollarization on Economic Growth: A Case of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby NGAMANYA MUNHUPEDZI

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of dollarization on business in Zimbabwe focusing on economic indicators such as inflation rate, GDP, employment and ease of doing business during the period 2009-2015. Zimbabwe experienced a very difficult economic phase characterised by hyperinflation, negative economic growth, unavailability of basic commodities and negative economic growth rates during the period 1998-2008. In 2009 the country adopted a multi-currency system whereby the Zimbabwean dollar was in circulation alongside various other currencies, with the United States Dollar and the South African Rand being the dominant ones. There has been general speculation that Zimbabwe’s economic problems are due to dollarization. Through analysing data from interviews and secondary sources, the research established that dollarization brought about stability in the economy, arrested inflation, and caused a marginal increase in GDP. However, the response of the employment rate was independent of the dollarization and may be attributed to other factors such as Economic Structural Adjustment Programme (ESAP in 1992, the global economic crisis in 2008 and the absence of reliable data.

  9. Incident pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes among HIV-infected women in Uganda and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Kathryn E; Kwok, Cynthia; Rinaldi, Anne; Byamugisha, Josaphat; Magwali, Tulani; Nyamapfeni, Prisca; Salata, Robert A; Morrison, Charles S

    2015-12-01

    To describe pregnancy outcomes among HIV-infected women and examine factors associated with live birth among those receiving and not receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The present analysis included women with HIV from Uganda and Zimbabwe who participated in a prospective cohort study during 2001-2009. Incident pregnancies and pregnancy outcomes were recorded quarterly. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate incident pregnancy probabilities; factors associated with live birth were evaluated by Poisson regression with generalized estimating equations. Among 306 HIV-infected women, there were 160 incident pregnancies (10.1 per 100 women-years). The pregnancy rate was higher among cART-naïve women than among those receiving cART (10.7 vs 5.5 per 100 women-years; P=0.047), and it was higher in Uganda than in Zimbabwe (14.4 vs 7.7 per 100 women-years; Ppregnancy (relative risk 0.8; 95% confidence interval 0.7-1.0). Women not receiving cART have higher pregnancy rates than do those receiving cART, but cART use might not affect the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Timely prenatal care and monitoring of illnesses during pregnancy should be incorporated into treatment services for HIV-infected women. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Socio-economic status and health care utilization in rural Zimbabwe: findings from Project Accept (HPTN 043).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevany, Sebastian; Murima, Oliver; Singh, Basant; Hlubinka, Daniel; Kulich, Michal; Morin, Stephen F; Sweat, Michael

    2012-03-07

    Zimbabwe's HIV epidemic is amongst the worst in the world, and disproportionately effects poorer rural areas. Access to almost all health services in Zimbabwe includes some form of cost to the client. In recent years, the socio-economic and employment status of many Zimbabweans has suffered a serious decline, creating additional barriers to HIV treatment and care. We aimed to assess the impact of i) socio-economic status (SES) and ii) employment status on the utilization of health services in rural Zimbabwe. Data were collected from a random probability sample household survey conducted in the Mutoko district of north-western Zimbabwe in 2005. We selected variables that described the economic status of the respondent, including: being paid to work, employment status, and SES by assets. Respondents were also asked about where they most often utilized healthcare when they or their family was sick or hurt. Of 2,874 respondents, all forms of healthcare tended to be utilized by those of high or medium-high SES (65%), including private (65%), church-based (61%), traditional (67%), and other providers (66%) (P=0.009). Most respondents of low SES utilized government providers (74%) (P=0.009). Seventy-one percent of respondents utilizing health services were employed. Government (71%), private (72%), church (71%), community-based (78%) and other (64%) health services tended to be utilized by employed respondents (P=0.000). Only traditional health services were equally utilized by unemployed respondents (50%) (P=0.000). A wide range of health providers are utilized in rural Zimbabwe. Utilization is strongly associated with SES and employment status, particularly for services with user fees, which may act as a barrier to HIV treatment and care access. Efforts to improve access in low-SES, high HIV-prevalence settings may benefit from the subsidization of the health care payment system, efforts to improve SES levels, political reform, and the involvement of traditional

  11. A framework for creating an ICT knowledge hub in Zimbabwe: A holistic approach in fostering economic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert Mahlangu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ICT knowledge hubs are important resources for a country to grow towards an innovative economy. Their growth has been viewed as a node point for techno-prenuership development and economic sustainability by many countries. The purpose of this study was to establish how Zimbabwe as a developing country should move towards the creation of an ICT knowledge hub that will promote economic growth in line with the Zimbabwe Agenda for Sustainable Socio-Economic Transformation (ZimAsset economic blueprint crafted in 2013. A qualitative research design was used whereby literature was conducted to establish models for ICT Knowledge hub creation while two focus group discussions were held with academia, research agents and software developers to achieve face validity and in-depth interviews were held with officials from The Ministry of ICT Postal and Courier services. The consensus was reached on the need for creating a focal point which will act as a cyber-port where ICT driven solutions can be obtained based on the industry needs. The focus group discussions settled for four components in creating an ICT knowledge hub. These are planning function, development function, management function and co-ordinating function. The research also established that the Ministry of ICT and Courier services in Zimbabwe has set up an innovation fund to encourage and reward innovation and craftsmanship in Zimbabwe mainly targeted at the youths. The government acquired the high-performance computing facility which is stationed at the University of Zimbabwe. The ICT hub should be used to facilitate access and use of this resource. Every country should therefore strive to create its own centre of innovation which enables it to gain maximum utility from its indigenous people in order to fully utilise ICTs for industry development and spearhead economic growth. The study recommends that there is need for establishing an ICT Knowledge hub in the country.

  12. Strengthening Locus Standi in Human Rights Litigation in Zimbabwe: An analysis of the Provisions in the New Zimbabwean Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovemore Chiduza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabweans have been both victims of and witnesses to serious human rights violations over the years. Though there is wide agreement and speculation that the state and its agencies are the perpetrators of these atrocities, they have largely remained unprosecuted and unpunished. Such impunity is inter alia the result of ineffective law enforcement mechanisms and institutions as well as the lack of capacity and legal knowledge of victims to approach the courts and seek redress. These factors negatively affected the protection of human rights and access to justice in Zimbabwe. Although the Lancaster House Constitution contained a Declaration of Rights, its enforcement mechanisms, particularly those relating to locus standi (legal standing, posed a great challenge to human rights litigation in Zimbabwe. This is so because the Lancaster House Constitution adopted the traditional common law approach to standing. Under this approach it was required that an individual must have a "personal, direct or substantial interest" in a matter in order to have standing. The Lancaster House Constitution failed to recognise the importance of broader rules of standing, which would accommodate public interest litigation, specifically for protecting human rights. Contrary to this, the new Constitution of Zimbabwe (2013 broadens the rules of standing in order to enhance access to the courts. This paper analyses the new approach to standing under the new constitutional dispensation in Zimbabwe. To this end, the discussion commences with an elucidation of the concept of locus standi and its link to access to justice. This is followed by an analysis of locus standi under the Lancaster House Constitution. Since the new approach in Zimbabwe is greatly informed by the South African approach to locus standi, a brief analysis of standing in South Africa is made. The paper concludes with a discussion of the approach to locus standi under the new constitution with a view to

  13. Spatial and temporal variation in domestic biofuel consumption rates and patterns in Zimbabwe: implications for atmospheric trace gas emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, J.; Andreae, M.O.; Helas, G.; Marufu, L.; University of Utrecht; Lelieveld, J.

    1999-01-01

    An ecologically nationwide and all-year-round domestic biofuel consumption study was conducted in Zimbabwe from January 1996 to March 1997. The study aimed at (a) establishing the determinants and magnitudes of spatial and temporal variations in biofuel consumption rates, (b) estimating the overall mean national rural and urban consumption rates, and (c) estimating the contribution of domestic biomass burning in Zimbabwe to the emission of atmospheric trace gases. The main source of spatial variation in biofuel consumption rates was found to be settlement type (rural or urban). Within a settlement type, per capita consumption rates varied in time and space with household size, ambient temperature, and physical availability. In rural areas wood and agricultural residues were consumed at national average rates of 1.3±0.2 and 0.07±0.01 tonnes capita -1 year -1 , respectively. In urban centres wood was consumed at an average rate of 0.4±0.26 tonnes capita -1 year -1 . These consumption rates translate into emission outputs from Zimbabwe of 4.6 Tg CO 2 -C year -1 , 0.4 Tg CO-C year -1 , 5.3 Gg NO-N year -1 , 14.5 Gg CH 4 -C year -1 , 24.2 Gg NMHC-C year -1 , 2.9 Gg organic acid-C year -1 (formic and acetic acids) and 48.4 Gg aerosol-C year -1 . For CO 2 , CO, and NO, these domestic biofuel emissions represent 41±6%, 67±6%, and 8±1%, respectively, of the total output of all sources evaluated and documented in Zimbabwe to date. This means that of the studied sources, domestic biomass burning is the major source of CO 2 and CO emission in Zimbabwe

  14. How do health workers experience and cope with shocks? Learning from four fragile and conflict-affected health systems in Uganda, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe and Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Witter, Sophie; Wurie, Haja; Chandiwana, Pamela; Namakula, Justine; So, Sovannarith; Alonso-Garbayo, Alvaro; Ssengooba, Freddie; Raven, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    This article is grounded in a research programme which set out to understand how to rebuild health systems post-conflict. Four countries were studied – Uganda, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, and Cambodia – which were at different distances from conflict and crisis, as well as each having a unique conflict story. During the research process, the Ebola epidemic broke out in West Africa. Zimbabwe has continued to face a profound economic crisis. Within our research on health worker incentives, we captu...

  15. Defining Formats and Corpus- based Examples in the General ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    Institute, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe (langa@arts.uz.ac.zw). Abstract: In this article the writer ... sentative" in terms of size in order to be appropriately used as basis for such corpus-based diction- aries, the ISN editors .... (e) the format should suggest a preference rather than a restriction. For COBUILD, a good ...

  16. Electricity access. Southern Africa sub-regional study: South Africa and Zimbabwe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, O.R.; Mwakasonda, S.A.

    2004-07-01

    This study focuses on the accessibility of electricity to the poor in South Africa and Zimbabwe as a means to improve understanding of the various factors that affect the provision of modern energy to the poor in these countries. The study examines the impact on the poor of power sector reforms. Specifically, it makes an assessment of the impact of the electrification programmes in the two countries. The situation in the two countries is discussed separately, followed by a comparative analysis. South Africa is the most industrialised country in Africa and it is endowed with a wide variety of natural resources. It is currently going through major changes in many spheres of its economy, including energy, following the democratic elections in 1994. An important consideration that is directing all aspects of government policy is the need to address the enormous disparities in income levels and living conditions betaveen the different racial groups, a result of apartheid. The rural areas are even more impoverished than urban ones. Alter the 1994 democratic elections, the South African Government launched the first phase of the National Electrification Programme (1994-99), aimed at increasing electrification from 36 per cent to about 66 per cent nationally by 2001 - 46 per cent rural and 80 per cent urban. By the end of 2001, 66.1 per cent of households were electrified, with more than 3.4 million connections made since 1994. Since then, several polities have been introduced in the electricity sector that are of direct relevance to this work. The most important of these concern the restructuring of the electricity supply industry and direct subsidies for the poor and disadvantaged. The South African Government established a National Electrification Fund to subsidise a portion of the capital costs of new electricity connections under the National Electrifcation Programme. The Fund derives its income not only from the electricity industry, but also from fiscal allocations

  17. Cost-effectiveness of community vegetable gardens for people living with HIV in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Chloe; Salpéteur, Cécile; Lacroix, Elisabeth; Zimunya, Simbarashe Dennis; Israël, Anne-Dominique; Aït-Aïssa, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    There is little evidence to date of the potential impact of vegetable gardens on people living with HIV (PLHIV), who often suffer from social and economic losses due to the disease. From 2008 through 2011, Action Contre la Faim France (ACF) implemented a project in Chipinge District, eastern Zimbabwe, providing low-input vegetable gardens (LIGs) to households of PLHIV. Program partners included Médecins du Monde, which provided medical support, and Zimbabwe's Agricultural Extension Service, which supported vegetable cultivation. A survey conducted at the end of the program found LIG participants to have higher Food Consumption Scores (FCS) and Household Dietary Diversity Scores (HDDS) relative to comparator households of PLHIV receiving other support programs. This study assessed the incremental cost-effectiveness of LIGs to improve FCS and HDDS of PLHIV compared to other support programs. This analysis used an activity-based cost model, and combined ACF accounting data with estimates of partner and beneficiary costs derived using an ingredients approach to build an estimate of total program resource use. A societal perspective was adopted to encompass costs to beneficiary households, including their opportunity costs and an estimate of their income earned from vegetable sales. Qualitative methods were used to assess program benefits to beneficiary households. Effectiveness data was taken from a previously-conducted survey. Providing LIGs to PLHIV cost an additional 8,299 EUR per household with adequate FCS and 12,456 EUR per household with HDDS in the upper tertile, relative to comparator households of PLHIV receiving other support programs. Beneficiaries cited multiple tangible and intangible benefits from LIGs, and over 80% of gardens observed were still functioning more than one year after the program had finished. Cost outcomes were 20-30 times Zimbabwe's per capita GDP, and unlikely to be affordable within government services. This analysis concludes that

  18. Iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented maize, sorghum and millets from five locations in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaza, Molly; Shumoy, Habtu; Muchuweti, Maud; Vandamme, Peter; Raes, Katleen

    2018-01-01

    The present study is an evaluation of iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented maize, sorghum, pearl millet and finger millet from five different locations in Zimbabwe. Iron and zinc contents ranged between 3.22 and 49.7 and 1.25-4.39mg/100gdm, respectively. Fermentation caused a reduction of between 20 and 88% of phytic acid (PA) while a general increase in soluble phenolic compounds (PC) and a decrease of the bound (PC) was observed. Bioaccessibility of iron and zinc ranged between 2.77 and 26.1% and 0.45-12.8%, respectively. The contribution of the fermented cereals towards iron and zinc absolute requirements ranged between 25 and 411% and 0.5-23% with higher contribution of iron coming from cereals that were contaminated with extrinsic iron. Populations subsisting on cereals could be more at risk of zinc rather than iron deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of shadow banking on the traditional banking system in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virimai Mugobo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The growth of shadow banks changed the face of banking in Zimbabwe. Their inconsistent product nature and complexity of form has been a cause for concern to regulatory authorities. The interrelationship between their financial intermediary role and that of formal banks has made them good substitutes to formal banking. This study conducts a statistical analysis of the country’s monetary aggregates and the total formal bank loan-to-deposits balances. The findings of this analysis show that the shadow banking system has always been a critical element of the formal banking sector which resulted from market needs and it completes the banking system. The shadow banking system does not pose direct threat to the formal banking system but it was a result of failure to attract savers who found shadow banks as a good alternative.

  20. Dancehall music and urban identities in Zimbabwe – A constructive postmodern perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorodzai Dube

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dancehall music may be seen as a commentary over the socio-political events that are unfolding in Zimbabwe since 2008, a period characterised by political and economic uncertainty. The study focuses on how this genre of music reflects identities that emerge from the context characterised by the disintegrating state institutions and fragile households. With such a context, dancehall music may be interpreted as offering hope and courage. Notably, the music carries a unique theological injunction where God is called upon to witness and offer strength, not to punish or change the status quo. I call this genre of music wilderness music to explain that the music provides spaces of hope and courage to fragile and less certain identities.

  1. Analysis of bank failures during financial tumult in Africa-Zimbabwe: A historical review

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    Shewangu Dzomira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the analysis of the bank failures phenomenon in Africa with a deep analysis of Zimbabwe scenario. The paper is based on historical research design which used analytical and comparative research approaches to study the bank failures phenomenon. To obtain the historical evidence the researcher consulted primary sources, secondary sources and running records. It was discovered and concluded that the failing of banks was attributed to liquidity and solvency problems as a result of flawed corporate governance standards, inadequate risk management, high levels of non-performing loans and speculative activities among a confluence of factors. It was therefore recommended that enterprise-wide risk management framework should be implemented without failing and adoption of Basel II/III on banking supervision and surveillance.

  2. A preliminary analysis of the groundwater recharge to the Karoo formations, mid-Zambesi basin, Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Flemming; Owen, R.; Dahlin, T.

    2002-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary study is being carried out on recharge to the Karoo sandstone aquifer in the western part of Zimbabwe, where recharge is controlled by the presence of a thick, confining basalt layer. The aquifer is geographically extensive, and has been identified throughout the southern part......, before it dips below an impervious basalt cover. However, resistivity profiling shows that the basalt at the basin margin is weathered and fractured, and probably permeable, while the basalt deeper into the basin is fresh, solid and impermeable. Field and laboratory analysis of 22 groundwater samples......–130 mm/yr, with an average value of 25 mm/yr. Preliminary results of recharge estimate using 36Cl data suggests lower direct infiltration rates, but further studies are needed. The combination of hydro-chemical, isotopic and geophysical investigations show that the recharge area extends well beyond...

  3. Culture and context of HIV prevention in rural Zimbabwe: the influence of gender inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    After many years of HIV prevention in Zimbabwe, AIDS morbidity and mortality rates continue to rise. This study explores factors facilitating or hindering rural Ndau women's participation in HIV prevention that might influence health promotion programming. Ethnographic methods were used with a sample of 38 females and 10 males. Women's existence is revealed as difficult and oppressive. Their socialization to become workers and mothers occurs within a context of limited voice, subservience, violence, and economic powerlessness, all barriers to HIV prevention. Through analysis of sociocultural and economic factors, it is suggested that cultural beliefs and practices, along with national and international forces, support and sustain gender inequality. For a change in the AIDS crisis, prevention strategies need to be multifaceted, consider people's culture and context, and include gender analysis. It is imperative that nurses working with diverse populations be sensitive to culture while challenging unjust and oppressive systems.

  4. Psychological Challenges Affecting Primary School Going Orphans In Wanganui Community Zimbabwe.

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    Mbwirire John

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to identify psychological challenges affecting primary school orphans in Wanganui Community in Zimbabwe. The study employed a mixed method approach combining questionnaires with teachers and care givers interview sessions with orphans and in-depth interviews with community socialdevelopment worker. The study finds that lack of love lack of attention and withdrawal were the main signs and symptoms of psychological challenge in the community. The study revealed that the term and symptoms of psychological challenges were understood differently between African context and Western context. The study recommended that action must be taken as soon as possible once the signs and symptoms which include lack of love lack of attention to rectify the psychological challenges faced by the community.

  5. Challenges of Virtual and Open Distance Science Teacher Education in Zimbabwe

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    Vongai Mpofu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a study of the implementation of science teacher education through virtual and open distance learning in the Mashonaland Central Province, Zimbabwe. The study provides insight into challenges faced by students and lecturers on inception of the program at four centres. Data was collected from completed evaluation survey forms of forty-two lecturers who were directly involved at the launch of the program and in-depth interviews. Qualitative data analysis revealed that the programme faces potential threat from centre-, institution-, lecturer-, and student-related factors. These include limited resources, large classes, inadequate expertise in open and distance education, inappropriate science teacher education qualifications, implementer conflict of interest in program participation, students’ low self-esteem, lack of awareness of quality parameters of delivery systems among staff, and lack of standard criteria to measure the quality of services. The paper recommends that issues raised be addressed in order to produce quality teachers.

  6. The costs of HIV/AIDS care at government hospitals in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Chapman, Glyn; Chitsike, Inam

    2000-01-01

    According to official figures, HIV infection in Zimbabwe stood at 700 000-1 000 000 in 1995, representing 7-10% of the population, with even higher expected numbers in 2000. Such high numbers will have far reaching effects on the economy and the health care sector. Information on costs of treatment...... and care of HIV/AIDS patients in health facilities is necessary in order to have an idea of the likely costs of the increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, the present study estimated the costs per in-patient day as well as per in-patient stay for patients in government health facilities...... an in-patient note review) to identify the direct treatment and diagnostic costs such as medication, laboratory tests and X-rays, and the standard step-down costing methodology to capture all the remaining resources used such as hospital administration, meals, housekeeping, laundry, etc. The findings...

  7. Spotted hyaenas Crocuta crocuta prey on new-born elephant calves in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe

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    Julia Salnicki

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta are known to be opportunists and to have a varied diet including mammals, reptiles and birds. Prey most often hunted are medium sized ungulates but spotted hyaenas will on occasion take larger species such as giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis and zebra Equus burchellii. They are also known to hunt whichever species are most abundant and will vary their prey seasonally. In this study spotted hyaenas were observed to take an unusual prey species in the form of elephant calves (Loxodonta africana. On a number of occasions hyaenas were observed feeding on or killing newborn and very young elephant calves. These observations were made whilst the authors were conducting research on spotted hyaena ecology in the woodlands of Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe and were made during the dry season between September and November 1999.

  8. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in goats and sheep in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, T.; Lind, Peter; Mukaratirwa, S.

    2005-01-01

    Seroprevalence rates of Toxoplasma gondii anti-antibodies in adult goats and sheep from different parts of Zimbabwe were determined. A total of 225 (67.9 %) of the 335 serum samples tested were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies with the indirect fluorescent antibody test. There were...... differences in antibody seroprevalences among communal land goats from the different agro-ecological zones (Natural regions IIb and III: 80 and 96.7%, respectively; Natural region IV: 65.9%; Natural region V: 45%; and Natural region III had a significantly higher seroprevalence than IV and V. The highest...... in sheep from a large commercial farm (10%) was significantly lower than that of sheep reared under the communal grazing system (80%). Overall, significantly higher proportions of seropositive animals had antibody titres of 1:50 (34.2% of 225) and 1:100 (44% of 225) as compared to the 9.8% and 12...

  9. Report of isolations of unusual lyssaviruses (rabies and Mokola virus identified retrospectively from Zimbabwe : short communication

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    J. Bingham

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Rabies isolates that had been stored between 1983 and 1997 were examined with a panel of anti-lyssavirus nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Out of 56 isolates from cats and various wild carnivore species, 1 isolate of Mokola virus and 5 other non-typical rabies viruses were identified. The Mokola virus isolate was diagnosed as rabies in 1993 from a cat. Genetic analysis of this isolate suggests that it falls in a distinct subgroup of the Mokola virus genotype. The 5 non-typical rabies viruses were isolated from honey badgers (Mellivora capensis, African civets (Civettictis civetta and an unidentified mongoose (Herpestidae. These isolates are representatives of rarely-reported wildlife-associated strains of rabies, probably maintained by the slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea. These findings indicate that both Mokola virus and the mongoose-associated variant may be more common in Zimbabwe than is apparent from routine surveillance.

  10. THE CONTRIBUTION OF SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN MEETING THE NEEDS OF ORPHANS IN THE MBERENGWA DISTRICT, ZIMBABWE

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    Katungu, Wisdom

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the turn of the millennium Zimbabwe has witnessed a raft of socio-economic and political challenges, exacerbated by the devastating effects of the HIV and Aids pandemic. This diminished the government’s ability to provide safety nets to vulnerable groups. The responsibility for orphan care has been shifted to the community, which has become the core focus of intervention initiatives by devising local-level coping mechanisms to deal with the orphan care crisis. The study explored the contribution of social entrepreneurship in meeting the needs of orphans in the Mberengwa district. The study concludes that the income-generating projects based on social entrepreneurship principles in Mberengwa play an important role in poverty alleviation and social protection, and particularly in meeting the needs of orphans. However, this cannot be achieved without the supportive role of government in promoting private-public partnerships.

  11. Culture as a barrier to rural women's entrepreneurship: experience from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsike, C

    2000-03-01

    This article identifies the important issues addressed by programs and projects that are aimed at promoting women's equality through entrepreneurship and suggests several actions for future focus of gender programs and training. Culture was seen as a barrier to the self-confident and autonomous economic activities of women in Zimbabwe. Likewise, structural barriers such as lack of marketable skills, time and ability to travel, land and assets, education, and position as primary family providers all compounded to the problem of entrepreneurship among women. Establishment of policy approaches for women like vocational skills training augmented by training in business skills and marketing, however, are insufficient since it failed to discuss and transfer behavioral skills necessary to make one an entrepreneur. To conclude, programs must be designed to empower personal skills and self-awareness, as well as address the constraints to entrepreneurship, and macroeconomic policy change.

  12. Jesus and Afro-Pentecostal Prophets: Dynamics within the liminal space in Galilee and in Zimbabwe

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    Zorodzai Dube

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available What happens when religious and spiritual interventions are used to explain concrete social economic reality? This study suggests that Afro-Pentecostal prophets in Zimbabwe exist within the liminal context; the prophets therefore function to redefine and contest identities in view of present social realities. This realisation allows for a comparison between the Zimbabwean prophets and Jesus of Nazareth, with a view to draw general conclusions regarding the function of prophets. As contribution, the study fills the void within the studies concerning the religious explanations of socioeconomic issues in view of structures of power. Borrowing from Herbert Marcuse, this study advances the thesis that the prophets attract people by miracles and promises of bliss and, in the process, divert people’s attention from directly confronting structures of power and hegemony.

  13. Backward Bifurcation in a Cholera Model: A Case Study of Outbreak in Zimbabwe and Haiti

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    Sharma, Sandeep; Kumari, Nitu

    In this paper, a nonlinear deterministic model is proposed with a saturated treatment function. The expression of the basic reproduction number for the proposed model was obtained. The global dynamics of the proposed model was studied using the basic reproduction number and theory of dynamical systems. It is observed that proposed model exhibits backward bifurcation as multiple endemic equilibrium points exist when R0 cholera in the community. We also obtain a unique endemic equilibria when R0 > 1. The global stability of unique endemic equilibria is performed using the geometric approach. An extensive numerical study is performed to support our analytical results. Finally, we investigate two major cholera outbreaks, Zimbabwe (2008-09) and Haiti (2010), with the help of the present study.

  14. Use of donkeys and their draught performance in smallholder farming in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, J; Prasad, V L

    1995-11-01

    Animal traction constitutes the most important source of power for agricultural work in smallholder farming in Zimbabwe. Two studies, a survey and a short term on-farm trial were conducted to evaluate the use of donkeys as draught animals. The survey covered 59 households in 2 smallholder farming areas. For the on-farm trial, 12 donkeys and 12 cattle were spanned separately in teams of 4 animals to plough 40 m x 70 m plots of medium textured soil. The survey findings highlighted the drought tolerance of donkeys compared to cattle. Mortality rates of donkeys were lower. Results of the draught performance trial indicated that donkeys ploughed less area per day (P draught force between the 2 species. The work rate per hour for ploughing with donkeys was 65% of that of cattle. It was concluded that donkeys play a critical role in providing draught power for smallholder farmers but that their potential is not fully utilised.

  15. Building resilience to food insecurity in rural communities: Evidence from traditional institutions in Zimbabwe

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    Emmanuel Mavhura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many rural communities that depend on smallholder farming face food insecurity induced by climate-related disasters. In response, some communities are taking the initiative to cope and adapt to climate-related disasters. Using case study material from the Zambezi Valley, Zimbabwe, this article examines how traditional institutions are enhancing resilience to food insecurity in rural areas. The data were collected through interviews and focus groups involving traditional leaders, ward councillors, village civil protection members and villagers selected in the valley. The findings point to how the Zunde raMambo informal safety net, nhimbe form of collective work and the practice of share-rearing arrangement to access draught power help save lives and alleviate food insecurity induced by flood or drought disasters. The study concludes that the three schemes are evidence of community reorganisation or change in response to food insecurity. They are a form of absorptive capacities enabling the community to cope with food insecurity.

  16. Prescription habits of dispensing and non-dispensing doctors in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trap, Birna; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Hogerzeil, Hans V

    2002-01-01

    , race, place of education, location of practice and patients seen per day showed that dispensing by doctors was associated with less clinically and economically appropriate prescribing. These findings suggest that the quality of health care--as related to drug use, patient safety and treatment cost......The number of dispensing doctors has increased in the last decade, but the implication of this trend on the quality of health care and drug use is unknown. We present a comparative drug utilization study of 29 dispensing doctors and 28 non-dispensing doctors in Zimbabwe based on standard indicators...... developed by the World Health Organization. Dispensing doctors prescribed significantly more drugs per patient than non-dispensing doctors (2.3 versus 1.7), injected more patients (28.4% versus 9.5%), and prescribed more antibiotics (0.72 versus 0.54) and mixtures (0.43 versus 0.25) per encounter...

  17. THE IMPACT OF GLOBALISATION ON BANKING SERVICE QUALITY IN ZIMBABWE (2003-2008

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    KOSMAS NJANIKE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study sought to investigate the impact of globalization on the quality of products in a developing economy banking sector. The objectives of the research were to ascertain whether globalisation helps restore or maintain confidence in the banking sector; ensure a sound financial sector; helps reduce fraudulent activities and whether the implementation of global measures improves the quality of products in the banking sector. Zimbabwe banking sector was used as a case study. Questionnaires and interviews were used to collect the data in addition to documentary review. It was found that globalization ensures efficient service delivery as human bank tellers; long queues and underutilisation of internetwere still in existence in the banking system. Globalisation of the banking sector is essential in that it brings new technology which help improve banking services and infrastructure hence reduce fraudulent activities, new risk management techniques and increased confidence in the banking sector.

  18. Successful Teaching, Learning, and Use of Digital Mapping Technology in Mazvihwa, Rural Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitzel Solera, M. V.; Madzoro, S.; Solera, J.; Mhike Hove, E.; Changarara, A.; Ndlovu, D.; Chirindira, A.; Ndlovu, A.; Gwatipedza, S.; Mhizha, M.; Ndlovu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Participatory mapping is now a staple of community-based work around the world. Particularly for indigenous and rural peoples, it can represent a new avenue for environmental justice and can be a tool for culturally appropriate management of local ecosystems. We present a successful example of teaching and learning digital mapping technology in rural Zimbabwe. Our digital mapping project is part of the long-term community-based participatory research of The Muonde Trust in Mazvihwa, Zimbabwe. By gathering and distributing local knowledge and also bringing in visitors to share knowledge, Muonde has been able to spread relevant information among rural farmers. The authors were all members of Muonde or were Muonde's visitors, and were mentors and learners of digital mapping technologies at different times. Key successful characteristics of participants included patience, compassion, openness, perseverance, respect, and humility. Important mentoring strategies included: 1) instruction in Shona and in English, 2) locally relevant examples, assignments, and analogies motivated by real needs, 3) using a variety of teaching methods for different learning modalities, 4) building on and modifying familiar teaching methods, and 5) paying attention to the social and relational aspects of teaching and learning. The Muonde mapping team has used their new skills for a wide variety of purposes, including: identifying, discussing, and acting on emerging needs; using digital mapping for land-use and agropastoral planning; and using mapping as a tool for recording and telling important historical and cultural stories. Digital mapping has built self-confidence as well as providing employable skills and giving Muonde more visibility to other local and national non-governmental organizations, utility companies, and educational institutions. Digital mapping, as taught in a bottom-up, collaborative way, has proven to be both accessible and of enormous practical use to rural Zimbabweans.

  19. Artisanal small-scale mining: Potential ecological disaster in Mzingwane District, Zimbabwe

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    Siduduziwe Ncube-Phiri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Artisanal small-scale mining (ASM has devastating impacts on the environment, such as deforestation, over-stripping of overburden, burning of bushes and use of harmful chemicals like mercury. These environmental impacts are a result of destructive mining, wasteful mineral extraction and processing practices and techniques used by the artisanal small-scale miners. This paper explores the ecological problems caused by ASM in Mzingwane District, Zimbabwe. It seeks to determine the nature and extent to which the environment has been damaged by the ASM from a community perspective. Interviews, questionnaires and observations were used to collect qualitative data. Results indicated that the nature of the mining activities undertaken by unskilled and under-equipped gold panners in Mzingwane District is characterised by massive stripping of overburden and burning of bushes, leading to destruction of large tracts of land and river systems and general ecosystem disturbance. The research concluded that ASM in Mzingwane District is an ecological time bomb, stressing the need for appropriate modifications of the legal and institutional frameworks for promoting sustainable use of natural resources and mining development in Zimbabwe. Government, through the Ministry of Small Scale and Medium Enterprises, need to regularise and formalise all gold mining activities through licensing, giving permanent claims and operating permits to panners in order to recoup some of the added costs in the form of taxes. At the local level, the Mzingwane Rural District Council (MRDC together with the Environmental Management Agency (EMA need to design appropriate environmental education and awareness programmes targeting the local community and gold panners.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of school support for orphan girls to prevent HIV infection in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted; Hallfors, Denise; Cho, Hyunsan; Luseno, Winnie; Waehrer, Geetha

    2013-10-01

    This cost-effectiveness study analyzes the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained in a randomized controlled trial that tested school support as a structural intervention to prevent HIV risk factors among Zimbabwe orphan girl adolescents. The intervention significantly reduced early marriage, increased years of schooling completed, and increased health-related quality of life. By reducing early marriage, the literature suggests the intervention reduced HIV infection. The intervention yielded an estimated US$1,472 in societal benefits and an estimated gain of 0.36 QALYs per orphan supported. It cost an estimated US$6/QALY gained, about 1 % of annual per capita income in Zimbabwe. That is well below the maximum price that the World Health Organization (WHO) Commission on Macroeconomics and Health recommends paying for health gains in low and middle income countries. About half the girls in the intervention condition were boarded when they reached high school. For non-boarders, the intervention's financial benefits exceeded its costs, yielding an estimated net cost savings of $502 per pupil. Without boarding, the intervention would yield net savings even if it were 34 % less effective in replication. Boarding was not cost-effective. It cost an additional $1,234 per girl boarded (over the 3 years of the study, discounted to present value at a 3 % discount rate) but had no effect on any of the outcome measures relative to girls in the treatment group who did not board. For girls who did not board, the average cost of approximately 3 years of school support was US$973.

  1. Masculinity as a barrier to men's use of HIV services in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovdal, Morten; Campbell, Catherine; Madanhire, Claudius; Mupambireyi, Zivai; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2011-05-15

    A growing number of studies highlight men's disinclination to make use of HIV services. This suggests there are factors that prevent men from engaging with health services and an urgent need to unpack the forms of sociality that determine men's acceptance or rejection of HIV services. Drawing on the perspectives of 53 antiretroviral drug users and 25 healthcare providers, we examine qualitatively how local constructions of masculinity in rural Zimbabwe impact on men's use of HIV services. Informants reported a clear and hegemonic notion of masculinity that required men to be and act in control, to have know-how, be strong, resilient, disease free, highly sexual and economically productive. However, such traits were in direct conflict with the 'good patient' persona who is expected to accept being HIV positive, take instructions from nurses and engage in health-enabling behaviours such as attending regular hospital visits and refraining from alcohol and unprotected extra-marital sex. This conflict between local understandings of manhood and biopolitical representations of 'a good patient' can provide a possible explanation to why so many men do not make use of HIV services in Zimbabwe. However, once men had been counselled and had the opportunity to reflect upon the impact of ART on their productivity and social value, it was possible for some to construct new and more ART-friendly versions of masculinity. We urge HIV service providers to consider the obstacles that prevent many men from accessing their services and argue for community-based and driven initiatives that facilitate safe and supportive social spaces for men to openly discuss social constructions of masculinity as well as renegotiate more health-enabling masculinities.

  2. Masculinity as a barrier to men's use of HIV services in Zimbabwe

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    Mupambireyi Zivai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of studies highlight men's disinclination to make use of HIV services. This suggests there are factors that prevent men from engaging with health services and an urgent need to unpack the forms of sociality that determine men's acceptance or rejection of HIV services. Methods Drawing on the perspectives of 53 antiretroviral drug users and 25 healthcare providers, we examine qualitatively how local constructions of masculinity in rural Zimbabwe impact on men's use of HIV services. Results Informants reported a clear and hegemonic notion of masculinity that required men to be and act in control, to have know-how, be strong, resilient, disease free, highly sexual and economically productive. However, such traits were in direct conflict with the 'good patient' persona who is expected to accept being HIV positive, take instructions from nurses and engage in health-enabling behaviours such as attending regular hospital visits and refraining from alcohol and unprotected extra-marital sex. This conflict between local understandings of manhood and biopolitical representations of 'a good patient' can provide a possible explanation to why so many men do not make use of HIV services in Zimbabwe. However, once men had been counselled and had the opportunity to reflect upon the impact of ART on their productivity and social value, it was possible for some to construct new and more ART-friendly versions of masculinity. Conclusion We urge HIV service providers to consider the obstacles that prevent many men from accessing their services and argue for community-based and driven initiatives that facilitate safe and supportive social spaces for men to openly discuss social constructions of masculinity as well as renegotiate more health-enabling masculinities.

  3. Qualitative Assessment of Vaccination Hesitancy Among Members of the Apostolic Church of Zimbabwe: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machekanyanga, Z; Ndiaye, S; Gerede, R; Chindedza, K; Chigodo, C; Shibeshi, M E; Goodson, J; Daniel, F; Zimmerman, L; Kaiser, R

    2017-10-01

    Vaccine hesitancy or lack of confidence in vaccines is considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. The rise and spread of measles outbreaks in southern Africa in 2009-2010 were linked to objections among Apostolic Church members, estimated at about 3.5 million in Zimbabwe as of 2014. To inform planning of interventions for a measles-rubella vaccination campaign, we conducted an assessment of the factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy using data from various stakeholders. Among nine districts in three regions of Zimbabwe, we collected data on religious attitudes toward, and perceptions of, vaccines through focus group discussions with health workers serving Apostolic communities and members of the National Expanded Programme on Immunization; semi-structured interviews with religious leaders; and open-ended questions in structured interviews with Apostolic parents/caregivers. Poor knowledge of vaccines, lack of understanding and appreciation of the effectiveness of vaccinations, religious teachings that emphasize prayers over the use of medicine, lack of privacy in a religiously controlled community, and low levels of education were found to be the main factors contributing to vaccine hesitancy among key community members and leaders. Accepting vaccination in public is a risk of sanctions. Poor knowledge of vaccines is a major factor of hesitancy which is reinforced by religious teachings on the power of prayers as alternatives. Because parents/caregivers perceive vaccines as dangerous for their children and believe they can cause death or disease, members of the Apostolic Church have more confidence in alternative methods such as use of holy water and prayers to treat diseases. Under these circumstances, it is important to debunk the myths about the power of holy water on the one hand and disseminate positive information of the efficacy of vaccines on the other hand in order to reduce hesitancy. Education about vaccines and vaccination in

  4. Prevalence of mastitis in dairy cows from smallholder farms in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsande, Simbarashe; Matope, Gift; Ndengu, Masimba; Pfukenyi, Davies M

    2013-03-28

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of sub-clinical and clinical mastitis and the associated factors in cows from selected smallholder dairy farms in Zimbabwe. Physical examinations were conducted on all lactating cows for evidence of signs of clinical mastitis. Composite milk samples were collected from all lactating cows for bacterial culture and somatic cell counting. Cows were categorised as clinical if they exhibited clinical features of mastitis, or sub-clinical if no apparent signs were present but they had a positive bacterial isolation and a somatic cell count of at least 300 x 103 cells/mL. Farm-level factors were obtained through a structured questionnaire. The association of mastitis and animal- and herd-level factors were analysed using logistic regression. A total of 584 animals from 73 farms were tested. Overall, 21.1%(123/584) had mastitis, 16.3%(95/584) had sub-clinical mastitis and 4.8% (28/584) had clinical mastitis. Herd-level prevalence was 49.3%. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (27.6%),  Escherichia coli (25.2%),  Staphylococcus aureus(16.3%), Klebsiella spp. (15.5%) and Streptococcus spp. (1.6%) were the most common isolates. In individual cows, pure dairy herds (OR = 6.3) and dairy crosses (OR = 3.1) were more likely to have mastitis compared to Mashona cows. Farms that used pre-milking teat dipping were associated with reduced mastitis prevalence. Further research is needed on the prevalence of mastitis and a comparison of data for both smallholder and commercial dairy farms in all regions of Zimbabwe should be undertaken.

  5. Factors contributing to the low uptake of medical male circumcision in Mutare Rural District, Zimbabwe

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    Irene O. Chiringa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical male circumcision (MMC has become a significant dimension of HIV prevention interventions, after the results of three randomised controlled trials in Uganda, South Africa and Kenya demonstrated that circumcision has a protective effect against contracting HIV of up to 60%. Following recommendations by the World Health Organization, Zimbabwe in 2009 adopted voluntary MMC as an additional HIV prevention strategy to the existing ABC behaviour change model. Purpose: The purpose of this study is thus to investigate the factors contributing to the low uptake of MMC. Methods: The study was a quantitative cross-sectional survey conducted in Mutare rural district, Zimbabwe. Questionnaires with open- and closed-ended questions were administered to the eligible respondents. The target population were male participants aged 15–29 who met the inclusion criteria. The households were systematically selected with a sample size of 234. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences was used to analyse the data. Results: Socioculturally, circumcised men are viewed as worthless (37%, shameful (30% and are tainted as promiscuous (20%, psychological factors reported were infection and delayed healing (39%, being ashamed and dehumanised (58%, stigmatised and discriminated (40.2% and fear of having an erection during treatment period (89.7% whilst socio-economic factors were not having time, as it will take their time from work (58% and complications may arise leading to spending money on treatment (84%. Conclusion: Knowledge deficits regarding male medical circumcision lead to low uptake, education on male medical circumcision and its benefits. Comprehensive sexual health education should target men and dispel negative attitudes related to the use of health services. Keywords: Factors, Low uptake, Medical Male Circumcision (MMC

  6. Waste dumpsites and public health: a case for lead exposure in Zimbabwe and potential global implications.

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    Tongesayi, Tsanangurayi; Kugara, Jameson; Tongesayi, Sunungurai

    2018-02-01

    Most waste sites in Zimbabwe are not sanitary landfills but open dumps that indiscriminately receive waste from municipalities, industries, commercial establishments, and social services establishments. People, including children, who eke out a living through scavenging the dumps expose themselves to environmental pollutants at the dumps via inadvertent ingestion and inhalation of contaminated dust, and dermal absorption. The public is potentially being exposed to a slew of the pollutants via air, water, and food, all contaminated by uncontrolled leachates and aerially deposited dust and particulates from the sites. One of the unfortunate consequences of globalization is the sharing of contaminated food and the associated disease burdens; hence, regional contamination can have global impacts. We analyzed the levels of lead at two waste sites in Zimbabwe to assess the daily exposure levels of Pb to children and adults who scavenge the sites as well as determine levels of the heavy metal that are potentially contaminating air, water, soils, and food in the country. Levels of Pb ranged from 23,000 to 14,600,000 µg/kg at one of the sites and from 30,000 to 1,800,000 µg/kg at the other. Inadvertent daily exposure amounts that were calculated by assuming an inadvertent daily ingestion of 20-500 mg of soil/dust were mostly higher than the provisional tolerable daily intake established by the World Health Organization for infants, children, and adults. The XRF measurements were validated using certified reference samples, 2710a (Montana soil) and 2781 (domestic sludge), from the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  7. Integrated human rights and poverty eradication strategy: the case of civil registration rights in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarandega, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    High poverty levels characterise sub-Saharan Africa, Zimbabwe included. Over 80 per cent of Zimbabwe's population lived below the total consumption poverty line and 70 per cent below the food poverty line in 2003. This plummeting of social indicators resulted from the freefall suffered by the country's economy from the 1990s, after unsuccessful attempts to implement structural adjustment programmes prescribed by international financial institutions. The ensuing socioeconomic decay, political crisis and international isolation of the country from the late 1990s reversed gains made in social indicators during the 1980s. Development theories attribute poverty to unchecked population growth, political, economic and environmental mismanagement, while developing countries' leaders attribute it to historical imbalances and global political and economic injustices. Despite this debate, poverty continues to evolve, expand and deepen and the need to eradicate it has become urgent. The complex question of what causes and what drives poverty is perpetually addressed and new ideas are emerging to answer the question. One recent view is that failure to centre development on people and to declare poverty a violation of human rights has allowed poverty to grow the world over. This study uses a hypothesised cause of poverty - civil registration - to exemplify the human right nature of poverty, and how a human rights' policy can be used as an instrument to eradicate poverty. The study demonstrates that civil registration is a right of instrumental relevance to poverty; and achieving civil registration grants people access to numerous other rights, some of which will lift them out of poverty, while the failure of civil registration deprives people of access to livelihoods, thereby entrenching them in poverty.

  8. Cervical cancer screening: Safety, acceptability, and feasibility of a single-visit approach in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallala, Muriel S; Mash, Robert

    2015-05-05

    Cervical cancer is the commonest cancer amongst African women, and yet preventative services are often inadequate. The purpose of the study was to assess the safety, acceptability and feasibility of visual inspection with acetic acid and cervicography (VIAC) followed by cryotherapy or a loop electrical excision procedure (LEEP) at a single visit for prevention of cancer of the cervix. The United Bulawayo Hospital, Zimbabwe. The study was descriptive, using retrospective data extracted from electronic medical records of women attending the VIAC clinic. Over 24 months 4641 women visited the clinic and were screened for cervical cancer using VIAC. Cryotherapy or LEEP was offered immediately to those that screened positive. Treated women were followed up at three months and one year. The rate of positive results on VIAC testing was 10.8%. Of those who were eligible, 17.0% received immediate cryotherapy, 44.1% received immediate LEEP, 1.9% delayed treatment, and 37.0% were referred to a gynaecologist. No major complications were recorded after cryotherapy or LEEP. Amongst those treated 99.5% expressed satisfaction with their experience. Only 3.2% of those treated at the clinic had a positive result on VIAC one year later. The service was shown to be feasible to sustain over time with the necessary consumables. There were no service-related treatment postponements and the clinic staff and facility were able to meet the demand for the service. A single-visit approach using VIAC, followed by cryotherapy or LEEP, proved to be safe, acceptable and feasible in an urban African setting in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Outcomes a year later suggested that treatment had been effective.

  9. How do countries regulate the health sector? Evidence from Tanzania and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaranayake, L; Mujinja, P; Hongoro, C; Mpembeni, R

    2000-12-01

    The health sectors in many low- and middle-income countries have been characterized in recent years by extensive private sector activity. This has been complemented by increasing public-private linkages, such as the contracting-out of selected services or facilities, development of new purchasing arrangements, franchising and the introduction of vouchers. Increasingly, however, experience with the private sector has indicated a number of problems with the quality, price and distribution of private health services, and thus led to a growing focus on the role of government in regulation. This paper presents the existing network of regulations governing private activity in the health sectors of Tanzania and Zimbabwe, and their appropriateness in the context of emerging market realities. It draws on a comparative mapping exercise reviewing the complexity of the variables currently being regulated, the level of the health system at which they apply, and the specific instruments being used. Findings indicate that much of the existing regulation occurs through legislation. There is still very much a focus on the 'social' rather than 'economic' aspects of regulation within the health sector. Recent changes have attempted to address aspects of private health provision, but some very key gaps remain. In particular, current regulations in Tanzania and Zimbabwe: (1) focus on individual inputs rather than health system organizations; (2) aim to control entry and quality rather than explicitly quantity, price or distribution; and (3) fail to address the market-level problems of anti-competitive practices and lack of patient rights. This highlights the need for additional measures to promote consumer protection and address the development of new private markets such as for health insurance or laboratory and other ancillary services.

  10. Acceptability of early infant male circumcision as an HIV prevention intervention in Zimbabwe: a qualitative perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Mavhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early infant male circumcision (EIMC is simpler, safer and more cost-effective than adult circumcision. In sub-Saharan Africa, there are concerns about acceptability of EIMC which could affect uptake. In 2009 a quantitative survey of 2,746 rural Zimbabweans (aged 18-44 indicated that 60% of women and 58% of men would be willing to have their newborn son circumcised. Willingness was associated with knowledge of HIV and male circumcision. This qualitative study was conducted to better understand this issue. METHODS: In 2010, 24 group discussions were held across Zimbabwe with participants from seven ethnic groups. Additionally, key informant interviews were held with private paediatricians who offer EIMC (n = 2 plus one traditional leader. Discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, translated into English (where necessary, coded using NVivo 8 and analysed using grounded theory principles. RESULTS: Knowledge of the procedure was poor. Despite this, acceptability of EIMC was high among parents from most ethnic groups. Discussions suggested that fathers would make the ultimate decision regarding EIMC although mothers and extended family can have (often covert influence. Participants' concerns centred on: safety, motive behind free service provision plus handling and disposal of the discarded foreskin. Older men from the dominant traditionally circumcising population strongly opposed EIMC, arguing that it separates circumcision from adolescent initiation, as well as allowing women (mothers to nurse the wound, considered taboo. CONCLUSIONS: EIMC is likely to be an acceptable HIV prevention intervention for most populations in Zimbabwe, if barriers to uptake are appropriately addressed and fathers are specifically targeted by the programme.

  11. The impact of collaborative strategies on disaster risk reduction in Zimbabwe dairy supply chains in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Chari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Disasters are on the increase globally with accompanying devastating effects on dairy supply chains. The devastating effects, caused by disasters on economies in various countries such as United States of America, Japan, Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique and Zimbabwe call for urgent sustainable mitigating measures in disaster risk reduction. These countries have experienced notable natural and man-made disasters in the past. The disasters negatively impacted the economies of both developed and developing countries, causing misery to people as hunger and poverty drastically increased. Zimbabwe’s dairy industry was not spared from these devastating effects as it was vulnerable to disasters such as droughts and cyclones. Disasters adversely affected supply chains in the country as evidenced by the closure of some dairy firms between the years 2000 and 2014. This article is set against the backdrop of declining output across all agricultural sectors in Zimbabwe, evident particularly in the dairy farming sector which has witnessed inadequate supply of raw milk and dairy products by local producers. The article assesses the impact of dairy organisations’ partnerships with government departments and non-governmental organisations in reducing disaster risks on the dairy supply chain cost efficiency. It also aims to show how partnerships can reduce disaster risks and weighs the benefits of reduced supply chain costs in improving the affordability of milk and milk products to the general public. The study employs a mixed-methods approach comprising structured questionnaires, administered to a sample of 92 respondents out of a randomly sampled population of 122 participants from dairy farming clusters across the country, with an 85% response rate. Key informants in the form of 18 dairy officers were purposively sampled for interviews throughout the dairy farming regions. The research findings will help government in the formulation of public policies for the

  12. The influence of conservation tillage methods on soil water regimes in semi-arid southern Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupangwa, W.; Twomlow, S.; Walker, S.

    Planting basins and ripper tillage practices are major components of the recently introduced conservation agriculture package that is being extensively promoted for smallholder farming in Zimbabwe. Besides preparing land for crop planting, these two technologies also help in collecting and using rainwater more efficiently in semi-arid areas. The basin tillage is being targeted for households with limited or no access to draught animals while ripping is meant for smallholder farmers with some draught animal power. Trials were established at four farms in Gwanda and Insiza in southern Zimbabwe to determine soil water contributions and runoff water losses from plots under four different tillage treatments. The tillage treatments were hand-dug planting basins, ripping, conventional spring and double ploughing using animal-drawn implements. The initial intention was to measure soil water changes and runoff losses from cropped plots under the four tillage practices. However, due to total crop failure, only soil water and runoff were measured from bare plots between December 2006 and April 2007. Runoff losses were highest under conventional ploughing. Planting basins retained most of the rainwater that fell during each rainfall event. The amount of rainfall received at each farm significantly influenced the volume of runoff water measured. Runoff water volume increased with increase in the amount of rainfall received at each farm. Soil water content was consistently higher under basin tillage than the other three tillage treatments. Significant differences in soil water content were observed across the farms according to soil types from sand to loamy sand. The basin tillage method gives a better control of water losses from the farmers’ fields. The planting basin tillage method has a greater potential for providing soil water to crops than ripper, double and single conventional ploughing practices.

  13. A serological survey of brucellosis in wild ungulate species from five game parks in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatenda R. Motsi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective serosurvey was carried out between 2009 and 2012 to detect antibodies to Brucella spp. in free-ranging African wildlife ungulates from five selected game parks in Zimbabwe. Samples were drawn from wildlife-livestock interface and non-interface areas in Zimbabwe. A total of 270 serum samples from four different species, namely African buffalo (Syncerus caffer (n=106, impala (Aepyceros melampus (n = 72, black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis (n= 45 and white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum (n = 47, were tested. The percentage of positive samples was 17.0% in buffalo (18/106; 95% CI: 9.72% – 24.1% and 1.4% in impala (1/72; 95% CI: 0% – 4.2%. No antibodies to Brucella spp. were detected in the two rhinoceros species. The difference in the percentage of seropositive cases between buffalo and impala was significant (p< 0.05. Seropositivity to Brucella spp. was higher (19.1% in adult buffalo compared with juveniles and sub-adults younger than six years (5.9%. Further, seropositivity was marginally higher (20.4% in animals from wildlife-livestock interface areas than in those from non-interface areas (13.45%; OR = 1.45 although the difference was not statistically significant. The study showed that brucellosis could be more widespread in buffalo and may circulate in this species independently in the absence of contact with cattle, whilst rhinoceros may be considered less susceptible to brucellosis. The role of the wildlife-livestock interface in the epidemiology of brucellosis in wildlife and livestock is probably overstated but needs to be explored further.

  14. Changes in temperature and precipitation extremes in western central Africa, Guinea Conakry, and Zimbabwe, 1955-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, E.; Aziz Barry, A.; Brunet, M.; Ekang, L.; Fernandes, A.; Massoukina, M.; Mbah, J.; Mhanda, A.; Do Nascimento, D. J.; Peterson, T. C.; Thamba Umba, O.; Tomou, M.; Zhang, X.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how extremes are changing globally, regionally, and locally is an important first step for planning appropriate adaptation measures, as changes in extremes have major impacts. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's synthesis of global extremes was not able to say anything about western central Africa, as no analysis of the region was available nor was there an adequate internationally exchanged long-term daily data set available to use for analysis of extremes. This paper presents the first analysis of extremes in this climatically important region along with analysis of Guinea Conakry and Zimbabwe. As per many other parts of the world, the analysis shows a decrease in cold extremes and an increase in warm extremes. However, while the majority of the analyzed world has shown an increase in heavy precipitation over the last half century, central Africa showed a decrease. Furthermore, the companion analysis of Guinea Conakry and Zimbabwe showed no significant increases.

  15. Job stress and locus of control in teachers: comparisons between samples from the United States and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, Laura M.; Kanyongo, Gibbs Y.; Kolbert, Jered B.; Lipinski, John; Kachmar, Steven P.; Koch, Gary D.

    2010-12-01

    This study examines the relationship between educators' locus of control and job stress using samples from the US and Zimbabwe. Multiple regression analyses are used to identify significant relationships in the US sample between teachers' external locus of control and the severity of the job stress that they experience, coupled with the perceived degree of organisational support received. However, this relationship between the locus of control and stress indices could not be identified for the Zimbabwean sample. Significant differences between the two samples were noted in terms of educators' perceptions of the frequency of poor organisational support, with the Zimbabwean teachers reporting greater dissatisfaction. To explain these differences, a qualitative approach was utilised to illuminate the contextual stressors that educators face in Zimbabwe. The implications for teacher preparation measures are discussed.

  16. Identifying behavioural determinants for interventions to increase handwashing practices among primary school children in rural Burundi and urban Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seimetz, Elisabeth; Slekiene, Jurgita; Friedrich, Max N D; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2017-07-14

    This article presents the development of a school handwashing programme in two different sub-Saharan countries that applies the RANAS (risk, attitudes, norms, ability, and self-regulation) systematic approach to behaviour change. Interviews were conducted with 669 children enrolled in 20 primary schools in Burundi and 524 children in 20 primary schools in Zimbabwe. Regression analyses were used to assess the influence of the RANAS behavioural determinants on reported handwashing frequencies. The results revealed that, in both countries, a programme targeting social norms and self-efficacy would be most effective. In Burundi, raising the children's perceived severity of the consequences of contracting diarrhoea, and in Zimbabwe, increasing the children's health knowledge should be part of the programme. The school handwashing programme should create awareness of the benefits of handwashing through educational activities, raise the children's ability and confidence in washing hands at school through infrastructural improvements, and highlight the normality of washing hands at school through events and poster creation.

  17. Impact of energy subsidies on energy consumption and supply in Zimbabwe. Do the urban poor really benefit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, Ikhupuleng

    2003-01-01

    Twenty percent of Zimbabwe's urban poor households are still to be connected to the grid. The majority of these households are poor. There are several reasons why the Zimbabwe urban poor are still not connected to the grid, the most important one being the household incomes and the cost of different sources of energy. In order to facilitate wider usage of electricity by the poor, the policy makers have introduced a subsidy policy. The objective of this paper is to ascertain the extent to which the poor urban households could afford the cost of electricity with or without subsidies. This gives an indication on whether contrary to the current thinking, subsidies are decisive for the affordability of electricity by the urban households. The paper also examines the distribution of the subsidies, amongst the different urban household income categories and other economic sectors. Furthermore the impact of such subsidies on the utility's finances is assessed

  18. In Hot Water. A study on sociotechnical intervention models and practices of water use in smallholder agriculture, Nyanyadzi catchment, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Bolding, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on intervention processes in smallholder agriculture in the Nyanyadzi river catchment, located in Chimanimani district, Manicaland Province Zimbabwe. In particular it concerns itself with sociotechnical interventions that were implemented by Agritex, the local extension and irrigation service, in the mid-1990s. Despite a flurry of interventions and agrarian policies directed at the intensification of agricultural production and promotion of commercial agriculture in communa...

  19. Gender Discrimination in Retail Shops’ Personnel: The Case of General Dealer Shops at Murambinda Growth Point, Buhera, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Nyevero Maruzani

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors that contribute to gender discrimination in retail shops, focusing on general dealer shops at Murambinda Growth point in Buhera, Zimbabwe. Despite the fact that policy makers continue to grapple with possible strategies to promote and advance progress towards equal opportunities for women, gender discrimination in retail shops still exists. Recent research also shows that workplace discrimination continues to be an impediment to gender equa...

  20. AN INTEGRATED ON-FARM EXPERIMENT AND SURVEY APPROACH TO MAIZE AND GROUNDNUT CONSTRAINT ANALYSIS IN ZIMBABWE

    OpenAIRE

    Shumba, Enos Mutambu

    1987-01-01

    On-farm trials conducted in Zimbabwe communal areas (peasant sector) have demonstrated the existence of a yield gap between potential farm yields and those achieved by farmers. This study utilizes the experimental and survey approach to quantify the size of the maize and groundnut yield gaps at the farm level and evaluates the economic returns associated with the yield increasing technologies. Three major conclusions drawn from the study are: First, the diagnostic survey and the yield gap pac...

  1. Perceptions of water access in the context of climate change by rural households in the Seke and Murewa districts, Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Mudombi, Shakespear; Muchie, Mammo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess perceptions of rural household heads with regard to various aspects of water access and climate change, and to evaluate whether there were significant differences in perceptions of respondents from female-headed and male-headed households. The study is based on a cross-sectional survey of 300 respondents conducted in the Seke and Murewa districts of Zimbabwe in 2011. The analysis included mainly descriptive statistics. The majority of both female-heade...

  2. Deconstructing the dichotomies of solar photovoltaic (PV) dissemination trajectories in Ghana, Kenya and Zimbabwe from the 1960s to 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawakyillenuo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    The profuse dissemination and utilisation of solar PV technology in the world is indispensable, especially in this era of climate change. However, in the African continent, between 1960 and 2007 Kenya and Zimbabwe were among countries with the highest PV dissemination, while Ghana was among countries with the least disseminations. Analysing empirical data through the lens of the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) theory, the article aims to uncover the drivers underpinning the disparate dissemination trends of PV in the three countries within the stated period and to tease out lessons apropos replicating the successes within Kenya and Zimbabwe in Ghana. SCOT theory is chosen because it provides an excellent framework for analysing the social shaping of PV's development and diffusion processes in these countries. This theory posits that the shape and meanings of a technology do not reside in it, but are acquired through the heterogeneity of social interactions. Findings in the paper reveal that a gamut of socio-economic and political antecedents informed the varied dissemination outcomes of the technology in these countries. Premised on these findings, the paper recommends critical steps, which Ghana needs to undertake to enhance the replication of the Kenyan and Zimbabwean PV success stories. - Highlights: ► I examined the disparate disseminations of PV in Kenya, Zimbabwe and Ghana. ► Kenya's PV market successes not down to private sector alone. ► Varied antecedents underpin the dissimilar disseminations of PV in these countries. ► Replication of Kenya and Zimbabwe success stories in Ghana demands certain factors.

  3. The involvement of extended families in the wellness of orphans in a primary school in Masvingo city in Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    D.Phil. (Career and Life Orientation) The study focuses on how extended families are involved on the wellness of orphans at a primary school in Masvingo City in Zimbabwe. Through an ethnographic research design, the study aimed to establish the involvement of extended families and challenges they face in rendering support and care to orphans. This study draws an intensive ethnographic research interrogative approach through observations, interviews, researcher made test and document analys...

  4. Beyond trend analysis: How a modified breakpoint analysis enhances knowledge of agricultural production after Zimbabwe's fast track land reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentze, Konrad; Thonfeld, Frank; Menz, Gunter

    2017-10-01

    In the discourse on land reform assessments, a significant lack of spatial and time-series data has been identified, especially with respect to Zimbabwe's ;Fast-Track Land Reform Programme; (FTLRP). At the same time, interest persists among land use change scientists to evaluate causes of land use change and therefore to increase the explanatory power of remote sensing products. This study recognizes these demands and aims to provide input on both levels: Evaluating the potential of satellite remote sensing time-series to answer questions which evolved after intensive land redistribution efforts in Zimbabwe; and investigating how time-series analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) can be enhanced to provide information on land reform induced land use change. To achieve this, two time-series methods are applied to MODIS NDVI data: Seasonal Trend Analysis (STA) and Breakpoint Analysis for Additive Season and Trend (BFAST). In our first analysis, a link of agricultural productivity trends to different land tenure regimes shows that regional clustering of trends is more dominant than a relationship between tenure and trend with a slightly negative slope for all regimes. We demonstrate that clusters of strong negative and positive productivity trends are results of changing irrigation patterns. To locate emerging and fallow irrigation schemes in semi-arid Zimbabwe, a new multi-method approach is developed which allows to map changes from bimodal seasonal phenological patterns to unimodal and vice versa. With an enhanced breakpoint analysis through the combination of STA and BFAST, we are able to provide a technique that can be applied on large scale to map status and development of highly productive cropping systems, which are key for food production, national export and local employment. We therefore conclude that the combination of existing and accessible time-series analysis methods: is able to achieve both: overcoming demonstrated limitations of

  5. The Impact of the HIV/AIDS and Economic Crises on Orphans and Other Vulnerable Children in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitiyo, George; Chitiyo, Morgan

    2009-01-01

    Zimbabwe, like most of Sub-Saharan Africa, has been hard-hit by HIV/ AIDS. National estimates reported by the Ministry of Health and Child Welfare put the prevalence rates of HIV in the age group between 15 and 49 at 15.3% (World Health Organization [WHO], UNICEF, & UNAIDS, 2008). This is one of the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rates in the…

  6. WHY DO SMALLHOLDER COTTON GROWERS IN ZIMBABWE ADOPT IPPM? THE ROLE OF PESTICIDE-RELATED HEALTH RISKS AND TECHNOLOGY AWARENESS

    OpenAIRE

    Maumbe, Blessing M.; Swinton, Scott M.

    2000-01-01

    In order to test whether farmer training and farmer health risks determine adoption of Integrated Pest and Production Management (IPPM) in Zimbabwe, a Poisson regression model was developed. The empirical analysis uses measures of farmer awareness of IPPM practices, pesticide health risks, labor and capital availability, expected pest damage and other conditioning variables. The results of the analysis show that farmer awareness of IPPM practices is significantly associated with their adoptio...

  7. Strategies on Women Entrepreneurship Survival: a Case Study of Women Entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe Between 2007-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Siziba Moreblessings

    2010-01-01

    Today's entrepreneurs require a comprehensive stock of knowledge and skills that are both related to their type of business and adaptable for change of their local and international environment .Rapid changes in the Southern African region in general and the country of Zimbabwe in particular, in the socio-economic structures are propelling entrepreneurs especially women towards the search for a competitive edge away from the “crowd”, in order to survive. The competitive edge strategies are es...

  8. Die trauma van tuiste en (niebehoort in Zimbabwe en sy diaspora: ‘Omsettingsversteuring’ in Shadows deur Novuyo Rosa Tshuma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan U. Jacobs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Die hernude xenofobiese aanvalle in Maart en April 2015 in Durban, Johannesburg en Kaapstad, die roof, afbrand van huise en winkels, lewensverlies, en vlug van duisende vreemde Afrikane na toevlugskampe, het nie alleen die hele kwessie rondom die Afrika-diaspora in Suid-Afrika na vore gebring nie, maar ook die vraag oor die betekenis van die begrippe ‘tuiste’ en ‘tuisland’ binne ’n diasporiese verband. In Shadows, wat in 2014 met die Herman Charles Bosman-prys bekroon is, beeld die Zimbabwiese skryfster Novuyo Rosa Tshuma die ontwrigte lewensomstandighede in die hedendaagse Zimbabwe uit, asook die hervestiging en dubbele vervreemding van die diasporiese Zimbabwiër-gemeenskap in Suid-Afrika. Die teks bestaan uit ’n novelle, ‘Shadows’, en vyf ander kortverhale, en kan bes beskou word as ’n verhaalsiklus, waarbinne the afsonderlike verhale verbind word deur die tema van diaspora en ook deur ’n aantal herkenbare diasporiese situasies en beelde. Die artikel put uit ‘n reeks opvattings oor diaspora, insluitende die Afrika- en binne-Afrika diaspora, en huidige navorsing oor Zimbabwe en sy diaspora. Die dubbelsinnige begrippe van tuiste en samehorigheid, insluiting en uitsluiting, word ondersoek na aanleiding van Tshuma se uitbeelding van die alledaagse township-lewe in Mugabe se Zimbabwe met sy voedseltekorte, algemene gebrek aan middele, en vernielde ekonomie, en hierteenoor, die randbestaan van die hedendaagse Zimbabwediaspora in Johannesburg met sy gewelddadige vervolging en korrupte magsmisbruike teen onwettige immigrante. Die artikel stel voor dat die psigogeniese toestand van ‘omskakelingsversteuring’, wat Tshuma beklemtoon in een van haar verhale, as ’n metafoor kan dien vir die paradoksale diasporiese vereenselwiging met, en vervreemding van, ’n tuiste, gemeenskap en tuisland in Zimbabwe sowel as in die onvriendelike gasheerland, Suid-Afrika

  9. Serological detection of infection with canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus in communal dogs from Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Anna; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Dawson, Jessica; Parry, Roger; Foggin, Chris; Adams, Hayley; Odoi, Agricola; Kennedy, Melissa A

    2014-09-05

    Domestic dogs are common amongst communities in sub-Saharan Africa and may serve as important reservoirs for infectious agents that may cause diseases in wildlife. Two agents of concern are canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV), which may infect and cause disease in large carnivore species such as African wild dogs and African lions, respectively. The impact of domestic dogs and their diseases on wildlife conservation is increasing in Zimbabwe, necessitating thorough assessment and implementation of control measures. In this study, domestic dogs in north-western Zimbabwe were evaluated for antibodies to CDV, CPV, and canine adenovirus (CAV). These dogs were communal and had no vaccination history. Two hundred and twenty-five blood samples were collected and tested using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for antibodies to CPV, CDV, and CAV. Of these dogs, 75 (34%) had detectable antibodies to CDV, whilst 191 (84%) had antibodies to CPV. Antibodies to canine adenovirus were present in 28 (13%) dogs. Canine parvovirus had high prevalence in all six geographic areas tested. These results indicate that CPV is circulating widely amongst domestic dogs in the region. In addition, CDV is present at high levels. Both pathogens can infect wildlife species. Efforts for conservation of large carnivores in Zimbabwe must address the role of domestic dogs in disease transmission.

  10. Serological detection of infection with canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus and canine adenovirus in communal dogs from Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna McRee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Domestic dogs are common amongst communities in sub-Saharan Africa and may serve as important reservoirs for infectious agents that may cause diseases in wildlife. Two agents of concern are canine parvovirus (CPV and canine distemper virus (CDV, which may infect and cause disease in large carnivore species such as African wild dogs and African lions, respectively. The impact of domestic dogs and their diseases on wildlife conservation is increasing in Zimbabwe, necessitating thorough assessment and implementation of control measures. In this study, domestic dogs in north-western Zimbabwe were evaluated for antibodies to CDV, CPV, and canine adenovirus (CAV. These dogs were communal and had no vaccination history. Two hundred and twenty-five blood samples were collected and tested using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for antibodies to CPV, CDV, and CAV. Of these dogs, 75 (34% had detectable antibodies to CDV, whilst 191 (84% had antibodies to CPV. Antibodies to canine adenovirus were present in 28 (13% dogs. Canine parvovirus had high prevalence in all six geographic areas tested. These results indicate that CPV is circulating widely amongst domestic dogs in the region. In addition, CDV is present at high levels. Both pathogens can infect wildlife species. Efforts for conservation of large carnivores in Zimbabwe must address the role of domestic dogs in disease transmission.

  11. The burden of disease in Zimbabwe in 1997 as measured by disability-adjusted life years lost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Glyn; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Objective To rank health problems contributing most to the burden of disease in Zimbabwe using Disability-Adjusted Life Years as the population health measure. Methods Epidemiological information was derived from multiple sources. Population size and total number of deaths by age and sex for the ...... pattern of Zimbabwe differed substantially from regional estimates for sub-Saharan Africa justifying the need for countries to develop their own burden of disease estimates.......Objective To rank health problems contributing most to the burden of disease in Zimbabwe using Disability-Adjusted Life Years as the population health measure. Methods Epidemiological information was derived from multiple sources. Population size and total number of deaths by age and sex...... for the year 1997 were taken from a nationwide census. The cause of death pattern was determined based on data from the Vital Registration System, which was adjusted for underreporting of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and reallocation of ill-defined causes. Non-fatal disease figures were estimated based...

  12. Zimbabwe: Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    the ZANU-PF, an arms embargo, and an asset freeze. Mugabe defied the travel ban in 2005 to attend the funeral of Pope John Paul II . The EU continues...from ZANU-PF. Critics like Pius Ncube, former Catholic Archbishop of Bulawayo, accused the government of distributing food only in areas where

  13. Church, mission and reconstruction: Being a church with integrity in reconstruction discourse in post-colonial Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canon B. Shambare

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The church in Africa, like its counterparts elsewhere in the world, is called to fulfil the mission of God as expressed in the call ‘Missio Dei’ and influentially remains with the integrity of the mission of Christ (Missio Christos, which is liberative and practical. For Christ was not only concerned with the spiritual needs of the people, but also with their material well-being. The following question therefore arises: how can the church in Africa, in general, and in Zimbabwe, in particular, actively do God’s mission and remain with integrity in the midst of the reality of suffering. Furthermore, how can the church for mission and reconstruction be understood in a post-colonial Zimbabwe given the contextual realities of political crises, corruption, poverty, moral decadence, defined or censored truth, leadership crises and no freedom of expression? This article argues that, although the church is faced with these arduous realities, it remains called by God to do God’s mission. While in post-colonial Zimbabwe the socio-political, socio-economic and socio-religious situation might seem hopeless, the church has remained vibrant and alive for reconstruction theology. The transformation of society is possible given the authority and mission mandate of the church. This article argues that the church is a key player in reconstruction theology and in the transformation of society. For transformation to be possible, the church should witness to the gospel of Christ without fear of being labelled, castrated and persecuted. The article asserts that the spirit of the Bible should be revived in a time of reconstruction in Zimbabwe. The assumption in this article is that Zimbabwe is ready for reconstruction discourse. For this to happen, the researchers argue that the church as a critical relevant player in reconstruction needs to ‘be church’ in its missional mandates. Integrity is essential if a church wants to be relevantly missional and

  14. The burden of chronic mercury intoxication in artisanal small-scale gold mining in Zimbabwe: data availability and preliminary estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckling, Nadine; Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; Pinheiro, Paulo; Plass, Dietrich; Shoko, Dennis; Drasch, Gustav; Bernaudat, Ludovic; Siebert, Uwe; Hornberg, Claudia

    2014-12-13

    Artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is a poverty-driven activity practiced in over 70 countries worldwide. Zimbabwe is amongst the top ten countries using large quantities of mercury to extract gold from ore. This analysis was performed to check data availability and derive a preliminary estimate of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) due to mercury use in ASGM in Zimbabwe. Cases of chronic mercury intoxication were identified following an algorithm using mercury-related health effects and mercury in human specimens. The sample prevalence amongst miners and controls (surveyed by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization in 2004 and the University of Munich in 2006) was determined and extrapolated to the entire population of Zimbabwe. Further epidemiological and demographic data were taken from the literature and missing data modeled with DisMod II to quantify DALYs using the methods from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2004 update published by the World Health Organization (WHO). While there was no disability weight (DW) available indicating the relative disease severity of chronic mercury intoxication, the DW of a comparable disease was assigned by following the criteria 1) chronic condition, 2) triggered by a substance, and 3) causing similar health symptoms. Miners showed a sample prevalence of 72% while controls showed no cases of chronic mercury intoxication. Data availability is very limited why it was necessary to model data and make assumptions about the number of exposed population, the definition of chronic mercury intoxication, DW, and epidemiology. If these assumptions hold, the extrapolation would result in around 95,400 DALYs in Zimbabwe's total population in 2004. This analysis provides a preliminary quantification of the mercury-related health burden from ASGM based on the limited data available. If the determined assumptions hold, chronic mercury intoxication is likely to have been one of the top 20 hazards for population

  15. A statistical analysis of the body condition of cows from two veterinary stations in Zimbabwe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saporu, F.W.O.

    2003-12-01

    The improvement of livestock production is important for Zimbabwe's agriculturally base economy. This paper examines the relationship between the body condition and metabolic parameters of female cows, for the better understanding of traditional livestock farming in Zimbabwe. The data analysed are part of the baseline data on the improvement of livestock production, collected from two sites Chinamora and Bulawayo. Body condition is indexed by body score. Thirty-five variables are examined. The variable selection method employed is stepwise regression. Regression model assumptions of normality and independent observations are checked using normal probability plot and Durbin-Watson statistics for autocorrelation of residuals. Collinearity and outlier problems are examined using eigenanalysis and influence statistics. The effect of some factors, such as, site, which relates to livestock management, parity and season, categorized by the quality of forage available for grazing, are also studied. The data are analysed using SAS statistical package on a Personal Computer. The results show that only about four variables substantially influence the relationship in each of the two sites considered. For the better managed site, Bulawayo, these are PCV, Calcium and WBC. Strongyles, Progesterone Level, Phosphate and HB are obtained in Chinamora. Negative correlation coefficient corresponds to strongyles only. That is, the effect of stronglyes is to reduce the value of bodyscore. For other variables, an improvement in their respective values will bring about improved body condition. Site difference is identified as a factor affecting the relationship. This emphasizes the role of good management in livestock production. Parity and season are also identified. Only two interactions are significant; site-season and a progesterone level-season interaction. The latter is obtained only in Chinamora site and it can be deduced that the cyclic cows are exposed to the risk of loosing their

  16. AIDS is everybody's business: reaching people at work: programmes in Uganda, India and Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    The AIDS advice of Ajonye Fermina Acuba, a trainer with the Federation of Uganda Employers (FUE), is provided in a serious of questions and answers. Other workplace experiences in Zimbabwe and India are reported. Questions were asked about the nature of the AIDS program in Uganda, the secrets of the program's success, the experiences of educators, and progress since 1988. FUE is nationally active with 150 member companies and 900 volunteer employees trained for peer education. Success was tied to proper selection of trainers, who were picked by union representatives and department heads. Training was over 3 days. 75% are men, but training is conducted for men and women together. success is attributed to the type of training and followup. Common problems overcome during training concern talking about changing sexual behavior. Employees initially believe educational efforts are only to promote condoms, but when risk reduction through any method is emphasized, the barriers are removed. Educators talk repeatedly with interested persons. Trainers requested better training to handle "first aid" situations before referral. Managers need specialized training programs. In Zimbabwe, commercial farm owners are engaging in AIDS educational activities through the Commercial Farmers' Union. 4500 farm owners and managers are represented. The program has operated since 1986 by providing volunteer coordinators from branch associations to initiate discussion with village leaders and later the community. AIDS committees are set up at the village level. Education focused on the fatal nature of the disease and lack of cure, the relationship with sexually transmitted diseases (STDS) which transmission can be prevented with condoms, the danger to women of sterility from STDs, and the price of not preventing through education is having to care for relatives' children. Stigma has been thus reduced. In India, the AIDS Research Foundation of India (AFRI), which is financed by local companies

  17. “All for some”: water inequity in Zambia and Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter B.

    In southern Africa, gross disparities in access to water are symptomatic of the overall uneven pattern of development. Despite post-independence egalitarian rhetoric, in countries such as Zambia and Zimbabwe inappropriate models (piped house connections in the urban areas, high technology irrigation schemes in the agricultural sector), combined with weak macro-economies and poorly formulated sectoral policies have actually exacerbated the disparities. Zero or very low tariffs have played a major role in this. Although justified as being consistent with water's special status, inadequate tariffs in fact serve to undermine any programme of making water accessible to all. This has led to a narrowing of development options, resulting in exclusivist rather than inclusivist development, and stagnation rather than dynamism. A major part of the explanation for perpetuation of such unsatisfactory outcomes is the existence of political interest groups who benefit from the status quo. The first case study in the paper involves urban water consumers in Zambia, where those with piped water connections seek to continue the culture of low tariffs which is by now deeply embedded. The result is that the water supply authorities (in this case the newly formed, but still politically constrained 'commercialised utilities') are unable even to maintain adequate supplies to the piped customers, let alone extend service to the peri-urban dwellers, 56% of whom do not have access to safe water. The paper outlines some modest, workable principles to achieve universal, affordable access to water in the urban areas, albeit through a mix of service delivery mechanisms. In a second case study of rural productive water in Zimbabwe, the reasons for only 2% of the rural subsistence farming households being involved in formal small-scale irrigation schemes 20 years after independence are explored. Again, a major part of the explanation lies in government pursuing a water delivery model which is not

  18. Patterns of domestic water use in rural areas of Zimbabwe, gender roles and realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makoni, Fungai S.; Manase, Gift; Ndamba, Jerry

    This paper presents practical experiences into the pattern of domestic water use, benefits and the gender realities. The study was undertaken in two districts of Zimbabwe, Mt Darwin and Bikita covering a total of 16 villages. The study aimed to assess the patterns of domestic water use, benefits derived from its use among the gender groups. Methodology for participatory assessment (MPA) was used for data collection and was done in a participatory manner. Traditionally most people in Zimbabwe are subsistence farmers who rely on rain fed agriculture. Where primary water sources are available such as shallow wells, family wells, deep wells and boreholes households use the water for household water and sanitation, irrigate small family gardens as well as their livestock. The survey established that women and men usually rank uses of water differently. In the two districts it was evident that women are playing more roles in water use and it is apparent that women are most often the users, managers and guardians of household water and hygiene. Women also demonstrated their involvement in commercial use of water, using water for livestock watering (20%) as well as brick moulding (21%). These involvement in commercial use were influenced by survival economics as well as the excess and reliability of the supply. The different roles and incentives in water use of women and men was demonstrated in how they ranked the benefits of water and sanitation. Men ranked clean drinking water among others as a top priority while women ranked improved health and hygiene and reduced distance as top priority. Overall the benefits highlighted by the communities and especially women were meeting the practical needs such as better access to water and reducing their work load. The assessment demonstrated the active role of women in water sources management highlighting quality, reliability and restrictions to their use. Though the communities gave the impression that decision making in the

  19. Factors associated with contracting malaria in Ward 29 of Shamva District, Zimbabwe, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladwin Muchena

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria cases at Wadzanayi Clinic in Shamva District, Zimbabwe, increased drastically, surpassing the epidemic threshold, in week four of December 2013. This rise was sustained, which necessitated an investigation of the outbreak. Objectives. To identify risk factors and system weaknesses to improve epidemic preparedness and response. Methods. An unmatched 1:1 case-control study was conducted in Ward 29 of Shamva District in Zimbabwe. Epidemic preparedness and response were assessed using the Zimbabwean epidemic preparedness and response guidelines. Results. The sociodemographic characteristics of all participants were similar, except for gender. The risk factors for contracting malaria were performing early morning chores (odds ratio (OR 2.75; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.20 - 6.32, having a body of water near the home (OR 3.41; 95% CI 1.62 - 7.20 and having long grass near the home (OR 2.61; 95% CI 1.10 - 6.37. Protective factors were staying indoors at night (OR 0.13; 95% CI 0.06 - 0.28 and staying in a sprayed home (OR 0.36; 95% CI 0.21 - 0.92. All cases were diagnosed with a malaria rapid diagnostic test. All complicated cases were treated with quinine. Four out of 58 uncomplicated cases were treated with quinine. The rest were treated with co-artemether. There was no documentation of the outbreak response by the district health executive. Respraying (indoor residual spraying was carried out, with a coverage of 78% of rooms sprayed. One nurse out of seven at Wadzanayi Clinic was trained in integrated disease surveillance and response, and malaria case management. District malaria thresholds were outdated. Malaria commodities such as drugs and sprays did not have reorder limits. Conclusion. This study re-emphasises the importance of environmental- and personal-level factors as determinants of malaria. Poor out­break preparedness and response may have propagated the malaria outbreak in this setting. Health education and the use

  20. Movement patterns and the medium-sized city. Tenants on the move in Gweru, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M

    1995-01-01

    During 1965-79, urban growth rates accelerated and continued after Zimbabwe's independence in 1980. For 1960-80, the estimated urban growth rate was 5.6% as compared with the natural growth rate of 3.5% and urban growth rate of 5.0% to 8.1% for the period 1982-92. Gweru, Zimbabwe, had a population of 110,000 in 1990, and as the provincial capital it is an important destination for rural and interurban migrants. Between 1982 and 1990 there was a 4.9% growth rate, resulting in the municipal waiting list for housing to exceed 14,000 in mid-1990. In a large study on migration and rental shelter, 188 tenants were interviewed in high, low-medium density, and periurban areas of the city with the intent of tracing respondents and the nature of migration streams. Regarding origins and connections, only one-fifth of the migrants were born in Gweru, more than half were born in rural areas, and the rest in other urban areas. More than 90% still had rural homes. Two-thirds made rural home visits six times or less a year and one-fourth visited seven times a year to once a month. 40% of the migrants to Gweru originated in larger cities, 24% in smaller urban areas, and 36% in rural areas. 58% moved to high density areas, 34% to low-medium, and 8% to peri-urban areas. The dominant motive was the search for employment and direct transfers, thus economic factors dominated over social factors. Three groups were distinguished according to length of stay: 1) 5 years or less who lived mainly in high and low-medium density housing; 2) 6-15 years; and 3) more than 15 years who lived in low density and high density areas. Regarding the previous two migrations, two-thirds stayed at the previous place for 5 years of less. The reasons for migration were overcrowding, family, and employment. Within Gweru high mobility was typical: one-third initiated one step, 43% initiated two steps, and 27% initiated three steps. Lodgers were the most mobile since one-third were moving three times.