WorldWideScience

Sample records for hakusan campus tokyo

  1. Inventory of the Heteroptera (Insecta: Hemiptera) in Komaba Campus of the University of Tokyo, a highly urbanized area in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masayuki U.; Kishimoto-Yamada, Keiko; Kato, Toshihide; Kurashima, Osamu; Ito, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The Heteroptera, or true bugs, forms one of the major insect groups with respect to the very diverse habitat preferences, including both aquatic and terrestrial species, as well as a variety of feeding types. The first comprehensive inventory of the Heteroptera at Komaba Campus of the University of Tokyo, or an urban green space in the center of the Tokyo Metropolis, Japan, was conducted. New information A total of 115 species in 29 families of the suborder Heteroptera were identified. The area had a high species richness compared with other urbanized and suburbanized localities in Tokyo. The campus is found to show a substantial difference in heteropteran species compositions, despite being close to the other localities surrounded by highly urbanized zones in central Tokyo. PMID:25941455

  2. Tokyo Jane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Robert D.; Minbaeva, Dana; Schafer, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Tokyo Jane is an accessible fashion jewelry company that makes and markets its products as “luxury for less” by designing, importing and selling fashion jewelry pieces that look luxurious but cost only a fraction of the high-priced items that inspired them. Finished products are air......-shipped to company headquarters in Copenhagen, Denmark from factories in China, stocked in the head office and delivered to 400 retail partners —small fashion boutiques, big department stores and online shops — who then sell to consumers in Europe, Scandinavia, the United Kingdom and Canada. The two partners who...... founded the firm in 2005 are facing several problems: the brand definition is not well enough developed to support the next stage in the firm’s growth, certain challenges have outstripped available human resources — they have only three permanent employees and a revolving number of interns...

  3. Tokyo / Karin Thea

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Karin, Thea

    2013-01-01

    Tokyo vaatamisväärtused: Sky Tree teletorn, Takeshita Dori jalakäijate tänav, Asakusa linnaosa, The Gate Hotel, Tokyo metroo, Ryogoku Kokugikan, Nippon Kasgaku Miraikan ning Jaapani suurim kalaturg Tsukiji

  4. The Tokyo axion helioscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, R.; Akimoto, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Minowa, M.; Mizumoto, T.; Moriyama, S.; Namba, T.; Takasu, Y.; Yamamoto, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Tokyo Axion Helioscope experiment aims to detect axions which are produced in the solar core. The helioscope uses a strong magnetic field in order to convert axions into X-ray photons and has a mounting to follow the sun very accurately. The photons are detected by an X-ray detector which is made of 16 PIN-photodiodes. In addition, a gas container and a gas regulation system are adopted for recovering the coherence between axions and photons in the conversion region giving sensitivity to axions with masses up to 2 eV. In this paper, we report on the technical detail of the Tokyo Axion Helioscope.

  5. Multi functionele gebouwcomplexen in Tokyo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijnsbergen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation describes eight Multi Uses Complexes in Tokyo. All these buildings combine work, living, leisure and parking. In the first part of the study, there is a historical view of Tokyo concerning the infra-structure of the city. Important is that the city has still the same street pattern

  6. "Ruudi" võitis Tokyos

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Lastefilm "Ruudi" (stsenaristid Katrin Laur, Aare Toikka, Aarne Mägi : režissöör Katrin Laur : nimiosas lapsnäitleja Paul Oskar Soe) sai Tokyo 14. lastefilmide festivalil Kodomotachino parima mängufilmi auhinna

  7. India and the Tokyo round

    OpenAIRE

    André Sapir; Robert Baldwin

    1983-01-01

    The paper attempts to quantify the gains and the losses for India from the changes in import tariffs decided during the Tokyo Round of Multilateral Trade Negotiations. The study focuses on exports to the ECCC, Japan, and the US. It is conducted at the tariff line level and uses the actual tariffs resulting from the Tokyo Round. The evaluation is in terms of the static effect of the tariff changes. The results indicate that the gains for India from most-favoured nation tariff cuts far outweigh...

  8. Lithuanian trade mission visits Tokyo

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Leedu välisministri Andronius Azubalise ja Jaapani välisministri Seiji Maehara kohtumisel räägiti riikidevahelisest koostööst. Tokyo visiidi ajal kohtus välisminister ka alamkoja väliskomitee esimehe Tadamasa Kodaira ja majandus- ja tööstusministri asetäitja Motohisa Ikedaga

  9. Tokyo Motor Show 2003; Tokyo Motor Show 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, E.

    2004-01-01

    The text which follows present the different techniques exposed during the 37. Tokyo Motor Show. The report points out the great tendencies of developments of the Japanese automobile industry. The hybrid electric-powered vehicles or those equipped with fuel cells have been highlighted by the Japanese manufacturers which allow considerable budgets in the research of less polluting vehicles. The exposed models, although being all different according to the manufacturer, use always a hybrid system: fuel cell/battery. The manufacturers have stressed too on the intelligent systems for navigation and safety as well as on the design and comfort. (O.M.)

  10. JCI Tokyo convention is held; JCI tokyo taikai wo kaisai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-10

    For 3 days on 15{approx}17 of Julies, Japan Concrete Inst. (Toyokazu Shiire chairman) held concrete technology annual meeting in the Tokyo big site in Tokyo and Ariake. Various events such as ready-mixed concrete seminar (participant: 562 person), joint seminar with the Korea concrete institute, observation were developed 20th concrete technology lecture (paper the report: 521 case participant real number: 1400 person), 12th concrete fair (exhibit: 95 case attendance number: 10150 person) center on present convention. The opinion in which the party of the first line of various quarters became heated on the direction in which the ready-mixed concrete will ought to advance based on performance definition and internationalization in the ready-mixed concrete seminar in this inside in future was exchanged. Whether it is the JIS ready-mixed concrete and whether quality audit system are necessary why. The severe order of more cheaply supplying the better concrete in the responsibility of the factory, also came out. Within the special lecture (participant: 548 person), it was an interest of the nation who obtained the time too, the fact of the president election that it does secret story especially and comes out happily heard it. In the new planning, 'the concrete which the primary school child makes' (it is introduced in this journal No. 614) was exhibited in the tip in the fair place. The figure of parent and child companion who gazed at the masterpiece which broke through the preliminary in each place was conspicuous. The still, schedule that the annual meeting in next time is held in the Sendai City on July 7{approx}9, 1999. (translated by NEDO)

  11. Nuclear engineering experiments at experimental facilities of JNC in graduate course of Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Takahashi, Minoru; Aoyama, Takafumi; Onose, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear engineering experiments using outside facilities of the campus have been offered for graduate students in the nuclear engineering course in Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech.). The experiments are managed with the collaboration of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University (KUR). This report presents the new curriculum of the nuclear engineering experiments at JNC since 2002. The change is due to the shutdown of Deuterium Criticality Assembly Facility (DCA) that was used as an experimental facility until 2001. Reactor physics experiment using the training simulator of the experimental fast reactor JOYO is continued from the previous curriculum with the addition of the criticality approach experiment and control rods calibration. A new experimental subject is an irradiated material experiment at the Material Monitoring Facility (MMF). As a result, both are acceptable as the student experiments on the fast reactor. (author)

  12. Tokyo Tower and Tokyo Skytree: History and Symbolism in Contemporary Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunuen Ysela Mandujano-Salazar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tokyo Tower and the Tokyo Skytree are the two most recognizable landmarks on the skyline of Japan’s capital. By means of a documental revision, a textual interpretative analysis of media contents, participant observation and unstructured interviews, the objective of this article is to identify the development of these towers as symbols of Tokyo and Japan. It is found that, with more than half a century of existence, the Tokyo Tower represents the successful post-war Japanese society, while in just five years the Tokyo Skytree has become a symbol of Japanese national spirit and resilience in an era of multiple crises. Both broadcasting towers are regularly portrayed in Japanese media linked to narratives of romance, dreams, family and community. Also, enhanced by their special lightening at night, they stand as attractive backgrounds for locals and visitors in relevant events in their lives.

  13. Environmental radiation status of the University of Tokyo after the TEPCO Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iimoto, Takeshi; Nogawa, Norio; Mitani, Hiroshi; Kamiko, Masao; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    The University of Tokyo campuses are primarily located in the metropolitan area of Tokyo, Japan. The three main university campuses are the Hongo campus and the Komaba campus, located in the mideastern part of Tokyo prefecture, and the Kashiwa campus, located in the north western part of Chiba prefecture. The distance between the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant and these three campuses ranges from ∼200 to ∼250 km. Immediately after the nuclear disaster, the university organized a special correspondence team to survey the environmental radiation status for the university. The team consists of about 20 members, including mostly radiation protection specialists or technical experts of the university specialized in radiation measurements. This project is not research-oriented; rather, the purpose is to provide, in the absence of related information, the actual data on environmental radiation immediately after the accident. This information is provided both to the members of the university community and to the public. The two primary measured quantities are (1) the ambient radiation dose (microsieverts per hour) and (2) the specific radioactivity (becquerels per kilogram) of soil around the surface of a ground, which is used to indicate the level of contamination. The ambient dose data were reported every day on the web site and the portal site magazine of the university, and soil contamination data were reported occasionally. This report provides the background status and technical information on the related activities. In addition, it documents the measured environmental radiation data. Temporal variation of the ambient radiation dose rate had been officially surveyed since the morning of March 15, 2011, at the selected representative locations on the campus sites. In addition, maps were drawn that showed the distribution area of the ambient dose rate of three campuses. The first peak dose of 0.72 μSv h"-"1 was observed at ∼2:30 pm on May 15, 2011, in

  14. SmartCampusAAU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all ma...... major mobile platforms (Android, iPhone and Windows Phone) and supports both device- and infrastructure-based positioning. SmartCampusAAU also offers a publicly available OData backend that allows researchers to share radio map and location tracking data.......This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all...

  15. TOKYO criteria 2014 for transpapillary biliary stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Yasuda, Ichiro; Itoi, Takao; Ryozawa, Shomei; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to carry out meta-analyses or to compare the results of different studies of biliary stents because there is no uniform evaluation method. Therefore, a standardized reporting system is required. We propose a new standardized system for reporting on biliary stents, the 'TOKYO criteria 2014', based on a consensus among Japanese pancreatobiliary endoscopists. Instead of stent occlusion, we use recurrent biliary obstruction, which includes occlusion and migration. The time to recurrent biliary obstruction was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. We can evaluate both plastic and self-expandable metallic stents (uncovered and covered). We also propose specification of the cause of recurrent biliary obstruction, identification of complications other than recurrent biliary obstruction, indication of severity, measures of technical and clinical success, and a standard for clinical care. Most importantly, the TOKYO criteria 2014 allow comparison of biliary stent quality across studies. Because blocked stents can be drained not only using transpapillary techniques but also by an endoscopic ultrasonography-guided transmural procedure, we should devise an evaluation method that includes transmural stenting in the near future. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  16. Research Campus Types | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Campus Types Research Campus Types Research campuses and laboratories come in all shapes and sizes, but have one thing in common; performing vital research and development. These campuses Private sector industries Federal, State, and Local Government Laboratories and research campuses operate

  17. Tokyo XX videofestival ja kohtumine Suure Hiirega / Raivo Kelomees

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kelomees, Raivo, 1960-

    1998-01-01

    JVC Tokyo XX videofestivalist. Peapreemia Jon Alpertile dokumentaalse videoga "Life of Crime : Deleris's Sad Story". R. Kelomehe videost "Maja". Interaktiivse kunsti muuseumist ICC (Inter Communication Center) Tokyo Opera Citys. Ilmunud ka kogumikus "Ekraan kui membraan". Tartu, 2007, lk. 72-75

  18. Towards Indonesian Cloud Campus

    OpenAIRE

    Thamrin, Taqwan; Lukman, Iing; Wahyuningsih, Dina Ika

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, Cloud Computing is most discussed term in business and academic environment.Cloud campus has many benefits such as accessing the file storages, e-mails, databases,educational resources, research applications and tools anywhere for faculty, administrators,staff, students and other users in university, on demand. Furthermore, cloud campus reduces universities’ IT complexity and cost.This paper discuss the implementation of Indonesian cloud campus and various opportunies and benefits...

  19. Virtual Campus Hub technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercoulen, Frank; Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio

    This deliverable briefly describes which technological components have been delivered for the Virtual Campus Hub and how they can be used. A detailed discussion of the technical details of the components, how they were realized and how they fit the VCH concept can be found in deliverables D5.......4. Virtual Campus Hub Technology Evaluation Report and D6.7 The Virtual Campus Hub Concept....

  20. Improvement of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kenta, E-mail: murakami@tokai.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Iwai, Takeo, E-mail: iwai@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, 2-2-2 Iida-Nishi, Yamagata, Yamagata-shi 990-9585 (Japan); Abe, Hiroaki, E-mail: abe.hiroaki@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Sekimura, Naoto, E-mail: sekimura@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports the modification of the High Fluence Irradiation Facility at the University of Tokyo (HIT). The HIT facility was severely damaged during the 2011 earthquake, which occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. A damaged 1.0 MV tandem Cockcroft-Walton accelerator was replaced with a 1.7 MV accelerator, which was formerly used in another campus of the university. A decision was made to maintain dual-beam irradiation capability by repairing the 3.75 MV single-ended Van de Graaff accelerator and reconstructing the related beamlines. A new beamline was connected with a 200 kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) to perform in-situ TEM observation under ion irradiation.

  1. The Erasmus Virtual Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakeit, D.

    2002-02-01

    The Erasmus Virtual Campus was inaugurated in September 2000 to bring together scientists and engineers interested in using the International Space Station and other facilities for their research. It also provides the foundation for creating Virtual Institutes in selected scientific disciplines. The current capabilities of the Campus are highlighted, along with plans for the future.

  2. Nuclear Human Resource Development in Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satio, Masaki; Igashira, Masayuki; Obara, Toru; Kikura, Hironari; Kawahara, Akira; Ujita, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Higher Educational activities have been conducted for more than half century. More than 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from the Department of Nuclear Engineering in Tokyo Institute if Technology. Many of them are working in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and 130 students from 20 overseas countries have graduated from Master and Doctoral Programs. In the present paper, the current nuclear educational activities in Tokyo Institute of Technology are summarized

  3. Solidarity and the city: The case of modern Tokyo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    is that of architecture. Architects have more than any other profession worked on, and with, the urban condition theoretically as well as practically and solution-oriented. Returning Japanese architects have been confronted with the art of rebuilding cities from the bottom, not least in the case of Tokyo . The second...... day’s Tokyo is marked by a non-visible hidden order of this historical era. It is an order that opens for methodological strategies to make possible the empirical understanding of urban society as emergent reality. They go for learning from Tokyo with a historical privilege to particular ideas...

  4. Handy Cash on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Explores how the installation of independent ATMs on college campuses, often operated by the institution, helps provide students with a greater level of service while potentially increasing bookstore and other business revenue. Several examples are discussed. (GR)

  5. OnCampus: a mobile platform towards a smart campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Kong, Xiangjie; Zhang, Fulin; Chen, Zhen; Kang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of researchers and practitioners are working to develop smart cities. Considerable attention has been paid to the college campus as it is an important component of smart cities. Consequently, the question of how to construct a smart campus has become a topical one. Here, we propose a scheme that can facilitate the construction of a smart and friendly campus. We primarily focus on three aspects of smart campuses. These are: the formation of social circles based on interests mining, the provision of educational guidance based on emotion analysis of information posted on a platform, and development of a secondary trading platform aimed at optimizing the allocation of campus resources. Based on these objectives, we designed and implemented a mobile platform called OnCampus as the first step towards the development of a smart campus that has been introduced in some colleges. We found that OnCampus could successfully accomplish the three above mentioned functions of a smart campus.

  6. A new probabilistic seismic hazard assessment for greater Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R.S.; Toda, S.; Parsons, T.; Grunewald, E.; Blong, R.; Sparks, S.; Shah, H.; Kennedy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Tokyo and its outlying cities are home to one-quarter of Japan's 127 million people. Highly destructive earthquakes struck the capital in 1703, 1855 and 1923, the last of which took 105 000 lives. Fuelled by greater Tokyo's rich seismological record, but challenged by its magnificent complexity, our joint Japanese-US group carried out a new study of the capital's earthquake hazards. We used the prehistoric record of great earthquakes preserved by uplifted marine terraces and tsunami deposits (17 M???8 shocks in the past 7000 years), a newly digitized dataset of historical shaking (10 000 observations in the past 400 years), the dense modern seismic network (300 000 earthquakes in the past 30 years), and Japan's GeoNet array (150 GPS vectors in the past 10 years) to reinterpret the tectonic structure, identify active faults and their slip rates and estimate their earthquake frequency. We propose that a dislodged fragment of the Pacific plate is jammed between the Pacific, Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates beneath the Kanto plain on which Tokyo sits. We suggest that the Kanto fragment controls much of Tokyo's seismic behaviour for large earthquakes, including the damaging 1855 M???7.3 Ansei-Edo shock. On the basis of the frequency of earthquakes beneath greater Tokyo, events with magnitude and location similar to the M??? 7.3 Ansei-Edo event have a ca 20% likelihood in an average 30 year period. In contrast, our renewal (time-dependent) probability for the great M??? 7.9 plate boundary shocks such as struck in 1923 and 1703 is 0.5% for the next 30 years, with a time-averaged 30 year probability of ca 10%. The resulting net likelihood for severe shaking (ca 0.9g peak ground acceleration (PGA)) in Tokyo, Kawasaki and Yokohama for the next 30 years is ca 30%. The long historical record in Kanto also affords a rare opportunity to calculate the probability of shaking in an alternative manner exclusively from intensity observations. This approach permits robust estimates

  7. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  8. Assessment of flood risk in Tokyo metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, J.; Dairaku, K.

    2013-12-01

    Flood is one of the most significant natural hazards in Japan. The Tokyo metropolitan area has been affected by several large flood disasters. Therefore, investigating potential flood risk in Tokyo metropolitan area is important for development of adaptation strategy for future climate change. We aim to develop a method for evaluating flood risk in Tokyo Metropolitan area by considering effect of historical land use and land cover change, socio-economic change, and climatic change. Ministry of land, infrastructure, transport and tourism in Japan published 'Statistics of flood', which contains data for flood causes, number of damaged houses, area of wetted surface, and total amount of damage for each flood at small municipal level. By using these flood data, we estimated damage by inundation inside a levee for each prefecture based on a statistical method. On the basis of estimated damage, we developed flood risk curves in the Tokyo metropolitan area, representing relationship between damage and exceedance probability of flood for the period 1976-2008 for each prefecture. Based on the flood risk curve, we attempted evaluate potential flood risk in the Tokyo metropolitan area and clarify the cause for regional difference of flood risk. By analyzing flood risk curves, we found out regional differences of flood risk. We identified high flood risk in Tokyo and Saitama prefecture. On the other hand, flood risk was relatively low in Ibaraki and Chiba prefecture. We found that these regional differences of flood risk can be attributed to spatial distribution of entire property value and ratio of damaged housing units in each prefecture.We also attempted to evaluate influence of climate change on potential flood risk by considering variation of precipitation amount and precipitation intensity in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Results shows that we can evaluate potential impact of precipitation change on flood risk with high accuracy by using our methodology. Acknowledgments

  9. Enhanced Surveillance for the Sports Festival in Tokyo 2013: Preparation for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimatani, Naotaka; Sugishita, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Tamie; Nakamura, Yuuki; Ohkusa, Yasushi; Yamagishi, Takuya; Matsui, Tamano; Kawano, Masashi; Watase, Hirotoshi; Morikawa, Yukiko; Oishi, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced surveillance was conducted during the Sports Festival in Tokyo 2013 (September 28-October 14, 2013) for early detection of outbreaks of infectious diseases and other health emergencies. Through this enhanced surveillance, 15 cases were found that required additional gathering of information outside the routine process of creating/evaluating the Daily Report. However, none of these was assessed as critical. Through the enhanced surveillance, we structured a framework that allows for earlier response when detecting aberrations. It includes the role of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government in communications and contacts with relevant parties such as public health centers, as well as in monitoring of surveillance data. However, some issues need to be further considered toward the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games, such as establishing the criteria for additional response steps, increasing the number of participating bodies in syndromic surveillance, and strengthening of cooperation with related departments, including those for crisis management assuming potential biological/chemical terrorism.

  10. Keeping Kids on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Mary Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Open-campus policies can devastate school lunch programs. Some school systems compete with fast-food outlets by offering similar menus; others hire private contractors to construct mall-like food courts. Several Colorado and California school districts have devised innovative programs to halt lunchtime flight without sacrificing nutrition. A…

  11. Planning for Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    From natural disasters to criminal violence, facilities officers are often called on to address campus safety and security issues beyond their usual responsibilities. Their experiences in coping with unanticipated events have produced a catalogue of lessons learned that can help them and their peers at other institutions who might face the same…

  12. 2006 Campus Technology Innovators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus Technology, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article features the winners of this year's "Campus Technology Innovator" competition. The winners are: (1) Drexel University, Pennsylvania (outsourcing); (2) Darton College, Georgia (3D); (3) Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (ePortfolios); (4) University of Michigan (the Web); (5) University of Tennessee College of…

  13. PNNL Campus Master Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, Whitney LC

    2012-09-07

    The Plan is used as a guide for PNNL in making facility and infrastructure decisions essential to supporting the PNNL vision: to establish a modern, collaborative, flexible, and sustainable campus while optimizing the efficiency of operations in support of courageous discovery and innovation.

  14. Use That Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris. Div. of Forestry, Fisheries, and Wildlife Development.

    The purpose of this publication is two-fold: to show how the natural features on campuses can be used effectively in environmental education and to plead for preservation of as much of the natural landscape as possible on new school sites. Since opportunities for teaching about nature are easily found on the grounds around a school, this booklet…

  15. Campus Projects Receiving "Earmarks."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonberger, Benjamin

    1991-01-01

    Specific campus projects that Congress has directed federal agencies to support this year at over 120 colleges and universities are listed. The agencies neither requested support nor sponsored merit-based competitions for the awards. In some cases, the institutions have a history of receiving special federal treatment. (MSE)

  16. Energy system for Tokyo East 21. Tokyo East 21 energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuoka, N. (Kajima Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The paper reports cogeneration of the Tokyo East 21 building, which is composed of a 21-story office building, a 20-story hotel, and a mall. The heat source system is a combined energy system; that is, midnight power utilization and the large-scale thermal stratification heat storage tank system as electric heat source, and the gas cogeneration system and the gas boiler/the double effect absorption refrigerator as gas heat source. The system is based on the large temperature-difference thermal stratification cooling water bed, supplying water directly to the low-story section, and supplying water to the high-story section through the water-water heat exchanger and by cooling water by the double effect absorption refrigerator and by the closed-loop inverter-control heat flow system. Moreover, for heat source for the water heat source heat pump package in the mall building, the cooling water which is used also for the cogeneration is utilized. It is a cascade-like utilization of low-temperature waste heat. This combined heat source system is found to be the most advantageous in comparison with the overall gas system and the electric heat pump system. 14 figs.

  17. Pariisi Tokyo palee taassünd / Merike Trubert

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Trubert, Merike

    2002-01-01

    21. I avati Pariisis taas Tokyo palee, nüüdsest kaasaegse kunsti eksponeerimiseks. Kunstikriitikutest direktorid Nicolas Bourriaud ja Jérõme Sans on seadnud eesmärgiks avastada uusi talente. Pakuti vaadata Alexander Györfi filmi "Ballaad õnnelikest inimestest", mida reaalsuses ei eksisteeri jm

  18. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: flowchart for the management of acute cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Kenji; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Asbun, Horacio J.; Endo, Itaru; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Pitt, Henry A.; Umezawa, Akiko; Asai, Koji; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Mori, Yasuhisa; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Belli, Giulio; Dervenis, Christos; Yokoe, Masamichi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Itoi, Takao; Jagannath, Palepu; Garden, O. James; Miura, Fumihiko; Nakamura, Masafumi; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Wakabayashi, Go; Cherqui, Daniel; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Shikata, Satoru; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Ukai, Tomohiko; Higuchi, Ryota; Wada, Keita; Honda, Goro; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Gouma, Dirk J.; Deziel, Daniel J.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Chen, Miin-Fu; Shibao, Kazunori; Liu, Keng-Hao; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chan, Angus C. W.; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Choi, In-Seok; Jonas, Eduard; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Fan, Sheung Tat; Ker, Chen-Guo; Giménez, Mariano Eduardo; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi; Inui, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new flowchart for the treatment of acute cholecystitis (AC) in the Tokyo Guidelines 2018 (TG18). Grade III AC was not indicated for straightforward laparoscopic cholecystectomy (Lap-C). Following analysis of subsequent clinical investigations and drawing on Big Data in particular, TG18

  19. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: antimicrobial therapy for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomi, Harumi; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Schlossberg, David; Okamoto, Kohji; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Ukai, Tomohiko; Endo, Itaru; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Pitt, Henry A.; Matsunaga, Naohisa; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Umezawa, Akiko; Asai, Koji; Suzuki, Kenji; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Mori, Yasuhisa; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Belli, Giulio; Dervenis, Christos; Yokoe, Masamichi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Itoi, Takao; Jagannath, Palepu; Garden, O. James; Miura, Fumihiko; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Shikata, Satoru; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Wada, Keita; Honda, Goro; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Gouma, Dirk J.; Deziel, Daniel J.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Chen, Miin-Fu; Liu, Keng-Hao; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Chan, Angus C. W.; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Choi, In-Seok; Jonas, Eduard; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Fan, Sheung Tat; Ker, Chen-Guo; Giménez, Mariano Eduardo; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Higuchi, Ryota; Hirata, Koichi; Inui, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy is a mainstay of the management for patients with acute cholangitis and/or cholecystitis. The Tokyo Guidelines 2018 (TG18) provides recommendations for the appropriate use of antimicrobials for community-acquired and healthcare-associated infections. The listed agents are for

  20. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: management bundles for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mayumi, Toshihiko; Okamoto, Kohji; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Schlossberg, David; Pitt, Henry A.; Yoshida, Masahiro; Gomi, Harumi; Miura, Fumihiko; Garden, O. James; Kiriyama, Seiki; Yokoe, Masamichi; Endo, Itaru; Asbun, Horacio J.; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Umezawa, Akiko; Suzuki, Kenji; Itoi, Takao; Hata, Jiro; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Dervenis, Christos; Asai, Koji; Mori, Yasuhisa; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Belli, Giulio; Mukai, Shuntaro; Jagannath, Palepu; Cherqui, Daniel; Kozaka, Kazuto; Baron, Todd H.; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Higuchi, Ryota; Wada, Keita; Gouma, Dirk J.; Deziel, Daniel J.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Wakabayashi, Go; Padbury, Robert; Jonas, Eduard; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Singh, Harjit; Gabata, Toshifumi; Chan, Angus C. W.; Lau, Wan Yee; Fan, Sheung Tat; Chen, Miin-Fu; Ker, Chen-Guo; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Choi, In-Seok; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi; Inui, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    Management bundles that define items or procedures strongly recommended in clinical practice have been used in many guidelines in recent years. Application of these bundles facilitates the adaptation of guidelines and helps improve the prognosis of target diseases. In Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13),

  1. Supermodernity, distraction, schizophrenia: walking in Tokyo & Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Ho-Yin Fong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The architecture in a supermodern city has no sense of the place where it is located. This paper discusses how schizophrenia and distraction, through walking, respond to supermodernity by referring to how three dislocated subjects, Fumiya Takemura, Aiichiro Fukuhara and Fai in Tokyo and Hong Kong, are respectively depicted in the novel, Adrift in Tokyo written by Fujita Yoshinaga in 1999, with a film adaptation by Satoshi Miki (2007, and the film To Live and Die in Mongkok directed by Wong Jing in 2009. It suggests that Hong Kong is more supermodern than Tokyo. After his release from prison, Fai in To Live and Die in Mongkok finds that Mongkok is a completely different place from the one in which he used to live. The living conditions are no better than those in the prison. He hallucinates about the past. Adrift in Tokyo can be read as a story about walking. Fukuhara, a debt collector, killed his wife; before surrendering to the police, he orders his debtor, Takemura, to walk with him in Tokyo in order to re-experience the walks he enjoyed with his wife. If Takemura agrees, the debt can be paid off. This paper discusses how the repressed heterogeneous time and place can be approached by walking in a way that the rhythm of life can be (re-experienced; in other words, when the body moves forward physically, the past appears as specter haunting the walker. This paper discusses how Adrift in Tokyo and To Live and Die in Mongkok read cities in distractive and schizophrenic ways. In the film version of Adrift in Tokyo, Takemura’s failed relationship with his father may unconsciously drive him to walk with Fukuhara. The novel may imply that the lost relationship with his mother drives him to walk. The film and the novel both address a kind of locality which should be inseparable from the birth parents. To Live and Die in Mongkok suggests that supermodernity kills mother and father. The Father-son relationship disappears at the very beginning of the

  2. Power quality on campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copper Development Association

    2011-05-15

    The Maria Stata Center on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is home to the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy. Computers and networks are everywhere on campus and the electrical infrastructure, mainly made of copper, ensures the highest level of power quality. The copper-based grounding system helps stabilize the wiring system and several K-rated transformers help accommodate harmonic currents and improve energy efficiency. Separation from sensitive and non-sensitive branch circuits helps to shield sensitive equipment from electrical noise, and the installation of transient voltage surge suppression equipment assures maximum protection from voltage surges. .

  3. Mobile Phone on Campus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周成

    2005-01-01

    Communication revolution has brought a great convenience to modem society and people. Especially, the occurrence of mobile phone, in away, has changed the world where we live. Maybe the mobile phone was a luxury for only a decade ago. Now, it is no exaggeration4 to say that the difference between the parts and the present is as vast as that between earth and heaven. With no exception6, campus students also fall into the category called “cell-phone school”.

  4. Asie : Asie de l'Est : Japon : Région de Kanto : Préfecture de Tokyo : Tokyo : Habitations récentes dans la banlieue Nord

    OpenAIRE

    Lubeigt , Guy

    1983-01-01

    Commentaire de l'auteur en 2015: Tokyo a été presque entièrement détruite par les bombardements US en 1945 - Toutes les maisons en bois ont flambé; Légende manuscrite sur le document original : "Tokyo, banlieue N. Nouveau lotissement, toits en tuiles. " Géolocalisation : Approximative centrée sur le Nord de Tokyo.

  5. The reliability and validity of the Tokyo Autistic Behaviour Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, H; Miyake, Y

    1990-03-01

    The Tokyo Autistic Behavior Scale (TABS) consisting of 39 items provisionally grouped in four areas--interpersonal-social relationship, language-communication, habit-mannerism and others--is an instrument used by a child's caretaker to rate the child's autistic behaviors on a 3-point scale. Test-retest reliability was satisfactory (i.e., an r for a total score was .94). Among six DSM-III diagnostic groups, infantile autism showed a significantly higher total TABS score than the other five groups, and a taxonomic validity coefficient was .54. An r between total scores of the TABS and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale--Tokyo Version was .59. The area scores showed a lower validity than the total score. The TABS appears to be a useful instrument to assess autistic behavior.

  6. [Phylogenetic analysis of rabies viruses isolated from animals in Tokyo in the 1950s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Kaoru; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kai, Akemi

    2011-05-01

    Molecular epidemiological analysis of 96 rabies viruses isolated from animals in Tokyo in the 1950s involves Japanese fixed virus, Komatsugawa, Takamen, and Nishigahara strains. Strains isolated in Tokyo were divided into Tokyo 1 and Tokyo 2, and grouped into a worldwide distribution cluster differing from Takamen and Nishigahara. Tokyo 1 was grouped into the same cluster as viruses isolated from United States west coast dogs in the 1930s and 1940s. Tokyo 2 was grouped into the same cluster as the Komatsugawa strain, also known as a cluster of viruses from the Khabarovsk raccoon dog, and the Lake Baikal stepped fox in Russia. These findings suggest that 1950s Tokyo rabies viruses were related to those in Russia and the USA.

  7. Profiling Campus Administration: A Demographic Survey of Campus Police Chiefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linebach, Jared A.; Kovacsiss, Lea M.; Tesch, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Campus law enforcement faces unique challenges, as there are different societal expectations compared to municipal law enforcement. Municipal law enforcement models typically focus on traditionally reactive law and order, while campus law enforcement models typically focus on proactive responses to crime and its deterrence. Stressors experienced…

  8. Tokyo Metropolitan Earthquake Preparedness Project - A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, H.

    2010-12-01

    Munich Re once ranked that Tokyo metropolitan region, the capital of Japan, is the most vulnerable area for earthquake disasters, followed by San Francisco Bay Area, US and Osaka, Japan. Seismologists also predict that Tokyo metropolitan region may have at least one near-field earthquake with a probability of 70% for the next 30 years. Given this prediction, Japanese Government took it seriously to conduct damage estimations and revealed that, as the worst case scenario, if a7.3 magnitude earthquake under heavy winds as shown in the fig. 1, it would kill a total of 11,000 people and a total of direct and indirect losses would amount to 112,000,000,000,000 yen(1,300,000,000,000, 1=85yen) . In addition to mortality and financial losses, a total of 25 million people would be severely impacted by this earthquake in four prefectures. If this earthquake occurs, 300,000 elevators will be stopped suddenly, and 12,500 persons would be confined in them for a long time. Seven million people will come to use over 20,000 public shelters spread over the impacted area. Over one millions temporary housing units should be built to accommodate 4.6 million people who lost their dwellings. 2.5 million people will relocate to outside of the damaged area. In short, an unprecedented scale of earthquake disaster is expected and we must prepare for it. Even though disaster mitigation is undoubtedly the best solution, it is more realistic that the expected earthquake would hit before we complete this business. In other words, we must take into account another solution to make the people and the assets in this region more resilient for the Tokyo metropolitan earthquake. This is the question we have been tackling with for the last four years. To increase societal resilience for Tokyo metropolitan earthquake, we adopted a holistic approach to integrate both emergency response and long-term recovery. There are three goals for long-term recovery, which consists of Physical recovery, Economic

  9. Earthquake Risk Mitigation in the Tokyo Metropolitan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Kasahara, K.; Nakagawa, S.; Nanjo, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Tsuruoka, H.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic disaster risk mitigation in urban areas constitutes a challenge through collaboration of scientific, engineering, and social-science fields. Examples of collaborative efforts include research on detailed plate structure with identification of all significant faults, developing dense seismic networks; strong ground motion prediction, which uses information on near-surface seismic site effects and fault models; earthquake resistant and proof structures; and cross-discipline infrastructure for effective risk mitigation just after catastrophic events. Risk mitigation strategy for the next greater earthquake caused by the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) subducting beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area is of major concern because it caused past mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (magnitude M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9) which had 105,000 fatalities. A M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that the M7+ earthquake will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. This earthquake is evaluated to occur with a probability of 70% in 30 years by the Earthquake Research Committee of Japan. In order to mitigate disaster for greater Tokyo, the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area (2007-2011) was launched in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions. The results that are obtained in the respective fields will be integrated until project termination to improve information on the strategy assessment for seismic risk mitigation in the Tokyo metropolitan area. In this talk, we give an outline of our project as an example of collaborative research on earthquake risk mitigation. Discussion is extended to our effort in progress and

  10. Blended Learning on Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a large-scale project implementing information and communication technology at Roskilde University, Denmark, this paper discusses ways of introducing technology-based blended learning in academic life. We examine some examples of use of systems for computer-mediated collabora......-tive learning and work in Danish Open University education as well as in courses on campus. We further suggest some possi-bilities for using technology in innovative ways, arguing that innovation is to be found, not in isolated instantiations of sys-tems, but in the form of a deliberate integration of all...... relevant ICT-features as a whole into the learning environment....

  11. Sexual Violence on Religious Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwoerd, James R.; Cheng, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Religious colleges and universities make up a substantial segment of the higher education landscape in North America, but the incidence of sexual violence on these campuses remains understudied. This study estimates the incidence of sexual violence on independent Christian campuses using a sample of part-time and full-time undergraduate students…

  12. Assignment: Eco-Friendly Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Meg

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how institutions of higher education can use their campus environments as a teaching tool and laboratory for finding solutions to environmental dilemmas and ensure that their campus operations, including the landscape, are exemplary models of environmental practice--even if it means far fewer expanses of lawn. Includes a list of…

  13. Campus network security model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-ku; Song, Li-ren

    2011-12-01

    Campus network security is growing importance, Design a very effective defense hacker attacks, viruses, data theft, and internal defense system, is the focus of the study in this paper. This paper compared the firewall; IDS based on the integrated, then design of a campus network security model, and detail the specific implementation principle.

  14. A new tomographic image on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo - Implication to seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Kasahara, K.; Kimura, H.; Honda, R.

    2012-12-01

    In central Japan, the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) subducts beneath the Tokyo metropolitan region. Devastating M8-class earthquakes occurred on the upper surface of the Philippine Sea plate (SPS), examples of which are the Genroku earthquake of 1703 (magnitude M=8.0) and the Kanto earthquake of 1923 (M=7.9), which had 105,000 fatalities. A M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this region at present has high potential to produce devastating loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions although it is smaller than the megathrust type M8-class earthquakes. This great earthquake is evaluated to occur with a probability of 70 % in 30 years by the Earthquake Research Committee of Japan. The M7+ earthquakes may occur either on the upper surface or intra slab of PSP. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US$) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo

  15. Radioactive fallout collected in Tokyo on November 26, 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiura, Y; Kanazawa, T

    1956-01-01

    A large nuclear weapon test by Russia was reported November 23, 1955 as having occurred the previous day. Rain water and fallout samples taken in Tokyo before and after the 22nd indicated the test had produced a secondary fallout from some previous explosion. Rain water of the 21st and fallout of the 29th had radioactive content of 13 days half-life; fallout of the 26th, rain of the 27th 3 days half-life. Sample of the 26th consisted of 15 mg of sooty material giving nearly 2000 counts/min at that time.

  16. Campus Capability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  17. Health risks and precautions for visitors to the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sachiko; Wada, Koji; Yanagisawa, Naoki; Smith, Derek R

    2018-02-02

    In 2020, Japan will host the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2020 (Tokyo 2020) which will involve a large population influx from various countries to Tokyo, the most populated city in Japan. We summarize the potential health risks for visitors to Tokyo 2020, related to communicable disease risks and other health threats, based on recent national and local surveillance reports. We reviewed up-to-date surveillance reports published by the National Institute of Infectious Diseases and Tokyo Metropolitan Infectious Disease Surveillance Center. Communicable disease risks for vaccine-preventable illnesses such as measles and rubella, as well as food and waterborne diseases represent the most likely risks. The risk of acquiring vector-borne diseases is considered low in Japan. On the other hand, however, heat-related illness represents a potential risk, as Tokyo 2020 is scheduled during the hottest season in Japan, with temperatures generally expected to exceed 30 °C. Maintaining an up-to-date routine vaccination schedule is highly recommended for visitors attending the Tokyo 2020 and appropriate hygiene measures for food and waterborne diseases as well as health promotion for heat-related illness. It may also be useful to increase the number of multilingual triage clinicians whom can be placed within emergency departments during the Tokyo 2020 to provide first contact services and coordination of emergency care among non-Japanese speaking visitors to Tokyo. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Commercialization of residential fuel cell systems at Tokyo Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hisao; Kameyama, Hiromichi; Okamura, Kiyoshi; Nishizaki, Kunihiro

    2007-07-01

    Increased affluence at homes may inevitably bring about increased energy consumption with it and hence increased CO2 emission from the residential sector, which accounts for a substantial share in the overall CO2 emission. Technologies that can reduce CO2 emission without sacrificing comfort of living at home will be critically important to achieve economic prosperity and preservation of the global environment at the same time. The residential fuel cell system is one of those technologies. Tokyo Gas has been engaging in its development cooperating with the manufacturers and has been playing an important role in the design, development and promotion of fuel cell systems with its vast knowledge and experience of end users' energy consumption. The development, demonstration and promotion of fuel cell systems have been strongly supported by the Japanese Government. In 'the Large Scale Demonstration Project', more than 1000 units of polymer electrolyte fuel cells have been installed to existing homes and have demonstrated their energy saving and CO2 emission reduction potential. This paper reports the status of the development of residential fuel cell systems in Japan and the role Tokyo Gas plays in it.

  19. Urban warming and energy consumption in Tokyo metro area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, T.; Hisada, T.; Shimada, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of field observation and three-dimensional simulation of urban warming in Tokyo metropolitan area. The three-dimensional governing equations in an urban atmospheric boundary layer were formulated by virtue of vorticity-velocity vector potential method. Particular attention was focused on the representation of a buoyancy term in equation of motion in the vertical direction, thereby describing the crossover and stratification effects near the ground surface. The vorticity-velocity potential method is superior from the view point of numerical stability and suitable for the simulation of an urban heat island. The authors first made a survey on the energy consumption in Tokyo metropolitan area. Next, the three-dimensional simulations were carried out using these data. The simulation results were then compared with the data of field observation of the surface temperature by automobiles. Further future prediction of urban warming was performed when the energy consumption rate is increased five times as large as the present rate, which will correspond to the year 2030 if the present consumption rate were maintained until then

  20. The Tokyo subway sarin attack-lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, T.; Hisaoka, T.; Yamada, A.; Naito, T.; Isonuma, H.; Okumura, S.; Miura, K.; Sakurada, M.; Maekawa, H.; Ishimatsu, S.; Takasu, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2005-01-01

    The sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subway system is reviewed from a clinical toxicology perspective. Based on the lessons learned from this attack, the following areas should be addressed on a global scale. First, an adequate supply of protective equipment is required, including level B protective equipment with a pressure demand breathing apparatus. In addition, a system should be established that enables a possible cause to be determined based on symptoms, physical findings, general laboratory tests, and a simple qualitative analysis for poisonous substances. If an antidote is needed, the system should enable it to be administered to the victims as quickly as possible. Preparation for a large-scale chemical attack by terrorists requires the prior establishment of a detailed decontamination plan that utilizes not only mass decontamination facilities but also public facilities in the area. A system should be established for summarizing, evaluating, and disseminating information on poisonous substances. Finally, a large-scale scientific investigation of the Tokyo sarin attack should be conducted to examine its long-term and subclinical effects and the effects of exposure to asymptomatic low levels of sarin

  1. Heterogeneous Structure and Seismicity beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S.; Kato, A.; Sakai, S.; Nanjo, K.; Panayotopoulos, Y.; Kurashimo, E.; Obara, K.; Kasahara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2010-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes damaged mega-thrust earthquakes. Sato et al. (2005) revealed the geometry of upper surface of PSP, and Hagiwara et al. (2006) estimated the velocity structure beneath Boso peninsula. However, these results are not sufficient for the assessment of the entire picture of the seismic hazards beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area including those due to an intra-slab M7+ earthquake. So, we launched the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in the Tokyo Metropolitan area (Hirata et al., 2009). Proving the more detailed geometry and physical properties (e.g. velocities, densities, attenuation) and stress field within PSP is very important to attain this issue. The core item of this project is a dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net) for making observations in the metropolitan area (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We deployed the 249 seismic stations with a spacing of 5 km. Some parts of stations construct 5 linear arrays at interval of 2 km such as Tsukuba-Fujisawa (TF) array, etc. The TF array runs from northeast to southwest through the center of Tokyo. In this study, we applied the tomography method to image the heterogeneous structure under the Tokyo metropolitan area. We selected events from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) unified earthquake list. All data of MeSO-net were edited into event data by the selected JMA unified earthquake list. We picked the P and S wave arrival times. The total number of stations and events are 421 and 1,256, respectively. Then, we applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) to this dataset and estimated the fine-scale velocity structure. The grid nodes locate 10 km interval in parallel with the array, 20 km interval in perpendicular to the array; and on depth direction, 5 km interval to a depth of less than 50 km and 10 km interval at a depth of more

  2. Education for Earthquake Disaster Prevention in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, S.; Tsuji, H.; Koketsu, K.; Yazaki, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Japan frequently suffers from all types of disasters such as earthquakes, typhoons, floods, volcanic eruptions, and landslides. In the first half of this year, we already had three big earthquakes and heavy rainfall, which killed more than 30 people. This is not just for Japan but Asia is the most disaster-afflicted region in the world, accounting for about 90% of all those affected by disasters, and more than 50% of the total fatalities and economic losses. One of the most essential ways to reduce the damage of natural disasters is to educate the general public to let them understand what is going on during those desasters. This leads individual to make the sound decision on what to do to prevent or reduce the damage. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), therefore, offered for public subscription to choose several model areas to adopt scientific education to the local elementary schools, and ERI, the Earthquake Research Institute, is qualified to develop education for earthquake disaster prevention in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The tectonic setting of this area is very complicated; there are the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates subducting beneath the North America and the Eurasia plates. The subduction of the Philippine Sea plate causes mega-thrust earthquakes such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M 8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M 7.9) which had 105,000 fatalities. A magnitude 7 or greater earthquake beneath this area is recently evaluated to occur with a probability of 70 % in 30 years. This is of immediate concern for the devastating loss of life and property because the Tokyo urban region now has a population of 42 million and is the center of approximately 40 % of the nation's activities, which may cause great global economic repercussion. To better understand earthquakes in this region, "Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area" has been conducted mainly by ERI. It is a 4-year

  3. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: diagnostic criteria and severity grading of acute cholecystitis (with videos)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoe, Masamichi; Hata, Jiro; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Asbun, Horacio J.; Wakabayashi, Go; Kozaka, Kazuto; Endo, Itaru; Deziel, Daniel J.; Miura, Fumihiko; Okamoto, Kohji; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Ker, Chen-Guo; Chen, Miin-Fu; Han, Ho-Seong; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Choi, In-Seok; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Shikata, Satoru; Ukai, Tomohiko; Higuchi, Ryota; Gabata, Toshifumi; Mori, Yasuhisa; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Jagannath, Palepu; Jonas, Eduard; Liau, Kui-Hin; Dervenis, Christos; Gouma, Dirk J.; Cherqui, Daniel; Belli, Giulio; Garden, O. James; Giménez, Mariano Eduardo; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Suzuki, Kenji; Umezawa, Akiko; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Pitt, Henry A.; Singh, Harjit; Chan, Angus C. W.; Lau, Wan Yee; Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Honda, Goro; Sugioka, Atsushi; Asai, Koji; Gomi, Harumi; Itoi, Takao; Kiriyama, Seiki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Matsumura, Naoki; Tokumura, Hiromi; Kitano, Seigo; Hirata, Koichi; Inui, Kazuo; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    The Tokyo Guidelines 2013 (TG13) for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis were globally disseminated and various clinical studies about the management of acute cholecystitis were reported by many researchers and clinicians from all over the world. The 1st edition of the Tokyo Guidelines 2007 (TG07)

  4. Towards more stable operation of the Tokyo Tier2 center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, T.; Mashimo, T.; Matsui, N.; Sakamoto, H.; Ueda, I.

    2014-06-01

    The Tokyo Tier2 center, which is located at the International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP) in the University of Tokyo, was established as a regional analysis center in Japan for the ATLAS experiment. The official operation with WLCG was started in 2007 after the several years development since 2002. In December 2012, we have replaced almost all hardware as the third system upgrade to deal with analysis for further growing data of the ATLAS experiment. The number of CPU cores are increased by factor of two (9984 cores in total), and the performance of individual CPU core is improved by 20% according to the HEPSPEC06 benchmark test at 32bit compile mode. The score is estimated as 18.03 (SL6) per core by using Intel Xeon E5-2680 2.70 GHz. Since all worker nodes are made by 16 CPU cores configuration, we deployed 624 blade servers in total. They are connected to 6.7 PB of disk storage system with non-blocking 10 Gbps internal network backbone by using two center network switches (NetIron MLXe-32). The disk storage is made by 102 of RAID6 disk arrays (Infortrend DS S24F-G2840-4C16DO0) and served by equivalent number of 1U file servers with 8G-FC connection to maximize the file transfer throughput per storage capacity. As of February 2013, 2560 CPU cores and 2.00 PB of disk storage have already been deployed for WLCG. Currently, the remaining non-grid resources for both CPUs and disk storage are used as dedicated resources for the data analysis by the ATLAS Japan collaborators. Since all hardware in the non-grid resources are made by same architecture with Tier2 resource, they will be able to be migrated as the Tier2 extra resource on demand of the ATLAS experiment in the future. In addition to the upgrade of computing resources, we expect the improvement of connectivity on the wide area network. Thanks to the Japanese NREN (NII), another 10 Gbps trans-Pacific line from Japan to Washington will be available additionally with existing two 10 Gbps lines

  5. Current status and future of MALT, The University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, H.; Tsuchiya, Y.S.; Nakano, C.

    2013-01-01

    MALT (Micro Analysis Laboratory, Tandem accelerator, The University of Tokyo) is designed for highly sensitive and precise elemental and isotopic microanalysis system using ion beam generated by MC-SNICSTM solid state ion sources and Pelletron TM 5UD tandem accelerator. Currently multi-nuclide AMS ( 10 Be, 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 129 I) system and other beam analysis techniques (PIXE, NRA, ERDA) are available and show good performance. After the 2011 earthquake-disaster and the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, investigation of 129 I distribution and behavior in the environment originated the accident has come to be an important mission at MALT as well as many collaborating scientific projects such as 'Study on natural and anthropogenic iodine isotope system', 'Application of in situ cosmogenic radio nuclides to the geomorphologic processes', and 'Analysis of cosmogenic radio nuclides in the Antarctic ice core', so on. (author)

  6. Tritiated water vapor in the surface air at Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hisayuki; Katsuragi, Yukio; Shigehara, Koji

    1984-01-01

    Tritium concentration in water vapor in the air near the surface and in the precipitation at Tokyo was measured during the period from 9 August to 20 November in 1974. From August to the middle of October, tritium mixing ratios in the surface air had relatively higher values except those in air masses which were associated with a typhoon. The mixing ratios of tritium in the air decreased abruptly at the middle of October, which indicates the decrease of tritium influx from aloft. These data exhibit the salient feature that variations in tritium concentration in TR are linear to the reciprocal of the content of water vapor during each period. Tritium concentrations in vapor and rain water collected simultaneously show nearly equal values. One of the reasons for the good correlation of tritium concentration between falling drops and ambient air is considered to be the result of the rapid isotopic exchange. (author)

  7. Towards more stable operation of the Tokyo Tier2 center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T; Mashimo, T; Matsui, N; Sakamoto, H; Ueda, I

    2014-01-01

    The Tokyo Tier2 center, which is located at the International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP) in the University of Tokyo, was established as a regional analysis center in Japan for the ATLAS experiment. The official operation with WLCG was started in 2007 after the several years development since 2002. In December 2012, we have replaced almost all hardware as the third system upgrade to deal with analysis for further growing data of the ATLAS experiment. The number of CPU cores are increased by factor of two (9984 cores in total), and the performance of individual CPU core is improved by 20% according to the HEPSPEC06 benchmark test at 32bit compile mode. The score is estimated as 18.03 (SL6) per core by using Intel Xeon E5-2680 2.70 GHz. Since all worker nodes are made by 16 CPU cores configuration, we deployed 624 blade servers in total. They are connected to 6.7 PB of disk storage system with non-blocking 10 Gbps internal network backbone by using two center network switches (NetIron MLXe-32). The disk storage is made by 102 of RAID6 disk arrays (Infortrend DS S24F-G2840-4C16DO0) and served by equivalent number of 1U file servers with 8G-FC connection to maximize the file transfer throughput per storage capacity. As of February 2013, 2560 CPU cores and 2.00 PB of disk storage have already been deployed for WLCG. Currently, the remaining non-grid resources for both CPUs and disk storage are used as dedicated resources for the data analysis by the ATLAS Japan collaborators. Since all hardware in the non-grid resources are made by same architecture with Tier2 resource, they will be able to be migrated as the Tier2 extra resource on demand of the ATLAS experiment in the future. In addition to the upgrade of computing resources, we expect the improvement of connectivity on the wide area network. Thanks to the Japanese NREN (NII), another 10 Gbps trans-Pacific line from Japan to Washington will be available additionally with existing two 10 Gbps lines

  8. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Meernik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121 to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62% completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  9. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  10. Preventing heat illness in the anticipated hot climate of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakamu, Takeyasu; Wada, Koji; Smith, Derek R; Endo, Shota; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2017-09-19

    Amid the effects of global warming, Tokyo has become an increasingly hot city, especially during the summertime. To prepare for the upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympics in Tokyo, all participants, including the athletes, staff, and spectators, will need to familiarize themselves with Tokyo's hot and humid summer conditions. This paper uses the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, which estimates the risk of heat illness, to compare climate conditions of sports events in Tokyo with the conditions of the past three Summer Olympics (held in Rio de Janeiro, London, and Beijing) and to subsequently detail the need for establishing appropriate countermeasures. We compared WBGT results from the past three Summer Olympics with the same time periods in Tokyo during 2016. There was almost no time zone where a low risk of heat illness could be expected during the time frame of the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics. We also found that Tokyo had a higher WBGT than any of those previous host cities and is poorly suited for outdoor sporting events. Combined efforts by the official organizers, government, various related organizations, and the participants will be necessary to deal with these challenging conditions and to allow athletes to perform their best, as well as to prevent heat illnesses among staff and spectators. The sporting committees, as well as the Olympic organizing committee, should consider WBGT measurements in determining the venues and timing of the events to better avoid heat illness and facilitate maximum athletic performance.

  11. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M.; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess w...

  12. Sustainable Campus Dining: How Campuses Are Targeting Sustainability and Engagement through Dining Services Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable food and dining is a popular topic on college and university campuses. Popular areas of focus include equipment upgrades in the kitchen, installation of campus or community gardens, and streamlining existing campus recycling operations, such as by converting campus vehicles to run on used vegetable oil from the dining hall. Research…

  13. A highly attennuative zone beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayotopoulos, Y.; Hirata, N.; Sakai, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Kasahara, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intensities of seismic waves observed at the dense seismic array of the Tokyo Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net) inside the Kanto basin, display unusual distribution patterns. In several occasions, the highest intensities are not observed in the area above an earthquakes hypocenter but appear sifted more than 20 km away. In order to understand the source of this unusual intensity distribution pattern, it is crucial to understand how the waves attenuate before they reach the surface. The attenuation of seismic waves along their path is represented by the t∗ attenuation operator that can be obtained by fitting the observed seismic wave spectrum to a theoretical spectrum using an ω2 model. In order to create a high quality dataset, only 1449 earthquakes that are recorded with intensity greater than 0 in the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) intensity scale are selected from the JMA unified earthquake list from April 1st 2008 to October 2nd 2013. A grid search method is applied to determine the t∗ values by matching the observed and theoretical spectra. The t∗ data where then inverted to estimate a 3D Q structure with grid points set at a 10 km spacing. We implemented the 3D velocity model estimated by Nakagawa et al., 2012 and in addition we set the initial Q values at 100 for the 0 km grids and to 400 for the grids below them. The obtained model suggests average Q values of 50˜100 inside the Kanto basin. Furthermore, a low Q zone is observed in the area where the Philippine Sea plate meets the upper part of the Pacific sea plate. This area is located at approximately 40 km depth, beneath the north-east Tokyo and west Chiba prefectures and is represented by Q values Earthquakes occurring on the Pacific plate pass through this low Q area inside the Philippine sea plate and are attenuated significantly. The estimated attenuation distribution at the MeSO-net station for these earthquakes implementing our 3D Q model greatly coincides with the

  14. The Role of Sub-National Actors in Climate Change Policy. The Case of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roppongi, Hitomi

    2016-06-01

    Tokyo is known as a pioneer throughout the history of Japan's environmental policy, often being compared to California in the United States or Paris in France. Following the global trend of growing local initiatives tackling climate change, Tokyo introduced a cap-and-trade scheme in 2010 ahead of a national implementation. The Tokyo Cap-and-Trade Program is the first of its kind that regulates CO_2 emissions from all business sectors, where energy consumers are defined in terms of the business establishments they own. Tokyo's initiative is largely seen as a reaction to the modest national commitment, following the tradition of center-local rivalry. This study first explains the centre-local relationship in the history of Japan's environmental governance. It then analyzes the development of the Tokyo's flagship climate policy and its implications for national and other sub-national governments in Japan. The tactics used by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government to overcome business opposition typically seen in the introduction of GHG control, and future policy challenges are also discussed. The study finds that Tokyo's policy encourages behavioral changes and technological improvement in the business sector, going a step beyond the existing culture of energy conservation in Japan. An emission trading scheme is often associated with the collapse of carbon markets and the 'money game', rather than a practical tool to reduce CO_2 emissions, but the Tokyo Cap-and-Trade Program has demonstrated a policy impact that recasts such an image. A known case of policy diffusion to Saitama prefecture, an immediate neighbor of Tokyo with the fifth largest population in Japan, is also discussed to elaborate on the potential domestic diffusion of the policy. (author)

  15. Connecting Students, Creating Futures at Central Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosin, Julie; Erbes, Elizabeth; Britt, James; Good, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Des Moines is an urban community located in the heart of Iowa. Des Moines Public Schools serves 32,000 students in a system with 62 buildings, including Central Campus--a Regional Academy. Central Campus is housed in four buildings, including the main campus at 1800 Grand located on the western edge of downtown Des Moines. As a regional academy,…

  16. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  17. Biomass Energy | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomass Energy Biomass Energy Biomass from local sources can be key to a campus climate action plan biomass may fit into your campus climate action plan. Campus Options Considerations Sample Project Related biomass fuels for energy does not add to the net amount of carbon in the atmosphere. This is because the

  18. Energy and Water Efficiency on Campus | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and Water Efficiency on Campus Energy and Water Efficiency on Campus NREL ensures the resiliency of our future energy and water systems through energy efficiency strategies and technologies , renewable energy, and water efficiency on the NREL campus. FY17 Energy Intensity. The South Table Mountain

  19. Flight to Liquidity on the Tokyo Stock Exchange during the 2008 Share Market Crashes

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Brooke Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the existence of the flight-to-liquidity phenomenon for shares which are traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange during share market crashes. Using data from the First section of the Tokyo Stock Exchange, the existence of a flight-to-liquidity during the 2008 share market crashes is clearly documented. The Tokyo Stock Exchange differs from other major exchanges as price limit rules restrict the daily price movements of shares. It provides a unique setting to test if a flight-to...

  20. Lessons from Japan: Resilience after Tokyo and Fukushima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. Spencer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the spring of 1995 Japan experienced the world’s first major terrorist attack using chemical weapons by a little-known religious cult called Aum Shinrikyo. The attack on the Tokyo subway, which killed 13 people, was the first lethal case of a non-state actor using a chemical agent against a civilian population. In March 2011, following a 9.0 magnitude earthquake in Japan, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor experienced a full meltdown releasing radiation into the surrounding area. The seemingly unhurried government reaction provided conflicting information to Japanese citizens, slowing evacuation and protective actions. Government failure is cited as a significant factor in the severity of the nuclear disaster in three investigations conducted after the incident. This article defines resilience and raises the question of whether the U.S. government has the ability to address the issues raised by the two case studies. There are four primary lessons of these two case studies from Japan: Trust is essential; two-way communications are vital; someone or something will always unexpectedly fail to act appropriately, while others will provide surprising support and; finally, recovery is long-term.

  1. Race and Class on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Angel B.

    2016-01-01

    Colleges and universities have a significant role to play in shaping the future of race and class relations in America. As exhibited in this year's presidential election, race and class continue to divide. Black Lives Matter movements, campus protests, and police shootings are just a few examples of the proliferation of intolerance, and higher…

  2. Visiting School Campuses: Reporter Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Spending time in schools and classrooms can be one of the best ways for novice reporters to dive into the education beat, and for veteran journalists to find fresh inspiration. While it is certainly not necessary for every story, education journalists should try their best to make time to visit schools. Classroom observations and campus tours help…

  3. Problem Gambling on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Jennifer L.; Hanson, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of college students gamble, with some doing so problematically. This article discusses gambling and problem gambling among college students, framing it as an emerging health issue on college campuses nationwide. Given that 4 out of 5 college students admit to gambling, and that approximately 8% gamble problematically, it is…

  4. About Women on Campus, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Bernice Resnick, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This quarterly newsletter provides information about the programs, issues, and concerns of women students, faculty, and administrators in higher education. Each of these four issues (comprising 1 year's worth) presents brief summaries of news items or reports in regularly appearing sections covering campus news, the workplace, sexual harassment,…

  5. Promoting Civil Discourse on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Rita

    2010-01-01

    During the past several decades, off campus and on, much of the discourse on controversial issues has been personal, vicious, and divisive. On the national scene, politics has become permeated with incivility. It now appears that Americans have been naive about their ability and willingness to engage in civil discourse and compromise. How can…

  6. The Virtual Campus Hub Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Prag, Sidsel-Marie Winther; Monaco, Lucio

    of Technology in Sweden, Politecnico di Torino in Italy, and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. The project is partially funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme (project no. RI-283746). This report describes the final concept of Virtual Campus Hub. It gives...

  7. Vanderbilt University: Campus Computing Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE/EFFECT, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Despite the decentralized nature of computing at Vanderbilt, there is significant evidence of cooperation and use of each other's resources by the various computing entities. Planning for computing occurs in every school and department. Caravan, a campus-wide network, is described. (MLW)

  8. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  9. About Women on Campus, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Bernice Resnick, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This quarterly newsletter provides information about the programs, issues, and concerns of women students, faculty, and administrators in higher education. Each of these four issues (comprising a single year) presents brief summaries of new items or reports in regularly appearing sections covering campus news, the workplace, sexual harassment,…

  10. Tod's & United Bamboo + Toyo Ito & Vito Acconci + Omotesando & Daikanyama = Tokyo / Sergio Pirrone

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pirrone, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Toyo Ito projekteeritud Itaalia jalatsi- ja kotifirmale kuuluvast Tod'si hoonest ning Vito Acconci kujundatud rõivakauplusest United Bamboo, mille interjöör meenutab kangast, Tokyos. Ill.: 8 värv. fotot, 9 korruste plaani

  11. Interaction between two subducting plates under Tokyo and its possible effects on seismic hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Francis; Okaya, David; Sato, Hiroshi; Hirata, Naoshi

    2007-09-01

    Underneath metropolitan Tokyo the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) subducts to the north on top of the westward subducting Pacific plate (PAC). New, relatively high-resolution tomography images the PHS as a well-defined subduction zone under western Kanto Plain. As PAC shoals under eastern Kanto, the PHS lithosphere is being thrusted into an increasingly tighter space of the PAC-Eurasian mantle wedge. As a result, zones of enhanced seismicity appear under eastern Kanto at the top of PHS, internal to PHS and also at its contact with PAC. These zones are located at depths greater than the causative fault of the disastrous 1923 Great Tokyo ``megathrust'' earthquake, in the vicinity of several well-located historical, damaging (M6 and M7) earthquakes. Thus a rather unique interaction between subducting plates under Tokyo may account for additional seismic hazards in metropolitan Tokyo.

  12. Strauss, R.: Symphony in F minor, Op. 12... Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra / David Nice

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nice, David

    1994-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Strauss, R.: Symphony in F minor, Op. 12... Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra / Hiroshi Wakasugi. Denon CD CO-75 860 (54 minutes); Symphony - comparative version: SNO, Järvi" (8/93)(CHAN) CHAN 9166

  13. Muusikamaailm : Wien Modern 2000. Muusikateater Huddersfieldis. Sibeliuse konkurss Helsingis. Penderecki uus teos Tokyos / Priit Kuusk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kuusk, Priit, 1938-

    2000-01-01

    Nüüdismuusikafestivalist "Wien Modern" 28. okt.-26. nov. Muusikalavastustest Huddersfieldi kaasaegse muusika festivalil. VIII Sibeliuse nim. rahvusvahelisest viiuldajate konkursist. 30. nov. toimus Tokyos K. Penderecki teose "Concerto grosso per tre violoncelli ed orchestra"

  14. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: management strategies for gallbladder drainage in patients with acute cholecystitis (with videos)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mori, Yasuhisa; Itoi, Takao; Baron, Todd H.; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Pitt, Henry A.; Ukai, Tomohiko; Shikata, Satoru; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Teoh, Anthony Yuen Bun; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Asbun, Horacio J.; Endo, Itaru; Yokoe, Masamichi; Miura, Fumihiko; Okamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Kenji; Umezawa, Akiko; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Wakabayashi, Go; Han, Ho-Seong; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Choi, In-Seok; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Chen, Miin-Fu; Garden, O. James; Singh, Harjit; Liau, Kui-Hin; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Gouma, Dirk J.; Belli, Giulio; Dervenis, Christos; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Giménez, Mariano Eduardo; Windsor, John A.; Lau, Wan Yee; Cherqui, Daniel; Jagannath, Palepu; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Liu, Keng-Hao; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Deziel, Daniel J.; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Fan, Sheung Tat; Ker, Chen-Guo; Jonas, Eduard; Padbury, Robert; Mukai, Shuntaro; Honda, Goro; Sugioka, Atsushi; Asai, Koji; Higuchi, Ryota; Wada, Keita; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Hirata, Koichi; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Inui, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    Since the publication of the Tokyo Guidelines in 2007 and their revision in 2013, appropriate management for acute cholecystitis has been more clearly established. Since the last revision, several manuscripts, especially for alternative endoscopic techniques, have been reported; therefore,

  15. Tokyo tähtsus üleilmse finantskeskusena väheneb / Kaja Koovit

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Koovit, Kaja, 1968-

    2011-01-01

    Tokyo positsioon rahvusvahelise finantskeskusena sai riiki tabanud maavärina, tsunami ja radiatsiooni tõttu hoobi. Suured välispangad, investeerimisfondid ja maaklerfirmad toovad oma töötajaid Tokyost ära

  16. Overview of the CTR blanket engineering research program at the University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Masaharu; Madarame, Haruki; Takahashi, Yoichi; Takagi, Toshiyuki

    1989-01-01

    A small overview has been given on the fusion reactor blanket engineering research program at the University of Tokyo as an introduction to the following articles, especially in its history, organization, experimental facilities and ten years research activity. (orig.)

  17. Redefining The U.S.-Japan Alliance: Tokyo’s National Defense Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    affairs to a member of the National Diet , a Fulbright Fellow at Tokyo University, a reporter for Defense News and the Iwate Nippo, and Tokyo...process of introducing electoral reform in the Diet has already split the LDP and led to the recent series of coalitions. The process of implementing this...what Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad told Japanese Prime Minister Murayama in August 1994. See "Mahathir to Japan: ’Drop War Apologies, Join

  18. A one-campus SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.M.; Teng, L.C.

    1987-04-01

    Advantages of the one-campus superconducting super collider with bypass-clustered Interaction Region arrangement are enumerated. Designs for double-bypass arrangements with 4 and 6 interaction points are examined and presented. Compared to the conceptual design given in the Conceptual Design Report, the only drawback identified is the additional dipoles required which amounts to ∼20% for the 6 Interaction Point arrangements and ∼10% for the 4 Interaction Point arrangements

  19. New tomographic images of P- , S- wave velocity and Q on the Philippine Sea Slab beneath Tokyo: Implication to seismotectonics and seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Naoshi; Sakai, Shin'ichi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Panayotopoulos, Yannis; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kasahara, Keiji; Kimura, Hisanor; Honda, Ryou

    2013-04-01

    The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates the next great M7+ earthquake in the Tokyo metropolitan region will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (1 trillion US) economic loss at worst case if it occur beneath northern Tokyo bay with M7.3. However, the estimate is based on a source fault model by conventional studies about the PSP geometry. To evaluate seismic hazard due to the great quake we need to clarify the geometry of PSP and also the Pacific palate (PAP) that subducs beneath PSP. We identify those plates with use of seismic tomography and available deep seismic reflection profiling and borehole data in southern Kanto area. We deployed about 300 seismic stations in the greater Tokyo urban region under the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Tokyo Metropolitan Area. We obtain clear P- and S- wave velocity (Vp and Vs) and Q tomograms which show a clear image of PSP and PAP. A depth to the top of PSP, 20 to 30 kilometer beneath northern part of Tokyo bay, is about 10 km shallower than previous estimates based on the distribution of seismicity (Ishida, 1992). This shallower plate geometry changes estimations of strong ground motion for seismic hazards analysis within the Tokyo region. Based on elastic wave velocities of rocks and minerals, we interpreted the tomographic images as petrologic images. Tomographic images revealed the presence of two stepwise velocity increase of the top layer of the subducting PSP slab. Rock velocity data reveals that subducting PSP crust transforms from blueschists to amphibolites at depth of 30km and amphibolites to eclogites at depth of 50km, which suggest that dehydration reactions occurs in subducting crust of basaltic compositions during prograde metamorphism and water is released from the subducting PSP crust. Tomograms show evidence for a low-velocity zone (LVZ) beneath the area just north of Tokyo bay. A Q tomogram show a low Q zone in PSP slab. We interpret the LVZ as a

  20. The first CERN Spring Campus

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    From 14 to 16 April, the first edition of the CERN Spring Campus took place in Spain. Taking place over three intensive days, this event brought experts from CERN together at the University of Oviedo, where they met the engineers and scientists of the future in a programme of scientific and technological dissemination and cultural exchange.   The young participants of the first CERN Spring Campus and their instructors show their enthusiasm after the intensive three-day course. “This three-day school focuses on preparing young engineers for the job market, with a particular emphasis on computing,” explains Derek Mathieson, Advanced Information Systems Group Leader in the GS Department and Head of the CERN Spring Campus organising committee. “We organised talks on entrepreneurship and IT, as well as on job interviews and CV writing. It was also an important opportunity for the participants to meet CERN computing engineers to find out what it is like to work in I...

  1. Violence on Campus: Defining the Problems, Strategies for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.; Schuh, John H., Ed.; Fenske, Robert H., Ed.

    This book addresses issues in dealing with campus violence, including types of violence on campuses, trends in campus violence, effects of increasing concerns about campus violence, and appropriate actions by student affairs and academic administrators to ensure campus safety. The chapters are: (1) "Violent Crime in American Society" (Fernando M.…

  2. Plant Operations. OSHA on Campus: Campus Safety Officers Discuss Problems and Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Joseph F.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Occupation Safety and Health Act (OSHA) has presented campus safety officers with new problems, but it is also offering them new potentials, which were explored at the recent national conference on Campus Security. (Editor)

  3. The cloud hovering over the virtual campus

    OpenAIRE

    Alier Forment, Marc; Mayol Sarroca, Enric; Casany Guerrero, María José

    2014-01-01

    The Virtual Campus has been around for about 20 years. It provides an online environment that mimics the processes and services of the physical campuses and classrooms. Its adoption is almost complete in countries where Internet access has become ubiquitous. For a time seemed like the innovation in education was happening in the Virtual Campus, but this is no more. Personal Learning Environments, Life Long Learning, MOOCS, Open Educational Resources, Mobile Apps, Gamification, Social Netwo...

  4. Transportation Options | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transportation Options Transportation Options Transportation to, from, and within a research campus from business travel often enlarge the footprint more than expected. To understand options for climate

  5. Conversations about Sexuality on a Public University Campus: Perspectives from Campus Ministry Students and Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charis R.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Messias, DeAnne K. Hilfinger; Friedman, Daniela B.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about university campus religious organisations' influence on students' sexuality-related attitudes and behaviours. This study sought to better understand sexuality-related communication within the context of campus ministries by exploring students' and campus ministry leaders' conversational experiences at a public university in…

  6. Colleges Debating Their Proper Role in Curbing Pornography on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koberstein, Jennifer A.

    1986-01-01

    Campus and administrative concerns about pornography on campus are increasing, including controversy over sale of periodicals on campus, screening of sexually explicit movies, student participation in films as actors, and education of students about social issues related to pornography. (MSE)

  7. Fifty years experiences in nuclear engineering education at Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuhiko; Saito, Masaki; Aritomi, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education has been initiated in 1957 at the graduate school of Tokyo Institute of Technology. Educational activities have been conducted for fifty years under the support of the Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors. In the past fifty years, about 1000 Master students and 200 Doctoral students and 200 Doctoral students graduated from our Nuclear Engineering Department at Tokyo Institute of Technology. Many of them found their jobs in nuclear industries and institutes. International course of nuclear engineering was initiated in 1994, and so far about 90 students from 15 overseas countries have graduated from our Master and Doctoral Programs. In 2003, our proposal of 'Innovative Nuclear Energy System for the Sustainable World' was adopted as the Center of Excellent Program sponsored by Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. Recently a collaborative education network has been developed among Kanazawa University, Fukui University, Ibaraki University, Okayama University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Japan Atomic Energy Agency. (author)

  8. Potential for air quality improvement in the Tokyo metropolitan area from use of hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, Paul; Murdock, Mork

    1998-01-01

    A revised estimation has been made of the local air quality improvement that can be achieved in Tokyo as a byproduct of a word-wide hydrogen energy economy based on global reduction of CO2 emission from fossil fuels. The study for the WE-NET Project in Japan examined the potential for reduction in nitrogen oxide emission with hydrogen fuel in the Tokyo metropolitan area where sufficient data exist on trends in population, vehicle registrations, traffic activity, and exhaust emissions. A dynamic model was developed to extrapolate the trends in these data to estimate future NOx emission rates in comparison to regulatory scenarios based on policy and technical decisions of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government for improvement of air quality in the metropolitan area. The results of the model show significant potential for reduction of NOx emission by the year 2020 with a concomitant reduction in mean roadside NOx concentration. (author)

  9. Researches at the University of Tokyo fast neutron sources reactor, YAYOI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.; Saito, I.

    1992-01-01

    The Fast neutron source reactor YAYOI was critical in 1971 at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, the Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo (UTNL). The core is fueled with the enriched uranium surrounded by the depleted uranium. YAYOI is the first fast reactor in Japan. Many types of studies have been carried out by the researchers of the University of Tokyo in these 20 years. It also contributed to the Japan's national project of developing fast breeder reactors. The reactor is opened to the visiting researchers from universities and research institutes. YAYOI has also been utilized for education of undergraduate and graduate students of the Department of Nuclear Engineering of the University of Tokyo. The present paper briefly summerizes past and present researchers. (author)

  10. [Mercury concentration of fish in Tokyo Bay and the surrounding sea area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R; Kashima, Y; Matsui, M; Okabe, T; Doi, R

    2001-07-01

    Total mercury in the muscles of three fish species was analyzed in fish caught in Tokyo Bay and the surrounding sea areas, Sagami Bay and Choshi. Tokyo Bay is a semi-closed sea area surrounded by Tokyo, Kanagawa and Chiba prefectures. Sagami Bay and Choshi are open to the Pacific Ocean. A total of 412 fish consisting of northern whiting (Sillago japonica), flatfish (Limanda yokohamae) and sardine (Sardinops melanosticta) were caught in these areas over a 6 months period from November 1998 to April 1999. Total mercury concentration ranged from 0.008-0.092 microgram/g (wet wt.) in northern whiting, 0.006-0.065 microgram/g in flatfish and 0.001-0.045 microgram/g in sardine. All concentrations were below the restriction limit of fish mercury in Japan, 0.4 microgram/g of total mercury concentration. A significant correlation was found between mercury concentrations and body length or body weight in northern whiting and flatfish, irrespective of the sea area. A correlation was also found between mercury concentration in fish and their feeding habits: among the 3 species caught in the same area, crustacean feeding northern whiting had the highest, polychaete feeding flatfish moderate, and plankton feeding sardine had the lowest mercury concentration. In a comparison of mercury concentration in the same species caught in different sea areas, a higher concentration was noted in fish caught in the semi-closed sea area of Tokyo Bay, than in fish caught in the open sea areas of Sagami Bay and Choshi. This difference was most marked in fish caught at the bottom of Tokyo Bay and we considered that the mercury concentration of seawater and sediment in these areas was the cause of mercury accumulation in fish. These findings suggest that improved water quality control and environmental monitoring is necessary in semi-closed sea areas such as Tokyo Bay.

  11. Wind Energy | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    an organizational mission? Research campuses should consider the following before undertaking an Wind and Solar PV Financing. Organizational Mission A research campus undertaking an on-site wind application of good engineering and operational practices that support the integration of wind power into the

  12. Suicide and Its Prevention on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a significant issue facing higher education institutions. Many campuses are involved in a variety of procedures, programs, and initiatives that seek to reduce or prevent suicide and the impact of suicide-related behavior. This article offers examples of campus prevention efforts, important resources on suicide prevention for college…

  13. Making Technology Work for Campus Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreno, Jeff; Keil, Brad

    2010-01-01

    The challenges associated with securing schools from both on- and off-campus threats create constant pressure for law enforcement, campus security professionals, and administrators. And while security technology choices are plentiful, many colleges and universities are operating with limited dollars and information needed to select and integrate…

  14. Campus Borongaj: a Challenge for the University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baletic, B.; Josic, M.; Tolic, V.

    2012-01-01

    The Borongaj Campus will provide optimal conditions for study, application of knowledge and ideas, lodging, sport and entertainment in one place. The Borongaj Campus will be an area open toward the local community and its complementary facilities. By means of constructing the Borongaj Campus, the University of Zagreb wishes to create new and better spatial possibilities and thus encourage scientists, university professors and students to work in a more dedicated and efficient manner. The campus will offer environmental, energy and technology reference point to the Croatian construction industry and to the local inhabitants of the city by using maximum of a green energy and implementing environmental protection. All energy demands of the Campus Borongaj are based on an integrated system of urban, architectural, mechanical, topological, geological, pedologic, hydrological, thermodynamic and aerodynamic measures to establish Campus Borongaj the regional green education centre for RES and transfer technology. The aim is that Campus Borongaj, with its partner projects, gradually pass from CO 2 zero to CO 2 minus, respectively nowadays on the principle of the society the 2000 W (according to the terminology of ETH Zuerich). Interconnection of energy, transport, food, sustainable construction in smart city Campus Borongaj as the pilot project in achieving the goals of reducing the CO 2 emissions by 80%, like reality today, without waiting the 2050th year.(author)

  15. 1979: The Campus Student Press in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingelhart, Louis E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses a number of topics involving the campus press, including the independence of campus publications, censorship issues, the relationship between the student press and the college administrator, the financing of student newspapers, yearbook production and financing, probable future student publications trends, and the need for appropriate…

  16. Sustainable Retrofitting of Nordic University Campuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Nenonen, Suvi; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2014-01-01

    of university campuses as socio-technical systems. Design/methodology/approach State-of-art analysis is conducted using literature review and document analysis. Findings The results identify the trends and challenges on strategic, tactical and operational levels and the three-level roadmap for future campus...

  17. Housing Survey. Campus Housing: Finding the Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Depending on where you look for statistics, the number of students enrolling in colleges or universities is increasing, decreasing or remaining the about the same. Regardless of those trends, campus housing is a marketing tool for institutions looking to draw students to and keep them on campus. Schools need to offer sufficient beds and…

  18. Virtual Campus Hub technical evaluation report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercoulen, Frank; Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio

    This report describes and discusses the technical achievements of the Virtual Campus Hub project and formulates a brief agenda for the future.......This report describes and discusses the technical achievements of the Virtual Campus Hub project and formulates a brief agenda for the future....

  19. The CIC Historic Campus Architecture Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    America's private colleges and universities include most of the oldest institutions of higher education in the country, and their evolving physical campuses say much about American education. In recent years, the study of campus history, preservation, and adaptive reuse has received increasing attention by many sectors of the educational…

  20. Photovoltaics | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    financing can be a critical factor in determining the feasibility of a particular project. Because solar , Innovations in Wind and Solar PV Financing. Back to Top Leading Example: Oberlin College PV Project The Lewis fit into climate action plans at your research campus. Campus Options Considerations Sample Project

  1. Hydropower | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    project. Options usually include self-financing, issuing bonds, or obtaining third-party financing from how hydropower may fit into your climate action plans. Campus Options Considerations Sample Project to handle permitting issues? Does your campus need a hydraulics laboratory? Is financing available

  2. Creating sustainable campuses: Sharing knowledge between ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-02

    Jun 2, 2016 ... As part of the Sustainable Campuses: Sharing our Knowledge for Social and ... structure, environmental education, and project design and management. ... Read the project report, Sustainable Campuses: Sharing our ... Innovative grants program teams up Canadian and Latin American researchers.

  3. Collaborative procurement for developing a sustainable campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifa, Faizatul Akmar Abdul; Rahim, Syukran Abdul; Rani, Wan Nurul Mardiah Wan Mohd; Ismail, Mohd. Noorizhar

    2016-08-01

    It is particularly challenging to achieve sustainability in campus universities, where a high volume of users and activities has made it more imperative to promote green buildings that reduce energy and water consumption while having a minimal carbon footprint. At present, the frameworks for sustainable campus have seldom focused on the project procurement method which would improve construction team integration in developing the physical aspect of campus development. Therefore, in response to that challenge, this paper investigates how the delivery team, responsible for the design and construction of a project, can be integrated to work together more efficiently and more using the collaborative procurement method known as partnering. This paper reports part of a previous research and sets the base for ongoing research on the critical factors in partnering for sustainable campus development. The outcome or result of this study will meet and support the requirement for construction, maintenance, and operation process for universities towards sustainable building/campus in the future.

  4. Interracial interactions at racially diverse university campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Gloria

    2005-02-01

    The present research was an observational study of casual interracial and intraracial public-group interactions among African American, Asian American, Latino, and White students at 6 southern California State University campuses. Results indicated (a) that at these racially diverse public-university campuses, there was no difference between the percentages of interracial and intraracial groups; (b) specifically, that at the campus with the second largest percentage of non-White students, there were more interracial than intraracial interactions; and (c) that for each of the 4 ethnic groups, at the campuses with the largest percentages of the specific group, interactions were more likely to be intraracial than they were at campuses that had smaller percentages of the specific group. Despite reports of self-segregation, these findings suggest that when Whites are not the majority of students, interracial interactions are common.

  5. Nordic campus retrofitting concepts - Scalable practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Nenonen, Suvi; Junghans, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary collaboration and transformations in learning processes can be supported by activity-based campus retrofitting. The aim of this paper is to analyse the ongoing campus retrofitting processes at the three university campuses and to identify the elements of activity......-based retrofitting. We answer the questions “What kind of examples of retrofitting are there at Nordic Campuses?” and “What kind of elements are typical for activity-based retrofitting concepts?” The 3-level framework of campus retrofitting processes was employed when conducting the three case studies. The cases...... were about the new ways of researching, collaborating and learning with the concepts of Living lab, Creative community for innovation and entrepreneurship and Network of learning hubs. The cases provided the first insights on retrofitting based on users’ changing needs and the requirements of more...

  6. Factors Contributing to Plate Waste among Elementary School Children in Tokyo, Japan: Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Keina; Akamatsu, Rie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the aspects of the Theory of Planned Behavior with the greatest relevance to plate waste (PW) among elementary school children in Tokyo, Japan. Methods: A total of 111 fifth- and sixth-grade students at an elementary school in Tokyo, Japan responded to a self-report questionnaire. The…

  7. Seasonal variations and sources of sedimentary organic carbon in Tokyo Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Atsushi; Kanda, Jota

    2017-01-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN) contents, their stable C and N isotope ratio (δ 13 C and δ 15 N), and chlorophyll a ([Chl a] sed ) of surface sediments were investigated monthly to identify the seasonal variations and sources of organic matter in Tokyo Bay. The sedimentary TOC (TOC sed ) and TN (TN sed ) contents, and the sedimentary δ 13 C and δ 15 N (δ 13 C sed and δ 15 N sed ) values were higher in summer than other seasons. The seasonal variations were controlled by high primary production in the water column and hypoxic water in the bottom water during summer. The fraction of terrestrial and marine derived organic matter was estimated by Bayesian mixing model using stable isotope data and TOC/TN ratio. Surface sediments in Tokyo Bay are dominated by marine derived organic matter, which accounts for about 69 ± 5% of TOC sed . - Highlights: • High values of sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen were observed in summer. • Surface sediments in Tokyo Bay were dominated by marine derived organic matter which was estimated by Bayesian mixing model. • The most amount of terrestrial POC was deposited and degraded in Tokyo Bay before being discharged to the open ocean.

  8. Construction, characteristics and present status of high-fluence irradiation facility at University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Kouchi, Noriyuki.

    1989-01-01

    New ion accelerator facility (HIT Facility) was constructed at Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Tokyo. This facility, which was equipped with some special apparatus, has been mainly dedicated to the study of radiation effects of ion beams on materials. In this report, the construction, the characteristics and the present status of this facility are described. (author)

  9. Tokyo Halloween on the Street : Japanese Dressing Up Between Bricolage and Authenticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.H.; Takagi, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on perspectives related to fashion and consumerist cultures on the one hand and anthropology and appropriation on the other hand, this paper addresses dressing up on the streets during the celebration of Halloween in Tokyo, Japan. By relating commercially marketed Halloween fun-dress to

  10. Development of a Distributed Modeling Framework to Estimate Thermal Comfort along 2020 Tokyo Olympic Marathon Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hirabayashi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress is an issue for marathon races in the summer, such as the one planned for the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic games. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government is planning to grow existing street trees’ canopies to enlarge their shade to reduce air temperature and solar radiation. To formulate a baseline to assess the effect of street trees and buildings on human thermal comfort, Distributed-COMfort FormulA (D-COMFA, a prototype of a distributed computer model using a geographic information system (GIS was developed. D-COMFA calculates the energy budget of a human body on a 1 m cell basis, using readily available datasets such as weather measurements and polygon data for street structures. D-COMFA was applied to a street segment along the marathon course in Tokyo on an hourly-basis on 9 August 2016, the hottest day in Tokyo in 2016. Our case study showed that the energy budget was positively related to the sky view factor, air temperature, and solar radiation. The energy budget was reduced on average by 26–62% in the shade throughout the day.

  11. Present situation of unused uranium fuel in Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2008-01-01

    Present situation of unused enriched uranium fuel in Tokyo Institute of Technology is described. The fuels were for sub-critical experiments. There is no special facility for transportation in the site. But there is no technical problem for it. One of the important issues to be done is a duty by national regulation against nuclear disaster. (author)

  12. Tokyo elanikud pagevad linnast. Poed kaubast tühjad / Katre Pilvinski

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pilvinski, Katre

    2011-01-01

    Tokyo poole liigub radiatsioon, mitmed elanikud lahkuvad linnast. Peaminister Naoto Kani sõnul edasise radioaktiivsuse lekke võimalus kasvab ning tehakse kõik, et vältida lekke levikut. Fukushima Daiichi tuumajaama ümbrusest on inimesed evakueeritud

  13. JURISDICTION OVER CRIMES COMMITTED ON BOARD AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT UNDER THE TOKYO CONVENTION 1963

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Sopilko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main aim of this paper is to clarify several issues of conflicting jurisdiction over crimes committed on board aircraft in flight. The study will examine the way in which the Tokyo Convention attempts to provide justice in the event of aviation security violations, and discuss its effectiveness in preventing such offences in the future. Methods: formal legal and case-study methods together with inductive reasoning, and comparison were used to analyse the legislation in the area of jurisdiction over crimes and other offences committed on board aircraft in flight. Results: it follows from the study that although the Tokyo Convention has contributed considerably to the establishing of clearer rules of jurisdiction over offences committed on board aircraft, considerable deficiencies of this treaty remain. The results have important implications for international policy-making. Discussion: the results of the study reveal several weaknesses of the Tokyo Convention. Firstly, it does not provide any definition or list of offences to which it applies, instead it relies on national penal laws to do so. In addition, the ‘freedom fighter exception’ and the lack of a strong enforcement mechanism may prove to impede the effective attainment of the Tokyo Convention’s main objectives – that is, to provide justice in the event of aviation security violations, and prevent such offences in the future. Therefore, further improvement in aviation security legislation is necessary to ensure that it is effective and adequate in the challenges faced today.

  14. Academic citizenship beyond the campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    hrough combining theories of space and place with works on institutional being, virtues and modes of becoming, this article develops and promotes academic citizenship as the formation of dwelling, being and becoming on the placeful university beyond the campus. We argue that this is a prerequisite......-imagine the possibilities of the university to integrate with people and society through dialogue and placeful-ness. Accordingly, supporting academic citizenship entails designing for the placeful university – a university that invites and promotes openness, dialogue, democracy, mutual integration, care and joint...... responsibility. Consequently, a comprehension of the placeful university is developed in the article to make the potentiality of academic citizenship for the future university emerge....

  15. Climate Neutral Campus Key Terms and Definitions | Climate Neutral Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuses | NREL Neutral Campus Key Terms and Definitions Climate Neutral Campus Key Terms and Definitions The term climate neutral evolved along with net zero and a number of other "green" and accuracy in these areas lets research campuses know exactly how close they are to climate

  16. Reflections from a living smart campus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengstenberg, Yann; Eckardt, Franziska; Benneworth, Paul Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Universities and their campuses can play important roles in the economic performances of their regions, for example through stimulating high technology entrepreneurship and helping to create new economic growth paths. Furthermore, universities can stimulate societal knowledge exchange to contribute

  17. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses. The...

  18. The Role of Campus Ministry at State-Supported Universities: A Judgment Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Barbara; And Others

    The judgmental policies of campus ministry held by campus ministers at state-supported universities were studied. The campus ministers were grouped according to the campus minister's ministry group, years of personal campus ministry experience, size of student body, campus minister's position at the school, and the campus minister's age by decade…

  19. Distribution and behavior of major and trace elements in Tokyo Bay, Mutsu Bay and Funka Bay marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Teruyuki; Kimura, Ken-ichiro

    2003-01-01

    Fourteen major and trace elements in marine sediment core samples collected from the coasts along eastern Japan, i.e. Tokyo Bay (II) (the recess), Tokyo Bay (IV) (the mouth), Mutsu Bay and Funka Bay and the Northwest Pacific basin as a comparative subject were determined by the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The sedimentation rates and sedimentary ages were calculated for the coastal sediment cores by the 210 Pb method. The results obtained in this study are summarized as follows: (1) Lanthanoid abundance patterns suggested that the major origin of the sediments was terrigenous material. La*/Lu* and Ce*/La* ratios revealed that the sediments from Tokyo Bay (II) and Mutsu Bay more directly reflected the contribution from river than those of other regions. In addition, the Th/Sc ratio indicated that the coastal sediments mainly originated in the materials from the volcanic island-arcs, Japanese islands, whereas those from the Northwest Pacific mainly from the continent. (2) The correlation between the Ce/U and Th/U ratios with high correlation coefficients of 0.920 to 0.991 indicated that all the sediments from Tokyo Bay (II) and Funka Bay were in reducing conditions while at least the upper sediments from Tokyo Bay (IV) and Mutsu Bay were in oxidizing conditions. (3) It became quite obvious that the sedimentation mechanism and the sedimentation environment at Tokyo Bay (II) was different from those at Tokyo Bay (IV), since the sedimentation rate at Tokyo Bay (II) was approximately twice as large as that at Tokyo Bay (IV). The sedimentary age of the 5th layer (8∼10 cm in depth) from Funka Bay was calculated at approximately 1940∼50, which agreed with the time, 1943∼45 when Showa-shinzan was formed by the eruption of the Usu volcano. (author)

  20. Sacchi, Livio (2004. Tokyo: City and Architecture. 249 p. ISBN: 0-7893-1212-3. Nueva York: Universe Publishing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermin Ernesto Flores Quiroz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The book by the Italian author Livio Sacchi, focuses on the analysis on the spatial development of the city of Tokyo and the way in which the socioeconomic processes of the 19th and 20th centuries influenced the conformation of the urban structure on which millions of Tokyo citizens develop their daily life. During the text, the author underlines the impact of the modern architectural movement on the urban landscape of Tokyo. Furthermore, it is important to mention that this work serves as a translator for the western readers, because it deciphers the social and spatial characteristics that constitute the most populous city in the world.

  1. Revealing Campus Nature: The Lessons of the Native Landscape for Campus Heritage Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    As American settlement spread to the Midwest, college and university campuses came to symbolize some of the greatest achievements of public policy and private philanthropy. However, the expansion westward often ignored the cultural precedents of Native Americans and the diversity of the varied native landscapes. Today, campus planners and historic…

  2. Prevalence and contamination levels of listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojima, Yukako; Ida, Miki; Nakama, Akiko; Nishino, Yukari; Fukui, Rie; Kuroda, Sumiyo; Hirai, Akihiko; Kai, Akemi; Sadamasu, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We surveyed prevalence and contamination levels of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods between 2000 and 2012 in Tokyo. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 52 (1.7%) out of 2,980 samples. Comparing the prevalence in the study period, 2.2% were positive in the former period (2000-2005) and 1.2% in the latter (2006-2012). Using the most probable number (MPN) technique, 32 samples were contaminated with fewer than 0.3 L. monocytogenes/g, 10 samples with 0.3-1.0/g and 4 samples with more than 1.0/g (the maximum was 2.3/g). The most common serovar was 1/2a, followed by 1/2b, 4b and 1/2c. We revealed that ready-to-eat foods in Tokyo were contaminated with L. monocytogenes, although the contamination levels were low.

  3. Gamma-ray dose rate in air on the subway lines in Tokyo metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masayuki; Hosoda, Masahiro; Ogashiwa, Susumu; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of gamma-ray dose rates in air were performed on 12 subway lines in Tokyo from the perspective of health physics, because the subways are commonly used for commuting in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The results showed that the maximum dose rate (36.5 nGy/h) was 1.6 times higher than that of the minimum one (23.3 nGy/h), and that the dose rate in the subway car was 33% lower than the outside. Also the results strongly suggested that the dose rates depend on the concentration of natural radionuclide around the subway lines and the platform structures rather than the depth. (author)

  4. Keterpaduan Pasar Tuna Segar Benoa/Bali, Indonesia Dan Pasar Sentral Tuna Tokyo, Jepang

    OpenAIRE

    SITORUS, EDYANTO

    2007-01-01

    Tuna fish is which forming life and horde in tropical territorial water until subtropics. Tuna type which important in commerce is Yellowfin, Bigeye, Poor Southern Bluefin, Northern Bluefin, Albacore and of Skipjack (Cakalang). Objective of this research is analyze integrity of market that happened between local market (Market of Benoa, Bali) with reference market (Tuna Central Market of Tokyo, Japan), It is seen from the research that in Benoa there are 3 system of selling fresh tu...

  5. A Study of the Tuition of Middle Schools in Prwear Tokyo Prefecture

    OpenAIRE

    Karasuda, Naoya

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarifying the tuition in middle schools at the prewar Tokyo prefecture. The tuition differed between the public schools and the private schools. In the 1890s, most expenses required for management of middle schools was provided with tuition in both private amd public schools. At this time, the tuition of public schools was higher than the private schools. After 1900 tuition of public schools became cheaper than private schools. As expenses of public schools, i...

  6. Antibacterial Therapy of Acute Cholecystitis and Cholangitis (According to Tokyo Guidelines2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics should be used wisely in antimicrobial therapy in each institution, region and country. The recent global spread of antibiotic resistance gives us a warning in the modern practice. Tokyo Guidelines 2013 provide practical guidance for physicians and surgeons involved in the treatment of community-acquired and hospital acute biliary infection. Much remains uncertain in this view. Continuous monitoring of local resistance to antibiotics and further studies in acute cholecystitis and cholangitis should be justified.

  7. Tokyo filmifestival näitas Aasia tippe / Pille-Riin Pregel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pregel, Pille-Riin

    2001-01-01

    Tokyo filmifestivalist. Lähemalt Tai mängufilmist "Ohtlik Bangkok" ("Bangkok Dangerous") : režissöörid vennad Oxide ja Danny Pang ning Iraani "Kuupaiste all" ("Under the Moonlight" : režissöör Reza Mir-Karimi. Peaauhinna sai Albaania mängufilm "Loosungid2 ("Slogans"), mille režissöör Gjergj Xhuavani sai ka parima režissööri auhinna. Lisatud võitjate nimekiri

  8. Implementing a campus wide recycling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, L.

    2002-01-01

    'Full text:' The University of Windsor is currently expanding its recycling program to include all buildings on campus, but faces two challenges: 1) uncertainty about the current waste composition and distribution on campus; and 2) uncertainty about the effectiveness of increased recycling. This project assesses the current waste composition and the attitudes of the students towards recycling, and evaluates the effectiveness of proposed recycling activities. At present, paper is the only material that is collected throughout the entire campus. Except for two buildings, all other potentially recyclable materials within buildings, such as metal, glass, and plastic beverage containers, are discarded. The main focus of this research is on beverage containers as they represent clearly identifiable materials, but other materials were examined as well. To quantify the waste, different buildings on campus were classified according to their function: academic,operational and administrative. The waste composition study indicated that approximately 33% of the campus waste which is landfilled is composed of potentially recyclable material. A survey was then conducted to gauge the campus population's views on recycling issues that could affect the design of a recycling program. Interestingly, 97% of the respondents indicated a high willingness to recycle, but were uncertain as to how and where to recycle on campus. The project is currently assessing potential diversion rates using new, clearly identifiable recycling receptacles placed within selected classrooms for all major materials. There is a significant tradeoff however because the cost for new receptacles is considerable: multiple materials containers are often placed in high pedestrian traffic locations (e.g., hallways) and not always in classrooms,of which there are often many. This project will evaluate the basic benefits and costs of implementing a more comprehensive recycling program, and recommend how other

  9. Three-dimensional distributions of sewage markers in Tokyo Bay water-fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managaki, Satoshi; Takada, Hideshige; Kim, Dong-Myung; Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Shiraishi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Three-dimensional distributions of fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs: more specifically, DSBP and DAS1), which are sewage-derived water-soluble markers, were observed in Tokyo Bay water through multi-layer sampling of water at 20 locations. In summer, FWAs predominated in the surface layers, with trace but significant concentration of FWAs in bottom water due to stratification of seawater. In winter, on the other hand, FWAs were extensively mixed into the bottom layers because of the vertical mixing of seawater. In the surface layer, FWA concentrations and the DSBP/DAS1 ratio (the concentration ratio of DSBP to DAS1) were lower in summer than in winter, suggesting more efficient photodegradation of FWAs in euphotic zones during the summer due to stronger solar radiation. Horizontally, FWAs were widely distributed over the surface layer of Tokyo Bay. Surface water with DSBP concentrations above 50 ng/L, corresponding to <200 times dilution of sewage effluent, was found to have spread up to 10 km from the coastline. In addition, an offshore decline in FWA concentrations was observed, showing a half-distance of 10-20 km. The decrease was caused by dilution by seawater of fresh water containing FWAs. The eastern part of the bay was different with respect to surface layers, with higher concentrations seen in northeastern parts. Furthermore, dispersion of combined sewer overflow (CSO)-derived water mass was observed in Tokyo Bay after heavy rain

  10. A Comparative Study on Cultural Attitudes of On-campus and Non-Campus Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shalchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article will explore the different way of leisure and some cultural attitudes among on-campus and non-campus students. The method of this study is survey research and questionnaires have been used. The statistical population is the students under the Ministry of Science, Research and Technology’s universities and three-stage cluster sampling method was used for sampling. In the first stage among 31 provinces in Iran, 6 cities have been chosen and in the second stage a number of universities have been chosen among Public University, Payame Noor University, University of Applied Science and Technology, and Nonprofit University, and in the third stage a number of students staying in dormitories and on-campus have been chosen randomly. The sample size is 2500 people and SPSS 19 software has been utilized for data analysis. The results show that there is a considerable difference between the participants’ priorities, obstacles and opportunities in the two groups. Also there is a significant difference between on-campus and non-campus students in terms of their treatment of the most important university’s issues, important criterion in individual success and concerns about the relation between themselves and the society. On-campus students claim financial limitations as one of the most important obstacles for passing their leisure time whereas non-campus students see social supervision as the most important limitation. Moreover, there is a large gap between on-campus students to have an access to leisure facilities, with other students. The concerns between the two groups are also very different. For example on-campus students have twice more concerns on marriage whereas non-campus students have twice more concerns on immigration to foreign countries.

  11. 78 FR 78338 - Japan-U.S. Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum Tokyo, Japan February 18-19...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Japan-U.S. Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum Tokyo, Japan February 18-19, 2014 AGENCY: International Trade... Japan-United States Decommissioning and Remediation Fukushima Recovery Forum (``Fukushima Recovery Forum...

  12. The Tokyo Trial and the Question of Colonial Responsibility: Korean Reactions to Allied Justice in Occupied Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-hwan Chong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the zainichi Korean media and organizations responded to the Tokyo Trial and its pursuit of war responsibility. Their critiques of the Tokyo Trial often presented a critical insight from the perspective of anti-colonialism. Zainichi Koreans correctly questioned the absence of colonial responsibility in the pursuit of justice and war responsibility in the trial. In this sense, the problems and limits of the Tokyo Trial that scholars started to “discover” in the 1970s had already been discussed by some zainichi Koreans in the late 1940s. By delving into previously under-explored historical sources, particularly the numerous newspapers published by zainichi Korean groups during the occupation period, this article demonstrates how zainichi Korean critics understood the limits of the Tokyo Trial beyond the binary of “victors' justice” and “the judgment of civilization.”

  13. 77 FR 56909 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Tokyo 1955-70: A New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-14

    ... the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, from on or about November 18, 2012, until on or about February... ``Tokyo 1955-70: A New Avant-Garde,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United...

  14. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Symposium on Naval Hydrodynamics Held at Tokyo (Japan) on October 6-10 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    sciences, material sciences, and ocean University of Tokyo, and his many able and science and technology . dedicated co-workers, in organizing this meeting...occasion. Since our Symposia concerning hydro- us to ease this section and gastronomy such as this dynamics or naval science took place in Tokyo, I buffet...Houten, R.J., Unpublished, 1978. 6. Van Oossanen, P., "Theoretical 6. CONCLUSION Prediction of Cavitation of Propellers,"Marine Technology , Vol. 14, No

  15. Corroborating a new probabilistic seismic hazard assessment for greater Tokyo from historical intensity observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, S.; Stein, R.; Toda, S.

    2006-12-01

    The long recorded history of earthquakes in Japan affords an opportunity to forecast seismic shaking exclusively from past observations of shaking. For this we analyzed 10,000 intensity observations recorded during AD 1600-2000 in a 350 x 350 km area centered on Tokyo in a Geographic Information System. A frequency-intensity curve is found for each 5 x 5 km cell, and from this the probability of exceeding any intensity level can be estimated. The principal benefits of this approach is that it builds the fewest possible assumptions into a probabilistic seismic forecast, it includes site and source effects without imposing this behavior, and we do not need to know the size or location of any earthquake or the location and slip rate of any fault. The cost is that we must abandon any attempt to make a time-dependent forecast, which could be quite different. We believe the method is suitable to many applications of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment, and to other regions. The two key assumptions are that the slope of the observed frequency-intensity relation at every site is the same, and that the 400-year record is long enough to encompass the full range of seismic behavior. Tests we conduct suggest that both assumptions are sound. The resulting 30-year probability of IJMA>=6 shaking (roughly equivalent to PGA>=0.9 g or MMI=IX-X) is 30-40% in Tokyo, Kawasaki, and Yokohama, and 10-15% in Chiba and Tsukuba, the range reflecting spatial variability and curve-fitting alternatives. The strongest shaking is forecast along the margins of Tokyo Bay, within the river sediments extending northwest from Tokyo, and at coastal sites near the plate boundary faults. We also produce long- term exceedance maps of peak ground acceleration for building code regulations, and short-term hazard maps associated with hypothetical catastrophe bonds. Our results for greater Tokyo resemble our independent Poisson probability developed from conventional seismic hazard analysis, as well as

  16. Social Experiments in Tokyo Metropolitan Area Convection Study for Extreme Weather Resilient Cities(TOMACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyoshi, Nakatani; Nakamura, Isao; MIsumi, Ryohei; Shoji, Yoshinori

    2015-04-01

    Introduction TOMACS research project has been started since 2010 July in order to develop the elementary technologies which are required for the adaptation of societies to future global warming impacts that cannot be avoided by the reduction of greenhouse gases. In collaboration with related government institutions, local governments, private companies, and residents, more than 25 organizations and over 100 people are participated. TOMACS consists of the following three research themes: Theme 1: Studies on extreme weather with dense meteorological observations Theme 2: Development of the extreme weather early detection and prediction system Theme 3: Social experiments on extreme weather resilient cities Theme 1 aims to understand the initiation, development, and dissipation processes of convective precipitation in order to clarify the mechanism of localized heavy rainfall which are potential causes of flooding and landslides. Theme 2 aims to establish the monitoring and prediction system of extreme phenomena which can process real-time data from dense meteorological observation networks, advanced X-band radar network systems and predict localized heavy rainfalls and strong winds. Through social experiments, theme 3 aims to establish a method to use information obtained by the monitoring system of extreme phenomena to disaster prevention operations in order to prevent disasters and reduce damage. Social Experiments Toyo University is the core university for the social experiments accomplishment. And following organizations are participating in this research theme: NIED, the Tokyo Metropolitan Research Institute for Environmental Protection (TMRIEP), University of Tokyo, Tokyo Fire Department (TFD), Edogawa Ward in Tokyo, Yokohama City, Fujisawa City and Minamiashigara City in Kanagawa, East Japan Railway Company, Central Japan Railway Company, Obayashi Corporation, and Certified and Accredited Meteorologists of Japan(CAMJ). The social experiments have carried out

  17. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system.

  18. Performance Analysis of IIUM Wireless Campus Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, Suhaimi Abd; Masud, Mosharrof H; Anwar, Farhat

    2013-01-01

    International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM) is one of the leading universities in the world in terms of quality of education that has been achieved due to providing numerous facilities including wireless services to every enrolled student. The quality of this wireless service is controlled and monitored by Information Technology Division (ITD), an ISO standardized organization under the university. This paper aims to investigate the constraints of wireless campus network of IIUM. It evaluates the performance of the IIUM wireless campus network in terms of delay, throughput and jitter. QualNet 5.2 simulator tool has employed to measure these performances of IIUM wireless campus network. The observation from the simulation result could be one of the influencing factors in improving wireless services for ITD and further improvement

  19. Enuresis and Hyperactivity-Inattention in Early Adolescence: Findings from a Population-Based Survey in Tokyo (Tokyo Early Adolescence Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Kanata

    Full Text Available Enuresis (9% at age 9.5 negatively affects children's psychosocial status. Clinically-diagnosed enuresis (2% at the age is associated with hyperactivity-inattention, and common neural bases have been postulated to underlie this association. It is, however, unclear whether this association is applicable to enuresis overall among the general population of early adolescents when considered comorbid behavioral problems. We aimed to examine whether enuresis correlates with hyperactivity-inattention after controlling for the effects of other behavioral problems.Participants were 4,478 children (mean age 10.2 ± 0.3 years old and their parents from the Tokyo Early Adolescence Survey (T-EAS, a population-representative cross-sectional study conducted in Tokyo, Japan conducted from 2012 to 2015. Children's enuresis and behavioral problems, including hyperactivity-inattention (as measured by the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire, were examined using parent-reporting questionnaires. Multivariate linear regression was used to explore whether enuresis predicts hyperactivity-inattention.The hyperactivity-inattention score was significantly higher in the enuretic group than the non-enuretic group (enuretic: M (SD = 3.8 (2.3, non-enuretic: M (SD = 3.0 (2.1, Hedge's g = 0.39, p < .001. This association remained significant even after controlling for other behavioral problems and including sex, age, intelligence quotient (IQ, low birth weight and parents' education (β = .054 [95% CI: .028-.080], p < .001.Enuresis was independently associated with hyperactivity-inattention in early adolescents among general population even when other behavioral problems were considered. These results suggest that, as with clinically-diagnosed cases, enuresis may predict need for screening and psychosocial support for hyperactivity-inattention.

  20. Suburban School Opens Elementary Campus in the Heart of Memphis: St. George's Independent School, Memphis, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    St. George's has nearly 1,150 students on three campuses: an elementary campus in Germantown and a middle/upper school campus in Collierville, both suburbs of Memphis, and a second elementary campus in Memphis. The Memphis campus serves 140 students in pre-K-5th grade. All Memphis campus students receive financial aid based on need, and…

  1. Software Engineering Infrastructure in a Large Virtual Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Jesus; Merino, Jorge; Navarro, Antonio; Peralta, Miguel; Roldan, Yolanda; Silveira, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The design, construction and deployment of a large virtual campus are a complex issue. Present virtual campuses are made of several software applications that complement e-learning platforms. In order to develop and maintain such virtual campuses, a complex software engineering infrastructure is needed. This paper aims to analyse the…

  2. Measuring Sexual Violence on Campus: Climate Surveys and Vulnerable Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Brooke; Jones, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Since the 2014 "Not Alone" report on campus sexual assault, the use of climate surveys to measure sexual violence on campuses across the United States has increased considerably. The current study utilizes a quasi meta-analysis approach to examine the utility of general campus climate surveys, which include a measure of sexual violence,…

  3. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  4. Balancing Disruptive Students' Rights with Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Kathryn I.; Kajs, Lawrence; Matthew, Millard E.

    2017-01-01

    Disruptive students potentially pose significant problems for campus administrators as they strive to maintain a safe campus environment conducive to learning while not violating the legal rights of the students. Maintaining a safe campus is important because increasing numbers of students with mental and cognitive disorders are enrolling in…

  5. Community College Institutional Effectiveness: Perspectives of Campus Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolits, Gary J.; Graybeal, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses a campus institutional effectiveness (IE) process and its influence on faculty and staff. Although a comprehensive, rational IE process appeals to campus leaders, this study found that it creates significant faculty and staff challenges. Campus leaders, faculty, and staff differ in their (a) knowledge and support of IE; (b)…

  6. Stalking on Campus: Ensuring Security with Rights and Liberties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julie; Longo, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    College campuses are often perceived as idyllic communities. While there is much truth in such perceptions, not surprisingly there are many complicated issues on college campuses. Stalking is one such problem that seems to persist and thrive in the cloistered college setting. Campus safety efforts must temper security practices with civil rights…

  7. A Spectrum of Liabilities for Off-Campus Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Mary-Pat

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is liability of higher education institutions for off-campus housing. In the off-campus housing context, the "assumed duty" theory was determinative in a 2006 Delaware Supreme Court case. A student was assaulted by the boyfriend of another student in the parking lot of off-campus housing. The housing was…

  8. The Formation and Development of the Mindful Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFon, Margaret A.; Christian, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This chapter recounts the development of faculty and student groups whose purposes are to promote mindfulness and contemplative pedagogy on the California State University-Chico campus through work both on the campus and in the greater Chico community. The "Mindful Campus" a student organization formed in 2011, merged with the…

  9. Characterization of NOx emission in the suburbs of Tokyo based on simultaneous and real-time observations of atmospheric Ox and NOx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, J.

    2013-12-01

    .1 ppbv for Ox and 0.5 ppbv for NOx (60-s integration, S/N = 3). The observation test in the suburbs of Tokyo was conducted in April 2013 at Tokorozawa Campus, Waseda University. During the campaign, 48 cases of ';NOx spikes', for which NOx levels significantly varied in the second time scale due to local NOx emission, were captured. NO2/NOx ratio in the exhaust gas was estimated as the slope of regression line between 1-s series data of Ox and those of NOx observed during each spike. The average of acquired NO2/NOx ratio was 0.10. Thus, as a result of observations of real atmosphere, the present NO2/NOx ratio in the exhaust gases in the suburbs of Tokyo was 0.10 as average, which was mainly due to exhausts of automobiles. However, when the individual cases were considered, NO2/NOx could vary from 0.00 to 0.30. Such a wide range of NO2/NOx ratio may be due to (1) difference of source types (eg. automobiles, power generator) and (2) difference of conditions of sources (eg. engines, filters of exhaust). For example, NO2/NOx ratio for hybrid electric vehicles may be different from those for conventional cars. When diffusion of such new model cars can change NOx emission in near future, the present method of simultaneous and real-time monitoring of Ox and NOx in the atmosphere can be useful and promising for characterization of NOx emission.

  10. Forecasting probabilistic seismic shaking for greater Tokyo from 400 years of intensity observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, S.; Stein, R. S.; Toda, S.

    2009-12-01

    The long recorded history of earthquakes in Japan affords an opportunity to forecast seismic shaking exclusively from past shaking. We calculate the time-averaged (Poisson) probability of severe shaking by using more than 10,000 intensity observations recorded since AD 1600 in a 350-km-wide box centered on Tokyo. Unlike other hazard assessment methods, source and site effects are included without modeling, and we do not need to know the size or location of any earthquake or the location and slip rate of any fault. The two key assumptions are that the slope of the observed frequency-intensity relation at every site is the same; and that the 400-year record is long enough to encompass the full range of seismic behavior. Tests we conduct here suggest that both assumptions are sound. The resulting 30-year probability of IJMA≥6 shaking (~PGA≥0.9 g or MMI≥IX) is 30-40% in Tokyo, Kawasaki, and Yokohama, and 10-15% in Chiba and Tsukuba. This result means that there is a 30% chance that 4 million people would be subjected to IJMA≥6 shaking during an average 30-year period. We also produce exceedance maps of peak ground acceleration for building code regulations, and calculate short-term hazard associated with a hypothetical catastrophe bond. Our results resemble an independent assessment developed from conventional seismic hazard analysis for greater Tokyo. Over 10000 intensity observations stored and analyzed using geostatistical tools of GIS. Distribution of historical data is shown on this figure.

  11. Preceptor engagement in distributed medical school campuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Piggott

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Barriers to engagement in teaching primarily focused on differences in job structure in the community, administrative barriers both at the hospital and through the medical school, and lack of knowledge on how to teach.  As medical schools look to expand the capacity of distributed campuses, misperceptions should be addressed and opportunities to improve engagement should be further explored.

  12. Solar Thermal | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    building can still be designed and constructed to be solar ready with roof exposures and slopes that accept Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Solar thermal applications can be simple, cost effective, and diverse for research campuses. The following links go to sections that describe when and where solar thermal

  13. Transportation Sustainability on a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to show the present level of sustainable transportation, mainly walking and bicycling, on a large campus in the US Midwest and then analyzes some of the opportunities and impediments in increasing the modal share. Design/methodology/approach: Three types of analysis are used. First, current level of walking and bicycling…

  14. Uus ja uhke campus valmib aastaks 2010

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli haldusdirektor Henn Karits tutvustab ülikooli lähimate aastate ehitusplaane - peamaja rekonstrueerimist, majandus- ja humanitaarteaduskondade hoone ning raamatukogu uue hoone ehitamist. Uus campus sisaldab endas ka maa-aluse parkla, spordikompleksi, üliõpilasühiselamud

  15. Smart Grid | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    power consumption of campus data centers. University of California at Los Angeles: Hosts the Wireless of the U.S. electric power grid through reinforced infrastructure, sophisticated electronic sensors transmission and distribution system to better coordinate energy delivery into the grid. Better coordinate

  16. Eco-Friendly Campuses as Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Stephen J.; Kearns, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable design projects offer academic communities the opportunity to make the design and operations of their campuses part of the larger lessons of social and environmental responsibility that are integral parts of higher education. In no place is that demonstrated more clearly than in New England, with its long commitment to environmental…

  17. A Student View of Campus Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea H.

    1971-01-01

    In this article the author discussed students' rejection of materialism and their role in a society that provides no function for the adolescent. Amidst campus disorder, the cooperation of administration, faculty, and students during recent strikes is seen as having a positive effect on future understanding and communication. (BY)

  18. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  19. Suicide Prevention in a Diverse Campus Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Akhter, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    As the college population in the United States rapidly diversifies, leaders of successful campus suicide prevention programs are recognizing the importance of targeting specific groups of students. Recent estimates from the National Center for Education Statistics indicated that in 2008 more than one-third (36.7 percent) of college students…

  20. Gatekeeper Training in Campus Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallack, Cory; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.; Taub, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Gatekeeper training is one of the most commonly employed methods for identifying and intervening with at-risk students (Davidson and Locke, 2010). Within the context of campus suicide prevention, a gatekeeper is broadly defined as any individual who has the potential to come into contact with at-risk students (Davidson and Locke, 2010). Although…

  1. The Campus Racial Climate: Contexts of Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Sylvia

    1992-01-01

    An examination of data from several studies investigated white (n=1,825), African-American (n=328), and Chicano (n=340) college student perceptions of campus racial climate and institutional commitment to cultural diversity. Student demographic variables were considered. Results indicated common and distinct views concerning the environment types…

  2. Quantum key distribution on Hannover Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhme, Joerg; Franz, Torsten; Werner, Reinhard F. [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, AG Quanteninformation (Germany); Haendchen, Vitus; Eberle, Tobias; Schnabel, Roman [Albert Einstein Institut, Quantum Interferometry (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We report on the progress of the implementation of an entanglement-based quantum key distribution on Hannover campus using squeezed gaussian states (continuous variables). This poster focuses on the theoretical aspects of the project. Experimental data has been compared with the theoretical simulation of the experimental setup. We especially discuss effects of the homodyne detection and postprocessing in use on the measurement outcome.

  3. Campus-Library Collaboration with Makerspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebekah J.

    2017-01-01

    Makerspaces provide an opportunity for libraries to build upon services they already offer while reaching out to students and faculty who do not frequent the library on a daily basis. By implementing a makerspace in the campus library, the space is seen as more neutral and approachable by students and staff from all academic departments. Broadly…

  4. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  5. An Empirical Investigation of Campus Portal Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghapour, Mohsen; Iranmanesh, Mohammad; Zailani, Suhaiza; Goh, Gerald Guan Gan

    2018-01-01

    This study has determined the determinants of the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness and their influence on campus portal usage. A quantitative approach was employed, using a five-point Likert scale questionnaire, adapted from previous studies. Data were gathered through a survey conducted with 341 staff working in the University of…

  6. Campus Memories: Learning with Contextualised Blogging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Tim; Al Takrouri, Bashar; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    De Jong, T., Al Takrouri, B., Specht, M., Koper, R. (2007). Campus Memories: Learning with Contextualised Blogging. In D. Griffiths, R. Koper & O. Liber (Eds). Proceedings of The 2nd TenCompetence Workshop (pp. 59-67), January 11-12, 2007, Manchester, United Kingdom.

  7. Historical Analysis of College Campus Interracial Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael W.; Firebaugh, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Interracial dating on American campuses has had a relatively stormy past. Until the past three decades or so, it was outlawed in some states. Southern institutions, in particular, such as the infamous Bob Jones University have made this issue divisive even among their own constituencies. Age and generation seem to be cogent factors with younger…

  8. Gay Rights on Campus, circa 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Elizabeth P.; Ford, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, staff, and faculty on college campuses has certainly improved over the last generation, but recent dramatic episodes confirm the continuing need for vigilance and reform. Students remain the constituency most vulnerable to the effects of entrenched bigotry: the harassment…

  9. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  10. Infusing JUST Design in Campus Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staeger-Wilson, Katheryne; Sampson, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    This practice brief highlights the collaborative work among a disability resource professional, a university architect, and students with disabilities to create a campus recreation center with universal design features. This partnership serves to illustrate that building to minimum compliance standards does not necessarily remove barriers to…

  11. Leadership Development on a Diverse Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riutta, Satu; Teodorescu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While leadership development is considered an important goal of education on many campuses, very little is known about how leadership skills develop in a diverse environment, which most colleges will be in the future. We compare causes for Socially Responsible Leadership (SRL) at the end of college students' first year in one diverse liberal arts…

  12. Social Class on Campus: Theories and Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Will

    2011-01-01

    This is at once a playful text with a serious purpose: to provide the reader with the theoretical lenses to analyze the dynamics of social class. It will appeal to students, and indeed anyone interested in how class mediates relationships in higher education, both because of its engaging tone, and because it uses the college campus as a microcosm…

  13. For Members Only: Feminism on Campus Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agness, Karin L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of contemporary feminism in the classroom and on campus is widespread, and student clubs, women's centers, and women's studies departments often exclude women who hold traditional views. In this article, the author takes a look at how this influence evolved and describes the very successful actions she took as a student to challenge…

  14. Landfill Gas | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfill Gas Landfill Gas For campuses located near an active or recently retired landfill , landfill gas offers an opportunity to derive significant energy from a renewable energy resource. The following links go to sections that describe when and where landfill gas systems may fit into your climate

  15. Toward a Virus-Free Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, Ariel

    2004-01-01

    In academic settings, battling Internet threats and coming out unscathed is uncommon. Unfortunately, on many college campuses cyber-security concerns rarely extend beyond the IT staff and are addressed in a disparate, ad-hoc fashion. Yet, while many universities and large corporations were hit hard by the recent NetSky and Sasser worms, fewer than…

  16. The University Campus: Why Military Sponsored Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Aubrey E.

    Military-sponsored research on the university campus has been a major issue during the past several years. Opposition has come from radicals, who wish to destroy the university itself, to critics, who feel such activities take needed funds and personnel from the more important task of solving our nation's social problems. These viewpoints and the…

  17. Campus Security Authorities, a New Look

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Recent high-profile events created the need for institutions in the United States to heighten concerns about how those responsible for compliance with the Clery Act handle Campus Security Authority (CSA) issues. Not expressly but realistically those responsible for integrating this complicated set of laws within institutions have likely just been…

  18. Campus Walkability, Pedometer-Determined Steps, and Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity: A Comparison of 2 University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B.; Mcclain, James J.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: At 2 Arizona State University (ASU) campuses, the authors measured student activity and distance walked on campus, as well as student-reported walkability around the student union. Methods: Students from ASU-Polytechnic (n = 20, 33% male) and ASU-Tempe (n = 20, 60% male) recorded distance walked on campus and wore…

  19. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summerizes the research and educational activities at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The Laboratory holds four main facilities, which are Yayoi reactor, an electron accelerator, fusion blanket research facility, and heavy ion irradiation research facility. And they are open to the researchers both inside and outside the University. The application of the facilities are described. The activities and achievements of the Laboratory staffs, and theses for graduate, master, and doctor degrees are also summerized. (J.P.N.)

  20. A new apparatus at hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Hiromi; Iwai, Takeo; Narui, Makoto; Omata, Takao [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    1996-12-01

    In the hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, following apparatuses were newly installed for accelerator relating apparatus on 1995 fiscal year; (1) Hyper ion microbeam analysis apparatus, (2) Fourier conversion infrared microscopy, (3) Pico second two-dimensional fluorescence measuring apparatus, (4) Femto second wave-length reversible pulse laser radiation apparatus, and others. In addition to double irradiation, pulse beam irradiation experiment and so forth characteristic in conventional hyper irradiation research apparatus, upgrading of material irradiation experiments using these new apparatuses are intended. (G.K.)

  1. A new apparatus at hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Hiromi; Iwai, Takeo; Narui, Makoto; Omata, Takao

    1996-01-01

    In the hyper irradiation research facility at the Atomic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, following apparatuses were newly installed for accelerator relating apparatus on 1995 fiscal year; 1) Hyper ion microbeam analysis apparatus, 2) Fourier conversion infrared microscopy, 3) Pico second two-dimensional fluorescence measuring apparatus, 4) Femto second wave-length reversible pulse laser radiation apparatus, and others. In addition to double irradiation, pulse beam irradiation experiment and so forth characteristic in conventional hyper irradiation research apparatus, upgrading of material irradiation experiments using these new apparatuses are intended. (G.K.)

  2. Medical Education in Japan and Introduction of Medical Education at Tokyo Women’s Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumiko Okubo

    2014-01-01

    Medical education in Japan changed rapidly in the last decade of the 20th century with the introduction of new education methods and implementation of the core curriculum and common achievement testing such as CBT and OSCE.Recently, there have been other movements in medical education in Japan that have introduced 'outcome(competency) based education(OBE)' and created a system for accreditation of medical education programs. This report provides an overview of current medical education in Japan. Moreover, it introduces medical education at Tokyo Women’s Medical University.

  3. Thermal comfort along the marathon course of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Tsuyoshi; Seo, Yuhwan; Yamasaki, Yudai; Tsunematsu, Nobumitsu; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Yamato, Hiroaki; Mikami, Takehiko

    2018-04-01

    The Olympic Games will be held in Tokyo in 2020 and the period will be the hottest period of the year in Japan. Marathon is a sport with a large heat load, and it is said that the risk of heat stroke rises more than other sports activities. The thermal environment of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic marathon course is analyzed by using wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) and Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) map of the center area of Tokyo. The change due to the place, the effect of the shadow of the building, and the position on the course was analyzed from the distribution of WBGT and UTCI in the short-term analysis of sunny day from August 2 to August 6, 2014. To make the distribution map, we calculated distributions of sky view factor and mean radiant temperature of the 10 km × 7.5 km analyzed area in the center of Tokyo. Distributions of air temperature and humidity are calculated from Metropolitan Environmental Temperature and Rainfall Observation System data, which is a high-resolution measurement network. It was possible to incorporate the local variation of temperature and humidity of the analyzed area. In the result, the WBGT is about 1 °C lower and the UTCI is about 4-8 °C lower in the shadow of buildings from 9:00 to 10:00 than in the sunny side. As a cooling method, making a shadow is a relatively effective method. The variation along the course considering the distribution of meteorological data within the area is about 0.5 °C WBGT and 1 °C UTCI range. If we allow the error of this range, one-point meteorological data can be applied for the estimation along the course. Passing the right side (left side in the case of return) of the course could keep the accumulated value slightly lower along the course in the morning because the marathon course roughly runs from west to east and buildings' shadow is on the relatively right side (south side). But practically, the effect of changing the position on the course was small. The long-term analysis on the

  4. Cognition of high-level radioactive waste disposal in the Tokyo metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    In Japan, the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) produced by nuclear power generation is an urgent issue. Recently, some questionnaire surveys were conducted. Especially the surveys in the Tokyo metropolitan area which were conducted by AESJ include the fulfilling questions concerning HLW relatively. In this paper, the author shows the results of surveys by AESJ. These results show that the issue concerning HLW is not so much concern for the respondents by comparison with many kinds of issues in the society. They also show that female respondents have less understanding about HLW disposal and have more degree of anxiety against HLW and disposal than male respondents. (author)

  5. Market-wide price co-movement around crashes in the Tokyo Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Jun-ichi Maskawa; Joshin Murai; Koji Kuroda

    2013-01-01

    As described in this paper, we study market-wide price co-movements around crashes by analyzing a dataset of high-frequency stock returns of the constituent issues of Nikkei 225 Index listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange for the three years during 2007--2009. Results of day-to-day principal component analysis of the time series sampled at the 1 min time interval during the continuous auction of the daytime reveal the long range up to a couple of months significant auto-correlation of the maximu...

  6. Social capital and stigma toward people with mental illness in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Yoshifumi; Kawakami, Norito; Miyamoto, Yuki; Chiba, Rie; Tsuchiya, Masao

    2013-04-01

    Living in a community with high social capital might lead to lower stigma towards people with mental illness. We examined the association between social capital and stigma toward people with mental illness in the community of Tokyo, Japan. A random sample of 2,000 community residents was selected and surveyed. Data from 516 respondents were analyzed. In this study, two individual-based social capital variables were significantly and negatively associated with the stigma score, while area-based social capital was not significantly associated with the stigma score. Social capital, particularly reciprocity/norm of cooperation and trust in the community, may be associated with lower stigma.

  7. Design and Implementation of Campus Application APP Based on Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    dongxu, Zhu; yabin, liu; xian lei, PI; weixiang, Zhou; meng, Huang

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, "Internet + campus" as the entrance of the Android technology based on the application of campus design and implementation of Application program. Based on GIS(Geographic Information System) spatial database, GIS spatial analysis technology, Java development technology and Android development technology, this system server adopts the Model View Controller architectue to realize the efficient use of campus information and provide real-time information of all kinds of learning and life for campus student at the same time. "Fingertips on the Institute of Disaster Prevention Science and Technology" release for the campus students of all grades of life, learning, entertainment provides a convenient.

  8. Campus Grids: Bringing Additional Computational Resources to HEP Researchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2012-01-01

    It is common at research institutions to maintain multiple clusters that represent different owners or generations of hardware, or that fulfill different needs and policies. Many of these clusters are consistently under utilized while researchers on campus could greatly benefit from these unused capabilities. By leveraging principles from the Open Science Grid it is now possible to utilize these resources by forming a lightweight campus grid. The campus grids framework enables jobs that are submitted to one cluster to overflow, when necessary, to other clusters within the campus using whatever authentication mechanisms are available on campus. This framework is currently being used on several campuses to run HEP and other science jobs. Further, the framework has in some cases been expanded beyond the campus boundary by bridging campus grids into a regional grid, and can even be used to integrate resources from a national cyberinfrastructure such as the Open Science Grid. This paper will highlight 18 months of operational experiences creating campus grids in the US, and the different campus configurations that have successfully utilized the campus grid infrastructure.

  9. Mental Health Problems among Undergraduates in Fukushima, Tokyo, and Kyoto after the March 11 Tohoku Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Motoya, Ryo; Sasagawa, Satoko; Takahashi, Takahito; Okajima, Isa; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Essau, Cecilia A

    2015-06-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake devastated the Tohoku region, which led to a tsunami and a nuclear disaster. While these three disasters caused tremendous physical damage, their psychological impact remains unclear. The present study evaluated traumatic responses, internalizing (i.e., anxiety and depression), and externalizing (i.e., anger) symptoms among Japanese young people in the immediate aftermath and 2.5 years later. A total of 435 undergraduates were recruited from universities in three differentially exposed regions: Fukushima, Tokyo, and Kyoto. They completed a set of questionnaires retrospectively (i.e., September to December 2013) to measure their traumatic responses, anxiety and depressive symptoms, functional impairment, and anger immediately after the disaster and 2.5 years later. Participants in Tokyo had the highest level of traumatic response and internalizing symptoms immediately after the earthquake, whereas those in Fukushima had significantly higher levels of trait anger, anger-in (holding one's anger in), and anger-out (expressing one's anger externally). In Kyoto, the levels of anxiety and depression after 2.5 years were significantly higher than they were immediately after the disasters. In conclusion, anger symptoms were high among young people who lived at or near the center of the disasters, while anxiety and depression were high among those who lived far away from the disasters. These findings suggest the importance of providing mental health services to young people who did not live near the disaster area as well as to those living in the directly affected area.

  10. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This is an annual report prepared on research education action, operation state of research instruments and others in FY 1995 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The laboratory has four large instruments such as high speed neutron source reactor, 'Yayoi', electron linac, fundamentally experimental equipment for blanket design of nuclear fusion reactor, and heavy radiation research equipment (HIT), of which former two are used for cooperative research with universities in Japan, and the next blanket and the last HIT are also presented for cooperative researches in Faculty of Engineering and in University of Tokyo, respectively. FY 1995 was the beginning year of earnest discussion on future planning of this facility with concentrated effort. These four large research instruments are all in their active use. And, their further improvement is under preparation. In this report, the progress in FY 1995 on operation and management of the four large instruments are described at first, and on next, research actions, contents of theses for degree and graduation of students as well as research results of laboratory stuffs are summarized. These researches are constituted mainly using these large instruments in the facility, aiming at development of advanced and new field of atomic energy engineering and relates to nuclear reactor first wall engineering, nuclear reactor fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, thermal-liquid engineering, mathematical information engineering, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on. (G.K.)

  11. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes research and educational activities, operation status of the research facilities of the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo on fiscal year 1996. This facility has four major research facilities such as fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', electron Linac, fundamental experiment facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design and high fluence irradiation facility(HIT). Education and research activities are conducted in a wide fields of nuclear engineering using these facilities. The former two facilities are available for various studies by universities all over Japan, facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design is utilized for research within the Faculty of Engineering and HIT is used for the research within the University of Tokyo. The facility established a plan to reorganized into a nation wide research collaboration center in fiscal year 1995 and after further discussion of a future program it is decided to hold 'Nuclear energy symposium' periodically after fiscal year 1997 as a part of the activity for appealing the research results to the public. (G.K.)

  12. Resilience with Mixed Agricultural and Urban Land Uses in Tokyo, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles Bruno Sioen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Urban agriculture can enhance the resilience of neighborhoods by providing fresh food in times of natural disasters; however, there is little empirical evidence to support this. Therefore, this study proposes a methodology to identify patterns of agricultural production in urban areas by quantifying self-sufficiency rates in vegetable weight and key nutrients. A spatial grid cell analysis using a geographic information system (GIS identifies the current and potential self-sufficiency of each land use pattern in Tokyo. In a total of 1479 grid cells, the dominant land use and locations of 49,263 agricultural plots led to the categorization of six distinguishable land use patterns. The results showed that Tokyo has a fruit and vegetable self-sufficiency of 4.27% and a potential of 11.73%. The nutritional self-sufficiency of selected nutrients was the highest in vitamin K (6.54%, followed by vitamin C (3.84% and vitamin A (1.92%. Peri-urban areas showed the highest resilience in relation to aggregated risks and population density because of the mixture in agricultural and urban land uses.

  13. Impact of energy consumption on urban warming and air pollution in Tokyo metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, T.S.; Hoshi, H.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid progress of industrialization and urbanization due to economic growth and concentration of social function in the urban areas in Japan have had an adverse effect on the urban environment. In most cities, it has become evident that the increase in energy consumption is causing environmental problems, including a temperature rise in the urban atmosphere (urban heat island) and air pollution. This paper reports the results of field observations and three dimensional simulations of the urban heat island using a three-dimensional modelling vorticity-velocity vector potential formation, in the Tokyo metropolitan area. According to the simulation for urban warming in the study area for the year 2031, the maximum temperature of a summer evening (18:00) would exceed 43 degrees celsius, indicating that Tokyo would no longer be comfortable for its inhabitants. It is concluded that in the near future, the problem of the urban heat island will become a more important issue than that of global warming because the rate of urban warming is greater. For this reason, the urban heat island could be fatal to humans unless resolved in the near future. (author). 1 tab., 11 figs., 18 refs

  14. Urban warming in Tokyo area and counterplan to improve future environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, T.S.; Hoshi, H.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid progress in industrialization and concentration of economic and social functions in urban areas has stimulated a consistent increase in population and energy consumption. The sudden urbanization in modern cities has caused environmental problems including alternation of the local climate. This is a phenomenon peculiar to the urban areas, and is characterized by a consistent rise in the temperature of the urban atmosphere, an increase in air pollutants, a decrease in relative humidity, and so on. The phenomenon characterized by a noticeable temperature rise in the urban atmosphere has been called the urban heat island and analyzed by both observational and numerical approaches. The numerical model can be classified into two ways: the mechanical model and energy balance model. Since Howard reported on the urban heat island in London, there have been a number of observational studies and numerical studies based on the two-dimensional modeling. Recently, three-dimensional studies have been reported simultaneously with great the advancement of the supercomputer. The present paper reports the results of the field observation by automobiles in the Tokyo metropolitan area and also the results of the three-dimensional simulation for urban warming in Tokyo at present and in the future around 2030. Further, the authors also present the results of a simulation for the effect of tree planting and vegetation

  15. Microclimate Variation and Estimated Heat Stress of Runners in the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Marathon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eichi Kosaka

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games will be held in July and August. As these are the hottest months in Tokyo, the risk of heat stress to athletes and spectators in outdoor sporting events is a serious concern. This study focuses on the marathon races, which are held outside for a prolonged time, and evaluates the potential heat stress of marathon runners using the COMFA (COMfort FormulA Human Heat Balance (HBB Model. The study applies a four-step procedure: (a measure the thermal environment along the marathon course; (b estimate heat stress on runners by applying COMFA; (c identify locations where runners may be exposed to extreme heat stress; and (d discuss measures to mitigate the heat stress on runners. On clear sunny days, the entire course is rated as ‘dangerous’ or ‘extremely dangerous’, and within the latter half of the course, there is a 10-km portion where values continuously exceed the extremely dangerous level. Findings illustrate which stretches have the highest need for mitigation measures, such as starting the race one hour earlier, allowing runners to run in the shade of buildings or making use of urban greenery including expanding the tree canopy.

  16. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This is an annual report prepared on research education action, operation state of research instruments and others in FY 1995 at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The laboratory has four large instruments such as high speed neutron source reactor, `Yayoi`, electron linac, fundamentally experimental equipment for blanket design of nuclear fusion reactor, and heavy radiation research equipment (HIT), of which former two are used for cooperative research with universities in Japan, and the next blanket and the last HIT are also presented for cooperative researches in Faculty of Engineering and in University of Tokyo, respectively. FY 1995 was the beginning year of earnest discussion on future planning of this facility with concentrated effort. These four large research instruments are all in their active use. And, their further improvement is under preparation. In this report, the progress in FY 1995 on operation and management of the four large instruments are described at first, and on next, research actions, contents of theses for degree and graduation of students as well as research results of laboratory stuffs are summarized. These researches are constituted mainly using these large instruments in the facility, aiming at development of advanced and new field of atomic energy engineering and relates to nuclear reactor first wall engineering, nuclear reactor fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, thermal-liquid engineering, mathematical information engineering, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on. (G.K.)

  17. History of ancient megathrust earthquakes beneath metropolitan Tokyo inferred from coastal lowland deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannen, Kazutaka; Yoong, Kim Haeng; Suzuki, Shigeru; Matsushima, Yoshiaki; Ota, Yuki; Kain, Claire L.; Goff, James

    2018-02-01

    Metropolitan Tokyo is located directly above a subduction zone that has generated two megathrust earthquakes in the past 300 years. However, the timing of older megathrusts on this margin is poorly understood. In this study, we aim to constrain the timings of past megathrust earthquakes, using coastal stratigraphy, paleoecology, radiocarbon dating and archaeological records from coastal lowlands. An investigation of 13 boreholes in the southern coastal area of metropolitan Tokyo found evidence for 4 m of uplift in a 6000-year period. However, we found that net vertical displacement in the last 1000 years is approximately zero. Results suggest that preservation of usually ephemeral lagoon sediments occurred on three occasions in the past 1000 years, and radiocarbon dating results show that the timings of these preservation episodes are close to that of major historical earthquakes. We thus attribute the intermittent preservation of the ephemeral lagoon deposits to coseismic uplift caused by the megathrust earthquakes. The candidates of the megathrust earthquakes are events that took place in 1703 CE, the 13th century, and 878 CE. Since these events produced no net vertical displacement due to inter-seismic subsidence, we propose that earthquakes responsible for long-term uplift of this region took place prior to the 9th century. This research also demonstrates the value of preserved intertidal sediments as paleoseismological archives where net tectonic displacement is neutral.

  18. The introduction of hydrogen in London and Tokyo: costs and strategic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, David; Hutchinson, David

    1998-01-01

    While the proposals made in this work are no more than tentative at this stage, especially in the light of unfinished analysis of the situation in Tokyo, they represent an initial perspective on some strategies and policies affecting the potential introduction of hydrogen into the energy system of an urban area. It has been shown that given certain assumptions the introduction of hydrogen into an urban energy infrastructure could be both environmentally beneficial and economically viable. In order to achieve this introduction several possible strategies have been proposed, although none of these has been tested in detail. These strategies are highly likely to vary between different urban areas depending on the prevailing conditions. Specific analysis on the conditions in Tokyo will be carried out in the near future. This should enable the qualitative evaluation of some of the proposals already made, and suggestion of new ones. At the same time, the transferability both of the methodology used for analysing London and the strategies suggested for the early introduction of hydrogen will be examined. (author)

  19. Time trends of perfluorinated compounds from the sediment core of Tokyo Bay, Japan (1950s-2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zushi, Yasuyuki; Tamada, Masafumi; Kanai, Yutaka; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2010-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) were detected in sediment core samples collected in Tokyo Bay to reveal their time trends. The core sample deposited during 1950s-2004 was divided into two- to three-year intervals and the concentrations of 24 types of PFCs were determined. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) decreased gradually from the early 1990s and its precursor decreased rapidly in the late 1990s, whereas perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased rapidly. The observed trends were regarded as a reflection of the shift from perfluorooctyl sulfonyl fluoride (PFOSF)-based products to telomer-based products after the phaseout of PFOSF-based products in 2001. The branched isomers of perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA) and perfluorotridecanoic acid (PFTrDA) were detected in the sample with its ratio of linear-isomer/branched-isomer concentrations decreasing. In this study, we revealed that the sediment core can serve as a tool for reconstructing the past pollution trend of PFCs and can provide interesting evidence concerning their environmental dynamics and time trend. - This study reports the time trends of the concentrations of 24 species of PFCs, including FTCA, FTUCA and FOSAA, in a sediment core of Tokyo Bay, Japan.

  20. Results of photovoltaic power generation system operation in Tokyo Electric Power Company; Tokyo Denryoku ni okeru taiyoko hatsuden setsubi no unten jisseki ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, H; Itokawa, K [Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    A report was made on the measurement of data and the results of the analysis at 14 sites of photovoltaic power generation facilities operated under system interconnection by Tokyo Electric Power Company. This type of system is provided in 40 sites as of the end of fiscal 1995, generating 479kw. The items measured were the generated electric energy at all 14 sites, and the quantity of solar radiation, outside air temperature, panel temperature, etc., at limited sites; and the capacity of each equipment, azimuth and inclination of the panel were also recorded simultaneously. Hourly values were used for the analysis. Five minute values were utilized, however, in the examination of the cause of lowered output and in the situation recognition of the influence of the shade or the change of weather. The utilization factor of the facilities was in the average 10.8% in fiscal 1994 and 10.7% in fiscal 1995. The factor decreased slightly unless the panel azimuth faced due south. The utilization factor at the panel inclination of 35 degrees and 45 degrees showed both 10.4% through the year making no difference. The system seemed to show no overwhelming possibilities in coping with electric power demand. The reason was that deviation existed for 2 hours or so in the peak and that reliability was low as basic power facilities. However, it was determined that the system be continuously examined in future. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Activity of environmental, safety and hygiene on Dainippon Ink and Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo plant; Dainippon Ink Kagaku Kogyo (kabu) Tokyo kojo no kankyo hoan katsudo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, T. [Dainippon Ink and Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-15

    This plant exists along Route 17 in Itabashi-ku, Tokyo adjacent to Saitama prefecture, and started operation in Nov. 1937 to produce printing ink, varnish for ink, paint for cans, paint for PCM and paint for incombustible building materials. Five hundred employees and more than 100 stationed workers from cooperative companies work in the plant. Disasters of the plant are drastically on the decrease. The plant achieved a non-disaster duration of nearly 9.7 million hours, and no accidents and disasters for nearly 10 years at the end of Feb. 1997. Safety and quality control are in promotion by top-down system through the organization and bottom-up activity by small groups. The experience meetings of safety and QC circle activities are held in spring and autumn every year to spread the results among employees. In addition, selective activities are made by top-down system at marked points to prevent accident and disaster, and a mannerism in circle activity. Environmental ISO was also introduced for further improvement of an environmental protection control system. 1 fig.

  2. Distribution characteristics of volatile methylsiloxanes in Tokyo Bay watershed in Japan: Analysis of surface waters by purge and trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yuichi; Minomo, Kotaro; Ohtsuka, Nobutoshi; Motegi, Mamoru; Nojiri, Kiyoshi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2017-05-15

    Surface waters including river water and effluent from sewage treatment plants (STPs) were collected from Tokyo Bay watershed, Japan, and analyzed for seven cyclic and linear volatile methylsiloxanes (VMSs), i.e., D3, D4, D5, D6, L3, L4, and L5 by an optimized purge and trap extraction method. The total concentrations of seven VMSs (ΣVMS) in river water ranged from watershed was estimated at 2300kg. Our results indicate widespread distribution of VMSs in Tokyo Bay watershed and the influence of domestic wastewater discharges as a source of VMSs in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of nuclear and radiological events. Textbook for lecture in graduate school of engineering in the University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio

    2007-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is carrying out the cooperative activity by providing specialized educational and training staff and making our facilities available for the graduate school of engineering in The University of Tokyo as part of developing human resources in nuclear technology. This report is prepared as a textbook for the lecture in the graduate school of engineering in The University of Tokyo and provides the outlines of activities on the analysis of nuclear and radiological events and analysis methods as well as the summaries of major incidents and accidents that occurred. (author)

  4. Information Security Risks on a University Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Al-Rawas

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with issues relating to security in the provision of information systems (IS services within a campus environment. It is based on experiences with a specific known environment; namely Sultan Qaboos University. In considering the risks and challenges that face us in the provision of IS services we need to consider a number of interwoven subject areas.  These are: the importance of information to campus communities, the types of information utilised, and the risk factors that relate to the provision of IS services. Based on our discussion of the risk factors identified within this paper, we make a number of recommendations for improving security within any environment that wishes to take the matter seriously. These recommendations are classified into three main groups: general, which are applicable to the entire institution; social, aimed at the work attitudes of staff and students; and technical, addressing the skills and technologies required.

  5. Campus Area Network Wi-Fi Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun K. Pillay

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless connectivity devices such as mobile phones and laptops are being increasingly used by University students to access learning resources on campus networks and the Internet. Each of the mobile devices offers security protocols for connection to a Wi-Fi router. This paper presents an overview of Wi-Fi security and recommendations in relation to free Wi-Fi service at The University of Fiji.

  6. Mobile Learning on the Campus and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Dew, Niall

    2008-01-01

    E-learning and blended learning are now well established within higher education, and\\ud learning at a distance either in the workplace, at home, or elsewhere is now\\ud commonplace. The mobile revolution is being acknowledged as the next phase where\\ud student learning no longer needs to be located in fixed places within a campus, or at a\\ud pc.

  7. A game based virtual campus tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razia Sulthana, A.; Arokiaraj Jovith, A.; Saveetha, D.; Jaithunbi, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the application is to create a virtual reality game, whose purpose is to showcase the facilities of SRM University, while doing so in an entertaining manner. The virtual prototype of the institution is deployed in a game engine which eases the students to look over the infrastructure, thereby reducing the resources utilization. Time and money are the resources in concern today. The virtual campus application assists the end user even from a remote location. The virtual world simulates the exact location and hence the effect is created. Thus, it virtually transports the user to the university, with the help of a VR Headset. This is a dynamic application wherein the user can move in any direction. The VR headset provides an interface to get gyro input and this is used to start and stop the movement. Virtual Campus is size efficient and occupies minimal space. It is scalable against mobile gadgets. This gaming application helps the end user to explore the campus, while having fun too. It is a user friendly application that supports users worldwide.

  8. A New Campus Built on Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Ari [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mercado, Andrea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce energy consumption by as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program. This case study reports on the process and outcome of this project including the achieved savings from design improvements for the campus. The intent of the project was to retrofit the Science & Engineering (S&E) building and the central plant at UC Merced to achieve up to 30% energy reduction. The anticipated savings from these retrofits represented about 17% of whole-campus energy use. If achieved, the savings contribution from the CBP project would have brought overall campus performance to 56% of the 1999 UC/CSU benchmark performance for their portfolio of buildings. However, the final design that moved forward as part of the CBP program only included the retrofit measures for the S&E building.

  9. ONR Tokyo Scientific Bulletin. Volume 5, Number 3, July-September 1980,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    the beginning of many specialist societies which now run their own national conferences. ANZAAS also makes money grants. and helps found journals. The...Ionospheric Sonde). There is equipment for studying whistlers on the campus in Dunedin, at Lauder , New Zealand, in the center of Otago province, and...effects. The Lauder station is not used to carry out auroral studies. The Otago observations on whistlers are in the frequency range from 3 to 30 kHz

  10. Fluctuation patterns of groundwater levels in Tokyo caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Akira; Ishihara, Shigeyuki; Amaguchi, Hideo; Takasaki, Tadakatsu

    2016-04-01

    The hourly groundwater levels have been observed at 42 sites in Tokyo Metropolis since 1952. The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred at 14:46 JST on March 11, 2011. It was the strongest earthquake on record with a magnitude of 9.0 (Mw) and large fluctuations of unconfined and confined groundwater levels were observed at 102 observation wells in Tokyo, around 400 km away from the epicenter. Abrupt rises and sharp drawdowns of groundwater levels were observed right after the earthquake for most of the wells, although some did not show a change. In this study, taking full advantage of the unique rare case data from the dense groundwater monitoring network in Tokyo, we investigate the fluctuation patterns of unconfined and confined groundwater levels caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake. The groundwater level data used in this study consist of one month time series in March 2011 with one-hour interval. The fluctuation patterns of groundwater levels caused by the earthquake were identified using Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). The SOM, developed by Kohonen, can project high-dimensional, complex target data onto a two-dimensional regularly arranged map in proportion to the degree of properties. In general, the objective of the SOM application is to obtain useful and informative reference vectors. These vectors can be acquired after iterative updates through the training of the SOM. Design of the SOM structure, selection of a proper initialization method, and data transformation methods were carried out in the SOM application process. The reference vectors obtained from the SOM application were fine-tuned using cluster analysis methods. The optimal number of clusters was selected by the Davies-Bouldin index (DBI) using the k-means algorithm. Using the optimal number of cluster, a final fine-tuning cluster analysis was carried out by Ward's method. As a result, the fluctuation patterns of the confined and unconfined groundwater level were classified into eight clusters

  11. Green Campus Study by using 10 UNEP’s Green University Toolkit Criteria in IPB Dramaga Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisriany, Saraswati; Sitti Fatimah, Indung

    2017-10-01

    Campus landscape is an important part of campus life, because it is regarded as a physical manifestation of the value of a college. Green campus is a concept to build sustainable living practices that are environmentally friendly in educational institutions around the world, including in IPB Dramaga Campus. The main objective of this study is to identified and analyze IPB Dramaga Campus sustainability used green campus criteria from UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme). The methods stages are data collection, analysis and assessment, and recommendation as the synthesis. All the data analyzed with gap analysis, then it assess with Likert Scale scoring. The results showed that green level of IPB Dramaga Campus is classified as Moderate, with total score 32. The result from each criterias are, Energy, Carbon and Climate Change is Moderate; Water is Not Good; Waste is Moderate; Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services is Very Good; Planning Design & Development is Good; Procurement is Moderate; Green Office is Very Not Good; Green Lab is Moderate; Green IT is Good; and Transport is Good. The Green Level of IPB Dramaga Campus will reach Very Good if these recommendation of strategies applied. The strategies are Green Office, Green Campus Audit, Green Champion, Green Financial Strategies, Water Treatment, Green Lab dan Off Campus Transportation.

  12. Retrospect over past 25 years at Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigebumi

    1983-01-01

    Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, was established on April 1, 1956, with the aims of the investigation on the peaceful use of nuclear energy and of the education of scientists and engineers in this field. This report reviews the history of the Laboratory during 25 years and traces the process of growth concerning research divisions, buildings, large-scale experimental facilities and the education in the graduate course for nuclear engineering. In addition, considering what the Laboratory has to be and what the future plan will be, it is mentioned that the research interest should be extended to the field of nuclear fusion reactor, especially the blanket engineering, as a long-term future project of the Research Laboratory. (author)

  13. Legionella thermalis sp. nov., isolated from hot spring water in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Naoto; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Inoue, Hiroaki; Agata, Kunio; Edagawa, Akiko; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuyama, Masafumi; Furuhata, Katsunori

    2016-03-01

    Strain L-47(T) of a novel bacterial species belonging to the genus Legionella was isolated from a sample of hot spring water from Tokyo, Japan. The 16S rRNA gene sequences (1477 bp) of this strain (accession number AB899895) had less than 95.0% identity with other Legionella species. The dominant fatty acids of strain L-47(T) were a15:0 (29.6%) and the major ubiquinone was Q-12 (71.1%). It had a guanine-plus-cytosine content of 41.5 mol%. The taxonomic description of Legionella thermalis sp. nov. is proposed to be type strain L-47(T) (JCM 30970(T)  = KCTC 42799(T)). © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    In this annual report, the activities of research and education, the state of operation of research facilities and others in fiscal year 1993 are summarized. Four main research facilities are the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron linear accelerator, the basic experiment facility for nuclear fusion reactor blanket design and the heavy irradiation research facility. The reactor and the accelerator are for the joint utilization by all universities in Japan, the blanket is used by the Faculty of Engineering, and the HIT is for the joint utilization in University of Tokyo. In fiscal year 1993, the installation of the fast neutron science research facility was approved. In this annual report, the management and operation of the above research facilities are described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation theses of teachers, are summarized. (K.I.)

  15. Analisis Kinerja Kontrak Berjangka Komoditi pada Tokyo Grain Exchange – Jepang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomy G. Soemapradja

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Futures contract is one of derivative instruments in which its value depends on underlying asset’s price fluctuation in the future. At the beginning, the futures contracts were traded with hedging motive, but now they are traded with speculative motive also. As an agricultural nation, finally, Indonesia has a commodity futures exchange (BBJ by the end of 2000. Low volume of transactions and less futures alternative on BBJ made Tokyo Grain Exchange (TGE as the object of this research. The statistical test concluded: The average rate of return of futures portfolio model is greater than average of forex trading of USD, and the risk of futures portfolio model is greater than forex trading of USD.

  16. Minutes of the IFMIF technical meetings, May 17-20, 2005, Tokyo, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Mizuho; Nakamura, Hiroo; Yutani, Toshiaki; Maebara, Sunao; Umetsu, Tomotake; Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2005-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) Technical Meetings were held on May 17-20, 2005 at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) Tokyo. The main objectives were 1) to review technical status of the subsystems; accelerator, target and test facilities, 2) to technically discuss interface issues between target and test facilities, 3) to review results of peer-reviews performed in the EU and Japan, 4) to harmonize design/experimental activities among the subsystems, 5) to review and discuss the Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity (EVEDA) tasks, and 6) to make a report of 1) - 5) to the IFMIF Executive Subcommittee. This report presents a brief summary of the Target Technical, Meeting, Test Facilities Technical Meeting, Target/Test Facilities Interface Meeting, Accelerator Technical Meeting and the Technical Integration Meeting. (author)

  17. Development of the real-time control (RTC) system for Tokyo sewage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, M; Mizushima, H; Ito, K

    2005-01-01

    Tokyo Metropolitan government has decided to make the maximum possible use of the existing facilities while ensuring safety against inundation and to promote measures also from a software approach by introducing a system capable of minimizing combined sewer overflow, the real-time control system (RTC). A pilot RTC system was installed in August 2002 for the Shinozaki Pumping Station. The RTC system monitors the precipitation volume and the water level in the pipe. Simulations were carried out on the basis of these data. From the results, it was found that with the use of the RTC it is possible to reduce CSO by roughly 50% for small rainfalls with a total precipitation level of 20 mm or less by strong rainwater in the pipe routes at the beginning of the rain. It has also been shown that CSO can be reduced by about 80% through the use of rainfall forecasting.

  18. Creating the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Medals from Electronic Scrap: Sustainability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Alexandra M.; Wang, Xue; Gaustad, Gabrielle

    2017-09-01

    For the upcoming 2020 Olympic Games, which are to be held in Tokyo, Japan, it has been proposed that recycled metal from electronic waste should be used to create the gold, silver, and bronze medals that will be awarded to athletes from around the world. This work is aimed at exploring the feasibility of this goal, quantifying the required electronic waste, identifying the limiting material constraints, and addressing a selection of sustainability metrics. The results show that 2.5-13.8% of Japan's available electronic waste would be required to create the medals, depending on the composition of the collected electronics and the processing yields. The environmental benefits from this venture are identified as being a savings of approximately 4.5-5.1 TJ of energy, which is equivalent to CO2 emissions reductions of approximately 420 metric tons. Additionally, qualitative potential benefits to environment, human health, economic recovery of valuable materials, and supply stability are considered.

  19. Kawasaki steam power plant of Tokyo Electric Power Co. and an example of geothermal power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-01-01

    The first part of this discussion is devoted to a description of the Kawasaki steam power plant, installed by Tokyo Electric Co. to supply electricity to the Keihin industrial area. The output is 700 MW and it possesses a thermal efficiency of 36.9%. The plant is operated automatically by remote control. The latter section describes the status of a geothermal power station in Hakone. It outlines the steam distribution piping, the steam itself, the turbine and vapor/water separation equipment. With regard to technical problems, it is suggested that old wells having weak pressure can be restored by self-cleaning and that further improvement can be brought about by dynamiting the base of the borehole.

  20. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    In this annual report, the activities of education and research, the state of operation of research facilities and others in Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal year 1992 are summarized. In this Laboratory, there are four large research facilities, that are, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linac, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment facility and the heavy irradiation research facility. Those are used for carrying out education and research in the wide fields of nuclear engineering, and are offered also for joint utilization. The results of research by using respective research facilities have been summarized in separate reports. The course of the management and operation of each research facility is described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation these of teachers, personnel and graduate students in the Laboratory are summarized. (J.P.N.)

  1. Tokyo et les campagnes: la progression de la banlieue à Toride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Desbois

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available L'espace périurbain japonais se distingue de ce que l'on observe en Europe ou aux États-Unis. La ville progresse en conservant dans son tissu même des éléments agro-ruraux. Nous utilisons ici un SIG réalisé pour deux quartiers de la commune de Toride, située dans la lointaine banlieue de Tokyo ; il permet de quantifier l'extension urbaine et de mieux en saisir le rythme depuis 1945. Il permet aussi de mettre en évidence le paysage très bigarré et, à certains égards, désordonné des grandes banlieues japonaises contemporaines.

  2. Biomagnification and debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in a coastal ecosystem in Tokyo Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukawa, Kaoruko; Yamada, Toshiko [Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Matsuo, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Ichiro [Department of Life Environment Conservation, Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, Tarumi 3-5-7, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8566 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Kotaro [Faculty of Marine Science, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Konan 4-5-7, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8477 (Japan); Takada, Hideshige, E-mail: shige@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    By field sampling and laboratory experiments we compared the mechanisms by which polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are biomagnified. We measured PBDEs and PCBs, together with stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes as an index of trophic level, in low-trophic-level organisms collected from a coastal area in Tokyo Bay. PBDEs were biomagnified to a lesser degree than PCBs. The more hydrophobic congeners of each were biomagnified more. However, the depletion of BDE congeners BDE99 and BDE153 from fish was suggested. To study congener-specific biotransformation of halogenated compounds, we conducted an in vitro experiment using hepatic microsomes of two species of fish and five BDE congeners (BDE47, 99, 100, 153, and 154) and five CB congeners with the same substitution positions as the PBDEs. BDE99 and 153 were partially debrominated, but BDE47 and 154 were not debrominated. This congener-specific debromination is consistent with the field results. Both in vitro and field results suggested selective debromination at the meta position. The CB congeners were not transformed in vitro. This result is also consistent with the field results, that PCBs were more biomagnified than PBDEs. We conclude that metabolizability is an important factor in the biomagnification of chemicals, but other factors must be responsible for the lower biomagnification of PBDEs in natural ecosystems. Highlights: ► PBDEs were less biomagnified than PCBs in low-trophic-level organisms in Tokyo Bay. ► Depletion of PBDE congeners BDE99 and BDE153 from fish was suggested. ► BDE99 and 153 were debrominated in in vitro experiment using hepatic microsomes of fish. ► BDE47, 100, and 154 as well as PCB congeners were not transformed in vitro. ► Both in vitro and field results suggested selective meta-protonation of PBDEs.

  3. IAEA to Cooperate with Japan on Nuclear Security at 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Government of Japan signed an agreement today aimed at enhancing nuclear security measures for the summer Olympic Games and Paralympic Games in Tokyo in 2020. The agreement follows previous IAEA support to major public events, including the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro and the 2012 European soccer championship in Poland and Ukraine. IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano and Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono presided over the signing ceremony at the Agency’s headquarters in Vienna. Practical Arrangements outlining the planned cooperation were signed by IAEA Deputy Director General Juan Carlos Lentijo, head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, and H.E. Mitsuru Kitano, Japan’s Ambassador to the International Organizations in Vienna. “The IAEA has extensive experience in supporting Member States on nuclear security for major public events,” Amano said at the ceremony. “The Agency welcomes the cooperation to support the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo, and is already cooperating with Japan by sharing the experiences of Member States which previously hosted the Olympics.” The details of the cooperation will be decided in due course, but the possible areas of cooperation include the IAEA offering Japanese authorities training courses, workshops, technical visits and exercises related to nuclear security, hosting preparatory technical meetings and lending supplementary radiation detection equipment. The IAEA and Japan may also exchange information related to nuclear security events as appropriate and through the cooperation, the IAEA will also benefit from Japan’s good practices on nuclear security.

  4. Campus Energy Approach, REopt Overview, and Solar for Universities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgqvist, Emma M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Van Geet, Otto D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This presentation gives an overview of the climate neutral research campus framework for reducing energy use and meeting net zero electricity on research campuses. It gives an overview of REopt and the REopt Lite web tool, which can be used to evaluate cost optimal sizes of behind the meter PV and storage. It includes solar PV installation trends at universities and case studies for projects implemented on university campuses.

  5. Tracing cohesive sediment transportation at river mouths around Tokyo, Japan by Cesium originated from Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    koibuchi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Sediment transport at river mouths, which consists of suspended-load and bed-load, has not been fully understood, since bed-load transport of cohesive sand is difficult to observe. Especially, the impact of sediment transport on the total amount of fine-grained cohesive sediment has not been elucidated. Cesium-134 and cesium-137 were spread from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) after the earthquake of March 11 of 2011, and attached to the fine-grained sand on the land. The contaminated sand flowed into the river mouths through the rivers possibly due to the complex physical processes in estuarine areas. To evaluate the fine-grained sediment transport around Tokyo and Tokyo Bay, field observations were carried out utilizing radionuclide originated from FDNPP as an effective tracer. The cohesive sediment transport at three different river mouths around Tokyo was successfully quantified. The cohesive sediment transport deposited in the estuary was found to be greatly dependent on the land use, geometry, river discharge and salinity. In addition,the transport driven by the rainfall was minute, and its behavior was quite different from suspended solids. Although further field observations of radionuclide are necessary, it is clear that fine-grained sediment in the bay from rivers already settled on the river mouth by aggregation. The settled sand will not move even in rainfall events. Consequently, the transport of radionuclide to the Pacific Ocean may not occur.; Cesium distribution around Tokyo Bay ; Cesium Concentration in Edogawa river

  6. Tokyo Guidelines 2018: surgical management of acute cholecystitis: safe steps in laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis (with videos)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakabayashi, Go; Iwashita, Yukio; Hibi, Taizo; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Asbun, Horacio J.; Endo, Itaru; Umezawa, Akiko; Asai, Koji; Suzuki, Kenji; Mori, Yasuhisa; Okamoto, Kohji; Pitt, Henry A.; Han, Ho-Seong; Hwang, Tsann-Long; Yoon, Yoo-Seok; Yoon, Dong-Sup; Choi, In-Seok; Huang, Wayne Shih-Wei; Giménez, Mariano Eduardo; Garden, O. James; Gouma, Dirk J.; Belli, Giulio; Dervenis, Christos; Jagannath, Palepu; Chan, Angus C. W.; Lau, Wan Yee; Liu, Keng-Hao; Su, Cheng-Hsi; Misawa, Takeyuki; Nakamura, Masafumi; Horiguchi, Akihiko; Tagaya, Nobumi; Fujioka, Shuichi; Higuchi, Ryota; Shikata, Satoru; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Ukai, Tomohiko; Yokoe, Masamichi; Cherqui, Daniel; Honda, Goro; Sugioka, Atsushi; de Santibañes, Eduardo; Supe, Avinash Nivritti; Tokumura, Hiromi; Kimura, Taizo; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Kitano, Seigo; Inomata, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi; Sumiyama, Yoshinobu; Inui, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2018-01-01

    In some cases, laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) may be difficult to perform in patients with acute cholecystitis (AC) with severe inflammation and fibrosis. The Tokyo Guidelines 2018 (TG18) expand the indications for LC under difficult conditions for each level of severity of AC. As a result of

  7. Federal Campuses Handbook for Net Zero Energy, Water, and Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-14

    In 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) defined a zero energy campus as "an energy-efficient campus where, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy." This handbook is focused on applying the EERE definition of zero energy campuses to federal sector campuses. However, it is not intended to replace, substitute, or modify any statutory or regulatory requirements and mandates.

  8. On-campus programs to support college students in recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Donald A

    2009-01-01

    The author argues that referral of alcohol-abusing college students to off-campus treatment services, although necessary for some, is not optimal for many. He advocates the implementation of comprehensive on-campus services for students committed to recovery in order to optimize their treatment while allowing them to remain in school and work towards their degree. The author suggests that such on-campus recovery services provide additional benefits to the college or university as well as to other students, and he proposes that on-campus alcohol-abusing students in recovery can serve as important opinion leaders and role models for their peers.

  9. Prevalence of insomnia among residents of Tokyo and osaka after the great East Japan earthquake: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hiroaki; Akahane, Manabu; Ohkusa, Yasushi; Okabe, Nobuhiko; Sano, Tomomi; Jojima, Noriko; Bando, Harumi; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2013-01-18

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. Tokyo and Osaka, which are located 375 km and 750 km, respectively, from the epicenter, experienced tremors of 5.0 lower and 3.0 seismic intensity on the Japan Meteorological Agency scale. The Great East Japan Earthquake was the fourth largest earthquake in the world and was accompanied by a radioactive leak at a nuclear power plant and a tsunami. In the aftermath of a disaster, some affected individuals presented to mental health facilities with acute stress disorder (ASD) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, few studies have addressed mental stress problems other than ASD or PTSD among the general public immediately after a disaster. Further, the effects of such a disaster on residents living at considerable distances from the most severely affected area have not been examined. This study aimed to prospectively analyze the effect of a major earthquake on the prevalence of insomnia among residents of Tokyo and Osaka. A prospective online questionnaire study was conducted in Tokyo and Osaka from January 20 to April 30, 2011. An Internet-based questionnaire, intended to be completed daily for a period of 101 days, was used to collect the data. All of the study participants lived in Tokyo or Osaka and were Consumers' Co-operative Union (CO-OP) members who used an Internet-based food-ordering system. The presence or absence of insomnia was determined before and after the earthquake. These data were compared after stratification for the region and participants' age. Multivariate analyses were conducted using logistic regression and a generalized estimating equation. This study was conducted with the assistance of the Japanese CO-OP. The prevalence of insomnia among adults and minors in Tokyo and adults in Osaka increased significantly after the earthquake. No such increase was observed among minors in Osaka. The overall adjusted odds ratios for the risk of insomnia post-earthquake versus pre

  10. What Should Stay Put? Campus Landscape Planning for the Long Term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahres, Mike Van

    2000-01-01

    Discusses campus landscape long-term planning and design decision making during campus alterations and upgrades. Those campus landscape elements that tend to remain in place and planning for their continued existence are discussed. (GR)

  11. FIRE's Guide to Free Speech on Campus. Second Edition. FIRE's Guides to Student Rights on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverglate, Harvey A.; French, David; Lukianoff, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Since its first publication in 2005, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) has distributed more than 138,000 print and online copies of its "Guide to Free Speech on Campus." In that time, FIRE's commitment to advocating on behalf of the essential rights discussed in the pages that follow has remained unwavering;…

  12. Managing International Branch Campuses: Lessons Learnt from Eight Years on a Branch Campus in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Christopher; Thabet, Rawy Abdelrahman

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: International branch campuses (IBCs) are complex entities and while much has been written about their expansion and development, the literature is largely from an external perspective. There have been few longitudinal studies examining the development of an IBC over time. The purpose of this paper is to review the development of one IBC…

  13. THERMAL ADAPTATION, CAMPUS GREENING AND OUTDOOR USE IN LAUTECH CAMPUS, OGBOMOSO, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Adeniran ADEDEJI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interwoven relationship between the use of indoors and outdoors in the tropics as means of thermal adaptation has long been recognized. In the case of outdoors, this is achieved by green intervention of shading trees as adaptive mechanisms through behavioural thermoregulation. Unfortunately, the indoor academic spaces of LAUTECH campus was not provided with necessary outdoor academic learning environment in the general site planning of the campus for use at peak indoor thermal dissatisfaction period considering the tropical climatic setting of the university. The students’ departmental and faculty associations tried to provide parks for themselves as alternatives which on casual observation are of substandard quality and poorly maintained because of lack of institutional coordination and low funding. This study examined the quality and use of these parks for thermal comfort through behavioral adjustment from subjective field evidence with the goal of improvement. To achieve this, twelve parks were selected within the campus. Questionnaires containing use and quality variables were administered randomly upon 160 users of these parks. The data obtained was subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Results show that the quality of the parks, weather condition, period of the day, and personal psychological reasons of users has great influence on the use of the parks. The study concludes with policy recommendations on improvement of the quality of the parks and the campus outdoors and greenery in general.

  14. Addressing the nuclear controversy on university campuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, G.B.; Poncelet, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    A strong anti-nuclear sentiment exists on many university campuses. Young minds are eager to adopt causes which purport to reflect new intellectual approaches to social, political, and economic issues. Hence, the opposition to nuclear power can be made to seem to be based on: 1) technical study of nuclear plants; 2) concern for the environment; 3) concern for public health and safety; 4) requirements for an improved economic order; and 5) demand for public decision on technical issues. All of these elements have the potential of attracting student and faculty interest and support. To contend with this problem, our company decided to attempt to achieve a dialogue with the student and faculty audiences. A small group of young nuclear engineers was chosen to undergo comprehensive training on the controversy and contemporary campus issues in the states to be visited. The selection and training emphasized the ability of the engineers to relate to the students as their peers. They were encouraged to speak candidly and for themselves. Thus, they were not burdened with the image of being viewed merely as typical corporate spokesmen. The rapport made possible by this approach is a very important element in the success of such an effort. Invitations to debate before student audiences were issued to leading opposition groups; also, to the news media to report the events. Response by the media has been outstandingly favorable: not only has the coverage been extensive, but it has carried the pro-nuclear arguments to large audiences on a scale and with a credibility not otherwise achievable. The results to date have been extremely encouraging. Other countries are invited to learn more about the ''Campus America'' program in order to evaluate whether or not such an approach, with appropriate modification, could prove effective in their own situations

  15. Addressing the nuclear controversy on university campuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, G.B.; Poncelet, C.G.

    1977-01-01

    A strong anti-nuclear sentiment exists on many university campuses. Young minds are eager to adopt causes which purport to reflect new intellectual approaches to social, political and economic issues. Hence, the opposition to nuclear power can be made to seem to be based on: (1) technical study of nuclear plants; (2) concern for the environment; (3) concern for public health and safety; (4) requirements for an improved economic order; and (5) demand for public decision on technical issues. All these elements could attract student and faculty interest and support. To contend with this problem in the USA, Westinghouse Electric Corporation attempted to achieve a dialogue with the student and faculty audiences. The development and results of the programme up to mid-1977 are reported in this paper. A small group of young nuclear engineers was chosen to undergo comprehensive training on the controversy and contemporary campus issues in the States to be visited. Selection and training emphasized the ability of the engineers to relate to the students as their peers. They were encouraged to speak candidly and for themselves. Thus, they did not give the impression of being merely typical corporate spokesmen. The rapport made possible by this approach is very important to the success of such an effort. Invitations to debate before student audiences were issued to leading opposition groups and to the news media. Response by the media has been outstandingly favourable: not only has the coverage been extensive, but it has carried the pro-nuclear arguments to large audiences on a scale and with a credibility not otherwise achievable. The results up to May 1977, in eight States, have been extremely encouraging. Other countries are invited to learn more about the ''Campus America'' programme in order to evaluate whether or not such an approach, with appropriate modification, could prove effective in their own situations. (author)

  16. Transactive Campus Energy Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Corbin, Charles D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haack, Jereme N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hao, He [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Woohyun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hostick, Donna J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Akyol, Bora A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Allwardt, Craig H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carpenter, Brandon J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huang, Sen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Guopeng [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lutes, Robert G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Makhmalbaf, Atefe [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ngo, Hung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Somasundaram, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Underhill, Ronald M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Transactive energy refers to the combination of economic and control techniques to improve grid reliability and efficiency. The fundamental purpose of transactive energy management is to seamlessly coordinate the operation of large numbers of new intelligent assets—such as distributed solar, energy storage and responsive building loads—to provide the flexibility needed to operate the power grid reliably and at minimum cost, particularly one filled with intermittent renewable generation such as the Pacific Northwest. It addresses the key challenge of providing smooth, stable, and predictable “control” of these assets, despite the fact that most are neither owned nor directly controlled by the power grid. The Clean Energy and Transactive Campus (CETC) work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Washington State Department of Commerce (Commerce) through the Clean Energy Fund (CEF). The project team consisted of PNNL, the University of Washington (UW) and Washington State University (WSU), to connect the PNNL, UW, and WSU campuses to form a multi-campus testbed for transaction-based energy management—transactive—solutions. Building on the foundational transactive system established by the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), the purpose of the project was to construct the testbed as both a regional flexibility resource and as a platform for research and development (R&D) on buildings/grid integration and information-based energy efficiency. This report provides a summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA.

  17. CSIR Energy Autonomous Campus Biogas Project

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sigawuke, Busisiwe P

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available urrounding supermarkets/restaurants 5 MW @ 1,000-1,200 h/a  5-6 GWh/yr Im-/export: Trading with other CSIR campuses Storage Power-to-H2: For long-term storage and fuel production Batteries: For short-term peak shaving Heat storage: For flattening of heat... & vege outlets. Zoological & Botanical • 90% of organic waste goes towards composting. • Carnivore droppings are sent to incinerators. • Some compost sold. • Insignificant volumes of organics are generated from onsite restaurants. Schools...

  18. Etiquette and Protocol: A Guide for Campus Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, April L.

    Intended for special events planners on college campuses, this book offers advice on matters of etiquette and protocol for campus events. Chapters cover the following topics: (1) invitations (e.g., the precedence of extending invitations, invitation components, formal invitations, types of invitations); (2) forms of address (with examples of…

  19. Generational Perceptions of Campus Climate among LGBTQ Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C.; Sanders, Laura A.; Flint, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Using data from the National LGBT Alumni Survey, we examined generational perceptions of campus climate for LGBTQ undergraduate students who graduated from 1944 through 2013 (N = 3,121) with Renn and Arnold's (2003) reconceptualized ecological model as a framework. Results demonstrate differences in LGBTQ student campus climate perceptions across…

  20. Embedding Marketing in International Campus Development: Lessons from UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations for embedding a market- and marketing-informed approach within the development process for a new international campus. It includes a brief outline of the current global profile of international campuses (as one form of transnational education) before highlighting the role of marketing at key stages of campus…

  1. Motivational Signage Increases Physical Activity on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, M. Allison; Torok, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated whether motivational signage influenced rates of stair use relative to elevator use on a college campus. Participants: In March and April 2004, the authors observed students, faculty, staff, and any visitors accessing a college campus building. Methods: During Phase I, the authors monitored ascending stair and…

  2. Racial Differences in College Students' Assessments of Campus Race Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Celia C.; McCallum, Debra M.; Hughes, Michael; Smith, Gabrielle P. A.; McKnight, Utz

    2017-01-01

    Guided by the principles of critical race theory, we sought to understand how race and racism help explain differences in White and Black students' assessments of race relations on a predominantly White college campus. The authors employed data from a campus-wide survey conducted in Spring 2013 at the University of Alabama; the sample numbered…

  3. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  4. Essential Ingredients to Working with Campus Protests and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Recent months have provided many campus law enforcement and security administrators with an added challenge in providing for the safety and welfare of their campus communities. The "Occupy Wall Street" (OWS) movement, which began on September 17, 2011 in New York City, was numerous protests against economic inequality, record rates of…

  5. The Public Health Approach to Campus Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Robertson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The perception that college students are coming to campus with more severe psychological concerns than in the past has been empirically supported on college campuses (Benton and others, 2003). Approximately 20 percent of all adolescents have a diagnosable mental health disorder (Kessler and others, 2005), many of which then continue on to college…

  6. Peer Involvement in Campus-Based Suicide Prevention: Key Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilakkuvan, Vinu; Snyder, Melanie G.; Wiggins, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Students on a college campus are involved in each other's lives in ways that are pervasive and consequential, including during times of distress. A comprehensive campus based suicide prevention plan includes strategies to promote peer involvement that are both safe and effective. Careful program planning, careful training and careful messaging are…

  7. The International Branch Campus as Transnational Strategy in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Stephen; Huisman, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The international branch campus is a phenomenon on the rise, but we still have limited knowledge of the strategic choices underlying the start of these ventures. The objective of this paper is to shed light on the motivations and decisions of universities to engage (or not) with the establishment of international branch campuses. As a point of…

  8. Modern Architecture and the U.S. Campus Heritage Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The history of an educational institution is maintained both in its traditions--the customs and practices of the school--and in its physical dimension--the buildings, landscapes, and other cultural resources that define its "campus." In the past 15 years, the memorialization of the American college and university campus--whether in…

  9. A New Campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsyredar Dagdanova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of building of modern university campuses through the example of a new campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business – a successful project that facilitates the improvement of education quality and provides conditions for harmonious development of the individual.

  10. Developing a campus slang dictionary for the university of Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper focuses on the study of slang on a university campus for a lexicographic project. The research was conducted at the University of Botswana, a campus comprising circa 16,000 students, most of whom are bilingual in Setswana and English, and a small population of foreign students. Very few studies and ...

  11. Perceptions of the Campus Climate for Nonreligious Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockenbach, Alyssa N.; Mayhew, Matthew J.; Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a campus climate survey involving 633 respondents from two institutions, this study examined perceptions of nonreligious acceptance on campus as a function of students' religious identification and strength of commitment to worldview. The findings suggest that atheist students are less inclined than are their peers to perceive a positive…

  12. Atheist Students on Campus: From Misconceptions to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Kathleen M.; Mueller, John A.

    2009-01-01

    People who follow trends in higher education are aware of a renewed emphasis on religious plurality and spirituality on college campuses. But all the articles, conferences, and campus activities surrounding religion and spirituality rarely, if at all, acknowledge one group: students who are atheists. If colleges are to be truly inclusive, they…

  13. Water budget formulation for Ahmadu Bello University, main campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study provides a water resources management option through formulation of water budget for the main campus of the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria using secondary data obtained from various sources. The data revealed that, water consumption in the campus in the year 2005 was 3,101 m3/d and 3,125 m3/d in year ...

  14. The Police Response to Mental Illness on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gary J.; Shtull, Penny R.

    2012-01-01

    Campus police officers are often among the initial contacts for behavioral incidents involving people with mental illness. Their training and access to resources influence decisions to direct the individual to support services and/or through campus disciplinary processes and/or the criminal justice system. Over the past decade, there has been an…

  15. Anti-Stigma Programs: Stigma in Campus Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafacz, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the most effective way to combat mental illness stigma is to focus on power groups who have a direct impact on the lives of persons with serious mental illness. With the increase of violence and need for mental health services on college campuses, campus police officers are seen as an important power group for persons…

  16. Breaking the Silence Surrounding Mental Health on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    Mentally ill students are able to participate in higher education at unprecedented rates. While colleges and universities have been responsive to the therapeutic needs, we have failed to successfully create supportive campus climates. Campus leaders are challenged to demonstrate ethical leadership that breaks the silence and confronts the stigma…

  17. Institutional Identity and Organizational Structure in Multi-Campus Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengerink, Harold A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the structure of universities with multiple campuses but no independent central administrative system. Discusses the hybrid missions of branch campuses, which are asked to serve both the overall university and local constituent communities. Explains that these multiple missions may conflict and thus require intentional organizational…

  18. Ready to Respond: Case Studies in Campus Safety and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Is your campus primed for the next big emergency? The National Campus Safety and Security Project (NCSSP), led by NACUBO, sought to help colleges and universities develop comprehensive emergency management plans that address the four phases of emergency management: prevention/mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. A major component of…

  19. Campus Kids Mentoring Program: Fifteen Years of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jerri

    2009-01-01

    This article features Campus Kids, a mentoring program located at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. Gonzaga is a Jesuit University with a strong commitment to social justice and humanistic education. Campus Kids began, in the true sense of a community partnership, as an attempt to connect community resources (potential university…

  20. College Student Perceptions on Campus Alcohol Policies and Consumption Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda L.; Roberts, Katherine J.; Donnelly, Joseph W.; Rutledge, Imani N.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental strategies for colleges and universities to reduce alcohol consumption among their students include the development and enforcement of campus alcohol policies. This study examines students' knowledge and attitudes toward campus alcohol policies and how they relate to alcohol consumption and alcohol social norms. A sample of 422…

  1. The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting. 2016 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Campus security and safety is an important feature of postsecondary education. The Department of Education is committed to assisting schools in providing students nationwide a safe environment in which to learn and to keep students, parents and employees well informed about campus security. These goals were advanced by the Crime Awareness and…

  2. Campus-based snack food vending consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Michelle L; Klein, Elizabeth G; Kaye, Gail

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the purchases of university vending machine clientele and to understand what consumers purchase, purchase motivations, and purchase frequency after implementation of a vending policy designed to promote access to healthier snack options. Cross-sectional data collection from consumers at 8 campus vending machines purposefully selected from a list of highest-grossing machines. Vending machines were stocked with 28.5% green (choose most often), 43% yellow (occasionally), and 28.5% red (least often) food items. Consumers were predominately students (86%) and persons aged 18-24 years (71%). Red vending choices were overwhelmingly selected over healthier vending options (59%). Vended snack food selections were most influenced by hunger (42%) and convenience (41%). Most consumers (51%) frequented vending machines at least 1 time per week. Despite decreased access to less healthful red snack food choices, consumers chose these snacks more frequently than healthier options in campus vending machines. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reading space characteristics in campus environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampubolon, A. C.; Kusuma, H. E.

    2018-03-01

    Reading activity is a part of daily learning activities that are usually done by college students and takes place in the facilities that are provided by the campus. However, students tend to have a perception of a particular location that is considered appropriate with the activities undertaken. This study identified students’ perceptions of reading space characteristics in campus environment which are considered able to accommodate reading activity. Exploratory qualitative research methods were used to collect data from selected types of space and the reasons for the students in choosing the specifics space to do their reading. The results showed that students do not only use library facilities as a support unit of academic activities. This study found that students tend to use some places with non-library function, such as students’ union room, hallway, and classroom. Students perceive reading space by its physical and social characteristics. The physical consist of ambiance, quiet place, tranquility, availability of facilities, the level of coolness, lighting, location accessibility, connection with nature, convenience furniture, air quality, aesthetics, the flexibility of activities, the crowd of place, the level of shade, outdoor, ownership, and indoor. While the social characteristics of the reading space are to have privacy, favorable reading position, and the presence of others.

  4. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Keisuke; Murakami, Michio; Oguma, Kumiko; Takada, Hideshige; Takizawa, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  5. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Keisuke, E-mail: keisukekr@gmail.com [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Michio [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Oguma, Kumiko [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takada, Hideshige [Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry (LOG), Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Takizawa, Satoshi [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  6. Radioactive contamination in the Tokyo metropolitan area in the early stage of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP accident and its fluctuation over five years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu Ishida

    Full Text Available Radioactive contamination in the Tokyo metropolitan area in the immediate aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP accident was analyzed via surface soil sampled during a two-month period after the accident. 131I, 134Cs, and 137Cs were detected in these soil samples. The activity and inventory of radioactive material in the eastern part of Tokyo tended to be high. The 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio in soil was 0.978 ± 0.053. The 131I/137Cs ratio fluctuated widely, and was 19.7 ± 9.0 (weighted average 18.71 ± 0.13, n = 14 in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The radioactive plume with high 131I activity spread into the Tokyo metropolitan area and was higher than the weighted average of 6.07 ± 0.04 (n = 26 in other areas. The radiocesium activity and inventory surveyed in soil from a garden in Chiyoda Ward in the center of Tokyo, fell approximately 85% in the four months after the accident, and subsequently tended to rise slightly while fluctuating widely. It is possible that migration and redistribution of radiocesium occurred. The behavior of radiocesium in Tokyo was analyzed via monitoring of radiocesium in sludge incineration ash. The radiocesium activity in the incineration ash was high at wastewater treatment centers that had catchment areas in eastern Tokyo and low at those with catchment areas in western Tokyo. Similar to the case of the garden soil, even in incineration ash, the radiocesium activity dropped rapidly immediately after the accident. The radiocesium activity in the incineration ash fell steadily from the tenth month after the accident until December 2016, and its half-life was about 500 days. According to frequency analysis, in central Tokyo, the cycles of fluctuation of radiocesium activity in incineration ash and rainfall conformed, clearly showing that radiocesium deposited in urban areas was resuspended and transported by rainfall run-off.

  7. Enabling Campus Grids with Open Science Grid Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzel, Derek; Fraser, Dan; Pordes, Ruth; Bockelman, Brian; Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  8. Study of Smart Campus Development Using Internet of Things Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widya Sari, Marti; Wahyu Ciptadi, Prahenusa; Hafid Hardyanto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of smart campus using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through smart campus, it is possible that a campus is connected via online by the outside entity, so that the teaching approach based on technology can be conducted in real time. This research was conducted in smart education, smart parking and smart room. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the related theme for the sake of system design of smart campus. The result of this research is the design of smart campus system that includes smart education development, smart parking and smart room with the sake of Universitas PGRI Yogyakarta as the case study.

  9. Enabling campus grids with open science grid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Derek [Nebraska U.; Bockelman, Brian [Nebraska U.; Swanson, David [Nebraska U.; Fraser, Dan [Argonne; Pordes, Ruth [Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The Open Science Grid is a recognized key component of the US national cyber-infrastructure enabling scientific discovery through advanced high throughput computing. The principles and techniques that underlie the Open Science Grid can also be applied to Campus Grids since many of the requirements are the same, even if the implementation technologies differ. We find five requirements for a campus grid: trust relationships, job submission, resource independence, accounting, and data management. The Holland Computing Center's campus grid at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was designed to fulfill the requirements of a campus grid. A bridging daemon was designed to bring non-Condor clusters into a grid managed by Condor. Condor features which make it possible to bridge Condor sites into a multi-campus grid have been exploited at the Holland Computing Center as well.

  10. Campus food and beverage purchases are associated with indicators of diet quality in college students living off campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E; Laska, Melissa N

    2013-01-01

    To examine the association between college students' dietary patterns and frequency of purchasing food/beverages from campus area venues, purchasing fast food, and bringing food from home. Cross-sectional Student Health and Wellness Study. One community college and one public university in the Twin Cities, Minnesota. Diverse college students living off campus (n = 1059; 59% nonwhite; mean [SD] age, 22 [5] years). Participants self-reported sociodemographic characteristics and frequency of purchasing food/beverages around campus, purchasing fast food, and bringing food from home. Campus area purchases included à la carte facilities, vending machines, beverages, and nearby restaurants/stores. Dietary outcomes included breakfast and evening meal consumption (d/wk) and summary variables of fruit and vegetable, dairy, calcium, fiber, added sugar, and fat intake calculated from food frequency screeners. The associations between each purchasing behavior and dietary outcomes were examined using t-tests and linear regression. Approximately 45% of students purchased food/beverages from at least one campus area venue ≥3 times per week. Frequent food/beverage purchasing around campus was associated with less frequent breakfast consumption and higher fat and added sugar intake, similar to fast-food purchasing. Bringing food from home was associated with healthier dietary patterns. Increasing the healthfulness of campus food environments and promoting healthy food and beverage purchasing around campuses may be an important target for nutrition promotion among college students.

  11. Annual report of the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubono, Shigeru; Mori, Yoshiharu; Niki, Kazuaki; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Outa, Haruhiko; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Tsutsui, Izumi; Itagaki, Toshiko

    1996-01-01

    This report is an annual report from April, 1995 to March 1996 at Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. In this fiscal year 1995, both the SF cyclotron and the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron operated smoothly for users from universities. A new radioactive nuclear facility was completed. The research programs at the TARN II cooler ring further made progress in the field of atomic physics. The superconducting large solid-angle kaon spectrometer (SKS) installed at the 12 GeV PS of KEK has continued to produce interesting results concerning hypernuclei. In order to preform a long-baseline neutrino-oscillation experiment, a new collaboration has been formed among INS, KEK and ICRR. And, internal collaborations are progressing, and much effort was concentrated on realizing the future project. This report contains the following thema: Nuclear physics division, Intermediate-energy physics division, High-energy physics division, Theoretical physics division, Accelerator research division, Interdisciplinary research laboratory, Research and development for Japanese Hadron Project, Supporting division, Meetings and Appendices. (G.K.)

  12. Present status of tandem accelerator research facility (MALT) in University of Tokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Hatori, Satoshi; Nakano, Chuichiro; Sunohara, Yoko [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    1996-12-01

    The tandem accelerator in University of Tokyo, which was renewed from 1991 to March, 1994 started the joint utilization within the University since April, 1995 after about one year of the period of adjustment. The time of operation exceeding 3500 hours in one year was recorded. This facility is that for carrying out the minute analysis such as AMS, PIXE, NRA and others and the research of atomic and molecular physics, and called microanalysis laboratory-tandem accelerator (MALT). Support has been done by placing emphasis on the development of AMS measurement which enables the microanalysis of {sup 14}C,{sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al, but the accuracy of {sup 14}C AMS did not attain the practical level. {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al AMS reached almost the practical level, and the measurement of actual samples has been carried out. The state of operation and utilization of the MALT is reported. As to the recent troubles and the countermeasures in the MALT, the voltage instability of the accelerator, the unstable ion source support mechanism and the poor transmissivity of beam in the accelerator are described. (K.I.)

  13. Genotoxic action of sunlight upon Bacillus subtilis spores: monitoring studies at Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, N

    1989-12-01

    Samples of Bacillus subtilis spores dried on membrane filter were exposed to natural sunlight from solar-noon time at Tokyo. The survival and mutation induction of wild-type (UVR) and repair-deficient (UVS) spores were determined on 66 occasions since 1979. Two of the values were considered to be useful in monitoring solar UV intensity; the inverse of the time (in minutes) of exposure to kill 63% of the UVS spores ("sporocidal index") and the induced mutation frequency at 60 minutes of exposure of the UVR spores ("mutagenic index"). Both values were varied greatly due to time of a year, weather and other conditions. Estimates of year-round changes under clear skies were obtained by connecting the maximum values attained in these years. In these curves, there are more than 7-fold differences in the genotoxicity between winter and summer months, with major increases observed in early spring and decreases through autumn. Using a series of UV cut-off filters, the wavelengths most effective for the sporocidal actions were estimated to be in the range of 308-325 nm, shorter wavelengths being effective when the genotoxicity was higher. Sunburn meter of Robertson-Berger type seems to respond to slightly longer wavelength components of the solar spectrum. However, a reasonable correlation was obtained between the reading of the meter and the sporocidal index.

  14. Periodical public opinion survey on nuclear energy. Inhabitants living in the Tokyo metropolitan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Yoshihiko; Tsutida, Shouji; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident (Fukushima accident) has brought about a great change in many people's perceptions about nuclear power plant safety. When discussing future energy options for Japan, it is important to have a full grasp of the attitude of a large number of people towards nuclear energy. The Atomic Energy Society of Japan has conducted annual questionnaire survey of 500 adults who live within 30 kilometers of Tokyo Station. The aim of this survey is to assess trends in public attitude towards nuclear energy. The authors that designed the questionnaire entries of this survey have been managing questionnaire data as members of the Data Management Working Group under the Social and Environmental Division of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan. We confirmed the change in public attitude towards nuclear energy through this periodical survey after the Fukushima accident. In particular, public concerns about the use of nuclear energy increased after the Fukushima accident, and many people have raised doubts over the use of nuclear energy in the future. (author)

  15. A survey of indoor pollution by volatile organo halogen compounds in Katsushika, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amagai, T.; Olansandan; Matsushita, H. [University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka (Japan); Ono, M. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakai, S. [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan); Tamura, K. [National Institute for Minamata Disease, Kumamoto (Japan); Maeda, K. [Tokyo Kasel University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    A survey of indoor and outdoor pollution by 10 volatile organo halogen compounds (VOHCs) was performed in Katsushika Ward, Tokyo, Japan. Thirteen houses in February and 30 houses in July were sampled. Four consecutive 24-hour samples were collected by passive sampling from living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom and outdoors in February and July 1995. Indoor concentrations of carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene were at nearly the same as outdoor concentrations; therefore, it was concluded that indoor pollution by these compounds was primarily due to penetration of outdoor pollutants. Indoor concentrations of some VOHCs were considerably higher than outdoor concentrations and they varied widely between households. The list included: p-dichlorobenzene, tetrachloroethylene and tri halomethanes, for which emission sources were insect repellents, dry-cleaned clothes, and tap water, showers and bathtub water, respectively. Indoor concentrations of these compounds were higher in reinforced concrete houses than in wooden houses or wooden houses with mortar walls. This suggests that airtightness of the rooms is responsible for high indoor VOHC concentrations. (author)

  16. Leaving the street and reconstructing lives: impact of DOTS in empowering homeless people in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatsu, L; Sato, N; Ngamvithayapong-Yanai, J; Ishikawa, N

    2013-07-01

    Since 2000, the Public Health Centre (PHC) in Shinjuku, an area of Tokyo with one of the largest homeless populations in Japan, has been implementing PHC-based DOTS treatment for homeless tuberculosis (TB) patients, with much epidemiological success. Anecdotal evidence indicates that homeless patients treated under DOTS have experienced various positive changes. However, this experience has not yet been systematically analysed. To explore the changes experienced by homeless TB patients, and to discuss the possible role of PHC-based DOTS treatment in effecting these changes. A qualitative study via in-depth interviews with 18 ex-homeless patients who completed DOTS-based treatment at Shinjuku City PHC. The data were analysed using the interpretive content analysis method. The various changes experienced by the participants were categorised into five sub-categories of empowerment, including improved mental health and interpersonal relationships. Some of these changes were attributable to the participants undergoing PHC-based DOTS, which, by addressing their various emotional needs, helped to trigger patient empowerment. Based on our findings, a model of empowerment using PHC-based DOTS was constructed. PHC-based DOTS not only successfully controlled TB, it also empowered homeless patients by addressing their emotional needs. The interpersonal skills of the nurses played a critical role in this process.

  17. Spatiotemporal Simulation of Future Land Use/Cover Change Scenarios in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruci Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulating future land use/cover changes is of great importance for urban planners and decision-makers, especially in metropolitan areas, to maintain a sustainable environment. This study examines the changes in land use/cover in the Tokyo metropolitan area (TMA from 2007 to 2017 as a first step in using supervised classification. Second, based on the map results, we predicted the expected patterns of change in 2027 and 2037 by employing a hybrid model composed of cellular automata and the Markov model. The next step was to decide the model inputs consisting of the modeling variables affecting the distribution of land use/cover in the study area, for instance distance to central business district (CBD and distance to railways, in addition to the classified maps of 2007 and 2017. Finally, we considered three scenarios for simulating land use/cover changes: spontaneous, sub-region development, and green space improvement. Simulation results show varied patterns of change according to the different scenarios. The sub-region development scenario is the most promising because it balances between urban areas, resources, and green spaces. This study provides significant insight for planners about change trends in the TMA and future challenges that might be encountered to maintain a sustainable region.

  18. Systematic Education of Self-Medication at Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narui, Koji; Samizo, Kazuo; Inoue, Michiko; Watanabe, Kinzo

    2016-01-01

    The promotion of self-medication by pharmacies, with the aim of encouraging a patient's self-selection of proper OTC drug, is written about in the national action plan "Japan is Back". The subject of self-medication has been improved in the 2013 revised edition of "Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education". At Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, the systematic education of self-medication was started from the onset of the six-year course in the third, fourth and fifth grade. We introduce here a new approach in our systematic education of self-medication. In the practice of the fourth grade, groups of around 5-6 students are formed. The pharmacy students assume various roles-of pharmacist, rater, observer, and chairman-and perform role-playing. We prepared a standardized patient (SP) showing various symptoms. The student of the role of pharmacist asks about the SP's symptoms, chooses an OTC drug suitable for the SP, and explains the OTC drug to the SP. After the role-playing, those in the roles of rater, observer, SP, and faculty give feedback to the student who played the role of pharmacist. Because we conduct this role-playing using SPs with a variety of symptoms, we can create a situation similar to a real drugstore.

  19. Radiation therapy for Kaposi's sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, Takeshi; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Toshihide; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Kumiko; Masuda, Gota

    2000-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is frequently found in association with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report on radiotherapy for patients with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital. Between April 1991 and May 1997, radiotherapy was given to 11 lesions in eight men with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma to relieve their symptoms. The lesions involved the head and neck region, the legs, and the gastrointestinal tract. Radiotherapy was carried out with 4-MV photon through parallel opposed field or high energy electrons. Total doses ranged from 20 to 38 Gy, with a median of 30 Gy, delivered in 2- to 3-Gy fractions. Four patients were given other treatments prior to the radiotherapy. Acute reaction was evaluated according to the modified acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiotherapy had relieved the symptoms in all patients at completion of this therapy. Lesions that involved the hard palate and vocal cords had completely disappeared. The lesions that received radiotherapy were controlled without symptoms until the patients died. Patients who had the head and neck region treated exhibited severe acute mucosal reaction (at a dose of 30 Gy, there was grade 2 morbidity by modified RTOG criteria, in two patients, and grade 3 in three patients) although the radiation therapy was completed for these patients. Radiotherapy promises a favorable outcome for symptom relief in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. (author)

  20. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediment of Tama River in Tokyo urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Akiko; Hosomi, Masaaki; Murakami, Akihiko; Sakakibara, Koji

    1997-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation rates of petroleum hydrocarbons, i.e., hexadecane (HEX), phenanthrene (PHE), and anthracene (ANT), were determined in estuarine sediment of the Tama River in urban Tokyo, followed by estimating their respective degradation potential. While in a sediment slurry, the aerobic biodegradation rates of these petroleum hydrocarbons ranged from 40 to 70 μg.g -1 dry sediment:day -1 . The anaerobic biodegradation rate of HEX was found to be 5 -8 μg.g -1 dry sediment.day -1 , whereas that of PHE and ANT could not be detected following a 2-month incubation. Aerobic degradation of HEX was not affected by coexistence with either PHE or ANT, nor by the salinity level. The number of HEX-, PHE-, or ANT-utilizing bacteria ranged from 5 - 10% of the total number of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. We calculated their biodegradation potentials using the biomass of naturally existing petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria present in the sampled sediment, with results for HEX, PHE, and ANT being 1.0 -3.5, 4.2 x 10 -2 , and 1.2 x 10 -2 -9.4 x 10 -1 μg.g -1 dry sediment day -1 , respectively. In the aerobic tidal sediment of the Tama River, the purification potentials of HEX, PHE, and ANT were assessed to be approximately equal to their accumulation potentials occurring at the normal water level. (Author)

  1. Spatiotemporal dynamics of urban green spaces and human-wildlife conflicts in Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Tetsuro; Numata, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    Although urban green spaces are increasingly important both for humans and wildlife, an increase in urban green spaces may also increase human-wildlife conflicts in urban areas. However, few studies have examined the relationship between the size of green spaces and the level of conflicts with wildlife in multiple taxa, including invertebrates and vertebrates. To better understand current pest statistics and predict changes that will occur as the area of green spaces increases, we analysed a dataset compiling the number of pest consultations in 53 metropolitan districts in Tokyo over a 20-year period and its relationships with the area of green space. Stinging insects (e.g., wasps) made up over 50% of pest consultations, followed (in order) by rats and other nuisance animals (e.g., snakes). The number of consultations per unit population did not correlate, or was even negatively correlated, with the proportions of green spaces (mainly forest) for many indoor pests, but did positively correlate for some outdoor pests, such as wasps and snakes. Therefore, wasps and snakes can increase when urban green spaces increase. Because even minor nuisances are relevant for urban lifestyles, considerations of ways to minimise conflicts with wildlife are critical for urban green space management.

  2. Comparison of two editions of Tokyo guidelines for the management of acute cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Han, Lu; Yang, Yunsheng; Linghu, Enqiang; Li, Wen; Cai, Fengchun; Kong, Jinyan; Wang, Xiangdong; Meng, Jiangyun; Du, Hong; Wang, Hongbin; Huang, Qiyang; Hyder, Quratulain; Zhang, Xiuli

    2014-02-01

    The Tokyo guidelines from 2007 (TG07) and 2013 (TG13) were compared for the management of acute cholangitis (AC). We reviewed patients with clinically-proven AC by detecting purulent biles during biliary drainage. TG07 and TG13 were compared regarding diagnosis, severity grading and prognostic values. New risk factors for 30-day mortality were investigated. Definite diagnosis for 120 eligible patients was made in 104 (86.7%) and 101 (84.2%) cases by TG07 and TG13, respectively (P = 0.36), higher than 61 (50.8%) by Charcot's triad (P < 0.001). Diagnostic overlap and concordance (κ) are 90.8% (109/120) and 0.63 (P < 0.0001). Patients classified into mild and moderate grades by TG07 and TG13 differed significantly (P = 0.043). Both guidelines could not predict clinical outcomes except the needs for multi ERCP session by TG13. Intrahepatic obstruction (OR = 11.2, 95% CI: 1.55-226.9) and hypoalbuminemia (≤ 25.0 g/l; OR = 17.3, 95% CI: 3.5-313.6) were independent risk factors for 30-day mortality in multivariate model. Two guidelines are reproducible and reliable in AC diagnosis but different in severity grading. TG13 are more practical for immediate severity grading, enabling planning treatment upon admission. Intrahepatic obstruction is a new candidate predictor of 30-day mortality for further assessment. © 2013 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  3. Toxic evaluations of sediments in Tokyo Bay, Japan, using Japanese medaka embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Seiichi; Kokushi, Emiko; Kawano, Machi; McElroy, Anne E; Koyama, Jiro

    2017-12-01

    Toxic risks of sediments collected from seven sites in Tokyo Bay were evaluated using Japanese medaka embryos. Those sediments with slight pore water were placed in grass petri dishes without overlying water. The most remarkable effect in the field sediment was to cause hatching delay in embryos, and the longest time until hatching took was 12.5 ± 1.6 days post-fertilization (dpf), although that in control group was 10.1 ± 0.7 dpf. A significant delay in hatching was observed at four sites. Because total carbon concentrations were relatively high in sediments at three of these four sites, several chemicals were expected to be residues in these sites and could cause their delay. Although extreme mortality was not observed at all sites, sediments collected from the site close to Kawasaki city induced 10 % mortality. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations were remarkably high at this site compared with other sites, and thus PAH toxicities could be causing the mortality. Concentration of heavy metals such as cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in sediments were also determined, but no clear relationship was found between toxicities to embryos and the distribution of their concentrations.

  4. Condensate demineralizer system for Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Shigeki; Ikeda, Yukio; Kuramoto, Kenji; Omori, Yoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyoshi

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the condensate demineralizing equipment recently supplied to the second, third, and fifth power units of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station of the Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. The output of this equipment is rated as 4,900 m 3 /h each, which is currently the largest capacity for this type of equipment in Japan. The purpose of this equipment is to remove any ion components and suspended solids contained in condensate to improve its water purity. By doing so, decreasing the corrosion rate of materials used in the plant and, at the same time, decreasing the radioactivity of the condensate, thus easing the whole plant operation can be achieved. The same kind of equipment is also employed at the conventional thermal power stations, but the required functioning and operating mode are quite different. In the case of the nuclear power plant, extremely severe requirements specific with nuclear technology must be met which arise solely from dealing with radioactive substances. Not only the water treatment method, but also layout and arrangement, operation and liquid waste processing methods differ from those for the conventional power plants. The equipment for the sixth unit at Fukushima is now under designing and that for the Tokai No.2 unit of the Japan Atomic Power Company is already under shop fabrication. Both have the rated capacity of 7,300 m 3 /h each, which exceeds far up the capacity of the previously mentioned equipment. (auth.)

  5. Investigation of radon and thoron concentrations in a landmark skyscraper in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazumasa Inoue; Masahiro Fukushi

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variation of the radon concentration, and the radon and thoron concentrations every 3 months for a year were measured using two types of devices in a landmark skyscraper, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Daiichi Building. In the measurement of temporal variation of the radon concentration using a pulse type ionization chamber, the average radon concentration was 21 ± 13 Bq m -3 (2-68 Bq m -3 ). The measured indoor radon concentration had a strong relationship with the operation of the mechanical ventilation system and the activities of the office workers. The radon concentration also increased together with temperature. Other environmental parameters, such as air pressure and relative humidity, were not related to the radon concentration. In the long-term measurements using a passive radon and thoron discriminative monitor, no seasonal variation was observed. The annual average concentrations of radon and thoron were 16 ± 8 and 16 ± 7 Bq m -3 , respectively. There was also no relationship between the two concentrations. The annual average effective dose for office workers in this skyscraper was estimated to be 0.08 mSv y -1 for 2000 working hours per year. When considering the indoor radon exposure received from their residential dwellings using the annual mean radon concentration indoors in Japan (15.5 Bq m -3 ), the annual average effective dose was estimated to be 0.37 mSv y -1 . This value was 31 % of the worldwide average annual effective dose. (author)

  6. Scaling behavior in urban development process of Tokyo City and hierarchical dynamical structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuba, Ikuo; Namatame, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    We study a geometric structure of urban development process which pays particular attention to scaling properties in the settlement area and inhabitant population through changes in the scaling exponents. Both the degree to which the space is fulfilled and the rate at which it is filled are obtained for the residential development in Tokyo. For distances larger than the city boundary, there is a sharp cross-over to a suburban region with a quite intriguing variation with a distance from the center of the city. The population densities in this region are found to collapse into a single scaling function with the scaling exponent 0.678 in the early 1990s in which the growth of the population attenuates. We propose a cellular automata model using the simulated annealing method that succeeds in reproducing the qualitative similar structural complexity of the actual city by taking into account the transportation system, especially railroad network. Finally, a possible theoretical consideration is given in analogous with fluid dynamics. Scaling of the population density is obtained assuming that there is a dynamical hierarchical structure in the scaling region where the stationarity is fulfilled. The theoretically obtained exponent 2/3 agrees well with the observed one

  7. Contamination, distribution and pathogenicity of Toxocara canis and T. cati eggs from sandpits in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macuhova, K; Akao, N; Fujinami, Y; Kumagai, T; Ohta, N

    2013-09-01

    The contamination, distribution and pathogenicity of Toxocara canis and T. cati eggs in sandpits in the Tokyo metropolitan area, Japan, are described. A total of 34 sandpits were examined, 14 of which were contaminated with T. cati eggs, as assessed by the floatation method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Two naturally contaminated sandpits were investigated to determine the vertical and horizontal distribution of eggs, and an inverse relationship between the sand depth and number of eggs was observed. To examine the pathogenicity of the eggs, three ICR mice were inoculated with 300 eggs, which were recovered from sandpits. The mice exhibited eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and IgG antibody production in the sera after 3 weeks of infection. Most migrating larvae were recovered from carcasses, although three were found in the brains of two infected mice. These three larvae were determined to be T. canis by PCR, revealing that not only T. cati, but also T. canis eggs could be found in sandpits and, further, that eggs recovered from sandpits have the ability to invade a paratenic host.

  8. Urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations and semen quality of male partners of subfertile couples in Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Tomoko; Yoshinaga, Jun; Toshima, Hiroki; Mizumoto, Yoshifumi; Hatakeyama, Shota; Tokuoka, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been known as a testicular toxicant in experimental rodents. Possible association between iAs exposure and semen quality (semen volume, sperm concentration, and sperm motility) was explored in male partners of couples (n = 42) who visited a gynecology clinic in Tokyo for infertility consultation. Semen parameters were measured according to WHO guideline at the clinic, and urinary iAs and methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-hydride generation-ICP mass spectrometry. Biological attributes, dietary habits, and exposure levels to other chemicals with known effects on semen parameters were taken into consideration as covariates. Multiple regression analyses and logistic regression analyses did not find iAs exposure as significant contributor to semen parameters. Lower exposure level of subjects (estimated to be 0.5 μg kg(-1) day(-1)) was considered a reason of the absence of adverse effects on semen parameters, which were seen in rodents dosed with 4-7.5 mg kg(-1).

  9. Annual report of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    In this annual report, the activities of education and research, the state of operation of research facilities and others in Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo in fiscal year 1991 are summarized. In this Laboratory, there are four large research facilities, that is, the fast neutron source reactor 'Yayoi', the electron beam linac, the nuclear fusion reactor blanket experiment facility and the heavy irradiation research facility. Those are used for carrying out education and research in the wide fields of nuclear engineering, and are offered also for joint utilization. The results of the research by using respective research facilities were summarized in separate reports. In this annual report, the course of the management and operation of respective research facilities is described, and the research activities, the theses for doctorate and graduation theses of the teachers, personnel and graduate students in the Laboratory are summarized. In the research, those on first wall engineering for fusion reactors, fuel cycle engineering, electromagnetic structure engineering, AI and robotics, quantum beam engineering, new type reactor design and so on are included. (K.I.)

  10. Teaching of severe accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo

    2011-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and accompanied tsunami brought about the severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. For 'No more Fukushima', twelve teaching of the accident was pointed out as follows: 1) natural disasters and external events shall be taken into consideration, 2) severe accident shall be included into safety regulation, 3) all possibility of hydrogen explosion shall be excluded, 4) diversity of safety important component and equipment shall be added with sufficient period of outage, 5) siting of multiple units at the same site shall be avoided at quake-prone country like Japan, 6) accident response environment for operators shall be improved, 7) accident convergence termination system shall be established so as to concentrate technical experience and knowledge, 8) off-site center shall be improved, 9) resident evacuation, consumption limit of food, radiation exposure and soil contamination limit shall be decided openly, 10) nuclear regulation and prevention of disaster shall be conducted by unitary organization to gain public trust, 11) fostering of safety culture among relevant enterprises shall be more encouraged and 12) nuclear industry shall develop reactor such as with no core meltdown or no evacuation and environmental contamination even if reactor core would be meltdown. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Bias correction in the realized stochastic volatility model for daily volatility on the Tokyo Stock Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2018-06-01

    The realized stochastic volatility model has been introduced to estimate more accurate volatility by using both daily returns and realized volatility. The main advantage of the model is that no special bias-correction factor for the realized volatility is required a priori. Instead, the model introduces a bias-correction parameter responsible for the bias hidden in realized volatility. We empirically investigate the bias-correction parameter for realized volatilities calculated at various sampling frequencies for six stocks on the Tokyo Stock Exchange, and then show that the dynamic behavior of the bias-correction parameter as a function of sampling frequency is qualitatively similar to that of the Hansen-Lunde bias-correction factor although their values are substantially different. Under the stochastic diffusion assumption of the return dynamics, we investigate the accuracy of estimated volatilities by examining the standardized returns. We find that while the moments of the standardized returns from low-frequency realized volatilities are consistent with the expectation from the Gaussian variables, the deviation from the expectation becomes considerably large at high frequencies. This indicates that the realized stochastic volatility model itself cannot completely remove bias at high frequencies.

  12. Seasonal Analysis of Microbial Communities in Precipitation in the Greater Tokyo Area, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Hiraoka

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The presence of microbes in the atmosphere and their transport over long distances across the Earth's surface was recently shown. Precipitation is likely a major path by which aerial microbes fall to the ground surface, affecting its microbial ecosystems and introducing pathogenic microbes. Understanding microbial communities in precipitation is of multidisciplinary interest from the perspectives of microbial ecology and public health; however, community-wide and seasonal analyses have not been conducted. Here, we carried out 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing of 30 precipitation samples that were aseptically collected over 1 year in the Greater Tokyo Area, Japan. The precipitation microbial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria and were overall consistent with those previously reported in atmospheric aerosols and cloud water. Seasonal variations in composition were observed; specifically, Proteobacteria abundance significantly decreased from summer to winter. Notably, estimated ordinary habitats of precipitation microbes were dominated by animal-associated, soil-related, and marine-related environments, and reasonably consistent with estimated air mass backward trajectories. To our knowledge, this is the first amplicon-sequencing study investigating precipitation microbial communities involving sampling over the duration of a year.

  13. Removal of sulfur dioxide and formation of sulfate aerosol in Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyakawa, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.

    2007-07-01

    Ground-based in situ measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and submicron sulfate aerosol (SO42-) together with carbon monoxide (CO) were conducted at an urban site in Tokyo, Japan from spring 2003 to winter 2004. The observed concentrations of SO2 were affected dominantly by anthropogenic emissions (for example, manufacturing industries) in source areas, while small fraction of the data (sulfur compounds (SOx = SO2 + SO42-) and the remaining fraction of SOx, which is derived as the ratio of the linear regression slope of the SOx-CO correlation, is used as measures for the formation of SO42- and removal of SOx, respectively. Using these parameters, the average formation efficiency of SO42- (i.e., amount of SO42- produced per SO2 emitted from emission sources) are estimated to be 0.18 and 0.03 in the summer and winter periods, respectively. A simple box model was developed to estimate the lifetime of SOx. The lifetime of SOx for the summer period (26 h) is estimated to be about two times longer than that for the winter period (14 h). The seasonal variations of the remaining fraction of SOx, estimated formation efficiency of SO42-, and lifetime of SOx are likely due to those of the boundary layer height and photochemical activity (i.e., hydroxyl radical). These results provide useful insights into the formation and removal processes of sulfur compounds exported from an urban area.

  14. Spatiotemporal distribution of radioactive cesium released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in the sediment of Tokyo Bay, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Ryota; Ishida, Masanobu; Baba, Daisuke; Tanimoto, Satomi; Okamoto, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in the Tokyo Bay sediments were investigated. The total radioactivity of "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs detected in the Tokyo Bay sediment ranged from 240 to 870 Bq/kg-dry in the estuary of Arakawa River, but the activities detected in other sites were about 90 Bq/kg-dry or less. These results suggested that radioactive cesium, which precipitated to the ground, was carried to the river along with clay particles by rainfall and transported to the estuary. The vertical distribution of radioactive cesium showed that it invaded deeper than estimated based on the accumulation rate of the sediment. It was described that the vertical distribution of radioactive cesium was affected by physical mixing of sediments by tidal current, flood, and bioturbation of benthos. (author)

  15. APPLICATION OF STEEL PIPE PILE LOADING TESTS TO DESIGN VERIFICATION OF FOUNDATION OF THE TOKYO GATE BRIDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Osamu; Kiyomiya, Osamu; Yoneyama, Haruo; Kawakami, Taiji

    Steel sheet pipe pile foundations with large diameter steel pipe sheet pile were used for the foundation of the main pier of the Tokyo Gateway bridge. However, as for the large diameter steel pipe pile, the bearing mechanism including a pile tip plugging effect is still unclear due to lack of the practical examinations even though loading tests are performed on Trans-Tokyo Bay Highway. In the light of the foregoing problems, static pile loading tests both vertical and horizontal directions, a dynamic loading test, and cone penetration tests we re conducted for determining proper design parameters of the ground for the foundations. Design parameters were determined rationally based on the tests results. Rational design verification was obtained from this research.

  16. Book of presentations. Tokyo Tech COE-INES. Indonesia international symposium 2005. 'Prospect of nuclear energy in Indonesia'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The symposium of the title was organized by the 21st Century COE Program, Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech COE-INES), the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), and the National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN). The symposium included presentations of 21 from Japan 24 from Indonesia and discussions on innovative nuclear energy systems and on a number of topics related to nuclear energy, including long-term policies and regulation for its development. Students from Japan and Indonesia played an important role in the symposium, presenting excellent work and discussion on their research topics as well as participating in very fruitful panel discussions on 'Education in Nuclear Field' and 'Attractiveness of Jobs in the Nuclear Field'. (J.P.N.)

  17. MONITORING OF RADIOACTIVITY AT DNURT CAMPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Dolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research paper aims to determine radioactive contamination on the territory of campus of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan (DNURT. Methodology. The dosimeters measured the radioactive contamination in different places (points of DNURT campus, focusing on public places. The centres of measurements became dormitories, monuments, stops, main entrances of the new and the old buildings, classrooms, basements, a swimming pool, boiler room and others. Findings. The conducted radiation monitoring for the first time in the history of the University discovered the source of radioactive contamination on DNURT territory and campus. The highest radiation background is observed on three points, namely: the pedestal of the monument, the monument to students-soldiers, the main entrance of the new building (columns. This can be explained by granite materials, which the pedestals and the stairs are made of. Originality. The largest contribution to the total value of annual effective dose of human exposure is made by ionizing radiation sources (IRS of building materials (65 - 70%. The radioactivity level of building materials is determined by the content of natural radionuclides that are included in uranium-radium and thorium decay series (18 and 12 radionuclides as well as potassium-40. Radioactivity of building materials is evaluated by the content of dominant radionuclides radium-226, thorium-232 and potassium-40. Their dominant role is explained by the fact that these long-lived high-energy - emitters are the products of decay of radium-226 in uranium series of and radium-224 in thorium series, exposing radioactive gases (radon-222 and radon-220. Radioactive gases are accumulated in the basements of educational buildings; their decay is accompanied by 100% alpha radiation, which is the most dangerous. Practical value. It is necessary to set radioactivity signs near the objects with high

  18. Recreating of rurality around the totoro forest in the outer fringe of tokyo metropolitan area : the spirituality of rurality

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Obara, Norihiro

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we made a point of rural land use and its conservation as the reflection of rurality in outer fringes, and discussed about recreating of rurality with utilising its conservation activities and the spirituality. In Sayama hill region of Tokyo metropolitan area, restructuring of rural land use and recreating rurality have been practised with conservation and maintenance activities in the Totoro forest. Although rural and urban residents think about those activities and their parti...

  19. A summary of waste disposal operator and office abolition of the Radioisotope Center in the University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higaki, Shogo; Kosaka, Naoki; Nogawa, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Radioisotope center in the University of Tokyo had approval of waste disposal operator only in the universities of Japan since 1983. However, the radioisotope center abolished the waste disposal office in December 2013. In this paper, we summarize the history of the waste disposal operator in the radioisotope center, and report the procedure of office abolition under the Japanese law and regulations concerning prevention from radiation hazards due to radio-isotopes, etc. revised after April 2012. (author)

  20. Construction Policies on Campus An Analytical Study of the Policy of Construction Planning on Kufa Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talib Hamid Altalib

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available University Campuses, as any lively physical entity, is subject to continuous variation due to . growth, development and change. This reality covers the existing or futuristic additives or additions, consecutively these changes may have a strong sensation of disorientation as a result of formatic changes in buildings, or in movement paths. And it epitomized the research problem to "the need for knowledge to clarify the impact of intellectual and executive policy in achieving coherence, functional and space organization of the elements of the university urban environment and in the stages of future growth and change," the search targeted "to highlight the study of constraction politics on campus Bmqomadtha intellectual and executive , as well as clarify the role of the executive policy in the application of thought, "and formulated the hypothesis search " urban policy affect Bmqomadtha (intellectual and executive on the process of organizing and homogeneity of the university urban environment to make them adapted to future changes, "the University of Kufa it was chosen as the campus to represent the experimental field of research.

  1. PV monitoring at Jubilee Campus - Nottingham University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffat, S.B.; Gan, G.

    2002-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a project monitoring the efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) modules integrated in the roofs of atria to meet the energy consumption needs of ventilation fans in the academic buildings at the Jubilee Campus of the University of Nottingham. Details are given of the instrumentation of one atrium to allow the monitoring the effectiveness of the ventilation in cooling the PV arrays integrated in the atrium roof, the economic analysis of the benefit of cooling the PV system, and the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling to predict the performance of the atrium. The design of the PV system, the calculated system efficiency, the high cost of atrium integrated PV power supplies, the periodic failure of the inverters, and the overheating of the PV array and the atrium space in the summer are discussed.

  2. Alcohol-induced sexual behavior on campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilman, P W

    1993-07-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of alcohol-related sexual activity on campus. Since coming to college, 35% of the students had engaged in some form of sexual activity that was influenced by drinking. Because they had been drinking, 18% had engaged in sexual intercourse, and 15% had abandoned safe-sex techniques. For the categories any form of sexual activity and abandonment of safe-sex techniques, a significantly greater percentage of women were affected by alcohol use, but this was not true for sexual intercourse. The survey showed no significant differences between undergraduate and graduate students. All three variables showed a relationship with heavier alcohol use and with binge drinking. Academic excellence was negatively correlated with alcohol-induced sexual intercourse.

  3. The Usage of Social Areas in University Campus Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begüm ERÇEVİK

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Universities aim to help students gain occupational skills through academic training and practice; to produce knowledge by carrying out applications and investigations which have scientific, social and economic bases, to prepare young people for com munity life by giving them duties and responsibilities; and finally, to make contributions to the social and educational level of the community. Moreover social and cultural activity areas in uni versities in which, apart from lecture halls, students spend most of their time during their educational, lives, are of great impor tance for social interaction. Social spaces, whose educational and awareness-raising role of preparing the youth for community life, are taken into account and of these areas, about their use of student assessment analysis is aimed. During this analysis, student views were investigated and compared at different university campus locations. Bahçeşehir University Beşiktaş Campus as a town university, Yıldız Teknik University Yıldız Merkez Campus as an in-town campus, Koç University Sarıyer Campus as a out-oftown campus were chosen as locations for the study. Statistical analysis is applied to the data obtained from the questionaries completed by students in the chosen universities. Following such investigations, findings relating to the sufficiency of social and cultural activity areas in campuses, their occupancy and reachability; and the user profile of the activity areas and town usage as a cultural area are obtained and evaluated.

  4. Decoding the Digital Campus Climate for Prospective LGBTQ+ Community Colleges Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jason L.; Dockendorff, Kari J.; Inselman, Kyle

    2018-01-01

    LGBTQ+ students are increasingly visible on community college campuses, and a safe and welcoming campus climate is critical to LGBTQ+ students' academic success and well-being. Campus climate is difficult to assess for prospective LGBTQ+ community college students, and institutional websites may be a source of information about campus climate.…

  5. Green Campus initiative and its impacts on quality of life of stakeholders in Green and Non-Green Campus universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyarattanachai, Ronnachai; Hollmann, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, Universitas Indonesia (UI) developed the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking for universities to share information about their sustainability practices. This ranking system was well aligned with the basis of Sustainability for Higher Education. The scoring system can also be used as a guideline for universities to achieve sustainability in their campuses. Since its first launch, more universities around the world have increasingly participated in the ranking system including many universities in Thailand. This study compared perception of stakeholders in Green Campus and Non-Green Campus universities in Thailand regarding stakeholders' satisfaction on sustainability practices and perceived quality of life at their campuses. The results showed that stakeholders at the studied Green Campus University were more satisfied and had significantly better perceived quality of life compared to stakeholders from the studied Non-Green Campus university. The results suggested that universities should adopt the criteria set in the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking to achieve better sustainability in their campuses and improve quality of life of their stakeholders.

  6. Campus Health Centers' Lack of Information Regarding Providers: A Content Analysis of Division-I Campus Health Centers' Provider Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Evan K

    2018-07-01

    Campus health centers are a convenient, and usually affordable, location for college students to obtain health care. Staffed by licensed and trained professionals, these providers can generally offer similar levels of care that providers at off-campus clinics can deliver. Yet, previous research finds students may forgo this convenient, on-campus option partially because of a lack of knowledge regarding the quality of providers at these campus clinics. This study sought to examine where this information deficit may come from by analyzing campus health centers' online provider information. All Division-I colleges or universities with an on-campus health center, which had information on their websites about their providers (n = 294), had their providers' online information analyzed (n = 2,127 providers). Results revealed that schools commonly offer professional information (e.g., provider specialties, education), but very little about their providers outside of the medical context (e.g., hobbies) that would allow a prospective student patient to more easily relate. While 181 different kinds of credentials were provided next to providers' names (e.g., MD, PA-C, FNP-BC), only nine schools offered information to help students understand what these different credentials meant. Most schools had information about their providers within one-click of the homepage. Recommendations for improving online information about campus health center providers are offered.

  7. Service hall in Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawara, Shigesuke

    1979-01-01

    There are six BWR type nuclear power plants in the Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. The service hall of the station is located near the entrance of the station. In the center of this service hall, there is the model of a nuclear reactor of full scale. This mock-up shows the core region in the reactor pressure vessel for the number one plant. The diameter and the thickness of the pressure vessel are about 5 m and 16 cm, respectively. The fuel assemblies and control rods are set just like the actual reactor, and the start-up operation of the reactor is shown colorfully and dynamically by pushing a button. When the control rods are pulled out, the boiling of water is demonstrated. The 1/50 scale model of the sixth plant with the power generating capacity of 1100 MWe is set, and this model is linked to the mock-up of reactor written above. The operations of a recirculating loop, a turbine and a condenser are shown by switching on and off lamps. The other exhibitions are shielding concrete wall, ECCS model, and many kinds of panels and models. This service hall is incorporated in the course of study and observation of civics. The good environmental effects to fishes and shells are explained in this service hall. Official buildings and schools are built near the service hall utilizing the tax and grant concerning power generation. This service hall contributes to give much freedom from anxiety to the public by the tour. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Characteristics of caffeine intoxication-related death in Tokyo, Japan, between 2008 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideto; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Abe, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Masako; Kato, Yukihisa; Shibata, Mikiyoshi; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2014-10-01

    Caffeine is widely available in beverages and over-the-counter products; however, in large doses, it can lead to lethal arrhythmia. This study aims to clarify the characteristics of caffeine intoxication-related deaths in Tokyo, Japan. Among the 4754 forensic autopsy cases between 2008 and 2013 in which a toxicological investigation was performed, cases in which the blood concentration of caffeine exceeded toxic levels (15 μg/ml) were selected (N = 22). We examined subjects' ages, medical histories, direct/underlying causes of death, and manner of death. We also assessed concurrent drug substance detection and identified the origin of the caffeine. More than 60% of the subjects were between the ages of 20 and 49 years (n = 14, 63.6%). Sixteen cases (72.7%) showed a history of psychiatric diseases such as depression and sleep disorders. The underlying cause of death for all cases except two was caffeine intoxication, and manner of death was classified as undetermined (n = 11), accidental (n = 7), suicide (n = 2), or others (n = 2). Toxicological analysis revealed the presence of ingredients common to analgesics/cold remedies in 12 cases (54.5%). The origin of the caffeine was identified in 11 cases (50.0%); the proportion of identification was significantly lower among the cases in which analgesic/cold remedy ingredients were not detected (20.0%). Caffeine intoxication-related deaths mainly occurred in young and middle-aged persons with common psychiatric diseases. Psychiatrists should take note of caffeine dependence while diagnosing common psychiatric symptoms. In half of the cases, the origin of the caffeine was unidentified; nevertheless, dietary sources or over-the-counter drugs containing caffeine were suspected. As it becomes easier to obtain caffeinated products, continuous monitoring of the number of deaths from caffeine intoxication, in addition to detailed investigations of the caffeine's origin, will be necessary.

  9. Characteristics of sudden bath-related death investigated by medical examiners in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideto; Hikiji, Wakako; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Abe, Nobuyuki; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2015-01-01

    Sudden bath-related deaths occur frequently in Japan, particularly among elderly people. However, the precise mechanism of bath-related death remains uncertain, and effective prevention strategies have not been established. Cases of bath-related deaths (n = 3289) were selected from all cases handled by the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office from 2009 to 2011 (N = 41 336). The ages and occurrence dates were examined, and major autopsy findings, including toxicological analysis, were evaluated for the autopsied cases (n = 550). Most cases occurred in individuals older than 60 years of age during winter. Analysis of autopsy findings revealed water inhalation signs in many cases (n = 435, 79.1%). Circulatory system diseases constituted more than half of the pathological findings regarding factors that may have contributed significantly to death (n = 300, 54.5%), and cardiac lesions were the most common pathological finding (n = 250, 45.5%). However, approximately one-third of the cases exhibited no remarkable pathological findings (n = 198, 36.0%). A quarter of all cases involved blood ethanol levels that exceeded 0.5 mg/mL (n = 140). The results suggested that drowning plays an important role in the final process of bath-related death. Circulatory system diseases may be the primary underlying pathology; however, there were variations in the medical histories and pathologies of cases of bath-related death. From a preventive perspective, family members should pay attention to elderly people with circulatory system diseases during bathing, particularly in winter. Additionally, the notion that ill or inebriated individuals should not take baths should be reinforced.

  10. Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in retailed meat in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Yoshitsugu; Yamada, Fumiya; Batmunkh, Otgonchimeg; Mochizuki, Mariko; Takano, Takashi; Hondo, Ryo; Ueda, Fukiko

    2010-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in retailed meats, comprising beef, chicken, and pork, in the Tokyo metropolitan area. A total of 379 samples of retailed meat were collected from 1998 to 2003, most of which were obtained by simultaneously purchasing the three classes of meat from a shop and then making another simultaneous purchase of meat from the same shop a few weeks later. The prevalence of L. monocytogenes was 28.0%, and the serotypes isolated were mainly 1/2a, 1/2b, 1/2c, and 4b. Comparison of the prevalence of each serotype among the classes of meat showed a predominant distribution of serotypes 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b in chicken, while serotype 1/2c was dominant in pork. A total of nine cases considered to be due to persistence and/or cross-contamination were found. Most of the strains involved in persistence and/or cross-contamination were of serotypes 1/2c or 4b. These results suggest that contamination in retailed meat in Japan is at almost the same level as in other countries and that chicken has the highest potential as a source of contamination and infection. In addition, we suggest that the ecological niche of serotype 1/2c is distinct from those of 1/2a, 1/2b, and 4b, which may explain why human hosts have less opportunity to be exposed to serotype 1/2c and why there is a lower rate of isolation of this serotype from cases of human listeriosis.

  11. Measurements and statistical analyses of indoor radon concentrations in Tokyo and surrounding areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Shiroharu; Suzuki, Takashi; Inokoshi, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    Since the UNSCEAR report published in 1982, radiation exposure to the respiratory tract due to radon and its progeny has been regarded as the single largest contributor to the natural radiation exposure of the general public. In Japan, the measurement of radon gas concentrations in many types of buildings have been surveyed by national and private institutes. We also carried out the measurement of radon gas concentrations in different types of residential buildings in Tokyo and its adjoining prefectures from October 1988 to September 1991, to evaluate the potential radiation risk of the people living there. One or two simplified passive radon monitors were set up in each of the 34 residential buildings located in the above-mentioned area for an exposure period of 3 months each. Comparing the average concentrations in the buildings of different materials and structures, those in the concrete steel buildings were always higher than those in the wooden and the prefabricated mortared buildings. The radon concentrations were proved to become higher in autumn and winter, and lower in spring and summer. Radon concentrations in an underground room of a concrete steel building showed the highest value throughout our investigation, and statistically significant seasonal variation was detected by the X-11 method developed by the U.S. Bureau of Census. The values measured in a room at the first floor of the same concrete steel building also showed seasonal variation, but the phase of variation was different. Another multivariate analysis suggested that the building material and structure are the most important factors concerning the levels of radon concentration among other factors such as the age of the building and the use of ventilators. (author)

  12. Interim report on the accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    The Investigation Committee on the Accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations (the Investigation Committee) of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) was established by the Cabinet decision on May 24, 2011. Its objectives are: to conduct investigation for finding out the causes of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS) and Fukushima Dai-ni Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ni NPS) of TEPCO as well as the causes of accident damage; and to make policy recommendations for limiting the expansion of damage and preventing reoccurrence of similar accidents. The Investigation Committee has conducted its investigation and evaluation since its first meeting on June 7, 2011. Its activities included: site visits to the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni NPSs, as well as to other facilities; hearing of heads of local governments around the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS; and hearing of people concerned through interviews mainly arranged by the Secretariat. As of December 16, 2011, the number of interviewees reached 456. The investigation and evaluation by the Investigation Committee are still ongoing and the Interim Report does not cover every item that the Committee aims at investigating and evaluating. Fact-finding of even some of those items discussed in the Interim Report are not yet completed. The Investigation Committee continues to conduct its investigation and evaluation and will issue its Final Report in the summer of 2012. This brief executive summary covers mainly considerations and evaluation of the issues in Chapter VII of the Interim Report, with brief reference to Chapters I to VI. The Investigation Committee recommendations are printed in bold. (author)

  13. Human resource development program for nuclear safety and security in Tokyo Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chi Young; Sagara, Hiroshi; Nagasaka, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The Academy for Global Nuclear Safety and Security Agent was established at Tokyo Institute of Technology in 2011, to develop global nuclear human resources in the field of 3S (Safety, Security, and Safeguards) as a Program for Leading Graduate Schools supported by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). New courses of nuclear safety and security were developed in addition to the existing nuclear engineering program; 1) Environmental Dynamics of Radioactive Nuclides; Numerical simulation of the environmental dispersion of radioactive materials released from hypothetical nuclear accidents and evaluation of the public exposure are performed, by using a computer-based emergency response system, to have students predict the environmental dispersion of radionuclides and radiological consequence by nuclear accidents. 2) Measurement of Environmental Radiation; Students acquire hands-on experiences measuring environmental radiation contamination caused by the nuclear accident in Fukushima with multiple types of radiation detectors. Environmental samples are collected and analyzed for isotope identification and its spatial distribution. 3) Simulation of Severe Nuclear Accidents; The evaluation results of Fukushima accident progression are discussed as well as typical sever accidents that threaten the integrity of reactor vessel. Students simulate BWR (Boiling Water Cooled Reactor) transients, design basis accidents, and severe accidents by using simulators. 4) Nuclear Security Training; Design of physical protection systems, its fundamental physics, and regulatory frameworks are covered and students gain the practical experiences by use of intrusion detection systems at JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), and by numerical simulation of hydro-dynamics of structure material and nuclear material criticality at the university. (author)

  14. Medicolegal death of homeless persons in Tokyo Metropolis over 12 years (1999-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hideto; Hikiji, Wakako; Tanifuji, Takanobu; Abe, Nobuyuki; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2013-05-01

    Recently, the number of homeless persons in Japan has steadily decreased. However, it is not certain whether unexpected death of the homeless have actually decreased in proportion to decrease in total number of cases. The documentation of medicolegal deaths among homeless persons handled in the Tokyo Medical Examiner's Office during 1999-2010 were reviewed, and we compared the number and manner/cause of death between cases occurring before 2004 and those occurring after 2004. In addition, we compared manner/cause of death between homeless and non-homeless persons. The number of medicolegal deaths of homeless persons remained almost the same during the study period in spite of a marked decrease in the total number of homeless persons after 2004. Age distribution shifted to older after 2004, and a higher proportion of the deceased had longer postmortem periods after 2004. Comparison between the manners/causes of death of the cases occurring before 2004 and those occurring after 2004 showed little difference. Disease constituted about 70% of all cases, and causes of death from disease were more various than those of non-homeless persons. Certain specific patterns included a higher proportion of death from circulatory disease in elderly homeless persons and a higher proportion of death from alcohol-related digestive disease and tuberculosis among younger homeless persons. Regarding accidental death, hypothermia was a leading cause of death irrespective of age group. Aging and isolation among homeless persons might contribute to an unchanged number of medicolegal death of them. In addition to measures to address frequent causes of death in each age group, better intervention for isolated homeless persons might be a key factor to prevent unexpected deaths of homeless persons in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proceedings of JAERI-JNC joint conference on nuclear safety research. March 7, 2003, Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun; Anoda, Yoshinari; Araya, Fumimasa; Yamaguchi, Toshio

    2003-08-01

    The JAERI-JNC Joint Conference on Nuclear Safety Research was held on March 7, 2003 in Tokyo with 188 participants, ahead of planned unification of JAERI and JNC in 2005. The objectives of the conference are to present recent results of safety research conducted in both institutes in accordance with the Five-Year Safety Research Plan by the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC), and to reflect suggestions from the participants for future research program. Prof. Matsubara, Vice Chairperson of NSC, first presented a special lecture entitled 'Expectation on Future Nuclear Safety Research in Japan'. Twelve papers were then presented on the overview of research results and those of individual research activities in the fields of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste and environmental radioactivity. In the final session, a panel discussion was conducted with a title of 'Expectation on Future Nuclear Safety Research' chaired by Prof. Kimura, Chairperson of Special Committee on Nuclear Safety Research under NSC. Through the presentations and discussions, consensus has almost been obtained among participants for several key issues on safety research to be conducted by a unified new organization, such as giving priority to safety research as one of major missions, assurance of independence of safety research with the governmental funds, assurance of transparency of the planning process of safety research, separation and harmonization between safety research and developmental research, importance of maintaining fundamental research and research facilities, promotion of cooperation with relevant organizations considering the needs from industries, and importance of dissemination of research results and personnel training. The present report compiles the summaries of special lecture, papers, questions and comments, panel discussions, and OHPs presented in the conference. (author)

  16. Establishment and current status of patient community at Tokyo Dental College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Hirata, Soichiro; Sugihara, Naoki; Mochizuki, Riuji; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Kawada, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The "Dental students training to address the needs of each individual patient: enhancement of ability to make a comprehensive diagnosis and treatment plans with high ethical standards and good communication skills", project launched at Tokyo Dental College was adopted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology as part of its "Program for Promoting University Education and Student Support, Theme A: Program for Promoting University Education Reform" in 2009. One of the main goals of this subject is "the establishment of Patient Community". Patient Community members allowed students to gain a more realistic experience of clinical practice than simulated patients. The Patient Community consists of patients and members of the parents' association who have agreed to cooperate for the advancement of dental education, becoming involved in dental student education through Communication Studies, which are held for first- to fourth-year students. Patient Community members were recruited at the open lectures (15 times, between July 10, 2010 and November 30, 2011). The Patient Community comprised 24 members, including 8 men and 16 women by November 30, 2011. The cumulative number of attendees in Communication Studies (I-IV, 6 times) was 35, including 13 men and 22 women. Fourteen people applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Seven people signed up between 1 and 7 days after the open lecture. On the other hand, only 3 people applied within 8 to 9 days after the open lecture. However, interestingly, the ratio of the attendance for Communication Studies by Patient Community members who applied 8 to 9 days after the open lecture was higher than that of members who applied for admission on the day of the open lecture. Since the number of Patient Community members is insufficient for the purposes of the Patient Community, it is necessary to think about how recruitment methods can be made more effective and how such open lectures should be

  17. [Two Outbreaks of Yersinia enterocolitica O:8 Infections in Tokyo and the Characterization of Isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Noriko; Ishitsuka, Rie; Yokoyama, Keiko; Saiki, Dai; Akase, Satoru; Monma, Chie; Hirai, Akihiko; Sadamasu, Kenji; Kai, Akemi

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of outbreaks caused by Yersinia enterocolitica has been very small in Japan, 4 outbreaks were occurred during the 2 years between 2012 and 2013. We describe herein 2 outbreaks which were examined in Tokyo in the present study. Outbreak 1: A total of 39 people (37 high school students and 2 staff) stayed at a hotel in mountain area in Japan had experienced abdominal pain, diarrhea and fever in August, 2012. The Y. enterocolitica serogroup O:8 was isolated from 18 (64.3%) out of 28 fecal specimens of 28 patients. The infection roots could not be revealed because Y. enterocolitica was not detected from any meals at the hotel or its environment. Outbreak 2: A total of 52 students at a dormitory had diarrhea and fever in April, 2013. The results of the bacteriological and virological examinations of fecal specimens of patients showed that the Y. enterocolitica serogroup O:8 was isolated from 24 fecal specimens of 21 patients and 3 kitchen staff. We performed bacteriological and virological examination of the stored and preserved foods at the kitchen of the dormitory to reveal the suspect food. For the detection of Y. enterocolitica, food samples. together with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were incubated at 4 degrees C for 21 days. Then, a screening test for Y. enterocolitica using realtime-PCR targeting the ail gene was performed against the PBS culture. One sample (fresh vegetable salad) tested was positive on realtime-PCR. No Y. enterocolitica was isolated on CIN agar from the PBS culture because many bacteria colonies other than Y. enterocolitica appeared on the CIN agar. After the alkaline-treatments of the culture broth or the immunomagnetic beads concentration method using anti-Y. enterocolitica O:8 antibodies, Y. enterocolitica O:8 which was the same serogroup as the patients' isolates was successfully isolated from the PBS culture. The fresh vegetable salad was confirmed as the incrimination food of this outbreak.

  18. DIVERSITY IN DIAK JÄRVENPÄÄ CAMPUS UNIT : Diversity and Relation among Different Institutions Located Within the Campus Premises

    OpenAIRE

    Shakya, Samasty; Singh, Sadin Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Sadin Kumar Singh & Samasty Shakya. Diversity in Diak Järvenpää Campus Unit: Diversity and Relation among Different Institution Located within the campus premises. Järvenpää, Spring 2012. 48p. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Diak South, Järvenpää Unit, Degree program in Social Services (UAS) Focus on Community Development Work The primary purpose of this research was to find the biggest issue of diversity in the campus area. All three educational institutions operating from t...

  19. Water Supply and Sanitation Facility Accessibility in Off-Campus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water Supply and Sanitation Facility Accessibility in Off-Campus Houses ... on drinking water source, rate of illness, type and usage of sanitation facilities. ... wells, unprotected dug wells; while others during the wet season harvest rain water.

  20. An empirical investigation of campus demographics and reported rapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma-Mosley, Jacquelyn D; Jozkowski, Kristen N; Martinez, Taylor

    2017-10-01

    Rape on college campuses continues to be a pervasive public health issue with approximately 11% of women experiencing rape while in college. As such, it is important to examine factors unique to college campuses that influence the occurrences of rape. Using data from 1,423 four-year universities (public and private with at least 1,000 students) from the Office of Education and the Clery Act (2014), we examined institutional risk factors, such as tuition, liquor violations, Greek-life, athletic programs, institution type (public vs. private), and geographical location. Public institutions with higher tuition, more liquor violations, and greater numbers of fraternity men and athletes were more likely to report rape on their campuses. Findings suggest that there are university-level characteristics which may increase certain campuses propensity toward violence against women.

  1. development of an integrated campus security alerting system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Keywords: Campus Security, Microcontroller, Internet Protocol Camera, Integrated system, Micro-switches. 1. INTRODUCTION .... personnel can fall back to the information captured/stored ...... Adetoba A. O. "Design and Construction of a Car.

  2. The Moral Imperative to Prevent Sexual Harassment on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Frank H. T.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses sexual harassment on college campuses. Focuses on harassing behavior that stems from power relationships and harassing behavior among peers. Describes how Cornell University is addressing these problems. (ABL)

  3. Are You Ready To Discuss IT Outsourcing on Your Campus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Explores why the idea of outsourcing campus information technology (IT) services rouses opinions and passions best handled by informed dialogue. Discusses how to conduct this dialog, including common myths about outsourcing and useful lessons. (EV)

  4. Implementing the Climate Action Plan | Climate Neutral Research Campuses |

    Science.gov (United States)

    considerations for building a portfolio, including: Compatibility with organizational mission: All climate NREL Implementing the Climate Action Plan Implementing the Climate Action Plan When implementing climate action plans on research campuses, two important and related questions must be answered

  5. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... generation was used to develop a holistic healthcare model for a higher education campus' health service. It became ... innovative. Health plays a .... conducted will set the tone for the interactive process of holistic healthcare.

  6. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  7. Power Purchase Agreements | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    meeting 15% of its energy needs through a 1.23 megawatt (MW) solar system consisting of 5,000 panels installation of 130 solar panels; enough power to supply the electrical needs of the Campus Center Cafe. The

  8. Spiders of Kerala Agricultural University Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Adarsh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 86 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera of 20 families have been recorded from the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU campus, Thrissur, Kerala, southern India.  This represents 5.1% of the total spiders’ species and 33.33% of the total families of spiders recorded in India.  The dominant spider family at KAU campus is Araneidae with 18 species of nine genera. Salticidae is represented by 14 species of 13 genera.  Out of 252 endemic spiders of India, 16 have been reported from KAU campus.  Guild structure analysis shows spiders belonging to seven types of feeding guilds present in KAU campus.  Orb-web builders are the dominant feeding guild accounting for 34%, followed by stalkers (22%, ground runners (20%, ambushers (8%, scattered line weavers (8%, foliage runners (7% and sheet-web builders (1%. 

  9. Next Generation Campus Network Deployment Project Based on Softswitch

    OpenAIRE

    HU Feng; LIU Ziyan

    2011-01-01

    After analyzing the current networks of Guizhou University,we brought forward a scheme of next generation campus networks based on softswitch technology by choosing SoftX3000 switching system of HuaWei and provided the specific solution of accessing campus networks in this paper. It is proved that this scheme is feasible by using OPNET, which not only accomplished the integration of the PSTN and IP networks but also achieved the combining of voice services and data services.

  10. Results of the Fall 2007 UC Davis Campus Travel Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Congleton, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Our collective transportation choices have far-reaching effects both locally and globally, from traffic congestion to global warming. While the concerted actions of many travelers working together could make significant inroads into solving these problems, a single traveler working alone could not. This report presents a snapshot of campus travel at the outset of the 2007-2008 academic year, measures campus mode split and average vehicle ridership, collects UC Davis travelers' opinions about ...

  11. Design and implementation about the campus wireless network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Fazhi; An Dehai; Wang Yanming; Cui Tao; Chen Gang; Liu Baoxu

    2007-01-01

    With the development of network applications, flexibility and wieldy is becoming more and more important for network users. Based on the analysis of the needs of campus wireless network. This article design and analysis the deployment mechanism, register system and protection system of wireless network. Built a wireless network system base on IHEP network environment, realization the 'always and everywhere' access the network in the IHEP campus area. (authors)

  12. From ship-yard to campus. Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij; Van scheepswerf naar campus. Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosef, J.P. [Wolter en Dros, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Van der Schee, W.G. [Wolter en Dros, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    The industrial buildings and halls of an old ship-yard in the Netherlands of the Rotterdam Droogdok Maatschappij (a shipbuilding and repair company in Rotterdam, Netherlands) has been renovated and transferred into educational facilities and buildings for small-scale businesses. [Dutch] Waar tientallen jaren geleden zware mokerslagen door de hallen galmden, staan nu studenten geconcentreerd gebogen over de fijnste technieken. De voormalige machinehallen van de Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij (RDM) in Rotterdam huisvesten tegenwoordig onderwijsinstellingen en kleinschalige innovatieve bedrijven. Het middelpunt van deze RDM-Campus is het Innovation Dock. Het was een uitdaging om in de oude tochtige hallen een behaaglijk binnenklimaat te creeren voor onderwijsdoeleinden en kantoren.

  13. Campus Solidarity Campaign: Developing a Program to Promote an Environment of Solidarity and Support on College Campuses for Students with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyluk, Kristin A.; Corrigan, Patrick W.; Jones, Nev; James, Drexler; Abelson, Sara; Malmon, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a campaign to promote an environment of solidarity and support on college campuses for students with mental illnesses. Method: Data were gathered from 24 members of a Chicago university campus who were selected as representatives of key campus stakeholder groups including students, administrative staff,…

  14. [Maggie's Tokyo's Human Support the Meaning of Where Now ? And Cancer Journey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yoshie

    2017-08-01

    The landscape architect Maggie Jencks felt that she wanted a place to "get herself back" when her breast cancer recurred and was told that she only had a few months remaining. Mr. Charles Jencks, her husband who fulfilled her wishes, opened the first "Maggie's Cancer Caring Centre" in Edinburgh in 1996. Masako Akiyama, the chief of Maggie's Tokyo found out about Maggie's Centre when she listened to a presentation from Andrew Anderson, the director of Maggie's Edinburgh, at an International Nursing Seminar in 2008. Masako Akiyama realized that support to "get back ones own power" is one of the important things. In addition, she felt that providing a "place" and "support" to patients and their families were predominant elements. When someone is diagnosed with cancer, the person gets a great shock and feels loneliness. Suddenly the person feels tomorrow will not come, every day becomes uncertain. These feelings affect their whole life such as enrollment, employment, loss of role, and change. They also affect people such as family, friends, colleagues, besides the person. Due to changes in treatment, the existential troubles that have been prolonged after the completion of the initial treatment appear. Cancer survivorship is called "Cancer journey"in the Maggie's flow. The cancer journey suddenly starts, when a person is diagnosed with cancer", without direction or a plan. Additionally, the "heart"is often left behind. To undertake the cancer journey, there are a lot of forks in the road that cannot turn back and they are urged to choose their path. "Where now ?"is a phrase in a pamphlet from Maggie's Centre, and the phrase shows that staff of Maggie's Centre can help cancer patient to recognize where they are in their Cancer journey. The Maggie's Centre has 2 important pillars: "building/environment"and "human support". As a "homely place" between hospital and my house, the building is "a healing space". Human support is provided free of charge and patients and

  15. Major to ultra trace elements in rainfall collected in suburban Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamura, Tadashi; Iwashita, Masato; Iijima, Satoe; Shintani, Megumi; Takaku, Yuichi

    Major to ultra trace elements such as rare earth elements (REEs), platinum group elements (PGEs) in 20 rainfall events from suburban Tokyo were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Anion species were also determined by an ion chromatography (IC). The concentrations of PGEs were so low that only Pt was detected in some rainfall events. Enrichment factors (EFs), refer to soil and sea salt components, were calculated for the measured elements (with Al and Na as references). Be, (Na), Mg, (Al), Si, Cl, K, Fe, Rb, Sr, REEs (except La, Gd), Ta, and U were mostly originated from natural materials (soil and sea salt). For Li, B, Ca, Mn, Sr, Ba, and Cs, the contribution of natural materials was significant. EFs for Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sb, Cd, Pb, Bi, Ag, Te, Au, Pt, SO 4-S and NO 3-N exceeded 100 indicating non-crustal, non-sea salt origin, presumably anthropogenic; however, contribution of volcanic gases could not be excluded for As, Se, Te and Bi. Pt seemed to be uniformly distributed worldwide and a catalyst for automobile emission control may be the main source. Au also showed uniform distribution. On the other hand, EFs for Zr, Nb, Hf and Th were less than unity. Probably these elements resided in acid resistant refractory fine minerals that did not decompose with acid treatment, and did not evaporate and ionize in the ICP. An alternative explanation is that the concentration of these elements was lower in the soil of the sampling area than the average crust. In the crust normalized REE pattern plot, La, Eu and Gd showed clear positive anomalies. La and Gd could have anthropogenic components. A possible source of La and Gd is cracking catalyst for petrol refining, but this source does not fully explain the anomaly. The source of Gd may also be Gd-DTPA (Gadolinium (III) diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid) used for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents. The Eu origin may be soil with higher concentration than the crust average.

  16. Effect of water temperature on survival of early-life stages of marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae in Tokyo Bay, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kodama, Keita; Oyama, Masaaki; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2017-07-01

    We investigated factors that might have disturbed the stock recovery of marbled flounder in Tokyo Bay by focusing on the early life stages. Field surveys in Tokyo Bay from 2006 to 2011 revealed that mature adult biomass increased from 2006 to 2008 and decreased thereafter. Meanwhile, larval and juvenile densities were high in 2006 and 2008 but low in other years. Discrepancies in the yearly trends of these parameters suggest that mortality during life stages between spawning and early larval phases might have affected the abundance of the subsequent life stages. Monthly mean water temperature between January and February, in which hatching and pelagic larvae occur in the bay, was lower in 2006 (8.6 °C) and 2008 (9.6 °C) than was observed in other years (10.4-11.4 °C). Significant negative correlation between water temperature and larval density implies that mortality during pre- and post-larval stages would be higher in warmer winter years (>10 °C). To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of water temperature on mortality and development in egg and larval stages under controlled laboratory conditions. Hatching rate was high in a water temperature range of 9.2-12.7 °C (66.6-82.5%), whereas it decreased in cooler (3.7% at 5.9 °C) or warmer (33.9% at 14.8 °C) conditions. Meanwhile, days from fertilization to hatching, size of larvae at hatching and survival rate of larvae after 18 d from hatching were monotonically and significantly decreased as water temperature was elevated. Combined evidence of the field and laboratory studies suggests that a warmer reproductive season (>10 °C) might induce mortalities of marbled flounder larvae in Tokyo Bay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of the Great East Japan earthquake on mandatory psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, A; Aoki, Y; Harima, H

    2012-10-09

    On 11 March 2011, the eastern part of Japan was struck by a magnitude 9.0 quake. About 20 000 people were killed or were missing, and a nuclear crisis followed. In Tokyo, people were indirectly exposed to the earthquake and nuclear crisis by TV broadcast. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential effect of the series of catastrophes on psychiatric emergency hospitalizations in Tokyo. Clinical records of patients who were mandatorily admitted to Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital by law because of urgent risk to self or others were reviewed. Records regarding the 2 years of investigation, which include the 6 months after the earthquake, were reviewed. The six months after the earthquake were compared with the eighteen months before the earthquake in clinical and demographic data using independent t-tests or χ(2) tests. During the 6 months before and after the earthquake, 97 and 127 people were mandatorily admitted. χ(2) Tests demonstrated a significant increase in the number of patients after the earthquake (P = 0.045), attributable to the significant increase in the number of patients with schizophrenia after the earthquake (P = 0.011, 32 vs 56), whereas there were no significant differences in the number of patients with other diagnoses between those two periods. Independent t-tests revealed that patients admitted after the earthquake had marginally significantly shorter periods of education compared with those admitted before the earthquake (13.78 vs 12.82 years, P = 0.084). This work suggests that patients with schizophrenia were more sensitive to indirect exposure to the earthquake and that a shorter period of education was a potential risk factor.

  18. [Serial Food Poisoning Outbreaks Caused by Norovirus-Contaminated Shredded Dried Laver Seaweed Provided at School Lunch, Tokyo, 2017].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somura, Yoshiko; Kimoto, Kana; Oda, Mayuko; Okutsu, Yuta; Kato, Rei; Suzuki, Yasunori; Siki, Dai; Hirai, Akihiko; Akiba, Tetsuya; Shinkai, Takayuki; Sadamasu, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    In February 2017, four food poisoning outbreaks occurred in Tokyo, involving ten schools. Shredded dried laver seaweed processed by a single food manufacturer in December 2016 was provided in common for the school meals that caused all four outbreaks. Of 4,209 persons exposed, 1,193 (28.3%) had symptoms of gastroenteritis. Norovirus (NoV) GII was detected in 207 (78.1%) of 265 cases by real-time RT-PCR. Thirty-one shredded dried laver seaweed samples were examined and seven (22.6%) of them were positive for NoV GII. PCR fragments of NoV ORF1/2 junction region (302 bp) from seven shredded dried laver seaweed samples and 20 clinical samples derived from the four outbreaks were sequenced. All of them displayed complete homology, and the genotype was classified as GII.17. A nearly full-length sequence (7,420 bp) of NoV RNA derived from a case was obtained by next-generation sequencer analysis and phylogenetic analysis indicated that this strain belongs to the same cluster as Hu/GII/JP/2015/GII.P17_GII.17/Kawasaki308. Thus, our investigation elucidated that the causative agent of these four serial food poisoning outbreaks was NoV GII.17 and the infectious source was a single batch of shredded dried laver seaweed. The water activity of the shredded dried laver seaweed was found to be 0.119 to 0.129. It was epidemiologically clarified that NoV does not lose infectivity for about two months even in the dry state. We conclude that a large diffuse outbreak of food poisoning caused by NoV GII.17 contamination of shredded dried laver seaweed had occurred in Tokyo. Our elucidation of the causative agent indicated that the food poisoning outbreaks in multiple areas of Japan, including Tokyo, during January to February 2017 were caused by the same contaminated food.

  19. Structure and dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied with the electron beam ion trap in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Hu, Zhimin; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Li, Yueming; Kato, Daiji; Currell, Fred J.; Tong Xiaomin; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Ohtani, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the structure and the dynamics of highly charged heavy ions studied through dielectronic recombination (DR) observations performed with the Tokyo electron beam ion trap. By measuring the energy dependence of the ion abundance ratio in the trap at equilibrium, we have observed DR processes for open shell systems very clearly. Remarkable relativistic effects due to the generalized Breit interaction have been clearly shown in DR for highly charged heavy ions. We also present the first result for the coincidence measurement of two photons emitted from a single DR event.

  20. Abstracts from 17. Japan conference on radiation and radioisotopes, September 2-4, 1985, Sankei Kaikan, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    At the 17th Japan Conference on Radiation and Radioisotopes held in Tokyo in September 1985, the basic theme was Expanding Uses of Radiation in Daily Life and Industry. Abstracts compiled covered the following fields of study; prospects and problems for development of radiation uses, food irradiation, medical applications, non-destructive testing, low-level waste management, high energy physics, new materials, and robotics and lasers. There were also four special lectures on radioisotopes, prospects for radiation processing in China, radiobiological studies of Pions in TRIUMF, and ICRU and ICRP recommendations on determination of dose equivalents.

  1. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the research 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in the fiscal year 1992. The Yayoi was operated smoothly through the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized and the related themes reached 23 cases. The research themes of the linac count up to 17, after its reconstruction to be twin-linac. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the 16 reports of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1992 are collected. (J.P.N.)

  2. Transformation of the Housing Market in Tokyo since the Late 1990s: Housing Purchases by Single-person Households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Kubo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to clarify the correlation between the transformation of the Japanese housing market and the increasing number of single-person households in Japan, with a special focus on the supply of compact condominiums. In order to achieve the abovementioned purpose, the changes in the Japanese housing market and diversification of the Japanese household structure are described. Finally, the features of the supply strategies of condominium suppliers, which reflect the diversification of the household structure and increasing need for condominiums by single-person households in central Tokyo, are examined.

  3. Wildlife habitat management on college and university campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosci, Tierney; Warren, Paige S.; Harper, Rick W.; DeStefano, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    With the increasing involvement of higher education institutions in sustainability movements, it remains unclear to what extent college and university campuses address wildlife habitat. Many campuses encompass significant areas of green space with potential to support diverse wildlife taxa. However, sustainability rating systems generally emphasize efforts like recycling and energy conservation over green landscaping and grounds maintenance. We sought to examine the types of wildlife habitat projects occurring at schools across the United States and whether or not factors like school type (public or private), size (number of students), urban vs. rural setting, and funding played roles in the implementation of such initiatives. Using case studies compiled by the National Wildlife Federation’s Campus Ecology program, we documented wildlife habitat-related projects at 60 campuses. Ten management actions derived from nationwide guidelines were used to describe the projects carried out by these institutions, and we recorded data about cost, funding, and outreach and education methods. We explored potential relationships among management actions and with school characteristics. We extracted themes in project types, along with challenges and responses to those challenges. Native plant species selection and sustainable lawn maintenance and landscaping were the most common management actions among the 60 campuses. According to the case studies we examined, we found that factors like school type, size, and location did not affect the engagement of a campus in wildlife habitat initiatives, nor did they influence the project expenditures or funding received by a campus. Our results suggest that many wildlife habitat initiatives are feasible for higher education institutions and may be successfully implemented at relatively low costs through simple, but deliberate management actions.

  4. Implementation of the Tobacco-Free Campus Policy on College Campuses: Evidence From a Survey of College Students in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Min; Liang, Zhu-Yuan; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Shadel, William G; Zhou, Lei; Xiao, Jiaying

    2016-11-01

    China issued a nationwide "Tobacco-Free Campus" Policy (TFCP) in January 2014, but it is unclear how well it was implemented across China's 2138 college campuses. We conducted an Internet survey of Beijing college students to evaluate the implementation of the TFCP in Beijing. An Internet survey of 711 students from 37 colleges in Beijing was conducted in May 2015. Respondents reported on secondhand smoking (SHS) exposure on campus, knowledge on and actions taken against SHS, and tobacco marketing exposure on campus. Almost 90% of respondents were exposed to SHS on campus at least once in the past month. Approximately 37% of nonsmokers and 61% of smokers reported seeing a teacher smoking, and the majority of both smokers and nonsmokers reported seeing a classmate smoking in campus buildings. The likelihood and location of SHS exposure depend on the participant's demographics and own smoking behavior. Nonsmokers were more likely to be aware of the health risk of SHS than smokers. Although most participants were aware of the harms, only 13% and 9% tried to stop their last SHS exposure indoors and outdoors, respectively. Forty-seven students from 14 colleges noticed tobacco marketing activities on campus. The TFCP on Chinese college campuses was only partially enforced, particularly with regard to SHS. On January 29, 2014, the Chinese Ministry of Education issued the TFCP. A major barrier to effective tobacco control in China is the difficulty in implementing policies issued by the central government. At this point, it is unclear whether the TFCP was successfully implemented on China's college campuses. Major tobacco use monitoring efforts do not include college students. The present research describes the current tobacco control environment on Beijing's college campuses 15 months after the TFCP took effect. To our knowledge, this is the first paper in the English literature on tobacco environment and exposure (rather than a prevalence survey) of college students in

  5. Earthquake resistant countermeasures for pipelines in Tokyo gas F.T.R.L.; Etude menee par l'institut de recherches de Tokyo gas et portant sur les mesures antisismiques applicables aux canalisations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, M.; Hosokawa, N.; Watanabe, T. [Tokyo Gas Fundamental Technology Research Lab. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Taking 'damage factor', 'ground response', 'soil pipe interaction', and 'deformability of pipes' as its four key concerns, Tokyo Gas F.T.R.L. is working to clarify the behavior of pipelines during strong earthquakes and improve their earthquake resistance to increase safety levels. In specific terms, Tokyo Gas F.T.R.L. has sought to contribute to earthquake resistance by, for example, conducting pipeline damage forecasts, FEM dynamic response analyses to quantify ground amplification, empirical and analytic studies of forces acting on pipelines, various vibration tests, and tests to determine the deforming behavior of pipes. A further important concern given the limited resources available is the prioritization of the pipes to be made more earthquake resistant. Ultimately, these studies should contribute to more rational and effective seismic design of pipelines and improvement of earthquake resistance both in the case of existing and new facilities and equipment. (authors)

  6. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  7. On Study of Building Smart Campus under Conditions of Cloud Computing and Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao

    2017-12-01

    two new concepts in the information era are cloud computing and internet of things, although they are defined differently, they share close relationship. It is a new measure to realize leap-forward development of campus by virtue of cloud computing, internet of things and other internet technologies to build smart campus. This paper, centering on the construction of smart campus, analyzes and compares differences between network in traditional campus and that in smart campus, and makes proposals on how to build smart campus finally from the perspectives of cloud computing and internet of things.

  8. True Green and Sustainable University Campuses? Toward a Clusters Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Sonetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Campus greening is often the first step universities take towards sustainability. However, the diffusion of sustainability reporting methodologies and rankings is still at an early stage, and is biased in mainly measuring energy efficiency indicators while omitting basic features enabling meaningful comparisons among centers or addressing social (users aspects related to long term sustainability transitions. This paper aims to introduce a critical perspective on sustainability university frameworks through: (i a review of current Campus Sustainability Assessments (CSAs; (ii performing and comparing the results obtained from the application of two internationally recognized CSAs (namely, Green Metric and ISCN to two case studies (the Politecnico di Torino, in Italy, and the Hokkaido University, In Japan and, finally, (iii proposing a new CSA approach that encompasses clusters of homogeneous campus typologies for meaningful comparisons and university rankings. The proposed clusters regard universities’ morphological structures (campuses nested within city centers versus outside of a city compact ones, climatic zones and functions. At the micro scale, the paper introduces the need for indicators beyond measuring pure energy efficiency, but which are attentive to local and societal constraints and provide long-term tracking of outcomes. This, better than a sheer record of sustainability priority actions, can help in building homogenous university case studies to find similar and scalable success strategies and practices, and also in self-monitoring progress toward achieving truly sustainable university campuses.

  9. Web Content Analysis On Sustainable Campus Operation (SCO Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Ruzaimah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the current practices implemented in global universities for achieving sustainability throughout campus operations. This study adopted a web content analysis method where 30 international green universities’ websites have been thoroughly examined to identify common initiatives implemented to achieve sustainability through campus operations. The findings are ranked based on the implementation of these initiatives by participating universities. From the websites reviewed, as much as 31 initiatives have been identified as common initiatives frequently implemented by green universities to achieve sustainability in campus operations. It was found that the common initiatives frequently implemented by most of the universities include ‘Provide bin with clearly marked signs to increase the number of recycling items’, and ‘Generate electricity on campus by establishing power generation plants’ with 87% and 83% respectively. This paper fills the gap by presenting the investigation of sustainability initiatives from some of the major green universities internationally. It is suggested that higher education institutions, particularly Malaysian universities, initiate or manage their implementation of sustainable campus operation (SCO initiatives based on the findings of this research.

  10. The use of social media for campus safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Brittany; Kapucu, Naim; Morgan, Jeffrey

    As public safety communication evolved, each disaster or emergency presented unique challenges for emergency managers and others response to disasters. Yet, a foundational focus is the timely dissemination of accurate information to keep communities informed and able to prepare, mitigate, respond, and recover. For the campus community, the increase in bomb threats, active shooter incidents, and geographic-based natural disasters call for the discovery of reliable and cost-effective solutions for emergency information management. Social media is becoming a critical asset in this endeavor. This article examines the evolution of public safety communication, the unique setting of the campus community, and social media's role in campus disaster resilience. In addition, an exploratory study was done to better understand the perception of social media use for public safety within the campus community. The findings provide practical recommendations for campus emergency management professions; however, future research is needed to provide specific, actionable ways to achieve these goals as well as understand how diverse universities utilize a variety of platforms.

  11. [Civil engineering education at the Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo: an analysis based on Ayahiko Ishibashi's memoirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    The Imperial College of Engineering (ICE or Kobu-Daigakko) in Tokyo, founded in 1873 under the auspices of the Ministry of Public Works, was one of the most prominent modern institutions of engineering education in early Meiji Japan. Previous studies have revealed that the ICE offered large scale practical training programs at enterprises of the Ministry, which sometimes lasted several months, and praised their ideal combination of theory and practice. In reality, it has been difficult to evaluate the quality of education at the ICE mainly because of scarcity of sources. ICE students published a collection of memoirs for alumni members, commemorating the fiftieth-year of the history of the Tokyo Imperial University. Drawing on the previously neglected collection of students' memoires, this paper appraises the education of civil engineering offered by the ICE. The paper also compares this collection with other official records of the college, and confirms it as a reliable source, even though it contains some minor errors. The author particularly uses the memoirs by Ayahiko Ishibashi, one of the first graduates from its civil engineering course, who left sufficient reminiscences on education that he received. This paper, as a result, illustrates that the main practical training for the students of civil engineering was limited to designing process, including surveying. Furthermore, practical training that Ishibashi received at those enterprises often lacked a plan, and its effectiveness was questionable.

  12. Geographically explicit urban land use change scenarios for Mega cities: a case study in Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Y.; Bagan, H.; Seya, H.; Nakamichi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In preparation for the IPCC 5th assessment report, the international modeling community is developing four Representative Concentration Paths employing the scenarios developed by four different Integrated Assessment Models. These RCPs will be employed as an input to climate models, such as Earth System Models. In these days, the importance of assessment of not only global but also local (city/zone level) impacts of global change has gradually been recognized, thereby downscaling climate models are one of the urgent problems to be solved. Needless to say, reliable downscaling requires spatially high resolution land use change scenarios. So far, there has been proposed a lot of methods for constructing land use change scenarios with considering economic behavior of human, such as agent-based model (e.g., Parker et al., 2001), and land use transport (LUT) model (e.g., Anas and Liu, 2007). The latter approach in particular has widely been applied to actual urban/transport policy; hence modeling the interaction between them is very important for creating reliable land use change scenarios. However, the LUT models are usually built based on the zones of cities/municipalities whose spatial resolutions are too low to derive sensible parameters of the climate models. Moreover, almost all of the works which attempt to build spatially high resolution LUT model employs very small regions as the study area. The objective of this research is deriving various input parameters to climate models such as population density, fractional green vegetation cover, and anthropogenic heat emission with spatially high resolution land use change scenarios constructed with LUT model. The study area of this research is Tokyo metropolitan area, which is the largest urban area in the world (United Nations., 2010). Firstly, this study employs very high ground resolution zones composed of micro districts around 1km2. Secondly, the research attempt to combine remote sensing techniques and LUT models

  13. A tale of two campuses: Lessons learned in establishing a satellite campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Charles

    2018-05-01

    "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity." The opening line of Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities could easily be the dramatic opening line of a summary of the establishment of a satellite medical school campus in Manitoba. Reflection on my last four years as associate dean reveals that most of the descriptors in that famous sentence at one time or another were apropos. This brief essay will relate the experiences of the last four years and some of the lessons learned along the way.

  14. DIGITAL COMPETENCIES – COLLABORATING, WORKING AND LEARNING ACROSS CAMPUSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellerup, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    of the project • Leadership - providing visions, direction, concrete support and resources • External consultants – providing professional guidance, structure, and expertise • Collaborative reflection, documentation, sharing and development of concrete teaching and learning designs • Access to digital platforms......A Design-Based Project The project Digital Competencies for Collaboration– across Campuses is a project, which illustrates how faculty through design-based research can improve and transform communication and learning. In the project the Social Education Program (SEP) at University College Zealand...... (UCZ) works with faculty’s competencies - developing new ways of using technology to empower faculty collaboration across campuses, to create new designs for teaching and to enable new methods of knowledge sharing. Faculty, in the case presented, is located on four different campuses and the use...

  15. Business Planning for a Campus-Wide Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, Tamsin E; Lasser, Frances; Carter, Candace; Matzke, Lise A M; Dhugga, Gurm; Arora, Nidhi; Dee, Simon; LeBlanc, Jodi; Babinsky, Sindy; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Cheah, Stefanie; Watson, Peter; Vercauteren, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    Biobanks are resources that facilitate research. Many biobanks exist around the world, but most tend to focus on a specific disease or research area. BC Children's Hospital and BC Women's Hospital are located on the same campus (Oak Street Campus) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. A campus-wide biobank has been established on the site of these two hospitals to collect specimens and annotated data from children or women seeking medical care at either of the hospitals. Such an initiative requires careful planning and consideration of many factors such as buy in and support of key stakeholders, governance, financial planning, and optimizing specimen collection. We developed a business plan to account for the many aspects associated with integrating the "BC Children's Hospital BioBank." This document describes the approach our business plan took for the implementation of our biobank and the progress, including deviations from the business plan. We also provide a perspective on the current status with a focus on sustainability.

  16. Special course for global nuclear human resource development in cooperation with Hitachi-GE nuclear energy in Tokyo institute of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, H.; Futami, T.; Saito, M.; Murata, F.; Shimizu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Many Asian countries are willing to learn Japanese nuclear power plants experiences, and are interested in introducing nuclear power generation to meet their future energy demand. Special course for Global Nuclear Human Resource Development was established in April, 2011 in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Graduate School of Tokyo Institute of Technology in cooperation with Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy. Purpose of the special course is to develop global nuclear engineers and researchers not only in the Tokyo Institute of Technology but also in the educational institutes of Southeast Asian countries

  17. Block survey of wall covered with plant in the city of Tokyo [Japan] and evaluation of thermal environment of wall greening system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, K.; Soh, Y.; Satoh, S.

    2007-01-01

    There were 384 (8877 square m) walls which covered with plant on 10 square km in the city of Tokyo, and the green wall rate in the city of Tokyo was 0.88%. Vines, for example Parthenocissus tricuspidata and Hedera helix, were widely used. The factor of thinking better of the landscape in urban area was one of the easily management of plants. The three wall greening systems, a wall covered with hanging climbers and two types of self-contained living wall, mitigated the thermal environment. However its degree can be depended on the greening method and the greenery occupancy rate of wall

  18. Decentralised energy solutions: The CSIR energy autonomous campus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter-Brown, Clinton

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available /yr Wind: Baseload 3-4 MW-class wind turbines Total of 3 MW 7 GWh/yr Biogas: Municipal/organic waste from surrounding supermarkets/restaurants 4-5 MW @ 800-1,000 hrs/yr 4 GWh/yr Trading with Tshwane municipality (import and export) based on pure economics... analysis, Site selection, Environmental Impact Assessment, etc Demand side management: Campus energy audit & street light energy audit Storage: Technology selection process, procurement of electric vehicles for the campus 27 Over 1 MW of Solar PV...

  19. Campus as a Living Laboratory for Sustainability: The Physics Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Timothy; Middlecamp, Catherine

    2018-04-01

    One of us is a physicist. The other is a chemist. For the past four years, we have been teaching a large introductory environmental science course that uses our campus as a lens through which to explore issues relating to sustainability. Our students "ask questions about the energy we use to heat and cool our buildings, the food we eat, the air we breathe, the electricity to run light bulbs and appliances, the goods we purchase, and the waste we create." This course fits in the genre of using "campus as a living laboratory," a term we will discuss later.

  20. Context-free pragmatism in Danish campus architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Emmerik Damgaard

    an educational ideal that also seem to lack a sense of context, and hence both the architecture and the educational structuring in Campus Roskilde can be understood as a context free pragmatism. I analyze this tendency with references to Dewey’s own work on the meaning of the educational environment.......The idea of new pragmatism has inspired a new Danish wave in architecture that since 2012 has had enormous influence on the design of campus buildings in the professional education sector in Denmark. In arguing for a no-nonsense approach to architecture representatives of new pragmatism refers...

  1. The use of local data in ESRI Virtual Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jan Kloster; Hedegaard, Torben

    1998-01-01

    of the Virtual Campus training modules. We consider this important, because the default exercises of course are based on US data, which are in many respects much different from Danish – and other European data. Assignments built on data, that are familiar to the trainees, will appear motivating, and probably...... make the training more rewarding for the individuals involved. We would like to present our results so far, to the European ESRI user community, together with some work still in progress. We believe, that our experience, and our work together with the very kind and cooperative Virtual Campus...

  2. Effects of a power shortage in the Tokyo metropolitan area on awareness of nuclear power generation and power savings behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Atsuko

    2004-01-01

    The shutdown of a number of nuclear power stations of the Tokyo Electric Power Company in the summer of 2003 caused a power shortage problem in the Tokyo Metropolitan area. To examine the effects of the power shortage, in September 2003 a survey was conducted in the service areas of the Kansai Electric Power Company (Kansai region) and the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Kanto region). This survey was part of a wider opinion survey begun in 1993 concerning nuclear power generation. The results of the September 2003 survey are as follows: The degree of recognition of the power shortage problem in the Metropolitan area was high, with 40% of respondents in the Kansai region and nearly 70% in the Kanto region understanding that the shortage was caused by the shutdown of several nuclear power station. The overall awareness of nuclear power generation was little affected in both the Kansai and Kanto regions, though the sense of a shortage of the generating capacity had been raised slightly. Once respondents knew about the power shortage problem, they estimated the likelihood of an occurrence of large-scale service interruption to be low, nearly at an even chance, and they had been only slightly worried about it, essentially viewing the problem optimistically. In the Kanto region, where public relations activities for power savings had been actively pursued, the frequency of experiencing exposure to such public relations activities was remarkably higher than in the Kansai region. The relation between exposure to public relations activities for power savings and power savings behavior was analyzed using quantification method II. Analysis results suggest that public relations activities for power savings in the Kanto region had the effect of urging power savings behavior. However, the difference in the rate of putting power savings behavior into practice was small between the Kanto and Kansai regions, indicating that public relation activities for power savings in the Kanto

  3. Environmental Assessment: Construction and Operation of Headquarters Air Force Reserve Command Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    not allow for walkability between the campus and various proximate destinations that support the HQ AFRC. Alternative Site 1 does not meet the...with the planned campus designs. The site location does not allow for good roadway access or walkability between the campus and various proximate

  4. Comparing Perceptions of Campus Crime Severity among Community College and Public Four-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Loren M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years violent crimes on several university campuses have been highlighted by mass media, drawing national attention to the issue of campus crime. Not all college campuses, however, experience the same level of crime. While community colleges serve roughly half of all undergraduates in the U.S., statistically these public institutions…

  5. Campus Strategic Action in the "Fisher" Case: Organizational Stakeholder Advocacy across the Field of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, Cassie L.; Young, Ryan L.; Sheets, Jessica K. E.; Phillips, Carson W.; Parker, Eugene T., III; Reyes, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Using a census sampling, this analysis evaluates the campus structures and practices that are predictive of a campus being affiliated with stakeholder legal advocacy regarding the Fisher Supreme Court affirmative action case of 2013. Findings reveal that a campus utilizing selective admissions operated as a sufficient, but not a necessary,…

  6. Globalisation, Mergers and "Inadvertent Multi-Campus Universities": Reflections from Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeman, Nadine; Benneworth, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Multi-site universities face the challenge of integrating campuses that may have different profiles and orientations arising from place-specific attachments. Multi-campus universities created via mergers seeking to ensure long-term financial sustainability, and increasing their attractiveness to students, create a tension in campuses' purposes. We…

  7. Home Away from Home?: A Case Study of Student Transitions to an International Branch Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Kaitlin Oyler

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the transition experience of home-campus students attending an international branch campus. The studied was informed by a diverse range of literature, including the internationalization of higher education and student affairs, development of international branch campuses, students in transition, the development of student…

  8. Factors to Consider When Balancing Campus Safety Concerns with Students' Civil Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Julia S.

    2017-01-01

    On April 16, 2007, a student at Virginia Tech University, known to be mentally ill, went on a rampage shooting 49 people on campus before taking his own life. When it was over, 32 people were dead, and the concept of a safe campus was forever changed. The incident revealed the inherent conflicts between campus safety concerns and students' civil…

  9. Indicators of Faculty and Staff Perceptions of Campus Safety: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfolk, Willie A.

    2013-01-01

    The study addressed the problem of a critical increase in campus crime between 1999 and 2009, a period during which overall crime in the United States declined. Further the research explored the perceptions of campus safety among faculty and staff at an institution where campus safety initiatives are nationally ranked as exemplary and incidents of…

  10. Beyond Sexual Assault Surveys: A Model for Comprehensive Campus Climate Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah; Stepleton, Kate; Cusano, Julia; O'Connor, Julia; Gandhi, Khushbu; McGinty, Felicia

    2018-01-01

    The White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault identified campus climate surveys as "the first step" for addressing campus sexual violence. Through a process case study, this article presents one model for engaging in a comprehensive, action-focused campus climate assessment process. Rooted in principles of…

  11. College Students' Experiences and Perceptions of Harassment on Campus: An Exploration of Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reason, Robert D.; Rankin, Susan R.

    2006-01-01

    Using a campus climate assessment instrument developed by Rankin (1998), we surveyed students (N = 7,347) from 10 campuses to explore the different experiences with harassment and campus climates reported by men and women. Both men and women reported experiencing harassment, although women experienced harassment at statistically significantly…

  12. Temporary suspension of acute facial paralysis using the S-S Cable Suture (Medical U&A, Tokyo, Japan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Mine; Takushima, Akihiko; Momosawa, Akira; Kurita, Masakazu; Harii, Kiyonori

    2008-07-01

    For a treatment of facial paralysis, suture suspension of soft tissue is considered effective due to its less invasiveness and relatively simple technique, with minimal bruising and rapid recovery. However, suture suspension effect may not last for a long period of time. We obtained good outcome with temporary static suture suspension in 5 cases of severe facial paralysis in the intervening period between the onset of paralysis and expected spontaneous recovery. We used the S-S Cable Suture (Medical U&A, Tokyo, Japan), which was based on the modification of previously established method using the Gore-Tex cable suture originally reported by Sasaki et al in 2002. Because of the ease of technique and relatively strong lifting capability of the malar pad, we recommend it as a useful procedure for a patient suffering acute facial paralysis with possible spontaneous recovery for an improved quality of life by the quick elimination of facial distortion.

  13. Lecture notes of the technical training curriculum of the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report is a transcript of lectures for the technical staff, held in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, from November 1990 to April 1992. Following themes are included in this report. (1) Cyclotron technology, (2) measuring technology of the peripheral devices for cyclotron, (3) heavy ion cyclotron technology, (4) beam cooling technology, (5) proton linac technology, (6) heavy ion linac technology, (7) measuring technology of electron and its equipments, (8) the latest high energy large experimental device and its measurement (HERA, ZENS experiment), (9) superconducting kaon spectrometer (SKS) and large superconducting magnet, (10) present status of the precision technology for accelerators, (11) the computer as basic technology of elementary particle and nuclear experiments, (12) present status of radiation management and measurement technology, (13) handling and processing method of the hazardous materials, (14) analog technology of the equipments for accelerators, and the summary of NIRS-Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). (T.F.)

  14. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's facilities in fiscal 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the research 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in the fiscal year 1993. In this report, the gists of 15 researches which were carried out on pile of the Yayoi, 9 researches off pile of the Yayoi and 14 researches by using the linear accelerator are collected. In addition, the 13 reports of Yayoi Study Meeting held in fiscal year 1993 are collected. Moreover, the list of the events carried out in the facility in fiscal year 1993, the registers of names of various committees, and the register of the names of persons who were in charge of joint utilization experiments in fiscal year 1993 are attached. (K.I.)

  15. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and the electron beam accelerator in the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, in fiscal year 1991. The Yayoi was operated smoothly throughout the year, and the number of research themes, for which the reactor Yayoi was jointly utilized, and the related themes reached 21 cases. After the linear accelerator was reconstructed as the twin linac, the joint utilization was resumed in October, 1989, and the number of research themes, was 15 cases. In this publication, in addition to the utilization reports, also the reports of 15 cases of Yayoi Study Meetings held in fiscal year 1991 are collected. (K.I.)

  16. Tokyo Tech–Hitotsubashi Interdisciplinary Conference : New Approaches to the Analysis of Large-Scale Business and Economic Data

    CERN Document Server

    Takayasu, Misako; Takayasu, Hideki; Econophysics Approaches to Large-Scale Business Data and Financial Crisis

    2010-01-01

    The new science of econophysics has arisen out of the information age. As large-scale economic data are being increasingly generated by industries and enterprises worldwide, researchers from fields such as physics, mathematics, and information sciences are becoming involved. The vast number of transactions taking place, both in the financial markets and in the retail sector, is usually studied by economists and management and now by econophysicists. Using cutting-edge tools of computational analysis while searching for regularities and “laws” such as those found in the natural sciences, econophysicists have come up with intriguing results. The ultimate aim is to establish fundamental data collection and analysis techniques that embrace the expertise of a variety of academic disciplines. This book comprises selected papers from the international conference on novel analytical approaches to economic data held in Tokyo in March 2009. The papers include detailed reports on the market behavior during the finan...

  17. The Japanese mind in disaster 3.11. Web survey in Tohoku, Tokyo, Osaka, and Kyushu (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Shoji; Tsujikawa, Norifumi; Shiotani, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The Tohoku Disaster 3.11 with earthquake M9.0, tsunami, and the Fukushima accident brought the inhabitants horrible damages. Tohoku area people [N=1,000], Tokyo people [N=500], Osaka people [N=500], and Kyushu people [N=500] (Total N=2,500) were targeted at Online survey which was designed to figure out the people's responses to the disaster and their psychological factors. The results showed that the Tohoku area people were in relatively solid local communities and bonded intimately each other. They thought it proper to cope with the disaster through community. They had more negative attitudes to Nuclear Power, and their trust toward the TEPCO and the government was more negative in dealing with the Fukushima accident. (author)

  18. Disturbance of recruitment success of mantis shrimp in Tokyo Bay associated with effects of hypoxia on the early life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Keita; Tajima, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Takamichi; Ohata, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Horiguchi, Toshihiro

    2014-08-30

    We investigated effects of severe hypoxia (dissolved oxygen shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria in Tokyo Bay. Ten-year field surveys were conducted to examine quantitative relationships in annual mean densities of larvae and juveniles, and spatial distribution of juveniles and severe hypoxia. There was no significant correlation between annual mean densities of larvae and juveniles, suggesting that mortality during larval or juvenile stages varies among years, which might have regulated abundance of young-of-the-year juveniles. Juvenile density was low in the severely hypoxic area, implying that hypoxia could affect survivals and spatial distribution of juveniles. Meanwhile, there are yearly fluctuations in juvenile density in normoxic areas of both northern and southern part of the bay. This evidence suggests that abundance of post-settled juveniles might have been determined by not only effects of hypoxia, but also other factors influencing mortality during the early life stages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Technological solution for the protection of the environment (in the Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo, Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glamochanin, Vlastimir

    1997-01-01

    As we approach the 21 century, the world finds itself confronting challenges regarding global-scale issues: economic development, the use of energy and natural resources, and environmental preservation. Moreover, these issues do not exist in a vacuum; they are all interrelated. They exert delicate effects on each other and can not be considered separately. If we continue as we have in the past, the earth will face an unprecedented crisis in the middle of coming century, in conjunction with the population explosion. (Susumu Yoda, President of the Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo, Japan). This paper presents a brief review of the research policy of the Japan Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, regarding environmental preservation

  20. Managing the university campus : Information to support real estate decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade managing the university campus has become more complex and challenging, with many more stakeholders, opportunities and threats to consider. Decreasing public involvement and funding for universities puts pressure on the internal allocation of resources, comparing investments in

  1. OUTDOOR SPACE QUALITY: CASE STUDY OF A UNIVERSITY CAMPUS PLAZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicle Aydin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studied the concept of campus plaza, i.e. the outdoor space of the Selcuk University located in Konya, Turkey. The objective of the study in which the survey, observation and photographic methods were used, was to examine the plaza as an outdoor space providing individual and social benefits to campus people and to determine the principles regarding the establishment of this space. Two hundred forty-three students participating in the survey were asked about the outdoor spaces they use in the campus area, the qualities of the plaza, their purposes and the frequency of plaza use, and a descriptive analysis was performed to determine the plaza’s quality. Additionally, a correlation analysis was carried out to evaluate the relationship between the landscape accessory and the manner in which the users’ senses were affected by the experienced space (profiles of the space. At the end of this study, two main components determining the campus plaza’s quality were found: (i qualities of the physical environment (climatic features, location of plaza, its relation with the surrounding structuring, pedestrian / vehicle relation in terms of accessibility, fixed elements / equipment in the area, quality of open space area, quality of landscape accessory and area’s being in good repair (ii user characteristics. User characteristics also comprised two quality criteria: (i the behavioural and functional quality, (ii the visual quality.

  2. An Examination of Campus Climate for LGBTQ Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Jason C.; Taylor, Jason L.; Rankin, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study examines campus climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) undergraduate students at community colleges. Data for the study originates from Rankin, Blumenfeld, Weber, and Frazer's (2010) "State of Higher Education for LGBT People." We analyzed both quantitative data generated from closed-ended…

  3. Money Worries Keep Students Going to Campus Food Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Hunger on campus is part of a lingering national problem that grew after the financial crisis that began in late 2007. In an unforgiving economy, many students across the country struggle not only to pay tuition but also to buy food. Colleges and nonprofit groups have noticed, and more are reacting. Food pantries are cropping up on two-year and…

  4. Campus Sexual Violence: The Impact of Disclosure on Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Double, Katelin B.

    2018-01-01

    A mixed methodological approach was used to examine the impact of disclosure characteristics on mental health among individuals who have experienced campus sexual violence occurring at Christian and non-religiously affiliated universities. After completing an online survey, a sample of 97 participants qualified for the study. No disclosure and…

  5. Organizing a Campus Seminar on Careers in Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt Disney Productions, Anaheim, CA.

    Developed by Walt Disney Productions as part of a project granted by the Career Education Program of the Office of Education, this handbook is designed to help college and university fine arts departments in planning and carrying out an on-campus seminar on careers in entertainment. Sections include Why Hold a Seminar on Careers in Entertainment?,…

  6. Emotional Support Animals, Service Animals, and Pets on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bergen, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, universities have been accommodating physically disabled students who require guide dogs and other types of service animals. Within the past several years, however, mentally disabled students have increasingly petitioned colleges with no-pet policies to permit them to bring their animals on campus because they need a companion or…

  7. Therapy Dogs on Campus: Recommendations for Counseling Center Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltry, Rachel M.; Mehr, Kristin E.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of a dog therapy outreach program through the counseling center at West Chester University in Pennsylvania. Two main goals were identified for this program: (a) provide stress relief and comfort to students across campus, and (b) increase potential access to counseling services and improve…

  8. The Practice of Campus-Based Threat Assessment: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Nolan, Jeffrey J.; Deisinger, Eugene R. D.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of threat assessment and management as implemented on campuses of higher education. Standards of practice and state calls for implementation are cited. An overview of some of the basic principles for threat assessment and management implementation is accompanied by examples of how they are utilized. Pitfalls…

  9. Collective Action Competence: An Asset to Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to operationalize theories of social learning and collective action for campus sustainability practitioners at higher education institutions (IHEs) to enhance their work, and to introduce the concept of collective action competence as a practical tool. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents a…

  10. Campus Partnerships Improve Impact Documentation of Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Partnerships with other campus college units can provide ways of improving Extension's impact documentation. Nutrition programs have relied upon knowledge gained and people's self report of behavior change. Partnering with the College of Nursing, student nurses provided blood screenings during the pre and 6 month follow-up of a pilot heart risk…

  11. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... This work ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare service .... The procedure refers to how the activity takes place. The ... Avant (1995:37) state that concepts are mental constructions .... received from the registered nurse he or she can return to the.

  12. Utilizing On-Campus Foodservice Facilities as a Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeyer, Martha A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Family and Consumer Sciences Department at Bradley University recognized the need to improve the quality of the laboratory experience in foodservice classes. A hands-on, real-world, learning experience was desired. Simultaneously, the university administration wanted to provide an on-campus foodservice for students from 8:00 p.m. to…

  13. Generating Social Change through Community-Campus Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Naomi; Gaetz, Stephen; Phipps, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a qualitative case study approach was used to explore the changes that community-campus collaborations stimulate. The authors document the "processes of interaction" (Spaapen & van Drooge, 2011) through which collaborations seek to contribute to positive social change, highlighting the outputs, outcomes, and…

  14. New Phone System Coming to NCI Campus at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Travis Fouche and Trent McKee, Guest Writers Beginning in September, phones at the NCI Campus at Frederick will begin to be replaced, as the project to upgrade the current phone system ramps up. Over the next 16 months, the Information Systems Program (ISP) will be working with Facilities Maintenance and Engineering and Computer & Statistical Services to replace the current

  15. Safety on a Rural Community College Campus via Integrated Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnage, Marie Foster; Dziagwa, Connie; White, Dave

    2009-01-01

    West Virginia University at Parkersburg uses a two-way emergency system as a baseline for emergency communications. The college has found that such a system, a key component of its safety and crisis management plan, can be integrated with other communication initiatives to provide focused security on the campus.

  16. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  17. Campus Partner Collections: Expanding the Boundaries of the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindi, Anne C.; Kelshian, Robert; Sandler, Alayne Mundt

    2011-01-01

    At most colleges and universities, there are a number of small, nonlibrary collections across campus, such as those found in student centers or academic departments. Historically, at American University, partnership with these collections was done through absorbing them into the main library collection. Recently, however, the Library has seen…

  18. Racism, Group Defamation, and Freedom of Speech on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramee, William A.

    1991-01-01

    Examines racism on college campuses. Discusses group defamation and freedom of speech within that context. Concludes in this period of racial unrest and conflict, a reappraisal is in order of delicate balance between protection from group and class defamation on the one hand and free speech on other, using law as an important base from which to…

  19. Incorporating Campus-Based Cultural Resources into Humanities Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traver, Amy E.; Nedd, Rolecia

    2018-01-01

    In this article, the authors reviewed one effort to deepen students' connections to the humanities through the use of campus-based cultural resources at Queensborough Community College (QCC) of the City University of New York (CUNY), a minority-serving institution in one of the most diverse counties in the United States. Focusing specifically on…

  20. Student Perceptions of Campus Cultural Climate by Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancis, Julie R.; Sedlacek, William E.; Mohr, Jonathan J.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on questionnaire about perceptions and experiences distributed to African American, Asian American, Latino/a, and White undergraduates. African Americans reported more racial-ethnic conflict on campus, more pressure to conform to stereotypes, and less equitable treatment by faculty and teaching assistants. White students' responses…

  1. Digital Devices Invade Campus, and Networks Feel the Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Inside campus libraries and dormitory rooms, thousands of students connect to the Internet not only to study with online systems like Blackboard but also to watch movies and TV shows on Netflix. Computers, smartphones, wireless printers, tablets, iPods, Xboxes, handheld gaming systems, e-readers, smart TVs, Blu-ray players--students now bring an…

  2. Guns on Campus: A Current Debate. E-Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Almost all U.S. college campuses ban concealed weapons. But in the aftermath of the tragic shooting deaths at Virginia Tech in 2007, the debate on whether guns should be permitted at colleges and universities has intensified. Dozens of states have considered proposals to lift bans on concealed weapons at colleges and universities, but so far none…

  3. Ready, Fire, Aim: The College Campus Gun Fight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether guns should be permitted on college and university campuses in the United States reflects the tension between two competing perspectives. America has both a robust gun culture and an equally robust (if less well known) gun-control culture. The gun culture is as American as apple pie: There may be as many as 300 million…

  4. Managing International Branch Campuses: What Do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the growth of the international branch campus (IBC) has been one of the most striking developments in the internationalisation of higher education. There are now over 200 IBCs across the world, mostly in the Middle East and East and South-east Asia. Despite the growing numbers of IBCs and the considerable financial and…

  5. Global Expansion of International Branch Campuses: Managerial and Leadership Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jason E.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the author outlines the growth of international branch campuses (IBCs) over the past fifty years and discusses some of the major management and leadership challenges associated with creating and sustaining IBCs. Part one of the chapter provides a discussion of the global expansion of IBCs. The second part focuses on the…

  6. Evaluating Student Satisfaction of Quality at International Branch Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed Zamberi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to present the determinants of students' perceptions of quality and experience of study at international branch campuses in Malaysia, a country that is set to become an academic hub in Asia. This study used a multi-method approach for data collection. The respondents comprised 245 students (both undergraduate and…

  7. Making Our Voices Audible in the Conversation on Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    Campus safety and the role of college and university officials relative to safety are important topics on the agendas of political leaders at the state and national levels. Student affairs leaders must consider how to contribute in a meaningful way to these very important conversations. (Contains 1 footnote.)

  8. Reading Clinics on University Campuses: A Way Forward for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The preponderance of pidgin and slang as campus languages, the large classes that limit students' oral participation at lectures and a host of other factors also limit students' language use/output. The result of these limitations can be witnessed in their poor performance at both productive and receptive language skills.

  9. ATM Technology Adoption in U.S. Campus Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Engui; Perry, John F.; Anderson, Larry S.; Brook, R. Dan; Hare, R. Dwight; Moore, Arnold J.; Xu, Xiaohe

    This study examined the relationships between ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) adoption in universities and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information processing maturity. Another purpose of the study was to identify the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking. Subjects were university domain LAN…

  10. Solid waste characterization and recycling potential for a university campus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo de Vega, Carolina; Ojeda Benitez, Sara; Ramirez Barreto, Ma. Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Integrated waste management systems are one of the greatest challenges for sustainable development. For these systems to be successful, the first step is to carry out waste characterization studies. In this paper are reported the results of a waste characterization study performed in the Campus Mexicali I of the Autonomous University of Baja California (UABC). The aim of this study was to set the basis for implementation of a recovery, reduction and recycling waste management program at the campus. It was found that the campus Mexicali I produces 1 ton of solid wastes per day; more than 65% of these wastes are recyclable or potentially recyclable. These results showed that a program for segregation and recycling is feasible on a University Campus. The study also showed that the local market for recyclable waste, under present conditions - number of recycling companies and amounts of recyclables accepted - can absorb all of these wastes. Some alternatives for the potentially recyclables wastes are discussed. Finally some strategies that could be used to reduce waste at the source are discussed as well

  11. Climate Action Planning Process | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Action Planning Process Climate Action Planning Process For research campuses, NREL has developed a five-step process to develop and implement climate action plans: Determine baseline energy consumption Analyze technology options Prepare a plan and set priorities Implement the climate action plan Measure and

  12. The Campus Executive's Role in Security and Liability Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Max; Territo, Leonard

    1986-01-01

    Executives at institutions of higher education have become increasingly concerned about serious crimes being committed on their campuses. The liability issue, criminal activity information, physical security and design issues, student patrol escorts, crime prevention training, and task force development are discussed. (MLW)

  13. Under Lock and Key: Preventing Campus Theft of Electronic Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J. Phil

    1996-01-01

    A discussion of computer theft prevention on college campuses looks at a variety of elements in electronic equipment security, including the extent of the problem, physical antitheft products, computerized access, control of key access, alarm systems, competent security personnel, lighting, use of layers of protection, and increasing…

  14. Campus Recruiting: What the Recruiters Are Looking For.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Martha R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 111 campus recruiters of graduating students shows agreement that interviews are the most important selection method. Students' verbal communication skills, character, work experience, and academic performance were judged the most important personal characteristics in applicants. Work-related expectations and attitudes were the most…

  15. The Campus Affiliates Program: Universities Respond to Troubled Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutziger, Sarah Sloan; Ager, Richard; Harrell, Evelyn B.; Wright, James

    1999-01-01

    Presents a case study of the Campus Affiliates Program, a collaborative venture designed to revitalize the most severely impoverished sectors of New Orleans (Louisiana). Focuses on processes that created the program; organizing principles; obstacles encountered; and impacts of the program on faculty, students, staff, and institutions. (DSK)

  16. Measuring Campus Climate for Personal and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Andrew J.; Mitchell, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding institutional climate enhances decision-making capacity when planning new programs and improving learning environments on college campuses. This chapter defines climate, discusses the purpose and advantages of climate assessment, and identifies important factors to consider in planning and conducting a personal and social…

  17. The Power Game: Sexual Harassment on the College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Kay

    A study examined four reports of sexual harassment on college campuses. The reports show that harassers "key" their victims so that a contest will begin but the victims do not understand what is happening. Miscommunication occurs when power myths about men and women intersect during the harassment episode. Such myths include: the looking…

  18. Brief Report: Autism Awareness--Views from a Campus Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Leigh Ann; Blacher, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a college community's views of the diagnostic characteristics and causes associated with autism spectrum disorders. An anonymous on-line survey of autism knowledge was distributed via campus server university-wide to all undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and staff. Of the 1,057 surveys completed, 76% of…

  19. Campus Improvement Committee Working to Increase Morale, Productivity | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Campus Improvement Committee (CIC) has recently been re-established, with Mike Addington, manager, Operations and Maintenance, as chair. Addington is excited to be involved in a committee that’s so near and dear to his heart, and he’s a big believer in the value of increasing morale and productivity through an appealing and pleasant work environment.

  20. United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War: Nuclear War Course Summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Briefly describes 46 courses on nuclear war available from United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War (UCAM). These courses are currently being or have been taught at colleges/universities, addressing effects of nuclear war, arms race history, new weapons, and past arms control efforts. Syllabi (with assignments/reading lists) are available from UCAM.…

  1. Gender Variance on Campus: A Critical Analysis of Transgender Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Lee M.

    2011-01-01

    Transgender college students face discrimination, harassment, and oppression on college and university campuses; consequently leading to limited academic and social success. Current literature is focused on describing the experiences of transgender students and the practical implications associated with attempting to meet their needs (Beemyn,…

  2. An Information Technology Manager's Guide to Campus Phone Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherron, Gene T.

    Written for the information technology manager who is about to enter the telephone communications system business, this paper takes a "primer" approach, outlining the major issues in telecommunications which face all higher education campuses today. An introduction which places the issues into perspective is followed by a quick look at the history…

  3. Operational Considerations for Opening a Branch Campus Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lawrence M.; Lammey, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Universities have been attracted to the creation of international branch campuses (IBCs) for many reasons, including cultural immersion of students and faculty and global brand recognition for a university seeking to enhance its reputation and strengthen its academic standards. This chapter provides specific advice for how IBCs can negotiate entry…

  4. On Campus with Women, Number 27, Summer 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Colleges, Washington, DC.

    A newsletter on issues pertaining to women's rights on campuses and in employment is presented. Developments and issues include the following: initiation of intercollegiate athletic championships for women in nine sports; a charge of unequal pay for women coaches; university cases of alleged sex discrimination in athletic programs; reference to…

  5. A Harassing Climate? Sexual Harassment and Campus Racial Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy-Wagner, Valerie; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2013-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, the authors discuss how research about sexual harassment and campus racial climates for undergraduate students is relegated to separate silos. Drawing on intersectionality and critical race feminist frameworks, the authors juxtapose these strands of research with attention to ethnicity/race and gender, highlighting how…

  6. Drug Abuse on College Campuses: Emerging Issues. Issues in Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This "Issues in Prevention" focuses on emerging issues concerning drug abuse on college campuses. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Drug Abuse Trends; (2) Q&A With Jim Lange; (3) Bath Salts; (4) Refuse to Abuse; (5) Related Federal Resource; and (6) Higher Education Center Resources.

  7. Ubiquitous Computing: The Universal Use of Computers on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David G., Ed.

    This book is a collection of vignettes from 13 universities where everyone on campus has his or her own computer. These 13 institutions have instituted "ubiquitous computing" in very different ways at very different costs. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction: The Ubiquitous Computing Movement" (David G. Brown); (2) "Dartmouth College" (Malcolm…

  8. A Second Home: Indigenous Considerations for Campus Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singson, Jamie M.; Tachine, Amanda R.; Davidson, Charlotte E.; Waterman, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    The experiences of Native Students in campus housing has had limited attention in scholarship, which restricts cultural understanding and opportunities to create inclusive living environments. College and university housing is well positioned to create a positive living environment for students. We raise concerns on how higher education…

  9. What Are College Students' Perceptions about Campus Safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekwa, Charles; Thomas, Eugene, Jr.; Jones, Valerie James

    2013-01-01

    Crime and violence on college and university campuses have found their way into the media spotlight. As a result, criminal and violent acts have become issues that warrant research. We discuss literature focused on the potential contributing factors that may lead to violent behavior. Additionally, we review legislation intended to protect students…

  10. A Diversity Doctor’s Best Lessons from the Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy-Anne Jordan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Review of the book: “Taking on Diversity: How We Can Move from Anxiety to Respect—A Diversity Doctor’s Best Lessons from the Campus.” By Rupert W. Nacoste. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-63388026-9

  11. Sustainable Education Campus in Spain: Nature and Architecture for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Sotelo, Pablo Campos

    2008-01-01

    The quality of education is intimately linked to its architecture. Any urbanistic/architectural project must stem from an in-depth study of the area's characteristics, taken in the broad geographical, climatic, cultural, functional and ideological sense. The site should provide the conceptual energy from which a campus draws life. This requirement…

  12. A Sustainability Initiative to Quantify Carbon Sequestration by Campus Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Over 3,900 trees on a university campus were inventoried by an instructor-led team of geography undergraduates in order to quantify the carbon sequestration associated with biomass growth. The setting of the project is described, together with its logistics, methodology, outcomes, and benefits. This hands-on project provided a team of students…

  13. The Vietnam War on Campus: Other Voices, More Distant Drums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Marc Jason, Ed.

    The essays in this collection represent recent scholarship on campus unrest in the 1960s and 1970s. They provide a variety of case studies of the 1960s movements and events beyond the more highly publicized events, and they offer new insights into the antiwar movement. The essays are: (1) "Pro-War and Anti-Draft: Young Americans for Freedom…

  14. On Campus and Online, Students Lose Weight for Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Sara

    2011-01-01

    About a third of college students nationwide are overweight, and the proportion of obese students has increased, to 11.3% in 2009 from 8% in 2000, according to the American College Health Association. College students are still slimmer than other young adults, but campus officials worry about the upward trend. Many colleges feel it's their…

  15. Campus Safety and Student Privacy Issues in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Kristen Slater

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to delve into, and further understand, the perceptions of higher education administrators when they experience having to simultaneously balance the issues of campus safety and student privacy. The research surveyed approximately 900 (with 147 returns) administrators who self-identified as having a role in incidents of…

  16. Campus Racial Politics and a "Rhetoric of Injury"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Haivan V.

    2009-01-01

    If college writing faculty wish to prepare students to engage in civic forums, then how might we prepare students to write and speak amid racial politics on our campuses? This article explores the college student discourse that shaped an interracial conflict at a public California university in 2002 and questions the "rhetoric of injury"…

  17. Reciprocity as Sustainability in Campus-Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomgarden, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The concept of reciprocity permeates the literature on campus-community partnership as a matter of principle, aspiration, and--ideally--best practice. More recently, principles and practices of sustainability have pervaded scholarly and popular discourse, emerging from and applying to environmental studies, economic development, and social justice…

  18. Faculty Activity Analysis in the Universidad Tecnica Del Estado Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Oscar

    An analysis of academic activities of college faculty at the eight campuses of Chile's Universidad Tecnica del Estado was conducted. Activities were grouped into seven categories: direct teaching, indirect teaching, research, community services, faculty development, academic administration, and other activities. Following the narrative…

  19. Multiracial Women Students and Racial Stereotypes on the College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jessica C.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have explored how multiracial women students encounter different racialized experiences when compared to their monoracial peers and multiracial men on campus, suggesting that their experiences with racial stereotypes may also diverge from both of these populations. Guided by critical race theory, in this study I explored 10 multiracial…

  20. Suggested Steps to Make Campuses More Trans-Inclusive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemyn, Brett Genny; Domingue, Andrea; Pettitt, Jessica; Smith, Todd

    2005-01-01

    To assist colleges and universities in becoming more supportive of transgender people, the authors, who work in campus LGBT student services, offer practical recommendations in areas where gender-variant students, staff, and faculty are likely to encounter discrimination. These areas include health care, residence halls, bathrooms, locker rooms,…

  1. Campus as a Living Laboratory for Sustainability: The Physics Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Timothy; Middlecamp, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    One of us is a physicist. The other is a chemist. For the past four years, we have been teaching a large introductory environmental science course that uses our campus as a lens through which to explore issues relating to sustainability. Our students "ask questions about the energy we use to heat and cool our buildings, the food we eat, the…

  2. Library Automation at a Multi-Campus Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Deirdre A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the planning and implementation of a library automation system which encompasses four campus locations of a community college, and includes automation of technical processes and full access to holdings and circulation records of all the libraries involved. Software and hardware considerations are discussed, and guidelines to automation…

  3. Risk perception and risk attitudes in Tokyo: A report of the first administration of DOSPERT+M in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Schwartz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Domain-Specific Risk Taking scale (DOSPERT has been used to measure risk perceptions and attitudes in several nations and cultures. Takahashi translated DOSPERT to Japanese but DOSPERT responses from Japan have never been reported. Butler et al. (2012 developed an additional medical risk domain subscale to be added to DOSPERT to form DOSPERT+M. Objective: To describe the translation of the medical risk domain subscale to Japanese and to characterize domain-specific risk attitudes in Tokyo. Methods: Members of a probability-weighted online panel representative of the Tokyo metro area were randomized to complete pairs of DOSPERT+M tasks (risk attitude, risk perception, benefit perception. We explored relationships among domains through correlational and factor analysis; we tested the hypothesis that the medical risk domain and DOSPERT's health/safety domains were uncorrelated. Participants: One hundred eighty panelists. Results: Six of the original DOSPERT items (two each in the ethics, health/safety, and financial domains are not useable in Japan according to the Japanese Marketing Research Association code because they ask about participation in illegal activities; we thus used abbreviated versions of those domains leaving out these items. The DOSPERT+M items generally did not cluster cleanly into the expected domains, although items within the same domain usually were intercorrelated. Participants demonstrated domain-specific conventional risk attitudes, although nearly half of those assessed were perceived-risk neutral in all domains. Unlike our recently reported findings in the U.S. population, DOSPERT+M medical domain scores were associated with health/safety domain scores, although they were often more strongly associated with scores in other domains, such as recreational activities. Conclusion: The DOSPERT (and DOSPERT+M instruments are problematic in Japan but Japanese citizens may also differ from those of other nations

  4. Associations of acute exposure to fine and coarse particulate matter and mortality among older people in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kashima, Saori; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have reported adverse health effects of short-term exposure to coarse particles independent of particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), but evidence in Asian countries is limited. We therefore evaluated associations between short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and mortality among older people in Tokyo, Japan. We used a time-stratified, case-crossover design. Study participants included 664,509 older people (≥65 years old) in the 23 urbanized wards of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, who died between January 2002 and December 2013. We obtained PM2.5 and suspended particulate matter (SPM; PMPM7-2.5 by subtracting PM2.5 from SPM to account for coarse particles. We then used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 confidence intervals (CIs). Same-day PM2.5 and PM7-2.5 were independently associated with all-cause and cause-specific mortality related to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases; for example, both pollutants were positively associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality even after simultaneous adjustment for each pollutant: OR of 1.006 (95% CI: 1.003, 1.009) for PM2.5 and 1.016 (95% CI: 1.011, 1.022) for PM7-2.5. Even below concentrations stipulated by the Japanese air quality guidelines for PM2.5 and SPM (PM7), we observed adverse health effects. This study provides further evidence that acute exposure to PM2.5 and coarse particles is associated with increased risk of mortality among older people. Rigorous evaluation of air quality guidelines for daily average PM2.5 and larger particles should be continued. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cultural differences in clinical leadership: a qualitative study comparing the attitudes of general dental practitioners from Greater Manchester and Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, P; Nomura, M; Ozaki, T; Ferguson, J; Matsuda, R

    2013-11-01

    Leadership has been argued to be a key component in the transformation of services in the United Kingdom and in Japan. In the UK, local professional networks have developed to provide clinician led care in dentistry; working to develop local plans to deliver improvements in the quality of care for patients. In Japan, the remuneration model for dental care has been revised with the aim to improve the service and tackle the current challenges of population health there. The aim of this study was to use semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis to explore general dental practitioners' (GDPs) understanding of the term 'leadership' and determine whether its meaning is culturally bound. Twelve participants were sampled purposively by the research team; identifying GDPs involved in leadership roles from across Greater Manchester and Tokyo. A set of open-ended questions was developed for semi-structured interviews a priori and the interviews continued until saturation. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and codes were developed into a coding frame for thematic analysis. Representative quotations are provided in the results. Fourteen codes were identified according to the aims of the study and organised into five overarching themes. 'Leadership as the relationship' was more pronounced among Japanese GDPs, while 'leadership as the individual' was common in GDPs from Greater Manchester. Differences were also found in respect of education and training in leadership. Training was also considered to be important by the GDPs from Japan, while UK GDPs felt leaders were more likely to be influenced by innate qualities. The interdependence of leadership and entrepreneurship was raised by both sets of GDPs. The concept of leadership was considered to be important by GDPs from both Greater Manchester and Tokyo; leadership was seen as providing strategy and direction for a clinical team. However, cultural influences were evident in how this was conceptualised.

  6. A high resolution 3D velocity model beneath the Tokyo Metropolitan area by MeSO-net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, S.; Sakai, S.; Honda, R.; Kimura, H.; Hirata, N.

    2015-12-01

    Beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area, the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) subducts and causes devastating mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). An M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating serious loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that an M7+ earthquake will cause 23,000 fatalities and 95 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. We have launched the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions since 2012. We analyze data from the dense seismic array called Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net), which has 296 seismic stations with spacing of 5 km (Sakai and Hirata, 2009; Kasahara et al., 2009). We applied the double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber, 2003) and estimated the velocity structure and the upper boundary of PSP (Nakagawa et al., 2010). The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) has activated seismicity also in Kanto region, providing better coverage of ray paths for tomographic analysis. We obtain much higher resolution velocity models from whole dataset observed by MeSO-net between 2008 and 2015. A detailed image of tomograms shows that PSP contacts Pacific plate at a depth of 50 km beneath northern Tokyo bay. A variation of velocity along the oceanic crust suggests dehydration reaction to produce seismicity in a slab, which may related to the M7+ earthquake. Acknowledgement: This study was supported by the Special Project for Reducing Vulnerability for Urban Mega Earthquake Disasters of MEXT, Japan and the Earthquake Research Institute cooperative research program.

  7. Comparison of Toxoplasma gondii Seroprevalence in Shelter Cats and Dogs during 1999-2001 and 2009-2011 in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oi, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Souichi; Maruyama, Soichi; Nogami, Sadao

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an important human health concern with respect to abortion, congenital hydrocephalus, and encephalitis in immunocompromised people. Cats and dogs both are potential sources of T. gondii because they have close contact with humans. However, no epidemiological surveys have been conducted in Tokyo over the past decade. Therefore, the present study investigated and compared the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in shelter cats and dogs during 1999-2001 and 2009-2011 in Tokyo, Japan. Serum samples were collected from 337 shelter cats and 325 shelter dogs in urban and suburban areas of Tokyo, during 1999-2001 (233 cats and 219 dogs) and 2009-2011 (104 cats and 106 dogs). T. gondii antibodies were measured in the serum samples using a commercial latex agglutination test. Data were compared using the Fisher's exact test, and significance was indicated at P cats was 5.6% (13 of 233) in 1999-2001 and 6.7% (7 of 104) in 2009-2011, and that in dogs was 1.8% (4 of 219) and 1.9% (2 of 106), respectively. Significantly higher seroprevalence was observed in cats from suburban areas compared with cats in urban areas during both periods (P cats and dogs in Tokyo is considerably low as the seroprevalence has reached a steady state.

  8. Finding "safe" campuses: predicting the presence of LGBT student groups at North Carolina colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Melinda D

    2013-01-01

    A key indicator of a supportive campus climate for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) college students is the existence of an LGBT student organization. This article integrates the research on high school LGBT policies and programs with social movement studies of campus activism to examine the characteristics associated with the existence of university-approved LGBT groups on North Carolina campuses. Drawing on data from the National Center for Education Statistics, campus Web sites, and other sources, logistic regression is used to examine the importance of public opinion, campus and community resources, and the institutional context in predicting the location of these student groups.

  9. Campus Climate Matters: Changing the Mental Health Climate on College Campuses Improves Student Outcomes and Benefits Society. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAND Corporation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    California, which has some 2.8 million students on its public higher education campuses, is taking steps to reduce the gap between students' need for mental health treatment and their use of mental health services. Beginning in 2011, as part of a statewide initiative to improve mental health outcomes for all Californians, the California Mental…

  10. Campus Microclimates for LGBT Faculty, Staff, and Students: An Exploration of the Intersections of Social Identity and Campus Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This ethnographic study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) faculty, staff, graduate students, and undergraduates expands the higher education conversation about campus climate beyond the traditional organizational-level paradigm. Findings suggest that LGBT individuals with similar organizational roles shared common experiences and…

  11. Impact of Campus Child Care Director Leadership and Activities on the Internal Success and Integration of the Campus Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kerisa Ann; Bierlein Palmer, Louann

    2017-01-01

    This study captures data from nearly 200 university campus-based child care center directors across the United States. It reveals the impacts directors believe their centers have had on the broader internal university community (e.g. student retention, research, teacher training in early childhood education) and the extent to which directors…

  12. Workplace Demographics and Technology: Challenges and Opportunities to the Campus Mission Including the Top Facilities Issues. APPA Thought Leaders 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, 2011

    2011-01-01

    It is not unusual in higher education circles to talk about issues affecting the campus. Experts might write about how shifting demographics are changing the campus, or say technology is becoming more pervasive on campus. The campus itself evolves alongside pedagogical practices, technological innovations, student needs, and the mission of the…

  13. Impact of the 2001 Tohoku-oki earthquake to Tokyo Metropolitan area observed by the Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, N.; Hayashi, H.; Nakagawa, S.; Sakai, S.; Honda, R.; Kasahara, K.; Obara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Kimura, H.; Sato, H.; Okaya, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake brought a great impact to the Tokyo metropolitan area in both seismological aspect and seismic risk management although Tokyo is located 340 km from the epicenter. The event generated very strong ground motion even in the metropolitan area and resulted severe requifaction in many places of Kanto district. National and local governments have started to discuss counter measurement for possible seismic risks in the area taking account for what they learned from the Tohoku-oki event which is much larger than ever experienced in Japan Risk mitigation strategy for the next greater earthquake caused by the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) subducting beneath the Tokyo metropolitan area is of major concern because it caused past mega-thrust earthquakes, such as the 1703 Genroku earthquake (M8.0) and the 1923 Kanto earthquake (M7.9). An M7 or greater (M7+) earthquake in this area at present has high potential to produce devastating loss of life and property with even greater global economic repercussions. The Central Disaster Management Council of Japan estimates that an M7+ earthquake will cause 11,000 fatalities and 112 trillion yen (about 1 trillion US$) economic loss. In order to mitigate disaster for greater Tokyo, the Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area was launched in collaboration with scientists, engineers, and social-scientists in nationwide institutions. We will discuss the main results that are obtained in the respective fields which have been integrated to improve information on the strategy assessment for seismic risk mitigation in the Tokyo metropolitan area; the project has been much improved after the Tohoku event. In order to image seismic structure beneath the Metropolitan Tokyo area we have developed Metropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net; Hirata et al., 2009). We have installed 296 seismic stations every few km (Kasahara et al., 2011). We conducted seismic

  14. Disability on campus: a perspective from faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigaki, Cheryl L; Anderson, Kim M; Howald, Carol L; Henson, Lee; Gregg, Bonnie E

    2012-01-01

    To identify employee perceptions regarding disability-related workplace issues in Institutions of Higher Education (IHE). Faculty and staff (N=1,144) at a large, Midwestern university. A voluntary on-line survey of disability-related employment issues was developed by the university's Chancellor's Committee of Persons with Disabilities. Item responses were analyzed using descriptive and Pearson chi-square statistical methods. Fifteen percent of faculty and staff respondents were found to have disabilities, with 26% reporting experience of job discrimination, and 20% reporting harassment because of their disability. Results indicated significant differences on gender, employment standing (i.e., faculty or staff) and disability status (i.e., with or without a disability), in regard to perceptions of disability acceptance, campus accessibility, disability awareness, ADA policy, and knowledge of work accommodation procedures. Recommendations for IHEs are provided to promote a welcoming and inclusive campus that ultimately supports work success for persons with a disability.

  15. Birds of Sabaragamuwa University campus, Buttala, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Surasinghe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a bird survey in the Sabaragamuwa University premises in southeastern Sri Lanka between 2001 and 2004. We recorded 145 bird species, representing 17 orders and 51 families from the campus. The birdlife included Red-faced Malkoha, a globally Vulnerable species and four Near Threatened taxa. The university premises suffer from severe habitat alteration largely owing to fire, filling-up of aquatic habitats, resource over-extraction, improper waste management, invasion by exotic species and livestock grazing. Several conservation measures, including habitat management strategies such as restoration of riparian vegetation, and wetlands, increasing plant diversity in home gardens and prevention of secondary successions in grasslands are recommended to protect the campus environment and to conserve its avifaunal diversity.

  16. Contents of heavy metals in urban parks and university campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Because the city park has become an important place for people's daily leisure, and the university campus is one of the most densely populated areas of the city, their environmental pollution is critical for the health and safety of the residents. In this paper, two kinds of evaluation methods were used to evaluate the content of Cu, Zn, As and Pb in soils of city parks and university campus in Xiangtan. The results showed that only Juhuatang Park was a non-polluted area, and the other 7 sampling sites were lightly polluted; Analysis shows the heavy metal contents of soil in city parks are closely related to vehicle emissions, agriculture and irrigation, combustion of household waste, living area and commercial shops, the use of fossil fuels, industrial waste gas and waste residue and other human activities.

  17. Development of a University Campus Healthy Sleep Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Brian E; Troy, Adam S; Patel, Hersila H; Halstead, Valerie; Arana, Mayra

    2018-03-01

    This article provides a preliminary evaluation of a campus sleep health program for undergraduate university students. In this study, 5 focus groups with 38 undergraduates assessed perceptions about sleep in relationship to college experiences. Additionally, 35 undergraduate students participated in campus sleep improvement workshops, and completed a brief self-report survey before and after the workshop. Results showed five themes emerged from focus groups: (a) Sleep and its impact on academics, (b) Understanding of the importance of sleep, (c) Procrastination and its impact on sleep, (d) Stress, and (e) Sleep and extracurricular/social activities. Based on self-report surveys, there was no improvement in perceived sleep importance, but perceived sleep confidence of undergraduate student-participants increased significantly after the workshop. The sleep health program for undergraduates showed promising results, and should be evaluated using a larger, more rigorous design in future studies.

  18. Construction of the NIFS campus information network, NIFS-LAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kato, Takeo; Nakamura, Osamu; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Watanabe, Reiko; Tsugawa, Kazuko; Kamimura, Tetsuo

    2000-10-01

    The advanced NIFS campus information network, NIFS-LAN, was designed and constructed as an informational infrastructure in 1996, 1997 and 1998 fiscal year. NIFS-LAN was composed of three autonomous clusters classified from research purpose; Research Information cluster, Large Helical Device Experiment cluster and Large-Scale Computer Simulation Research cluster. Many ATM(Asychronous Transfer Mode) switching systems and switching equipments were used for NIFS-LAN. Here, the outline of NIFS-LAN is described. (author)

  19. Pedagogical and Technological Challenges in on/off Campus Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Knudsen, Morten; Rokkjær, Ole

    2004-01-01

    the individual learning process. Experiences from distance education in individual learning are fine since individual learning responsibilities are natural leaving out alternative learning options. On-campus students did not benefit from the new method and especially the challenges expected to support...... and development. This requires new competences in the learning organization, and the problem is if the willingess for changes exists among staff and in the organization as long as competition from the educational market is small...

  20. Pedagogical and technological challenges in on/off campus education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Ole; Knudsen, Morten Haack; Rokkjær, Ole

    2004-01-01

    the individual learning process. Experiences from distance education in individual learning are fine since individual learning responsibilities are natural leaving out alternative learning options. On-campus students did not benefit from the new method and especially the challenges expected to support...... and development. This requires new competences in the learning organization, and the problem is if the willingness for changes exists among staff and in the organization as long as competition from the educational market is small...

  1. Biodiversity assessment at Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) campus, Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahir Hussain, K.; Satpathy, K.K.; Prasad, M.V.R.; Ramesh, T.; Selvanayagam, M.

    2008-01-01

    A rapid assessment of biodiversity in the DAE campus, Kalpakkam was carried out. The entire DAE campus of 3000 acres, at Kalpakkam was divided into four representative plots comprising of different landscapes namely (1) undisturbed area with dense vegetation, (2) building area, (3) water bodies with riparian cover and (4) sandy area with meager vegetation for inventorying of charismatic terrestrial/semi-aquatic fauna viz., Mammals, Birds, Reptiles, Amphibians and Butterflies. For birds, early morning surveys were made whereas for mammals evening and night surveys were followed. Midday sampling was followed for butterflies and other animals. Each plot was surveyed twice in a week over a period of one year (April 07' to March 08'). Totally 128 species of animals were identified during the survey and it has highlighted the potential of biodiversity in the campus. The diversity of butterflies is remarkable. Twenty-two butterfly species were encountered. Frogs, toads, lizards and snakes are also diverse. Five species of frogs and one species of toad were recorded. Lizards are more diverse than snakes. Nine species of lizards were encountered. Calotus versicolor is abundant followed by common skink. Totally five species of snakes were recorded. Among them Common bronzedback and Green Vine Snake were predominant. Seventy species of birds were recorded during the survey period. Black crowned night heron, Common house crow, Great cormorant, Oriental white ibis, Painted stork, Cattle egret, Common mynah are more common. Sixteen species of mammals were encountered during the survey. Wild cattle, Jackal, Jungle cat, Toddy cat, Crested porcupine and Indian civet are the major wildlife found. Indian civet and Crested porcupine are elusive animals that are diminishing from wild and their presence at this campus is an indication of less human intervention. (author)

  2. Students' perceptions of sexual harassment at a Gauteng university campus

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.A. South African society is experiencing high levels of violence against women. Various research studies have been conducted in South Africa and at international universities: they all indicate the presence of violence on campus. The researcher used a quantitative approach to gather information on students‟ perceptions of sexual violence and focused on gender differences and similarities. Both undergraduate and postgraduate students living in residence were invited to participate in the ...

  3. Numerical Analysis of Storm Surge and Seiche at Tokyo Bay caused by the 2 Similar Typhoons, Typhoon Phanphon and Vongfong in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, T.; Takagawa, T.

    2017-12-01

    A long period damped oscillation, or seiche, sometimes happens inside a harbor after passing typhoon. For some cases, a maximum sea level is observed due to the superposition of astronomical tide and seiche rather than a peak of storm surge. Hence to clarify seiche factors for reducing disaster potential is important, a long-period seiche with a fundamental period of 5.46 hours in Tokyo Bay (Konishi, 2008) was investigated through numerical simulations and analyses. We examined the case of Typhoon Phanphon and Vongfong in 2014 (Hereafter Case P and V). The intensity and moving velocity were similar and the best-tracks were an arc-shaped, typical one approaching to Tokyo Bay. The track of Case V was about 1.5 degree higher latitude than that of Case P, only Typhoon Phanphon caused significant seiche.Firstly, numerical simulations for the 2 storm surges at Tokyo Bay were conducted by Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and Meso-Scale Model Grid Point Values (MSM-GPV). MSM-GPV gave the 10m wind speed and Sea Level Pressure (SLP), especially the Mean Error (ME) and Root Mean Squire Error (RMSE) of SLP were low compared to the 12 JMA observation points data (Case P: ME -0.303hPa, RMSE 1.87hPa, Case V: ME -0.285hPa, RMSE 0.74hPa). The computational results showed that the maximum of storm surge was underestimated but the difference was less than 20cm at 5 observation points in Tokyo Bay(Fig.1, 2).Then, power spectrals, coherences and phase differences of storm surges at the 5 observation points were obtained by spectral analysis of observed and simulated waveforms. For Case P, the phase-difference between the bay mouth and innermost part of Tokyo Bay was little, and coherence was almost 1(Fig.3, 4). However, for Case V, coherence was small around the fundamental period of 5.46 hours. Furthermore, Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of storm surge, SLP and sea surface stress were conducted. The contributions of EOF1 were above 90% for the all variables, the

  4. Copyright for Movie Night: Film Screenings on Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela D. Willi Hooper

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available I undertook this paper so that I, along with other librarians and educators, could better understand how to comply with copyright law, conserve university resources, and streamline services to students regarding the procurement of public performance rights (PPR for films and other audiovisual resources. Student groups frequently screen films on campuses, and accepted legal interpretations of sections 101 and 106 of the 1976 Copyright Act indicate that a specific license should be sought for any public performance of a copyrighted audiovisual work. My review of PPR information on the public websites of the 38 members of the ORBIS-Cascade Alliance (an academic library consortium in the Northwest points to the potential for greater collaboration with student affairs professionals and other campus departments to provide more accurate and complete information about PPR and library audiovisual resources (e.g., DVDs or streaming media that have PPR attached. Campus-focused resources about PPR should include information about fair use, educational exemptions, public domain, open licenses, and library-licensed content that comes with PPR. The academic library community could undertake a project to enhance the accessibility of accurate and supportive PPR information to student groups by creating tools or best practices. This area is ripe for more current research.

  5. A Study of WLAN Campus in an Educational Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghareed Abdul-Hameed

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available the main aim of campus network is to efficiently separate, share and access knowledge among its users. The big demand of such systems of distributed knowledge networks is to be able to handle advanced applications which are the end-user requirements. The main goal of this study is to assess the ability of WLAN campus to dealing with applications request of end users in education establishments and network achievement under different conditions of operation. The study has been conducted in two stages: the first stage was accomplished by conducting a survey, using the Student Village network at Anglia Ruskin University as a case study; the main aim was to determine end-use requirements, gather information about the nature applications running by users and get a view about the likely future applications. The second stage was achieved by conducting experiments to evaluate the WLAN campus network performance under various different scenarios: impact of handover from Access Point (AP to another AP on end-user link performance, network performance in different usage time and network performance in different weather conditions.

  6. Camp Campus: College Preparation for Adolescents and Young Adults with High-Functioning Autism, Asperger Syndrome, and Other Social Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retherford, Kristine S.; Schreiber, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    Camp Campus is a 1-week campus experience for juniors or seniors in high school or high school graduates who are diagnosed with high-functioning autism, Asperger syndrome, or a related social communication disorder and who plan to attend college. Participants experience campus life by partaking of campus services, living and dining on campus,…

  7. Development on power distribution technologies of four electric power companies in Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. , Inc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    Electric power companies have been needed to cope with various needs in accordance with the progress of highly information-oriented society, the improvement of industrial technology, and the advancement and diversification of the living environment. In such situation, the power distribution section of Tokyo Electric Power has promoted technical development, setting up following priority items to put into operation: to reduce power failure caused by works and accidents, to improve reliability in supply, to reduce costs of construction and all over business management, to serve customers to answer various needs, to develop new technology and new methods based on the medium- and long-term prospect, and so forth. Several examples of recent technical development are introduced here. They are as follows; compact equipment and materials for electric poles to match the circumstances of cities and to simplify the construction method for power distribution, a 750kVA large high-voltage power-generation truck to make provision against an emergency such as a disaster by a typhoon, a compact transformer used on the ground, a high-voltage automatic cabinet, and a detector to find the failure of indoor power distribution works in resistances in a short time. 8 figs.

  8. Identification of subjects for social responsibility education at universities and the present activity at the university of Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karima, Risuke; Oshima, Yoshito; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The management of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has recently become a critical concern for companies in advanced countries. For universities, there is a requirement to contribute to the promotion of CSR, resulting in graduates who have sufficient cognition of and a good attitude towards CSR. In addition, universities have social responsibilities, which can be called "University Social Responsibility (USR)." On the basis of the concepts of the guidelines for CSR in the "Green Paper," which was presented by the European Committee (EC) in 2001, we provide a perspective here on what factors dictate the establishment of education programs for social responsibilities at universities. These factors include an outline of the concepts and the significance of CSR, social ethics and the morals of higher education and research, compliances, human resource management, human rights, safety and health in academic settings, and various concerns regarding environmental safety and preservation. Additionally, through the concept postulated here for social responsible education, in this paper, we introduce the present activity at the University of Tokyo (UT) in terms of the education program for CSR and USR, proposing that the future establishment of university-wide education programs based on the concept of CSR and the value of sustainability is required at UT.

  9. Report of the research results with University of Tokyo, Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory's Facilities in fiscal 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This book contains a large number of reports of studies made in 1986 through joint utilization of the nuclear reactor 'Yayoi' and electron beam type accelerator which are installed in the Nuclear engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo. The reports presented deal with 'Behaviors of Neutrons in Fast Reactor Blanket Shield', 'Effect of Fast Neutron Radiation on Organic Materials', 'Production and Recovery of Tritium in Nuclear Fusion Reactor Blanket System', 'Bench Mark Experiment of Effect of Atmospheric Scattering of Neutron', 'Experimental Evaluation of Nuclear Heat Rate', 'Fast Neutron Shielding Experiment', 'Effect of Fast Neutron Radiation on Hot Water', 'Neutron Shielding Experiment', 'Biological and Medical Application of 'Yayoi' Neutron', 'Effect of Fission-Fusion Correlation Radiation on Semiconductors (Si, GaAs)', 'Application of Fast Neutron to Radiography Technology', 'Streaming in Offset Slit', 'Design and Evaluation of New Reactor', 'LET Effect on Organic Material', 'Handling, Separation and Recovery of Transuranium Elements', 'Reactor Operation Support System Using Knowledge Engineering Technique', 'Application of Shape Memory Alloys to Nuclear Reactor Devices', 'Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Hear Transfer', and many other studies. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Growing electricity demand and role of nuclear power in Asia. WANO Tokyo Center summarizes Asian Nuclear Power Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    Present status of the activities of World Association of Nuclear Operations (WANO) in Asia was briefly summarized here. The WANO Tokyo Center is the hub for WANO's activities having a member ship of 17 operators from six countries and territories. The center conducts a variety of activities designed to enhance the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Asia. Asian economy is expanding now in spite of the stagnation of recent world economy. The economic development has been paralleled by population growth in Asia and the 21st century may become the 'age of Asia'. Despite this remarkable economic growth, some parts of Asia are still at the developing stage in terms of electric power infrastructure. Demand for electric power is expected to increase dramatically from now on, making the development of electric power plants an urgent priority. Nuclear power has thus become the focus of increasing interest in Asia. At present, 17 operators in six countries of Asia operate 79 units at 32 power stations with a total capacity of approximately 60 GW, or equivalent to around 17% of the total capacity of all WANO members. China's massive NPP construction program and Indonesia's nuclear power program are expected to boost total capacity in future. (M.N.)

  11. Report from investigation committee on the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2012-01-01

    Government's Investigation Committee on the Accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company published its final report on July 23, 2012. Results of investigation combined final report and interim report published on December 26, 2011. The author was head of accident accuse investigation team mostly in charge of site response, prior measure and plant behavior. This article reported author related technical investigation results focusing on site response and prior measures against tsunamis of units 1-3 of Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations. Misunderstanding of working state of isolation condenser of unit 1, unsuitability of alternative water injection at manual stop of high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system of unit 3 and improper prior measure against tsunami and severe accident were pointed out in interim report. Improper monitoring of suppression chamber of unit 2 and again unsuitable work for HPCI system of unit 3 were reported in final report. Thorough technical investigation was more encouraged to update safety measures of nuclear power stations. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Dry deposition fluxes and deposition velocities of trace metals in the Tokyo metropolitan area measured with a water surface sampler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Masahiro; Marumoto, Kohji

    2004-04-01

    Dry deposition fluxes and deposition velocities (=deposition flux/atmospheric concentration) for trace metals including Hg, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in the Tokyo metropolitan area were measured using an improved water surface sampler. Mercury is deposited on the water surface in both gaseous (reactive gaseous mercury, RGM) and particulate (particulate mercury, Hg(p)) forms. The results based on 1 yr observations found that dry deposition plays a significant if not dominant role in trace metal deposition in this urban area, contributing fluxes ranging from 0.46 (Cd) to 3.0 (Zn) times those of concurrent wet deposition fluxes. The deposition velocities were found to be dependent on the deposition of coarse particles larger than approximately 5 microm in diameter on the basis of model calculations. Our analysis suggests that the 84.13% diameter is a more appropriate index for each deposited metal than the 50% diameter in the assumed undersize log-normal distribution, because larger particles are responsible for the flux. The deposition velocities for trace metals other than mercury increased exponentially with an increase in their 84.13% diameters. Using this regression equation, the deposition velocities for Hg(p) were estimated from its 84.13% diameter. The deposition fluxes for Hg(p) calculated from the estimated velocities tended to be close to the mercury fluxes measured with the water surface sampler during the study periods except during summer.

  13. Nontarget approach for environmental monitoring by GC × GC-HRTOFMS in the Tokyo Bay basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zushi, Yasuyuki; Hashimoto, Shunji; Tanabe, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an approach for sequential nontarget and target screening for the rapid and efficient analysis of multiple samples as an environmental monitoring using a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatograph coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (GC × GC-HRTOFMS). A key feature of the approach was the construction of an accurate mass spectral database learned from the sample via nontarget screening. To enhance the detection power in the nontarget screening, a global spectral deconvolution procedure based on non-negative matrix factorization was applied. The approach was applied to the monitoring of rivers in the Tokyo Bay basin. The majority of the compounds detected by the nontarget screening were alkyl chain-based compounds (55%). In the quantitative target screening based on the output from the nontarget screening, particularly high levels of organophosphorus flame retardants (median concentrations of 31, 116 and 141 ng l(-1) for TDCPP, TCIPP and TBEP, respectively) were observed among the target compounds. Flame retardants used for household furniture and building materials were detected in river basins where buildings and arterial traffic were dominated. The developed GC × GC-HRTOFMS approach was efficient and effective for environmental monitoring and provided valuable new information on various aspects of monitoring in the context of environmental management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Roseomonas tokyonensis sp. nov. isolated from a biofilm sample obtained from a cooling tower in Tokyo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ishizaki, Naoto; Edagawa, Akiko; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Strain K-20(T), a Gram-negative, nonmotile, nonspore-forming and strictly aerobic coccobacillus, which produces a pale pink pigment (R2A agar medium, 30℃, seven days) was isolated from a sample of biofilm obtained from a cooling tower in Tokyo, Japan. A phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA partial gene sequences (1,439 bp) showed that the strain (accession number: AB297501) was related to Roseomonas frigidaquae CW67(T) and Roseomonas stagni HS-69(T) with 97.4% and 96.9% sequence similarity, respectively. Strain K-20(T) formed a distinct cluster with Roseomonas frigidaquae CW67(T) in the phylogenetic tree at a high bootstrap value (93%); however, distance was recognized between the strains. In addition, the DNA-DNA hybridization level between strain K-20(T) and Roseomonas frigidaquae JCM 15073(T) was 33%. The taxonomic data indicate that K-20(T) (=JCM 14634(T) =KCTC 32152(T)) should be classified in the genus Roseomonas as the type strain of a novel species, Roseomonas tokyonensis sp. nov.

  15. Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric OH reactivity and trace species within a suburban forest near Tokyo during AQUAS-TAMA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Sathiyamurthi; Nagai, Yoshihide; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Yamasaki, Shohei; Shoji, Koki; Ida, Akira; Jones, Charlotte; Tsurumaru, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yuhi; Yoshino, Ayako; Shimada, Kojiro; Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shungo; Hatakeyama, Shiro; Matsuda, Kazuhide; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2018-07-01

    Total OH reactivity, which gives the instantaneous loss rate of OH radicals due to reactive species, is an invaluable technique to understand regional air quality, as it gives the overall reactivity of the air mass, the fraction of each trace species reactive to OH, the fraction of missing sinks, O3 formation potential, etc. Total OH reactivity measurement was conducted in a small suburban forest located ∼30 km from Tokyo during the air quality study at field museum TAMA (AQUAS-TAMA) campaign in early autumn 2012 and summer 2013. The average measured OH reactivities during that autumn and summer were 7.4 s-1 and 11.4 s-1, respectively. In summer, isoprene was the major contributor, accounting for 28.2% of the OH reactivity, as a result of enhanced light-dependent biogenic emission, whereas NO2 was major contributor in autumn, accounting for 19.6%, due to the diminished contribution from isoprene as a result of lower solar strength. Higher missing OH reactivity 34% was determined in summer, and linear regression analysis showed that oxygenated VOCs could be the potential candidates for missing OH reactivity. Lower missing OH reactivity 25% was determined in autumn and it was significantly reduced (11%) if the interference of peroxy radicals to the measured OH reactivity were considered.

  16. Two long-term slow slip events around Tokyo Bay found by GNSS observation during 1996-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Yabe, Suguru

    2017-03-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) with durations ranging from days to more than a decade have been observed in plate subduction zones around the world. In the Kanto district in Japan, several SSEs have been identified based on geodetic observations. However, none of these events have had durations largely exceeding a year. In this study, we show that long-term SSEs with durations longer than 3 years occurred before the year 2000 and after 2007 on the upper interface of the Philippine Sea Plate at depths of 30-40 km. The fault model determined by inversion of global navigation satellite system data is located northeast of Tokyo Bay, where a seismic gap and low seismic wave velocities were detected by seismological observations. Moreover, the acceleration periods of the fault slip corresponded well with increases in the background seismicity for shallower earthquakes. The slip history was also temporally correlated with the long-term shear stress changes governed mainly by non-tidal variations in the ocean bottom pressure. However, the predicted slip from the long-term stress change was too small to reproduce the observed slow slips. To prove the causal relationship between the SSEs and the external stress change, more advanced modeling is necessary to confirm whether such a small slip can trigger an SSE.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Report of the second joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials. July 12, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    Joint research committees in purpose of the discussion on DEMO blanket in view point of the both of reactor technology and materials were held by the Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Fusion Materials. The joint research committee was held in Tokyo on July 12, 2002. In the committee, the present status of development of solid and liquid breeding blanket, the present status of development of reduced activation structure materials, and IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) program were discussed based on the discussions of the development programs of the blanket and materials at the first joint research committee. As a result, it was confirmed that high electric efficiency with 41% would be obtained in the solid breeding blanket system, that neutron radiation data of reduced activation ferritic steel was obtained by HFIR collaboration, and that KEP (key element technology phase) of IFMIF would be finished at the end of 2002 and the data base for the next step, i.e. EVEDA (engineering validation/engineering design activity) was obtained. In addition, the present status of ITER CTA, which was a transient phase for the construction, and the outline of ITER Fast Track, which was an accelerated plan for the performance of the power plants, were reported. This report consists of the summary of the discussion and the viewgraphs which were used at the second joint research committee, and these are very useful for the researchers of the fusion area in Japan. (author)

  18. Manufacturing process of ion source cone for SF cyclotron of Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The manufacturing process of the complicated structural cone elements for the low energy ion source of the SF cyclotron of Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, is reported. The drawing for manufacture is shown. This cone has a cylindrical part with 16 mm diameter and 60 mm length, a conical part with 50 mm large diameter and 62 deg conical angle, and many holes and notches, and is made of copper. The manufacturing process of the cone elements is as follows: providing the material by sawing a bar, cutting both end surfaces and drilling centering holes on a lathe, machining multiple outer surface utilizing an index on a milling machine, marking work on end and side surfaces, drilling centering holes for gas passage, water passage and bolt holes utilizing a circular table on a milling machine, spot facing and drilling centering holes for oblique gas and water passages on the outer surface utilizing an angle gauge on a milling machine, drilling gas and water passages on a drilling machine, brazing of plugs, machining of inner and outer surfaces on a lathe, machining of outer surface on a milling machine, finishing by hand work and so on. These process steps are shown in photographs. (Nakai, Y.)

  19. Radiation therapy for Kaposi's sarcoma associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebara, Takeshi [Municipal Kanbara General Hospital, Fujikawa, Shizuoka (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kurosaki, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kaizu, Toshihide; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Kumiko; Masuda, Gota

    2000-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is frequently found in association with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report on radiotherapy for patients with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital. Between April 1991 and May 1997, radiotherapy was given to 11 lesions in eight men with AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma to relieve their symptoms. The lesions involved the head and neck region, the legs, and the gastrointestinal tract. Radiotherapy was carried out with 4-MV photon through parallel opposed field or high energy electrons. Total doses ranged from 20 to 38 Gy, with a median of 30 Gy, delivered in 2- to 3-Gy fractions. Four patients were given other treatments prior to the radiotherapy. Acute reaction was evaluated according to the modified acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Radiotherapy had relieved the symptoms in all patients at completion of this therapy. Lesions that involved the hard palate and vocal cords had completely disappeared. The lesions that received radiotherapy were controlled without symptoms until the patients died. Patients who had the head and neck region treated exhibited severe acute mucosal reaction (at a dose of 30 Gy, there was grade 2 morbidity by modified RTOG criteria, in two patients, and grade 3 in three patients) although the radiation therapy was completed for these patients. Radiotherapy promises a favorable outcome for symptom relief in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. (author)

  20. A Japanese-American Sam Spade: The Metaphysical Detective in Death in Little Tokyo, by Dale Furutani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portilho Carla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this essay is to discuss the legacy of the roman noir in contemporary detective fiction produced outside the hegemonic center of power, here represented by the novel Death in Little Tokyo (1996, written by Japanese-American author Dale Furutani. Starting from the concept of the metaphysical detective (Haycraft 76; Holquist 153-156, characterized by deep questioning about narrative, interpretation, subjectivity, the nature of reality and the limits of knowledge, this article proposes a discussion about how these literary works, which at first sight represent a traditionally Anglo-American genre, constitute narratives that aim to rescue the memory, history and culture of marginalized communities. Typical of late modernity detective fiction, the metaphysical detective has none of the positivistic detective’s certainties, as he does not share in his Cartesian notion of totality, being presented instead as a successor of the hardboiled detective of the roman noir. In this article I intend to analyze the paths chosen by the author and discuss how his re-reading of the roman noir dialogues with the texts of hegemonic noire detective fiction, inscribing them in literary tradition and subverting them at the same time.