WorldWideScience

Sample records for guided focused ultrasound

  1. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-01-01

    animals and humans for HIFU-induced ablation and drug delivery. Integrated CT-guided focused ultrasound holds promise for tissue ablation, enhancing local drug delivery, and CT thermometry for monitoring ablation in near real-time

  2. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    animals and humans for HIFU-induced ablation and drug delivery. Integrated CT-guided focused ultrasound holds promise for tissue ablation, enhancing local drug delivery, and CT thermometry for monitoring ablation in near real-time.

  3. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share your patient story here Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Body Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Blood Clots Images related to MR-guided Focused Ultrasound for Uterine ...

  4. [Transcranial focused ultrasound: Neurological applications of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B; Martin, E

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasound surgery uses the thermal effects of the absorption of high-intensity focused ultrasound to induce localized thermal ablation of diseased tissue. The clinical introduction in recent years was made possible by a better understanding of the interactions of ultrasound with biological structures and the resulting physiological changes, major advances in the design of ultrasound applicators and the development of imaging modalities for reliable guiding the interventions. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is especially appealing for applications in the brain where target volumes have to be accessed with high precision without inflicting collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. In 2013 a MRgFUS system was CE certified for the treatment of functional neurological disorders, such as chronic neuropathic pain and movement disorders. Currently, some 400 patients have been treated worldwide using this system, which is also undergoing clinical testing for the treatment of primary brain tumors and brain metastases. This article describes the technical basis of transcranial focused ultrasound neurosurgery and summarizes the current clinical experience of this new class of image-guided, non-invasive interventions.

  5. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood–brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood–brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that

  6. A cMUT probe for ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Dominique; Coutier, Caroline; Legros, Mathieu; Bouakaz, Ayache; Certon, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted therapy represents a promising strategy in the arsenal of modern therapy. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology could overcome some difficulties encountered by traditional piezoelectric transducers. In this study, we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of an ultrasound-guided focused ultrasound (USgFUS) cMUT probe dedicated to preclinical evaluation of targeted therapy (hyperthermia, thermosensitive liposomes activation, and sonoporation) at low frequency (1 MHz) with simultaneous ultrasonic imaging and guidance (15 to 20 MHz). The probe embeds two types of cMUT arrays to perform the modalities of targeted therapy and imaging respectively. The wafer-bonding process flow employed for the manufacturing of the cMUTs is reported. One of its main features is the possibility of implementing two different gap heights on the same wafer. All the design and characterization steps of the devices are described and discussed, starting from the array design up to the first in vitro measurements: optical (microscopy) and electrical (impedance) measurements, arrays' electroacoustic responses, focused pressure field mapping (maximum peak-to-peak pressure = 2.5 MPa), and the first B-scan image of a wire-target phantom.

  7. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yang [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Wei, E-mail: wangyang301301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  8. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  9. An integrated ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system for in-vivo experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2017-03-01

    We present the system architecture of an integrated Ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (USgHIFU) system for image-guided surgery and temperature tracking in vivo. The system is capable of operating with multiple frontends. Current implementation has a SonixRP for imaging and a custom designed dual mode ultrasound array (DMUA) system (32Tx/32Rx) for imaging/therapy. The highlights of the system include a fully-programmable, multiple data stream capable data processing engine, and an arbitrarily programmable high power array driver that is able to synthesize complex beam patterns in space and time. The data processing engine features a pipeline-style design that can be programmed on-the-fly by re-arranging the pre-verified GPU-accelerated high performance pipeline blocks, which cover an extensive range from basic functions such as filtering to specialized processing like speckle tracking. Furthermore, the pipeline design also has the option of bringing in MATLAB (Mathworks, Natick, MA, US) as part of the processing chain, thus vastly increase the capability of the system. By properly balancing the processing load between GPU-enabled routine and MATLAB script. This allows one to achieve a high degree of flexibility while meeting real-time constraints. Results are presented from in vivo rat experiment. Where low dose of therapeutic ultrasound was delivered into the hind limb of the Copenhagen rats using DMUA and temperature was tracked using a linear probe (HST, Ultrasonix). The data is processed in realtime with MATLAB in the loop to perform temperature regularization. Results show that we can reliably track the low temperature heating in the presence of motion artifacts (respiration and pulsation).

  10. Review of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in the treatment of uterine fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Felipe Magalhães Peregrino

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyoma is the most frequently occurring solid pelvic tumor in women during the reproductive period. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound is a promising technique for decreasing menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea in symptomatic women. The aim of this study is to review the role of Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of uterine fibroids in symptomatic patients. We performed a review of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases up to April 2016. The analysis and data collection were performed using the following keywords: Leiomyoma, High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation, Ultrasonography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Menorrhagia. Two reviewers independently performed a quality assessment; when there was a disagreement, a third reviewer was consulted. Nineteen studies of Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound-treated fibroid patients were selected. The data indicated that tumor size was reduced and that symptoms were improved after treatment. There were few adverse effects, and they were not severe. Some studies have reported that in some cases, additional sessions of Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound or other interventions, such as myomectomy, uterine artery embolization or even hysterectomy, were necessary. This review suggests that Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound is a safe and effective technique. However, additional evidence from future studies will be required before the technique can be recommended as an alternative treatment for fibroids.

  11. MRI-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound of Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckel, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for completely noninvasive tumor ablation. This thesis focuses on its application for the treatment of patients with breast cancer. The first part of the thesis describes the role of breast MRI for

  12. Bone metastasis treatment using magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeo, Sin Yuin; Elevelt, Aaldert; Donato, Katia; van Rietbergen, Bert; ter Hoeve, Natalie D.; van Diest, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075281775; Grüll, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bone pain resulting from cancer metastases reduces a patient's quality of life. Magnetic Resonance-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising alternative palliative thermal treatment technique for bone metastases that has been tested in a few clinical studies.

  13. Clinical applications for magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU): present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, Samatha; Rieke, Viola; Kohi, Maureen; Westphalen, Antonio C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been well known for decades that high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) generates heat in tissues resulting in coagulative necrosis. Implementation, however, has been slow, due to difficulties with finding an appropriate imaging modality that could not only guide treatment, but also provide real-time thermal feedback. These problems have been overcome with the newest magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound systems (MRgHIFU). With its superior spatial resolution enabling accurate image guidance coupled with its ability to provide real-time thermography during treatments, MRI is moving further into the realm of therapeutics for oncologic patient care. This article will discuss the implementation of an MR-guided HIFU system, current clinical indications and touch on future directions.

  14. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion for identifying reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Kuniyil Ajith Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of acoustic inhomogeneities and resulting reflection artifacts is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. Absorption of light by skin and superficial optical absorbers will generate photoacoustic transients, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed, may appear in the region of interest, which causes difficulties in image interpretation. We propose a novel method to identify and potentially eliminate reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound [PAFUSion]. Our method uses focused ultrasound pulses to mimic the wave field produced by photoacoustic sources and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts in clinical combined photoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound. Simulation and phantom results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion can identify reflections in photoacoustic images and thus envisages potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  15. TU-B-210-00: MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Therapy in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips

  16. TU-B-210-00: MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Therapy in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.

  17. Magnetic resonance–guided interstitial high-intensity focused ultrasound for brain tumor ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonell, Jacquelyn; Patel, Niravkumar; Rubino, Sebastian; Ghoshal, Goutam; Fischer, Gregory; Burdette, E. Clif; Hwang, Roy; Pilitsis, Julie G.

    2018-01-01

    Currently, treatment of brain tumors is limited to resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Thermal ablation has been recently explored. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is being explored as an alternative. Specifically, the authors propose delivering HIFU internally to the tumor with an MRI-guided robotic assistant (MRgRA). The advantage of the authors’ interstitial device over external MRI-guided HIFU (MRgHIFU) is that it allows for conformal, precise ablation and concurrent tissue sampling. The authors describe their workflow for MRgRA HIFU delivery. PMID:29385926

  18. Feasibility of MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound as Organ-Sparing Treatment for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruch, Robert; Curiel, Laura; Chopra, Rajiv; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    High cure rates for testicular cancer have prompted interest in organ-sparing surgery for patients with bilateral disease or single testis. Focused ultrasound (FUS) ablation could offer a noninvasive approach to organ-sparing surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using MR thermometry to guide organ-sparing focused ultrasound surgery in the testis. The testes of anesthetized rabbits were sonicated in several discrete locations using a single-element focused transducer operating at 2.787MHz. Focal heating was visualized with MR thermometry, using a measured PRF thermal coefficient of -0.0089±0.0003 ppm/° C. Sonications at 3.5-14 acoustic watts applied for 30 seconds produced maximum temperature elevations of 10-80° C, with coagulation verified by histology. Coagulation of precise volumes in the testicle is feasible with MRI-guided focused ultrasound. Variability in peak temperature for given sonication parameters suggests the need for online temperature feedback control.

  19. MR-guided focused ultrasound robot for performing experiments on large animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, N.; Damianou, C.

    2011-09-01

    Introduction: In this paper an experimental MRI-guided focused ultrasound robot for large animals is presented. Materials and methods: A single element spherically focused transducer of 4 cm diameter, focusing at 10 cm and operating at 1 MHz was used. A positioning device was developed in order to scan the ultrasound transducer for performing MR-guided focused ultrasound experiments in large animals such as pig, sheep and dog. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic, brass screws, and brass pulleys. The system is manufactured automatically using a rapid prototyping system. Results: The system was tested successfully in a number of animals for various tasks (creation of single lesions, creation of overlapping lesions, and MR compatibility). Conclusions: A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can be via a lateral or superior-inferior approach. This system has the potential to be marketed as a cost effective solution for performing experiments in small and large animals.

  20. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  1. Noninvasive treatment of focal adenomyosis with MR-guided focused ultrasound in two patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveena Polina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenomyosis is a common benign gynecological disorder presenting with dysmenorrhea, menorrhagia, and pressure symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS utilizes precisely focused USG waves to generate and maintain high temperatures within the targeted tissue to achieve protein denaturation and coagulative necrosis. The heat generated is monitored using MRI images acquired in real-time in three planes. We present two cases of focal adenomyosis treated with MRgFUS showing good symptomatic relief at 3 and 6 months follow-up.

  2. Acoustic characterization of Thiel liver for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakitsios, Ioannis; Joy, Joyce; Mihcin, Senay; Melzer, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to measure the essential acoustic parameters, i.e., acoustic impedance, reflection coefficient, attenuation coefficient, of Thiel embalmed human and animal liver. The Thiel embalmed tissue can be a promising, pre-clinical model to study liver treatment with Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS). Using a single-element transducer and the contact pulse-echo method, the acoustic parameters, i.e., acoustic impedance, reflection coefficient and attenuation coefficient of Thiel embalmed human and animal liver were measured. The Thiel embalmed livers had higher impedance, similar reflection and lower attenuation compared to the fresh tissue. Embalming liver with Thiel fluid affects its acoustic properties. During MRgFUS sonication of a Thiel organ, more focused ultrasound (FUS) will be backscattered by the organ, and higher acoustic powers are required to reach coagulation levels (temperatures >56 °C).

  3. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound: a new technology for clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolesz, Ferenc A; McDannold, Nathan J

    2014-02-01

    Transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) is an old idea but a new technology that may change the entire clinical field of the neurosciences. TcMRgFUS has no cumulative effect, and it is applicable for repeatable treatments, controlled by real-time dosimetry, and capable of immediate tissue destruction. Most importantly, it has extremely accurate targeting and constant monitoring. It is potentially more precise than proton beam therapy and definitely more cost effective. Neuro-oncology may be the most promising area of future TcMRgFUS applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. NMR guided focused ultrasound for myoma therapy - results from the first radiology-gynecology expert meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin; David, M.; Kroencke, T.; Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin

    2013-01-01

    The contribution on the results from the first radiology-gynecology expert meeting concerning NMR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) for myoma therapy covers the following topics: structural prerequisites for MRgFUS therapy; required examinations before MRgFUS therapy; indication for MRgFUS therapy; success criteria for the MRgFUS therapy; contraindications; MRgFUS therapy for patients that want to have children; side effects and complications of MRgFUS therapy; post-examination after MRgFUS therapy.

  5. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thanou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery under the guidance of an imaging modality can improve drug disposition and achieve site-specific drug delivery. The term focal drug delivery has been introduced to describe the focal targeting of drugs in tissues with the help of imaging and focused ultrasound. Focal drug delivery aims to improve the therapeutic profile of drugs by improving their specificity and their permeation in defined areas. Focused-ultrasound- (FUS- mediated drug delivery has been applied with various molecules to improve their local distribution in tissues. FUS is applied with the aid of microbubbles to enhance the permeability of bioactive molecules across BBB and improve drug distribution in the brain. Recently, FUS has been utilised in combination with MRI-labelled liposomes that respond to temperature increase. This strategy aims to “activate” nanoparticles to release their cargo locally when triggered by hyperthermia induced by FUS. MRI-guided FUS drug delivery provides the opportunity to improve drug bioavailability locally and therefore improve the therapeutic profiles of drugs. This drug delivery strategy can be directly translated to clinic as MRg FUS is a promising clinically therapeutic approach. However, more basic research is required to understand the physiological mechanism of FUS-enhanced drug delivery.

  6. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound for Palliation of Painful Skeletal Metastases: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael; Dennis, Kristopher; Huang, Yuexi; Mougenot, Charles; Chow, Edward; DeAngelis, Carlo; Coccagna, Jennifer; Sahgal, Arjun; Hynynen, Kullervo; Czarnota, Gregory; Chu, William

    2017-10-01

    Bone is one of the most common sites of metastases, with bone metastases-related pain representing a significant source of morbidity among patients with cancer. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound is a noninvasive, outpatient modality with the potential for treating painful bone metastases. The aim of this study is to report our initial experience with magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in the treatment of bone metastases and our preliminary analysis of urinary cytokine levels after therapy. This was a single-center pilot study of 10 patients with metastatic cancer to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for primary pain control in device-accessible skeletal metastases. Treatments were performed on a clinical magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system using a volumetric ablation technique. Primary efficacy was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory scores and morphine equivalent daily dose intake at 3 time points: before, day 14, and day 30 after the magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound treatment. Urine cytokines were measured 3 days before treatment and 2 days after the treatment. Of the 10 patients, 8 were followed up 14 days and 6 were followed up 30 days after the treatment. At day 14, 3 patients (37.5%) exhibited partial pain response and 4 patients (50%) exhibited an indeterminate response, and at day 30 after the treatment, 5 patients (83%) exhibited partial pain response. No treatment-related adverse events were recorded. Of the urine cytokines measured, only Transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα) demonstrated an overall decrease, with a trend toward statistical significance ( P = .078). Our study corroborates magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound as a feasible and safe modality as a primary, palliative treatment for painful bone metastases and contributes to the limited body of literature using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound for this clinical indication.

  7. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery for treatment of painful osseous metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Mark; Machtinger, Ronit; Fennessy, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is an emerging technology that can non-invasively heat and ablate targeted tissue utilizing ultrasound energy. Use of MR imaging for treatment guidance provides several key advantages over more widely used ultrasound guidance for focused ultrasound ablation. MR allows for precise targeting, detailed beam path visualization, real time non-invasive temperature measurement, and treatment feedback to ensure therapeutic goals are achieved. In the realm of oncology, management of painful bone metastases is a common and daunting clinical problem. The Insightec ExAblate System has been shown in phase I/II trials for treatment of bone metastases to have an excellent safety profile and high rates of pain response. An international multi-center phase III trial for patients with painful bone metastases or multiple myeloma who are not candidates for radiation therapy is currently open. Patients are randomized 3:1 to MRgFUS or sham treatment with crossover to study treatment allowed for sham failures. The primary study endpoint is assessment of pain control over 3 months following treatment. In addition safety, quality of life, cost effectiveness analysis, and patient perceived clinical benefit are also being assessed. Details of the MRgFUS system, technical and clinical therapeutic parameters, use of real time non-invasive MR thermometry, and examples of patient treatments with use of MRgFUS to treat bone metastases will be discussed. New directions in use of MRgFUS including an update on development of a new mobile applicator and integration of MRgFUS in multimodality oncologic care will also be presented.

  8. Power cavitation-guided blood-brain barrier opening with focused ultrasound and microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, M. T.; Apostolakis, I.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2018-03-01

    Image-guided monitoring of microbubble-based focused ultrasound (FUS) therapies relies on the accurate localization of FUS-stimulated microbubble activity (i.e. acoustic cavitation). Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays can achieve this, but with insufficient spatial resolution. In this study, we address this limitation and perform high-resolution monitoring of acoustic cavitation-mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening with a new technique called power cavitation imaging. By synchronizing the FUS transmit and passive receive acquisition, high-resolution passive cavitation imaging was achieved by using delay and sum beamforming with absolute time delays. Since the axial image resolution is now dependent on the duration of the received acoustic cavitation emission, short pulses of FUS were used to limit its duration. Image sets were acquired at high-frame rates for calculation of power cavitation images analogous to power Doppler imaging. Power cavitation imaging displays the mean intensity of acoustic cavitation over time and was correlated with areas of acoustic cavitation-induced BBB opening. Power cavitation-guided BBB opening with FUS could constitute a standalone system that may not require MRI guidance during the procedure. The same technique can be used for other acoustic cavitation-based FUS therapies, for both safety and guidance.

  9. Thermometry during MR-guided focused ultrasound in a preclinical model based on Thiel embalmed tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakitsios, Ioannis; Bobeica, Mariana; Saliev, Timur; Rube, Martin; Melzer, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the accuracy of Proton Resonance Frequency (PRF) thermometry during MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) ablation on explanted Thiel embalmed human and animal liver, fresh animal liver, and compared to gel phantom. PRF thermometry during MRgFUS was conducted using a 1.5T MRI system. The phantom and the organs were sonicated with the following energies: 300J, 600J, 1000J and 1400J. The temperature increase which was measured using PRF thermometry during sonication was compared to actual temperature rise in the same conditions measured by fibre optic thermocouple. Sonication of fresh animal liver showed temperature differences varying between 0.27°C and 0.40°C, whereas the phantom results showed temperature differences from 0.23°C to 0.40°C. For the Thiel embalmed organs, the temperature difference varied from 1.17 °C to 3.13°C for the ovine liver, and from 1.3°C to 3.10°C for the human liver. The temperature differences measured in the fresh liver were small and similar to those found for the gel phantom. However, the temperature differences calculated for the Thiel embalmed organs were higher compared to the fresh organ. This indicates that the PRF-based temperature calibration of the Focused Ultrasound machine for Thiel embalmed tissue is necessary.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound to increase localized blood-spinal cord barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Allison H; Hawryluk, Gregory W; Anzai, Yoshimi; Odéen, Henrik; Ostlie, Megan A; Reichert, Ethan C; Stump, Amanda J; Minoshima, Satoshi; Cross, Donna J

    2017-12-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects thousands of people every year in the USA, and most patients are left with some permanent paralysis. Therapeutic options are limited and only modestly affect outcome. To address this issue, we used magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) as a non-invasive approach to increase permeability in the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB). We hypothesize that localized, controlled sonoporation of the BSCB by MRgFUS will aid delivery of therapeutics to the injury. Here, we report our preliminary findings for the ability of MRgFUS to increase BSCB permeability in the thoracic spinal cord of a normal rat model. First, an excised portion of normal rat spinal column was used to characterize the acoustic field and to estimate the insertion losses that could be expected in an MRgFUS blood spinal cord barrier opening. Then, in normal rats, MRgFUS was applied in combination with intravenously administered microbubbles to the spinal cord region. Permeability of the BSCB was indicated as signal enhancement by contrast administered prior to T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and verified by Evans blue dye. Neurological testing using the Basso, Beattie, and Breshnahan scale and the ladder walk was normal in 8 of 10 rats tested. Two rats showed minor impairment indicating need for further refinement of parameters. No gross tissue damage was evident by histology. In this study, we have opened successfully the blood spinal cord barrier in the thoracic region of the normal rat spine using magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles.

  11. Image-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound Stimulates Human Primary Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently been investigated as a new mode of non-invasive brain stimulation, which offers exquisite spatial resolution and depth control. We report on the elicitation of explicit somatosensory sensations as well as accompanying evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials induced by FUS stimulation of the human somatosensory cortex. As guided by individual-specific neuroimage data, FUS was transcranially delivered to the hand somatosensory cortex among healthy volunteers. The sonication elicited transient tactile sensations on the hand area contralateral to the sonicated hemisphere, with anatomical specificity of up to a finger, while EEG recordings revealed the elicitation of sonication-specific evoked potentials. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic propagation through the skull showed that a threshold of acoustic intensity may exist for successful cortical stimulation. The neurological and neuroradiological assessment before and after the sonication, along with strict safety considerations through the individual-specific estimation of effective acoustic intensity in situ and thermal effects, showed promising initial safety profile; however, equal/more rigorous precautionary procedures are advised for future studies. The transient and localized stimulation of the brain using image-guided transcranial FUS may serve as a novel tool for the non-invasive assessment and modification of region-specific brain function.

  12. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablating uterine fibroids with hyperintense on T2-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Lian; Li, Quan; Qin, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate whether uterine fibroids with hyperintense on pretreatment T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be treated with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU). Materials and methods: 282 patients with 282 symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent USgHIFU treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI, uterine fibroids were classified as hypointense, isointense and hyperintense. Hyperintense fibroids were subjectively further subdivided into heterogeneous hyperintense, slightly homogeneous hyperintense and markedly homogeneous hyperintense based on the signal intensity of fibroid relative to myometrium and endometrium on T2-weighted MRI. Enhanced MRI was performed within one month after HIFU treatment. Non-perfused volume (NPV, indicative of successful ablation) ratio, treatment time, treatment efficiency, energy effect ratio and adverse events were recorded. Results: The median volume of uterine fibroids was 70.3 cm 3 (interquartile range, 41.1–132.5 cm 3 ). The average NPV ratio, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume after HIFU treatment, was 76.8 ± 19.0% (range, 0–100%) in the 282 patients. It was 86.3 ± 11.9% (range, 40.9–100.0%) in the group with hypointense fibroids, 77.1 ± 16.5% (range, 32.2–100.0%) in isointense fibroids, and 67.6 ± 23.9% (range, 0–100.0%) in hyperintense fibroids. The lowest NPV ratio, lowest treatment efficiency, more treatment time, more sonication energy and pain scores were observed in the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids, and the NPV ratio was 55.8 ± 26.7% (range, 0–83.9%) in this subgroup. Conclusion: Based on our results, the heterogeneous and markedly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids were suitable for USgHIFU, and only the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids should be excluded

  13. A framework for continuous target tracking during MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablations in the abdomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zachiu, Cornel; Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Dmitriev, Ivan D.; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Ries, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: During lengthy magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRg-HIFU) thermal ablations in abdominal organs, the therapeutic work-flow is frequently hampered by various types of physiological motion occurring at different time-scales. If left un-addressed this can lead to

  14. MR guided focused ultrasound: technical acceptance measures for a clinical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, K. R.; Hangiandreou, N. J.; Hesley, G. K.; Gostout, B. S.; McGee, K. P.; Felmlee, J. P.

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a hybrid technique which offers efficient and safe focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments of uterine fibroids under MR guidance and monitoring. As a therapy device, MRgFUS requires systematic testing over a wide range of operational parameters prior to use in the clinical environment. We present technical acceptance tests and data for the first clinical MRgFUS system, ExAblate® 2000 (InSightec Inc., Haifa, Israel), that has been FDA approved for treating uterine fibroids. These tests characterize MRgFUS by employing MR temperature measurements in tissue mimicking phantoms. The coronal scan plane is empirically demonstrated to be most reliable for measuring temperature elevations resulting from high intensity ultrasound (US) pulses ('sonications') and shows high sensitivity to changes in sonication parameters. Temperatures measured in the coronal plane were used as a measure of US energy deposited within the focal spot for a range of sonication parameters used in clinical treatments: spot type, spot length, output power, sonication duration, US frequency, and depth of sonication. In addition, MR images acquired during sonications were used to measure effective diameters and lengths of available sonication spot types and lengths. At a constant 60 W output power, the effective spot type diameters were measured to vary between 4.7 ± 0.3 mm and 6.6 ± 0.4 mm; treatment temperatures were found to decrease with increasing spot diameter. Prescribing different spot lengths was found to have no effect on the measured length or on measured temperatures. Tests of MRgFUS positioning accuracy determined errors in the direction parallel to the propagation of the US beam to be significantly greater than those in the perpendicular direction; most sonication spots were erroneously positioned towards the FUS transducer. The tests reported here have been demonstrated to be sufficiently sensitive to detect water leakage

  15. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses ... of Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy? What is Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast ...

  16. Open-source, small-animal magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorman, Megan E; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Wilkens, Ken; Dockery, Mary D; Giorgio, Todd D; Grissom, William A; Caskey, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound or high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS/MRgHIFU) is a non-invasive therapeutic modality with many potential applications in areas such as cancer therapy, drug delivery, and blood-brain barrier opening. However, the large financial costs involved in developing preclinical MRgFUS systems represent a barrier to research groups interested in developing new techniques and applications. We aim to mitigate these challenges by detailing a validated, open-source preclinical MRgFUS system capable of delivering thermal and mechanical FUS in a quantifiable and repeatable manner under real-time MRI guidance. A hardware and software package was developed that includes closed-loop feedback controlled thermometry code and CAD drawings for a therapy table designed for a preclinical MRI scanner. For thermal treatments, the modular software uses a proportional integral derivative controller to maintain a precise focal temperature rise in the target given input from MR phase images obtained concurrently. The software computes the required voltage output and transmits it to a FUS transducer that is embedded in the delivery table within the magnet bore. The delivery table holds the FUS transducer, a small animal and its monitoring equipment, and a transmit/receive RF coil. The transducer is coupled to the animal via a water bath and is translatable in two dimensions from outside the magnet. The transducer is driven by a waveform generator and amplifier controlled by real-time software in Matlab. MR acoustic radiation force imaging is also implemented to confirm the position of the focus for mechanical and thermal treatments. The system was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms and in vivo during murine tumor hyperthermia treatments. Sonications were successfully controlled over a range of temperatures and thermal doses for up to 20 min with minimal temperature overshoot. MR thermometry was validated with an optical temperature probe, and focus

  17. MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Thalamotomy for Moderate-to-Severe Tremor in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Schlesinger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thalamotomy is effective in alleviating tremor in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Methods. Seven PD patients, mean age 59.4 ± 9.8 years (range, 46–74 with a mean disease duration of 5.4 ± 2.8 years (range, 2–10 suffering from severe refractory tremor, underwent ventral intermediate nucleus thalamotomy using MRI guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS, an innovative technology that enables noninvasive surgery. Results. Tremor stopped in the contralateral upper extremity in all patients immediately following treatment. Total UPDRS decreased from 37.4 ± 12.2 to 18.8 ± 11.1 (p=0.007 and PDQ-39 decreased from 42.3 ± 16.4 to 21.6 ± 10.8 (p=0.008 following MRgFUS. These effects were sustained (mean follow-up 7.3 months. Adverse events during MRgFUS included headache (n=3, dizziness (n=2, vertigo (n=4, and lip paresthesia (n=1 and following MRgFUS were hypogeusia (n=1, unsteady feeling when walking (n=1, resolved, and disturbance when walking tandem (n=1, resolved. Conclusions. Thalamotomy using MRgFUS is safe and effective in PD patients. Large randomized studies are needed to assess prolonged efficacy and safety.

  18. Does the phase of menstrual cycle affect MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine leiomyomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Minna J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Fennessy, Fiona M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Zou, Kelly H. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); McDannold, Nathan [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Hynynen, Kullervo [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Jolesz, Ferenc A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Stewart, Elizabeth A. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Rybicki, Frank J. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tempany, Clare M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: ctempanyafdhal@partners.org

    2006-08-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the phase of menstrual cycle at the time of MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for uterine leiomyomas affects treatment outcome. Methods: We enrolled all patients participating in a prospective phase III clinical trial from our center who completed 6 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. Patients with irregular cycles and those on oral contraceptives were excluded. Data prospectively documenting the date of the last menstrual period (LMP) at the time of treatment, length and duration of cycle, and raw symptom severity score (SSS) from the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire, at baseline and 6 months were collected. Proliferative phase patients were determined retrospectively as those who were treated within less than 14 days from LMP; secretory phase patients were classified as those who were treated greater than 14 days from LMP. Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled. There was no significant difference in the mean SSS at baseline and mean SSS at 6 months between patients treated in the proliferative versus secretory phase of the cycle. No significant difference in the SSS change from baseline to 6 months was seen between the two groups. Conclusions: Menstrual cycle phase does not influence MRgFUS treatment outcome. Symptomatic improvement occurs with treatment during either phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, the scheduling of MRgFUS treatment need not be based upon the phase of the menstrual cycle.

  19. Does the phase of menstrual cycle affect MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine leiomyomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Minna J.; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Zou, Kelly H.; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Stewart, Elizabeth A.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Tempany, Clare M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the phase of menstrual cycle at the time of MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for uterine leiomyomas affects treatment outcome. Methods: We enrolled all patients participating in a prospective phase III clinical trial from our center who completed 6 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. Patients with irregular cycles and those on oral contraceptives were excluded. Data prospectively documenting the date of the last menstrual period (LMP) at the time of treatment, length and duration of cycle, and raw symptom severity score (SSS) from the Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life questionnaire, at baseline and 6 months were collected. Proliferative phase patients were determined retrospectively as those who were treated within less than 14 days from LMP; secretory phase patients were classified as those who were treated greater than 14 days from LMP. Results: A total of 58 patients were enrolled. There was no significant difference in the mean SSS at baseline and mean SSS at 6 months between patients treated in the proliferative versus secretory phase of the cycle. No significant difference in the SSS change from baseline to 6 months was seen between the two groups. Conclusions: Menstrual cycle phase does not influence MRgFUS treatment outcome. Symptomatic improvement occurs with treatment during either phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, the scheduling of MRgFUS treatment need not be based upon the phase of the menstrual cycle

  20. Dynamic T2-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M.

    2012-11-01

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1°C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T2, since T2 increases linearly in fat during heating. T2-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T2. Calibration of T2-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T2 and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T2 temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/°C was observed. Dynamic T2-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  1. Positioning device for MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damianou, Christakis [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus); MEDSONIC, LTD, Limassol (Cyprus); Ioannides, Kleanthis [Polikliniki Igia, Limassol (Cyprus); Milonas, Nicos [Frederick Institute of Technology (FIT), Limassol (Cyprus)

    2008-04-15

    A prototype magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- compatible positioning device was used to move an MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. The positioning device has three user-controlled degrees of freedom that allow access to various targeted lesions. The positioning device was designed and fabricated using construction materials selected for compatibility with high magnetic fields and fast switching magnetic field gradients encountered inside MRI scanners. The positioning device incorporates only MRI compatible materials such as piezoelectric motors, plastic sheets, brass screws, plastic pulleys and timing belts. The HIFU/MRI system includes the multiple subsystems (a) HIFU system, (b) MR imaging, (c) Positioning device (robot) and associate drivers, (d) temperature measurement, (e) cavitation detection, (f) MRI compatible camera, and (g) Soft ware. The MRI compatibility of the system was successfully demonstrated in a clinical high-field MRI scanner. The ability of the robot to accurately move the transducer thus creating discrete and overlapping lesions in biological tissue was tested successfully. A simple, cost effective, portable positioning device has been developed which can be used in virtually any clinical MRI scanner since it can be sited on the scanner's table. The propagation of HIFU can use either a lateral or superior-inferior approach. Discrete and large lesions were created successfully with reproducible results. (orig.)

  2. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound ablation of uterine fibroids. Early clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Koji; Osuga, Keigo; Tomoda, Kaname; Nakamura, Hironobu; Murakami, Takamichi; Okada, Atsuya

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound (MRIgFUS) ablation for uterine fibroids and to identify the candidates for this treatment. A total of 48 patients with a symptomatic uterine fibroid underwent MRIgFUS. The percent ablation volume was calculated, and the patients' characteristics and the MR imaging features of the fibroids that might predict the effect of this treatment were assessed. Changes in the symptoms related to the uterine fibroid were assessed at 6 and 12 months. The planned target zone were successfully treated in 32 patients with bulk-related and menstrual symptoms but unsuccessfully treated in the remaining 16 patients. These 16 patients were obese or their uterine fibroid showed heterogeneous high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The 32 successfully treated patients were followed up for 6 months. At the 6-month follow-up, bulk-related and menstrual symptoms were diminished in 60% and 51% of patients, respectively. Among them, 17 patients were followed up for 12 months, and 9 of them who showed alleviation of bulk-related symptoms at 6 months had further improvement. The mean percent ablation volume of those nine patients was 51%. In 5 (33%) of the 15 patients with alleviation of menstrual symptoms at 6 months, the symptoms became worse at 12 months. There was a significant difference in the mean percent ablation volume between patients with alleviation of menstrual symptoms and those without (54% vs. 37%; P=0.03). MRIgFUS ablation is a safe, effective treatment for nonobese patients with symptomatic fibroids that show low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Ablation of more than 50% of the fibroid volume may be needed with a short-term follow-up. (author)

  4. Workflow and intervention times of MR-guided focused ultrasound - Predicting the impact of new techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeve, Arjo J; Al-Issawi, Jumana; Fernandez-Gutiérrez, Fabiola; Langø, Thomas; Strehlow, Jan; Haase, Sabrina; Matzko, Matthias; Napoli, Alessandro; Melzer, Andreas; Dankelman, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) has become an attractive, non-invasive treatment for benign and malignant tumours, and offers specific benefits for poorly accessible locations in the liver. However, the presence of the ribcage and the occurrence of liver motion due to respiration limit the applicability MRgFUS. Several techniques are being developed to address these issues or to decrease treatment times in other ways. However, the potential benefit of such improvements has not been quantified. In this research, the detailed workflow of current MRgFUS procedures was determined qualitatively and quantitatively by using observation studies on uterine MRgFUS interventions, and the bottlenecks in MRgFUS were identified. A validated simulation model based on discrete events simulation was developed to quantitatively predict the effect of new technological developments on the intervention duration of MRgFUS on the liver. During the observation studies, the duration and occurrence frequencies of all actions and decisions in the MRgFUS workflow were registered, as were the occurrence frequencies of motion detections and intervention halts. The observation results show that current MRgFUS uterine interventions take on average 213min. Organ motion was detected on average 2.9 times per intervention, of which on average 1.0 actually caused a need for rework. Nevertheless, these motion occurrences and the actions required to continue after their detection consumed on average 11% and up to 29% of the total intervention duration. The simulation results suggest that, depending on the motion occurrence frequency, the addition of new technology to automate currently manual MRgFUS tasks and motion compensation could potentially reduce the intervention durations by 98.4% (from 256h 5min to 4h 4min) in the case of 90% motion occurrence, and with 24% (from 5h 19min to 4h 2min) in the case of no motion. In conclusion, new tools were developed to predict how

  5. Volumetric analysis of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound thalamotomy lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harary, Maya; Essayed, Walid I; Valdes, Pablo A; McDannold, Nathan; Cosgrove, G Rees

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thalamotomy was recently approved for use in the treatment of medication-refractory essential tremor (ET). Previous work has described lesion appearance and volume on MRI up to 6 months after treatment. Here, the authors report on the volumetric segmentation of the thalamotomy lesion and associated edema in the immediate postoperative period and 1 year following treatment, and relate these radiographic characteristics with clinical outcome. METHODS Seven patients with medication-refractory ET underwent MRgFUS thalamotomy at Brigham and Women's Hospital and were monitored clinically for 1 year posttreatment. Treatment effect was measured using the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor (CRST). MRI was performed immediately postoperatively, 24 hours posttreatment, and at 1 year. Lesion location and the volumes of the necrotic core (zone I) and surrounding edema (cytotoxic, zone II; vasogenic, zone III) were measured on thin-slice T2-weighted images using Slicer 3D software. RESULTS Patients had significant improvement in overall CRST scores (baseline 51.4 ± 10.8 to 24.9 ± 11.0 at 1 year, p = 0.001). The most common adverse events (AEs) in the 1-month posttreatment period were transient gait disturbance (6 patients) and paresthesia (3 patients). The center of zone I immediately posttreatment was 5.61 ± 0.9 mm anterior to the posterior commissure, 14.6 ± 0.8 mm lateral to midline, and 11.0 ± 0.5 mm lateral to the border of the third ventricle on the anterior commissure-posterior commissure plane. Zone I, II, and III volumes immediately posttreatment were 0.01 ± 0.01, 0.05 ± 0.02, and 0.33 ± 0.21 cm 3 , respectively. These volumes increased significantly over the first 24 hours following surgery. The edema did not spread evenly, with more notable expansion in the superoinferior and lateral directions. The spread of edema inferiorly was associated with the incidence of gait disturbance. At 1 year, the

  6. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odéen, Henrik; Todd, Nick; Diakite, Mahamadou; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  7. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odéen, Henrik; Diakite, Mahamadou; Todd, Nick; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  8. MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Breast Cancer with a Dedicated Breast Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G., E-mail: L.G.Merckel-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W., E-mail: W.Bartels@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Koehler, Max O., E-mail: max.kohler@philips.com [Philips Healthcare (Finland); Bongard, H. J. G. Desiree van den, E-mail: D.vandenBongard@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel, E-mail: R.Deckers-2@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Mali, Willem P. Th. M., E-mail: W.Mali@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: Christoph.Binkert@ksw.ch [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology (Switzerland); Moonen, Chrit T., E-mail: C.Moonen@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute (Netherlands); Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A., E-mail: K.G.A.Gilhuijs@umcutrecht.nl; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den, E-mail: mbosch@umcutrecht.nl [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    Optimizing the treatment of breast cancer remains a major topic of interest. In current clinical practice, breast-conserving therapy is the standard of care for patients with localized breast cancer. Technological developments have fueled interest in less invasive breast cancer treatment. Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a completely noninvasive ablation technique. Focused beams of ultrasound are used for ablation of the target lesion without disrupting the skin and subcutaneous tissues in the beam path. MRI is an excellent imaging method for tumor targeting, treatment monitoring, and evaluation of treatment results. The combination of HIFU and MR imaging offers an opportunity for image-guided ablation of breast cancer. Previous studies of MR-HIFU in breast cancer patients reported a limited efficacy, which hampered the clinical translation of this technique. These prior studies were performed without an MR-HIFU system specifically developed for breast cancer treatment. In this article, a novel and dedicated MR-HIFU breast platform is presented. This system has been designed for safe and effective MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer. Furthermore, both clinical and technical challenges are discussed, which have to be solved before MR-HIFU ablation of breast cancer can be implemented in routine clinical practice.

  9. Non-invasive cardiac pacing with image-guided focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Bour, Pierre; Vaillant, Fanny; Amraoui, Sana; Dubois, Rémi; Ritter, Philippe; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze; Bernus, Olivier; Quesson, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Currently, no non-invasive cardiac pacing device acceptable for prolonged use in conscious patients exists. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to perform remote pacing using reversibility of electromechanical coupling of cardiomyocytes. Here we described an extracorporeal cardiac stimulation device and study its efficacy and safety. We conducted experiments ex vivo and in vivo in a large animal model (pig) to evaluate clinical potential of such a technique. The stimulation threshold was determined in 10 different ex vivo hearts and different clinically relevant electrical effects such as consecutive stimulations of different heart chambers with a single ultrasonic probe, continuous pacing or the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia were shown. Using ultrasonic contrast agent, consistent cardiac stimulation was achievable in vivo for up to 1 hour sessions in 4 different animals. No damage was observed in inversion-recovery MR sequences performed in vivo in the 4 animals. Histological analysis revealed no differences between stimulated and control regions, for all ex vivo and in vivo cases.

  10. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Zhaomei; Ma, C-M; Chen Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Chen Lili; Pollack, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS; (5) docetaxel + RT; (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg −1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio. (paper)

  11. MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound safely enhances interstitial dispersion of large polymeric nanoparticles in the living brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Hersh

    Full Text Available Generating spatially controlled, non-destructive changes in the interstitial spaces of the brain has a host of potential clinical applications, including enhancing the delivery of therapeutics, modulating biological features within the tissue microenvironment, altering fluid and pressure dynamics, and increasing the clearance of toxins, such as plaques found in Alzheimer's disease. Recently we demonstrated that ultrasound can non-destructively enlarge the interstitial spaces of the brain ex vivo. The goal of the current study was to determine whether these effects could be reproduced in the living brain using non-invasive, transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS. The left striatum of healthy rats was treated using MRgFUS. Computer simulations facilitated treatment planning, and targeting was validated using MRI acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. Following MRgFUS treatments, Evans blue dye or nanoparticle probes were infused to assess changes in the interstitial space. In MRgFUS-treated animals, enhanced dispersion was observed compared to controls for 70 nm (12.8 ± 0.9 mm3 vs. 10.6 ± 1.0 mm3, p = 0.01, 200 nm (10.9 ± 1.4 mm3 vs. 7.4 ± 0.7 mm3, p = 0.01 and 700 nm (7.5 ± 0.4 mm3 vs. 5.4 ± 1.2 mm3, p = 0.02 nanoparticles, indicating enlargement of the interstitial spaces. No evidence of significant histological or electrophysiological injury was identified. These findings suggest that transcranial ultrasound can safely and effectively modulate the brain interstitium and increase the dispersion of large therapeutic entities such as particulate drug carriers or modified viruses. This has the potential to expand the therapeutic uses of MRgFUS.

  12. Noninvasive, in vivo determination of uterine fibroid thermal conductivity in MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiming; Fischer, John; Warner, Lizette; Oto, Aytekin; Hor, Pei-Herng; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-06-01

    To estimate the local thermal conductivity of uterine fibroid in vivo at a high temperature range (60-80°C) typically encountered in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) surgery. The thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo is unknown and knowledge about tissue thermal conductivity may aid in effective delivery of thermal energy for ablation. All subjects (nine women) provided written informed consent to participate in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. A total of 10 fibroids were treated using MRgHIFU surgery with real-time temperature monitoring during both heating and cooling periods. The local thermal conductivity was determined by analyzing the spatiotemporal spread of temperature during the cooling period. The thermal conductivity of MRgHIFU-treated uterine fibroids was 0.47 ± 0.07 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) (range: 0.25∼0.67 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) ) which is slightly lower than the reported value for skeletal muscle at temperatures of thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo from the spatiotemporal spread of temperature around the HIFU focus during the cooling period. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. An experimental model to investigate the targeting accuracy of MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrusca, Lorena; Viallon, Magalie; Breguet, Romain; Terraz, Sylvain; Manasseh, Gibran; Auboiroux, Vincent; Goget, Thomas; Baboi, Loredana; Gross, Patrick; Sekins, K Michael; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2014-01-16

    Magnetic Resonance-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a hybrid technology that aims to offer non-invasive thermal ablation of targeted tumors or other pathological tissues. Acoustic aberrations and non-linear wave propagating effects may shift the focal point significantly away from the prescribed (or, theoretical) position. It is therefore mandatory to evaluate the spatial accuracy of ablation for a given HIFU protocol and/or device. We describe here a method for producing a user-defined ballistic target as an absolute reference marker for MRgHIFU ablations. The investigated method is based on trapping a mixture of MR contrast agent and histology stain using radiofrequency (RF) ablation causing cell death and coagulation. A dedicated RF-electrode was used for the marker fixation as follows: a RF coagulation (4 W, 15 seconds) and injection of the mixture followed by a second RF coagulation. As a result, the contrast agent/stain is encapsulated in the intercellular space. Ultrasonography imaging was performed during the procedure, while high resolution T1w 3D VIBE MR acquisition was used right after to identify the position of the ballistic marker and hence the target tissue. For some cases, after the marker fixation procedure, HIFU volumetric ablations were produced by a phased-array HIFU platform. First ex vivo experiments were followed by in vivo investigation on four rabbits in thigh muscle and six pigs in liver, with follow-up at Day 7. At the end of the procedure, no ultrasound indication of the marker's presence could be observed, while it was clearly visible under MR and could be conveniently used to prescribe the HIFU ablation, centered on the so-created target. The marker was identified at Day 7 after treatment, immediately after animal sacrifice, after 3 weeks of post-mortem formalin fixation and during histology analysis. Its size ranged between 2.5 and 4 mm. Experimental validation of this new ballistic marker method was performed for

  14. Basic study on ultrasonic monitoring using 1.5-dimensional ultrasound phased array for ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    We have been studying a real-time detection method for tissue changes induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment using ultrasonic RF signals. It has been difficult to track the target region when the tissue to be treated deviates from the imaging plane along the elevation axis of the probe. In this study, a new 1.5-dimensional (1.5D) prototype phased array probe consisting of transducer elements along both the lateral and elevation axes was developed to track tissue motion along the elevation axis of the probe, and the elevational displacement range where the tracking is effective was investigated. The complex cross-correlation coefficient based on a block matching algorithm was applied to 2.5D volumetric RF images acquired by the 1.5D probe and the displacement vector along the elevation axis was calculated. From the results, it was found that the effective tracking range using this prototype probe was up to 3 mm, about 3 times that of a conventional 1D imaging probe. The proposed 1.5D phased array probe has the potential to track target tissue with intrafractional motion.

  15. [Neuroprotective subthalamotomy in Parkinson's disease. The role of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in early surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guridi, Jorge; Marigil, Miguel; Becerra, Victoria; Parras, Olga

    Subthalamic nucleus hyperactivity in Parkinson's disease may be a very early phenomenon. Its start is not well known, and it may occur during the pre-symptomatic disease stage. Glutamatergic hyperactivity may be neurotoxic over the substantia nigra compacta dopaminergic neurons. If this occurred, the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, should affect the neurons that maintain a high turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Would a subthalamic nucleus lesion decrease this hyperactivity and thus be considered as a neuroprotective mechanism for dopaminergic neurons? The authors hypothesise about the possibility to perform surgery on a subthalamic nucleus lesion at a very early stage in order to avoid the neurotoxic glutamatergic effect over the dopaminergic neurons, and therefore be considered as a neuroprotective surgery able to alter the progress of the disease during early motor symptoms. In this regard, magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound techniques open a new window in the stereotactic armamentarium. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. First clinical experience with a dedicated MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound system for breast cancer ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merckel, Laura G.; Knuttel, Floor M.; Peters, Nicky H.G.M.; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, Utrecht (Netherlands); Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dalen, Thijs van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schubert, Gerald [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands); Weits, Teun [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vaessen, Paul H.H.B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Anesthesiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gorp, Joost M.H.H. van [Diakonessenhuis Utrecht, Department of Pathology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To assess the safety and feasibility of MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation in breast cancer patients using a dedicated breast platform. Patients with early-stage invasive breast cancer underwent partial tumour ablation prior to surgical resection. MR-HIFU ablation was performed using proton resonance frequency shift MR thermometry and an MR-HIFU system specifically designed for breast tumour ablation. The presence and extent of tumour necrosis was assessed by histopathological analysis of the surgical specimen. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess the relationship between sonication parameters, temperature increase and size of tumour necrosis at histopathology. Ten female patients underwent MR-HIFU treatment. No skin redness or burns were observed in any of the patients. No correlation was found between the applied energy and the temperature increase. In six patients, tumour necrosis was observed with a maximum diameter of 3-11 mm. In these patients, the number of targeted locations was equal to the number of areas with tumour necrosis. A good correlation was found between the applied energy and the size of tumour necrosis at histopathology (Pearson = 0.76, p = 0.002). Our results show that MR-HIFU ablation with the dedicated breast system is safe and results in histopathologically proven tumour necrosis. (orig.)

  17. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential into the Brain using MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etame, Arnold B.; Diaz, Roberto J.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Smith, Christian A.; Mainprize, Todd G.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Rutka, James T.

    2014-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major impediment to the delivery of therapeutics into the central nervous system (CNS). Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been successfully employed in multiple potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications outside the CNS. However, AuNPs have very limited biodistribution within the CNS following intravenous administration. Magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a novel technique that can transiently increase BBB permeability allowing delivery of therapeutics into the CNS. MRgFUS has not been previously employed for delivery of AuNPs into the CNS. This work represents the first demonstration of focal enhanced delivery of AuNPs into the CNS using MRgFUS in a rat model both safely and effectively. Histologic visualization and analytical quantification of AuNPs within the brain parenchyma suggest BBB transgression. These results suggest a role for MRgFUS in the delivery of AuNPs with therapeutic potential into the CNS for targeting neurological diseases. PMID:22349099

  18. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  19. A comparison of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound for the treatment of uterine fibroids in patients with an anteverted uterus and a retroverted uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyi; He, Min; Huang, Guohua; He, Jia

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the treatment outcomes of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) for uterine fibroids in patients with an anteverted uterus versus a retroverted uterus. Based on the principles of statistics we enrolled 221patients with an anteverted uterus and 221 with a retroverted uterus. All patients had a solitary uterine fibroid and every fibroid was identified as hypointense on the T2 weighted images (T2WI) on magnetic resonance. The baseline characteristics of the patients, treatment results and adverse events were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The average non-perfused volume ratio of fibroids was 85.2 ± 18.7% in the group of patients with a retroverted uterus, while it was 87.7 ± 11.8% in patients with an anteverted uterus (P uterus were treated using lower sonication power and longer sonication time. During the procedure patients with a retroverted uterus had a higher incidence of sciatic/buttock pain and groin pain, while patients with an anteverted uterus complained of lower abdominal pain or a burning sensation on the skin. Immediately after USgHIFU, the rates of sciatic/buttock pain and skin burn were significantly higher in patients with a retroverted uterus. The results of this study indicated that uterine fibroids with hypointensity on T2WI in a retroverted uterus can be safely and effectively treated with USgHIFU. However, the fibroids in an anteverted uterus are easier to treat with USgHIFU.

  20. T1-weighted MRI as a substitute to CT for refocusing planning in MR-guided focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintermark, Max; Sumer, Suna; Lau, Benison; Cupino, Alan; Tustison, Nicholas J; Demartini, Nicholas; Elias, William J; Kassell, Neal; Patrie, James T; Xin, Wenjun; Eames, Matt; Snell, John; Hananel, Arik; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    Precise focusing is essential for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to minimize collateral damage to non-diseased tissues and to achieve temperatures capable of inducing coagulative necrosis at acceptable power deposition levels. CT is usually used for this refocusing but requires a separate study (CT) ahead of the TcMRgFUS procedure. The goal of this study was to determine whether MRI using an appropriate sequence would be a viable alternative to CT for planning ultrasound refocusing in TcMRgFUS. We tested three MRI pulse sequences (3D T1 weighted 3D volume interpolated breath hold examination (VIBE), proton density weighted 3D sampling perfection with applications optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution and 3D true fast imaging with steady state precision T2-weighted imaging) on patients who have already had a CT scan performed. We made detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the MRI data and compared those so-called ‘virtual CT’ to detailed measurements of the calvarial structure based on the CT data, used as a reference standard. We then loaded both standard and virtual CT in a TcMRgFUS device and compared the calculated phase correction values, as well as the temperature elevation in a phantom. A series of Bland–Altman measurement agreement analyses showed T1 3D VIBE as the optimal MRI sequence, with respect to minimizing the measurement discrepancy between the MRI derived total skull thickness measurement and the CT derived total skull thickness measurement (mean measurement discrepancy: 0.025; 95% CL (−0.22–0.27); p = 0.825). The T1-weighted sequence was also optimal in estimating skull CT density and skull layer thickness. The mean difference between the phase shifts calculated with the standard CT and the virtual CT reconstructed from the T1 dataset was 0.08 ± 1.2 rad on patients and 0.1 ± 0.9 rad on phantom. Compared to the real CT, the MR-based correction showed a 1 °C drop on the

  1. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Partanen, A [Philips Healthcare, Andover, Massachusetts (United States); Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E [Acoustic MedSystems Inc., Savoy, IL (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  2. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, N; Partanen, A; Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E; Farahani, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  3. MR-guided high-focused ultrasound for renal sympathetic denervation-a feasibility study in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Heckmann, Lilian; Beck, Alexander; Stolzenburg, Nicola; Schnorr, Jörg; Kamp, Julia; Rinnenthal, Jan L; Hamm, Bernd; Günther, Rolf W; Streitparth, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation has recently gained clinical relevance for the treatment of therapy-resistant hypertension. Denervation is currently mainly performed using catheter-based transarterial radiofrequency ablation of periarterial sympathetic nerve fibers. Since this approach has numerous limitations, we conducted a study to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided high-focused ultrasound (MRgHiFUS) for renal sympathetic denervation in pigs as an alternative to catheter-based ablation. Renal periarterial MRgHiFUS was performed under general anesthesia in ten pigs. Blood pressure measurements and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the kidneys, renal arteries, and surrounding structures were obtained immediately before and after the interventions and after 4 weeks. Histological examinations of periarterial tissues and determination of renal norepinephrine (NE) concentration were performed to assess treatment efficacy. In each pig, 9.8 ± 2.6 sonications with a mean energy deposition of 2,670 ± 486 J were performed. The procedure was well tolerated by all pigs. No major complications occurred. MRgHiFUS induced periarterial edema in three pigs, but only one pig showed corresponding histological changes. The NE level of the treated kidney was lower in five pigs (-8% to -38%) compared to the untreated side. Overall, there was no significant difference between the NE values of both kidneys in any of the treated pigs. Postinterventional MRI indicated absorption of ultrasound energy at the transverse process and fascia. MRgHiFUS had some thermal periarterial effects but failed to induce renal denervation. Insufficient energy deposition is most likely attributable to a small acoustic window with beam path impediment in the porcine model. Since HiFUS treatment in humans is expected to be easier to perform due to better access to renal sympathetic nerves, further studies of this method are desirable to investigate the

  4. Intrapleural fluid infusion for MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation in the liver dome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijlemans, Joost W; de Greef, Martijn; Schubert, Gerald; Moonen, Chrit T W; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Ries, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of tumors in the liver dome is challenging because of the presence of air in the costophrenic angle. In this study, we used a porcine liver model and a clinical MR-HIFU system to assess the feasibility and safety of using intrapleural fluid infusion (IPI) to create an acoustic window for MR-HIFU ablation in the liver dome. Healthy adult Dalland land pigs (n = 6) under general anesthesia were used with animal committee approval. Degassed saline (200-800 mL) was infused into the intrapleural space under ultrasound guidance. A clinical 1.5-T MR-HIFU system was used to perform sonications (4-mm treatment cells, 300-450 W, 20-30 seconds) in the liver dome under real-time MR thermometry. An intercostal firing technique was used to prevent rib heating in one experiment. Technical success was defined as a temperature increase (>10°C) in the target area. After termination, the animal was examined for thermal damage to liver, diaphragm, pleura, lung, or intercostal muscle. An acoustic window was established in all animals. A temperature increase in the target area was achieved in all animals (max. 47°C-67°C). MR thermometry showed no heating outside the target area. Intercostal firing effectively reduced rib heating (55°C vs. 42°C). Postmortem examination revealed no unwanted thermal damage. One complication occurred, in the first experiment, because of an ill-suited needle (displacement of the needle). The results indicate that IPI may be used safely to assist MR-HIFU ablation of tumors in the liver dome. For reliable tissue coagulation, IPI must be combined with an intercostal sonication technique. Considering the proportion of patients with tumors in the liver dome, IPI widens the applicability of MR-HIFU ablation for liver tumors considerably. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-E-J-162: Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Bone Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop and verify our quality assurance (QA) procedures to ensure the safety and efficacy of MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of bone metastases. Methods: A practical QA program was developed. Monthly and daily QA (DQA) procedures were performed. The major QA items included the checks of the machine hardware, software and patient safety features. Briefly, these checks/tests include: 1) the cooling system reservoir and treatment table; 2) power to the treatment table; 3) the MR coil; 4) the transducer position with MRI; 5) image display on the treatment work station; 6) the effective focal spot in 3 directions using MR thermometry; and 7) all the safety devices including a sonication lamp, and the emergency stop-sonication switches. In order to avoid patient skin burn, it is important to remove gas bubbles in the interfaces between the treatment table and the gel pad, and the gel pad and patients skin during the patient setup. Our QA procedures have been verified and evaluated through patient treatments. Seven patients with scapula, humeral head, sacrum, ilium, pubic ramus and acetabular bone metastases were treated using MRgFUS. Results: Our study showed that all seven patients tolerated the MRgFUS treatment well. No skin toxicity or other complications were observed. The pain score (0–10) using the visual analog scale (VAS) was significantly reduced from 8.0 ± 1.1 before treatment to 4.7 ± 3.0, 3.0 ± 1.5, 3.2 ± 2.8 and 3.4 ± 1.5 at one day, one month, two months and three months after the MRgFUS treatment, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrated that with the appropriate QA procedures, MRgFUS is a safe, effective and noninvasive treatment modality for palliation of bone metastases

  6. SU-E-T-245: MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Increased PARP Related Apoptosis On Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Cvetkovic, D; Gupta, R; Yang, D; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated that significant tumor growth delay was observed in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. Temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level, which is the intensity of the DAB reaction. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality might be able to synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better result.

  7. SU-F-J-225: Histology Study of MR Guided Pulsed Focused Ultrasound On Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated significant tumor growth delay in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. The temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level using the DAB analysis software. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality may synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better therapeutic result.

  8. Histopathology of breast cancer after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound and radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuttel, Floortje M; Waaijer, Laurien; Merckel, Laura G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Witkamp, Arjen J; Deckers, Roel; van Diest, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) are being researched as possible substitutes for surgery in breast cancer patients. The histopathological appearance of ablated tissue has not been studied in great detail. This study aimed to compare histopathological features of breast cancer after MR-HIFU ablation and RFA. MR-HIFU ablation and RFA were performed in- and ex-vivo. Tumours in six mastectomy specimens were partially ablated with RFA or MR-HIFU. In-vivo MR-HIFU ablation was performed 3-6 days before excision; RFA was performed in the operation room. Tissue was fixed in formalin and processed to haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and cytokeratin-8 (CK-8)-stained slides. Morphology and cell viability were assessed. Ex-vivo ablation resulted in clear morphological changes after RFA versus subtle differences after MR-HIFU. CK-8 staining was decreased or absent. H&E tended to underestimate the size of thermal damage. In-vivo MR-HIFU resulted in necrotic-like changes. Surprisingly, some ablated lesions were CK-8-positive. Histopathology after in-vivo RFA resembled ex-vivo RFA, with hyper-eosinophilic stroma and elongated nuclei. Lesion borders were sharp after MR-HIFU and indistinct after RFA. Histopathological differences between MR-HIFU-ablated tissue and RF-ablated tissue were demonstrated. CK-8 was more reliable for cell viability assessment than H&E when used directly after ablation, while H&E was more reliable in ablated tissue left in situ for a few days. Our results contribute to improved understanding of histopathological features in breast cancer lesions treated with minimally invasive ablative techniques. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping during magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waspe, Adam C.; Looi, Thomas; Mougenot, Charles; Amaral, Joao; Temple, Michael; Sivaloganathan, Siv; Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, ON, L6C 2S3 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8 (Canada)

    2012-11-28

    Focal bone tumor treatments include amputation, limb-sparing surgical excision with bone reconstruction, and high-dose external-beam radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is an effective non-invasive thermotherapy for palliative management of bone metastases pain. MR thermometry (MRT) measures the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) of water molecules and produces accurate (<1 Degree-Sign C) and dynamic (<5s) thermal maps in soft tissues. PRFS-MRT is ineffective in fatty tissues such as yellow bone marrow and, since accurate temperature measurements are required in the bone to ensure adequate thermal dose, MR-HIFU is not indicated for primary bone tumor treatments. Magnetic relaxation times are sensitive to lipid temperature and we hypothesize that bone marrow temperature can be determined accurately by measuring changes in T{sub 2}, since T{sub 2} increases linearly in fat during heating. T{sub 2}-mapping using dual echo times during a dynamic turbo spin-echo pulse sequence enabled rapid measurement of T{sub 2}. Calibration of T{sub 2}-based thermal maps involved heating the marrow in a bovine femur and simultaneously measuring T{sub 2} and temperature with a thermocouple. A positive T{sub 2} temperature dependence in bone marrow of 20 ms/ Degree-Sign C was observed. Dynamic T{sub 2}-mapping should enable accurate temperature monitoring during MR-HIFU treatment of bone marrow and shows promise for improving the safety and reducing the invasiveness of pediatric bone tumor treatments.

  10. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2014-07-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 s using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650 kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could potentially be used to reduce the time and/or acoustic intensity required for HIFU-mediated heating, thereby increasing the feasibility and clinical efficacy of HIFU thermal ablation therapy.

  11. Biomechanical properties of bone treated by magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound - an in vivo porcine model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Amir; Avivi, Eran; Brosh, Tamar; Schwartz, Ignat; Liberman, Boaz

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system uses MR imaging for real-time aiming of thermal ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors. Past clinical studies showed no increase in fracture rate after MRgFUS treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of MRgFUS treatment on mechanical properties of bone and correlate the effect to histological findings of treated bone. Four fully grown mini-pigs were treated by MRgFUS. Six consecutive right normal ribs were treated in each animal, and the left corresponding ribs served as controls. The animals were sacrificed at pre-set intervals (0, 2, 6 and 12weeks after treatment), and the treated and control bones were extracted. Mechanical properties of each bone were examined using three points bending studies for comparing treated bones to the corresponding controls. Histologic properties using Masson and hematoxylin-eosin stains were also compared. The ratio between treated and control biomechanical properties showed reduction in bone biomechanical properties at 6weeks post-MRgFUS treatment. The mean±SD yield load ratio and maximum ratios were 0.69±0.11 and 0.71±0.13, respectively (both p=0.031). These findings showed some recovery trend at 12weeks after treatment. Histological analysis showed a reduction in mean osteon size at 2weeks after treatment (0.58×10(-3)±0.1×10(-3)mm and 0.16×10(-3)±0.017×10(-3)mm) in control vs. treated bones, respectively (p=0.005). Treatment with the MRgFUS system resulted in a ~30% reduction in mechanical strength at 6weeks post-treatment. The reduction showed a reversible trend, with a 25%-20% decrease in strength at 12weeks post-treatment. © 2013.

  12. SU-E-T-245: MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Increased PARP Related Apoptosis On Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Cvetkovic, D; Gupta, R; Yang, D; Ma, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated that significant tumor growth delay was observed in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. Temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level, which is the intensity of the DAB reaction. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality might be able to synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better result

  13. SU-F-J-225: Histology Study of MR Guided Pulsed Focused Ultrasound On Treatment of Prostate Cancer in Vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our previous study demonstrated significant tumor growth delay in the mice treated with pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU). The purpose of this study is to understand the cell killing mechanisms of pHIFU. Methods: Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP), were grown orthotopically in 17 nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were treated using pHIFU with an acoustic power of 25W, pulse width 100msec and 300 pulses in one sonication under MR guidance. Mutiple sonications were used to cover the whole tumor volume. The temperature (less than 40 degree centigrade in the focal spot) was monitored using MR thermometry. Animals were euthanized at pre-determined time points (n=2) after treatment: 0 hours; 6 hrs; 24 hrs; 48 hrs; 4 days and 7 days. Two tumorbearing mice were used as control. Three tumor-bearing mice were treated with radiation (RT, 2 Gy) using 6 MV photon beams. RT treated mice were euthanized at 0 hr, 6 hrs and 24 hrs. The tumors were processed for immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PARP (a surrogate of apoptosis). A multispectral imaging analysis system was used to quantify the expression of PARP staining. Cell apoptosis was calculated based on the PARP expression level using the DAB analysis software. Results: Our data showed that PARP related apoptosis peaked at 48 hrs and 7 days in pHIFU treated mice, which is comparable to that for the RT group at 24 hrs. The preliminary results from this study were consistent with our previous study on tumor growth delay using pHIFU. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that non-thermal pHIFU increased apoptotic tumor cell death through the PARP related pathway. MR guided pHIFU may have a great potential as a safe, noninvasive treatment modality for cancer therapy. This treatment modality may synergize with PARP inhibitors to achieve better therapeutic result.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids: impact of technology advancement on ablation volumes in 115 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumm, Christoph G; Stahl, Robert; Clevert, Dirk-André; Herzog, Peter; Mindjuk, Irene; Kornprobst, Sabine; Schwarz, Christina; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Reiser, Maximilian F; Matzko, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the advanced technology of the new ExAblate 2100 system (Insightec Ltd, Haifa, Israel) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound surgery on treatment outcomes in patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids, as measured by the nonperfused volume ratio. This is a retrospective analysis of 115 women (mean age, 42 years; range, 27-54 years) with symptomatic fibroids who consecutively underwent MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment in a single center with the new generation ExAblate 2100 system from November 2010 to June 2011. Mean ± SD total volume and number of treated fibroids (per patient) were 89 ± 94 cm and 2.2 ± 1.7, respectively. Patient baseline characteristics were analyzed regarding their impact on the resulting nonperfused volume ratio. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatment was technically successful in 115 of 123 patients (93.5%). In 8 patients, treatment was not possible because of bowel loops in the beam pathway that could not be mitigated (n = 6), patient movement (n = 1), and system malfunction (n = 1). Mean nonperfused volume ratio was 88% ± 15% (range, 38%-100%). Mean applied energy level was 5400 ± 1200 J, and mean number of sonications was 74 ± 27. No major complications occurred. Two cases of first-degree skin burn resolved within 1 week after the intervention. Of the baseline characteristics analyzed, only the planned treatment volume had a statistically significant impact on nonperfused volume ratio. With technological advancement, the outcome of MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment in terms of the nonperfused volume ratio can be enhanced with a high safety profile, markedly exceeding results reported in previous clinical trials.

  15. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS): Ablation of liver tissue in a porcine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopelman, Doron [Department of Surgery B, ' HaEmek' Medical Center, Afula, and the Technion, Israel institute of technology, Haifa (Israel)]. E-mail: Kopelman_d@clalit.org.il; Inbar, Yael [Focused Ultrasound Treatment Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Hanannel, Arik [InSightec Ltd., Tirat Hacarmel (Israel); Freundlich, David [InSightec Ltd., Tirat Hacarmel (Israel); Castel, David [Focused Ultrasound Treatment Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Perel, Azriel [Department of Anesthesiology, and intensive care, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Greenfeld, Adrian [Department of Anesthesiology, and intensive care, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Salamon, Tal [Department of Surgery B, ' HaEmek' Medical Center, Afula, and the Technion, Israel institute of technology, Haifa (Israel); Sareli, Merab [Department of Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Valeanu, Adrian [Department of Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Papa, Moshe [Department of Surgery C, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer (Israel)

    2006-08-15

    Background: Liver surgery is technically demanding and is considered a major procedure with relatively high morbidity rates. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) uses focused ultrasonic energy to create a heat coagulation lesion, which can be achieved in a totally controlled, very accurate manner (<1 mm). The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of non-invasive focal ablation of liver tissue achieved by consecutive MRgFUS sonications. Materials and methods: Six MRgFUS procedures were performed in five pigs under general anesthesia, with the ExAblate 2000 system (InSightec, Israel). Real-time imaging and temperature mapping (Signa Twinspeed 1.5T, GEHC, USA) enabled the immediate evaluation of the results of each sonication. Different foci were chosen within the liver. These mock lesions were ablated by several sonications, each of them performed during 20-30 s of apnea. Between sonications, the pigs were normally ventilated. The pigs were sacrificed 3-21 days after the procedure and their livers were examined. Results: The MRgFUS created complete tissue destruction of mock lesions in different areas of the pig's liver. The lesion sizes in each animal varied according to the number of sonications used and the extent of overlap between adjacent sonications. The lesion ranged in size from 1.5 cm x 1.5 cm x 2.0 cm to 5.5 cm x 4.5 cm x 2.0 cm. There was no morbidity. Conclusions: MRgFUS under general anesthesia is a safe, completely non-invasive technology for the ablation of liver tissue. Liver tissue can be ablated in a very accurate manner, based on the pre-treatment planning on the MR images. The MR imaging characteristics, including real-time temperature mapping, enable real-time control of every step of the ablation process. Mechanical ventilation with intermittent periods of apnea is a technique that overcomes the problem of the respiratory movements of the liver.

  16. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  17. Clinical outcome of magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) in the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamp, J.E.K.; Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Beck, A.; David, M.; Hengst, S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcome of magnetic-resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) treatment for symptomatic uterine fibroids in premenopausal women using the validated USF-QOL (Uterine Fibroid Symptom and Quality of Life) Questionnaire. Materials and Methods: 54 patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids were enrolled in this prospective study. The patients completed the UFS-QOL Questionnaire prior to MRgFUS treatment as well as after 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: The rate of technical success was 91.5 % (95.2 % after subtraction of screening errors). 6/54 patients (11 %) had other treatments (surgery, n = 4; UAE, n = 2), 8/54 (15 %) dropped out due to pregnancy, and 8/54 were lost to follow-up. The remaining group showed considerable symptom relief as early as after 3 months. The median overall quality of life score increased from 64.7 (quartile range QR: 49.8 - 77.6) before treatment to 77.6 (QR: 61.4 - 87.1) (p < 0.001), 78.4 (QR: 66.4 - 89.7) (p < 0.001), and 82.8 (QR: 69.8 - 92.2) (p < 0.001) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The corresponding median symptom severity score decreased from 46.9 (QR: 28.1 - 56.2) to 34.4 (QR: 21.9 - 43.7) at 3 months (p = 0.003) and 28.1 at 6 and 12 months (QR: 18.7 - 38.3, QR: 15.6 - 34.4) (p < 0.001, p = 0.002). The rate of complications requiring treatment was 9 %, and the rate of overall complications was 39 %. No major complications occurred. Conclusion: Our results indicate significant alleviation of fibroid-related symptoms within 12 months of MRgFUS with improvement beginning as early as 3 months after treatment. We observed no major complications, and some women became pregnant after MRgFUS. There was a low treatment failure rate of 11 %. (orig.)

  18. Effects of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation on bone mechanical properties and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sin Yuin; Arias Moreno, Andrés J; van Rietbergen, Bert; Ter Hoeve, Natalie D; van Diest, Paul J; Grüll, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for palliative treatment of bone pain. In this study, the effects of MR-HIFU ablation on bone mechanics and modeling were investigated. A total of 12 healthy rat femurs were ablated using 10 W for 46 ± 4 s per sonication with 4 sonications for each femur. At 7 days after treatments, all animals underwent MR and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Then, six animals were euthanized. At 1 month following ablations, the remaining six animals were scanned again with MR and SPECT/CT prior to euthanization. Thereafter, both the HIFU-treated and contralateral control bones of three animals from each time interval were processed for histology, whereas the remaining bones were subjected to micro-CT (μCT), three-point bending tests, and micro-finite element (micro-FE) analyses. At 7 days after HIFU ablations, edema formation around the treated bones coupled with bone marrow and cortical bone necrosis was observed on MRI and histological images. SPECT/CT and μCT images revealed presence of bone modeling through an increased uptake of (99m)Tc-MDP and formation of woven bone, respectively. At 31 days after ablations, as illustrated by imaging and histology, healing of the treated bone and the surrounding soft tissue was noted, marked by decreased in amount of tissue damage, formation of scar tissue, and sub-periosteal reaction. The results of three-point bending tests showed no significant differences in elastic stiffness, ultimate load, and yield load between the HIFU-treated and contralateral control bones at 7 days and 1 month after treatments. Similarly, the elastic stiffness and Young's moduli determined by micro-FE analyses at both time intervals were not statistically different. Multimodality imaging and histological data illustrated the presence of HIFU-induced bone damage at the cellular level, which activated the

  19. Evaluation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-polymer composite microcapsules for magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Zheng, Yuanyi; Li, Pan; Wang, Dong; Niu, Chengcheng; Gong, Yuping; Huang, Rongzhong; Wang, Zhibiao; Wang, Zhigang; Ran, Haitao

    2014-11-03

    Superparamagnetic poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-coated Fe3O4 microcapsules are receiving increased attention as potential diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in the field of oncology. In this study, PLGA-coated Fe3O4 microcapsules were combined with a magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-guided HIFU) platform, with the objective of investigating the effects of these composite microcapsules regarding MR-guided HIFU liver cancer surgery in vivo. PLGA-coated Fe3O4 microcapsules consisting of a liquid core and a PLGA-Fe3O4 shell were fabricated using a modified double emulsion evaporation method. Their acute biosafety was confirmed in vitro using MDA cells and in vivo using rabbits. To perform MR-guided HIFU surgery, the microcapsules were intravenously injected into a rabbit liver tumor model before MR-guided HIFU. T2-weighted images and MR signal intensity in normal liver parenchyma and tumor tissue were acquired before and after injection, to assess the MR imaging ability of the microcapsules. After MR-guided HIFU ablation tissue temperature mapping, the coagulative volume and histopathology of the tumor tissue were analyzed to investigate the ablation effects of MR-guided HIFUs. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed that the microcapsules displayed a spherical morphology and a shell-core structure (mean diameter, 587 nm). The hysteresis curve displayed the typical superparamagnetic properties of the microcapsules, which are critical to their application in MR-guided HIFU surgery. In MR-guided HIFU surgery, these microcapsules functioned as an MRI contrast agent, induced significant hyperthermal enhancement (P microcapsules is a potentially synergistic technique regarding the enhancement of MR-guided HIFU cancer surgery.

  20. Opening the Blood-Brain Barrier with MR Imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound: Preclinical Testing on a Trans-Human Skull Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuexi; Alkins, Ryan; Schwartz, Michael L; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a protocol in preparation for a clinical trial on opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided focused ultrasound for the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to brain tumors. Materials and Methods The procedures were approved by the institutional animal care committee. A trans-human skull porcine model was designed for the preclinical testing. Wide craniotomies were applied in 11 pigs (weight, approximately 15 kg). A partial human skull was positioned over the animal's brain. A modified clinical MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound brain system was used with a 3.0-T MR unit. The ultrasound beam was steered during sonications over a 3 × 3 grid at 3-mm spacing. Acoustic power levels of 3-20 W were tested. Bolus injections of microbubbles at 4 μL/kg were tested for each sonication. Levels of BBB opening, hemorrhage, and cavitation signal were measured with MR imaging, histologic examination, and cavitation receivers, respectively. A cavitation safety algorithm was developed on the basis of logistic regression of the measurements and tested to minimize the risk of hemorrhage. Results BBB openings of approximately 1 cm 3 in volume were visualized with gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging after sonication at an acoustic power of approximately 5 W. Gross examination of histologic specimens helped confirm Evans blue (bound to macromolecule albumin) extravasation, and hematoxylin-eosin staining helped detect only scattered extravasation of red blood cells. In cases where cavitation signals were higher than thresholds, sonications were terminated immediately without causing hemorrhage. Conclusion With a trans-human skull porcine model, this study demonstrated BBB opening with a 230-kHz system in preparation for a clinical trial. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  1. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi; Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao; Zhou Kun; Chen Li; Peng Song; Zhu Hui; Zou Huiling; Bai Jin; Wang Zhibiao

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 ± 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 ± 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 ± 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm 3 . According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 ± 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 ± 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm 3 , slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 ± 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm 3 , the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 ± 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 ± 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60.0%) in average, with paired t

  2. Feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for ablating uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lian; Chen Wenzhi [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Liu Yinjiang; Hu Xiao [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zhou Kun [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Chen Li [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Peng Song; Zhu Hui [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); Zou Huiling [National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Bai Jin [Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang Zhibiao [Clinical Center for Tumour Therapy of 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400010 (China); National Engineering Research Center of Ultrasound Medicine, Chongqing 400010 (China); Institute of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences, Chongqing 400016 (China)], E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapeutic ablation of uterine fibroids in patients with bowel lies anterior to uterus. Materials and methods: Twenty-one patients with 23 uterine fibroids underwent MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment, with a mean age of 39.4 {+-} 6.9 (20-49) years, with fibroids average measuring 6.0 {+-} 1.6 (range, 2.9-9.5) cm in diameter. After being compressed with a degassed water balloon on abdominal wall, MR imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound treatment was performed under conscious sedation by using fentanyl and midazolam. This procedure was performed by a Haifu JM focused ultrasound tumour therapeutic system (JM2.5C, Chongqing Haifu Technology Co., Ltd., China), in combination with a 1.5-Tesla MRI system (Symphony, Siemens, Germany), which provides real-time guidance and control. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed to evaluate the efficacy of thermal ablation immediately and 3 months after HIFU treatment. The treatment time and adverse events were recorded. Results: The mean fibroid volume was 97.0 {+-} 78.3 (range, 12.7-318.3) cm{sup 3}. According to the treatment plan, an average 75.0 {+-} 11.4% (range, 37.8-92.4%) of the fibroid volume was treated. The mean fibroid volume immediately after HIFU was 109.7 {+-} 93.1 (range, 11.9-389.6) cm{sup 3}, slightly enlarged because of edema. The average non-perfused volume was 83.3 {+-} 71.7 (range, 7.7-282.9) cm{sup 3}, the average fractional ablation, which was defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume immediately after HIFU treatment, was 76.9 {+-} 18.7% (range, 21.0-97.0%). There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment volume and the non-perfused volume. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 months obtained in 12 patients, the fibroid volume decreased by 31.4 {+-} 29.3% (range, -1.9 to 60

  3. Non-Invasive, Focal Disconnection of Brain Circuitry Using Magnetic Resonance-Guided Low-Intensity Focused Ultrasound to Deliver a Neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanrong; Tan, Hongying; Bertram, Edward H; Aubry, Jean-François; Lopes, Maria-Beatriz; Roy, Jack; Dumont, Erik; Xie, Mingxing; Zuo, Zhiyi; Klibanov, Alexander L; Lee, Kevin S; Wintermark, Max

    2016-09-01

    Disturbances in the function of neuronal circuitry contribute to most neurologic disorders. As knowledge of the brain's connectome continues to improve, a more refined understanding of the role of specific circuits in pathologic states will also evolve. Tools capable of manipulating identified circuits in a targeted and restricted manner will be essential not only to expand our understanding of the functional roles of such circuits, but also to therapeutically disconnect critical pathways contributing to neurologic disease. This study took advantage of the ability of low-intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver a neurotoxin with poor BBB permeability (quinolinic acid [QA]) in a guided manner to a target region in the brain parenchyma. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups receiving the following treatments: (i) magnetic resonance-guided FUS + microbubbles + saline (n = 5), or (ii) magnetic resonance-guided FUS + microbubbles + QA (n = 5). Systemic administration of QA was well tolerated. However, when QA and microbubbles were systemically administered in conjunction with magnetic resonance-guided FUS, the BBB was disrupted and primary neurons were destroyed in the targeted subregion of the hippocampus in all QA-treated animals. Administration of vehicle (saline) together with microbubbles and FUS also disrupted the BBB but did not produce neuronal injury. These findings indicate the feasibility of non-invasively destroying a targeted region of the brain parenchyma using low-intensity FUS together with systemic administration of microbubbles and a neurotoxin. This approach could be of therapeutic value in various disorders in which disturbances of neural circuitry contribute to neurologic disease. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Gold Nanoparticle-Mediated-Enhanced Hyperthermia Using MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Surendra B; Myers, Matthew R; Lanier, Mathew; Dumoulin, Charles; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2017-04-12

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has gained increasing popularity as a noninvasive therapeutic procedure to treat solid tumors. However, collateral damage due to the use of high acoustic powers during HIFU procedures remains a challenge. The objective of this study is to assess the utility of using gold nanoparticles (gNPs) during HIFU procedures to locally enhance heating at low powers, thereby reducing the likelihood of collateral damage. Phantoms containing tissue-mimicking material (TMM) and physiologically relevant concentrations (0%, 0.0625%, and 0.125%) of gNPs were fabricated. Sonications at acoustic powers of 10, 15, and 20 W were performed for a duration of 16 s using an MR-HIFU system. Temperature rises and lesion volumes were calculated and compared for phantoms with and without gNPs. For an acoustic power of 10 W, the maximum temperature rise increased by 32% and 43% for gNPs concentrations of 0.0625% and 0.125%, respectively, when compared to the 0% gNPs concentration. For the power of 15 W, a lesion volume of 0, 44.5 ± 7, and 63.4 ± 32 mm 3 was calculated for the gNPs concentration of 0%, 0.0625%, and 0.125%, respectively. For a power of 20 W, it was found that the lesion volume doubled and tripled for concentrations of 0.0625% and 0.125% gNPs, respectively, when compared to the concentration of 0% gNPs. We conclude that gNPs have the potential to locally enhance the heating and reduce damage to healthy tissue during tumor ablation using HIFU.

  5. Focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative parathormone monitoring: The value of PTH assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration washout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Fatih; Arpaci, Dilek; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Emre, Ali Ugur; Elri, Tarik; Ilikhan, Sevil Uygun; Bahadir, Burak; Bayraktaoglu, Taner

    2016-03-01

    The accurate identification of hyperfunctioning parathyroid (HP) gland is the only issue for definitive surgical treatment in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Various imaging and operative techniques have been proposed to confirm the localization of the diseased gland. Nevertheless, none of these methods proved to be the gold standard. The presented study aimed to assess the value of parathyroid hormone assay in preoperative ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)-PTH washout fluid to verify the correct localisation for focused parathyroidectomy without intra-operative PTH monitoring. The retrospective analysis of 57 patients with pHPT who underwent FNA-PTH was conducted from a prospective database. Biochemical assessment together with radiological (ultrasonography) and nuclear (MIBI scan) imaging was reviewed. Associations between FNA-PTH washout values and localization technics were evaluated and compared in terms of operative findings. Focused parathyroidectomy without intraoperative PTH monitoring was performed to 45 patients with high FNA-PTH values. The median largest diameter of the target parathyroid lesion identified by ultrasonography was 13 mm (range, 6 to 36). The median serum PTH level was 190 pg/mL (range, 78 to 1709; reference range, 15 to 65) whereas the median washout PTH was 2500 pg/mL (range, 480 to 3389). According to operative findings high FNA-PTH levels correctly identified parathyroid adenoma in 40 cases (89% of sensitivity and 100% of specificity and positive predictive value) whereas MIBI scan localized the lesion in 36 of these cases (80% of sensitivity). The higher level of PTH in preoperative ultrasound guided FNA washout is a considerable data to predict the correct localization of HP, particularly in circumstances of greater values than the serum PTH level. However, although its specificity is high, in cases of coexisting nodular thyroid disease, associated additional HP might be missed at focused parathyroidectomy

  6. A dual-mode hemispherical sparse array for 3D passive acoustic mapping and skull localization within a clinical MRI guided focused ultrasound device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Brinker, Spencer T.; Coviello, Christian M.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that passive acoustic imaging may be used alongside MRI for monitoring of focused ultrasound therapy. However, past implementations have generally made use of either linear arrays originally designed for diagnostic imaging or custom narrowband arrays specific to in-house therapeutic transducer designs, neither of which is fully compatible with clinical MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) devices. Here we have designed an array which is suitable for use within an FDA-approved MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound device, within the bore of a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The array is constructed from 5  ×  0.4 mm piezoceramic disc elements arranged in pseudorandom fashion on a low-profile laser-cut acrylic frame designed to fit between the therapeutic elements of a 230 kHz InSightec ExAblate 4000 transducer. By exploiting thickness and radial resonance modes of the piezo discs the array is capable of both B-mode imaging at 5 MHz for skull localization, as well as passive reception at the second harmonic of the therapy array for detection of cavitation and 3D passive acoustic imaging. In active mode, the array was able to perform B-mode imaging of a human skull, showing the outer skull surface with good qualitative agreement with MR imaging. Extension to 3D showed the array was able to locate the skull within  ±2 mm/2° of reference points derived from MRI, which could potentially allow registration of a patient to the therapy system without the expense of real-time MRI. In passive mode, the array was able to resolve a point source in 3D within a  ±10 mm region about each axis from the focus, detect cavitation (SNR ~ 12 dB) at burst lengths from 10 cycles to continuous wave, and produce 3D acoustic maps in a flow phantom. Finally, the array was used to detect and map cavitation associated with microbubble activity in the brain in nonhuman primates.

  7. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Boiling histotripsy lesion characterization on a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided high intensity focused ultrasound system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Eranki

    Full Text Available High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is a non-invasive therapeutic technique that can thermally ablate tumors. Boiling histotripsy (BH is a HIFU approach that can emulsify tissue in a few milliseconds. Lesion volume and temperature effects for different BH sonication parameters are currently not well characterized. In this work, lesion volume, temperature distribution, and area of lethal thermal dose were characterized for varying BH sonication parameters in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMP and demonstrated in ex vivo tissues.The following BH sonication parameters were varied using a clinical MR-HIFU system (Sonalleve V2, Philips, Vantaa, Finland: acoustic power, number of cycles/pulse, total sonication time, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF. A 3×3×3 pattern was sonicated inside TMP's and ex vivo tissues. Post sonication, lesion volumes were quantified using 3D ultrasonography and temperature and thermal dose distributions were analyzed offline. Ex vivo tissues were sectioned and stained with H&E post sonication to assess tissue damage.Significant increase in lesion volume was observed while increasing the number of cycles/pulse and PRF. Other sonication parameters had no significant effect on lesion volume. Temperature full width at half maximum at the end of sonication increased significantly with all parameters except total sonication time. Positive correlation was also found between lethal thermal dose and lesion volume for all parameters except number of cycles/pulse. Gross pathology of ex vivo tissues post sonication displayed either completely or partially damaged tissue at the focal region. Surrounding tissues presented sharp boundaries, with little or no structural damage to adjacent critical structures such as bile duct and nerves.Our characterization of effects of HIFU sonication parameters on the resulting lesion demonstrates the ability to control lesion morphologic and thermal characteristics with a clinical MR-HIFU system in

  9. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  10. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W.; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  11. MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis low back pain - case series of an innovative new technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, Evan M.; Platt, Michael W. [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Gedroyc, Wladyslaw [St Mary' s Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) to treat facet joint osteoarthritis pain. Patients with a positive response to facet joint interventions were recruited from Pain and Spinal Clinics. Treatments were performed at the levels of pain according to symptomatology, previous invasive treatment and MRI grading of facet joint osteoarthritis. Both safety and efficacy data were collected. Pain palliation was evaluated using a validated pain numerical rating scale (NRS), Oswestry disability questionnaire (ODQ), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score Eighteen patients were treated. There were no major adverse events. At 6/12 we found a reduction in both the NRS (average/worst) pain scores (60.2 %/51.2 %). This was associated with 45.9 % improvement in the ODQ score and 61.9 % reduction in the BPI interference score. We observed an improvement in the EuroQol (EQ-5D) health state score based on UK coefficients of +0.379 (0.317 to 0.696). Our phase I observational pilot study has evaluated an innovative new technique that is both non-invasive and radiation free. It is the first description of this procedure in the literature. In all patients the technique was safe, free of complications, effective and well tolerated. (orig.)

  12. MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of bone: evaluation of acute findings with MR and CT imaging in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Rieke, Viola; Do, Loi; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M; Saeed, Maythem

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate hyperacute (guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) in a swine bone model as a function of sonication number and energy. Experimental procedures received approval from the local Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. MRgHIFU was used to create distal and proximal ablations in the right femur of eight pigs. Each target was dosed with four or six sonications within similar volumes. The energy dosed to the distal target was higher (419 ± 19 J) than the proximal target (324 ± 17 J). The targeted femur and contralateral control were imaged before and after ablation using MR at 3T. Qualitative changes in signal on T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and T1-weighted postcontrast images were assessed. Ablation dimensions were calculated from postcontrast MRI. The 64-slice CT images were also obtained before and after ablation and qualitative changes were assessed. MRgHIFU bone ablation size measured on average 8.5 × 21.1 × 16.2 mm (transverse × craniocaudal × anteroposterior). Interestingly, within similar prescribed volumes, increasing the number of sonications from 4 to 6 increased the depth of the intramedullary hypoenhanced zone from 2.9 mm to 6.5 mm (P bone. Unlike CT, T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced MR demonstrated the hyperacute structural changes in the femur and surrounding soft tissue. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Treatment of Movement Disorders With Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Fishman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the use of ultrasound as a potential therapeutic modality in the brain has been under study for several decades, relatively few neuroscientists or neurologists are familiar with this technology. Stereotactic brain lesioning had been widely used as a treatment for medically refractory patients with essential tremor (ET, Parkinson disease (PD, and dystonia but has been largely replaced by deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery, with advantages both in safety and efficacy. However, DBS is associated with complications including intracerebral hemorrhage, infection, and hardware malfunction. The occurrence of these complications has spurred interest in less invasive stereotactic brain lesioning methods including magnetic resonance imaging–guided high intensity–focused ultrasound (FUS surgery. Engineering advances now allow sound waves to be targeted noninvasively through the skull to a brain target. High intensities of sonic energy can create a coagulation lesion similar to that of older radiofrequency stereotactic methods, but without opening the skull, recent Food and Drug Administration approval of unilateral thalamotomy for treatment of ET. Clinical studies of stereotactic FUS for aspects of PD are underway. Moderate intensity, pulsed FUS has also demonstrated the potential to safely open the blood-brain barrier for localized delivery of therapeutics including proteins, genes, and cell-based therapy for PD and related disorders. The goal of this review is to provide basic and clinical neuroscientists with a level of understanding to interact with medical physicists, biomedical engineers, and radiologists to accelerate the application of this powerful technology to brain disease

  14. Head phantoms for transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D C; Farnum, Mercy; Khaled, Mohamad; Elias, W Jeff; Hananel, Arik; Snell, John W; Kassell, Neal F; Aubry, Jean-Francois

    2015-04-01

    In the ongoing endeavor of fine-tuning, the clinical application of transcranial MR-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS), ex-vivo studies wlkiith whole human skulls are of great use in improving the underlying technology guiding the accurate and precise thermal ablation of clinically relevant targets in the human skull. Described here are the designs, methods for fabrication, and notes on utility of three different ultrasound phantoms to be used for brain focused ultrasound research. Three different models of phantoms are developed and tested to be accurate, repeatable experimental options to provide means to further this research. The three models are a cadaver, a gel-filled skull, and a head mold containing a skull and filled with gel that mimics the brain and the skin. Each was positioned in a clinical tcMRgFUS system and sonicated at 1100 W (acoustic) for 12 s at different locations. Maximum temperature rise as measured by MR thermometry was recorded and compared against clinical data for a similar neurosurgical target. Results are presented as heating efficiency in units (°C/kW/s) for direct comparison to available clinical data. The procedure for casting thermal phantom material is presented. The utility of each phantom model is discussed in the context of various tcMRgFUS research areas. The cadaveric phantom model, gel-filled skull model, and full head phantom model had heating efficiencies of 5.3, 4.0, and 3.9 °C/(kW/s), respectively, compared to a sample clinical heating efficiency of 2.6 °C/(kW/s). In the seven research categories considered, the cadaveric phantom model was the most versatile, though less practical compared to the ex-vivo skull-based phantoms. Casting thermal phantom material was shown to be an effective way to prepare tissue-mimicking material for the phantoms presented. The phantom models presented are all useful in tcMRgFUS research, though some are better suited to a limited subset of applications depending on the researchers

  15. Preservation of the endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-sun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Uterine Fibroid Integrated Management Center, MINT Intervention Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyo Keun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sin-Ho [SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Hyun [Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Biostatistics Team, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the integrity of endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids based on contrast-enhanced MRI findings, and to identify the risk factors for endometrial impairment. In total, 117 submucosal fibroids (diameter: 5.9 ± 3.0 cm) in 101 women (age: 43.6 ± 4.4 years) treated with MR-HIFU ablation were retrospectively analysed. Endometrial integrity was assessed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images at immediate (n = 101), 3-month (n = 62) and 12-month (n = 15) follow-ups. Endometrial impairment was classified into grades 0 (continuous endometrium), 1 (pin-point, full-thickness discontinuity), 2 (between grade 1 and 3), or 3 (full-thickness discontinuity >1 cm). Risk factors were assessed with generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Among 117 fibroids, grades 0, 1, 2 and 3 endometrial impairments were observed at initial examination in 56.4%, 24.8%, 13.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Among 37 fibroid cases of endometrial impairment for which follow-ups were conducted, 30 showed improvements at 3- and/or 12-month follow-up. GEE analysis revealed the degree of endometrial protrusion was significantly associated with severity of endometrial injury (P < 0.0001). After MR-HIFU ablation of submucosal fibroids, endometrial enhancement was preserved intact or minimally impaired in most cases. Impaired endometrium, which is more common after treating endometrially-protruded fibroids, may recover spontaneously. (orig.)

  16. Improving Thermal Dose Accuracy in Magnetic Resonance-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery: Long-Term Thermometry Using a Prior Baseline as a Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Rachel R.; Webb, Taylor D.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Ghanouni, Pejman

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate thermal dose volume (TDV) and non-perfused volume (NPV) of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatments in patients with soft tissue tumors, and describe a method for MR thermal dosimetry using a baseline reference. Materials and Methods Agreement between TDV and immediate post treatment NPV was evaluated from MRgFUS treatments of five patients with biopsy-proven desmoid tumors. Thermometry data (gradient echo, 3T) were analyzed over the entire course of the treatments to discern temperature errors in the standard approach. The technique searches previously acquired baseline images for a match using 2D normalized cross-correlation and a weighted mean of phase difference images. Thermal dose maps and TDVs were recalculated using the matched baseline and compared to NPV. Results TDV and NPV showed between 47%–91% disagreement, using the standard immediate baseline method for calculating TDV. Long-term thermometry showed a nonlinear local temperature accrual, where peak additional temperature varied between 4–13°C (mean = 7.8°C) across patients. The prior baseline method could be implemented by finding a previously acquired matching baseline 61% ± 8% (mean ± SD) of the time. We found 7%–42% of the disagreement between TDV and NPV was due to errors in thermometry caused by heat accrual. For all patients, the prior baseline method increased the estimated treatment volume and reduced the discrepancies between TDV and NPV (P = 0.023). Conclusion This study presents a mismatch between in-treatment and post treatment efficacy measures. The prior baseline approach accounts for local heating and improves the accuracy of thermal dose-predicted volume. PMID:26119129

  17. Preservation of the endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young-sun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Lim, Hyo Keun; Rhim, Hyunchul; Jung, Sin-Ho; Ahn, Joong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the integrity of endometrial enhancement after magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) ablation of submucosal uterine fibroids based on contrast-enhanced MRI findings, and to identify the risk factors for endometrial impairment. In total, 117 submucosal fibroids (diameter: 5.9 ± 3.0 cm) in 101 women (age: 43.6 ± 4.4 years) treated with MR-HIFU ablation were retrospectively analysed. Endometrial integrity was assessed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images at immediate (n = 101), 3-month (n = 62) and 12-month (n = 15) follow-ups. Endometrial impairment was classified into grades 0 (continuous endometrium), 1 (pin-point, full-thickness discontinuity), 2 (between grade 1 and 3), or 3 (full-thickness discontinuity >1 cm). Risk factors were assessed with generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Among 117 fibroids, grades 0, 1, 2 and 3 endometrial impairments were observed at initial examination in 56.4%, 24.8%, 13.7% and 4.3%, respectively. Among 37 fibroid cases of endometrial impairment for which follow-ups were conducted, 30 showed improvements at 3- and/or 12-month follow-up. GEE analysis revealed the degree of endometrial protrusion was significantly associated with severity of endometrial injury (P < 0.0001). After MR-HIFU ablation of submucosal fibroids, endometrial enhancement was preserved intact or minimally impaired in most cases. Impaired endometrium, which is more common after treating endometrially-protruded fibroids, may recover spontaneously. (orig.)

  18. Feasibility Study on MR-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Sciatic Nerve in a Swine Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, Elena A., E-mail: kayee@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Gutta, Narendra Babu, E-mail: gnbabu.aiims@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Monette, Sebastien, E-mail: monettes@mskcc.org [The Rockefeller University, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (United States); Gulati, Amitabh, E-mail: gulatia@mskcc.org; Loh, Jeffrey, E-mail: jeffreyloh@gmail.com [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Anesthesiology-Critical Care (United States); Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan, E-mail: srimaths@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Ezell, Paula C., E-mail: paula.ezell@intusurg.com [The Rockefeller University, Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (United States); Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org; Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    IntroductionSpastic patients often seek neurolysis, the permanent destruction of the sciatic nerve, for better pain management. MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) may serve as a noninvasive alternative to the prevailing, more intrusive techniques. This in vivo acute study is aimed at performing sciatic nerve neurolysis using a clinical MRgHIFU system.MethodsThe HIFU ablation of sciatic nerves was performed in swine (n = 5) using a HIFU system integrated with a 3 T MRI scanner. Acute lesions were confirmed using T1-weighted contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI and histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The animals were euthanized immediately following post-ablation imaging.ResultsReddening and mild thickening of the nerve and pallor of the adjacent muscle were seen in all animals. The HIFU-treated sections of the nerves displayed nuclear pyknosis of Schwann cells, vascular hyperemia, perineural edema, hyalinization of the collagenous stroma of the nerve, myelin sheet swelling, and loss of axons. Ablations were visible on CE MRI. Non-perfused volume of the lesions (5.8–64.6 cc) linearly correlated with estimated lethal thermal dose volume (4.7–34.2 cc). Skin burn adjacent to the largest ablated zone was observed in the first animal. Bilateral treatment time ranged from 55 to 138 min, and preparation time required 2 h on average.ConclusionThe acute pilot study in swine demonstrated the feasibility of a noninvasive neurolysis of the sciatic nerve using a clinical MRgHIFU system. Results revealed that acute HIFU nerve lesions were detectable on CE MRI, gross pathology, and histology.

  19. Restoring Neurological Physiology: The Innovative Role of High-Energy MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound (HIMRgFUS). Preliminary Data from a New Method of Lesioning Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugno, Antonella; Maugeri, Rosario; Graziano, Francesca; Gagliardo, Cesare; Franzini, Angelo; Catalano, Carlo; Midiri, Massimo; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2017-01-01

    Tremor is a disabling condition, common to several neurodegenerative diseases. Lesioning procedures and deep brain stimulation, respectively, of the ventralis intermedius nucleus for intentional tremor, and of the subthalamic nucleus for parkinsonian resting tremor, have been introduced in clinical practice for patients refractory to medical treatment. The combination of high-energy focused ultrasound (HIFUS) with sophisticated magnetic resonance (MR) instrumentation, together with accurate knowledge of the stereotactic brain coordinates, represents a revolution in neuromodulation. At the Neurosurgical Clinic and the Radiology Department of the University of Palermo,, two patients affected by severe and refractory forms of intentional tremor were treated by MRI-guided FUS (MRgFUS) with a unique 1.5 T MR scanner prototype that uses FUS. This apparatus is the only one of its type in the world." This is the first Italian experience, and the second in Europe, of treatment with MRI-gFUS for intentional tremor. But this is the very first experience in which a 1.5 T MRI apparatus was used. In both patients, the treatment completely abolished the tremor on the treated side, with results being excellent and stable after 7 and 5 months, respectively; no side effects were encountered. MRgFUS, recently introduced in clinical practice, and widely used at several clinical centers, has been shown to be a valid therapeutic alternative in the treatment of tremor in several neurodegenerative diseases. It is virtually safe, noninvasive, and very efficacious. We report this technique in which a 1.5 T MR scanner was used. Further investigations with long-term follow up and larger clinical series are needed.

  20. Ultrasound-guided pleural access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, Samira; Argento, A Christine

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasonography of the thorax has become a more recognized tool in pulmonary medicine, thanks to continuing clinical research that has proven its many valuable roles in the day-to-day management of pulmonary and pleural diseases. Ultrasound examination is a cost-effective imaging modality that permits the pulmonologist to obtain information about the pathologies in the thorax without the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation, providing the examiner with real-time and immediate results. Its ease of use and training along with its portability to the patient's bedside and accurate examination of the pleural space has allowed for safer pleural procedures such as thoracentesis, chest tube placement, tunneled pleural catheter placement, and medical thoracoscopy. In this review, we summarize the technique of chest ultrasonography, compare ultrasound to other frequently used thoracic imaging modalities, and focus on its use in obtaining pleural access while performing invasive pleural procedures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a noninvasive uterine-preserving treatment alternative to hysterectomy for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids). Uterine fibroids commonly occur, have a broad impact on women's health and lifestyle, continue to be the main indication for hysterectomy, and represent a costly public health burden. Objectives The objectives of the analysis were to evaluate patients’ eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids and the technical success, safety, effectiveness, and durability of this treatment. The review also compared the safety and effectiveness of MRgHIFU with other minimally invasive uterine-preserving treatments and surgeries for uterine fibroids. Methods A literature search was performed on March 27, 2014, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to March 27, 2014. Results The evidence review identified 2 systematic reviews, 2 RCTs, 45 cohort study reports, and 19 case reports involving HIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment was variable, ranging from 14% to 74%. In clinical cohort studies involving 1,594 patients, 26 major complications (1.6%) were reported. MRgHIFU resulted in statistically and clinically significant reductions in fibroid-related symptoms in studies conducted in 10 countries, although few involved follow-up longer than 1 year. Retreatment rates following MRgHIFU were higher in early clinical studies involving regulated restrictions in the extent of fibroid ablation than in later reports involving near-complete ablation. Emergent interventions, however, were rare. Although a desire for fertility was an exclusion criteria for treatment, spontaneous term pregnancies did occur following HIFU. There were no

  2. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a noninvasive uterine-preserving treatment alternative to hysterectomy for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids). Uterine fibroids commonly occur, have a broad impact on women's health and lifestyle, continue to be the main indication for hysterectomy, and represent a costly public health burden. The objectives of the analysis were to evaluate patients' eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids and the technical success, safety, effectiveness, and durability of this treatment. The review also compared the safety and effectiveness of MRgHIFU with other minimally invasive uterine-preserving treatments and surgeries for uterine fibroids. A literature search was performed on March 27, 2014, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to March 27, 2014. The evidence review identified 2 systematic reviews, 2 RCTs, 45 cohort study reports, and 19 case reports involving HIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment was variable, ranging from 14% to 74%. In clinical cohort studies involving 1,594 patients, 26 major complications (1.6%) were reported. MRgHIFU resulted in statistically and clinically significant reductions in fibroid-related symptoms in studies conducted in 10 countries, although few involved follow-up longer than 1 year. Retreatment rates following MRgHIFU were higher in early clinical studies involving regulated restrictions in the extent of fibroid ablation than in later reports involving near-complete ablation. Emergent interventions, however, were rare. Although a desire for fertility was an exclusion criteria for treatment, spontaneous term pregnancies did occur following HIFU. There were no randomized trials comparing MRgHIFU and

  3. Perfusion volume correlates, percentage of involution, and clinical efficacy at diverse follow-up survey times after MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery in uterine fibroids: first report in a Mexican mestizo population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco-Choque, Ana Luz; Fernandez-de Lara, Yeni; Vivas-Bonilla, Ingrid; Romero-Trejo, Cecilia [Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico); Villa, Antonio R. [UNAM, Division de Investigacion, Facultad de Medicina, Mexico City (Mexico); Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto [Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico); Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Coordination of Research and Innovation, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery in a Mexican mestizo population. This retrospective study included 159 women (mean age 37 ± 6.4 years, range 22-53 years) from 2008 to 2010. Two hundred sixty-eight symptomatic uterine fibroids were treated using MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. Parameters included initial perfused volume, final perfused volume, non-perfused volume (NPV), and treated volume ratio (TVR). Follow-up up to 15 months assessed treatment efficacy and symptomatic relief. Non-parametric statistics and the Kaplan-Meier method were performed. T{sub 2}-weighted hypointense fibroids showed a frequency of 93.6 %; isointense and hyperintense fibroids had frequencies of 5.60 and 1.1 %. There was a negative correlation between NPV and age (r = -0.083, p = 0.307) and treatment time (r = -0.253, p = 0.001). Median TVR was 96.0 % in small fibroids and 76.5 % in large fibroids. Involution of 50 % and 80 % was achieved at months 6-7 and month 11, respectively. Relief of symptoms was significant (p < 0.05). Our data show that higher TVR attained immediately post-treatment of MRgFUS favours higher involution percentages at follow-up; however, careful patient selection and use of pretreatment imaging are important components for predicting success using MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery. (orig.)

  4. Synthetic focusing in ultrasound modulated tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Kuchment, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Several hybrid tomographic methods utilizing ultrasound modulation have been introduced lately. Success of these methods hinges on the feasibility of focusing ultrasound waves at an arbitrary point of interest. Such focusing, however, is difficult to achieve in practice. We thus propose a way to avoid the use of focused waves through what we call synthetic focusing, i.e. by reconstructing the would-be response to the focused modulation from the measurements corresponding to realistic unfocused waves. Examples of reconstructions from simulated data are provided. This non-technical paper describes only the general concept, while technical details will appear elsewhere. © 2010 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  5. Non-Invasive Targeted Peripheral Nerve Ablation Using 3D MR Neurography and MRI-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MR-HIFU): Pilot Study in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Merel; Staruch, Robert M; Ladouceur-Wodzak, Michelle; van den Bosch, Maurice A; Burns, Dennis K; Chhabra, Avneesh; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been proposed for noninvasive treatment of neuropathic pain and has been investigated in in-vivo studies. However, ultrasound has important limitations regarding treatment guidance and temperature monitoring. Magnetic resonance (MR)-imaging guidance may overcome these limitations and MR-guided HIFU (MR-HIFU) has been used successfully for other clinical indications. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing 3D MR neurography to identify and guide ablation of peripheral nerves using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Volumetric MR-HIFU was used to induce lesions in the peripheral nerves of the lower limbs in three pigs. Diffusion-prep MR neurography and T1-weighted images were utilized to identify the target, plan treatment and immediate post-treatment evaluation. For each treatment, one 8 or 12 mm diameter treatment cell was used (sonication duration 20 s and 36 s, power 160-300 W). Peripheral nerves were extracted < 3 hours after treatment. Ablation dimensions were calculated from thermal maps, post-contrast MRI and macroscopy. Histological analysis included standard H&E staining, Masson's trichrome and toluidine blue staining. All targeted peripheral nerves were identifiable on MR neurography and T1-weighted images and could be accurately ablated with a single exposure of focused ultrasound, with peak temperatures of 60.3 to 85.7°C. The lesion dimensions as measured on MR neurography were similar to the lesion dimensions as measured on CE-T1, thermal dose maps, and macroscopy. Histology indicated major hyperacute peripheral nerve damage, mostly confined to the location targeted for ablation. Our preliminary results indicate that targeted peripheral nerve ablation is feasible with MR-HIFU. Diffusion-prep 3D MR neurography has potential for guiding therapy procedures where either nerve targeting or avoidance is desired, and may also have potential for post

  6. Ultrasound guided synovial biopsy of the wrist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; van Dalen, A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Seven patients (4 female and 3 male, mean age 46) with arthritis of the wrist (n = 7) without known etiology were evaluated. High-definition ultrasound equipment was used for localization of synovial hypertrophy, suitable for ultrasound guided biopsy without risk. A 18-gauge diameter Tru-cut biopsy

  7. Manipulation of Microbubble Clusters Using Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Hironobu; Osaki, Taichi; Kawaguchi, Kei; Unga, Johan; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Azuma, Takashi; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo; Takagi, Shu

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, microbubbles (MBs) are expected to be utilized for the ultrasound drug delivery system (DDS). For the MB-DDS, it is important to establish a method of controlling bubbles and bubble clusters using ultrasound field. The objective of this study is to clarify behaviors of bubble clusters with various physical conditions. MBs in the ultrasound field are subjected to the primary Bjerknes force. The force traps MBs at the focal region of the focused ultrasound field. The trapped MBs form a bubble cluster at the region. A bubble cluster continues growing with absorbing surrounding bubbles until it reaches a maximum size beyond which it disappears from the focal region. In the present study, two kinds of MBs are used for the experiment. One is Sonazoid with average diameter of 2.6 um and resonant frequency of 5 MHz. The other is developed by Teikyo Univ., with average diameter of 1.5 um and presumed resonant frequency of 4 MHz. The bubble cluster's behaviors are analyzed using the high-speed camera. Sonazoid clusters have larger critical size than the other in every frequency, and its cluster size is inversely proportional to the ultrasound frequency, while Teikyo-bubble clusters have different tendency. These results are discussed in the presentation.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ... Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During ...

  9. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Ultrasound-guided ophthalmic regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, Steven; Palte, Howard D

    2016-12-01

    Needle-based and cannula-based eye blocks are 'blind' techniques prone to rare but serious complications. Ultrasound, an established adjunct for peripheral nerve block, may be beneficial for ophthalmic anesthesia application. The present review details the evolution of ultrasound-guided eye blocks, outlines safety issues, and reviews recent studies and editorial opinions. Ultrasound-assisted ophthalmic regional anesthesia allows imaging of key structures such as the globe, orbit, and optic nerve. Recent findings reveal that needle path is not reliably predictable by clinical evaluation. Needle tips are frequently found to be intraconal, extraconal, or transfixed in the muscle cone independent of the intended type of block. In addition, contemporary human and animal studies confirm that real-time observation of local anesthetic spread inside of the muscle cone correlates directly with block success. Ultrasound-guided ophthalmic regional anesthesia is evolving beyond simple visualization of the anatomy. Recent research emphasizes the imprecision of needle tip location without ultrasound and the key role of imaging local anesthetic dispersion. There is ongoing debate in the literature regarding the utility of routine ultrasound for eye blocks.

  11. Ultrasound guided local steroid injection versus extracorporeal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nayera Saber

    2011-12-17

    Dec 17, 2011 ... injection;. Plantar fascia thickness;. Mayo clinic scoring system. Abstract Objective: This study was conducted to compare and evaluate the therapeutic effects of ultrasound guided local steroid injection versus medium frequency shock wave therapy in plantar fasciitis treatment among Egyptian population.

  12. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... assistance of a nurse and an MR imaging technologist. As with the ultrasound procedure, you may receive antibiotics, sedatives and pain medication before the biopsy. The MRI-guided procedure may use contrast ... A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) catheter into a ...

  13. Ultrasound-guided forceps for pleural biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Agmy

    2014-04-01

    Clinical implications: Ultrasound-guided forceps for pleural biopsy can overcome many of the limitations of the conventional needle biopsy procedures, provides multiple biopsy specimens of the parietal pleura that are inaccessible to the biopsy needle, and can be carried out easily and safely even in sick and obese patients. The diagnostic yield is nearly similar to thoracoscopy.

  14. ultrasound-guided shoulder arthrogram injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Anterior approach ultrasound-guided arthrogram injections are a quick and reliable way of injecting contrast medium prior to a shoulder. MRI scan. A retrospective study on patients who we had previously injected and scanned at our clinic was undertaken, to compare the more documented posterior ...

  15. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia improves arteriovenous fistula flow characteristics in end-stage renal disease patients. Shyam Meenaa*, Virendra Aryaa, Indu Sena, Mukut Minza and Mahesh Prakasha. aDepartment of Anaesthesia, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, ...

  16. Sonosensitive theranostic liposomes for preclinical in vivo MRI-guided visualization of doxorubicin release stimulated by pulsed low intensity non-focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzitelli, S; Giustetto, P; Cutrin, J C; Delli Castelli, D; Boffa, C; Ruzza, M; Menchise, V; Molinari, F; Aime, S; Terreno, E

    2015-03-28

    The main goal of this study was to assess the theranostic performance of a nanomedicine able to generate MRI contrast as a response to the release from liposomes of the antitumor drug Doxorubicin triggered by the local exposure to pulsed low intensity non focused ultrasounds (pLINFU). In vitro experiments showed that Gadoteridol was an excellent imaging agent for probing the release of Doxorubicin following pLINFU stimulation. On this basis, the theranostic system was investigated in vivo on a syngeneic murine model of TS/A breast cancer. MRI offered an excellent guidance for monitoring the pLINFU-stimulated release of the drug. Moreover, it provided: i) an in vivo proof of the effective release of the liposomal content, and ii) a confirmation of the therapeutic benefits of the overall protocol. Ex vivo fluorescence microscopy indicated that the good therapeutic outcome was originated from a better diffusion of the drug in the tumor following the pLINFU stimulus. Very interestingly, the broad diffusion of the drug in the tumor stroma appeared to be mediated by the presence of the liposomes themselves. The results of this study highlighted either the great potential of US-based stimuli to safely trigger the release of a drug from its nanocarrier or the associated significant therapeutic improvement. Finally, MRI demonstrated to be a valuable technique to support chemotherapy and monitoring the outcome. Furthermore, in this specific case, the theranostic agent developed has a high clinical translatability because the MRI agent utilized is already approved for human use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lee, Tae Hwa; Willmann, Jugen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB) mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  18. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lee, Tae Hwa; Willmann, Jugen K.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB) mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy

  19. Ultrasound-guided sacroiliac joint injection technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Dominic

    2008-07-01

    We describe a case report and technique for using a portable ultrasound scanner and a curvilinear transducer (4-5MHz) (SonoSite Micromaxx SonoSite, Inc. 21919 30th Drive SE Bothwell W. A.) to guide sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection. A 42-year-old male presented with chronic lower back pain centered on his left SIJ. His pain averaged 7 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). For the ultrasound-guided SIJ injection the patient was placed in the prone position. The ultrasound transducer was oriented in a transverse orientation at the level of the sacral hiatus. Here the sacral cornuae were identified. Moving the transducer laterally from here, the lateral edge of the sacrum was identified. This bony edge was followed in a cephalad direction with the transducer maintained in a transverse orientation. A second bony contour, the ileum, was identified. The cleft between both bony contours represented the sacroiliac joint. This was found at 4.5 cm depth. Real-time imaging was used to direct a 22G spinal needle into the SIJ, where solution was injected under direct vision. The patient\\'s pain intensity decreased to a 2 out of 10 (numerical rating scale). Function improved and the patient was able to return to work. These improvements were maintained at 16 weeks. Ultrasound guidance does not expose patients and personnel to radiation and is readily accessible. Ultrasound-guided SIJ injections may have particular applications in the management of chronic lower back pain in certain clinical scenarios (e.g. pregnancy). Future studies to demonstrate efficacy and reproducibility are needed.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Cannulation of the Hemodialysis Arteriovenous Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Frank; Faratro, Rose; McQuillan, Rory F

    2017-07-01

    Successful cannulation of the arteriovenous access for patients with end-stage kidney failure to allow catheter-free hemodialysis is associated with superior patient outcomes. With an increasing rate of arteriovenous access creation, coupled with increasing dialysis patient age, the "difficult-to-cannulate" access is becoming more commonplace. Ultrasound-guided cannulation aims to improve first-time successful cannulations and minimize cannulation-associated complications such as infiltration and hematoma formation, minimizing delays in access use and reducing catheter dependency. Ultrasound-guided cannulation has the potential to not only improve patient experience but also reduce morbidity associated with complications, dialysis catheter dependency, and subsequent healthcare costs. A smooth and complication-free dialysis initiation is also important for the longevity of technique survival and self-cannulation in home hemodialysis patients. Appropriate training of the ultrasound operator is required to ensure competent image acquisition with simultaneous needling. There are various approaches and considerations in choosing how to apply the ultrasound probe and needle the access, which are often governed by personal choice, training, and institutional patterns of practice more than a robust evidence base. Future research should focus on providing more clarity on the optimal method of utilizing ultrasound guidance in arteriovenous access cannulation, the precise indications for its use and, lastly, the benefits it confers compared to traditional blind cannulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Ultrasound-guided removal of Implanon devices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Persaud, T

    2008-11-01

    Our study has shown that ultrasound-guided localisation and removal of Implanon rods is safe, practical and highly successful. Over a 4-year period, 119 patients had successful, uncomplicated removal of their subdermal devices.The technique is particularly useful for removal of the device when it is not palpable or when an attempt at removal of a palpable device has not been successful.

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artifon, Everson L.A.; Ferreira, Fla'vio C.; Sakai, Paulo

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate a comprehensive review of published articles regarding endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage. Review of studies regarding EUS-guided biliary drainage including case reports, case series and previous reviews. EUS-guided hepaticogastrostomy, coledochoduodenostomy and choledoantrostomy are advanced biliary and pancreatic endoscopy procedures, and together make up the echo-guided biliary drainage. Hepaticogastrostomy is indicated in cases of hilar obstruction, while the procedure of choice is the coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy in distal lesions. Both procedures must be performed only after unsuccessful ERCPs. The indication of these procedures must be made under a multidisciplinary view while sharing information with the patient or legal guardian. Hepaticogastrostomy and coledochoduodenostomy or choledochoantrostomy are feasible when performed by endoscopists with expertise in biliopancreatic endoscopy. Advanced echo-endoscopy should currently be performed under a rigorous protocol in educational institutions.

  3. Non-invasive magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablation of a vascular malformation in the lower extremity : a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breugel, Marjolein; Nijenhuis, Robbert J; Ries, Mario G; Toorop, RJ; Vonken, EPA; Wijlemans, JW; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Therapy of choice for symptomatic vascular malformations consists of surgery, sclerotherapy, or embolization. However, these techniques are invasive with possible complications and require hospitalization. We present a novel non-invasive technique, i.e., magnetic resonance-guided

  4. Existing Evidence on Ultrasound-Guided Injections in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Eldra W; Cole, David; Jacobs, Bret; Phillips, Shawn F

    2018-02-01

    Office-based ultrasonography has become increasingly available in many settings, and its use to guide joint and soft tissue injections has increased. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the use of ultrasound-guided injections over traditional landmark-guided injections, with a rapid growth in the literature over the past few years. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted to demonstrate increased accuracy of ultrasound-guided injections regardless of anatomic location. In the upper extremity, ultrasound-guided injections have been shown to provide superior benefit to landmark-guided injections at the glenohumeral joint, the subacromial space, the biceps tendon sheath, and the joints of the hand and wrist. Ultrasound-guided injections of the acromioclavicular and the elbow joints have not been shown to be more efficacious. In the lower extremity, ultrasound-guided injections at the knee, ankle, and foot have superior efficacy to landmark-guided injections. Conclusive evidence is not available regarding improved efficacy of ultrasound-guided injections of the hip, although landmark-guided injection is performed less commonly at the hip joint. Ultrasound-guided injections are overall more accurate than landmark-guided injections. While current studies indicate that ultrasound guidance improves efficacy and cost-effectiveness of many injections, these studies are limited and more research is needed.

  5. Bone remodeling after MR imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation: evaluation with MR imaging, CT, Na(18)F-PET, and histopathologic examination in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Rieke, Viola; Seo, Youngho; Horvai, Andrew E; Hawkins, Randall A; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M; Saeed, Maythem

    2015-02-01

    To serially monitor bone remodeling in the swine femur after magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with MR imaging, computed tomography (CT), sodium fluorine 18 (Na(18)F)-positron emission tomography (PET), and histopathologic examination, as a function of sonication energy. Experimental procedures received approval from the local institutional animal care and use committee. MR imaging-guided HIFU was used to create distal and proximal ablations in the right femurs of eight pigs. The energy used at the distal target was higher (mean, 419 J; range, 390-440 J) than that used at the proximal target (mean, 324 J; range, 300-360 J). Imaging was performed before and after ablation with 3.0-T MR imaging and 64-section CT. Animals were reevaluated at 3 and 6 weeks with MR imaging (n = 8), CT (n = 8), Na(18)F-PET (n = 4), and histopathologic examination (n = 4). Three-dimensional ablation lengths were measured on contrast material-enhanced MR images, and bone remodeling in the cortex was measured on CT images. Ablation sizes at MR imaging 3 and 6 weeks after MR imaging-guided HIFU ablation were similar between proximal (low-energy) and distal (high-energy) lesions (average, 8.7 × 21.9 × 16.4 mm). However, distal ablation lesions (n = 8) demonstrated evidence of subperiosteal new bone formation at CT, with a subtle focus of new ossification at 3 weeks and a larger focus of ossification at 6 weeks. New bone formation was associated with increased uptake at Na(18)F-PET in three of four animals; this was confirmed at histopathologic examination in four of four animals. MR imaging-guided HIFU ablation of bone may result in progressive remodeling, with both subcortical necrosis and subperiosteal new bone formation. This may be related to the use of high energies. MR imaging, CT, and PET are suitable noninvasive techniques to monitor bone remodeling after MR imaging-guided HIFU ablation. © RSNA, 2014.

  6. Bone Remodeling after MR Imaging–guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation: Evaluation with MR Imaging, CT, Na18F-PET, and Histopathologic Examination in a Swine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Viola; Seo, Youngho; Horvai, Andrew E.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.; Saeed, Maythem

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To serially monitor bone remodeling in the swine femur after magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation with MR imaging, computed tomography (CT), sodium fluorine 18 (Na18F)–positron emission tomography (PET), and histopathologic examination, as a function of sonication energy. Materials and Methods Experimental procedures received approval from the local institutional animal care and use committee. MR imaging–guided HIFU was used to create distal and proximal ablations in the right femurs of eight pigs. The energy used at the distal target was higher (mean, 419 J; range, 390–440 J) than that used at the proximal target (mean, 324 J; range, 300–360 J). Imaging was performed before and after ablation with 3.0-T MR imaging and 64-section CT. Animals were reevaluated at 3 and 6 weeks with MR imaging (n = 8), CT (n = 8), Na18F-PET (n = 4), and histopathologic examination (n = 4). Three-dimensional ablation lengths were measured on contrast material–enhanced MR images, and bone remodeling in the cortex was measured on CT images. Results Ablation sizes at MR imaging 3 and 6 weeks after MR imaging–guided HIFU ablation were similar between proximal (low-energy) and distal (high-energy) lesions (average, 8.7 × 21.9 × 16.4 mm). However, distal ablation lesions (n = 8) demonstrated evidence of subperiosteal new bone formation at CT, with a subtle focus of new ossification at 3 weeks and a larger focus of ossification at 6 weeks. New bone formation was associated with increased uptake at Na18F-PET in three of four animals; this was confirmed at histopathologic examination in four of four animals. Conclusion MR imaging–guided HIFU ablation of bone may result in progressive remodeling, with both subcortical necrosis and subperiosteal new bone formation. This may be related to the use of high energies. MR imaging, CT, and PET are suitable noninvasive techniques to monitor bone remodeling after MR imaging–guided

  7. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications.

  8. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehmer, Marcel R.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Tiemann, Klaus; Hall, Christopher S.; Gruell, Holger; Steinbach, Oliver C.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaging has been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Important advances in this field are based on a combination of progress in guiding and monitoring ultrasound energy, novel drug classes becoming available, the development of smart delivery vehicles, and more in depth understanding of the mechanisms of the cellular and molecular basis of diseases. Recent research demonstrates that both pressure sensitive and temperature sensitive delivery systems hold promise for local treatment. The use of ultrasound for the delivery of drugs has been demonstrated in particular the field of cardiology and oncology for a variety of therapeutics ranging from small drug molecules to biologics and nucleic acids.

  9. Application of Zernike polynomials towards accelerated adaptive focusing of transcranial high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Elena A.; Hertzberg, Yoni; Marx, Michael; Werner, Beat; Navon, Gil; Levoy, Marc; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the phase aberrations produced by human skulls during transcranial magnetic resonance imaging guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), to demonstrate the potential of Zernike polynomials (ZPs) to accelerate the adaptive focusing process, and to investigate the benefits of using phase corrections obtained in previous studies to provide the initial guess for correction of a new data set. Methods: The five phase aberration data sets, analyzed here, were calculated based on preoperative computerized tomography (CT) images of the head obtained during previous transcranial MRgFUS treatments performed using a clinical prototype hemispherical transducer. The noniterative adaptive focusing algorithm [Larrat , “MR-guided adaptive focusing of ultrasound,” IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 57(8), 1734–1747 (2010)]10.1109/TUFFC.2010.1612 was modified by replacing Hadamard encoding with Zernike encoding. The algorithm was tested in simulations to correct the patients’ phase aberrations. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was used to visualize the effect of the phase aberration correction on the focusing of a hemispherical transducer. In addition, two methods for constructing initial phase correction estimate based on previous patient's data were investigated. The benefits of the initial estimates in the Zernike-based algorithm were analyzed by measuring their effect on the ultrasound intensity at the focus and on the number of ZP modes necessary to achieve 90% of the intensity of the nonaberrated case. Results: Covariance of the pairs of the phase aberrations data sets showed high correlation between aberration data of several patients and suggested that subgroups can be based on level of correlation. Simulation of the Zernike-based algorithm demonstrated the overall greater correction effectiveness of the low modes of ZPs. The focal intensity achieves 90% of nonaberrated intensity using fewer than 170 modes of ZPs. The

  10. Motion tracing system for ultrasound guided HIFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xu; Jiang, Tingyi; Corner, George; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-03-01

    One main limitation in HIFU treatment is the abdominal movement in liver and kidney caused by respiration. The study has set up a tracking model which mainly compromises of a target carrying box and a motion driving balloon. A real-time B-mode ultrasound guidance method suitable for tracking of the abdominal organ motion in 2D was established and tested. For the setup, the phantoms mimicking moving organs are carefully prepared with agar surrounding round-shaped egg-white as the target of focused ultrasound ablation. Physiological phantoms and animal tissues are driven moving reciprocally along the main axial direction of the ultrasound image probe with slightly motion perpendicular to the axial direction. The moving speed and range could be adjusted by controlling the inflation and deflation speed and amount of the balloon driven by a medical ventilator. A 6-DOF robotic arm was used to position the focused ultrasound transducer. The overall system was trying to estimate to simulate the actual movement caused by human respiration. HIFU ablation experiments using phantoms and animal organs were conducted to test the tracking effect. Ultrasound strain elastography was used to post estimate the efficiency of the tracking algorithms and system. In moving state, the axial size of the lesion (perpendicular to the movement direction) are averagely 4mm, which is one third larger than the lesion got when the target was not moving. This presents the possibility of developing a low-cost real-time method of tracking organ motion during HIFU treatment in liver or kidney.

  11. Ultrasound guided pleural biopsy in undiagnosed exudative pleural effusion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel S. Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    In conclusion: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS guided pleural biopsy had a diagnostic yield which was slightly lower but comparable to both CT guided pleural biopsy and medical thoracoscopic pleural biopsy (MT.

  12. Public Participation Guide: Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    A focus group is a small group discussion with professional leadership. Focus groups are used to find out what issues are of most concern for a community or group when little or no information is available.

  13. Robotically assisted velocity-sensitive triggered focused ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Florian; Brunner, Alexander; Jenne, Jürgen W.; Krafft, Axel J.; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS) of abdominal organs is challenging due to breathing motion and limited patient access in the MR environment. In this work, an experimental robotically assisted FUS setup was combined with a MR-based navigator technique to realize motion-compensated sonications and online temperature imaging. Experiments were carried out in a static phantom, during periodic manual motion of the phantom without triggering, and with triggering to evaluate the triggering method. In contrast to the non-triggered sonication, the results of the triggered sonication show a confined symmetric temperature distribution. In conclusion, the velocity sensitive navigator can be employed for triggered FUS to compensate for periodic motion. Combined with the robotic FUS setup, flexible treatment of abdominal targets might be realized.

  14. WE-EF-BRA-12: Magnetic Resonance- Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Localized Ablation of Head and Neck Tissue Structures: A Feasibility Study in An Animal Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partanen, A [Philips Healthcare, Andover, Massachusets (United States); Ellens, N; Noureldine, S; Tufano, R [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Burdette, E [Acoustic MedSystems Inc., Savoy, IL (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is feasible in the head and neck [1]. This study aims to expand upon these findings to assess the feasibility of treatment planning and monitoring via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance using a clinical MR-guided HIFU platform. Methods: Two 31 kg pigs were anaesthetized, shaved, and positioned prone on the HIFU table (Sonalleve, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland). The necks were acoustically coupled to the integrated transducer using gel pads and degassed water. MR imaging verified acoustic coupling and facilitated target selection in the thyroid and thymus. Targets were thermally ablated with 130–200 W of acoustic power over a period of 16 s at a frequency of 1.2 MHz while being monitored through real-time, multi-planar MR-thermometry. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was used to assess treatment efficacy. Post-treatment, animals were euthanized and sonicated tissues were harvested for histology assessment. Results: MR-thermometry, post-contrast-imaging, and gross pathology demonstrated that the system was capable of causing localized thermal ablation in both the thyroid and the thymus without damaging the aerodigestive tract. In one animal, superficial bruising was observed in the ultrasound beam path. Otherwise, there were no adverse events. Analysis of the tissue histology found regions of damage consistent with acute thermal injury at the targeted locations. Conclusion: It is feasible to use a clinical MR-guided HIFU platform for extracorporeal ablation of porcine head and neck tissues. MR guidance and thermometry are sufficient to target and monitor treatment in the thyroid region, despite the presence of the inhomogeneous aerodigestive tract. Further study is necessary to assess efficacy and survival using a tumor model, and to examine what modifications should be made to the transducer positioning system and associated patient positioning aids to adapt it for clinical head and neck targets

  15. Scaled signal intensity of uterine fibroids based on T2-weighted MR images: a potential objective method to determine the suitability for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun [CHA University, Comprehensive Gynecologic Cancer Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang-Wook [CHA University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Sungnam-si, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Sokolov, Amit [InSightec Ltd., Haifa (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a non-invasive method to treat uterine fibroids. To help determine the patient suitability for MRgFUS, we propose a new objective measure: the scaled signal intensity (SSI) of uterine fibroids in T2 weighted MR images (T2WI). Forty three uterine fibroids in 40 premenopausal women were included in this retrospective study. SSI of each fibroid was measured from the screening T2WI by standardizing its mean signal intensity to a 0-100 scale, using reference intensities of rectus abdominis muscle (0) and subcutaneous fat (100). Correlation between the SSI and the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio (a measure for treatment success) was calculated. Pre-treatment SSI showed a significant inverse-correlation with post treatment NPV ratio (p < 0.05). When dichotomizing NPV ratio at 45 %, the optimal cut off value of the SSI was found to be 16.0. A fibroid with SSI value 16.0 or less can be expected to have optimal responses. The SSI of uterine fibroids in T2WI can be suggested as an objective parameter to help in patient selection for MRgFUS. (orig.)

  16. Ultrasound-guided neural blockade in Proteus syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anatomy, a young patient with Proteus syndrome requiring forearm surgery successfully received a supraclavicular block, using an ultrasound-guided technique for needle placement. We recommend that practitioners experienced in ultrasound- guided neural blockade perform regional anaesthesia in selected patients with ...

  17. Ultrasound guided electrochemotherapy for the treatment of a clear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound guided biopsy yielded a diagnosis of clear cell thymoma upon histopathology. After complete staging procedures, the owner elected to treat the cat with electrochemotherapy (ECT) using systemic bleomycin. Two sessions of ultrasound guided ECT were performed at two week intervals with trains of biphasic ...

  18. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  19. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30-110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was -3.4 ± 2.1 mm and -0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small uncertainties in the PAM

  20. Pressure and temperature distribution in biological tissues by focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Feng, Feng; Kabo, Michael; Wang, Jeffrey; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2003-07-01

    The interaction between ultrasound and biological tissues has been the subject of a number of investigators for nearly half a century and the number of applications of high intensity, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes continues to grow. This paper is motivated by possible medical applications of focused ultrasound in minimally invasive treatment of a variety of musculoskeletal disorders that are responsive to thermal treatment. The mechanical and thermal effects in a subject"s body induced by high-frequency ultrasound are simulated using PZFlex, a finite element based program. The FEM model described in this report is of a transverse section of the body at the level of the second lumbar vertebra (L2) extracted from a CT image. In order to protect the nerves inside the spinal canal as well as to obtain an effective heating result at the focal region within the intervertebral disk, a suitable orientation of axis of the focused ultrasound lens have to be determined in advance. The pressure, energy loss distribution and temperature distribution are investigated in this paper with the different orientations of the axis and different transverse diameter of the spherical ultrasound lens. Since nonlinear effects are expected to be important in the therapeutic application in some literatures, this paper also demonstrates the effects of nonlinearities on the pressure and temperature distribution induced by focused ultrasound in a two dimensional model. Finally, a comparison of the results between linear and nonlinear cases is reported.

  1. In vivo optimisation study for multi-baseline MR-based thermometry in the context of hyperthermia using MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound for head and neck applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Köhler, Max; Lee, Justin; Hynnyen, Kullervo

    2014-12-01

    In this in vivo study, the feasibility to perform hyperthermia treatments in the head and neck using magnetic resonance image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) was established using a porcine acute model. Porcine specimens with a weight between 17 and 18 kg were treated in the omohyoid muscle in the neck. Hyperthermia was applied with a target temperature of 41 °C for 30 min using a Sonalleve MRgHIFU system. MR-based thermometry was calculated using water-proton resonance frequency shift and multi-baseline look-up tables indexed by peak-to-peak displacement (Dpp) measurements using a pencil-beam navigator. Three hyperthermia experiments were conducted at different Dpp values of 0.2, 1.0 and 3.0 mm. An optimisation study was carried out to establish the optimal parameters controlling the multi-baseline method that ensured a minimisation of spatial-average peak-to-peak temperature (TSA-pp) and temperature direct current bias (TSA-DC). The multi-baseline technique reduced considerably the noise on both TSA-pp and TSA-DC. The reduction of noise was more important when Dpp was higher. For Dpp = 3 mm the average (±standard deviation (SD)) of TSA-pp and TSA-DC was reduced from 4.5 (± 2.5) and 2.5 (±0.6) °C, respectively, to 0.8 (± 0.7) and 0.09 (± 0.2) °C. This in vivo study showed the level of noise in PRFS-based thermometry introduced by respiratory motion in the context of MRgHIFU hyperthermia treatment for head and neck and the feasibility of reducing this noise using a multi-baseline technique.

  2. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging using different b-value combinations for the evaluation of treatment results after volumetric MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikink, Marlijne E.; Voogt, Marianne J.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Nijenhuis, Robbert J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keserci, Bilgin [Samsung Medical Center, High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Philips Healthcare, Advanced Science and Development, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-sun [Samsung Medical Center, High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Medical Center, Sunkyunkwan University, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vincken, Koen L.; Bartels, Lambertus W. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping using different b-value combinations for treatment evaluation after magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) of uterine fibroids. Fifty-six patients with 67 uterine fibroids were treated with volumetric MR-HIFU. Pre-treatment and post-treatment images were obtained using contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1WI) and DWI using b = 0, 200, 400, 600, 800 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC maps were generated using subsets of b-values to investigate the effects of tissue ablation on water diffusion and perfusion in fibroids treated with MR-HIFU. Four combinations of b-values were used: (1) all b-values; (2) b = 0, 200 s/mm{sup 2}; (3) b = 400, 600, 800 s/mm{sup 2}; and (4) b = 0, 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Using the lowest b-values (0 and 200 s/mm{sup 2}), the mean ADC value in the ablated tissue reduced significantly (p < 0.001) compared with baseline. Calculating the ADC value with the highest b-values (400, 600, 800 s/mm{sup 2}), the ADC increased significantly (p < 0.001) post-treatment. ADC maps calculated with the lowest b-values resulted in the best visual agreement of non-perfused fibroid tissue detected on CE images. Other b-value combinations and normal myometrium showed no difference in ADC after MR-HIFU treatment. A decrease in contrast agent uptake within the ablated region on CE-T1WI was correlated to a significantly decreased ADC when b = 0 and 200 s/mm{sup 2} were used. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of new approach to ultrasound guided stellate ganglion block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Ghai

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: There is a significant variation in the anatomy of stellate ganglion at the level of C 6 and C 7 . Ultrasound guided lateral approach increases the efficacy of SGB by deposition of drug subfascially with real-time imaging.

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Andreas; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are fluid collections in the peripancreatic tissues associated with acute or chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage has become an established indication, having better results as compared to percutaneous drainage, nonguided endoscopic drainage...

  5. Transvaginal Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration of Pelvic Abscesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Corsi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the utility of a less invasive approach to the care of women with a pelvic abscess, we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of women with pelvic abscesses managed by transvaginal ultrasound-guided aspiration.

  6. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergency department for patients admitted with respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    triage, patients with cardiac arrest, patients with undifferentiated shock, patients with cardiopulmonary instability, patients with respiratory symptoms, trauma patients with suspected cardiac injuries, and assessment of the fluid status before fluid loading. When using focused cardiac ultrasound (US...... help improve the diagnostic accuracy, the proportion of patients receiving appropriate treatment, and possibly the patient outcome. This article gives a practical guide and an overview of some of the current concepts of using focused cardiac US in patients admitted with respiratory symptoms....

  7. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally focusing is done by taking out one sample in the received signal from each transducer element and then sum these signals. This method does not take into account the temporal or spatial spread of the received signal from a point scatterer and does not make an optimal focus of the data...... for beamforming the received RF signals from the individual transducer elements. The matched filter is applied on RF signals from individual transducer elements, thus properly taking into account the spatial spread of the received signal. The method can be applied to any transducer and can also be used...... for synthetic aperture imaging for single element transducers. It is evaluated using the Field II program. Data from a single 3 MHz transducer focused at a distance of 80 mm is processed. Far from the transducer focal region, the processing greatly improves the image resolution: the lateral slice...

  8. Focused ultrasound for treatment of uterine myoma: From experimental model to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Milan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that focused ultrasound has a biologic effect on tissue. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU on a small target area raises the temperature of the tissue enough to denaturate proteins and cause irreversible cell damage. The tight focus of the ultrasound energy allows delivery of the intended dose to a very precise location. The resulting coagulation necrosis is relatively painless. The application of this method in the human clinical setting has required pilot studies on an animal model. Although the treatment had a high success rate, there was a significant percentage of complications, mainly attributed to the technical drawbacks of the procedure. Therefore, this method has been modified for use in humans, and the HIFU is now guided, monitored and controlled by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In October 2004, Food and Drug Adiministration (FDA approved MRI guided focused ultrasound treatment of uterine fibroids in humans. Since then, successful treatment of uterine myomas by HIFU has been performed in thousands of women.

  9. Comparison of ultrasound-guided versus anatomical landmark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Femoral vein cannulation may be required during major surgery in infants and children and may prove to be life saving under certain conditions. This study compared ultrasound (US)-guided cannulation of the femoral vein in infants with the traditional anatomical landmark-guided technique. Methods Eighty ...

  10. A review of transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies: Is there ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We compared our institution's initial experience with transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) prostate biopsies in a single arm prospective study to a historical cohort of finger guided (FG) biopsies. The primary outcome measure was prostate cancer detection. We documented our findings on TRUS including the ...

  11. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  12. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy: an Overview for Radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Sun; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hyo Keun; Choi, Dong Il [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Min Joo [College of Medicine, Cheju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    High-intensity focused ultrasound therapy is a novel, emerging, therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves, propagated through tissue media, as carriers of energy. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation as well as hemostasis, thrombolysis and targeted drug/gene delivery. However, the application of this technology still has many drawbacks. It is expected that current obstacles to implementation will be resolved in the near future. In this review, we provide an overview of high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy from the basic physics to recent clinical studies with an interventional radiologist's perspective for the purpose of improving the general understanding of this cutting-edge technology as well as speculating on future developments

  13. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, S.Q.H.; Solangi, R.A.; Memon, M.; Solangi, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) as a preoperative diagnostic modality for breast cancer. Females with solid and/or intermediate breast lesions visualized on ultrasonography. Apart from clinical work-up, all the above mentioned patients underwent ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy and excisional biopsy of their breast lesions. The histopathological diagnosis on ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy was then compared with the findings of the excisional biopsy. Out of the total 93 cases, 47(50.5%) had benign lesions on ultrasound; US-CNB showed 24 as fibroadenomata, four with chronic non-specific mastitis, five chronic suppurative mastitis, one tuberculosis, four fat necrosis, two lactational adenoma and seven cases with benign ductal hyperplasia without atypia. Nine (9.7%) cases showed suspicious abnormality on ultrasound; US-CNB revealed five cases with atypical ductal hyperplasia, one ductal carcinoma in situ and three invasive ductal carcinoma. Thirty seven (39.8%) cases were highly suggestive of malignancy on ultrasound; US-CNB showed 34 as invasive ductal carcinoma, two invasive lobular and one medullary carcinoma. Excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in all cases except four; one case of chronic suppurative mastitis was diagnosed as that of tuberculosis and three cases of atypial ductal hyperplasia as invasive ductal carcinoma. Hence there was no false positive case, but four (4.3%) false negative cases. The sensitivity of the US-CNB was thus 100% and specificity 91.1%. Ultrasound guided core needle biopsy is a satisfactory procedure for the histopathological diagnosis of breast lesions. Any unsatisfactory, suspicious or atypical change on US-CNB should be followed by an open biopsy. (author)

  14. Focus cardiac ultrasound core curriculum and core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neskovic, Aleksandar N; Skinner, Henry; Price, Susanna; Via, Gabriele; De Hert, Stefan; Stankovic, Ivan; Galderisi, Maurizio; Donal, Erwan; Muraru, Denisa; Sloth, Erik; Gargani, Luna; Cardim, Nuno; Stefanidis, Alexandros; Cameli, Matteo; Habib, Gilbert; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Edvardsen, Thor; Popescu, Bogdan A

    2018-02-26

    There is a growing trend of using ultrasound examination of the heart as a first-line diagnostic tool for initial patient evaluation in acute settings. Focus cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) is a standardized but restricted cardiac ultrasound examination that may be undertaken by a range of medical professionals with diverse backgrounds. The intention of this core curriculum and syllabus is to define a unifying framework for educational and training processes/programmes that should result in competence in FoCUS for various medical professionals dealing with diagnostics and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies. The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging prepared this document in close cooperation with representatives of the European Society of Anaesthesiology, the European Association of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesiology, the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association of the European Society of Cardiology and the World Interactive Network Focused On Critical Ultrasound. It aims to provide the key principles and represents a guide for teaching and training of FoCUS. We offer this document to the emergency and critical care community as a reference outline for teaching materials and courses related to FoCUS, for promoting teamwork and encouraging the development of the field.

  15. The technique of ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romics, Imre

    2004-11-01

    This article discusses the preparations for ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, the conditions used and the process of performing a biopsy. The first step in preparing the patient is a cleansing enema before biopsy. Every author proposes the use of a preoperative antibiotic based prophylaxis. Differences may be found in the type, dosage and the duration of this preoperative application, which can last from 2 h to 2 days. For anaesthesia, lidocaine has been proposed, which may be used as a gel applied in the rectum or in the form of a prostate infiltrate. Quite a few colleagues administer a brief intravenous narcosis. A major debate goes on in respect of defining the number of biopsy samples needed. Hodge proposed sextant biopsy in 1989, for which we had false negative findings in 20% of all cases. Because of this, it has recently been suggested that eight or rather ten samples be taken. There are some who question even this. Twelve biopsy samples do offer an advantage compared to six, although in the case of eight this is not the case. We shall present an in depth discussion of the various opinions on the different numbers of biopsies samples required. For the sample site, the apex, the base and the middle part are proposed, and (completing the process) two additional samples can also be taken from the transition zone (TZ), since 20% of all prostate cancers originate from TZ. In case of a palpable nodule or any lesion made visible by TRUS, an additional, targeted, biopsy has to be performed. Certain new techniques like the 3-D Doppler, contrast, intermittent and others shall also be presented. The control of the full length of samples taken by a gun, as well as the proper conservation of the samples, are parts of pathological processing and of the technical tasks. A repeated biopsy is necessary in the case of PIN atypia, beyond which the author also discusses other indications for a repeated biopsy. We may expect the occurrence of direct postoperative complications

  16. Feasibility of Ultrasound Guided Atlanto-occipital Joint Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Sun Jae; Lee, U-Young; Cho, Sei Un; Rhee, Won Ihl

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound guided atlanto-occipital joint injection. Method Six atlanto-occipital joints of three cadavers were examined. Cadavers were placed in prone position with their head slightly rotated towards the contra-lateral side. The atlanto-occipital joint was initially identified with a longitudinal ultrasound scan at the midline between occipital protuberance and mastoid process. Contrast media 0.5cc was injected into the atlanto-occipital joint using ...

  17. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Il Hwang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy

  18. Numerical simulations of clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-04-01

    A computational model utilizing grid and finite difference methods were developed to simulate focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery interventions. The model couples the propagation of ultrasound in fluids (soft tissues) and solids (skull) with acoustic and visco-elastic wave equations. The computational model was applied to simulate clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery treatments performed in patients suffering from therapy resistant chronic neuropathic pain. Datasets of five patients were used to derive the treatment geometry. Eight sonications performed in the treatments were then simulated with the developed model. Computations were performed by driving the simulated phased array ultrasound transducer with the acoustic parameters used in the treatments. Resulting focal temperatures and size of the thermal foci were compared quantitatively, in addition to qualitative inspection of the simulated pressure and temperature fields. This study found that the computational model and the simulation parameters predicted an average of 24 ± 13% lower focal temperature elevations than observed in the treatments. The size of the simulated thermal focus was found to be 40 ± 13% smaller in the anterior-posterior direction and 22 ± 14% smaller in the inferior-superior direction than in the treatments. The location of the simulated thermal focus was off from the prescribed target by 0.3 ± 0.1 mm, while the peak focal temperature elevation observed in the measurements was off by 1.6 ± 0.6 mm. Although the results of the simulations suggest that there could be some inaccuracies in either the tissue parameters used, or in the simulation methods, the simulations were able to predict the focal spot locations and temperature elevations adequately for initial treatment planning performed to assess, for example, the feasibility of sonication. The accuracy of the simulations could be improved if more precise ultrasound tissue properties (especially of the

  19. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part IV - EUS-guided Interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, C; Hocke, M; Fusaroli, P

    2016-01-01

    The fourth part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound describes general aspects of endoscopic ultrasound-guided diagnostic and therapeutic interventions and assesses the evidence for endoscopic ultrasound......-guided sampling. Endoscopic ultrasound combines the most advanced high-resolution ultrasound imaging of lesions within the wall and in the vicinity of the gastrointestinal tract and safe and effective fine needle based tissue acquisition from these lesions. The guideline addresses the indications......-guided sampling as well as for safe performance. Additionally, the guideline deals with the principles and reliability of cytopathological reporting in endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling (long version)....

  20. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    )-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PFNAB)/US-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy (PNCB) of abdominal lesions is efficacious in diagnosis, is helpful in treatment choice, to evaluate whether various ...

  1. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PFNAB)/US-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy (PNCB) of abdominal lesions is efficacious in diagnosis, is helpful in treatment choice, to evaluate whether various other investigations ...

  2. Internal jugular vein cannulation: an ultrasound-guided technique versus a landmark-guided technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurkan Turker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the landmark-guided technique versus the ultrasound-guided technique for internal jugular vein cannulation in spontaneously breathing patients. METHODS: A total of 380 patients who required internal jugular vein cannulation were randomly assigned to receive internal jugular vein cannulation using either the landmark- or ultrasound-guided technique in Bursa, Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, between April and November, 2008. Failed catheter placement, risk of complications from placement, risk of failure on first attempt at placement, number of attempts until successful catheterization, time to successful catheterization and the demographics of each patient were recorded. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.01. Carotid puncture rate and hematoma were more frequent in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group (p < 0.05. The number of attempts for successful placement was significantly higher in the landmark group than in the ultrasound-guided group, which was accompanied by a significantly increased access time observed in the landmark group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively. Although there were a higher number of attempts, longer access time, and a more frequent complication rate in the landmark group, the success rate was found to be comparable between the two groups. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that internal jugular vein catheterization guided by real-time ultrasound results in a lower access time and a lower rate of immediate complications.

  3. MRI-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: comparison with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imschweiler, Thomas; Freiwald, Bianka; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A. [Kantonspital Baden AG, Institute for Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Haueisen, Harald [Kantonspital Aarau AG, Institute for Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); Kampmann, Gert [Clinica Sant' Anna, Lugano, Sorengo (Switzerland); Rageth, Luzi [Adjumed Services AG, Zurich (Switzerland); Seifert, Burkhardt [Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Division of Biostatistics, Zuerich (Switzerland); Rageth, Christoph [Breast Centre, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    To analyse the development of MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) in Switzerland and to compare the procedure with stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB. We performed a retrospective analysis of VABs between 2009 and 2011. A total of 9,113 VABs were performed. Of these, 557 were MRI guided. MRI-guided VAB showed the highest growth rate (97 %) of all three procedures. The technical success rates for MRI-guided, stereotactically guided and ultrasound-guided VAB were 98.4 % (548/557), 99.1 % (5,904/5,960) and 99.6 % (2,585/2,596), respectively. There were no significant differences (P = 0.12) between the MRI-guided and the stereotactically guided procedures. The technical success rate for ultrasound-guided VAB was significantly higher than that for MRI-guided VAB (P < 0.001). There were no complications using MRI-guided VAB requiring open surgery. The malignancy diagnosis rate for MRI-guided VAB was similar to that for stereotactically guided VAB (P = 0.35). MRI-guided VAB is a safe and accurate procedure that provides insight into clinical breast findings. (orig.)

  4. Basic dissecting techniques in ultrasound-guided surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Pilecki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided surgery is an area of minimally-invasive surgery where surgical procedures are performed with the aid of ultrasound imaging throghout the operation. This requires the operator to posses a certain degree of experience in endoscopic procedures, and to be adeptly skillfull in conducting US examinations. It is combining and finely tuning together these two elements that allows to perform efficiently an ultrasound-guided surgical procedure. Accessing an affected site correctly is of utmost importance in surgery, being oftentimes decisive in terms of the procedure’s final outcome. In ultrasound-guided procedures, the operative site is accessed percutaneously, with a single point incision, yet tissues situated deeper within are dissected with dissecting techniques in a fluid evironment, typical for this area of surgery. Dissecting techniques in ultrasound-guided surgery are currently divided into basic ones which employ either a hydrodissection needle, surgical instruments, electrosurgical instruments, a thread, or a combination thereof, and advanced ones where either a balloon, a hook dissection technique, or a hybrid one is used. Hydrodissection with a needle was devised based on the rule of complementarity, and is the most frequently applied technique in ultrasound-guided surgery. The immense possibilities that go along with this modality will be of huge benefit to any surgeon, regardless of their field. Dissection with a variety of surgical instruments and electrosurgery instruments is a standard practice in all surgery areas, yet the method of imaging we employ in ultrasound-guided surgery results in certain modifications of these techniques. It is, however, learning the thread technique that facilitates a precise and oftentimes extensive dissection. This technique is successfully applied for dissecting muscle, ligament, tendon, vascular and other structures. Having mastered dissecting techniques allows to perform

  5. Ultrasound guided reduction of childhood intussusception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Chong Hyun; Kim, Han Suk

    1986-01-01

    Following on from diagnosis using ultrasound, hydrostatic reduction using saline enema under ultrasound guidance was tried in 20 cases of childhood intussusception. The conclusions were as follows: 1. Success rates of saline enema under ultrasound guidance during a first-8 month period (P1) and a second-10 month period (P2) were 55.6% (5/9) and 54.5% (6/11) respectively. Average success rate was 55% (11/20). 2. During the periods of P1 and P2, no case was reduced by barium enema in 6 cases of failed reduction with saline enema. 3. During the period of P2, 5 cases of successful reduction with saline enema were confirmed by clinical follow-up without barium enema. 4. During the periods of P1 and P2, 9 cases of failed reduction with saline enema were operated, resulting in 6 cases of segmental resection and 3 cases of manual reduction. 5. The obvious advantages of this method are: 1. No radiation hazard. 2. No fear of barium peritonitis. 3. Detection of leading point. 6. With above results, this method could completely replace barium enema. And ultrasonography should be the initial study in the evaluation of intussusception in children and then if necessary, saline enema under ultrasound guidance should be done.

  6. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided to Fluoroscopy-Guided Biceps Tendon Sheath Therapeutic Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle; Gustas, Cristy

    2016-10-01

    Biceps tendinitis is a source of anterior shoulder pain and is amenable to therapeutic injection. Studies have shown greater accuracy with image-guided compared to unguided injection of the biceps tendon sheath. There is no literature comparing ultrasound-guided to fluoroscopy-guided biceps tendon sheath injection. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical outcomes, complication rates, procedure success rates, and financial costs of the two imaging-guided methods. A 10-year retrospective review of the picture archiving and communication system was performed to identify patients who underwent image-guided proximal biceps tendon sheath injection. Two radiologists reviewed the picture archiving and communication system and clinical notes to record pain relief, complications, fluoroscopy time, first-pass success rate (defined as injection into the sheath on the first needle pass), final success rate (needle placement in the tendon sheath on the final needle pass), and average costs. Fifty fluoroscopy-guided and 53 ultrasound-guided cases were identified. There was no statistically significant difference in pain relief or complications. The first-pass success rate was 90.6% for ultrasound compared to 74.0% for fluoroscopy. The final-pass success rate was 98.2% for ultrasound versus 92.0% for fluoroscopy. The mean fluoroscopy time was 57.6 seconds. Ultrasound showed preinjection abnormalities of the biceps tendon in 47.5% of cases. Compared to fluoroscopy-guided biceps tendon sheath injection, ultrasound had higher initial- and final-pass success rates, visualized abnormalities before injection, and had similar pain relief and complication rates. Ultrasound is more accurate and has greater diagnostic benefits than unguided or fluoroscopy-guided biceps tendon sheath injection.

  7. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of digestive tract lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, S.; Martin, I.; Ballesteros, J. M.; Gomez, C.; Marco, S. F.; Fernandez, P.

    1999-01-01

    To present our experience in ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy of lesions located in the digestive tract. We performed ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy in 14 patients (10 men and 4 women) ranging in age from 7 to 71 years (mean; 519 years). The lesions were located throughout the digestive tract, from the pyriform sinus to the sigmoid colon. The biopsy was carried out with a 5 MHz convex probe equipped with a device to direct the needle. An 18G automatic needle or a 20G Chiba needle was used to obtain specimens for histological study in every case, and additional samples were collected with a 22G needle for cytological examination in 13 of the patients. The ultrasound images corresponded to pseudokidney in 9 cases and extrinsic masses in 5. The diagnosis was obtained from the histological examination in every case (100%) and from cytology in 6 (44.4%), the latter results were less specific. The only complication corresponded to a case of bilioperitoneum. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy is a suitable technique for the histological diagnosis of those lesions of the digestive tract that are visible in ultrasound images, but that for some reason can not be examined by endoscopic biopsy. (Author) 20 refs

  8. A training system for ultrasound-guided needle insertion procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanong; Magee, Derek; Ratnalingam, Rish; Kessel, David

    2007-01-01

    Needle placement into a patient body under guidance of ultrasound is a frequently performed procedure in clinical practice. Safe and successful performance of such procedure requires a high level of spatial reasoning and hand-eye co-ordination skills, which must be developed through intensive practice. In this paper we present a training system designed to improve the skills of interventional radiology trainees in ultrasound-guided needle placement procedures. Key issues involved in the system include surface and volumetric registration, solid texture modelling, spatial calibration, and real-time synthesis and rendering of ultrasound images. Moreover, soft tissue deformation caused by the needle movement and needle cutting is realised using a mass-spring-model approach. These have led to a realistic ultrasound simulation system, which has been shown to be a useful tool for the training of needle insertion procedures. Preliminary results of a construct evaluation study indicate the effectiveness and usefulness of the developed training system.

  9. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...... of inoperable disease. Techniques may still vary based on operator experience. Serious complications exist, but are rare....

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silviu, Ungureanu Bogdan; Daniel, Pirici; Claudiu, Mărgăritescu

    2015-01-01

    ultrasound (EUS)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) probe through a 19G needle in order to achieve a desirable necrosis area in the pancreas. Radiofrequency ablation of the head of the pancreas was performed on 10 Yorkshire pigs with a weight between 25 kg and 35 kg and a length of 40-70 cm. Using an EUS...

  11. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...

  12. A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle biopsies of breast lesions at a regional public hospital in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Objective: To assess the influence of technical variables on the diagnostic yield of breast specimens obtained by using US-LCNB, and the sensitivity of detecting ...

  13. Amoebic liver abscess: Drained by ultrasound guided percutaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: Amoebic Liver Abscess in a 20-month-old child: A case of amoebic liver abscess in a Nigerian child is presented. Management consisted of 10days course of Metronidazole and 5days course of Tinidazole without improvement. This was followed by four sessions of ultrasound guided percutaneous needle ...

  14. Ultrasound-guided wire localization of lesions detected on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wire localization for planned surgical treatment in the management of breast cancer is underutilized in our environment. The objective of this study is to assess the role of ultrasound-guided wire localization of breast masses detected on screening mammography and its impact on biopsy and breast ...

  15. Ultrasound-guided endoscopic transgastric drainage of a post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite of a number of techniques in the armentarium of the paediatric surgeon, the management of pancreatic pseudocysts remains a challenge. We report on a case of a 5-year-old child with a post-traumatic pancreatic pseudocyst who was successfully treated with endoscopic ultrasound-guided transgastric approach.

  16. The use of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane blocks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This study investigated the postoperative analgesic efficacy of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) blocks, in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. Design, setting and subjects: This was a prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled study. Thirty patients were ...

  17. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Monitoring using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal and mechanical effects were investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n=13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. Passive Cavitation Detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity while a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating tissue the initial-softening-then-stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46±0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise. PMID:26168177

  18. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise.

  19. How to achieve ultrasound-guided femoral venous access: the new standard of care in the electrophysiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Benedict M; Child, Nicholas; Roberts, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Bedside vascular ultrasound machines are increasingly available. They are used to facilitate safer vascular access across a number of different specialties. In the electrophysiology laboratory however, where patients are frequently anticoagulated and require the insertion of multiple venous sheaths, anatomical landmark techniques predominate. Despite the high number of vascular complications associated with electrophysiological procedures and the increasing evidence to support its use in electrophysiology, ultrasound remains underutilised. A new standard of care is required. A comprehensive technical report, providing a detailed explanation of this important technique, will provide other electrophysiology centres with the knowledge and justification for adopting ultrasound guidance as their standard practice. We review the increasing body of evidence which demonstrates that routine ultrasound usage can substantially improve the safety of femoral venous access in the electrophysiology laboratory. We offer a comprehensive technical report to guide operators through the process of ultrasound-guided venous access, with a specific focus on the electrophysiology laboratory. Additionally, we detail a novel technique which utilises real-time colour Doppler ultrasound to accurately identify needle tip location during venous puncture. The use of vascular ultrasound to guide femoral venous cannulation is rapid, inexpensive and easily learnt. Ultrasound is readily available and offers the potential to significantly reduce vascular complications in the unique setting of the electrophysiology laboratory. Ultrasound guidance to achieve femoral venous access should be the new standard of care in electrophysiology.

  20. Ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization in prone position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofi Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization (CVC is a commonly performed intraoperative procedure. Traditionally, CVC placement is performed blindly using anatomic landmarks as a guide to vessel position. Real-time ultrasound provides the operator the benefit of visualizing the target vein and the surrounding anatomic structures prior to and during the catheter insertion, thereby minimizing complications and increasing speed of placement. A 22-year-old male underwent open reduction and internal fixation of acetabulum fracture in prone position. Excessive continuous bleeding intraoperatively warranted placement of CVC in right internal jugular vein (IJV, which was not possible in prone position without the help of ultrasound. Best view of right IJV was obtained and CVC was placed using real-time ultrasound without complications. Ultrasound-guided CVC placement can be done in atypical patient positions where traditional anatomic landmark technique has no role. Use of ultrasound not only increases the speed of placement but also reduces complications known with the traditional blind technique.

  1. Ultrasound-guided central venous access using Google Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teresa S; Dameff, Christian J; Tully, Jeffrey L

    2014-12-01

    The use of ultrasound during invasive bedside procedures is quickly becoming the standard of care. Ultrasound machine placement during procedures often requires the practitioner to turn their head during the procedure to view the screen. Such turning has been implicated in unintentional hand movements in novices. Google Glass is a head-mounted computer with a specialized screen capable of projecting images and video into the view of the wearer. Such technology may help decrease unintentional hand movements. Our aim was to evaluate whether or not medical practitioners at various levels of training could use Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided procedure, and to explore potential advantages of this technology. Forty participants of varying training levels were randomized into two groups. One group used Google Glass to perform an ultrasound-guided central line. The other group used traditional ultrasound during the procedure. Video recordings of eye and hand movements were analyzed. All participants from both groups were able to complete the procedure without difficulty. Google Glass wearers took longer to perform the procedure at all training levels (medical student year 1 [MS1]: 193 s vs. 77 s, p > 0.5; MS4: 197s vs. 91s, p ≤ 0.05; postgraduate year 1 [PGY1]: 288s vs. 125 s, p > 0.5; PGY3: 151 s vs. 52 s, p ≤ 0.05), and required more needle redirections (MS1: 4.4 vs. 2.0, p > 0.5; MS4: 4.8 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY1: 4.4 vs. 2.8, p > 0.5; PGY3: 2.0 vs. 1.0, p > 0.5). In this study, it was possible to perform ultrasound-guided procedures with Google Glass. Google Glass wearers, on average, took longer to gain access, and had more needle redirections, but less head movements were noted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Visuospatial Ability as a Predictor of Novice Performance in Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafqat, Atif; Ferguson, Eamonn; Thanawala, Vishal; Bedforth, Nigel M; Hardman, Jonathan G; McCahon, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Visuospatial ability correlates positively with novice performance of simple laparoscopic tasks. The aims of this study were to identify whether visuospatial ability could predict technical performance of an ultrasound-guided needle task by novice operators and to describe how emotional state, intelligence, and fear of failure impact on this. Sixty medical student volunteers enrolled in this observational study. The authors used an instructional video to standardize training for ultrasound-guided needle advancement in a turkey breast model and assessed volunteers' performance independently by two assessors using composite error score (CES) and global rating scale (GRS). The authors assessed their "visuospatial ability" with mental rotation test (MRT), group embedded figures test, and Alice Heim group ability test. Emotional state was judged with UWIST Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL), and fear of failure and general cognitive ability were judged with numerical reasoning test. High CES scores (high error rate) were associated with low MRT scores (ρ = -0.54; P emotions, GRS scores were low when anxiety levels were high (ρ = -0.35; P = 0.005) and CES scores (errors) were low when individuals reported feeling vigorous and active (ρ = -0.30; P = 0.01). An MRT predicts novice performance of an ultrasound-guided needling task on a turkey model and as a trait measure could be used as a tool to focus training resources on less-able individuals. Anxiety adversely affects performance. Therefore, both may prove useful in directing targeted training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia.

  3. Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Background: Obstructive uropathy is a common problem in urologic practice; temporary relief of obstruction in the upper tract poses a significant challenge. Ultrasound‑guided percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) is an option for upper tract drainage; compared to fluoroscopic guidance, it is readily available, ...

  4. Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Nephrostomy: Experience at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstructive uropathy is a common problem in urologic practice; temporary relief of obstruction in the upper tract poses a significant challenge. Ultrasound‑guided percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) is an option for upper tract drainage; compared to fluoroscopic guidance, it is readily available, affordable, and not ...

  5. Successful Intravascular Ultrasound-Guided Transradial Coronary Intervention with a 4Fr Guiding Catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Sadamatsu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Minimizing the catheter size can reduce vascular access complications and contrast dye usage in coronary angiography. The small diameter of the 4Fr guiding catheter has limited the use of several angioplasty devices such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in the past. However, the combination of a novel IVUS catheter and a 0.010 guidewire makes it possible to perform IVUS-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a 4Fr guiding catheter. We herein report the case of a 51-year-old man with silent myocardial ischemia who underwent IVUS-guided transradial PCI with a 4Fr guiding catheter.

  6. Optimizing sonication protocols for transthoracic focused ultrasound surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Volovick, A.; Cao, R.; Nabi, G.; Cochran, S.; Melzer, A.; Huang, Z.

    2012-11-01

    During transthoracic focused ultrasound surgery (TFUS), the intervening ribs absorb and reflect the majority of the ultrasound energy excited by an acoustic source, resulting in pain, bone injuries and insufficient energy delivered to the target organs of liver, kidney, and pancreas. Localized hot spots may also exist at the interfaces between the ribs and soft tissue and in the highly absorptive regions such as the skin and connective tissue. The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of focal beam distortion and frequency-dependent rib heating in TFUS and to propose possible techniques to reduce the side-effects of rib heating and increase ultrasound efficacy. Frequency-dependent heating at the target and the ribs were estimated using finite element analysis (PZFlex, Weidlinger Associates Inc, USA) along with experimental verification on a range of different phantoms. The ratio of ultrasonic power density at the target and the ribs, the time-varying spatial distribution of temperature, and the ablated focus of each sonication were taken as key indicators to determine the optimal operating frequency. Comparison with a patient specific model was also made. TFUS seems to be useful to treat tumours that are small and near the surface of the abdominal organs. For targets deep inside these organs, severe attenuation of energy occurs, suggesting that purely ultrasound thermal ablation with advanced heating patterns will have limited effects in improving the treatment efficacy. Results demonstrate that the optimal ultrasound frequency is around 0.8 MHz for the configurations considered, but this may shift to higher frequencies with changes in the axial and lateral positions of the tumours relative to the ribs. To date, we have elucidated the most important effects and correlated these with idealised anatomical geometry. The changes in frequency and other techniques such as selection of excited element patterns in FUS arrays had some effect. However, more advanced

  7. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Evaluation of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Benign Uterine Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chong-Qing; Zhang, Rui-Tao; Xiong, Yu; Chen, Li; Wang, Jian; Huang, Guo-Hua; Li, Ke-Quan; Zhang, Lian; Bai, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As a noninvasive treatment technique, ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been considered as a routine treatment for uterine fibroids and adenomyosis in China. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as another option to assess the treatment efficacy during HIFU treatment. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the adverse effects of HIFU ablation for benign uterine diseases in a group of patients studied with ultrasound contrast agent (UCA), in comparison with a group of patients not exposed to UCA. From November 2010 to December 2013, 2604 patients with benign uterine diseases were treated with HIFU. Among them, 1300 patients were exposed to an UCA, whereas 1304 patients were not. During HIFU procedure, the incidences of leg pain, sacral/buttock pain, groin pain, treatment area pain, and the discomfort “hot” sensation on skin were higher in the patients who were exposed to SonoVue (Bracco, Milan, Italy) than those who were not (20.5% vs 11.7%, 52.5% vs 42.3%, 6.5% vs 4.5%, 68.9% vs 55.4%, and 48.1% vs 42.9%, respectively). Among the postoperative adverse effects, the incidence of lower abdominal pain was significantly higher in patients who were exposed to an UCA than those who were not (51.2% vs 39.9%, P < 0.05). Two patients who were exposed to an UCA had acute renal function failure. In conclusion, UCA may increase the incidences of some common HIFU-related adverse effects during HIFU treatment for benign uterine diseases, but most of which were acceptable and self-limited. After HIFU treatment, renal function should be monitored in patients with a history of hypertension or taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25906100

  8. Pre-puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mahmoud; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2015-10-01

    Palpation method is widely used in clinical practice to identify the puncture site during combined spinal-epidural (CSE) blocks. Tuffier's line, is an anatomical landmark between two iliac crests (inter-cristal), which is widely used to identify the puncture site during CSE blocks is not always an indicator for specific vertebral level or inter-vertebral space. One hundred and Ten (110) women were scheduled for normal vaginal delivery and were randomized into two equal groups; palpation group and an ultrasound guided group to detect the efficacy of puncture ultrasound before CSE blocks to increase chances of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt and to reduce the number of attempts or punctures during insertion of CSE catheter. There were no significant differences between two studied groups regarding; maternal age, weight and height, while, there was a significant difference between two studied groups regarding; parity. Percentage of successful CSE procedure on the first attempt was significantly higher (67.27%) in ultrasound compared to palpation group (40%). Number of punctures (attempts) were significantly less in ultrasound (1.2 ± 0.6) compared to palpation group (2.3 ± 0.8) and the number of redirections was also significantly less in ultrasound (1.4 ± 0.5) compared to palpation group (2.8 ± 1.6). Although, time to identify puncture site was significantly longer in ultrasound compared to palpation group and total procedure time was longer in ultrasound (9.1 ± 1.5 min) compared to palpation group (6.2 ± 1.2 min), there was no significant difference between two studied groups regarding; time to identify puncture site and total procedure time. Two cases of dural puncture in palpation versus no cases in ultrasound group and two cases of intravascular catheter placement (one in each group), with no significant difference between two groups. Pre- puncture ultrasound guided epidural insertion before vaginal delivery, increases the chance of a

  9. Ultrasound guided aspiration cytology of neck mass except thyroid mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Park, Cheong Soo; Lee, Gwang Gil

    1988-01-01

    Results of ultrasound guided aspiration cytology of extrathyroidal neck masses of 73 patients were reviewed. Included cases were 23 malignant lesions; 16 metastatic tumors, 4 lymphomas, 3 salivary gland tumors and 50 benign lesions: 24 tuberculous lymphadenites, 15 abscess, 3 benign lymph node hyperplasias, etc. There were one case of false negative and none of false positive result for malignancy. In two cases of malignancy, insufficient cellular material was obtained. In one case of lymphoma, and a benign lymph node hyperplasia, it was difficult to distinguish between benignancy and malignancy on cytologic smear. For the malignant lesions, sensitivity was 83%, specificity was 98%, and overall accuracy was 93%. There were none who had suffered adverse effect from the procedure. Ultrasound guided aspiration cytology seems to be simple, accurate and safe diagnostic modality for neck masses especially in condition that malignancy can not be excluded

  10. Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy: Current Status and Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sung Il; Lee, Hak Jong; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Eun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    In Korea, the incidence of prostate cancer in 2002 was sixth among the malignancies diagnosed in men, but it was the most rapidly increasing cancer. As many prostate cancers are indistinguishable from normal prostate tissue as determined on an ultrasound examination, the randomized systematic transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy is the gold standard for the detection of prostate cancer. Indications for a TRUS guided prostate biopsy including an elevated level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and an abnormal digital rectal exam, as well as patient preparation and procedure techniques including anesthesia are reviewed in this report. This report also considers controversies about a prostate biopsy such as the ideal number of biopsy cores, usefulness of PSA derivatives, effective methods for local anesthesia, and the use of patient preparation questionnaires covering topics such as the paucity of anticoagulants and the use of antibiotics and enemas

  11. Pulmonary Vein Isolation by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Antz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI using radiofrequency current (RFC ablation is a potentially curative treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. The shortcomings of the RFC technology (technically challenging, long procedure times, complications steadily kindle the interest in new energy sources and catheter designs. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU has the ability to precisely focus ultrasound waves in a defined area with a high energy density. HIFU balloon catheters (BC positioned at the PV ostia appear to be an ideal tool to transmit the ablation energy in a circumferential manner to the PV ostia and may therefore bear substantial advantage over conventional ablation catheters in PVI procedures. In clinical trials the HIFU BC has shown promising success rates similar to RFC catheter ablation for PVI in patients with AF. However, procedure times are still long and serious complications have been observed. Therefore, it may be a valuable alternative to the conventional techniques in selected patients but further clinical trials have to be initiated.

  12. Ultrasound-guided genitourinary interventions: principles and techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Ultrasound (US) is often used to guide various interventional procedures in the genitourinary (GU) tract because it can provide real-time imaging without any radiation hazard. Moreover, US can clearly visualize the pathway of an aspiration or biopsy needle to ensure the safety of the intervention. US guidance also helps clinicians to access lesions via the transabdominal, transhepatic, transvaginal, transrectal, and transperineal routes. Hence, US-guided procedures are useful for radiologists who wish to perform GU interventions. However, US-guided procedures and interventions are difficult for beginners because they involve a steep initial learning curve. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic principles and techniques of US-guided GU interventions.

  13. Ultrasound-guided genitourinary interventions: principles and techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Kwan Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is often used to guide various interventional procedures in the genitourinary (GU tract because it can provide real-time imaging without any radiation hazard. Moreover, US can clearly visualize the pathway of an aspiration or biopsy needle to ensure the safety of the intervention. US guidance also helps clinicians to access lesions via the transabdominal, transhepatic, transvaginal, transrectal, and transperineal routes. Hence, US-guided procedures are useful for radiologists who wish to perform GU interventions. However, US-guided procedures and interventions are difficult for beginners because they involve a steep initial learning curve. The purpose of this review is to describe the basic principles and techniques of US-guided GU interventions.

  14. Assessment of ultrasound-guided procedures in preclinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Richard; Stolz, Lori Ann; Breshears, Elliot; Patanwala, Asad E; Stea, Nicholas; Hawbaker, Nicolaus; Thompson, Matthew; Sanders, Arthur Barry; Adhikari, Srikar

    2017-10-01

    Medical graduates entering residency often lack confidence and competence in procedural skills. Implementation of ultrasound (US)-guided procedures into undergraduate medical education is a logical step to addressing medical student procedural competency. The objective of our study was to determine the impact of an US teaching workshop geared toward training medical students in how to perform three distinct US-guided procedures. Cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. Following a 1-h didactic session, a sample of 11 students out of 105 (10.5 %) were asked to perform three procedures each (total 33 procedures) to establish a baseline of procedural proficiency. Following a 1-h didactic session, students were asked to perform 33 procedures using needle guidance with ultrasound to establish a baseline of student proficiency. Also, a baseline survey regarding student opinions, self-assessment of skills, and US procedure knowledge was administered before and after the educational intervention. After the educational workshop, students' procedural competency was assessed by trained ultrasound clinicians. One-hundred-and-five third-year medical students participated in this study. The average score for the knowledge-based test improved from 46 % (SD 16 %) to 74 % (SD 14 %) (p technical skill at performing US-guided procedures.

  15. Faculty staff-guided versus self-guided ultrasound training for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, George A; Kelmenson, Daniel A; Noble, Vicki E; Murray, Alice F; Currier, Paul F

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonography is of growing importance within internal medicine (IM), but the optimal method of training doctors to use it is uncertain. In this study, the authors provide the first objective comparison of two approaches to training IM residents in ultrasonography. In this randomised trial, a simulation-based ultrasound training curriculum was implemented during IM intern orientation at a tertiary care teaching hospital. All 72 incoming interns attended a lecture and were given access to online modules. Interns were then randomly assigned to a 4-hour faculty-guided (FG) or self-guided (SG) ultrasound training session in a simulation laboratory with both human and manikin models. Interns were asked to self-assess their competence in ultrasonography and underwent an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess their competence in basic and procedurally oriented ultrasound tasks. The primary outcome was the score on the OSCE. Faculty-guided training was superior to self-guided training based on the OSCE scores. Subjects in the FG training group achieved significantly higher OSCE scores on the two subsets of task completion (0.9-point difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.54; p = 0.008) and ultrasound image quality (2.43-point difference, 95% CI 1.5-3.36; p training groups demonstrated an increase in self-assessed competence after their respective training sessions and there was little difference between the groups. Subjects rated the FG training group much more favourably than the SG training group. Both FG and SG ultrasound training curricula can improve the self-reported competence of IM interns in ultrasonography. However, FG training was superior to SG training in both skills acquisition and intern preference. Incorporating mandatory ultrasound training into IM residencies can address the perceived need for ultrasound training, improve confidence and procedural skills, and may enhance patient safety. However, the optimal training method

  16. An Ultrasound Imaging-Guided Robotic HIFU Ablation Experimental System and Accuracy Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chih Yu; Syu, Jia Hao; Tseng, Ching Shiow; Chang, Chih-Ju

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, noninvasive thermal treatment by using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has high potential in tumor treatment. The goal of this research is to develop an ultrasound imaging-guided robotic HIFU ablation system for tumor treatment. The system integrates the technologies of ultrasound image-assisted guidance, robotic positioning control, and HIFU treatment planning. With the assistance of ultrasound image guidance technology, the tumor size and location can be determined from ultrasound images as well as the robotic arm can be controlled to position the HIFU transducer to focus on the target tumor. After the development of the system, several experiments were conducted to measure the positioning accuracy of this system. The results show that the average positioning error is 1.01 mm with a standard deviation 0.34, and HIFU ablation accuracy is 1.32 mm with a standard deviation 0.58, which means this system is confirmed with its possibility and accuracy.

  17. Noninvasive skin tightening: focus on new ultrasound techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabi SG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Guillen Fabi Goldman, Butterwick, Fitzpatrick, Groff and Fabi, Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Microfocused ultrasound (MFU has been recently developed to meet the ever-growing public demand for achieving significant, noninvasive skin lifting and tightening. MFU can be focused on subcutaneous tissue where the temperature briefly reaches greater than 60°C, producing small (<1 mm3 thermal coagulation points to a depth of up to 5 mm within the mid-to-deep reticular layer of the dermis and subdermis. The intervening papillary dermal and epidermal layers of skin remain unaffected. The application of heat at these discrete thermal coagulation points causes collagen fibers in the facial planes such as the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and platysma, as well as the deep reticular dermis, to become denatured, contracting and stimulating de novo collagen. A commercially available device combines MFU with high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V, which enables visualization of tissue planes to a depth of 8 mm and allows the user to see where the MFU energy will be applied (Ultherapy®; Ulthera Inc., Mesa, AZ, USA. Using different transducers, MFU-V treatment can be customized to meet the unique physical characteristics of each patient by adjusting energy and focal depth of the emitted ultrasound. By targeting the facial superficial musculoaponeurotic system, noninvasive tightening and lifting of sagging facial and neck skin and improvements in the appearance of wrinkles can be achieved. MFU-V can also improve lines and wrinkles of the décolleté. Treatment protocols for the use of MFU-V continue to be refined, and its use in combination with other rejuvenation techniques has been demonstrated. Brief discomfort that often occurs during treatment can be minimized with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other treatment-related adverse events include transient erythema, edema, and occasional bruising. MFU-V is

  18. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous injection of methylene blue to identify nerve pathology and guide surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Joseph A; Breshears, Jonathan D; Arnaout, Omar; Simon, Neil G; Hastings-Robinson, Ashley M; Aleshi, Pedram; Kliot, Michel

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to provide a technique that could be used in the preoperative period to facilitate the surgical exploration of peripheral nerve pathology. METHODS The authors describe a technique in which 1) ultrasonography is used in the immediate preoperative period to identify target peripheral nerves, 2) an ultrasound-guided needle electrode is used to stimulate peripheral nerves to confirm their position, and then 3) a methylene blue (MB) injection is performed to mark the peripheral nerve pathology to facilitate surgical exploration. RESULTS A cohort of 13 patients with varying indications for peripheral nerve surgery is presented in which ultrasound guidance, stimulation, and MB were used to localize and create a road map for surgeries. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative ultrasound-guided MB administration is a promising technique that peripheral nerve surgeons could use to plan and execute surgery.

  19. Advanced Ultrasound-Guided Interventions for Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Evan; Jelsing, Elena; Onishi, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is increasingly recognized as an important cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Tendinopathy is thought to be principally a degenerative process, rather than inflammatory as was traditionally believed. Consequently, traditional tendinopathy treatments focused solely on decreasing inflammation have often been ineffective or even harmful. The advancement of ultrasonography as for guidance of outpatient musculoskeletal procedures has facilitated the development of novel percutaneous procedures for the treatment of tendinopathy, mostly by using mechanical intervention to stimulate regeneration. Several of these techniques, including percutaneous needle tenotomy, percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy, high-volume injection, and percutaneous needle scraping, are reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in bariatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusasco, Claudia; Corradi, Francesco; Zattoni, Pier Luigi; Launo, Claudio; Leykin, Yigal; Palermo, Salvatore

    2009-10-01

    Central venous catheterization may be difficult in morbidly obese patients because anatomic landmarks are often obscured. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in 55 patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The usefulness of ultrasonic examination combined with intraatrial electrocardiogram as a diagnostic tool for catheter misplacement was studied. Preliminary ultrasound examination of the neck vessels demonstrated anatomical variations in the position of internal jugular vein in 19 cases and four unrecognized asymptomatic thromboses of the right internal jugular vein. Central venous catheterization was successful in all 55 patients, in 51 with single skin puncture, and in 42 with single vein puncture. In three cases in whom the catheter was misplaced, this was detected by bedside ultrasonic examination during the procedure and immediately corrected by real-time echographic visualization. No arterial puncture, no hematoma, and no pneumothorax occurred in any patient. Successful catheter placement was also confirmed in all patients by post-operative chest X-ray. No evidence of infection or thrombosis subsequently was noted. The use of ultrasound guidance may increase the success rate and decrease the incidence of complications associated with central venous cannulation. The advantages of this approach is visualization of the anatomical structures at puncture site prior to skin puncture and the ability to track needle and guide-wire placement during the procedure. With its high accuracy in detecting catheter misplacement, bedside ultrasonic examination combined with intraatrial electrocardiogram may further decrease morbidity associated with misplaced central venous catheters.

  1. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications.

  2. Ultrasound-guided arthroscopic management of hallux rigidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz M. Paczesny

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The use of metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy in the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans was first described in 1988. The technique produces good results. However, it can be difficult to enter a joint when it is deformed by degenerative disease. Sonography is a modern visualisation modality which can be used in orthopaedic surgery. Aim: To describe a method of intraoperative sonographic navigation during first metatarso-phalangeal joint arthroscopy. Material and methods: The modality was used in 3 patients. The joint was visualised in the ultrasound scanner. After confirming the intra-articular position of the guide needle, a medial portal was established. The procedure started with the removal and vaporisation of the hypertrophic synovium. Gradual resection of the osteophytes was then carried out. The procedure was terminated after the ultrasound image showed that a smooth upper surface of the metatarsal head had been achieved. Results : All 3 patients were satisfied with the procedure and function of the treated feet. Average surgery time was 81 min. No complications were found. Conclusions : Mini-invasive treatment of hallux rigidus with sonography-guided arthroscopic cheilectomy appears to be a reproducible procedure leading to good clinical results. We encourage surgeons familiar with ultrasound visualisation of the joints to use the technique described in this paper in the arthroscopic treatment of hallux rigidus.

  3. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation Training: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Xu; Trivedi, Vatsal; AlSaflan, AbdulHadi A; Todd, Suzanne Clare; Tricco, Andrea C; McCartney, Colin J L; Boet, Sylvain

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) has become the criterion standard of regional anesthesia practice. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia teaching programs often use simulation, and guidelines have been published to help guide URGA education. This systematic review aimed to examine the effectiveness of simulation-based education for the acquisition and maintenance of competence in UGRA. Studies identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ERIC were included if they assessed simulation-based UGRA teaching with outcomes measured at Kirkpatrick level 2 (knowledge and skills), 3 (transfer of learning to the workplace), or 4 (patient outcomes). Two authors independently reviewed all identified references for eligibility, abstracted data, and appraised quality. After screening 176 citations and 45 full-text articles, 12 studies were included. Simulation-enhanced training improved knowledge acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) when compared with nonsimulation training. Seven studies measuring skill acquisition (Kirkpatrick level 2) found that simulation-enhanced UGRA training was significantly more effective than alternative teaching methods or no intervention. One study measuring transfer of learning into the clinical setting (Kirkpatrick level 3) found no difference between simulation-enhanced UGRA training and non-simulation-based training. However, this study was discontinued early because of technical challenges. Two studies examined patient outcomes (Kirkpatrick level 4), and one of these found that simulation-based UGRA training improved patient outcomes compared with didactic teaching. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia knowledge and skills significantly improved with simulation training. The acquired UGRA skills may be transferred to the clinical setting; however, further studies are required to confirm these changes translate to improved patient outcomes.

  5. Ultrasound-guided injection for plantar fasciitis: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Nair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantar fasciitis (PF is a distressing condition experienced by many patients. Although self-limiting, it tends to become a chronic ailment if the precipitating factors are not addressed. One of the modality of treating PF is intra-lesional corticosteroid injection. This was done using palpation technique earlier but nowadays many specialists use ultrasound (US imaging as a guide to give injection accurately instead of inadvertently damaging the plantar fascia or injecting into surrounding soft tissue, both of which can have serious implications. We did a literature search in Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases to find out articles describing US-guided corticosteroid injection for treating PF and whether guided injection was effective than injection given by palpation.

  6. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation of human primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jung, Yujin; Chung, Yong An; Song, In-Uk; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is making progress as a new non-invasive mode of regional brain stimulation. Current evidence of FUS-mediated neurostimulation for humans has been limited to the observation of subjective sensory manifestations and electrophysiological responses, thus warranting the identification of stimulated brain regions. Here, we report FUS sonication of the primary visual cortex (V1) in humans, resulting in elicited activation not only from the sonicated brain area, but also from the network of regions involved in visual and higher-order cognitive processes (as revealed by simultaneous acquisition of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging). Accompanying phosphene perception was also reported. The electroencephalo graphic (EEG) responses showed distinct peaks associated with the stimulation. None of the participants showed any adverse effects from the sonication based on neuroimaging and neurological examinations. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic profile showed the presence of individual variability in terms of the location and intensity of the acoustic focus. With exquisite spatial selectivity and capability for depth penetration, FUS may confer a unique utility in providing non-invasive stimulation of region-specific brain circuits for neuroscientific and therapeutic applications.

  7. MO-AB-210-03: Workshop [Advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  8. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part v - EUS-Guided Therapeutic Interventions (short version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, P; Jenssen, C.; Hocke, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The fifth section of the Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) assesses the evidence for all the categories of endoscopic ultrasound-guided treatment reported to date. Celiac plexus neurolysis...

  9. Combinational light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment for HeLa cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Se-Woon; Park, Kitae; Park, Chulwoo; Ryu, Jaemyung; Choi, Hojong

    2017-12-01

    Light sources such as laser and light emitting diode or ultrasound devices have been widely used for cancer therapy and regenerative medicines, since they are more cost-effective and less harmful than radiation therapy, chemotherapy or magnetic treatment. Compared to laser and low intensity ultrasound techniques, light emitting diode and high frequency focused ultrasound shows enhanced therapeutic effects, especially for small tumors. We propose combinational light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment for human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Individual red, green, and blue light emitting diode light only, high frequency focused ultrasound only, or light emitting diode light combined with high frequency focused ultrasound treatments were applied in order to characterize the responses of HeLa cells. Cell density exposed by blue light emitting diode light combined with high frequency focused ultrasound (2.19 ± 0.58%) was much lower than that of cells exposed by red and green light emitting diode lights (81.71 ± 9.92% and 61.81 ± 4.09%), blue light emitting diode light (11.19 ± 2.51%) or high frequency focused ultrasound only (9.72 ± 1.04%). We believe that the proposed combinational blue light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment could have therapeutic benefits to alleviate cancer cell proliferation.

  10. Gelatin model for training ultrasound-guided puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Campos Moraes Amato

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is indispensable that members of the medical profession receive the technical training needed to enable them to rapidly obtain effective vascular access. Training procedures should be used judiciously to familiarize students with the technique. However, existing models are expensive or ineffective, and models need to be developed that are similar to what will be encountered in real patients.OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate creation and application of a gelatin model for training ultrasound-guided puncture.METHOS: The model was made using a mixture of colorless gelatin and water in a transparent plastic receptacle with two pairs of orifices of different diameters, through which two plastic tubes were inserted, to simulate blood vessels.RESULTS: The model was a close approximation to the real medical procedure in several aspects, since gelatin has a similar consistency to human tissues, providing a more faithful reproduction of the tactile sensation at the moment when the needle reaches the interior of a vessel and its contents are aspirated.CONCLUSIONS: The method proposed here can be used to easily construct a low-cost model using everyday materials that is suitable for large-scale training of ultrasound-guided puncture.

  11. Development of an ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jackie

    Use of the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) has gained popularity over the past 30 years in the USA and over the past 15 years in the UK. The PICC was initially used for specific purposes, such as the delivery of parenteral nutrition and chemotherapy, but its use has expanded both within the acute hospital and community settings. This article describes an ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service that has been set up in a district general hospital to expand the service within the oncology department and to begin a service for non-oncology patients. As expected, patients who have benefited from the development of this service include those requiring parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy and intravenous therapy in the community. However, retrospective audit has shown that the largest group of patients to benefit from the ultrasound-guided PICC insertion service was those with difficult venous access for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are discussed, along with an overview of the benefits the service has provided to other groups of patients, and associated benefits to the hospital trust.

  12. Multifunctional pulse generator for high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can achieve high spatial resolution for the treatment of diseases. A major technical challenge in implementing a HIFU therapeutic system is to generate high-voltage high-current signals for effectively exciting a multichannel HIFU transducer at high efficiencies. In this paper, we present the development of a multifunctional multichannel generator/driver. The generator can produce a long burst as well as an extremely high-voltage short pulse of pseudosinusoidal waves (trigger HIFU) and second-harmonic superimposed waves for HIFU transmission. The transmission timing, waveform, and frequency can be controlled using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) via a universal serial bus (USB) microcontroller. The hardware is implemented in a compact printed circuit board. The test results of trigger HIFU reveal that the power consumption and the temperature rise of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors were reduced by 19.9% and 38.2 °C, respectively, from the previous design. The highly flexible performance of the novel generator/driver is demonstrated in the generation of second-harmonic superimposed waves, which is useful for cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment, although the previous design exhibited difficulty in generating it.

  13. Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Telis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men. As new focal therapies become more popular in treatment of prostate cancer, failure cases requiring salvage therapy with either surgical or other techniques are being reported. Objective. To report the options in treatment of prostate cancer after recurrence or failure of the primary treatment modality. Methods. We report a salvage robotic assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP for prostate cancer recurrence following high intensity focused ultrasound treatment (HIFU in the United States. Results. A 67-year-old man who underwent HIFU treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma 2 years prior was presented with a rising prostate specific antigen of 6.1 ng/mL to our clinic. A biopsy proven recurrent disease in the area of previous treatment documented the failure of treatment. The patient elected to undergo a salvage RALP. The operation time was 159 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1 with no complications. The catheter was removed on post-op day 10. The patient reserved sexual function and urinary continence. The PSA levels on 6 months’ follow-up are undetectable. Conclusions. Salvage RALP is an effective and safe treatment choice for recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following failed HIFU treatment if operated by an experienced surgeon.

  14. Ultrasound-guided drainage of subcutaneous abscesses on the trunk is feasible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Søren; Rud, Bo; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Subcutaneous trunk abscesses are frequent, and current treatment options generally involve incision. By contrast, the standard care for breast abcesses is ultrasound-guided drainage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of ultrasound-guided drainage combined with antibiotics...

  15. Microwave ablation of liver metastases guided by contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, T; Skjoldbye, B O; Nolsoe, C P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of microwave (MW) ablation of liver metastases guided by B-mode ultrasound (US) and contrast-enhanced US (CEUS).......The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of microwave (MW) ablation of liver metastases guided by B-mode ultrasound (US) and contrast-enhanced US (CEUS)....

  16. Technical tips to perform safe and effective ultrasound guided steroid joint injections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Dimitri A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the technique used to perform ultrasound guided steroid joint injections in children in a group of joints that can be injected using ultrasound as the only image guidance modality. The technique is described and didactic figures are provided to illustrate key technical concepts. It is very important to be familiar with the sonographic appearance of the pediatric joints and the developing bone when performing ultrasound-guided joint injections in children.

  17. Design and tests of an adaptive focusing neutron guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valicu, Roxana Georgiana

    2012-01-01

    This work contains the Monte Carlo Simulations, as well as the first tests with an adaptive focusing neutron guide for creating a focus that does not depend on the wavelength of the incoming neutrons. All known neutron guides consist of a rectangular shape, built out of four glass plates. The inner side of the guide is coated with a complex structure of metal layers. This reflects and guides the neutrons (in analogy with the reflection of the light). For beam focusing neutron guides with fixed curvature can be built. For most experiments it is important that the beam is focused on to a small surface of the sample. In the case of focusing guides with fixed curvature it has been observed that the focusing (dimension and position of the beam focus) is wavelength dependent. This is why for measurements that are performed with different wavelengths it is very important to change the curvature of the neutron guide in order to obtain optimal results. In this work we have designed, constructed and tested a guide where we can change the curvature during the experiment. In this way we can obtain a variable curvature in horizontal as well as in vertical direction. For a curvature in the horizontal or vertical direction it is not necessary to move all four walls, only two of the opposed plates. The element that changes the curvature of the guide consists of an acting element (piezomotor) as well as a rod that can be operated by the piezomotor and that acts through a lever onto the plate. The action of a force and a consecutive torsion momentum at the free end of the plate changes the curvature of the whole plate in an almost parabolic way. Making use of the Monte Carlo simulations we were able to determine the optimal curvature for each wavelength of a neutron guide for the spectrometer TOFTOF installed at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II). First tests have shown that with an adaptive focusing guide one can gain up to a factor three in intensity at

  18. Design and tests of an adaptive focusing neutron guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicu, Roxana Georgiana

    2012-08-23

    This work contains the Monte Carlo Simulations, as well as the first tests with an adaptive focusing neutron guide for creating a focus that does not depend on the wavelength of the incoming neutrons. All known neutron guides consist of a rectangular shape, built out of four glass plates. The inner side of the guide is coated with a complex structure of metal layers. This reflects and guides the neutrons (in analogy with the reflection of the light). For beam focusing neutron guides with fixed curvature can be built. For most experiments it is important that the beam is focused on to a small surface of the sample. In the case of focusing guides with fixed curvature it has been observed that the focusing (dimension and position of the beam focus) is wavelength dependent. This is why for measurements that are performed with different wavelengths it is very important to change the curvature of the neutron guide in order to obtain optimal results. In this work we have designed, constructed and tested a guide where we can change the curvature during the experiment. In this way we can obtain a variable curvature in horizontal as well as in vertical direction. For a curvature in the horizontal or vertical direction it is not necessary to move all four walls, only two of the opposed plates. The element that changes the curvature of the guide consists of an acting element (piezomotor) as well as a rod that can be operated by the piezomotor and that acts through a lever onto the plate. The action of a force and a consecutive torsion momentum at the free end of the plate changes the curvature of the whole plate in an almost parabolic way. Making use of the Monte Carlo simulations we were able to determine the optimal curvature for each wavelength of a neutron guide for the spectrometer TOFTOF installed at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II). First tests have shown that with an adaptive focusing guide one can gain up to a factor three in intensity at

  19. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  20. Focused ultrasound influence on calcein-loaded thermosensitive stealth liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novell, Anthony; Al Sabbagh, Chantal; Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Gaillard, Cédric; Tsapis, Nicolas; Fattal, Elias; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2015-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is a versatile technology for non-invasive thermal therapies in oncology. Indeed, this technology has great potential for local heat-mediated drug delivery from thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs), thus improving therapeutic efficacy and reducing toxicity profiles. In the present study we evaluated the influence of FUS parameters on the release of calcein from TSLs used to model a hydrophilic drug. Quantitative calcein release from TSLs (DPPC/CHOL/DSPE-PEG2000: 90/5/5) and non-thermosensitive liposomes (NTSLs) (DPPC/CHOL/DSPE-PEG2000: 65/30/5) was measured by spectrofluorimetry after both water bath and FUS-induced in vitro heating. The heating of TSLs at 42 °C in a water bath resulted in a maximum calcein release of 45%. No additional calcein release was observed at temperatures above 42 °C. A similar percentage of calcein release was achieved when TSLs were exposed to 1 MHz sinusoidal waves at peak negative pressure of 1.5 MPa, 40% duty cycle, for 10 min (i.e. above 42 °C). No release was detected when NTSLs were heated in a water bath. For both TSLs and NTSLs, the calcein release was increased by more than 10% for acoustic pressures ranging from 1.5 MPa to 2 MPa. This additional release was attributed to the mechanical stress generated by FUS, which was sufficient to disrupt the liposomal membrane. Furthermore, analysis of cryo-TEM images showed a significant decrease in liposome size (14%) induced by the thermal effect, whereas the liposome diameter remained unaffected by the FUS-triggered non-thermal effects.

  1. Focused ultrasound subthalamotomy in patients with asymmetric Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fernández, Raul; Rodríguez-Rojas, Rafael; Del Álamo, Marta; Hernández-Fernández, Frida; Pineda-Pardo, Jose A; Dileone, Michele; Alonso-Frech, Fernando; Foffani, Guglielmo; Obeso, Ignacio; Gasca-Salas, Carmen; de Luis-Pastor, Esther; Vela, Lydia; Obeso, José A

    2018-01-01

    Ablative neurosurgery has been used to treat Parkinson's disease for many decades. MRI-guided focused ultrasound allows focal lesions to be made in deep brain structures without skull incision. We investigated the safety and preliminary efficacy of unilateral subthalamotomy by focused ultrasound in Parkinson's disease. This prospective, open-label pilot study was done at CINAC (Centro Integral de Neurociencias), University Hospital HM Puerta del Sur in Madrid, Spain. Eligible participants had Parkinson's disease with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism. Patients with severe dyskinesia, history of stereotactic surgery or brain haemorrhage, a diagnosis of an unstable cardiac or psychiatric disease, or a skull density ratio of 0·3 or less were excluded. Enrolled patients underwent focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. The subthalamic nucleus was targeted by means of brain images acquired with a 3-Tesla MRI apparatus. Several sonications above the definitive ablation temperature of 55°C were delivered and adjusted according to clinical response. The primary outcomes were safety and a change in the motor status of the treated hemibody as assessed with part III of the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS III) in both off-medication and on-medication states at 6 months. Adverse events were monitored up to 48 h after treatment and at scheduled clinic visits at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02912871. Between April 26 and June 14, 2016, ten patients with markedly asymmetric parkinsonism that was poorly controlled pharmacologically were enrolled for focused ultrasound unilateral subthalamotomy. By 6 months follow-up, 38 incidents of adverse events had been recorded, none of which were serious or severe. Seven adverse events were present at 6 months. Three of these adverse events were directly related to subthalamotomy: off-medication dyskinesia in the treated arm

  2. Ultrasound-guided implantation techniques in treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, S.S.; Torp-Pedersen, S.T.; Holm, H.H.

    1989-01-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound-guided interstitial radiotherapy is an attractive and elegant technique for the administration of high-dose local radiotherapy to the prostate. The complications of seed implantation are those associated with the radiation rather than with the technique of implantation. However, radiotherapy has not provided impressive local control of the disease or prolonged survival. The poor disease control was not attributed to poor seed placement, but rather to the inadequacy of 125 I in controlling the cancer. The essence of nonsurgical treatment for prostate cancer is the use of effective imaging. Experience in the field of minimally invasive surgery has shown that ultrasound is the ideal imaging system for targeting treatments because of its ease of use and the absence of adverse effects. As the newer techniques of implantation come to be accepted, it is hoped that the complications of rectal and bladder radiation injury will decrease and the therapeutic benefits increase. The clinical trials required to define the precise role of each of the modalities of treatment must take nodal staging into account and must be compared with the gold standard of radical prostatectomy in the treatment of early confined disease

  3. Ultrasound-guided drainage of deep pelvic abscesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Torben; Nolsøe, Christian; Skjoldbye, Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate and evaluate the ultrasound-guided drainage of deep pelvic abscesses in which transabdominal percutaneous access could not be performed because of overlying structures. A retrospective analysis of 32 consecutive patients with 33 deep pelvic abscesses...... (median diameter 7 cm), 19 were treated with catheter drainage and 18 of these cases resulted in favorable clinical outcomes. Of the smaller abscesses (median diameter 4 cm), 14 were treated with needle drainage. In two of these cases, follow-up US showed that a repeat puncture and drainage was necessary....... All needle drainages resulted in favorable clinical outcomes. Sixteen of the 29 transrectal or transvaginal drainage procedures were performed without any anesthesia (10 were performed with a needle and six were performed with a catheter). Apart from minor discomfort during the drainage procedure...

  4. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Irrigation of Calcific Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Carmelo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-11-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT) is a common disease that may cause highly disabling shoulder pain. No treatment is required for asymptomatic calcifications; mild symptoms may be treated conservatively. Among several therapeutic options, ultrasound-guided percutaneous irrigation of calcific tendinopathy (US-PICT) is currently accepted as the first-line safe and effective treatment for RCCT, with significant pain improvement and a very low rate of minor complications. Different approaches have been reported to dissolve calcified deposits, all including the use of a fluid (local anesthetic or saline solution) and the use of one or two needles to inject and retrieve the fluid/dissolved calcium. This review describes both one-needle and two-needle US-PICT techniques, providing technical and practical information that can improve daily clinical practice. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Ultrasound-guided block of the axillary nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Lund, J; Jenstrup, M T

    2012-01-01

    performed using a newly developed in-plane ultrasound-guided technique. In one patient undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery, we used the axillary nerve block as the only analgesic combined with propofol sedation and spontaneous breathing. Chronic shoulder pain was eliminated after the axillary nerve...... block in two patients. The pain score after arthroscopic shoulder surgery in these two patients remained low until termination of the nerve block. In a fourth patient, severe post-operative pain after osteosynthesis of a displaced proximal humerus fracture was almost eliminated after performing...... an axillary nerve block. These findings warrant larger clinical trials that investigate the pain-mediating role of the axillary nerve in the perioperative setting....

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  7. Motion compensation with skin contact control for high intensity focused ultrasound surgery in moving organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diodato, A.; Cafarelli, A.; Schiappacasse, A.; Tognarelli, S.; Ciuti, G.; Menciassi, A.

    2018-02-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an emerging therapeutic solution that enables non-invasive treatment of several pathologies, mainly in oncology. On the other hand, accurate targeting of moving abdominal organs (e.g. liver, kidney, pancreas) is still an open challenge. This paper proposes a novel method to compensate the physiological respiratory motion of organs during HIFU procedures, by exploiting a robotic platform for ultrasound-guided HIFU surgery provided with a therapeutic annular phased array transducer. The proposed method enables us to keep the same contact point between the transducer and the patient’s skin during the whole procedure, thus minimizing the modification of the acoustic window during the breathing phases. The motion of the target point is compensated through the rotation of the transducer around a virtual pivot point, while the focal depth is continuously adjusted thanks to the axial electronically steering capabilities of the HIFU transducer. The feasibility of the angular motion compensation strategy has been demonstrated in a simulated respiratory-induced organ motion environment. Based on the experimental results, the proposed method appears to be significantly accurate (i.e. the maximum compensation error is always under 1 mm), thus paving the way for the potential use of this technique for in vivo treatment of moving organs, and therefore enabling a wide use of HIFU in clinics.

  8. Ultrasound guided versus landmark guided corticosteroid injection in patients with rotator cuff syndrome: Randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhayana, Himanshu; Mishra, Puneet; Tandon, Anupama; Pankaj, Amite; Pandey, Rohit; Malhotra, Raskesh

    2018-03-01

    Impingement syndrome is the most common differential in a patient presenting to an orthopaedic OPD with shoulder pain. Impingement syndrome is often managed with subacromial corticosteroid injection, which can be instilled using either landmark guided (LMG) approach or with the assistance of ultrasound (US). This study was envisaged to enquire whether ultrasound assistance improves the accuracy, efficacy or safety profile of the injection. 60 patients of rotator cuff syndrome underwent diagnostic ultrasound. They were randomly assigned to receive subacromial injection of 2 ml (40 mg/ml) methylprenisolone and 2 ml of 1% lignocaine combination either by US assistance (n = 30) or using LMG assistance (n = 30). The patients were evaluated before injection and on follow up visits at day 5, week 3, week 6 and 3rd month by a single assessor. The assessor was blinded of the treatment group to which patient belonged. Clinical assessment included demographic and clinical data, accuracy of injection, VAS (0-100) for pain, Constant score with goniometer evaluation of range of motion, patient's self assessment proforma and post injection side effects if any. Initial demographic, clinical and US findings in the groups exhibited no significant differences. The accuracy of US guided injections (100%) was more when compared from LMG injection (93.3%). Both VAS and Constant score showed significant improvement following steroid injection up to 3 months of follow up. However the differences in the two groups were not significant suggesting comparable efficacy of the two approaches. (Mean VAS score decrease: 27.23 for US and 25.16 for LMG, p guided injections have a higher accuracy of drug placement in the subacromial bursa, there is no difference in terms of clinical outcomes or safety profile of either of the method. Hence US guided injections seems to be unjustified, when compared to equally efficacious and cost effective LMG steroid injection.

  9. POTENTIAL OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED LUMBAR FACET RADIOFREQUENCY DENERVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Volkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of US navigation for Radiofrequency denervation (RFD of the lumbar facets.Material and methods. The authors performed a prospective controlled cohort study which included 50 patients with chronic pain syndrome who underwent RFD LIII-SI facets on both sides. The main group (US included 25 patients, who underwent US guided navigation with FScontrol of the correct placement of the cannula prior to ablation. In the control group (FS the RFD was performed only under FS control. Patients were selected after preliminary test block of medial branch with 50% pain reduction from the baseline. Patients with overweight, spinal deformity, pronounced degenerative changes, spinal stenosis and developmental anomalies were not included in the study. For the evaluation of outcomes, the numeric pain scale NRS-11 and the Oswestry index (ODI were used, the accuracy of the cannula position was assessed and factors determining the accuracy were searched.Results. As a result of the intervention, there was a significant decrease of NRS-11 and ODI criteria in both groups (p<0.001, a positive outcome was achieved in 18 (72% of US patients and 16 (64% of FS patients, p = 0.564. Of the 200 attempts to position the cannula under the ultrasound control, 169 (84.5% were successful, in most cases (187 out of 200, 93.5% at least 3 attempts were required to reposition the cannula. The average time for performing the procedure under the ultrasound control was 47.3±1.13 minutes. The facet angle and procedure level were defined as predictors of the cannula positioning accuracy, odds ratio 0.93 (95% CI 0.894–0.963 and 0.51 (95% CI 0.32–0.805, respectively.Conclusion. RFD of lumbar facet under ultrasound navigation allows to achieve a relatively high accuracy of the cannula position into the zone of passage of the articular branch. The navigation capabilities are reduced at the level of LV and SI vertebrae due to structural

  10. Estimation of blood velocity vectors using transverse ultrasound beam focusing and cross-correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Lacasa, Isabel Rodriguez

    1999-01-01

    Modern ultrasound scanners estimate the blood velocity by tracking the movement of the blood scatterers along the ultrasound beam. This is done by emitting pulsed ultrasound fields and finding the shift in position from pulse to pulse by correlating the received signals. Only the velocity component...... in a correlation estimator to find the velocity across the beam. This approach is extended in this paper by making beamforming along the direction of the flow. A fairly broad beam is emitted and the received signal is then focused along a selected direction. This direction can be along the ultrasound beam...

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  12. [Clinical application of mammography-guided wire localization plus ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy for breast microcalcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Decai; Zhang, Jinghua; Hu, Wanning; Li, Hongmin; Niu, Fengling; Liu, Jingping; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaochen; Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Haiping; Wang, Yang

    2014-08-26

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of mammography-guided wire localization plus ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of breast microcalcification and avoid the effects of preoperative excisional biopsy for patients undergoing sentinel node biopsy. A total of 38 patients with unpalpable lesions, ultrasonic negativity and abnormal mammography received a guide wire under mammography and performed ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of breast microcalcification before preoperative excisional biopsy. All 38 lesions were successfully located and biopsied for pathological examination. Carcinoma was present in 9 lesions: ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (6/38) and intraductal carcinoma with early infiltration (3/38). For 29 benign lesions, there were mastopathies (25/38), atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH)(3/38) and intraductal papiloma (1/38). Breast microcalcification was detected in all lesions by ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy. The detection rate of breast cancer detected was 30.8% and the diagnostic accuracy 100%. For patients with unpalpable lesions, ultrasound negativity and abnormal mammography, mammography-guided wire-localization plus ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of breast microcalcification is accurate, safe and feasible. And it may avoid the effects of preoperative excisional biopsy for patients with sentinel node biopsy. The procedure is worthy of wider clinical applications.

  13. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PRESAGE® as a new calibration method for high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M.; McErlean, C.; Rivens, I.; Adamovics, J.; Leach, M. O.; ter Haar, G.; Doran, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a non-invasive cancer therapy that makes use of the mainly thermal effects of ultrasound to destroy tissue. In order to achieve reliable treatment planning, it is necessary to characterise the ultrasound source (transducer) and to understand how the wave propagates in tissue and the energy deposition in the focal region. This novel exploratory study investigated how HIFU affects PRESAGE®, an optical phantom used for radiotherapy dosimetry, which is potentially a rapid method of calibrating the transducer. Samples, of two different formulations, were exposed to focused ultrasound and imaged using Optical Computed Tomography. First results showed that, PRESAGE® changes colour on ultrasound exposure (darker green regions were observed) with the alterations being related to the acoustic power and sample composition. Future work will involve quantification of these alterations and understanding how to relate them to the mechanisms of action of HIFU.

  15. Alleviating Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Pain Using Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Neurolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Mamoru; Kamata, Ken; Yoshikawa, Tomoe; Nakai, Atsushi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Miyata, Takeshi; Yamao, Kentaro; Imai, Hajime; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2018-01-01

    The most common symptom in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer is abdominal pain. This has traditionally been treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioid analgesics. However, these treatments result in inadequate pain control or drug-related adverse effects in some patients. An alternative pain-relief modality is celiac plexus neurolysis, in which the celiac plexus is chemically ablated. This procedure was performed percutaneously or intraoperatively until 1996, when endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided celiac plexus neurolysis was first described. In this transgastric anterior approach, a neurolytic agent is injected around the celiac trunk under EUS guidance. The procedure gained popularity as a minimally invasive approach and is currently widely used to treat pancreatic cancer-associated pain. We focus on two relatively new techniques of EUS-guided neurolysis: EUS-guided celiac ganglia neurolysis and EUS-guided broad plexus neurolysis, which have been developed to improve efficacy. Although the techniques are safe and effective in general, some serious adverse events including ischemic and infectious complications have been reported as the procedure has gained widespread popularity. We summarize reported clinical outcomes of EUS-guided neurolysis in pancreatic cancer (from the PubMed and Embase databases) with a goal of providing information useful in developing strategies for pancreatic cancer-associated pain alleviation. PMID:29462851

  16. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Hydrodissection of a Symptomatic Sural Neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Ryan R; Mitchell, Justin J; Chadayammuri, Vivek P; Hill, John; Wolcott, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Symptomatic neuromas of the sural nerve are a rare but significant cause of pain and debilitation in athletes. Presentation is usually in the form of chronic pain and dysesthesias or paresthesias of the lateral foot and ankle. Treatment traditionally ranges from conservative measures, such as removing all external compressive forces, to administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin B6, tricyclic antidepressants, antiepileptics, or topical anesthetics. This article reports a case of sural nerve entrapment in a 34-year-old male triathlete with a history of recurrent training-induced right-sided gastrocnemius strains. The patient presented with numbness in the right lateral foot and ankle that had persisted for 3 months, after he was treated unsuccessfully with extensive nonoperative measures, including anti-inflammatory drugs, activity modification, and a dedicated physical therapy program of stretching and strengthening. Orthopedic assessment showed worsening pain with forced passive dorsiflexion and manual pressure applied over the distal aspect of the gastrocnemius. Plain radiographs showed normal findings, but in-office ultrasound imaging showed evidence of sural nerve entrapment with edema and neuromatous scar formation in the absence of gastrocnemius or soleus pathology. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided hydrodissection of the sural nerve at the area of symptomatic neuroma and neural edema was performed the same day. The patient had complete relief of symptoms and full return to the preinjury level of participation in competitive sports. This case report shows that hydrodissection, when performed by an experienced physician, can be an effective, minimally invasive technique for neurolysis in the setting of sural nerve entrapment, resulting in improvement in clinical symptoms. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. 76 FR 43119 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Focused Ultrasound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... and Mechanical Safety Performance Testing. Inflammation/Foreign Body Response..... Section 10... and it is identified as a device using focused ultrasound to produce localized, mechanical motion... for mechanical cellular membrane disruption intended for noninvasive aesthetic use. FDA has identified...

  18. Find, Fight, Follow: Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanches, P.G.; Gruell, H.; Steinbach, O.C.

    2012-01-01

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaginghas been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Therapeutic applications using ultrasound, for example thermal ablation, hyperthermia or ultrasound induced drug

  19. Ultrasound-guided lumpectomy of nonpalpable breast cancer versus wire-guided resection: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahusen, F.D.; Bremers, A.J.A.; Fabry, H.F.; Taets van Amerongen, A.H.; Boom, R.P.; Meijer, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The wire-guided excision of nonpalpable breast cancer often results in tumor resections with inadequate margins. This prospective, randomized trial was undertaken to investigate whether intraoperative ultrasound (US) guidance enables a better margin clearance than the wire-guided

  20. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial–subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of...

  1. Design and validation of an MR-conditional robot for transcranial focused ultrasound surgery in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Karl D; Sin, Vivian W; Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Looi, Thomas; Waspe, Adam C; Drake, James M

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) involves cerebral shunt placement or an invasive brain surgery. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) applied to the brains of pediatric patients presents an opportunity to treat IVH in a noninvasive manner, termed "incision-less surgery." Current clinical and research focused ultrasound systems lack the capability to perform neonatal transcranial surgeries due to either range of motion or dexterity requirements. A novel robotic system is proposed to position a focused ultrasound transducer accurately above the head of a neonatal patient inside an MRI machine to deliver the therapy. A clinical Philips Sonalleve MRgFUS system was expanded to perform transcranial treatment. A five degree-of-freedom MR-conditional robot was designed and manufactured using MR compatible materials. The robot electronics and control were integrated into existing Philips electronics and software interfaces. The user commands the position of the robot with a graphical user interface, and is presented with real-time MR imaging of the patient throughout the surgery. The robot is validated through a series of experiments that characterize accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio degeneration of an MR image as a result of the robot, MR imaging artifacts generated by the robot, and the robot's ability to operate in a representative surgical environment inside an MR machine. Experimental results show the robot responds reliably within an MR environment, has achieved 0.59 ± 0.25 mm accuracy, does not produce severe MR-imaging artifacts, has a workspace providing sufficient coverage of a neonatal brain, and can manipulate a 5 kg payload. A full system demonstration shows these characteristics apply in an application environment. This paper presents a comprehensive look at the process of designing and validating a new robot from concept to implementation for use in an MR environment. An MR conditional robot has been designed and

  2. Design and validation of an MR-conditional robot for transcranial focused ultrasound surgery in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Karl D.; Sin, Vivian W.; Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Looi, Thomas; Waspe, Adam C.; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) involves cerebral shunt placement or an invasive brain surgery. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) applied to the brains of pediatric patients presents an opportunity to treat IVH in a noninvasive manner, termed “incision-less surgery.” Current clinical and research focused ultrasound systems lack the capability to perform neonatal transcranial surgeries due to either range of motion or dexterity requirements. A novel robotic system is proposed to position a focused ultrasound transducer accurately above the head of a neonatal patient inside an MRI machine to deliver the therapy. Methods: A clinical Philips Sonalleve MRgFUS system was expanded to perform transcranial treatment. A five degree-of-freedom MR-conditional robot was designed and manufactured using MR compatible materials. The robot electronics and control were integrated into existing Philips electronics and software interfaces. The user commands the position of the robot with a graphical user interface, and is presented with real-time MR imaging of the patient throughout the surgery. The robot is validated through a series of experiments that characterize accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio degeneration of an MR image as a result of the robot, MR imaging artifacts generated by the robot, and the robot’s ability to operate in a representative surgical environment inside an MR machine. Results: Experimental results show the robot responds reliably within an MR environment, has achieved 0.59 ± 0.25 mm accuracy, does not produce severe MR-imaging artifacts, has a workspace providing sufficient coverage of a neonatal brain, and can manipulate a 5 kg payload. A full system demonstration shows these characteristics apply in an application environment. Conclusions: This paper presents a comprehensive look at the process of designing and validating a new robot from concept to implementation for use in an MR environment. An MR

  3. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part IV - EUS-guided interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, C; Hocke, M; Fusaroli, P

    2016-01-01

    -guided sampling. Endoscopic ultrasound combines the most advanced high-resolution ultrasound imaging of lesions within the wall and in the vicinity of the gastrointestinal tract and safe and effective fine needle-based tissue acquisition from these lesions. The guideline addresses the indications...

  4. A simple tissue model for practicing ultrasound guided vascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The use of ultrasound in anaesthetic practice continues to be more established and the use of ultrasound guidance in establishing vascular access is recommended by various groups. We have developed a tissue model for the practice and skills development in ultrasound vascular access. Method: The tissue ...

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Intervention for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah El-Sayed Allam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial myofascial pain is prevalent and most often results from entrapment of branches of the trigeminal nerves. It is challenging to inject branches of the trigeminal nerve, a large portion of which are shielded by the facial bones. Bony landmarks of the cranium serve as important guides for palpation-guided injections and can be delineated using ultrasound. Ultrasound also provides real-time images of the adjacent muscles and accompanying arteries and can be used to guide the needle to the target region. Most importantly, ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the risk of collateral injury to vital neurovascular structures. In this review, we aimed to summarize the regional anatomy and ultrasound-guided injection techniques for the trigeminal nerve and its branches, including the supraorbital, infraorbital, mental, auriculotemporal, maxillary, and mandibular nerves.

  6. Intracellular delivery of peptides and siRNAs using microbubble enhanced focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-05-01

    Bioactive substances such as peptides and nucleic acid based agents have attracted great attention for the next generation drug for various diseases. However, the greatest challenge for using these bioactive substances is the development of their delivery system, especially the method for delivering these substances through the cell membrane. With the advancement of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent technology, it has become possible to transiently change the permeability of the cell membrane. Moreover, using a focused ultrasound transducer, it is possible to narrow and focus the ultrasound energy within a small target, avoiding damage to the surrounding tissue. In this research we have searched the possibility of delivering the Bak BH3 peptide, the death domain of the Bc1-2 family of proteins, or the short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) using microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound in an in vitro setting. Using a 1.696 MHz focused ultrasound and a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent OPTISON®, we first tested the stability of BH3 peptide under microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound exposure and proved that the peptide is stable under these circumstances. Next, we have tested the cell-killing effect of the intracellularly delivered Bak BH3 peptide in HeLa and BJAB cell line and observed a statistically enhanced cell death in BJAB cells but not in HeLa cells, leading to the conclusion that intracellularly delivered BH3 peptide by microbubble-enhanced ultrasound can exert its cell killing effect in some cells. We also investigated if we can silence the EGFP expression in the cell by delivering siRNA targeting the EGFP in both transient and stable EGFP expression cell line. Using a 1.653 MHz focused ultrasound and OPTISON®, in both cases, intracellularly delivered siRNA by microbubble-enhanced ultrasound was able to knock down the EGFP expression, which demonstrates the feasibility of using this novel method

  7. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  8. Ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions in American football: 18 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Radhika B; Stevens, Kathryn J; Shivaram, Giri M; McAdams, Timothy R; Dillingham, Michael F; Beaulieu, Christopher F

    2014-12-01

    Myotendinous strains, contusions, and hematomas are common injuries in American football. Along with ligament sprains and inflammatory disorders, musculoskeletal injuries often result in lost participation time. This article summarizes 18 years of experience with 128 ultrasound-guided drainages and injections in 69 football players with 88 injuries. When performed by an operator with sufficient expertise in diagnostic and procedural skills, ultrasound-guided musculoskeletal interventions are minimally invasive, are safe, and can play an integral role in injury management.

  9. Systematic study on the performance of elliptic focusing neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Rodriguez, D.; DiJulio, D.D.; Bentley, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    In neutron scattering experiments there is an increasing trend towards the study of smaller volume samples, which make the use of focusing optics more important. Focusing guide geometries based on conic-sections, such as those with parabolic and elliptic shapes, have been extensively used in both recently built neutron instruments and upgrades of existing hardware. A large fraction of proposed instruments at the European Spallation Source feature the requirement of good performance when measuring on small samples. The optimised design of a focusing system comes after time consuming Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations. Therefore, in order to help reduce the time needed to design such focusing systems, it is necessary to study systematically the performance of focusing guides. In the present work, we perform a theoretical analysis of the focusing properties of neutron beams, and validate them using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and Particle Swarm Optimisations (PSOs), where there is a close correspondence between the maximum divergence of the beam and the shape of the guide. The analytical results show that two limits can be considered, which bound a range of conic section shapes that provide optimum performance. Finally, we analyse a more realistic guide example and we give an assessment of the importance of the contribution from multiple reflections in different systems.

  10. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P guided-fine needle aspiration, gender, age, size, presence of vascularity, and suspicious US features were not associated with post-biopsy hematoma according to experience level. Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more with ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P guided-core needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P guided-core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  11. Controlled Hyperthermia with MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, Steffen; Salomir, Rares; Pedersen, Michael

    and penetration depth are governed by the wavelength. Hence for US it is possible to body non-invasively position sub-millimeter focal points in deep seated regions of the. Temperature Control: Most solid tumours cover volumes larger than that of the focal region. This problem may be reduced somewhat...... by deconstructing the tumour volume into a series of parallel planar regions of interest (ROI), which are treated sequentially. By employing continuous sonication while moving the focal point along an inside-out spiral trajectory, the thermal transport may be exploited to promote a homogenous temperature rise...

  12. Safe and cost-effective ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device: our experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Usha; Astudillo-Dávalos, Fausto E; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and difference in cost of ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device (IUD). A total of 23 women underwent ultrasound-guided retrieval of retained IUDs between January 2013 and March 2014. Transvaginal ultrasound was performed in all cases to assess the localization of the IUD. Under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, either the crochet type IUD hook (Gyneas, Goussainville, France) or Alligator forceps were used to grasp the IUD and remove it from the uterine cavity. The costs of the ultrasound guided procedure and the hysteroscopic removal of the IUD were compared. Twenty-three patients who failed IUD removal in the clinic were referred to our department for ultrasound-guided removal. All patients had an IUD present in the uterine cavity. Eleven patients had Paragard IUDs (48%), eight had Mirena IUDs (35%), three had Lippes loop (13%), and one had a ring IUD (4%). The patients' ages ranged from 20-56 years. The IUDs were in place for 8 months to 23 years. Of the 23 patients with retained IUDs, 19 were successfully removed (83%), and 4 underwent hysteroscopic removal of IUD. The IUD removal cost in the operating room on average was $3562 US dollars and the cost of ultrasound-guided removal was $465 US dollars. Retained intrauterine devices with or without strings can often be safely removed in an office-based setting under ultrasound guidance at less cost than in the operating room, even in cases with embedded IUDs. Our experience leads us to propose in-office IUD removal under ultrasound guidance as the first line in management of retained IUDs after failed removal by conventional practices. Ultrasound provides numerous advantages including direct visualization in a less invasive manner than hysteroscopy. Three-dimensional imaging can also be used for enhanced perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound-guided versus computed tomography-scan guided biopsy of pleural-based lung lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Rahul; McLean, Anna W; Smith, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) guided biopsies have long been the standard technique to obtain tissue from the thoracic cavity and is traditionally performed by interventional radiologists. Ultrasound (US) guided biopsy of pleural-based lesions, performed by pulmonologists is gaining popularity and has the advantage of multi-planar imaging, real-time technique, and the absence of radiation exposure to patients. In this study, we aim to determine the diagnostic accuracy, the time to diagnosis after the initial consult placement, and the complications rates between the two different modalities. A retrospective study of electronic medical records was done of patients who underwent CT-guided biopsies and US-guided biopsies for pleural-based lesions between 2005 and 2014 and the data collected were analyzed for comparing the two groups. A total of 158 patients underwent 162 procedures during the study period. 86 patients underwent 89 procedures in the US group, and 72 patients underwent 73 procedures in the CT group. The overall yield in the US group was 82/89 (92.1%) versus 67/73 (91.8%) in the CT group (P = 1.0). Average days to the procedure was 7.2 versus 17.5 (P = 0.00001) in the US and CT group, respectively. Complication rate was higher in CT group 17/73 (23.3%) versus 1/89 (1.1%) in the US group (P guided biopsy is similar to that of CT-guided biopsy, with a lower complication rate and a significantly reduced time to the procedure.

  14. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Eikelder, H. M. M.; Bošnački, D.; Elevelt, A.; Donato, K.; Di Tullio, A.; Breuer, B. J. T.; van Wijk, J. H.; van Dijk, E. V. M.; Modena, D.; Yeo, S. Y.; Grüll, H.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  15. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Eikelder, H M M; Bošnački, D; Breuer, B J T; Van Wijk, J H; Van Dijk, E V M; Modena, D; Yeo, S Y; Grüll, H; Elevelt, A; Donato, K; Di Tullio, A

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  16. Development and Assessment of a Novel Task Trainer and Targeting Tasks for Ultrasound-guided Invasive Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Shumard, Kristina M; Brost, Brian C

    2017-06-01

    The American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) recommends that all providers performing ultrasound-guided invasive procedures be competent in a core set of guidance skills common to all ultrasound-guided procedures, including in-plane and out-of-plane needle guidance and needle imaging optimization techniques such as probe translation, rotation, and heel-toe standoff. To allow for the practice and assessment of these core skills, we have created a novel task trainer and set of targeting tasks, and sought to obtain validity evidence in the content and response process domains for this training and assessment system according to the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. We have constructed an ultrasound-guided invasive procedure training system and five targeting tasks that focused on the needle guidance skills outlined by the AIUM. All tasks were performed by obstetrics and gynecology or maternal-fetal medicine physicians with and without experience in ultrasound-guided invasive procedures during a series of simulation workshops. All participants completed a survey regarding the trainer's and the tasks' usefulness in the training of inexperienced physicians. The physicians who completed the tasks had favorable views of task trainer and curriculum. The targeting curriculum was felt to allow practice of all of the core guidance skills outlined by the AIUM. The average response provided for all of the tasks was 4.0 or greater, with half of the items having an average response of 4.5 or higher. We have constructed a task trainer that incorporates all of the core skills outlined by the AIUM. All five tasks received very favorable reviews from both experienced and inexperienced providers. Taken together, our findings suggest they have strong content and response process validity evidence. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of frequency-dependent ultrasound attenuation in transparent medium using focused shadowgraph technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Yukina; Kudo, Nobuki

    2017-07-01

    Acoustic fields of a short-pulsed ultrasound propagating through a transparent medium with ultrasound attenuation were visualized by the focused shadowgraph technique. A brightness waveform and its spatial integrations were derived from a visualized field image and compared with a pressure waveform measured by a membrane hydrophone. The experimental results showed that first-order integration of the brightness wave has good agreement with the pressure waveforms. Frequency-dependent attenuation of the pulse propagating through castor oil was derived from brightness and pressure waveforms, and attenuation coefficients determined from focused shadowgraphy and hydrophone techniques showed good agreement. The results suggest the usefulness of the shadowgraph technique not only for the visualization of ultrasound fields but also for noncontact estimation of rough pressure waveforms and correct ultrasound attenuation.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Thermal Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Wong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA of the knee is one of the most common joint diseases affecting adults in the United States. For elderly patients with multiple medical comorbidities who do not wish to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA, lifestyle modification, pharmacologic management, and injections are the mainstay of therapy. Previously, pain management interventions were limited to intra-articular joint injections and viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid. Fluoroscopic-guided techniques for radiofrequency ablation (RFA of the genicular nerves have been previously described and a recent cadaveric study suggests that ultrasound-guided genicular nerve blocks can be performed accurately. We performed an ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the genicular nerves in 88-year-old woman who had deferred surgical management given her age. Following successful ultrasound guided diagnostic genicular nerve blocks, she proceeded to RFA using the same ultrasound guided technique. The procedure resulted in significant pain relief and improvement in overall function for greater than 6 months. The use of ultrasound provides a relatively rapid and noninvasive method to directly visualize genicular nerves and surrounding vasculature. Our case suggests that, for genicular nerve blockade and RFA, ultrasound may be a useful alternative to fluoroscopy. Not only did the procedure result in significant pain relief that has persisted for greater than 6 months but also more importantly her function status and quality of life were improved.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Thermal Radiofrequency Ablation for Chronic Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Joshua; Bremer, Nicholas; Weyker, Paul D; Webb, Christopher A J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is one of the most common joint diseases affecting adults in the United States. For elderly patients with multiple medical comorbidities who do not wish to undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lifestyle modification, pharmacologic management, and injections are the mainstay of therapy. Previously, pain management interventions were limited to intra-articular joint injections and viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid. Fluoroscopic-guided techniques for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the genicular nerves have been previously described and a recent cadaveric study suggests that ultrasound-guided genicular nerve blocks can be performed accurately. We performed an ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of the genicular nerves in 88-year-old woman who had deferred surgical management given her age. Following successful ultrasound guided diagnostic genicular nerve blocks, she proceeded to RFA using the same ultrasound guided technique. The procedure resulted in significant pain relief and improvement in overall function for greater than 6 months. The use of ultrasound provides a relatively rapid and noninvasive method to directly visualize genicular nerves and surrounding vasculature. Our case suggests that, for genicular nerve blockade and RFA, ultrasound may be a useful alternative to fluoroscopy. Not only did the procedure result in significant pain relief that has persisted for greater than 6 months but also more importantly her function status and quality of life were improved.

  20. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  1. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  2. Development and Implementation of an Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Program for Emergency Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Courtney; Jones, Jodi

    2018-01-01

    Emergency medical care often necessitates placement of peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters. When traditional methods for obtaining PIV access are not successful, ultrasound guidance is a rescue technique for peripheral vascular placement that improves the quality of patient care. The aim of this training program was to develop a process where emergency nurses would be competent to perform ultrasound guided PIV to improve the quality of patient care delivered while reducing throughput time. Administrative program development required creating a nursing practice statement, procedure guideline, operational plan, and competency validation. A training program comprising both didactic and hands-on training was developed and provided by emergency medicine physicians with formal ultrasound fellowship training. In determining whether the training program was adequate in preparing the student to place an ultrasound-guided PIV, 92.9% of students "agreed" or "strongly agreed." In having confidence in their ability to obtain an ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 35.7% of respondents "agreed" and 64.3% "strongly agreed." In finding it difficult to be successful in achieving ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 71.4% of students "strongly disagreed" and 14.3% "disagreed." All students (100%) felt it was a feasible task to train nurses to successfully place ultrasound-guided PIV catheters and 71.4% of students strongly support continuing to provide this training program and competency validation. Establishment of an effective didactic and hands-on training program resulted in emergency department nurses becoming competent in placement of ultrasound guided PIV catheters to provide optimal patient care. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glenohumeral joint injection: a comparative study of ultrasound and fluoroscopically guided techniques before MR arthrography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.; Collins, J.M.; Maresch, B.J.; Smeets, J.H.R.; Janssen, C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Jager, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the variability in accuracy of contrast media introduction, leakage, required time and patient discomfort in four different centres, each using a different image-guided glenohumeral injection technique. Each centre included 25 consecutive patients. The ultrasound-guided anterior (USa) and

  4. Ultrasound Guided Nerve Root Injection in Patients with Cervical Spondylytic Radicular Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LT Choong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Selective cervical nerve root injection using a mixture of corticosteroid and lignocaine is a treatment option for managing cervical radiculopathic pain. The procedure is usually performed under image guided fluoroscopy or Computerized Tomograhy. Ultrasound-guided cervical nerve root block does not expose the patients and personnel to radiation. During injection, the fluid is mostly visualized in a real-time fashion. This retrospective study reviewed the effectiveness of ultrasound in guiding cervical peri-radicular injection for pain relief in patients with recalcitrant cervical radiculopathy. There were no complications reported in this series.

  5. High intensity focused ultrasound technology, its scope and applications in therapy and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phenix, Christopher Peter; Togtema, Melissa; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Curiel, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a safe, inexpensive and wide-spread diagnostic tool capable of producing real-time non-invasive images without significant biological effects. However, the propagation of higher energy, intensity and frequency ultrasound waves through living tissues can induce thermal, mechanical and chemical effects useful for a variety of therapeutic applications. With the recent development of clinically approved High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) systems, therapeutic ultrasound is now a medical reality. Indeed, HIFU has been used for the thermal ablation of pathological lesions; localized, minimally invasive ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the transient formation of pores on cell membranes; the temporary disruption of skin and the blood brain barrier; the ultrasound induced break-down of blood clots; and the targeted release of drugs using ultrasound and temperature sensitive drug carriers. This review seeks to engage the pharmaceutical research community by providing an overview on the biological effects of ultrasound as well as highlighting important therapeutic applications, current deficiencies and future directions.

  6. On the Development of Focused Ultrasound Liquid Atomizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Al-Jumaily

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the evolution of focused ultrasonic transducers of various kinds for fluid atomization and vaporization. Ultrasonic transducers used for atomization purposes in biomedical, pharmaceutical, or industrial applications, such as surface acoustic wave (SAW transducers, array of micromachined nozzles, and Fourier horn micromachined nozzles with or without a central channel, are all presented and compared. For simplicity of manufacturing and low cost, we focus on plates and curved and corrugated structures for biomedical humidification.

  7. Focused Ultrasound for Essential Tremor: Review of the Evidence and Discussion of Current Hurdles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rohani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. While there is no breakthrough progress in the medical treatment of essential tremor (ET, in the past decades several remarkable achievements happened in the surgical field, such as radiofrequency thalamotomy, thalamic deep brain stimulation and gamma knife thalamotomy. The most recent advance in this area is magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS. Methods. Purpose of this review is to discuss the new developments and trials of MRgFUS in the treatment of ET and other tremor disorders. Results. MRgFUS is an incision-less surgery performed without anesthesia and ionizing radiation (no risk of cumulative dose and delayed side effects. Studies have shown the safety and effectiveness of unilateral MRgFUS-thalamotomy in the treatment of ET. It has been successfully used in few patients with Parkinson's disease-related tremor and fewer patients with Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome. Safety and long-term effects of the procedure are still unclear, as temporary and permanent adverse events have been reported as well as reoccurrence of tremor. Discussion. MRgFUS is a promising new surgical approach with still a number of unknowns and unsolved issues. It represents a valuable option particularly for patients who refused or could not be candidate for other procedures, deep brain stimulation in particular. 

  8. Focused ultrasound as a tool to input sensory information to humans (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, L. R.; Tsirulnikov, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    This review is devoted to the analysis of studies and implementations related to the use of focused ultrasound for functional effects on neuroreceptor structures. Special attention was paid to the stimulation of neuroreceptor structures in order to input sensory information to humans. This branch of medical and physiological acoustics appeared in Russia in the early 1970s and was being efficiently developed up to the late 1980s. Then, due to lack of financial support, only individual researchers remained at this field and, as a result, we have no full- fledged theoretical research and practical implementations in this area yet. Many promising possibilities of using functional effects of focused ultrasound in medicine and physiology have remained unimplemented for a long time. However, new interesting ideas and approaches have appeared in recent years. Very recently, very questionable projects have been reported related to the use of ultrasound for targeted functional effects on the human brain performed in some laboratories. In this review, the stages of the development of scientific research devoted to the functional effects of focused ultrasound are described. By activating the neuroreceptor structures of the skin by means pulses of focused ultrasound, one can cause all the sensations perceived by human beings through the skin in everyday life, such as tactile sensations, thermal (heat and cold), tickling, itching, and various types of pain. Stimulation of the ear labyrinth of humans with normal hearing using amplitude-modulated ultrasound causes auditory sensations corresponding to an audio modulating signal (pure tones, music, speech, etc.). Activation of neuroreceptor structures by means of focused ultrasound is used for the diagnosis of various neurological and skin diseases, as well as hearing disorders. It has been shown that the activation is related to the mechanical action of ultrasound, for example, by the radiation force, as well as to the direct

  9. The effect of ultrasound-guided compression immediately after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy on postbiopsy bleeding: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong Hee; Kim, Jung Im; Bae, Sang Rak; Lee, Yong Seok; Kang, Sung Hak; Han, Chang Hee

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether ultrasound-guided compression performed immediately after transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy decreases bleeding complications. We prospectively evaluated a total of 148 consecutive patients who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy between March 2015 and July 2016. Systematic 12-core prostate biopsy was performed in all patients. Of these, 100 patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the compression group (n = 50) underwent TRUS-guided compression on bleeding biopsy tracts immediately after prostate biopsy, while the non-compression group (n = 50) underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy alone. The incidence rate and duration of hematuria, hematospermia, and rectal bleeding were compared between the two groups. The incidence rates of hematuria and hematospermia were not significantly different between the two groups (60 vs. 64%, p = 0.68; 22 vs. 30%, p = 0.362, respectively, for compression vs. non-compression group). The rectal bleeding incidence was significantly lower in the compression group as compared to the non-compression group (20 vs. 44%, p = 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in the median duration of hematuria, hematospermia, or rectal bleeding between the two groups (2, 8, and 2 days vs. 2, 10, and 1 days, p > 0.05, respectively, for compression vs. non-compression group). TRUS-guided compression [p = 0.004, odds ratio (OR) 0.25] and patient age (p = 0.013, OR 0.93) were significantly protective against the occurrence of rectal bleeding after prostate biopsy in multivariable analysis. Although it has no impact on other complications, ultrasound-guided compression on bleeding biopsy tracts performed immediately after TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is an effective and practical method to treat or decrease rectal bleeding.

  10. Percutaneous subclavian artery stent-graft placement following failed ultrasound guided subclavian venous access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkup Peter

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound guidance for central and peripheral venous access has been proven to improve success rates and reduce complications of venous cannulation. Appropriately trained and experienced operators add significantly to diminished patient morbidity related to venous access procedures. We discuss a patient who required an arterial stent-graft to prevent arterial hemorrhage following inadvertent cannulation of the proximal, ventral, right subclavian artery related to unsuccessful ultrasound guided access of the subclavian vein. Case presentation During pre-operative preparation for aortic valve replacement and aorto-coronary bypass surgery an anesthetist attempted ultrasound guided venous access. The ultrasound guided attempt to access the right jugular vein failed and the ultrasound guided attempt at accessing the subclavian vein resulted in inappropriate placement of an 8.5 F sheath in the arterial system. Following angiographic imaging and specialist consultations, an arterial stent-graft was deployed in the right subclavian artery rather than perform an extensive anterior chest wall resection and dissection to extract the arterial sheath. The patient tolerated the procedure, without complication, despite occlusion of the right internal mammary artery and the right vertebral artery. There were no neurologic sequelae. There was no evidence of hemorrhage after subclavian artery sheath extraction and stent-graft implantation. Conclusion The attempted ultrasound guided puncture of the subclavian vein resulted in placement of an 8.5 F subclavian artery catheter. Entry of the catheter into the proximal subclavian artery beneath the medial clavicle, the medial first rib and the manubrium suggests that the operator, most likely, did not directly visualize the puncture needle enter the vessel with the ultrasound. The bones of the anterior chest impede the ultrasound beam and the vessels in this area would not be visible to ultrasound

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  12. The impact of an ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop on resident knowledge: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    There has been a rapid growth in the use of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in the past decade. Residency programs have been trying to find the best way to teach these newer techniques. Our department decided to develop a teaching workshop for our residents with the purpose of improving knowledge and skills in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The hypothesis was that the workshop would improve overall knowledge of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia as determined by a test developed for this activity. In addition, the goal was to help improve imaging and technical skills. A one-day workshop was organized for the CA1 and CA3 resident classes. The workshop was organized with the following learning objectives: (1) be able to identify basic ultrasound anatomy; (2) learn how to apply principles of ultrasound physics in order to obtain good ultrasound images; (3) develop basic ultrasound imaging skills on human models; and (4) develop needle visualization skills on gel models. The workshop included: a pre-test, a 2-hour didactic session, a 2-hour imaging and skills workshop, and a post-test. A twenty-question exam was developed by our faculty for this activity. A total of 20 residents participated in the two workshops. Tests scores (number correct out of twenty) were 9.5 ± 2.8 for the pre-test and 16.0 ± 1.9 for the post-test (P type of setting. Furthermore, knowledge acquired during the workshop was retained when CA1 residents were re-tested one year after the workshop. The ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop will become part of the didactic series for our CA1 residents and will be a required learning activity. Additional work still needs to be done to find out the best way to test knowledge and skill outcomes in residents learning new technology and techniques.

  13. Treatment with focused ultrasound waves softens the rat cervix during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Daishen; Yu, Heng; Garfield, Robert E; Shi, Shao-Qing; Towe, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Application of focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS) to the rat cervix during pregnancy has significant physiologic effects. One-millisecond-long pulses of 680-kHz ultrasound with a repetition frequency of 25 Hz, at ISPTA (spatial-peak, temporal-average intensity) of 1, 2 and 4W/cm(2), were applied to the rat abdomen over the cervix. FUS produced a significant change in cervical elasticity known as softening, which is part of the ripening process, comparable to the degree seen just before delivery. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) were used. During gestation, the FUS system was applied to the cervix for variable times up to 1 h. Daily measurements of cervix light-induced florescence were made to estimate changes in softening. In addition, cervical stretch estimates of softening were made of isolated cervices of control and FUS-treated rats to measure distensiblity. The ultrasound power with ISPPA (spatial-peak, pulse-average intensity) of 40 W/cm(2) was considered tolerable; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulatory limit is 190 W/cm(2) for both the body periphery and the fetus. This is the first report of alterations induced by ultrasound in the connective tissue of the cervix and suggests the therapeutic application of ultrasound for the facilitation of labor and delivery. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation in inconspicuous hepatocellular carcinoma on B-mode ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui Joo; Kim, Yun Soo; Shin, Seung Kak; Kwon, Oh Sang; Choi, Duck Joo; Kim, Ju Hyun

    2017-11-01

    B-mode ultrasound (US) has difficulty targeting small hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) with poor conspicuity during radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can improve visualization of small or inconspicuous HCCs. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of CEUS-guided RFA electrode insertion during the arterial phase in inconspicuous HCCs. Ninety-three treatment-naïve HCCs from 80 patients treated with RFA from August 2012 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Seventy-five HCCs from 65 patients underwent B-mode US-guided RFA, and 15 HCCs from 14 patients that were inconspicuous on B-mode US underwent CEUS-guided RFA during the arterial phase after injection of sulfur hexafluoride microbubbles (SonoVue®). Technical success was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography within 1 week and 3 months after the procedure. The mean size of HCCs treated with CEUS-guided RFA was smaller than that of HCCs treated with B-mode US-guided RFA (1.17±0.36 vs. 1.63±0.55 cm, p=0.003). Technical success rates of CEUS-guided RFA within 1 week and 3 months were 100% (15/15) and 93.3% (14/15), respectively. Technical success rates of B-mode US-guided RFA were 97.3% (73/75) and 94.5% (69/73), respectively. CEUS-guided RFA is highly efficacious for ablation of very small and inconspicuous HCCs.

  15. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society – update. Ultrasound examination of thyroid gland and ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Trzebińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography is a primary imaging technique in patients with suspected thyroid disease. It allows to assess the location, size and echostructures of the thyroid gland as well as detect focal lesions, along with indication of their size, echogenicity, echostructure and vascularity. Based on these features, ultrasound examination allows to predict abnormal focal lesions for biopsy and monitor the biopsy needle track. This paper presents the standards of thyroid ultrasound examination regarding ultrasound apparatus technical requirements, scanning techniques, readings, measurements, and the description of the examination. It discusses the ultrasound features of increased malignancy risk in focal lesions (nodules found in the thyroid gland. It presents indications for fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid gland for the visibility of single nodules (focal lesions and numerous lesions as well as discusses contraindications for thyroid biopsy. It describes the biopsy technique, possible complications and rules for post-biopsy monitoring of benign lesions. The paper is an update of the Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society issued in 2011. It has been prepared on the basis of current literature, taking into account the information contained in the following publications: Thyroid ultrasound examination and Recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society for the performance of the FNAB of the thyroid.

  16. Numerical evaluation of the skull for human neuromodulation with transcranial focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Transcranial focused ultrasound is an emerging field for human non-invasive neuromodulation, but its dosing in humans is difficult to know due to the skull. The objective of the present study was to establish modeling methods based on medical images to assess skull differences between individuals on the wave propagation of ultrasound. Approach. Computational models of transcranial focused ultrasound were constructed using CT and MR scans to solve for intracranial pressure. We explored the effect of including the skull base in models, different transducer placements on the head, and differences between 250 kHz or 500 kHz acoustic frequency for both female and male models. We further tested these features using linear, nonlinear, and elastic simulations. To better understand inter-subject skull thickness and composition effects we evaluated the intracranial pressure maps between twelve individuals at two different skull sites. Main results. Nonlinear acoustic simulations resulted in virtually identical intracranial pressure maps with linear acoustic simulations. Elastic simulations showed a difference in max pressures and full width half maximum volumes of 15% at most. Ultrasound at an acoustic frequency of 250 kHz resulted in the creation of more prominent intracranial standing waves compared to 500 kHz. Finally, across twelve model human skulls, a significant linear relationship to characterize intracranial pressure maps was not found. Significance. Despite its appeal, an inherent problem with the use of a noninvasive transcranial ultrasound method is the difficulty of knowing intracranial effects because of the skull. Here we develop detailed computational models derived from medical images of individuals to simulate the propagation of neuromodulatory ultrasound across the skull and solve for intracranial pressure maps. These methods allow for a much better understanding of the intracranial effects of ultrasound for an individual in order to

  17. Septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Randelli, Filippo; Sdao, Silvana; Sardanelli, Francesco; Randelli, Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff is a common condition. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration is one of several options to treat this condition. The main advantages of this procedure are short duration, good outcome, and low cost. Furthermore, only minor complications have been reported in the literature, namely, vagal reactions during the procedure and mild postprocedural pain. We report the first case of septic bursitis after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment of calcific tendinopathy. Although this is generally considered a very safe procedure, a risk of infection should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intestinal intussusception: description of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Hanemann Kim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of reporting the technique of ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of intestinal intussusception, three cases with confirmed diagnosis of the disease submitted to reduction with this technique are described. All cases had successful reductions with no complications. One patient experienced a recurrence of the invagination eight days after treatment, which was surgically corrected. The technique of hydrostatic reversal of intestinal intussusception guided by ultrasound may be used in place of the conventional barium enema, since it is a minimally invasive and safe method, with high rates of success and few complications.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Hip Arthrocentesis in a Child with Hip Pain and Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Moak

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Children presenting to the emergency department with hip pain and fever are at risk for significant morbidity due to septic arthritis. Distinguishing between septic arthritis and other causes of hip pain may be challenging. Sonographic visualization of the hip with real-time ultrasound-guided arthrocentesis may allow faster differentiation between etiologies, hastening definitive therapy and improving analgesia. This report describes the use of hip sonography in a case of Lyme arthritis. The authors review the medical literature in support of bedside hip sonography and discuss how to perform ultrasound-guided hip arthrocentesis. Clinical findings in septic and Lyme arthritis are also described.

  20. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy of the liver with focal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gang Seok; Yang, Hyun Cheol; Park, Byoung Lan; Kim, Byoung Geun; Sohn, Jang Sihn

    1985-01-01

    The ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirations were performed in order to diagnose a suspected neoplastic or infectious disease in 52 patients with focal liver disease. Of these, neoplastic lesions were suspected in 31 patients and infectious lesions in 21 patients ultrasonically and/or clinically. The overall accuracy for both suspected malignant and infectious disease was 79% (41/52). The primary indication for fine needle aspiration was to document the presence of malignancy and to avoid a diagnostic laparotomy, and to drain hepatic abscess. Consequently we were convinced that the ultrasound-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy in the focal liver disease is the best method for a conclusive diagnosis

  1. Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Image Fusion Guided Lumbosacral Plexus Block – A Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strid, JM; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    by guidance of US and magnetic resonance (MR) image fusion and real-time 3D electronic needle tip tracking.2 We aim to estimate the effect and the distribution of lidocaine after SSPS guided by US/MR image fusion compared to SSPS guided by ultrasound. Methods Twenty-four healthy volunteers will be included...... plexus blockade for hip surgery anaesthesia. Br J Anaesth. 2013, April 15. 2Ewertsen C, Saftoiu A, Gruionu LG, et al. Real-time image fusion involving diagnostic ultrasound. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2013;200:W249-55....

  2. Simulation Based Investigation of Focusing Phased Array Ultrasound in Dissimilar Metal Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Hee Kim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flaws at dissimilar metal welds (DMWs, such as reactor coolant systems components, Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM, Bottom Mounted Instrumentation (BMI etc., in nuclear power plants have been found. Notably, primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC in the DMWs could cause significant reliability problems at nuclear power plants. Therefore, phased array ultrasound is widely used for inspecting surface break cracks and stress corrosion cracks in DMWs. However, inspection of DMWs using phased array ultrasound has a relatively low probability of detection of cracks, because the crystalline structure of welds causes distortion and splitting of the ultrasonic beams which propagates anisotropic medium. Therefore, advanced evaluation techniques of phased array ultrasound are needed for improvement in the probability of detection of flaws in DMWs. Thus, in this study, an investigation of focusing and steering phased array ultrasound in DMWs was carried out using a time reversal technique, and an adaptive focusing technique based on finite element method (FEM simulation. Also, evaluation of focusing performance of three different focusing techniques was performed by comparing amplitude of phased array ultrasonic signals scattered from the targeted flaw with three different time delays.

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Single-Injection Infraclavicular Block Versus Ultrasound-Guided Double-Injection Axillary Block: A Noninferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Ariane; Nadeau, Marie-Josée; Dion, Nicolas; Lévesque, Simon; Nicole, Pierre C; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2016-01-01

    Single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block is a simple, reliable, and effective technique. A simplified double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block technique with a high success rate recently has been described. It has the advantage of being performed in a superficial and compressible location, with a potentially improved safety profile. However, its effectiveness in comparison with single-injection infraclavicular block has not been established. We hypothesized that the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block would show rates of complete sensory block at 30 minutes noninferior to the single-injection ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block. After approval by our research ethics committee and written informed consent, adults undergoing distal upper arm surgery were randomized to either group I, ultrasound-guided single-injection infraclavicular block, or group A, ultrasound-guided double-injection axillary block. In group I, 30 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posterior to the axillary artery. In group A, 25 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine was injected posteromedial to the axillary artery, after which 5 mL was injected around the musculocutaneous nerve. Primary outcome was the rate of complete sensory block at 30 minutes. Secondary outcomes were the onset of sensory and motor blocks, surgical success rates, performance times, and incidence of complications. All outcomes were assessed by a blinded investigator. The noninferiority of the double-injection ultrasound-guided axillary block was considered if the limits of the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were within a 10% margin of the rate of complete sensory block of the infraclavicular block. At 30 minutes, the rate of complete sensory block was 79% in group A (90% CI, 71%-85%) compared with 91% in group I (90% CI, 85%-95%); the upper limit of CI of group A is thus included in the established noninferiority margin of 10%. The rate of complete sensory block was lower in group A (proportion

  4. A retrospective comparison of microwave ablation and high intensity focused ultrasound for treating symptomatic uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng, E-mail: zwp215@163.com; Han, Zhi-Yu, E-mail: hanzhiyu301@hotmail.com; Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zjbch@sina.com; Liang, Ping, E-mail: liangping301@hotmail.com

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •Both HIFU and PMWA are thermal ablation techniques and they all provide safe and reliable alternative treatment methods for uterine fibroids. •However, whether there are obvious difference between these two kinds of approaches in improving symptom, treatment time, ablation rate, regression rate and adverse events, until now, there are no clinical trials which have been performed to compare the therapeutic effects of HIFU and PMWA. •In this research, we retrospectively compare the results of these two treatment methods. •To our knowledge, our study is the first directly comparing long-term outcome after PMWA and HIFU in patients with uterine fibroids. -- Abstract: Objectives: To retrospectively compare the effectiveness and safety of percutaneous microwave ablation (PMWA) and ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU) for treating symptomatic uterine fibroids. Methods: Seventy-three women with symptomatic uterine fibroids who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in our study from September 2012 to December 2013. Thirty-one patients with forty uterine fibroids underwent PMWA, and forty-two patients with fifty-one uterine fibroids underwent USgHIFU. A contrast-enhanced MRI was performed before and after treatment, and all patients were followed up for 6 months. Assessment endpoints included symptom severity scores (SSS), treatment time, ablation rate, fibroid regression rate and adverse events. Results: The mean age of the patients in our study was 35.4 ± 6.2 years (range, 21–49 years), and the median volume of uterine fibroids was 95.7 cm{sup 3} (60.3–131.5 cm{sup 3}). The ablation rate of uterine fibroids was 79.8 ± 18.2% and 77.1 ± 14.9% in the PMWA group and the USgHIFU group, respectively, and showed no significant difference between the groups. Changes in SSS after PMWA were similar in the PMWA group (47.7 pre-treatment vs. 29.9 post-treatment) and USgHIFU group (42.1 pre-treatment vs. 24.6 post-treatment). The

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Diagnosis and Treatment of Morton's Neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Ayşe Merve; Onat, Şule Şahin; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-02-01

    Morton's neuroma is the fibrous enlargement of the interdigital nerve branches, usually in the second and third interspace between the metatarsal heads where the lateral and medial plantar nerves often join. Specific symptoms are dull or sharp pain, numbness and/or tingling in the third and fourth digits, burning sensation, cramping, and a feeling of "walking on a stone" around the metatarsal heads. Numerous clinical tests for Morton's neuroma have been described, such as thumb index finger squeeze, and Mulder's click and foot squeeze tests. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for confirmation, especially for differential diagnosis, exact localization, and number of neuromas. Further, performing dynamic imaging during the aforementioned tests is paramount and can readily be carried out with ultrasound. The treatment mainly comprises footwear modifications, radiofrequency ablation, physical therapy, local (corticosteroid and anesthetic) injections into the affected webspace, and surgery. Again the use of real-time ultrasound guidance during such interventions is noteworthy.

  6. The role of ultrasound-guided triamcinolone injection in the treatment of de Quervain's disease: treatment and a diagnostic tool?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajder, E.; de Jonge, M. C.; van der Horst, C. M. A. M.; Obdeijn, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the technique and usefulness of ultrasound-guided intrasheath injection of triamcinolone in the treatment of de Quervain's disease (dQD). Our study was retrospective in design. Seventy-one wrists of 62 patients who were treated with an ultrasound-guided

  7. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part II Diagnostic Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidhu, P. S.; Brabrand, K.; Cantisani, V.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part of the series on interventional ultrasound guidelines of the Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB). It deals with the diagnostic interventional procedure. General points are discussed which are pertinent to all patients, followed by organ......-specific imaging that will allow the correct pathway and planning for the interventional procedure. This will allow for the appropriate imaging workup for each individual interventional procedure (Long version)....

  8. Spinal Cord Injury During Ultrasound-Guided C7 Cervical Medial Branch Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donghwi; Seong, Min Yong; Kim, Ha Yong; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided cervical medial branch block (CMBB) is commonly performed to diagnose and treat head, neck, and shoulder pain. However, its use at the C7 level has been shown to be less accurate than at other levels, which may increase the chance of injury owing to the imprecision of needle site provided by the ultrasound guide. We report the first case of iatrogenic spinal cord injury from an ultrasound-guided C7 CMBB. The patient, upon receiving this procedure, had fainted shortly after experiencing an electrical sensation that ran from the neck to the toe. The patient complained of weakness and tingling sensation in the left upper extremity. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hematoma in the cervical spinal cord, and an electrophysiological study, which was performed at 3 weeks after the incident, revealed an injury at the left C3-T2 anterior horn. After 2 months of rehabilitation, the patient showed moderate improvement in the strength of the left proximal upper extremity; however, there was no improvement in the strength of the left distal upper extremity. Therefore, we recommend caution when performing ultrasound-guided CMBB at the C7 level, as the guide particularly at this level is relatively inaccurate, posing a risk of spinal cord injury.

  9. Attitudes towards three ultrasound-guided vascular access techniques in a paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Carrie; Ng, Lorraine; Kessler, David O

    2017-10-26

    although nurses often place peripheral intravenous (IV) catheters, little is known about their perceptions regarding use of ultrasound guidance. the authors aimed to determine paediatric emergency department nurses' attitudes toward ultrasound-guided IV access techniques and assessed practice change after training. In a cross-sectional study of nurses, they had didactic and hands-on practice sessions, using three short-axis ultrasound-guided IV access techniques on gel models. Outcomes included likability and ease of learning and performing the techniques. A 3-month follow-up questionnaire assessed attitudes and behavioural changes. 18 nurses were enrolled and 17 analysed. Participants liked all three techniques and thought they were easy to learn and perform. Eighty-two percent of the nurses used at least one technique clinically. The two-person self-guided technique was most preferred (65%) and used 3 months later (65%). nurses reported generally positive attitudes toward all three ultrasound-guided IV access techniques, but preferred the two-person self-guided technique. Owing to the small sample size, these results cannot be generalised and further research is needed.

  10. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  11. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology in the mediastinum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Serényi, Péter; Madácsy, László; Szepes, Attila

    2013-03-03

    Endoscopic ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the posterior mediastinum is technically a relatively simple and safe procedure, and it can provide important information for the further management of patients. To analyze and compare the results of mediastinal endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration with the data available in the literature. The authors retrospectively analyzed their prospective database on mediastinal endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of 49 patients referred to their endoscopy centre between 1 November 2009 and 1 November 2012. For the fine needle aspiration 22 and 25 G needles were used. Two to six needle passes were performed in each patient. All slides were prepared at the endoscopy unit and analyzed at the cytology laboratory. The authors performed mediastinal endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration for enlarged lymph nodes or suspected mediastinal malignancy in all but 4 patients (2 suspected oesophageal cancers, 1 suspected benign oesophageal stenosis with wall thickening and 1 cardia tumour, all with non-diagnostic endoscopic biopsies). Five patients were excluded from the analysis since fine needle aspiration was not performed in them. Benign lesions were suspected based on the endoscopic ultrasound morphology in 7, and malignant disease in 37 patients. In 3 cases samples obtained by biopsy were not informative for cytological analysis. Cytology confirmed all benign lesions and showed malignancy in 28 cases. Cytology failed to reveal malignancy in 6 patients, although it was suspected based upon endoscopic ultrasound finding. Furthermore, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provided the diagnosis in 15 of the 17 patients when bronchoscopy was non-diagnostic. The diagnostic accuracy of the EUS-FNA was the following: sensitivity 82%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 1.0, negative predictive value 0.54. Only one infectious complication was

  12. Evaluating imaging-pathology concordance and discordance after ultrasound-guided breast biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided breast biopsy has become the main method for diagnosing breast pathology, and it has a high diagnostic accuracy, approaching that of open surgical biopsy. However, methods for confirming adequate lesion retrieval after US-guided biopsy are relatively limited and false-negative results are unavoidable. Determining imaging-pathology concordance after US-guided biopsy is essential for validating the biopsy result and providing appropriate management. In this review article, we briefly present the results of US-guided breast biopsy; describe general aspects to consider when establishing imaging-pathology concordance; and review the various categories of imaging-pathology correlations and corresponding management strategies. PMID:29169231

  13. High Voltage Staircase Drive Circuit for Triggered High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Keisuke; Okada, Jumpei; Nakamura, Kotaro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-07-01

    In triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, cavitation clouds are produced by extremely high intensity trigger pulses and enhance the effect of following heating waves. The ultrasound intensity must be quickly changed from that for trigger pulses to that for heating waves before cavitation clouds vanish. We newly designed and constructed a class D amplifier based on a staircase voltage drive concept, which has the capability of outputting high voltage waves for trigger pulses and continuous waves for heating waves and the capability of fast switching between the two modes. Its efficacy was confirmed by an experiment with a BSA containing polyacrylamide gel.

  14. Validation of the Peripheral Ultrasound-guided Vascular Access Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primdahl, Stine C; Weile, Jesper; Clemmesen, Louise; Madsen, Kristian R; Subhi, Yousif; Petersen, Poul; Graumann, Ole

    2018-01-01

    Evidence-based standards in proficiency are needed for ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous access. In this study, we explored the validity of the Peripheral Ultrasound-Guided Vascular Access (P-UGVA) Rating Scale.We recruited 3 groups of physicians (5 novices, 5 intermediates, and 5 experts) of increasing proficiency in peripheral ultrasound-guided intravenous access. All participants performed 3 peripheral ultrasound-guided intravenous accesses on three different patients. Performance was video-recorded by 3 cameras and the ultrasound image. Synchronized and anonymized split-screen film clips were rated using the P-UGVA rating scale by 2 assessors, which also assessed overall performance on a 1-5 Likert-scale. Evidence of validity was explored using the contemporary validity framework by Messick (content, response process, internal structure, relations to other variables, and consequences).Content and response process was ensured in the development of the rating scale and validity study. Internal consistency of the P-UGVA rating scale was excellent and sufficient high for certification purposes (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91). Proficiency groups were successfully discriminated by the UPGIVA rating scale (P = .029, one-way ANOVA), and the P-UGVA rating scale scores also correlated strongly with the overall performance evaluations (rho = 0.87, P rate of 26.5% and false negative rate of 8.5%.We present validity evidence for the P-UGVA rating scale and an evidence-based standard in proficiency for ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous access. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous acoustic stimulation of human primary and secondary somatosensory cortices using transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Chung, Yong An; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-10-26

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is gaining momentum as a novel non-invasive brain stimulation method, with promising potential for superior spatial resolution and depth penetration compared to transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation. We examined the presence of tactile sensations elicited by FUS stimulation of two separate brain regions in humans-the primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory areas of the hand, as guided by individual-specific functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Under image-guidance, acoustic stimulations were delivered to the SI and SII areas either separately or simultaneously. The SII areas were divided into sub-regions that are activated by four types of external tactile sensations to the palmar side of the right hand-vibrotactile, pressure, warmth, and coolness. Across the stimulation conditions (SI only, SII only, SI and SII simultaneously), participants reported various types of tactile sensations that arose from the hand contralateral to the stimulation, such as the palm/back of the hand or as single/neighboring fingers. The type of tactile sensations did not match the sensations that are associated with specific sub-regions in the SII. The neuro-stimulatory effects of FUS were transient and reversible, and the procedure did not cause any adverse changes or discomforts in the subject's mental/physical status. The use of multiple FUS transducers allowed for simultaneous stimulation of the SI/SII in the same hemisphere and elicited various tactile sensations in the absence of any external sensory stimuli. Stimulation of the SII area alone could also induce perception of tactile sensations. The ability to stimulate multiple brain areas in a spatially restricted fashion can be used to study causal relationships between regional brain activities and their cognitive/behavioral outcomes.

  16. Variables determining the success of ultrasound-guided hydrostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reduction was three times. We used intrvenous sedation in irritable infants. Results 2 ... routine ultrasound, as it is the best diagnostic tool. The characteristic appearance of the mass either in the cross- ... distention and prevent aspiration. Venous access was achieved, and intravenous fluid replacement was main- tained.

  17. Ultrasound-guided cryoablation of breast fibroadenoma: a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golatta, Michael; Harcos, Aba; Pavlista, David; Danes, Jan; Klein, Rafi; Simovich, Paola; Gruber, Ines; Hahn, Markus

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cryoablation (CA) under ultrasound guidance in the office setting with liquid nitrogen system for patients with fibroadenoma (FA). For this prospective multicenter trial, an office-based cryosurgical system was used to treat histological confirmed benign FA with a maximum dimension of 3 cm. Sixty CA procedures were performed under ultrasound guidance. A freeze-thaw-freeze treatment cycle was performed according to the size of the FA. During the CA procedure continuous ultrasound monitoring was performed, verifying engulfment of the FA. Patients attended four follow-up visits at 1 week, 3, 6 months and 1 year and underwent ultrasound, physical examination and photography. Data were collected and analyzed in 60 cases. 59 of 60 FA (98 %) were fully engulfed by the ice ball. No serious adverse events occurred related to the IceSense3 system. At the 1-year follow-up, the FAs were gone in 93% of the cases. Prior to CA procedure, 76% of the FAs were palpable. Afterwards in some cases (22%), a scar/cryo lesion was palpable. 28% of the patients reported pain, described as mild or moderate, compared to 2% after 1 year. Cosmetic results at 12 months follow-up were reported as good or excellent in 100% by physician and in 97% by patients. The cryodestruction of the FA using liquid nitrogen system proved functional and safe, while showing meaningful reduction in volume, palpability, pain and cosmetic satisfying outcomes.

  18. Attempt at Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration of Intracranial Abscess in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This may be carried out through a burrhole or through a pre-existing cranial defect such as the anterior fontanelle. Aims and Objectives: To demonstrate the benefit of ... for patients who may be too ill for general anaesthesia. Keywords: Intracranial Abscess; Ultrasound guidance; Cranial defect: Anterior fontanelle; Burrhole.

  19. An experience of ultrasound-guided hydrostatic reduction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Follow-up ultrasound was performed after 24 hours to rule out recurrence. Results: The disease was most prevalent in the age group 6–24 months. The ileocolic type was the most common. Mean duration (hours) was 17.02 ± 20.81 for time to presentation. Complete therapeutic reduction was achieved in 70 of the 78 cases, ...

  20. Transperineal seed-implantation guided by biplanar transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, H.H.; Torp-Pedersen, S.; Myschetzky, P.

    1990-01-01

    A new method for precise transperineal placement of therapeutic sources in prostatic cancer is described. The method is a modification of the technique described in 1983 by Holm and coworkers. Insertion of needles is monitored by transverse as well as longitudinal transrectal ultrasound

  1. Role of Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Thoracic Lesions | Elameen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This prospective study is to evaluate and enhance the role of ultrasound in biopsy guidance of thoracic lesions. Methods: 55 patients were subjected for fine needle aspiration (FNA) and/or core needle biopsy (CNB) from peripheral chest lesions in Ribat University Hospital during the period from April 2011 and ...

  2. Transperineal seed-implantation guided by biplanar transrectal ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hans Henrik; Torp-Pedersen, S; Myschetzky, P

    1990-01-01

    A new method for precise transperineal placement of therapeutic sources in prostatic cancer is described. The method is a modification of the technique described in 1983 by Holm and coworkers. Insertion of needles is monitored by transverse as well as longitudinal transrectal ultrasound....

  3. Subacute posteromedial impingement of the ankle in athletes: MR imaging evaluation and ultrasound guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiou, Christina; Robinson, Philip; O'Connor, Philip J.; Grainger, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    To describe the use of MR imaging and efficacy of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the diagnosis and management of athletes with clinical posteromedial impingement of the ankle. A retrospective analysis of imaging findings on MR was undertaken in nine elite athletes with clinical posteromedial ankle impingement. MR studies from six professional athletes with posterolateral pain were also reviewed as an imaging control group. The two reviewing radiologists were blinded to the clinical details and the proportion of control and study subjects. The nine study athletes also underwent diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided injection of steroid and anaesthetic into the posteromedial capsular abnormality. Follow-up was by telephone interview. Posteromedial capsular thickening was seen only in athletes with posteromedial impingement (7/9). Posteromedial synovitis was present in all athletes with posteromedial impingement; however, posterior and posterolateral synovitis was also seen in these athletes. Mild posteromedial synovitis was present in two control athletes. Ultrasound identified abnormal posteromedial soft tissue thickening deep to tibialis posterior between the medial malleolus and talus in all nine athletes. After injection all athletes returned to their previous level of sport, with eight of the nine not experiencing any residual or recurrent symptoms. If MR imaging excludes significant coexistent abnormality, ultrasound can localise posteromedial soft tissue abnormality and guide injection therapy, allowing return to athletic activity without surgical intervention. (orig.)

  4. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiography for the exclusion of biliary atresia in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyung Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Choe, Byung Ho; Kim, Kap Cheol; Kim, Jong Yeol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Hee Jung [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of performing an ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiogram (PCC) for excluding biliary atresia as the cause of neonatal jaundice. Between Oct. 2003 and Feb. 2005, six ultrasound-guided PCC procedures were performed to five jaundiced infants (4 females and 1 male; mean age: 60 days old) for whom possibility of biliary atresia could not be ruled out by the DISIDA scan as the cause of their neonatal jaundice. Gallbladder puncture was performed under ultrasound guidance with a 23-gauge needle. Contrast material injection during fluoroscopic examination was performed after dilatation of the gallbladder lumen with normal saline under ultrasound guidance. The criteria used for excluding biliary atresia were complete visualization of the extrahepatic biliary trees and/or contrast excretion into the duodenum. The complications and final diagnosis was assessed according to the clinical and laboratory findings. The procedures were successful in all the patients without any complication. Biliary atresia could be ruled out in all the patients. The final diagnosis was neonatal cytomegalovirus hepatitis in two patients, total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in two patients, and combined cytomegalovirus hepatitis and total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in one patient. Ultrasound-guided PCC is a feasible and effective method for the early definitive exclusion of biliary atresia as the cause of neonatal jaundice. By the technique of injecting normal saline before contrast injection, PCC can be done even in a totally collapsed or very small gallbladder.

  5. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiography for the exclusion of biliary atresia in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Choe, Byung Ho; Kim, Kap Cheol; Kim, Jong Yeol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hye Jeong; Lee, Hee Jung

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of performing an ultrasound-guided percutaneous cholecysto-cholangiogram (PCC) for excluding biliary atresia as the cause of neonatal jaundice. Between Oct. 2003 and Feb. 2005, six ultrasound-guided PCC procedures were performed to five jaundiced infants (4 females and 1 male; mean age: 60 days old) for whom possibility of biliary atresia could not be ruled out by the DISIDA scan as the cause of their neonatal jaundice. Gallbladder puncture was performed under ultrasound guidance with a 23-gauge needle. Contrast material injection during fluoroscopic examination was performed after dilatation of the gallbladder lumen with normal saline under ultrasound guidance. The criteria used for excluding biliary atresia were complete visualization of the extrahepatic biliary trees and/or contrast excretion into the duodenum. The complications and final diagnosis was assessed according to the clinical and laboratory findings. The procedures were successful in all the patients without any complication. Biliary atresia could be ruled out in all the patients. The final diagnosis was neonatal cytomegalovirus hepatitis in two patients, total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in two patients, and combined cytomegalovirus hepatitis and total parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis in one patient. Ultrasound-guided PCC is a feasible and effective method for the early definitive exclusion of biliary atresia as the cause of neonatal jaundice. By the technique of injecting normal saline before contrast injection, PCC can be done even in a totally collapsed or very small gallbladder

  6. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo [Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Silvestri, Enzo [Diagnostica per Immagini, Ospedale Evangelico Internazionale, Corso Solferino 29A, 16100 Genova (Italy); Serafini, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Diagnostica per Immagini, Ospedale Santa Corona, Via XXV Aprile 38, 17037 Pietra Ligure, Savona (Italy); Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Scienze Chirurgiche, Oncologiche e Gastroenterologiche, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Giustiniani, Padova (Italy); Garlaschi, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Scienze per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Cimmino, Marco Amedeo [Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via L.B. Alberti 4, 16132 Genova (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria, E-mail: io@lucasconfienza.it [Servizio di Radiologia, IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Università degli Studi di Milano, Piazza Malan 2, San Donato Milanese, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Femoral Nerve Block to Facilitate the Closed Reduction of a Dislocated Hip Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Carlin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic hip dislocation is a common but unfortunate complication in patients who have undergone total hip arthroplasty. Successful closed reduction in the emergency department leads to a reduced length of stay and rate of hospitalization. 1, 2 The use of regional anesthesia by femoral nerve block represents a novel approach for controlling pain in patients with hip pathologies. 3 Ultrasound-guided approaches have been used with great success for controlling pain in patients with hip fractures. 4, 5 Here we report the case of a 90-year-old male who presented with a dislocated hip prosthesis, which was subsequently corrected with closed reduction following delivery of regional anesthesia to the femoral nerve under ultrasound guidance. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported use of an ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block to facilitate closed reduction of a dislocated prosthetic hip, and highlights a novel approach that avoids the use of procedural sedation in an elderly patient.

  8. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Mauri, Giovanni; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand

  9. Efficacy of Ablation Therapy for Secondary Hyperparathyroidism by Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Thermoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfeng; Qian, Linxue; Zu, Yuan; Wei, Ying; Hu, Xiangdong

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the value of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave thermoablation to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). One hundred and thirty-eight parathyroid glands from 56 patients with SHPT were ablated in this study. All the parathyroid glands were evaluated by real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound before, during and after ablation. Changes in serum parathyroid hormone (sPTH) levels were measured before treatment and at 1 h, 1 wk, 1 mo and 6 mo after thermoablation treatment. All 56 cases had a 1-mo follow-up, and 34 cases had a 6-mo follow-up. The sPTH level of the 54 cases 1 mo after ablation was significantly lower than that before (p 0.05). Ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave thermoablation is a feasible and effective non-surgical alternative treatment for SHPT patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Enhanced guided bone regeneration by asymmetrically porous PCL/pluronic F127 membrane and ultrasound stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Tae Ho; Chun, So Young; Park, Eui Kyun; Lee, Jin Ho

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel method for fabricating a guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane with an asymmetrical pore structure and hydrophilicity by an immersion precipitation method. Results from an animal study, in a cranial defect model in rats, indicated that the unique asymmetrically porous GBR membrane would provide a good environment for bone regeneration. In the present study, we applied low intensity pulsed ultrasound as a simple and non-invasive stimulus to an asymmetrically porous polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 GBR membrane-implanted site transcutaneously in rats to investigate the feasibility of using ultrasound to stimulate enhanced bone regeneration through the membrane. It was observed that the ultrasound-stimulated PCL/F127 GBR membrane group had much faster bone regeneration behavior than a PCL/F127 membrane group w/o ultrasound or a control group (w/o membrane and ultrasound). The greater bone regeneration behavior in the GBR membrane/ultrasound group may be caused by a synergistic effect of the asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membrane with unique properties (selective permeability, hydrophilicity and osteoconductivity), and the stimulatory effect of ultrasound (induction of angiogenesis and osteogenesis of cells).

  11. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  12. Ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block evaluated by infrared thermography and distal skin temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Bjerregaard, Lars Stryhn

    2014-01-01

    of the 2nd and 5th digits. METHODS: We performed an ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block in 45 patients undergoing upper limb surgery. The contralateral hand served as control and we obtained infrared thermographic images of both hands before the block and during the following 30 min. We defined...

  13. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection for MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Soo Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Kang, Duck Sick [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    To assess the feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography. Between June 2002 and October 2004, 132 patients (29 female, 103 male: mean age, 33.6 years) underwent ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast media injection (40 ml saline + 10 ml 2% lidocaine + 0.2 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine + 0.4 ml epinephrine) for MR arthrography. The patients were classified into four groups, viz. the no leakage group, the minor leakage with successful intraarticular injection group, the major leakage with unsuccessful intraarticular injection group, and the injection failure group. The 'no leakage' and 'minor leakage' groups were considered to be technical successes, while the 'major leakage' and 'injection failure' groups were regarded as technical failures. The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR Arthrography was 99.2% (131/132 patients) and one patients 0.7% (1/132 patients) was included in the 'major leakage' group. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography was feasible with a high success rate.

  14. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection for MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Soo Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Kang, Duck Sick

    2005-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography. Between June 2002 and October 2004, 132 patients (29 female, 103 male: mean age, 33.6 years) underwent ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast media injection (40 ml saline + 10 ml 2% lidocaine + 0.2 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine + 0.4 ml epinephrine) for MR arthrography. The patients were classified into four groups, viz. the no leakage group, the minor leakage with successful intraarticular injection group, the major leakage with unsuccessful intraarticular injection group, and the injection failure group. The 'no leakage' and 'minor leakage' groups were considered to be technical successes, while the 'major leakage' and 'injection failure' groups were regarded as technical failures. The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR Arthrography was 99.2% (131/132 patients) and one patients 0.7% (1/132 patients) was included in the 'major leakage' group. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography was feasible with a high success rate

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided coeliac plexus neurolysis to reduce pain in patients with pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Andreas Slot; Karstensen, John Gésdal; Cherciu, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Pain is among the most common symptoms in patients with pancreatic cancer and up to 80% require analgesics, most often as opioids. Unfortunately the analgesic effect is frequently insufficient, and increasing doses are required, resulting in unpleasant side effects. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided n...

  16. Transfacial ultrasound-guided gland-preserving resection of parotid sialoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William W; Walvekar, Rohan R; Gillespie, M Boyd

    2013-02-01

    Review surgical techniques and outcomes of ultrasound-guided, transfacial, gland-preserving removal of difficult parotid stones. Case series with chart review. Two academic tertiary care centers. Patients who underwent ultrasound-guided, combined transfacial-endoscopic operation for symptomatic parotid sialolithiasis from June 2010 through June 2012 at 2 tertiary care university hospitals were evaluated. Outcome measurements included stone size, stone location, complications, symptom relief, and gland preservation rate. A total of 14 patients underwent ultrasound-guided, transfacial operation for symptomatic parotid sialolithiasis. Ten of 14 patients (71%) had completely successful therapy defined by no symptoms postoperatively with a preserved, functional gland. Three of the 4 patients without complete symptom resolution did endorse symptom improvement, whereas the fourth patient eventually underwent parotidectomy. Needle localization was used to aid in transfacial stone retrieval in 57% of cases. Ultrasound-guided, combined transfacial-endoscopic removal of certain parotid stones is an alternative to parotidectomy for patients in whom endoscopy or shock wave therapy for stone retrieval is ineffective, unavailable, or contraindicated. Needle localization is a useful adjunct in stone retrieval.

  17. Ultrasound-guided block of the axillary nerve: a volunteer study of a new method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Asghar, S; Andersen, H L

    2011-01-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) is the gold standard for perioperative pain management in shoulder surgery. However, a more distal technique would be desirable to avoid the side effects and potential serious complications of IBPB. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop...... and describe a new method to perform an ultrasound-guided specific axillary nerve block....

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Bipolar Umbilical Cord Occlusion in Complicated Monochorionic Pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Katrine V; Jensen, Lisa N; Jørgensen, Connie

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ultrasound-guided bipolar umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) is used in complicated monochorionic multiple pregnancies in Denmark. The aim of this study was to assess a learning curve in the procedure of UCO. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and two monochorionic pregnancies treated...

  19. Value of Artisanal Simulators to Train Veterinary Students in Performing Invasive Ultrasound-Guided Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hage, Maria Cristina F. N. S.; Massaferro, Ana Beatriz; Lopes, Érika Rondon; Beraldo, Carolina Mariano; Daniel, Jéssika

    2016-01-01

    Pericardial effusion can lead to cardiac tamponade, which endangers an animal's life. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis is used to remove abnormal liquid; however, it requires technical expertise. In veterinary medical education, the opportunity to teach this procedure to save lives during emergencies is rare; therefore, simulators are…

  20. Efficacy of a single ultrasound-guided injection for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Atchia, Ismaël

    2011-01-01

    Intra-articular injection is effective for osteoarthritis, but the best single injection strategy is not known, nor are there established predictors of response. The objectives of this study were to assess and predict response to a single ultrasound-guided injection in moderate to severe hip osteoarthritis.

  1. A novel concept for continuous peripheral nerve blocks. Presentation of a new ultrasound-guided device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C; Madsen, M H

    2015-01-01

    concept and prototype for ultrasound-guided in-plane positioning and readjustment of peripheral nerve catheters (patent pending). The integrated catheter-needle prototype comprises three parts: a curved needle, a catheter with clear echogenic markings attached to the needle tail and a detachable hub...

  2. Bilateral Ultrasound Guided Supraclavicular Block in a Patient on Antiplatelet Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Kumar KS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 63 year old male hypertensive and diabetic patient, with coronary artery and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, presented with bilateral both bone forearm fracture. Open reduction and internal fixation was done successfully with bilateral ultrasound guided supraclavicular block. The problems associated with peripheral nerve block in an Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD patient on antiplatelet therapy are discussed.

  3. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. SETTING: Hvidovre...

  4. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  5. A Prospective Randomized Study to Evaluate a New Learning Tool for Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Adhikary, Sanjib; Karanzalis, Demetrius; Liu, Wai-Man Raymond; Hadzic, Admir; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a new learning tool for needle insertion accuracy skills during a simulated ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia procedure. Thirty participants were included in this randomized controlled study. After viewing a prerecorded video of a single, discreet, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia task, all participants performed the same task three consecutive times (pretest), and needle insertion accuracy skills in a phantom model were recorded as baseline. All participants were then randomized into two groups, experimental and control. The experimental group practiced the task using the new tool, designed with two video cameras, a monitor, and an ultrasound machine where the images from the ultrasound and video of hand movements are viewed simultaneously on the monitor. The control group practiced the task without using the new tool. After the practice session, both groups repeated the same task and were evaluated in the same manner as in the pretest. Participants in both group groups had similar baseline characteristics with respect to previous experience with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia procedures. The experimental group had significantly better needle insertion accuracy scores ( P  < 0.01) than the control group. Using the new learning tool, inexperienced participants had better needle insertion accuracy scores ( P  < 0.01) compared with experienced participants. This study demonstrates that the use of this new learning tool results in short-term improvement in hand-eye, motor, and basic needle insertion skills during a simulated ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia procedure vs traditional practice methods. Skill improvement was greater in novices compared with experienced participants. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Guide to the ultrasound examination of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolnick, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book is written to assist the operator when performing an organized and directed ultrasound examination. It provides, in outline form, a sequential approach to the scanning of abdominal organs and regions by; indicating the structures within the organ or region that should be scanned; suggesting other regions for examination if abnormalities within the initially imaged structures are detected and; suggesting differential diagnostic possibilities when abnormalities are seen

  7. Determining temperature distribution in tissue in the focal plane of the high (>100 W/cm(2)) intensity focused ultrasound beam using phase shift of ultrasound echoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwat, Piotr; Kujawska, Tamara; Lewin, Peter A; Secomski, Wojciech; Gambin, Barbara; Litniewski, Jerzy

    2016-02-01

    In therapeutic applications of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) the guidance of the HIFU beam and especially its focal plane is of crucial importance. This guidance is needed to appropriately target the focal plane and hence the whole focal volume inside the tumor tissue prior to thermo-ablative treatment and beginning of tissue necrosis. This is currently done using Magnetic Resonance Imaging that is relatively expensive. In this study an ultrasound method, which calculates the variations of speed of sound in the locally heated tissue volume by analyzing the phase shifts of echo-signals received by an ultrasound scanner from this very volume is presented. To improve spatial resolution of B-mode imaging and minimize the uncertainty of temperature estimation the acoustic signals were transmitted and received by 8 MHz linear phased array employing Synthetic Transmit Aperture (STA) technique. Initially, the validity of the algorithm developed was verified experimentally in a tissue-mimicking phantom heated from 20.6 to 48.6 °C. Subsequently, the method was tested using a pork loin sample heated locally by a 2 MHz pulsed HIFU beam with focal intensity ISATA of 129 W/cm(2). The temperature calibration of 2D maps of changes in the sound velocity induced by heating was performed by comparison of the algorithm-determined changes in the sound velocity with the temperatures measured by thermocouples located in the heated tissue volume. The method developed enabled ultrasound temperature imaging of the heated tissue volume from the very inception of heating with the contrast-to-noise ratio of 3.5-12 dB in the temperature range 21-56 °C. Concurrently performed, conventional B-mode imaging revealed CNR close to zero dB until the temperature reached 50 °C causing necrosis. The data presented suggest that the proposed method could offer an alternative to MRI-guided temperature imaging for prediction of the location and extent of the thermal lesion prior to applying the

  8. Ultrasound-guided trigger point injections in the cervicothoracic musculature: a new and unreported technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botwin, Kenneth P; Sharma, Kavita; Saliba, Romeo; Patel, Bharat C

    2008-01-01

    Myofascial pain is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The myofascial pain syndrome is one of the largest groups of under diagnosed and under treated medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Trigger points are commonly seen in patients with myofascial pain which is responsible for localized pain in the affected muscles as well as referred pain patterns. Correct needle placement in a myofascial trigger point is vital to prevent complications and improve efficacy of the trigger point injection to help reduce or relieve myofascial pain. In obese patients, these injections may not reach the target tissue. In the cervicothoracic spine, a misguided or misplaced injection can result in a pneumothorax. Here, we describe an ultrasound-guided trigger point injection technique to avoid this potential pitfall. Office based ultrasound-guided injection techniques for musculoskeletal disorders have been described in the literature with regard to tendon, bursa, cystic, and joint pathologies. For the interventionalist, utilizing ultrasound yields multiple advantages technically and practically, including observation of needle placement in real-time, ability to perform dynamic studies, the possibility of diagnosing musculoskeletal pathologies, avoidance of radiation exposure, reduced overall cost, and portability of equipment within the office setting. To our knowledge, the use of ultrasound guidance in performing trigger point injection in the cervicothoracic area, particularly in obese patients, has not been previously reported. A palpable trigger point in the cervicothoracic musculature was localized and marked by indenting the skin with the tip of a plastic needle cover. The skin was then sterile prepped. Then, using an ultrasound machine with sterile coupling gel and a sterile latex free transducer cover

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Mobile App-Guided Training in Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (eFAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Philip Morkeberg; Todsen, Tobias; Subhi, Yousif

    2017-01-01

    the cost-effectiveness of mobile app-guided training versus traditional formats such as textbook-guided training. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of mobile app-guided versus textbook-guided ultrasound training. Material and methods First-year residents (n?=?38) with no previous ultrasound...... underlines the need for careful evaluation of cost-effectiveness when introducing technological innovations for clinical skills training....

  10. Usefulness of rehabilitation in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitation program for patients in whom ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment (UGPT) was performed for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). In this prospective observational study, 86 patients (22 males and 64 females) with shoulder calcific tendinopathy treated with UGPT were enrolled. At the end of the procedure, a corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was performed. The patients were then asked to follow a specific rehabilitation protocol (2 times/week for 5 weeks) that focused on mobility, strength and function. At baseline and after 6 weeks, clinical parameters, visual analog scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley scale (CMS) scores and ultrasound (US) features were collected. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 ± 8.4 years and their mean BMI was 22.7 ± 2.1. Considering the whole cohort, the treatment was effective, with a significant decrease in the VAS score and an improvement in the CMS score. Thereafter, on the basis of the compliance to the rehabilitation program (by self-report), 53 and 33 patients were included in the rehabilitation group (Rehab group; performed exercises ≥2 times/week) and the No Rehab group (performed exercises <2 times/week), respectively. The comparison between the groups showed that the subjects who performed the exercises regularly had better results in terms of pain and functional recovery, and less associated diseases (e.g. adhesive bursitis and tenosynovitis of the long head of the biceps) than those who were less compliant with the program. UGPT, followed by a specific postprocedure rehabilitation program, was an effective treatment for RCCT. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Driving Circuitry for Focused Ultrasound Noninvasive Surgery and Drug Delivery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kullervo Hynynen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent works on focused ultrasound (FUS have shown great promise for cancer therapy. Researchers are continuously trying to improve system performance, which is resulting in an increased complexity that is more apparent when using multi-element phased array systems. This has led to significant efforts to reduce system size and cost by relying on system integration. Although ideas from other fields such as microwave antenna phased arrays can be adopted in FUS, the application requirements differ significantly since the frequency range used in FUS is much lower. In this paper, we review recent efforts to design efficient power monitoring, phase shifting and output driving techniques used specifically for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU.

  12. Current status of high-intensity focused ultrasound for the management of uterine adenomyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Vincent Y. T. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen Mary Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2017-04-15

    While high-intensity focused ultrasound has been used for some time in the management of uterine fibroids, its effectiveness and safety in managing adenomyosis is less well established. A literature review was performed of all eligible reports using this modality as a treatment for adenomyosis. Relevant publications were obtained from the PubMed electronic database from inception through March 2016. Eleven articles, including information from 1,150 treatments and follow-up data from 990 patients, were reviewed. High-intensity focused ultrasound appears to be effective and safe in the management of symptomatic adenomyosis, and can be considered as an alternative uterine-sparing option for women with this condition.

  13. Accurate acoustic power measurement for low-intensity focused ultrasound using focal axial vibration velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenyang; Guo, Gepu; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong; Hu, Jimin

    2017-07-01

    Low-intensity focused ultrasound is a form of therapy that can have reversible acoustothermal effects on biological tissue, depending on the exposure parameters. The acoustic power (AP) should be chosen with caution for the sake of safety. To recover the energy of counteracted radial vibrations at the focal point, an accurate AP measurement method using the focal axial vibration velocity (FAVV) is proposed in explicit formulae and is demonstrated experimentally using a laser vibrometer. The experimental APs for two transducers agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulations, showing that AP is proportional to the square of the FAVV, with a fixed power gain determined by the physical parameters of the transducers. The favorable results suggest that the FAVV can be used as a valuable parameter for non-contact AP measurement, providing a new strategy for accurate power control for low-intensity focused ultrasound in biomedical engineering.

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: A case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellini, Elia; Crinò, Stefano F; Ballarè, Marco; Pallio, Socrate; Occhipinti, Pietro

    2016-02-10

    Here we offer a review of the literature regarding endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours and describe the case of a cystic tumour completely ablated after a multisession procedure. A total of 35 PubMed indexed cases of treated functioning and non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours resulted from our search, 29 of which are well-documented and summarised. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation appears as a local, minimally invasive treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, suitable for selected patients. This technique appears feasible, relatively safe and efficient, especially when applied to symptom relief in functioning tumours, aiming at loss of endocrine secretion. For non-functioning tumours, where the goal is complete tissue ablation, eus guided ethanol ablation can provide good results for patients who are unfit for surgery or for those who refuse surgical resection. Its role in "fit for surgery" patients requires assessment through further studies.

  15. Real-time ultrasound-guided placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter without fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamuta, Soshi; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Matsuhashi, Shiori; Shimizu, Arata; Uraoka, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masato

    2018-03-01

    Malposition of peripherally inserted central catheters placed at the bedside is a well-recognized phenomenon. We report the success rate of the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters with ultrasound guidance for tip positioning and describe the knacks and pitfalls. We retrospectively reviewed the medical case charts of 954 patients who received peripherally inserted central catheter procedure. Patient clinical data included success rate of puncture, detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography, adjustment rate after X-ray, and success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement. The success rate of puncture was 100% (954/954). Detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography was 82.1% (78/95). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip navigation was 98.2% (937/954). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip location was 98.0% (935/954). Adjustment rate after X-ray was 1.79% (17/952). The final success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement was 99.8% (952/954). Ultrasound guidance for puncturing and tip positioning is a promising option for the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters. Ultrasound guidance could dispense with radiation exposure and the transfer of patients to the X-ray department.

  16. [Effects of high intensity focused ultrasound with SonoVue on blood vessels pathological examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yan; Bai, Jin; Li, Faqi; Wang, Zhibiao

    2010-12-01

    The injury of tumor blood vessels will break up the nutrition supply for the tumor. In this paper, we investigated the effects exerted by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with ultrasound microbubble agent on blood vessels. Ultrasound diagnosis was used to find the goat hepatic blood vessels each being approximately 3mm in diameter. HIFU was focused on the blood vessels. The acoustic power was 250W; HIFU irradiating Mode was line scan (the length of the line: 10 mm; speed: 3 mm/s; irradiating time: 30s). In the experimental group, 0.03 ml/kg SonoVue was injected into the goat before HIFU irradiation,while normal saline was given to the control group. The goats were killed at 24h after HIFU irradiation, then goat liver tissues and blood vessels of target area were taken out. HE staining and Victoria's blue and Ponceau's staining of tissue section showed that the endothelial cells of blood vessels dropped off and became necrosed, and the continuity of blood vessels was interrupted. HIFU combined with SonoVue will damage large blood vessels on HIFU focus, but there is no evident discrepancy between the group with SonoVue and the group without SonoVue.

  17. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Pain Management in Patients with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dababou, Susan; Marrocchio, Cristina; Scipione, Roberto; Erasmus, Hans-Peter; Ghanouni, Pejman; Anzidei, Michele; Catalano, Carlo; Napoli, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    Cancer-related pain affects up to 80% of patients with malignancies. Pain is an important distressing symptom that diminishes the quality of life and negatively affects the survival of patients. Opioid analgesics are generally the primary therapy for cancer-related pain, with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and other interventions used in cases of treatment-resistant pain. These treatments, which can be associated with substantial side effects and systemic toxicity, may not be effective. High-intensity focused ultrasound is an entirely noninvasive technique that is approved for treatment of uterine fibroids, bone metastases, and essential tremors. With magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonographic guidance, high-intensity ultrasound waves are focused on a small well-demarcated region to result in precise localized ablation. This treatment may represent a multimodality approach to treating patients with malignant diseases-facilitating pain palliation, enhanced local drug delivery and radiation therapy effects, and stimulation of anticancer specific immune responses, and potentially facilitating local tumor control. Focused ultrasound can be used to achieve pain palliation by producing several effects, including tissue denervation, tumor mass reduction, and neuromodulation, that can influence different pathways at the origin of the pain. This technology has several key advantages compared with other analgesic therapies: It is completely noninvasive, might be used to achieve rapid pain control, can be safely repeated, and can be used in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy to enhance their effects. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2018.

  18. Two-dimensional mapping of needle visibility with linear and curved array for ultrasound-guided interventional procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Hesty; Suprijanto, Kurniadi, Deddy

    2018-02-01

    Needle visibility in ultrasound-guided technique has been a crucial factor for successful interventional procedure. It has been affected by several factors, i.e. puncture depth, insertion angle, needle size and material, and imaging technology. The influences of those factors made the needle not always well visible. 20 G needles of 15 cm length (Nano Line, facet) were inserted into water bath with variation of insertion angles and depths. Ultrasound measurements are performed with BK-Medical Flex Focus 800 using 12 MHz linear array and 5 MHz curved array in Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia mode. We propose 3 criteria to evaluate needle visibility, i.e. maximum intensity, mean intensity, and the ratio between minimum and maximum intensity. Those criteria were then depicted into representative maps for practical purpose. The best criterion candidate for representing the needle visibility was criterion 1. Generally, the appearance pattern of the needle from this criterion was relatively consistent, i.e. for linear array, it was relatively poor visibility in the middle part of the shaft, while for curved array, it is relatively better visible toward the end of the shaft. With further investigations, for example with the use of tissue-mimicking phantom, the representative maps can be built for future practical purpose, i.e. as a tool for clinicians to ensure better needle placement in clinical application. It will help them to avoid the "dead" area where the needle is not well visible, so it can reduce the risks of vital structures traversing and the number of required insertion, resulting in less patient morbidity. Those simple criteria and representative maps can be utilized to evaluate general visibility patterns of the needle in vast range of needle types and sizes in different insertion media. This information is also important as an early investigation for future research of needle visibility improvement, i.e. the development of beamforming strategies and

  19. Ultrasound in Radiology: from Anatomic, Functional, Molecular Imaging to Drug Delivery and Image-Guided Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade, ultrasound has expanded medical imaging well beyond the “traditional” radiology setting - a combination of portability, low cost and ease of use makes ultrasound imaging an indispensable tool for radiologists as well as for other medical professionals who need to obtain imaging diagnosis or guide a therapeutic intervention quickly and efficiently. Ultrasound combines excellent ability for deep penetration into soft tissues with very good spatial resolution, with only a few exceptions (i.e. those involving overlying bone or gas). Real-time imaging (up to hundreds and thousands frames per second) enables guidance of therapeutic procedures and biopsies; characterization of the mechanical properties of the tissues greatly aids with the accuracy of the procedures. The ability of ultrasound to deposit energy locally brings about the potential for localized intervention encompassing: tissue ablation, enhancing penetration through the natural barriers to drug delivery in the body and triggering drug release from carrier micro- and nanoparticles. The use of microbubble contrast agents brings the ability to monitor and quantify tissue perfusion, and microbubble targeting with ligand-decorated microbubbles brings the ability to obtain molecular biomarker information, i.e., ultrasound molecular imaging. Overall, ultrasound has become the most widely used imaging modality in modern medicine; it will continue to grow and expand. PMID:26200224

  20. Surgery versus ultrasound-guided steroid injections for trigger finger disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rehne L; Lange, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    -centre, randomised controlled trial with a one-year follow-up. Patients are randomly assigned to either ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection (n = 83) or to open surgical release of A1-pulley (n = 83). Follow-up is conducted at 12 weeks and one year after treatment. The affected finger will be assessed using...... a trigger finger score. Furthermore, any treatment complications, absence from work or sport and use of related medical services or additional treatment are also recorded. DISCUSSION: The present study will be the first to compare treatment of trigger finger by conventional open surgery with ultrasound...

  1. Ultrasound-guided core biopsy of breast lesions in Ibadan: Our initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millicent O Obajimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Ultrasound-guided core needle or  tru-cut biopsy is a new concept in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment in developing countries, including Nigeria. A tru-cut biopsy is less invasive surgery, replacing diagnostic surgical biopsies in many institutions. It has a known sensitivity of 94-100%, whether performed with ultrasound or stereotactic guidance. The technique is reliable, simple, reproducible, and relatively cheap. Aims: This is a premier report of ultrasound- guided core biopsy of the breast in Nigeria. This study will evaluate the sampling adequacy and diagnostic accuracy of sonomammographic-guided tru-cut biopsies in determining the nature of a breast lump sent for histopathological analysis. Materials and Methods: A prospective study involving 40 women with clinical suspicion of breast cancer and/or Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS category 3-5 referred for breast imaging at the Department of Radiology of the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Core biopsy was performed with a manual BARD Magnum™ gun, a General Electric GE Logiq P5 ultrasound unit with a high frequency linear transducer. Statistical Package for social sciences [SPSS] Software version 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Forty core needle biopsies (CNB were performed on palpable masses. Histopathology confirmed cancer in 24 (60%, while 10 (25% were benign. Invasive ductal carcinoma accounted for 88% of cancers. Sensitivity and specificity of the core biopsies was found to be 100% and 80%, respectively. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided biopsy for breast lesion assessment in our center shows high accuracy in determining the nature of a breast lump. Its routine use in countries with limited resources is recommended.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided 50% Ethyl Alcohol Injection for Patients With Malleolar and Olecranon Bursitis: A Prospective Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Seong; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility and effect of ultrasound-guided ethyl alcohol injection on malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. Methods Twenty-four patients received ultrasound-guided 50% diluted ethyl alcohol injection at the site of synovial proliferative bursitis after aspiration of the free fluid. Results Swelling and symptoms significantly decreased in 13 of the 24 patients without any complications. Eleven patients had partial improvement in swelling and symptoms. Conclusion Ultrasound-guided alcohol injection could be an alternative therapeutic option before surgery in patients with chronic intractable malleolar and olecranon synovial proliferative bursitis. PMID:27152282

  3. The clinical value of trans-vaginal ultrasound-guided puncture in the treatment of pelvic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Gong Wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of trans-vaginal ultrasound-guided (TVS) puncture in the treatment of pelvic abscess. Methods 30 cases with pelvic abscess were treated by transvaginal ultrasound-guided puncture. The long-dated effects were followed-up. Results: 29 cases were cured by TVS puncture. Operation was performed in 1 patient because of invalid effect. The cure rate was 97%. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided puncture is a safe and convenient method in the treatment of pelvic abscess. (authors)

  4. Fluoroscopy- vs ultrasound-guided aspiration techniques in the management of periprosthetic joint infection: which is the best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Filippo; Brioschi, Marco; Randelli, Pietro; Ambrogi, Federico; Sdao, Silvana; Aliprandi, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Fluid samples obtained from an affected joint still play a central role in the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). It is the only preoperative test able to discover the causative microbiological agent. In the hip, fluid aspiration can be performed through fluoroscopy, ultrasound, or, less commonly, computed tomography. However, there is still a lack of consensus on which method is preferable in terms of efficacy and costbenefit. We, therefore, asked whether (1) the benefits in terms of sensitivity and specificity and (2) the costs were comparable between fluoroscopy- and ultrasound-guided joint aspirations in a suspicious of hip PJI. Between 2013 and 2016, 52 hip aspirations were performed on 49 patients with clinical, radiological, or serological suspicion of PJI, waiting for a revision surgery. The patients were divided in two groups: fluoroscopy- (n = 26) vs ultrasound-guided hip aspiration group (n = 26). These groups were also divided in control and infected patients. The criteria of MusculoSkeletal Infection Society (MSIS) were used, as gold standard, to define PJI. (1) Ultrasound-guided aspiration revealed valid sensitivity (89% vs 60%) and specificity (94% vs 81%) in comparison with fluoroscopic-guided aspiration. (2) The cost analysis was also in favor of ultrasound-guided aspiration (125.30€) than fluoroscopic-guided aspiration (343.58€). We concluded that ultrasound-guided hip aspiration could represent a valid, safe, and less expensive diagnostic alternative to fluoroscopic-guided aspiration in hip PJI.

  5. Therapeutic response assessment of high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroid: Utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Xiaodong [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)]. E-mail: zhouxd@fmmu.edu.cn; Ren Xiaolong [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)]. E-mail: renxiaolong70@hotmail.com; Zhang Jun [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); He Guangbin [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zheng Minjuan [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Tian Xue [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li Li [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhu Ting [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang Min [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Lei [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo Wen [Department of Ultrasonography, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 17 West Changle Road, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To assess the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (ceUS) in the assessment of the therapeutic response to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in patients with uterine fibroid. Materials and methods: Sixty-four patients with a total of 64 uterine fibroids (mean: 5.3 {+-} 1.2 cm; range: 3.2-8.9 cm) treated with HIFU ablation under the ultrasound guidance were evaluated with ceUS after receiving an intravenous bolus injection of a microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) within 1 week after intervention. We obtained serial ceUS images during the time period from beginning to 5 min after the initiation of the bolus contrast injection. All of the patients underwent a contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) and ultrasound guided needle puncture biopsy within 1 week after HIFU ablation. And as a follow-up, all of the patients underwent US at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after HIFU treatment. The volume change was observed and compared to pre- and post-HIFU ablation. The results of the ceUS were compared with those of the ceMRI in terms of the presence or absence of residual unablated tumor and pathologic change in the treated lesions. Results: On ceUS, diagnostic accuracy was 100%, while residual unablated tumors were found in three uterine fibroids (4.7%) and failed treatment was found in eight uterine fibroids (12.5%). All the 11 fibroids were subjected to additional HIFU ablation. Of the 58 ablated fibroids without residual tumors on both the ceUS and ceMRI after the HIFU ablation, the volumes of all the fibroids decreased in different degrees during the 1 year follow-up USs. And histologic examinations confirmed findings of necrotic and viable tumor tissue, respectively. Conclusion: CEUS is potentially useful for evaluating the early therapeutic effect of percutaneous HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids.

  6. Therapeutic response assessment of high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroid: Utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaodong; Ren Xiaolong; Zhang Jun; He Guangbin; Zheng Minjuan; Tian Xue; Li Li; Zhu Ting; Zhang Min; Wang Lei; Luo Wen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (ceUS) in the assessment of the therapeutic response to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in patients with uterine fibroid. Materials and methods: Sixty-four patients with a total of 64 uterine fibroids (mean: 5.3 ± 1.2 cm; range: 3.2-8.9 cm) treated with HIFU ablation under the ultrasound guidance were evaluated with ceUS after receiving an intravenous bolus injection of a microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) within 1 week after intervention. We obtained serial ceUS images during the time period from beginning to 5 min after the initiation of the bolus contrast injection. All of the patients underwent a contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) and ultrasound guided needle puncture biopsy within 1 week after HIFU ablation. And as a follow-up, all of the patients underwent US at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after HIFU treatment. The volume change was observed and compared to pre- and post-HIFU ablation. The results of the ceUS were compared with those of the ceMRI in terms of the presence or absence of residual unablated tumor and pathologic change in the treated lesions. Results: On ceUS, diagnostic accuracy was 100%, while residual unablated tumors were found in three uterine fibroids (4.7%) and failed treatment was found in eight uterine fibroids (12.5%). All the 11 fibroids were subjected to additional HIFU ablation. Of the 58 ablated fibroids without residual tumors on both the ceUS and ceMRI after the HIFU ablation, the volumes of all the fibroids decreased in different degrees during the 1 year follow-up USs. And histologic examinations confirmed findings of necrotic and viable tumor tissue, respectively. Conclusion: CEUS is potentially useful for evaluating the early therapeutic effect of percutaneous HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids

  7. Transcostal high-intensity-focused ultrasound: ex vivo adaptive focusing feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, J-F; Pernot, M; Marquet, F; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, CNRS UMR 7587, Universite Paris VII, Inserm, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: jean-francois.aubry@espci.fr

    2008-06-07

    Ex vivo experiments have been conducted through excised pork rib with bone, cartilage, muscle and skin. The aberrating effect of the ribcage has been experimentally evaluated. Adaptive ultrasonic focusing through ribs has been studied at low power. Without any correction, the pressure fields in the focal plane were both affected by inhomogeneous attenuation and phase distortion and three main effects were observed: a mean 2 mm shift of the main lobe, a mean 1.25 mm spreading of the half width of the main lobe and up to 20 dB increase of the secondary lobe level. Thanks to time-reversal focusing, a 5 dB decrease in the secondary lobes was obtained and the ratio between the energy deposited at the target location and the total amount of energy emitted by the therapeutic array was six times higher than that without correction. Time-reversal minimizes the heating of the ribs by automatically sonicating between the ribs, as demonstrated by temperature measurements using thermocouples placed at different locations on the ribcage. It is also discussed how this aberration correction process could be achieved non-invasively for clinical application.

  8. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Zongyu; Li Faqi; Zou Jiangzhong; Wang Zhibiao

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3x3x25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049±2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532±0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612±0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76±0.08 W/m/- deg. C; specific heat 3653±143 J/kg- deg. C; fusion point154±8 deg. C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320)

  9. Enhanced Detection of Cancer Biomarkers in Blood-Borne Extracellular Vesicles Using Nanodroplets and Focused Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J; Jovel, Juan; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Lewis, John D; Zemp, Roger J

    2017-01-01

    The feasibility of personalized medicine approaches will be greatly improved by the development of noninvasive methods to interrogate tumor biology. Extracellular vesicles shed by solid tumors into the bloodstream have been under recent investigation as a source of tumor-derived biomarkers such as proteins and nucleic acids. We report here an approach using submicrometer perfluorobutane nanodroplets and focused ultrasound to enhance the release of extracellular vesicles from specific locations in tumors into the blood. The released extracellular vesicles were enumerated and characterized using micro flow cytometry. Only in the presence of nanodroplets could ultrasound release appreciable levels of tumor-derived vesicles into the blood. Sonication of HT1080-GFP tumors did not increase the number of circulating tumor cells or the metastatic burden in the tumor-bearing embryos. A variety of biological molecules were successfully detected in tumor-derived extracellular vesicles, including cancer-associated proteins, mRNAs, and miRNAs. Sonication of xenograft HT1080 fibrosarcoma tumors released extracellular vesicles that contained detectable RAC1 mRNA with the highly tumorigenic N92I mutation known to exist in HT1080 cells. Deep sequencing serum samples of embryos with sonicated tumors allowed the identification of an additional 13 known heterozygous mutations in HT1080 cells. Applying ultrasound to HT1080 tumors increased tumor-derived DNA in the serum by two orders of magnitude. This work is the first demonstration of enhanced extracellular vesicle release by ultrasound stimulation and suggests that nanodroplets/ultrasound offers promise for genetic profiling of tumor phenotype and aggressiveness by stimulating the release of extracellular vesicles. Cancer Res; 77(1); 3-13. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  11. Analysis of "dry" mesothelioma with ultrasound guided biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, Jos A.; Boers, James E.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Image-guided sampling of the thickened pleura is a sensitive approach in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion. Malignant pleural mesothelioma presenting without effusion however is more of a diagnostic challenge. In this study we report the diagnostic yield

  12. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration: advantages and potential pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton HH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heidi H Hamilton,1 Jalidsa Pellicier,1 Matthew Bernstein,1 Haytham Dimashkieh,2 Jack Yang1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, 2Department of Pathology, Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greenville, SC, USA Abstract: Endobronchial ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EBUS-FNA is currently considered the procedure of choice for evaluating mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma. In this setting, it is a minimally invasive procedure that can be used to simultaneously diagnose, stage, and obtain cellular material for ancillary studies. Additionally, EBUS-FNA can also be used to triage and diagnose many other mediastinal pathologic processes, such as metastatic malignancy from nonpulmonary origins, lymphoma, and granulomatous lymphadenopathy. At a time when EBUS-FNA is considered the optimal choice for many neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions of the mediastinal lymph nodes, it has become increasingly important for pathologists to familiarize themselves with the nuances of this procedure. The primary focus of this review is to explore the advantages, adequacy issues, and potential pitfalls of EBUS-FNA, paying particular attention to the situations that may adversely affect patient management. Keywords: lung cancer staging, cytology, mediastinal lymph node

  13. Characterization of Different Microbubbles in Assisting Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Kai; Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-04-01

    Microbubbles (MBs) serve as a critical catalyst to amplify local cavitation in CNS capillary lumen to facilitate focused ultrasound (FUS) to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, limited understanding is available regarding the effect of different microbubbles to induce BBB opening. The aim of this study is to characterize different MBs on their effect in FUS-induced BBB opening. Three MBs, SonoVue, Definity, and USphere, were tested, with 0.4-MHz FUS exposure at 0.62-1.38 of mechanical index (MI) on rats. Evans blue, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI and small-animal ultrasound imaging were used as surrogates to allow molecule-penetrated quantification, BBB-opened observation, and MBs circulation/persistence. Cavitation activity was measured via the passive cavitation detection (PCD) setup to correlate with the exposure level and the histological effect. Under given and identical MB concentrations, the three MBs induced similar and equivalent BBB-opening effects and persistence. In addition, a treatment paradigm by adapting exposure time is proposed to compensate MB decay to retain the persistence of BBB-opening efficiency in multiple FUS exposures. The results potentially improve understanding of the equivalence among MBs in focused ultrasound CNS drug delivery, and provide an effective strategy for securing persistence in this treatment modality.

  14. Non-invasive peripheral nerve stimulation via focused ultrasound in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Matthew E.; Lee, Stephen A.; Yang, Georgiana; Kim, Seaok; Wang, Qi; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2018-02-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been employed on a wide range of clinical applications to safely and non-invasively achieve desired effects that have previously required invasive and lengthy procedures with conventional methods. Conventional electrical neuromodulation therapies that are applied to the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are invasive and/or non-specific. Recently, focused ultrasound has demonstrated the ability to modulate the central nervous system and ex vivo peripheral neurons. Here, for the first time, noninvasive stimulation of the sciatic nerve eliciting a physiological response in vivo is demonstrated with FUS. FUS was applied on the sciatic nerve in mice with simultaneous electromyography (EMG) on the tibialis anterior muscle. EMG signals were detected during or directly after ultrasound stimulation along with observable muscle contraction of the hind limb. Transecting the sciatic nerve downstream of FUS stimulation eliminated EMG activity during FUS stimulation. Peak-to-peak EMG response amplitudes and latency were found to be comparable to conventional electrical stimulation methods. Histology along with behavioral and thermal testing did not indicate damage to the nerve or surrounding regions. The findings presented herein demonstrate that FUS can serve as a targeted, safe and non-invasive alternative to conventional peripheral nervous system stimulation to treat peripheral neuropathic diseases in the clinic.

  15. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  16. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F Can; Burgess, Mark T; Papademetriou, Iason T; McDannold, Nathan J; Porter, Tyrone M

    2017-07-13

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  17. A radiation emission shielding method for high intensity focus ultrasound probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yazhu

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is a key issue in the design and development of safe and effective medical instruments. The treatment probes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems not only receive and transmit electromagnetic waves, but also radiate ultrasound waves, resulting in electromagnetic coupling. In this paper, an electromagnetic shielding method involving the enclosure of the probe in a copper wire mesh was introduced. First, sound pressure distribution simulations and measurements were performed using a hydrophone in order to evaluate the effects of the wire mesh on the acoustic performance of the HIFU system. The results indicated that the wire mesh did not disturb the normalized sound pressure field. In addition, the attenuation of the maximum pressure in the focal plane was equal to 6.2%. Then, the electronic emission level was tested in a chamber. After the implementation of the wire mesh, the 10-100 MHz frequency band radiation was suppressed, and the HIFU system satisfied the national EMC standards.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Angioplasty of Dysfunctional Vascular Access for Haemodialysis. The Pros and Cons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Medina, J., E-mail: josegmedina57@gmail.com [“Reina Sofia” University Hospital, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiology (Spain); García-Alfonso, J. J., E-mail: juanjozarandieta@gmail.com [University of Murcia, Faculty of Medicine (Spain)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo describe the benefits and the disadvantages of angioplasty in dialysis fistulas using only ultrasound guidance.Materials and MethodsThis is a prospective study in 132 failing or non-maturing arteriovenous accesses that underwent 189 ultrasound-guided balloon angioplasties. The technical success was defined as non-use of X-ray fluoroscopy during the procedure.Results127 procedures (67%) were successfully completed without fluoroscopy. Most failures were due to difficulty to traverse aneurismal segments, as well as anastomotic stenoses. Including initial failures, the primary patency rates at 6, 12 months and 2 years were 75 ± 3, 41 ± 3 and 14 ± 2%, respectively.ConclusionEndovascular repair of the dysfunctional vascular access for haemodialysis under ultrasound guidance is feasible and safe in roughly two-thirds of cases.

  19. Technical guide to evaluate upper limb joints (shoulder, elbow and wrist) by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon Baez, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    A guideline to follow is offered to radiologists and residents of radiology service of medical imaging, when evaluating by ultrasound the shoulder joints, elbow, wrist. The importance to performing of musculoskeletal ultrasound by its pathology variable is established. The use of appropriate equipment and effective application of the techniques exposed of echography exploration have made enable the valuation of many pathologies with high sensitivity and specificity. The echography has been the musculoskeletal imaging technique that more rapidly has evolved. Currently, this technique has been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging in various clinical fields and also serves as a complement to other techniques. Exposed techniques have been of great benefit for radiologists medical and residents, obtaining with its use a quick guide for the realization of upper limb musculoskeletal ultrasounds. The appropriate and easy techniques are better known for the evaluation of these structures, and so document both sports injuries, as joint and rheumatic diseases [es

  20. Curvelet based automatic segmentation of supraspinatus tendon from ultrasound image: a focused assistive diagnostic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rishu; Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Dass, Sarat Chandra; Faye, Ibrahima; Vasant, Pandian; George, John; Izza, Faizatul

    2014-12-04

    Disorders of rotator cuff tendons results in acute pain limiting the normal range of motion for shoulder. Of all the tendons in rotator cuff, supraspinatus (SSP) tendon is affected first of any pathological changes. Diagnosis of SSP tendon using ultrasound is considered to be operator dependent with its accuracy being related to operator's level of experience. The automatic segmentation of SSP tendon ultrasound image was performed to provide focused and more accurate diagnosis. The image processing techniques were employed for automatic segmentation of SSP tendon. The image processing techniques combines curvelet transform and mathematical concepts of logical and morphological operators along with area filtering. The segmentation assessment was performed using true positives rate, false positives rate and also accuracy of segmentation. The specificity and sensitivity of the algorithm was tested for diagnosis of partial thickness tears (PTTs) and full thickness tears (FTTs). The ultrasound images of SSP tendon were taken from medical center with the help of experienced radiologists. The algorithm was tested on 116 images taken from 51 different patients. The accuracy of segmentation of SSP tendon was calculated to be 95.61% in accordance with the segmentation performed by radiologists, with true positives rate of 91.37% and false positives rate of 8.62%. The specificity and sensitivity was found to be 93.6%, 94% and 95%, 95.6% for partial thickness tears and full thickness tears respectively. The proposed methodology was successfully tested over a database of more than 116 US images, for which radiologist assessment and validation was performed. The segmentation of SSP tendon from ultrasound images helps in focused, accurate and more reliable diagnosis which has been verified with the help of two experienced radiologists. The specificity and sensitivity for accurate detection of partial and full thickness tears has been considerably increased after segmentation when

  1. Fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation for small hepatocellular carcinoma: a retrospective comparison with ultrasound-guided ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Yoon, C.J.; Seong, N.J.; Jeong, S.-H.; Kim, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the therapeutic efficacy of fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation (F-RFA) and ultrasound-guided RFA (US-RFA) in treatment of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: Between January 2006 and January 2012, 93 patients with small HCCs underwent percutaneous RFA. In 42 patients with 46 HCCs invisible on US, F-RFA was performed following intra-arterial iodised oil injection (group A). The remaining 51 patients with 58 HCCs received US-RFA (group B). Technical effectiveness, complications, local tumour progression, and patient survival were retrospectively compared between the two groups. Results: Technical effectiveness was achieved in 45 HCCs of group A (97.8%) and 64 HCCs of group B (96.6%; p=0.65). There was no major complication in either group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year local tumour progression rates were lower in group A than those of group B with marginal significance (0%, 3.7% and 3.7% in group A, and 13%, 13%, and 13% in group B; p=0.05). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year patient survival rates were 100%, 58.3%, and 51.2% (group A), and 82.4%, 54.9%, and 46.1% (group B; p=0.26). Conclusions: F-RFA is a feasible and safe treatment for small HCC invisible on US. Its therapeutic efficacy was comparable with that of US-RFA. -- Highlights: •Fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation can treat small hepatocellular carcinoma invisible on ultrasonography. •Fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation can treat small hepatocellular carcinoma with unfavorable location. •Therapeutic efficacy of fluoroscopy-guided radiofrequency ablation is comparable with ultrasound-guided procedure

  2. Ultrasound-Guided versus Fluoroscopy-Guided Deep Cervical Plexus Block for the Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of ultrasound-guided deep cervical plexus block with fluoroscopy-guided deep cervical plexus block for patients with cervicogenic headache (CeH. Methods. A total of 56 patients with CeH were recruited and randomly assigned to either the ultrasound-guided (US or the fluoroscopy-guided (FL injection group. A mixture of 2–4 mL 1% lidocaine and 7 mg betamethasone was injected along C2 and/or C3 transverse process. The measurement of pain was evaluated by patients’ ratings of a 10-point numerical pain scale (NPS before and 2 wks, 12 wks, and 24 wks after treatments. Results. The blocking procedures were well tolerated. The pain intensity, as measured by NPS, significantly decreased at 2 wks after injection treatment in both US and FL groups, respectively, compared with that of baseline (P < 0.05. The blocking procedures had continued, and comparable pain relieving effects appeared at 12 wks and 24 wks after treatment in both US and FL groups. There were no significant differences observed in the NPS before and 2 wks, 12 wks, and 24 wks after treatment between US and FL groups. Conclusions. The US-guided approach showed similar satisfactory effect as the FL-guided block. Ultrasonography can be an alternative method for its convenience and efficacy in deep cervical plexus block for CeH patients without radiation exposure.

  3. Ultrasound guided needle biopsy of skeletal muscle in neuromuscular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindequist, S; Schrøder, H D; Larsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Guided by ultrasonography percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle was performed in 24 patients, using the one hand held Biopty system and a 2 mm Tru-Cut needle. The specimens were graded with regard to diagnostic quality and utility and almost all specimens (96%) were of highest quality....... The use of ultrasonography was helpful in selecting a suitable area for the biopsy and vascular structures could be avoided. The procedure was well tolerated and easy to perform, and no complications were recorded....

  4. Ultrasound-guided wire localization of lesions detected on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Breast cancer, breast conserving surgery, screening mammography, wire localization. Résumé. Fond: Localisation de fil pour le traitement chirurgical prévue dans la gestion du cancer du sein est sous-utilisé dans notre environnement. L'objectif de cette étude est d'évaluer le rôle de localisation de fil guidée par ...

  5. Point-of-Care Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Cannulation of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Make it Simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Joo, Ki Hyuk; You, Yeon Ho; Ryu, Seung; Lee, Jin Woong; Kim, Seung Whan

    2017-12-30

    Cannulation of the great vessels is required for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Currently, there is no guideline for optimal imaging modalities during percutaneous cannulation of ECMO. The purpose of this study was to describe percutaneous cannulation guided by point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for ECMO and compare it with fluoroscopy and landmark guidance. Three groups (POCUS-, fluoroscopy-, and landmark-guided) of percutaneous cannulation for ECMO were analyzed retrospectively in a tertiary academic hospital. In the POCUS-guided group, visual confirmation of guidewire and cannula by ultrasound in both the access and return cannula were essential for successful cannulation. Fluoroscopy- and landmark-guided groups were cannulated with the conventional technique. A total of 128 patients were treated by ECMO during the study period, of which 94 (73.4%) cases were venoarterial ECMO. This included 56 cases of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Also, there were 30 (23.4%) cases of venovenous ECMO and 4 (3.1%) cases of venoarteriovenous ECMO. A total of 71 (55.5%) patients were cannulated under POCUS guidance, and 43 (33.6%) patients were cannulated under fluoroscopy guidance and 14 (10.9%) patients were cannulated by landmark guidance. No surgical cut downs were required. Misplacement of cannula occurred in 3 (2.3%) cases. All three occurred in the landmark-guided group. POCUS-guided cannulation is comparable to fluoroscopy-guided cannulation in terms of avoiding cannula misplacement. In our experience, POCUS-guided cannulation is a useful strategy over fluoroscopy- and landmark-guided cannulation during peripheral ECMO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pin placement in pelvic external fixation: description of a surgical technique and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Cuervas-Mons, Manuel; Rojo-Manaute, José; Mora, Félix; Arnal, Juan; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2017-11-01

    Pelvic fracture in trauma patients can lead to hemodynamic instability. External fixation is a treatment capable of stabilizing these injuries in the context of damage control surgery. Supra-acetabular pin offers the greater biomechanical stability but requires the use of intraoperative fluoroscopy. The aim of this study was to analyze our results for an ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pinning. Cross-sectional study with cadaveric specimens. Ultrasound-guided pin placement assessed by fluoroscopy and dissection. Fourteen ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pins were placed in seven cadaveric specimens. Excellent placement in all cases, evaluated with radiological control. Good qualitative bone fixation after dissection. One femoral cutaneous nerve was not found during anatomic dissection and was assumed injured. Ultrasound-guided supra-acetabular pin placement is a feasible and effective technique. Our study indicates that pin placement without intraoperative fluoroscopy is feasible without compromising the reliability of its placement. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The role of ultrasound guided percutaneous needle aspiration and lavage (barbotage in the treatment of calcific tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal Niazi

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound guided aspiration and lavage (barbotage is a highly effective, less aggressive method of treatment in cases of calcific tendinosis, especially for cases with severe pain that does not respond to other conservative methods.

  8. Comparative study between ultrasound guided tap block and paravertebral block in upper abdominal surgeries. Randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya M. Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block and thoracic paravertebral block were safe and effective anesthetic technique for upper abdominal surgery with longer and potent postoperative analgesia in thoracic paravertebral block than transversus abdominis block.

  9. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  10. Compensated Row-Column Ultrasound Imaging System Using Multilayered Edge Guided Stochastically Fully Connected Random Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Daya, Ibrahim; Chen, Albert I H; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Wong, Alexander; Yeow, John T W

    2017-09-06

    The row-column method received a lot of attention for 3-D ultrasound imaging. By reducing the number of connections required to address the 2-D array and therefore reducing the amount of data to handle, this addressing method allows for real time 3-D imaging. Row-column still has its limitations: the issues of sparsity, speckle noise inherent to ultrasound, the spatially varying point spread function, and the ghosting artifacts inherent to the row-column method must all be taken into account when building a reconstruction framework. In this research, we build on a previously published system and propose an edge-guided, compensated row-column ultrasound imaging system that incorporates multilayered edge-guided stochastically fully connected conditional random fields to address the limitations of the row-column method. Tests carried out on simulated and real row-column ultrasound images show the effectiveness of our proposed system over other published systems. Visual assessment show our proposed system's potential at preserving edges and reducing speckle. Quantitative analysis shows that our proposed system outperforms previously published systems when evaluated with metrics such as Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio, Coefficient of Correlation, and Effective Number of Looks. These results show the potential of our proposed system as an effective tool for enhancing 3-D row-column imaging.

  11. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Drainage of Neonatal Pyometrocolpos Under Local Anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algin, Oktay; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Kilic, Nizamettin

    2011-01-01

    Hydrometrocolpos is an uncommon congenital disorder with cystic dilatation of the vagina and uterus that occurs as a result of accumulated secretions from the reproductive tract due to distal genital tract obstruction. Secondary infection may also occur, resulting in pyometrocolpos, a potentially lethal disease. Immediate drainage of the cystic mass in patients determined to have pyometrocolpos is required to prevent or treat uropathy and septicemia until definitive corrective surgery can be performed. We report an unusual cause of obstructive uropathy in three infants: pyometrocolpos due to lower genital tract atresia. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of the pyometrocolpos resulted in dramatically improved clinical and laboratory findings in these patients. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage under local anesthesia is a simple, minimally invasive, safe, and effective procedure that facilitates later successful corrective surgery and avoids the need for more complex drainage procedures.

  13. Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures About the Shoulder: Anatomy, Indications, and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourcho, Adam M; Colio, Sean W; Hall, Mederic M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic and acute shoulder pain and dysfunction are common complaints among patients. Shoulder pain may be the result of abnormality involving the rotator cuff, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, biceps tendon, glenoid labrum, glenohumeral joint, acromioclavicular joint, sternoclavicular joint, or glenohumeral joint capsule. Ultrasound-guided (USG) procedures of the shoulder are well established for interventional management. Ultrasound provides the advantages of excellent soft tissue resolution, injection accuracy, low cost, accessibility, portability, lack of ionizing radiation, and the ability to perform real-time image-guided procedures. The purpose of this article is to review common indications and effective techniques for USG injections about the shoulder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Ilioinguinal/Iliohypogastric Nerve Blocks for Persistent Inguinal Postherniorrhaphy Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Joakim Mutahi; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Zbigniew J; Kehlet, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Background:Ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve blocks are used in the clinical management of persistent inguinal postherniorrhaphy pain, but no controlled studies have been published on the subject. In this controlled study, we investigated the analgesic and sensory effects of ultrasound-guide......, at the level of the anterior superior iliac spine, are not useful in diagnosis and management of persistent inguinal postherniorrhaphy pain.......Background:Ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerve blocks are used in the clinical management of persistent inguinal postherniorrhaphy pain, but no controlled studies have been published on the subject. In this controlled study, we investigated the analgesic and sensory effects of ultrasound......-guided blocks of the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves with lidocaine.Methods:A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in 12 patients with severe persistent inguinal postherniorrhaphy pain, including a control group of 12 healthy controls, was performed. Assessments included pain...

  15. Real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anaesthesia: a prospective observational study of a new approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, P H

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the subarachnoid space has traditionally been achieved by either a blind landmark-guided approach or using prepuncture ultrasound assistance. To assess the feasibility of performing spinal anaesthesia under real-time ultrasound guidance in routine clinical practice we conducted a single center prospective observational study among patients undergoing lower limb orthopaedic surgery. A spinal needle was inserted unassisted within the ultrasound transducer imaging plane using a paramedian approach (i.e., the operator held the transducer in one hand and the spinal needle in the other). The primary outcome measure was the success rate of CSF acquisition under real-time ultrasound guidance with CSF being located in 97 out of 100 consecutive patients within median three needle passes (IQR 1-6). CSF was not acquired in three patients. Subsequent attempts combining landmark palpation and pre-puncture ultrasound scanning resulted in successful spinal anaesthesia in two of these patients with the third patient requiring general anaesthesia. Median time from spinal needle insertion until intrathecal injection completion was 1.2 minutes (IQR 0.83-4.1) demonstrating the feasibility of this technique in routine clinical practice.

  16. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Ultrasound guidance is the safe and effective method for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  17. A case of spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma after ultrasound guided liver biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Hospital, Dong A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver biopsy has not been reported in the English literature. Herein, we present a case of partial spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma after ultrasound guided liver biopsy in a 64-year-old female. During 28 months, the tumor, which had been shrinking, showed no interval change. However, after 28 months, tumor showed regrowth, which led to a segmentectomy.

  18. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. Study Design A mixed prospective and retrospective study design Place and Duration of Study Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Methodology Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had r...

  19. Routine ultrasound guided evacuation of first trimester missed abortion versus blind evacuation

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Abdulla Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical management of miscarriage has changed little over the years and many women undergo surgical uterine evacuation. Surgical evacuation of the uterine contents in missed abortion is a challenge to the obstetrician as it is done blindly. The current study recommends the use of ultrasound guided surgical evacuation. It serves two important advantages; the first is to complete evacuation without the need of additional step. The second is to protect against uterine perforatio...

  20. Ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Jiang; Qian, Lin-Xue; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Jun-Feng

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. A total of 474 benign thyroid nodules in 435 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided microwave ablation from September 2012 to August 2015 were included. Nodule volume and thyroid function were measured before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and subsequently after every 6 months. The nodule volume reduction rate and changes of thyroid function were evaluated. The volume of all thyroid nodules significantly decreased after ultrasound-guided microwave ablation. The average volume was 13.07 ± 0.95 ml before treatment, and 1.14 ± 0.26 ml at 12-months follow-up. The mean volume reduction rate was 90% and the final volume reduction rate was 94%. The volume reduction rate of mainly cystic nodules was significantly higher than that of simple solid and mainly solid nodules (all P microwave ablation is an effective and safe technique for treatment of benign thyroid nodules, and has the potential for clinical applications. Impact statement Ultrasound-guided MWA is an effective and safe technique for the treatment of benign thyroid nodules. It can significantly reduce the nodule volume, improve the patients' clinical symptoms, has less complication, guarantees quick recovery, meets patients' aesthetic needs, and shows less interference on the physiological and psychological aspects of the body. MWA should be a good complement to traditional open surgery and has potentials in clinical applications.

  1. Post-cardiac catheterization femoral fistula corrected by ultrasound-guided compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, N; Lacroix, J

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of post-cardiac catheterization femoral fistula diagnosed by color and pulsed Doppler sonography and treated by ultrasound-guided compression. We avail ourselves of the case to review the echo Doppler semiology of the different types of arteriovenous fistulas with an emphasis on the functional analysis of the dialysis accesses. We also stress the therapeutic options in front of undesirable shunts.

  2. Ultrasound-guided facet joint injection to treat a spinal cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Tung-Liang; Chung, Chin-Teng; Lan, Howard Haw-Chang; Sheen, Huey-Min

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal cysts often present with backache and may be accompanied by lower extremity weakness as well as radiation pain if root compression occurs. The treatment regimens include anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, procedures guided by fluoroscopy or computed tomography, and surgery. We report the case of a patient with a symptomatic lumbar spinal cyst at the L4–L5 facet joint. The symptoms immediately remitted after ultrasound-guided steroid–lidocaine injection into the L4–L5 fac...

  3. Ultrasound-guided facet joint injection to treat a spinal cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Liang Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal cysts often present with backache and may be accompanied by lower extremity weakness as well as radiation pain if root compression occurs. The treatment regimens include anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, procedures guided by fluoroscopy or computed tomography, and surgery. We report the case of a patient with a symptomatic lumbar spinal cyst at the L4–L5 facet joint. The symptoms immediately remitted after ultrasound-guided steroid–lidocaine injection into the L4–L5 facet joint. Magnetic resonance imaging follow up 4 months after injection showed complete resolution of the cyst.

  4. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  5. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage: Experiences in 146 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jai Keun [Sohwa Children' s Hospital, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ki Whang; Chung, Soo Yoon; Jeong, Mi Gyoung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Deuk Lin; Kwon, Gui Hyang; Lee, Hae Kyung [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous biliary drainage is an important technique for palliative therapy of obstructive biliary disease and diagnostic information. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the experiences of ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was performed on 146 occasions in 134 patients. The causes of biliary obstruction were: benign diseases (19 cases, 14.2%) such as bile duct stones or stricture, cholangiocarcinoma (37 cases, 27.6%), pancreatic carcinoma (35 cases, 26.1%), metastasis (22 cases, 16.5%), gall bladder cancer (14 cases, 10.4%), ampulla of Vater cancer (4 cases, 3.0%), hepatocellular carcinoma (3 cases, 2.2%). Retrospectively reviewing medical records, we found out frequency of external or external/internal biliary drainages, puncture of left or right hepatic duct, and presence of bileinfection. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage was compared with conventional biliary drainage of previous reports on the basis of frequency of complications. External (124 procedures, 84.9%) and external/internal biliary drainage (22 procedures, 15.1%) were carried out by puncture of dilated right (59.6%) or left (40.4%) intrahepatic duct. Sixty-nine complications occurred in 47 patients. Catheter related complications (33/69, 47.8%) were most common: catheter dislodgement (17/69, 24.6%), malfunction (9/69, 13.1%), leakage (7/69, 10.1%). Other minor complications such as simple fever (16/69, 23.2%), cholangitis (7/69, 10.1%), hemobilia (4/69, 5.8%), biloma (2/69, 2.9%) and wound infection (1/69, 1.5%) occurred. Major complications including sepsis (4/69, 5.8%) and bile peritonitis (2/69, 2.9%) were also noted. Puncture-related complications such as hemobilia, biloma and bile peritonitis occurred in 8 cases (5.5%). Comparing with conventional X-ray guided drainage, ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage is a safe procedure for

  6. Noninvasive body sculpting technologies with an emphasis on high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Mark L; Solish, Nowell J; Desilets, Charles S

    2011-10-01

    Body-sculpting procedures are becoming increasingly popular in the United States. Although surgical lipoplasty remains the most common body sculpting procedure, a demand exists for noninvasive alternatives capable of reducing focal adiposity without the risks of adverse events (AEs) associated with invasive excisional body-sculpting procedures. This report describes the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety, and tolerability of cryolipolysis, radiofrequency ablation, low-level external laser therapy, injection lipolysis, low-intensity nonthermal ultrasound, and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), with an emphasis on thermal HIFU. The articles cited were identified via a PubMed search, with additional article citations identified by manual searching of the reference lists of articles identified through the literature search. Each of the noninvasive treatments reviewed can be administered on an outpatient basis. These treatments generally have fewer complications than lipoplasty and require little or no anesthesia or analgesia. However, HIFU is the only treatment that can produce significant results in a single treatment, and only radiofrequency, low-level laser therapy, and cryolipolysis have been approved for use in the United States. Early clinical data on HIFU support its efficacy and safety for body sculpting. In contrast, radiofrequency, laser therapy, and injection lipolysis have been associated with significant AEs. The published literature suggests that noninvasive body-sculpting techniques such as radiofrequency ablation, cryolipolysis, external low-level lasers, laser ablation, nonthermal ultrasound, and HIFU may be appropriate options for nonobese patients requiring modest reduction of adipose tissue.

  7. Ultrasound guided percutaneous removal of wooden foreign bodies in the extremities with hydro-dissection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, HeeJin; Lee, So Yeon; Chung, Eun Chul; Rho, Myung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon; Son, Eun Seok [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We described the technique of ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous removal of the foreign bodies (FB) with hydro-dissection in the radiologic department and presented video files of several cases.Four patients referred to the radiology department for US evaluation and US-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs in the upper and lower extremities between November, 2006 and November, 2013 were included in this study. The procedures started with US evaluation for the exact location and shape of the FB. A 5 mm-sized skin incision was made at the site of the nearest point from the FB where no passing arteries or tendons were present. We adopted a hydro dissection technique to separate the FB from adjacent tissue using a 2% lidocaine solution. Injected anesthetics detached the FBs from surrounding tissue and thereby facilitated removal. After the tip of the mosquito forceps reached the FB, the wooden FBs were removed. The mean time required for the entire procedure was approximately 20 minutes. There were no significant complications during the US-guided removal or long-term complications after the procedure. All 4 FBs were successfully removed from the soft tissue under US guidance. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous removal of the FBs with hydro-dissection in the radiology department is a less invasive and safe method over surgical removal in the operating room. Additionally, the use of a guide wire and serial dilator may help minimize soft tissue injury and facilitate the introduction of forceps.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-fei; Wang, Yi-ru; Huo, Hui-ping; Wang, Yue-xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration. PMID:26807123

  9. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yi-Ru; Huo, Hui-Ping; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  11. Methylprednisolone versus triamcinolone in painful shoulder using ultrasound-guided injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-López, Mario Alfredo; Navarro-Soltero, Luis Alberto; Rosas-Cabral, Alejandro; Gallaga, Adán; Huerta-Yáñez, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    There is little evidence about the comparative efficacy of corticosteroids in the treatment of painful shoulder. The main aim was to compare the efficacy of methylprednisolone (MTP) versus triamcinolone (TMC) in the treatment of painful shoulder using an ultrasound-guided injection. Patients with painful shoulder due to subacromial bursitis and partial or full-thickness rotator cuff tears demonstrated by musculoskeletal ultrasound received a guided-injection of MTP acetate 40 mg (12 patients) or TMC acetonide 40 mg (12 patients). Range of motion and pain visual analogue scale were registered at 10 and 30 min, 1 and 2 weeks postinjection. Two weeks postinjection, both groups reported a mean improvement in range of motion (33%) and relief of pain (61%). Relief of pain of 50% or more was observed in 92% of patients in MTP group and 50% of TMC group (p = 0.02). Two months postinjection, 50% of the patients in MTP group and 25% in TMC group reported total relief of pain (p = 0.3). Patients with painful shoulder receiving an ultrasound-guided injection of MTP or TMC have a rapid and sustained overall response. Relief of pain tends to be more rapid with MTP than TMC.

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of meniscal cysts: preliminary clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacMahon, P.J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland)]. E-mail: petermacmahon@yahoo.com; Brennan, D.D. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); Duke, D. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); Forde, S. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland); Eustace, S.J. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland)

    2007-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of symptomatic meniscal cysts. Materials and methods: Patients with lateral knee joint tenderness and swelling and confirmed meniscal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were consecutively enrolled for ultrasound-guided percutaneous cyst aspiration. Cysts were injected with local anaesthetic and steroid before completion of procedure. All 18 patients (all male, average age 33 years) were subsequently followed up (average time 10 months) and meniscal cyst symptoms assessed by questionnaire. Fischer's exact test used to analyse the data. Results: In every case the procedure was well tolerated, and each patient indicated that they would be willing to have a repeat procedure in the future. Ten patients reported complete resolution of symptoms secondary to therapeutic cyst aspiration and had resumed participation in high-performance sport. Two patients reported a satisfactory sustained response, reporting only occasional 'twinges of pain'. In the remaining six patients, symptoms returned after an initial pain-free period. The pain-free period ranged from 1-8 weeks. In this study, patient outcome did not significantly correlate with any meniscal cyst characteristic. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration of meniscal cysts is a well-tolerated, simple, and safe procedure. In this small patient series, it was associated with positive early results with favourable outcomes in the mid to long-term. It should be considered in patients unsuitable for surgical debridement or as an interim therapy if surgery is delayed or postponed.

  13. Ultrasound guided electrical impedance tomography for 2D free-interface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guanghui; Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2017-07-01

    The free-interface detection problem is normally seen in industrial or biological processes. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique with advantages of high-speed and low cost, and is a promising solution for free-interface detection problems. However, due to the ill-posed and nonlinear characteristics, the spatial resolution of EIT is low. To deal with the issue, an ultrasound guided EIT is proposed to directly reconstruct the geometric configuration of the target free-interface. In the method, the position of the central point of the target interface is measured by a pair of ultrasound transducers mounted at the opposite side of the objective domain, and then the position measurement is used as the prior information for guiding the EIT-based free-interface reconstruction. During the process, a constrained least squares framework is used to fuse the information from different measurement modalities, and the Lagrange multiplier-based Levenberg-Marquardt method is adopted to provide the iterative solution of the constraint optimization problem. The numerical results show that the proposed ultrasound guided EIT method for the free-interface reconstruction is more accurate than the single modality method, especially when the number of valid electrodes is limited.

  14. Diagnostic efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of peripheral lymph nodes in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussouar, S; Medjhoul, A; Bernaudin, J F; Tayebjee, O; Soussan, M; Uzunhan, Y; Nunes, H; Kambouchner, M; Martin, A; Valeyre, D; Brillet, P Y

    2015-09-14

    Core-needle biopsy guided by ultrasound can be performed for investigating peripheral lymph node (PLN). The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of this technique in sarcoidosis. Retrospective review of files of all patients in the database of the radiology department of Avicenne university hospital who underwent PLN biopsies guided by ultrasound from January 2008 to June 2011 (n=292). Cases with either granulomas at histology with the procedure or with a final diagnosis of sarcoidosis were included in the study. The histological specimens were adequate in 282 out of 292 cases (96%) showing non-caseating granulomas in 22 cases (n=20 patients with a final diagnosis of sarcoidosis and n=2 patients with tuberculosis). After reviewing clinical files of the 282 patient, 22 were confirmed to have sarcoidosis, at initial presentation (n=19) or later during flare-up or relapse (n=3) with only 2 patients having no granuloma on PLN biopsy. PLN were palpable in 18 cases and only detected by (18F)FDG-PET/CT showing increased PLN uptake in 4 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of adequate biopsy were 91 and 99% and the positive and negative predictive values were 91 and 99%, respectively. Core-needle biopsy guided by ultrasound has a high efficacy for evidencing granulomas in sarcoidosis patients with PLN involvement either clinically palpable or in the presence of (18F)FDG-PET/CT uptake.

  15. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): An ex vivo feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y.; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase-shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n=43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n=28). Two dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and Passive Cavitation Detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (Δφ) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite unpredictable changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property change throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with treatment duration

  16. Multi-parametric monitoring and assessment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) boiling by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): an ex vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-03-07

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Here, a multi-parametric study is performed to investigate both elastic and acoustics-independent viscoelastic tissue changes using the Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI) displacement, axial compressive strain and change in relative phase shift during high energy HIFU treatment with tissue boiling. Forty three (n = 43) thermal lesions were formed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 28). Two-dimensional (2D) transverse HMI displacement maps were also obtained before and after lesion formation. The same method was repeated in 10 s, 20 s and 30 s HIFU durations at three different acoustic powers of 8, 10, and 11 W, which were selected and verified as treatment parameters capable of inducing boiling using both thermocouple and passive cavitation detection (PCD) measurements. Although a steady decrease in the displacement, compressive strain, and relative change in the focal phase shift (Δϕ) were obtained in numerous cases, indicating an overall increase in relative stiffness, the study outcomes also showed that during boiling, a reverse lesion-to-background displacement contrast was detected, indicating potential change in tissue absorption, geometrical change and/or, mechanical gelatification or pulverization. Following treatment, corresponding 2D HMI displacement images of the thermal lesions also mapped consistent discrepancy in the lesion-to-background displacement contrast. Despite the expectedly chaotic changes in acoustic properties with boiling, the relative change in phase shift showed a consistent decrease, indicating its robustness to monitor biomechanical properties independent of the acoustic property changes throughout the HIFU treatment. In addition, the 2D HMI displacement images confirmed and indicated the increase in the thermal lesion size with

  17. A boundary condition to the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya equation for modeling strongly focused nonlinear ultrasound fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosnitskiy, P., E-mail: pavrosni@yandex.ru; Yuldashev, P., E-mail: petr@acs366.phys.msu.ru; Khokhlova, V., E-mail: vera@acs366.phys.msu.ru [Physics Faculty, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    An equivalent source model was proposed as a boundary condition to the nonlinear parabolic Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya (KZ) equation to simulate high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields generated by medical ultrasound transducers with the shape of a spherical shell. The boundary condition was set in the initial plane; the aperture, the focal distance, and the initial pressure of the source were chosen based on the best match of the axial pressure amplitude and phase distributions in the Rayleigh integral analytic solution for a spherical transducer and the linear parabolic approximation solution for the equivalent source. Analytic expressions for the equivalent source parameters were derived. It was shown that the proposed approach allowed us to transfer the boundary condition from the spherical surface to the plane and to achieve a very good match between the linear field solutions of the parabolic and full diffraction models even for highly focused sources with F-number less than unity. The proposed method can be further used to expand the capabilities of the KZ nonlinear parabolic equation for efficient modeling of HIFU fields generated by strongly focused sources.

  18. Functional Assay of Cancer Cell Invasion Potential Based on Mechanotransduction of Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Weitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells undergo a number of biophysical changes as they transform from an indolent to an aggressive state. These changes, which include altered mechanical and electrical properties, can reveal important diagnostic information about disease status. Here, we introduce a high-throughput, functional technique for assessing cancer cell invasion potential, which works by probing for the mechanically excitable phenotype exhibited by invasive cancer cells. Cells are labeled with fluorescent calcium dye and imaged during stimulation with low-intensity focused ultrasound, a non-contact mechanical stimulus. We show that cells located at the focus of the stimulus exhibit calcium elevation for invasive prostate (PC-3 and DU-145 and bladder (T24/83 cancer cell lines, but not for non-invasive cell lines (BPH-1, PNT1A, and RT112/84. In invasive cells, ultrasound stimulation initiates a calcium wave that propagates from the cells at the transducer focus to other cells, over distances greater than 1 mm. We demonstrate that this wave is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules and can be abolished through inhibition of transient receptor potential channels and inositol trisphosphate receptors, implicating these proteins in the mechanotransduction process. If validated clinically, our technology could provide a means to assess tumor invasion potential in cytology specimens, which is not currently possible. It may therefore have applications in diseases such as bladder cancer, where cytologic diagnosis of tumor invasion could improve clinical decision-making.

  19. AASHTO transportation asset management guide : a focus on implementation executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This AASHTO Transportation Asset Management Executive Summary serves as a companion to the AASHTO Transportation : Asset Management GuideA Focus on Implementation, which takes as a starting point the Transportation : Asset Management Guide publish...

  20. [Ultrasound-guided facet block to low back pain: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Ana Ellen Q; Leal, Plinio C; Bezerra, Elmiro Helio M; Giraldes, Ana Laura A; Ferraro, Leonardo C; Rezende, Andre H; Sakata, Rioko Kimiko

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a common cause of low back pain. The diagnosis is clinical and can be confirmed by imaging studies. Pain treatment and confirmation of diagnosis are made by intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and by local anesthetic use, due to clinical improvement. A direct monitoring of the procedure can be done under fluoroscopy, a classic technique, or else by an ultrasound-guided procedure. Female patient, 88 years old, 1.68m and 72kg, with facet osteoarthrosis at L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 for two years. On physical examination, she exhibited pain on lateralization and spinal extension. We opted in favor of an ultrasound-guided facet joint block. A midline spinal longitudinal scan was obtained, with identification of the desired joint space at L3-L4. A 25 G needle was inserted into the skin by the echographic off-plane ultrasound technique. 1 mL of contrast was administered, with confirmation by fluoroscopy. After aspiration of the contrast, 1 mL of solution containing 0.25% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10 mg of methylprednisolone acetate was injected. Injections into L3-L4, L2-L3 and L1-L2 to the right were applied. The visualization of the facet joint by ultrasound involves minimal risk, besides reduction of radiation. This option is suitable for a large part of the population. However, fluoroscopy and computed tomography remain as monitoring techniques indicated for patients with specific characteristics, such as obesity, severe degenerative diseases and anatomical malformations, in which the ultrasound technique is still in need of further study. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound-guided facet block to low back pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Ana Ellen Q; Leal, Plinio C; Bezerra, Elmiro Helio M; Giraldes, Ana Laura A; Ferraro, Leonardo C; Rezende, Andre H; Sakata, Rioko Kimiko

    2014-01-01

    osteoarthrosis is a common cause of low back pain. The diagnosis is clinical and can be confirmed by imaging studies. Pain treatment and confirmation of diagnosis are made by intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and by local anesthetic use, due to clinical improvement. A direct monitoring of the procedure can be done under fluoroscopy, a classic technique, or else by an ultrasound-guided procedure. female patient, 88 years old, 1.68 m and 72 kg, with facet osteoarthrosis at L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 for two years. On physical examination, she exhibited pain on lateralization and spinal extension. We opted in favor of an ultrasound-guided facet joint block. A midline spinal longitudinal scan was obtained, with identification of the desired joint space at L3-L4. A 25G needle was inserted into the skin by the echographic off-plane ultrasound technique. 1 mL of contrast was administered, with confirmation by fluoroscopy. After aspiration of the contrast, 1 mL of solution containing 0.25% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10mg of methylprednisolone acetate was injected. Injections into L3-L4, L2-L3 and L1-L2 to the right were applied. the visualization of the facet joint by ultrasound involves minimal risk, besides reduction of radiation. This option is suitable for a large part of the population. However, fluoroscopy and computed tomography remain as monitoring techniques indicated for patients with specific characteristics, such as obesity, severe degenerative diseases and anatomical malformations, in which the ultrasound technique is still in need of further study. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound-guided facet block to low back pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ellen Q. Santiago

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthrosis is a common cause of low back pain. The diagnosis is clinical and can be confirmed by imaging studies. Pain treatment and confirmation of diagnosis are made by intra-articular injection of corticosteroid and by local anesthetic use, due to clinical improvement. A direct monitoring of the procedure can be done under fluoroscopy, a classic technique, or else by an ultrasound-guided procedure. CASE REPORT: Female patient, 88 years old, 1.68 m and 72 kg, with facet osteoarthrosis at L2-L3, L3-L4 and L4-L5 for two years. On physical examination, she exhibited pain on lateralization and spinal extension. We opted in favor of an ultrasound-guided facet joint block. A midline spinal longitudinal scan was obtained, with identification of the desired joint space at L3-L4. A 25 G needle was inserted into the skin by the echographic off-plane ultrasound technique. 1 mL of contrast was administered, with confirmation by fluoroscopy. After aspiration of the contrast, 1 mL of solution containing 0.25% bupivacaine hydrochloride and 10 mg of methylprednisolone acetate was injected. Injections into L3-L4, L2-L3 and L1-L2 to the right were applied. CONCLUSIONS: The visualization of the facet joint by ultrasound involves minimal risk, besides reduction of radiation. This option is suitable for a large part of the population. However, fluoroscopy and computed tomography remain as monitoring techniques indicated for patients with specific characteristics, such as obesity, severe degenerative diseases and anatomical malformations, in which the ultrasound technique is still in need of further study.

  3. Transcatheter duplex ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy for treatment of greater saphenous vein reflux: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, R J; Navarro, L

    2000-05-01

    Surgical ligation and stripping of the greater saphenous vein has been the gold standard for treatment of saphenofemoral junction incompetence for several years. Although sclerotherapy of the greater saphenous vein has also been advocated by some phlebologists, the procedure can be technically challenging and has resulted in inadvertent nontarget injection. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of transcatheter duplex-guided sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicose veins due to saphenofemoral junction reflux. Fifty-one greater saphenous veins in 50 patients were treated with transcatheter sclerotherapy. Using local anesthesia and ultrasound guidance, the greater saphenous vein was entered 15-45 cm below the saphenofemoral junction. An infusion catheter was placed over a guidewire and positioned under ultrasound guidance, and 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate was administered below the saphenofemoral junction and along the course of an "empty" greater saphenous vein via the catheter. Catheter placement and treatment was possible in all patients, with 2-5 ml of 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate administered per session. At the 24-hour and 1-week follow-ups, all treated greater saphenous vein segments were closed following initial treatment, with no flow detectable by continuous wave or color Doppler interrogation. No patients required re-treatment, with all veins remaining closed at 2- to 12-months follow-up. There have been no adverse reactions. Transcatheter duplex ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy should improve both the safety and efficacy of treatment compared to conventional ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy and offers an alternative to surgical ligation and stripping for those patients wishing to avoid surgery.

  4. Focused ultrasound transducer spatial peak intensity estimation: a comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam; ter Haar, Gail

    2018-03-01

    Characterisation of the spatial peak intensity at the focus of high intensity focused ultrasound transducers is difficult because of the risk of damage to hydrophone sensors at the high focal pressures generated. Hill et al (1994 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 20 259-69) provided a simple equation for estimating spatial-peak intensity for solid spherical bowl transducers using measured acoustic power and focal beamwidth. This paper demonstrates theoretically and experimentally that this expression is only strictly valid for spherical bowl transducers without a central (imaging) aperture. A hole in the centre of the transducer results in over-estimation of the peak intensity. Improved strategies for determining focal peak intensity from a measurement of total acoustic power are proposed. Four methods are compared: (i) a solid spherical bowl approximation (after Hill et al 1994 Ultrasound Med. Biol. 20 259-69), (ii) a numerical method derived from theory, (iii) a method using measured sidelobe to focal peak pressure ratio, and (iv) a method for measuring the focal power fraction (FPF) experimentally. Spatial-peak intensities were estimated for 8 transducers at three drive powers levels: low (approximately 1 W), moderate (~10 W) and high (20-70 W). The calculated intensities were compared with those derived from focal peak pressure measurements made using a calibrated hydrophone. The FPF measurement method was found to provide focal peak intensity estimates that agreed most closely (within 15%) with the hydrophone measurements, followed by the pressure ratio method (within 20%). The numerical method was found to consistently over-estimate focal peak intensity (+40% on average), however, for transducers with a central hole it was more accurate than using the solid bowl assumption (+70% over-estimation). In conclusion, the ability to make use of an automated beam plotting system, and a hydrophone with good spatial resolution, greatly facilitates characterisation of the FPF, and

  5. Lean Six Sigma Applied to Ultrasound Guided Needle Biopsy in the Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Bruce H; Woodward-Hagg, Heather K; Wade, Christopher L; Butler, Penny D; Kokoska, Mimi S

    2014-07-01

    (1) Confirm the positive value stream of office-based ultrasound using Lean Six Sigma; (2) demonstrate how ultrasound reduces time to diagnosis, costs, patient inconvenience and travel, exposure to ionizing radiation, intravenous contrast, and laboratory tests. Case series with historical controls using chart review. Tertiary Veterans Administration Hospital (university-affiliated). Patients with a consult request or decision for ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (USFNA) from 2006 to 2012. Process evaluation using Lean Six Sigma methodologies; years study conducted: 2006-2012; outcome measurements: type of diagnostic tests and imaging studies including CT scans with associated radiation exposure, time to preliminary and final cytopathologic diagnosis, episodes of patient travel. Value stream mapping prior to and after implementing office-based ultrasound confirmed the time from consult request or decision for USFNA to completion of the USFNA was reduced from a range of 0 to 286 days requiring a maximum 17 steps to a range of 0 to 48 days, necessitating only a maximum of 9 steps. Office-based USFNA for evaluation of head and neck lesions reduced costs, time to diagnosis, risks and inconvenience to patients, radiation exposure, unnecessary laboratory, and patient complaints while increasing staff satisfaction. In addition, office-based ultrasound also changed the clinical management of specific patients. Lean Six Sigma reduces waste and optimizes quality and accuracy in manufacturing. This is the first known application of Lean Six Sigma to office-based USFNA in the evaluation of head and neck lesions. The literature supports the value of office-based ultrasound to patients and health care systems. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  6. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6 who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US guidance group (n=75. All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3% and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7% and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7% major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%. The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%. Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  7. Evolution of Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided breast biopsy systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Z. Mahmoud

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted ultrasound-guided breast biopsy combines ultrasound (US imaging with a robotic system for medical interventions. This study was designed to provide a literature review of a robotic US-guided breast biopsy system to delineate its efficacious impact on current medical practice. In addition, the strengths and limitations of this approach were also addressed. Articles published in the English language between 2000 and 2016 were appraised in this review. A wide range of systems that bind robotics with US imaging and guided breast biopsy were examined in this article. The fundamental safety and real-time imaging capabilities of US, together with the accuracy and maneuverability of robotic devices, is clearly an effective association with unmatched capabilities. Numerous experimental systems have obvious benefits over old-fashioned techniques, and the future of robot-assisted US-guided breast biopsy will be characterized by increasing levels of automation, and they hold tremendous possibility to impact doctor achievement, patient recovery, and clinical management.

  8. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous biopsy in lytic bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.H.; Lazaro, S. de; Gil, S.; Gomez, F.; Gonzalez, M.; Ambit, S.; Piqueras, R.; Bardon, F.

    1996-01-01

    Percutaneous biopsy (PB) of bone lesions is a widely used diagnostic technique that involves fluoroscopic or computerized tomography guidance. Among the bone lesions that can be studied by biopsy, the most common types in practice are lytic lesions composed to some degree of soft tissue. The objective of this report is to propose the use of ultrasonography (US) inthe guidance of PB in this type of lesions. We employed US to guide PB of lytic bone lesions in 62 patients. The lesions were located as follows; rib (n=3D23), dorsal vertebra (n=3D10), lumbarvertebra (n=3D5), sacrum (n=3D2), ilium (n=3D7), sternum (n=3D5), humerus (n=3D3),femur (n=3D3), ischium (n=3D2), sternoclavicular joint (n=3D1) and clacaneus (n=3D1). The definitive diagnosis was metastasis of diverse origin in 36 cases, lung carcinoma in 7, plasmacytoma in 6, myeloma in 1, Ewing's tumor in 2. non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 2, neuro fibrosarcoma in 1, sarcoma in 1, osteoblastoma in 1, desmoplastic fibroma in 1, nonspecific osteomyelitis in3 and inflammatory arthritis in 1. The correct histological diagnosis was obtained in 93.5% of cases. The only complication was a case of minor pneumothorax that did not require drainage. US is a highly safe method of guidance in PB of lytic bone lesions that clearly identifies changes in the cortical tissue and the associated soft tissue component. (Author)

  9. Ultrasound-guided identification of cardiac imaging windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Garry; Qi, Xiu-Ling; Robert, Normand; Dick, Alexander J; Wright, Graham A

    2012-06-01

    Currently, the use of cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify cardiac quiescent periods relative to the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal is insufficient for producing submillimeter-resolution coronary MR angiography (MRA) images. In this work, the authors perform a time series comparison between tissue Doppler echocardiograms of the interventricular septum (IVS) and concurrent biplane x-ray angiograms. Our results indicate very close agreement between the diastasis gating windows identified by both the IVS and x-ray techniques. Seven cath lab patients undergoing diagnostic angiograms were simultaneously scanned during a breath hold by ultrasound and biplane x-ray for six to eight heartbeats. The heart rate of each patient was stable. Dye was injected into either the left or right-coronary vasculature. The IVS was imaged using color tissue Doppler in an apical four-chamber view. Diastasis was estimated on the IVS velocity curve. On the biplane angiograms, proximal, mid, and distal regions were identified on the coronary artery (CA). Frame by frame correlation was used to derive displacement, and then velocity, for each region. The quiescent periods for a CA and its subsegments were estimated based on velocity. Using Pearson's correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis, the authors compared the start and end times of the diastasis windows as estimated from the IVS and CA velocities. The authors also estimated the vessel blur across the diastasis windows of multiple sequential heartbeats of each patient. In total, 17 heartbeats were analyzed. The range of heart rate observed across patients was 47-79 beats per minute (bpm) with a mean of 57 bpm. Significant correlations (R > 0.99; p windows. The mean difference in the starting times between IVS and CA quiescent windows was -12.0 ms. The mean difference in end times between IVS and CA quiescent windows was -3.5 ms. In contrast, the correlation between RR interval and both the start and duration of the x

  10. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in Uterine Fibroid Treatment: Review Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Mustafa Z.; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Alzimami, Khalid S.; Aljuhani, Manal Saud; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a highly precise medical procedure used locally to heat and destroy diseased tissue through ablation. This study intended to review HIFU in uterine fibroid therapy, to evaluate the role of HIFU in the therapy of leiomyomas as well as to review the actual clinical activities in this field including efficacy and safety measures beside the published clinical literature. An inclusive literature review was carried out in order to review the scientific foundation, and how it resulted in the development of extracorporeal distinct devices. Studies addressing HIFU in leiomyomas were identified from a search of the Internet scientific databases. The analysis of literature was limited to journal articles written in English and published between 2000 and 2013. In current gynecologic oncology, HIFU is used clinically in the treatment of leiomyomas. Clinical research on HIFU therapy for leiomyomas began in the 1990s, and the majority of patients with leiomyomas were treated predominantly with HIFUNIT 9000 and prototype single focus ultrasound devices. HIFU is a non-invasive and highly effective standard treatment with a large indication range for all sizes of leiomyomas, associated with high efficacy, low operative morbidity and no systemic side effects. Uterine fibroid treatment using HIFU was effective and safe in treating symptomatic uterine fibroids. Few studies are available in the literature regarding uterine artery embolization (UAE). HIFU provides an excellent option to treat uterine fibroids

  11. [Study on therapeutic dosimetry and biologic effect of high intensity focused ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuemei; Xiong, Xin; Zou, Jianzhong; Li, Faqi; Ma, Ping; Wang, Zhibiao

    2009-02-01

    This study was aimed at exploring the high intensity focused ultrasound(HIFU) therapeutic dosimetry and its biologic effect. In-vitro, bovine liver was immersed into 0.9% NS and degassed for application. The JC Model-focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system was used in the experiment. The HIFU parameters were: frequency 1.6 MHz, depth 20 mm, acoustic power from 16.44 W to 196.32 W. Under each power, at radiating times from is to 20 s, bioptic specimens were obtained from all samples. The results showed when the acoustic power was equal to or higher than 179.96 W, only is of radiating is adequate to induce coagulative necrosis, and when the acoustic power was lower than 65.44 W, the radiating time to produce coagulative necrosis was about 7 s. In the range of 65.44-179.96 W, at each time when the acoustic power was set up with an increment of 16.36 W, the time to produce coagulative necrosis was 1-2 s shorter. The form of biological focal region (BFR) varied with the acoustic power and HIFU irradiation time. The size of BFR increased with the increase of HIFU irradiation dosage (acoustic power x exposure time). There is positive correlation between the size of BFR and the dosage of HIFU irradiation (y = 0.0164x(1.05591), R5 = 0.9238, P < 0.05).

  12. The role of ultrasound and ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of lymph nodes in patients with skin tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solivetti, Francesco Maria; Elia, Fulvia; Santaguida, Maria Giulia; Guerrisi, Antonino; Visca, Paolo; Cercato, Maria Cecilia; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound (US) in the study of superficial lymph nodes during the follow-up of patients surgically treated for skin tumours. The secondary objective was to compare positive cytological results with histological reports. From 2004 to 2011, 480 patients (male/female: 285/195; median age 57 years; prevalent skin tumour: melanoma) underwent US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of suspicious recurrent lymph nodes. An expert radiologist first performed US testing of the lymph nodes, expressing either a negative or positive outcome of the test. Subsequently, US-guided FNAB was performed. FNAB positive patients were subjected to lymphadenectomy; the patients who tested negative underwent the follow-up. The size of lymph nodes was ≤ 2 cm in 90% of cases. Out of the 336 (70%) US “positive” patients, 231 (68.8%) were FNAB positives. Out of the 144 (30%) US “negatives”, 132 (91.7%) were FNAB negatives. The sensitivity and specificity of the US were 95% and 55.7%, respectively; the negative predictive value was 91.7% and the positive predictive value was 68.8%. Definitive histological results confirmed FNAB positivity in 97.5% of lymphadenectomies. US is a sensitive method in the evaluation of superficial lymph nodes during the follow-up of patients with skin tumours. High positive predictive value of cytology was confirmed

  13. Distribution of Platelet-rich Plasma after Ultrasound-Guided Injection for Chronic Elbow Tendinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Cho, Hee Kyung; Park, Jinyoung; Park, Jung Hyun

    2017-03-01

    Characteristics of the spreads of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are not widely known despite commonly use. This study aims to evaluate whether PRP stays within the injected area by using ultrasonography, to improve understanding of the spreads of intratendinous injected PRP. Thirty-nine patients (15 males, 24 females; mean age, 49.3 years), who had symptoms on their elbows (> 6 months) and diagnosed as lateral (25 elbows) or medial (14 elbows) tendinopathies of elbow, were included. The severity of tendon pathology was assessed by ultrasonography as tear or no tear. Immediately after ultrasound-guided PRP injection, ultrasound images were evaluated to assess the area of PRP distribution, which was defined as the presence of fluid or microbubbles. Ultrasound revealed that 13 elbows had tendon tear and 26 had no tear, respectively. Post-injection ultrasound confirmed the injected PRP was within the tendon in all cases. The mean distance of distribution from the injection site was 12.6 mm (5.0-26.0 mm). There was no difference in the distance of PRP distribution between tendon tear and no tear. Injected PRP spread to soft tissue outside the tendon in 20 of 39 cases. Intra-articular extension of PRP was observed in 5 cases. Although PRP remained intratendinous after the injection in all cases, some portion tended to spread outside from the injection site in a short space of time. Postinjection ultrasonographic imaging has a value for observing the spreading patterns of intratendinous PRP injection.

  14. Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C L; Trought, W S; von Ramm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1980-05-01

    Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasonic system are described. This work was performed utilising both the Thaumascan (two-dimensional, high resolution, actual time, ultrasound, multi-element array scanner) and the first commercial unit based on this system, the Grumman RT-400. Examples of normal and pathological anatomy are presented from over 300 examinations performed to date, including a series of 28 abdominal aortic aneurysms studied with the RT-400. Following electronic alterations in the Thaumascan with resultant improvement in the grey scale, prospective analyses in 86 obstetric and 23 abdominal examinations were undertaken. These studies indicate that fetal, intra-uterine, and abdominal structures can be rapidly and consistently imaged. The value of real time ultrasonic scanning in obstetric and abdominal examinations is illustrated. The principles of dynamically focused phased arrays are described, and the merits and limitations of these systems are discussed.

  15. Steroid injection for painful shoulder: Usefulness of ultrasound-guided approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Hee [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection into the subacromial bursa and biceps tendon sheath for painful shoulders and the usefulness of ultrasound-guided approach. Seventeen shoulders of twelve patients with shoulder pain and limited motion were included, and these patient were clinically diagnosed as a painful arc syndrome. Under ultrasound guidance, steroid injection was performed into the subacormial bursa (13 cases) and biceps tendon sheath (4 cases). In 7 cases, 1 mL of steroid was used while the remaining six patients received a mixture of 1 mL of steroid and 1 ml of lidocaine. Both shoulders of two patients received 0.5 mL of steroid. The location of needle and injection duration of fluid were continuously monitored, and complications such as leakage of steroid were recorded. Medical records were reviewed for the presence of pain relief and increasing range of motion following the injection. On ultrasonogram, the needle within the subacromial bursa and biceps tendon sheath was seen as a linear echogenic structure, and injected fluid was identified. There was neither the leakage of steroid injection nor any other complications. In 16 (94%) of 17 shoulders, there was decreased intensity of shoulder pain while increased range of motion was noted in three patients following the injection. Steroid injection into the subacormial bursa and biceps tendon sheath is effective in treating shoulder pain and limited range of motion of the shoulder, and ultrasound is useful guiding method.

  16. Computer tomography urography assisted real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy on renal calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, You-Qiang; Wu, Jie-Ying; Li, Teng-Cheng; Zheng, Hao-Feng; Liang, Guan-Can; Chen, Yan-Xiong; Hong, Xiao-Bin; Cai, Wei-Zhong; Zang, Zhi-Jun; Di, Jin-Ming

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of pre-designed route on computer tomography urography (CTU) in the ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal calculus.From August 2013 to May 2016, a total of 100 patients diagnosed with complex renal calculus in our hospital were randomly divided into CTU group and control group (without CTU assistance). CTU was used to design a rational route for puncturing in CTU group. Ultrasound was used in both groups to establish a working trace in the operation areas. Patients' perioperative parameters and postoperative complications were recorded.All operations were successfully performed, without transferring to open surgery. Time of channel establishment in CTU group (6.5 ± 4.3 minutes) was shorter than the control group (10.0 ± 6.7 minutes) (P = .002). In addition, there was shorter operation time, lower rates of blood transfusion, secondary operation, and less establishing channels. The incidence of postoperative complications including residual stones, sepsis, severe hemorrhage, and perirenal hematoma was lower in CTU group than in control group.Pre-designing puncture route on CTU images would improve the puncturing accuracy, lessen establishing channels as well as improve the security in the ultrasound-guided PCNL for complex renal calculus, but at the cost of increased radiation exposure.

  17. Steroid injection for painful shoulder: Usefulness of ultrasound-guided approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Hee

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of steroid injection into the subacromial bursa and biceps tendon sheath for painful shoulders and the usefulness of ultrasound-guided approach. Seventeen shoulders of twelve patients with shoulder pain and limited motion were included, and these patient were clinically diagnosed as a painful arc syndrome. Under ultrasound guidance, steroid injection was performed into the subacormial bursa (13 cases) and biceps tendon sheath (4 cases). In 7 cases, 1 mL of steroid was used while the remaining six patients received a mixture of 1 mL of steroid and 1 ml of lidocaine. Both shoulders of two patients received 0.5 mL of steroid. The location of needle and injection duration of fluid were continuously monitored, and complications such as leakage of steroid were recorded. Medical records were reviewed for the presence of pain relief and increasing range of motion following the injection. On ultrasonogram, the needle within the subacromial bursa and biceps tendon sheath was seen as a linear echogenic structure, and injected fluid was identified. There was neither the leakage of steroid injection nor any other complications. In 16 (94%) of 17 shoulders, there was decreased intensity of shoulder pain while increased range of motion was noted in three patients following the injection. Steroid injection into the subacormial bursa and biceps tendon sheath is effective in treating shoulder pain and limited range of motion of the shoulder, and ultrasound is useful guiding method.

  18. Guided interventions in musculoskeletal ultrasound: what's the evidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J., E-mail: jdavidson@doctors.org.u [St Richard' s Hospital, Spitalfield Lane, Chichester, West Sussex (United Kingdom); Jayaraman, S. [St Richard' s Hospital, Spitalfield Lane, Chichester, West Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Increasing histological and radiological understanding of the processes involved in soft-tissue injury is leading to novel targeted treatments. A number of reviews have recommended that these treatments should be performed with image guidance. This review describes current ultrasound-guided interventions and injections, together with the level of evidence for these. Discussion of guided interventions will include; percutaneous lavage (barbotage), brisement, dry needling, electrocoagulation, and of guided injections; corticosteroids, autologous substances (blood and platelet rich plasma), sclerosants, and prolotherapy (hyperosmolar dextrose). Representative imaging illustrating some of these techniques is included for correlation with the methods described. As these procedures are often performed in sportspeople, it is essential that the radiologist is aware of prohibited substances and methods outlined in an annual publication from the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA). Finally, future directions, including the use of autologous substances, mesenchymal and stem cells will be discussed.

  19. Indications, results, and clinical impact of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling in gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Deprez, Pierre H; Jenssen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    For pancreatic solid lesions, ESGE recommends performing endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided sampling as first-line procedure when a pathological diagnosis is required. Alternatively, percutaneous sampling may be considered in metastatic disease.Strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence.......In the case of negative or inconclusive results and a high degree of suspicion of malignant disease, ESGE suggests re-evaluating the pathology slides, repeating EUS-guided sampling, or surgery.Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.In patients with chronic pancreatitis associated with a pancreatic mass...... suggests performing EUS-guided sampling for the assessment of regional lymph nodes (LNs) in T1 (and, depending on local treatment policy, T2) adenocarcinoma and of lesions suspicious for metastasis such as distant LNs, left liver lobe lesions, and suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis.Weak recommendation...

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Versus Landmark-Guided Local Corticosteroid Injection for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Forogh, Bijan; Moeini-Taba, Seyed-Mohammad; Abedini, Amin; Kadkhodaie, Mona; Jahanjoo, Fateme; Eftekharsadat, Bina

    2018-04-01

    To review the literature and assess the comparative effectiveness of ultrasound-guided versus landmark-guided local corticosteroid injections in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase (Ovid), and Web of Science (from inception to February 1, 2017). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ultrasound-guided injection with landmark-guided injection in patients with CTS were included. Two authors independently screened abstracts and full texts. The outcomes of interest were Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Status Scale (FSS) scores of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire and 4 electrodiagnostic parameters, including compound muscle action potential (CMAP), sensory nerve action potential (SNAP), distal motor latency (DML), and distal sensory latency (DSL). Overall, 569 abstracts were retrieved and checked for eligibility; finally, 3 RCTs were included (181 injected hands). Pooled analysis showed that ultrasound-guided injection was more effective in SSS improvement (mean difference [MD], -.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], -.59 to -.32; P.99), DML (MD, .05; 95% CI, -.30 to .39; P=.80), or DSL (MD, .00; 95% CI, -.65 to .65; P>.99). This review suggested that ultrasound-guided injection was more effective than landmark-guided injection in symptom severity improvement in patients with CTS; however, no significant differences were observed in functional status or electrodiagnostic improvements between the 2 methods. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Shadow effects in simulated ultrasound images derived from computed tomography images using a focused beam tracing model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Lundgren, Bo; Stage, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasound images based on computed tomography (CT) data has previously been performed with different approaches. Shadow effects are normally pronounced in ultrasound images, so they should be included in the simulation. In this study, a method to capture the shadow effects has been......Focus ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) equipped with a dedicated research interface giving access to beamformed radio frequency data. CT images were obtained with an Aquilion ONE Toshiba CT scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tochigi, Japan). CT data were mapped from Hounsfield units...

  2. Image-guided ex vivo liver ablation by unfocused ultrasound using passive cavitation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Karunakaran, Chandra P.; Besse, John A.; Heinlein, Grace E.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2007-02-01

    Ablation therapy is used as an alternative to surgical resection of hepatic tumors. In ablation, tumors are destroyed through heating by RF current, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), or other energy sources. Ablation can be performed with a linear array transducer delivering unfocused intense ultrasound (therapy cycle. It also operates in pulse-echo mode to capture B-scan images. Ex-vivo fresh bovine liver tissue placed in degassed saline is exposed to continuous wave ultrasound interleaved with brief pulsed ultrasound imaging cycles. Tissue exposures range between 5 to 20 minutes. The following measurements are made at intervals of 1 to 3 seconds: tissue temperature with a needle thermocouple, acoustic emissions with a 1 MHz passive unfocused detector, and tissue echogenicity from image brightness. Passively detected acoustic emissions are used to quantify cavitation activity in the ablation experiments presented here. As severity and extent of tissue ablation are related to temperature, this paper will statistically model temperature as a function of tissue echogenicity and cavitation. The latter two quantities can potentially be monitored noninvasively and used as a surrogate for temperature, enabling improved image guidance and control of ultrasound ablation.

  3. Protocol for the realization of transrectal prostatic biopsy guided by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arce Montero, Jairo

    2013-01-01

    A general protocol is proposed for the realization of the ultrasound-guided prostatic biopsy in patients with positive screening. The screening should be performed taking into account risk antecedents, rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in the patients. However, patients that have presented without alteration in the PSA and suspect rectal examination, should be considered for biopsy endorectal with ultrasound guidance even more with positive risk factors. The generalities of prostate cancer are described. The general prostatic anatomy and echographic are reviewed. The echographic technique is analyzed in the exploration endorectal. The echographic findings suspects of prostate cancer are characterized. The different biopsy sampling techniques are described; and based on appropriate knowledge of prostatic echographic anatomy, could increase the effectiveness in the early detection of prostate cancer in patients with positive screening. The complications derived from the process are enumerated. The final recommendations are noted on the protocol described [es

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided techniques for diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions: Can we do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Andrew C; Lee, Linda S

    2016-10-21

    The diagnostic approach to a possible pancreatic mass lesion relies first upon various non-invasive imaging modalities, including computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Once a suspect lesion has been identified, tissue acquisition for characterization of the lesion is often paramount in developing an individualized therapeutic approach. Given the high prevalence and mortality associated with pancreatic cancer, an ideal approach to diagnosing pancreatic mass lesions would be safe, highly sensitive, and reproducible across various practice settings. Tools, in addition to radiologic imaging, currently employed in the initial evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass lesion include serum tumor markers, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). EUS-FNA has grown to become the gold standard in tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

  5. Learning Ultrasound-Guided Needle Insertion Skills through an Edutainment Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing-Yin; Ni, Dong; Pang, Wai-Man; Qin, Jing; Chui, Yim-Pan; Yu, Simon Chun-Ho; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is essential in many of minimally invasive surgeries or procedures, such as biopsy, drug delivery, spinal anaesthesia, etc. Accurate and safe needle insertion is a difficult task due to the high requirement of hand-eye coordination skills. Many proposed virtual reality (VR) based training systems put their emphasis on realistic simulation instead of pedagogical efficiency. The lack of schematic training scenario leads to boredom of repetitive operations. To solve this, we present our novel training system with the integration of game elements in order to retain the trainees' enthusiasm. Task-oriented scenarios, time attack scenarios and performance evaluation are introduced. Besides, some state-of-art technologies are also presented, including ultrasound simulation, needle haptic rendering as well as a mass-spring-based needle-tissue interaction simulation. These works are shown to be effective to keep the trainees up with learning.

  6. Ultrasound-guided greater auricular nerve block as sole anesthetic for ear surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K. Ritchie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A greater auricular nerve (GAN block was used as the sole anesthetic for facial surgery in an 80-year-old male patient with multiple comorbidities which would have made general anesthesia challenging. The GAN provides sensation to the ear, mastoid process, parotid gland, and angle of the mandible. In addition to anesthesia for operating room surgery, the GAN block can be used for outpatient or emergency department procedures without the need for a separate anesthesia team. Although this nerve block has been performed using landmark-based techniques, the ultrasoundguided version offers several potential advantages. These advantages include increased reliability of the nerve block, as well as prevention of inadvertent vascular puncture or blockade of the phrenic nerve, brachial plexus, or deep cervical plexus. The increasing access to ultrasound technology for medical care providers outside the operating room makes this ultrasound guided block an increasingly viable alternative.

  7. Fast-track, ambulatory ultrasound-guided Tru-Cut liver biopsy is feasible and cost-efficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chenxi; Lorentzen, Torben; Skjoldbye, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Most institutions perform percutaneous liver biopsy with a post-biopsy patient observation period lasting up to eight hours, which is resource-demanding. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of liver biopsy performed in a fast-track set-up with an only one-hour post......-biopsy observation time. METHODS: Patients referred to our institution underwent fast-track ultrasound-guided 18-gauge Tru-Cut liver biopsy procedures. Each single biopsy procedure was followed by a post-procedure observational period of one hour and an additional focused assessment with sonography for trauma before...... throughput, this approach may also reduce diagnostic work-up time and bring financial benefits. Therefore, we encourage the use of this approach in institutions comparable to our own. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  8. Angled-focused 45 MHz PMN-PT single element transducer for intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Williams, Jay; Kang, Bong Jin; Yoon, Changhan; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Sang Goo; Shung, K Kirk; Kim, Hyung Ham

    2015-06-01

    A transducer with an angled and focused aperture for intravascular ultrasound imaging has been developed. The acoustic stack for the angled-focused transducer was made of PMN-PT single crystal with one matching layer, one protective coating layer, and a highly damped backing layer. It was then press-focused to a desired focal length and inserted into a thin needle housing with an angled tip. A transducer with an angled and unfocused aperture was also made, following the same fabrication procedure, to compare the performance of the two transducers. The focused and unfocused transducers were tested to measure their center frequencies, bandwidths, and spatial resolutions. Lateral resolution of the angled-focused transducer (AFT) improved more than two times compared to that of the angled-unfocused transducer (AUT). A tissue-mimicking phantom in water and a rabbit aorta tissue sample in rabbit blood were scanned using AFT and AUT. Imaging with AFT offered improved contrast, over imaging with AUT, of the tissue-mimicking phantom and the rabbit aorta tissue sample by 23 dB and 8 dB, respectively. The results show that AFT has strong potential to provide morphological and pathological information of coronary arteries with high resolution and high contrast.

  9. Fusion of freehand SPECT and ultrasound to perform ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of sentinel nodes in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bree, R.; Pouw, B.; Heuveling, D. A.; Castelijns, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Criteria for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (USgFNAC) for the detection of occult lymph node metastasis in patients with clinically negative head and neck cancer are based on the morphology of cervical lymph nodes. To improve the selection of lymph nodes

  10. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliopoulos, S., E-mail: stavspiliop@upatras.g [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Patras (Greece); Katsanos, K.; Diamantopoulos, A.; Karnabatidis, D.; Siablis, D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Patras (Greece)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Results: Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63 {+-} 12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6 {+-} 1.6 versus 4.6 {+-} 1.9, p < 0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16 {+-} 2.7 versus 19 {+-} 0.8 ml, p < 0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4 {+-} 1.3 versus 4.5 {+-} 1.3 min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation.

  11. Contrast ultrasound-guided photothermal therapy using gold nanoshelled microcapsules in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shumin; Dai, Zhifei; Ke, Hengte; Qu, Enze; Qi, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Kuo; Wang, Jinrui

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test whether dual functional gold nano-shelled microcapsules (GNS-MCs) can be used as an ultrasound imaging enhancer and as an optical absorber for photothermal therapy (PTT) in a rodent model of breast cancer. Methods: GNS-MCs were fabricated with an inner air and outer gold nanoshell spherical structure. Photothermal cytotoxicity of GNS-MCs was tested with BT474 cancer cells in vitro and non-obese diabetes-SCID (NOD/SCID) mice with breast cancer. GNS-MCs were injected into the tumor under ultrasound guidance and treated with near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. The photothermal ablative effectiveness of GNS-MCs was evaluated by measuring the surface and internal temperature of the tumor as well as the size of the tumor using histological confirmation. Results: NIR laser irradiation resulted in significant tumor cell death in GNS-MCs-treated BT474 cells in vitro. GNS-MCs were able to serve as an ultrasound enhancer to guide the intratumoral injection of GNS-MCs and ensure their uniform distribution. In vivo studies revealed that NIR laser irradiation increased the intratumoral temperature to nearly 70 °C for 8 min in GNS-MCs-treated mice. Tumor volumes decreased gradually and tumors were completely ablated in 6 out of 7 mice treated with GNS-MCs and laser irradiation by 17 days after treatment. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided PTT with theranostic GNS-MCs is a promising technique for in situ treatment of breast cancer

  12. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliopoulos, S.; Katsanos, K.; Diamantopoulos, A.; Karnabatidis, D.; Siablis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Results: Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63 ± 12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6 ± 1.6 versus 4.6 ± 1.9, p < 0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16 ± 2.7 versus 19 ± 0.8 ml, p < 0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4 ± 1.3 versus 4.5 ± 1.3 min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation.

  13. Contrast ultrasound-guided photothermal therapy using gold nanoshelled microcapsules in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shumin [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China); Ordos Center Hospital, Ordos, Inner Mongolia 017000 (China); Dai, Zhifei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ke, Hengte [Nanomedicine and Biosensor Laboratory, School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Qu, Enze [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China); Qi, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Kuo [Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100019 (China); Wang, Jinrui, E-mail: jinrui_wang@sina.com [Department of Ultrasonography, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to test whether dual functional gold nano-shelled microcapsules (GNS-MCs) can be used as an ultrasound imaging enhancer and as an optical absorber for photothermal therapy (PTT) in a rodent model of breast cancer. Methods: GNS-MCs were fabricated with an inner air and outer gold nanoshell spherical structure. Photothermal cytotoxicity of GNS-MCs was tested with BT474 cancer cells in vitro and non-obese diabetes-SCID (NOD/SCID) mice with breast cancer. GNS-MCs were injected into the tumor under ultrasound guidance and treated with near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation. The photothermal ablative effectiveness of GNS-MCs was evaluated by measuring the surface and internal temperature of the tumor as well as the size of the tumor using histological confirmation. Results: NIR laser irradiation resulted in significant tumor cell death in GNS-MCs-treated BT474 cells in vitro. GNS-MCs were able to serve as an ultrasound enhancer to guide the intratumoral injection of GNS-MCs and ensure their uniform distribution. In vivo studies revealed that NIR laser irradiation increased the intratumoral temperature to nearly 70 °C for 8 min in GNS-MCs-treated mice. Tumor volumes decreased gradually and tumors were completely ablated in 6 out of 7 mice treated with GNS-MCs and laser irradiation by 17 days after treatment. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that ultrasound-guided PTT with theranostic GNS-MCs is a promising technique for in situ treatment of breast cancer.

  14. A novel concept for continuous peripheral nerve blocks. Presentation of a new ultrasound-guided device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C; Madsen, M H; Lange, K H W

    2015-02-01

    Existing techniques for placing and maintaining the position of peripheral nerve catheters are associated with variable success rates and frequent secondary failures. These factors may affect the clinical efficacy and usefulness of peripheral nerve catheters. We developed a new concept and prototype for ultrasound-guided in-plane positioning and readjustment of peripheral nerve catheters (patent pending). The integrated catheter-needle prototype comprises three parts: a curved needle, a catheter with clear echogenic markings attached to the needle tail and a detachable hub allowing injection of local anesthetic while advancing the needle in the tissue. The system works like a suture and is introduced through the skin, passes in close relation to the nerve and exits through the skin. This allows in-plane ultrasound guidance throughout the procedure both during initial positioning as well as during later in-plane readjustment of the catheter. We tested the system in the popliteal region of two fresh cadavers in a preliminary proof of concept study. Both initial placement and secondary readjustment were precise, judged by the catheter orifices placed close to the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa. Circumferential spread of 3-ml isotonic saline around the sciatic nerve was observed on ultrasound images in both conditions. Preliminary proof of concept of this novel method demonstrates that precise in-plane ultrasound-guided initial placement and secondary in-plane readjustment is possible in fresh cadavers. Future studies should address the clinical efficacy and usefulness of this novel concept. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Physiological Motion and Registration of Abnormalities in Liver During Focused Ultrasound Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Sunita; Rh, Abhilash

    Continuous deformation and dislocation of soft tissues in the abdominal and thoracic region presents a major issue for effective targeting of all non-invasive ablative modalities such as radiotherapy/surgery and Focused Ultrasound Surgery. Most significant among these is the movement of the target organs due to physiological processes such as respiration. The movement is found to be most significant for liver and kidneys. We studied movement and compensation strategies with the aim to implement them during ultrasound ablation using our robotic system for targeted FUS dose delivery. The motion pattern of the liver can be assumed to be in a single plane as it closely follows the movement of the diaphragm. However, the movement of kidneys is three dimensional and follows complicated patterns. Kidney motion is highly subject specific and has poor repeatability. In our research, we quantify the relation of liver movement and the breathing pattern so as to achieve real-time movement compensation using a prediction-correlation approach.

  16. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Circular Cyclocoagulation in Glaucoma: A Step Forward for Cyclodestruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Mastropasqua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ciliary body ablation is still considered as a last resort treatment to reduce the intraocular pressure (IOP in uncontrolled glaucoma. Several ablation techniques have been proposed over the years, all presenting a high rate of complications, nonselectivity for the target organ, and unpredictable dose-effect relationship. These drawbacks limited the application of cyclodestructive procedures almost exclusively to refractory glaucoma. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, proposed in the early 1980s and later abandoned because of the complexity and side effects of the procedure, was recently reconsidered in a new approach to destroy the ciliary body. Ultrasound circular cyclocoagulation (UC3, by using miniaturized transducers embedded in a dedicated circular-shaped device, permits to selectively treat the ciliary body in a one-step, computer-assisted, and non-operator-dependent procedure. UC3 shows a high level of safety along with a predictable and sustained IOP reduction in patients with refractory glaucoma. Because of this, the indication of UC3 was recently extended also to naïve-to-surgery patients, thus reconsidering the role and timing of ciliary body ablation in the surgical management of glaucoma. This article provides a review of the most used cycloablative techniques with particular attention to UC3, summarizing the current knowledge about this procedure and future possible developments.

  17. The design of a focused ultrasound transducer array for the treatment of stroke: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajek, Daniel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of mechanically disintegrating blood clots at high pressures. Safe thrombolysis may require frequencies higher than those currently utilized by transcranial HIFU. Since the attenuation and focal distortion of ultrasound in bone increases at higher frequencies, resulting focal pressures are diminished. This study investigated the feasibility of using transcranial HIFU for the non-invasive treatment of ischemic stroke. The use of large aperture, 1.1–1.5 MHz phased arrays in targeting four clinically relevant vessel locations was simulated. Resulting focal sizes decreased with frequency, producing a maximum –3 dB depth of field and lateral width of 2.0 and 1.2 mm, respectively. Mean focal gains above an order of magnitude were observed in three of four targets and transducer intensities required to achieve thrombolysis were determined. Required transducer element counts are about an order of magnitude higher than what currently exists and so, although technically feasible, new arrays would need to be developed to realize this as a treatment modality for stroke. (paper)

  18. Deep tissue penetration of nanoparticles using pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dong Gil; Yoon, Hong Yeol; Jeon, Sangmin; Um, Wooram; Son, Sejin; Park, Jae Hyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2017-11-01

    Recently, ultrasound (US)-based drug delivery strategies have received attention to improve enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect-based passive targeting efficiency of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo conditions. Among the US treatment techniques, pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) have specialized for improving tissue penetration of various macromolecules and nanoparticles without irreversible tissue damages. In this study, we have demonstrated that pHIFU could be utilized to improve tissue penetration of fluorescent dye-labeled glycol chitosan nanoparticles (FCNPs) in femoral tissue of mice. pHIFU could improve blood flow of the targeted-blood vessel in femoral tissue. In addition, tissue penetration of FCNPs was specifically increased 5.7-, 8- and 9.3-folds than that of non-treated (0 W pHIFU) femoral tissue, when the femoral tissue was treated with 10, 20 and 50 W of pHIFU, respectively. However, tissue penetration of FCNPs was significantly reduced after 3 h post-pHIFU treatment (50 W). Because overdose (50 W) of pHIFU led to irreversible tissue damages, including the edema and chapped red blood cells. These overall results support that pHIFU treatment can enhance the extravasation and tissue penetration of FCNPs as well as induce irreversible tissue damages. We expect that our results can provide advantages to optimize pHIFU-mediated delivery strategy of nanoparticles for further clinical applications.

  19. Heating in vascular tissue and flow-through tissue phantoms induced by focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinlan

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. This process, called acoustic hemostasis, is being studied in the hope that such a method would ultimately provide a lifesaving treatment during the so-called "golden hour", a brief grace period after a severe trauma in which prompt therapy can save the life of an injured person. Thermal effects play a major role in occlusion of small vessels and also appear to contribute to the sealing of punctures in major blood vessels. However, aggressive ultrasound-induced tissue heating can also impact healthy tissue and can lead to deleterious mechanical bioeffects. Moreover, the presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature of blood vessel walls owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in Newtonian viscous media. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments, in non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms, designed to provide a ground truth verification of the model predictions. The calculated and measured results were compared over a range of values for insonation pressure, insonation time, and flow rate; we show good agreement between predictions and measurements. We then conducted a series of simulations that address two limiting problems of interest: hemostasis in small and large vessels. We employed realistic human tissue properties and considered more complex geometries. Results show that the heating pattern in and around a blood vessel is different for different vessel sizes, flow rates and for varying beam orientations relative to the flow axis

  20. Ultrasound-guided biopsy of transplanted pancreas: evaluation of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Vieira da Nóbrega

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the experience with percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic grafts guided by ultrasonography. Methods: Series of cases referred from outpatient’s clinic for biopsy of pancreas transplant, between December 2006 and March 2008. Data were collected from medical electronic records for age, sex and histopathology. The indication for the procedure was obtained from medical and laboratory records. Doppler ultrasonography was performed for control and to guide biopsy in real time. Rresults: Twenty patients referred for biopsy of their transplanted pancreas over a one-year period were evaluated. In one patient, biopsy was not performed for having no safe access for ultrasound. It was used 18 gauge needles, mostly automatic-cut type. The main indications were increased blood glucose and pancreatic enzyme levels as well as reduction of urinary amylase. The sonographic aspect of the pancreatic graft was normal in 18 cases. In all 19 biopsies performed, satisfactory samples for histopathological study were obtained. There were no complications. Cconclusions: This series of cases demonstrated low sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in diagnosis of pancreatic transplants disorders, but showed to be very useful to guide transplanted pancreas biopsies. Although no complications occurred in this experience, the risk-benefit relation should always be assessed for every patient.

  1. The effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hızlı, Fatih; Özcan, Osman; Selvi, İsmail; Eraslan, Pınar; Köşüş, Aydın; Baş, Okan; Yıkılmaz, Taha Numan; Güven, Oğuz; Başar, Halil

    2015-11-01

    Several studies evaluating the tolerance of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided needle biopsies showed that moderate-to-severe pain was associated with the procedure. Additionally, prebiopsy anxiety or rebiopsy as a result of a prior biopsy procedure is mentioned as factors predisposing to higher pain intensity. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effects of hypnotherapy during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate needle biopsy for pain and anxiety. Sixty-four patients presenting for TRUS-guided prostate needle biopsy were randomly assigned to receive either 10-min presurgery hypnosis session (n = 32, mean age 63.5 ± 6.1, p = 0.289) or a presurgery control session (n = 32, mean age 61.8 ± 6.8, p = 0.289). The hypnosis session involved suggestions for increased relaxation and decreased anxiety. Presurgery pain and anxiety were measured using visual analog scales (VAS), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS), respectively. In our statistics, p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Postintervention, and before surgery, patients in the hypnosis group had significantly lower mean values for presurgery VAS [mean 1 (0-8); p = 0.011], BAI (6.0 vs 2.0; p < 0.001), and HAS (11.0 vs 6.0; p < 0.001). The study results indicate that a brief presurgery hypnosis intervention can be an effective means of controlling presurgical anxiety, and therefore pain, in patients awaiting diagnostic prostate cancer surgery.

  2. A random phased-array for MR-guided transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vandiver; Phipps, Marshal A; Caskey, Charles F

    2018-04-18

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is a non-invasive technique for therapy and study of brain neural activation. Here we report on the design and characterization of a new MR-guided FUS transducer for neuromodulation in non-human primates at 650 kHz. The array is randomized with 128 elements 6.6 mm in diameter, radius of curvature 7.2 cm, opening diameter 10.3 cm (focal ratio 0.7), and 46% coverage. Simulations were used to optimize transducer geometry with respect to focus size, grating lobes, and directivity. Focus size and grating lobes during electronic steering were quantified using hydrophone measurements in water and a three-axis stage. A novel combination of optical tracking and acoustic mapping enabled measurement of the 3D pressure distribution in the cortical region of an ex vivo skull to within ~3.5 mm of the surface, and allowed accurate modelling of the experiment via non-homogeneous 3D acoustic simulations. The data demonstrates acoustic focusing beyond the skull bone, with the focus slightly broadened and shifted proximal to the skull. The fabricated design is capable of targeting regions within the S1 sensorimotor cortex of macaques. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  3. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment and follow-up of Baker's cyst in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köroğlu, Mert; Çallıoğlu, Mehmet; Eriş, Hüseyin Naim; Kayan, Mustafa; Çetin, Meltem; Yener, Mahmut; Gürses, Cemil; Erol, Bekir; Türkbey, Barış; Parlak, Ayşe Eda; Akhan, Okan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of this study is to assess sonographic changes and clinical response in different subgroups of Baker's cyst patients with knee osteoarthritis after a single session of ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration and corticosteroid injection. Materials and methods: Thirty-two knee osteoarthritis patients (46–85 years, mean 58.97 ± 9.88) with symptomatic Baker's cyst diagnosed at ultrasonography were included in the study. To determine the grade of the symptoms, Visual Analogue Scale was applied. The patients were grouped in two, as simple (n = 24) and complex (n = 8) Baker's cyst. Thirty-two ultrasound-guided cyst aspirations concomitant 1 ml betamethasone injection (24 simple, 8 complex subgroups) were performed. Patients were followed clinically as well as via ultrasonography for 6 months after procedures. Results: A significant decrease in volume of the Baker's cysts after percutaneous treatment was accompanied by a significant clinical improvement. Moreover, the volume reduction of Baker's cyst after the treatment was significantly correlated with the clinical improvement (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.542, p = 0.001). All 6 Baker's cysts relapsed at ultrasonography were complex type. Furthermore, a comparison of patients with simple Baker's cysts and those with complex Baker's cysts demonstrated no significant change in Visual Analogue Scale scores between two groups (p = 0.061, Mann–Whitney U). No complications (minor or major) occurred secondary to percutaneous treatment. Conclusion: Baker's cysts can be grouped as simple and complex groups via ultrasonography prior to the treatment. Cyst aspiration with ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection yields clinical improvement and cyst volume reduction in all subgroups of patients with Baker's cyst secondary to knee osteoarthritis.

  4. Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ripollés

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transverse abdominal plan blockade is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that were carried out according to the descriptions, and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the transverse abdominal plan blockade in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials are inconsistent.OBJECTIVES: To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockade for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences.METHODS: Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 randomized clinical trials where intervention with ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockades was performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score > 1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the randomized clinical trials.CONCLUSIONS: The transverse abdominal plan blockades have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in randomized clinical trial are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed randomized clinical trial, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice.

  5. The transabdominal chorionic villus sampling puncture guided by color Doppler ultrasound during early pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Weixiang; Chen Zhiyi; Yuan Wenlin; Cai Kuan; Zhu Junlin; Wang Weiqun; Chen Xia

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the operation of chorionic villus sampling (CVS) guided by color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) via abdomen puncture during early pregnancy and investigate the advertences during the operation. Methods: CVS guided by CDU probe via abdomen puncture were operated on 28 pregnant women who had the indications of antenatal diagnosis. CDU was used to observe the implantation position of the fo1iaceous villis and help setting mark of the puncture point and puncture range on body surface before operation. The needle was punctured under real-time ultrasound guidance and villis were aspirated during the operation: The choice of the right time of puncture and the operation skills were emphasized in the study. Results: The CVS puncture approach should be set through CDU ob servation, which attend to avoid the surrounding blood vessels, intestinal canal and surrounding important organs. The puncture point should be chosen in a point where lobif0rmed villis distributed wider and with a larger scope. The operations were performed from 10 to13 weeks of pregnancy, with an average of 11 weeks. Among these 28 cases, 9.6 were successfully drawn materials in one time, 1 in twice and l failure, with the total ratio of achievement was 96.4%. For all the cases, fetal heart pulsating could be seen by real-time CDU observation fight after the operation, and no larger hematoma echo in the placental site occurred. Ultrasound reexamined one week after the operation, fetal heart pulsation could be found in all cases, and no abortion cases occurred after regular follow-up in 25 continued pregnant patients. Conclusion: Abdominal CVS puncture guided by CDU probe is conveniently operated, safe and available in clinic. It is an important method for antenatal diagnosis during early pregnancy. The puncture localization, skills and the time are the key points for the success in obtaining the materials. (authors)

  6. Ultrasound-guided placement of ventricular catheters in first-time pediatric VP shunt surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Marcel; Khachatryan, Marina; Schuhmann, Martin Ulrich

    2018-03-01

    Ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunts are effective for treatment of hydrocephalus in all age groups; however, they are associated with complications, a common one being ventricular catheter (VC) obstruction. VC position is likely to influence VC survival; however, most VCs are positioned freehand without guidance. This paper describes the accuracy of ultrasound guidance for VC placement and the impact of tip location on VC occlusion rate. This is a retrospective cohort study of hydrocephalic children with first-time VP shunt and ultrasound-guided VC placement. Data recorded were age, sex, cause of hydrocephalus, side (left or right) and location (frontal or occipital) of VC, and exact postoperative position within the ventricle on first postoperative imaging: middle of ventricle (optimal position), near or touching the medial or lateral ventricle wall, within the third ventricle, and at the contralateral side. Of the 128 screened patients, 85 had a first postoperative imaging that clearly defined the VC position and were included. The follow-up was at least 12 months. Seventy-three percent of VCs were placed on the right and 71% via a frontal burhole. Eighty-three of 85 VC tips (95%) were in the intended ventricle, 61% at optimal position. Nine of 85 VCs (10%) obstructed within the first 12 months. Seven of nine (78%) obstructed VCs were located in a nonoptimal position (p = 0.016). Two of nine (22%) obstructed VCs entered through a frontal and seven of nine (78%) through an occipital burrhole (p = 0.016). Ultrasound-guided VC placement is as precise as frameless navigated placement. The optimal VC position was associated to a significant lower VC obstruction rate. The frontal position was superior to the occipital. Intraoperative US guidance is fast with almost no extra time and no extra cost. US-guided VC placement should become standard of care in VP shunt surgery.

  7. Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Javier; Mezquita, Sandra Marmaña; Abad, Alfredo; Calvo, José

    2015-01-01

    The transverse abdominal plan blockade is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that were carried out according to the descriptions, and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the transverse abdominal plan blockade in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials are inconsistent. To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockade for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences. Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 randomized clinical trials where intervention with ultrasound-guided transverse abdominal plan blockades was performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score>1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the randomized clinical trials. The transverse abdominal plan blockades have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in randomized clinical trial are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed randomized clinical trial, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda

  8. [Analgesic efficacy of the ultrasound-guided blockade of the transversus abdominis plane - a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Javier; Marmaña Mezquita, Sandra; Abad, Alfredo; Calvo, José

    2015-01-01

    The transverse abdominal plan blockade (TAP) is a block of abdominal wall that has diffused rapidly in the clinical practice as part of a multimodal analgesia for abdominal surgery. The performance of the ultrasound-guided technique has allowed the lowering of potential complications, as well as new approaches that according to the descriptions carried out and the prospective studies would make it possible to utilize the TAP in different surgical interventions; however, the results obtained in randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are inconsistent. To prepare a systematic review aiming to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound-guided TAP for different surgical interventions, as well as the indications according to the approaches and their influences. Two research approaches, one manual, and the other in Pubmed returned 28 RCT where an intervention with ultrasound-guided TAP were performed to compare the analgesic efficacy in contrast to another technique in adults, published between 2007 and October 2013, in English or Spanish, with Jadad score > 1, according to the inclusion criteria for this review. The authors analyzed independently all the RCT. The TAP have been shown to be an effective technique in colorectal surgery, cesarean section, cholecystectomy, hysterectomy, appendectomy, donor nephrectomy, retropubic prostatectomy, and bariatric surgery. However, the data found in RCT are not conclusive, and as a result, it is necessary to develop new and well designed RCT, with enough statistical power to compare different approaches, drugs, doses, and volumes for the same intervention, aiming to answer the current questions and their effects in the habitual clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Laparoscopic Ovarian Wedge Resection in Recurrent Serous Borderline Ovarian Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Benjamin P; Saso, Srdjan; Farren, Jessica; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Smith, J Richard; Yazbek, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the use of intraoperative ultrasound-guided ovarian wedge resection in the treatment of recurrent serous borderline ovarian tumors (sBOTs) that are too small to be visualized laparoscopically. This was a prospective analysis of all women with recurrent sBOTs that were not visible laparoscopically, who underwent intraoperative ultrasound-guided ovarian wedge resection between January 2015 and December 2016 at the West London Gynaecological Cancer Centre, Imperial College NHS Trust, London, United Kingdom. We evaluated 7 patients, with a median age of 35 years (range, 28-39 years). Six women were nulliparous, whereas 1 woman had a single child. Previous surgical intervention left 5 women with a single ovary, whereas the remaining 2 had previous ovarian-sparing surgery. The median size of recurrence was 18 mm (range, 12-37 mm). All women underwent uncomplicated intraoperative guided ovarian wedge resections. Histological assessment confirmed sBOT in all 7 cases. Six of the women remain disease-free. One woman recurred postoperatively with her third recurrence, who previously had bilateral disease and noninvasive implants with microinvasive disease and micropapillary pattern. No cases progressed to invasive disease. The median follow-up time was 12 months (range, 1-20 months). One pregnancy has been achieved postoperatively but resulted in miscarriage. Continuous intraoperative ultrasound can be used to facilitate complete tumor excision in recurrent sBOT while minimizing the removal of ovarian tissue in women with recurrent sBOT. It is essential that surgical techniques evolve simultaneously with diagnostic imaging modalities to enable surgeons to treat such pathology.

  10. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hand, J W; Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S; Dickinson, R J; Gavrilov, L R

    2009-01-01

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least ±15 mm off axis and axially to more than ±15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci ±10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm 3 in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  11. Thermal treatment planning for SonoKnife focused-ultrasound thermal treatment of head and neck cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose is to develop a patient-specific treatment planning method for a cylindrically-focused (i.e., SonoKnife) ultrasound thermal therapy system to optimize the thermal treatment of locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and/or positive lymph nodes. To achieve a more efficient and effective treatment, a temperature-based treatment planning was devised, which was composed of : (1) a 3D acoustic-thermal model has been developed to simulate the acoustic field, temperature distribution, and thermal dose coverage induced by the SonoKnife applicator. (2) A 3D relevant anatomical structures (e.g. the H&N tumors, bones and cavities) were reconstructed based on multislice CT scans. A step-and-shoot strategy was devised to perform the treatment, in which the initial applied power levels, placement of the transducers, and sonication times per scan were determined by conducting a temperature-based forward simulation. The maximum temperature, thermal dose coverage of target, and thermal exposure to surrounding tissue were analyzed. For performance evaluation, the treatment planning was applied on representative examples obtained from the clinical radiation therapy of HNSCC and positive lymph nodes. This treatment planning platforms can be used to guide applicator placement, set-up configurations, and applied power levels prior to delivery of a treatment or for post-procedure analysis of temperature distributions.

  12. Focused ultrasound delivery of Raman nanoparticles across the blood-brain barrier: Potential for targeting experimental brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Roberto Jose; McVeigh, Patrick Z.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Burrell, Kelly; Bebenek, Matthew; Smith, Christian; Etame, Arnold; Zadeh, Gelareh; Hynynen, Kullervo; Wilson, Brian C.; Rutka, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral mapping of nanoparticles with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) capability in the near-infrared range is an emerging molecular imaging technique. We used magnetic resonance image-guided transcranial focused ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) to reversibly disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) adjacent to brain tumor margins in rats. Glioma cells were found to internalize SERS capable nanoparticles of 50 nm or 120 nm physical diameter. Surface coating with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody or non-specific human immunoglobulin G, resulted in enhanced cell uptake of nanoparticles in-vitro compared to nanoparticles with methyl terminated 12-unit polyethylene glycol surface. BBB disruption permitted the delivery of SERS capable spherical 50 or 120 nm gold nanoparticles to the tumor margins. Thus, nanoparticles with SERS imaging capability can be delivered across the BBB non-invasively using TcMRgFUS and have the potential to be used as optical tracking agents at the invasive front of malignant brain tumors. PMID:24374363

  13. Ultrasound-guided interstitial laser photocoagulation of an autonomous thyroid nodule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Radioiodine ((131)I) and surgery are the standard therapeutic options for the solitary autonomous thyroid nodule (AFTN). Percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) has proven to be an effective technique and possible alternative to the conventional treatment options. However, PEI is not devoid of side...... effects and often necessitates multiple treatment sessions. We present a case of a 17-year-old female successfully treated with ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) for an AFTN. Initially, she had a serum thyrotropin (TSH) of 0.01 mU/L and normal peripheral thyroid...

  14. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Higgins, Laurence D.; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. Study Design A mixed prospective and retrospective study design Place and Duration of Study Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Methodology Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had received ultrasound-guided injections of lidocaine and triamcinolone for adhesive capsulitis We then assessed short-term follow-up outcomes (within 3 months of procedure) using medical record review and phone interviews. Longer-term follow-up (at least 3 months from the procedure) outcomes were determined by mailings and phone calls. Average and worst shoulder pain scores were measured on a visual analog scale. Shoulder ROM was measured in forward flexion, isolated abduction, and external rotation. Results Patients presented an average of 5.1 (SD=4.1) months after onset of symptoms. Within three months of the injection, 55.9% (95% CI: 39.2%, 72.6%) of patients reported greater than 75% pain relief and 44.1% (95% CI: 27.4%, 60.8%) of patients reported greater than 75% ROM improvement. The percentage of patients who improved increased with increased duration of follow-up. At short-term follow-up (mean=2.1 months, SD=2.7), average pain decreased from 5.6 (SD=2.2) to 3.0 (SD=1.8) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased from 7.8 (SD=1.2) to 4.3 (SD=3.2) (p ≤ .001). At longer-term follow-up (mean =10.4 months, SD=3.7), average pain decreased to 1.9 (SD=1.9) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased to 2.9 (SD=2.3) (p ≤ .001). Conclusion A majority of patients had significant pain reduction and functional improvement after an ultrasound guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis. Our patients experience the majority of their pain and functional relief within

  15. Outcomes of Ultrasound-guided Glen Humeral Corticosteroid Injections in Adhesive Capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Amos; Katz, Jeffrey N; Higgins, Laurence D; Newman, Joel; Gomoll, Andreas; Jain, Nitin B

    2014-09-25

    To assess short and longer-term outcomes of ultrasound-guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injections for adhesive capsulitis. A mixed prospective and retrospective study design. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, between June 2011 and July 2012. Using medical records, we first retrospectively identified patients who had received ultrasound-guided injections of lidocaine and triamcinolone for adhesive capsulitis We then assessed short-term follow-up outcomes (within 3 months of procedure) using medical record review and phone interviews. Longer-term follow-up (at least 3 months from the procedure) outcomes were determined by mailings and phone calls. Average and worst shoulder pain scores were measured on a visual analog scale. Shoulder ROM was measured in forward flexion, isolated abduction, and external rotation. Patients presented an average of 5.1 (SD=4.1) months after onset of symptoms. Within three months of the injection, 55.9% (95% CI: 39.2%, 72.6%) of patients reported greater than 75% pain relief and 44.1% (95% CI: 27.4%, 60.8%) of patients reported greater than 75% ROM improvement. The percentage of patients who improved increased with increased duration of follow-up. At short-term follow-up (mean=2.1 months, SD=2.7), average pain decreased from 5.6 (SD=2.2) to 3.0 (SD=1.8) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased from 7.8 (SD=1.2) to 4.3 (SD=3.2) (p ≤ .001). At longer-term follow-up (mean =10.4 months, SD=3.7), average pain decreased to 1.9 (SD=1.9) (p ≤ .001) and worst pain decreased to 2.9 (SD=2.3) (p ≤ .001). A majority of patients had significant pain reduction and functional improvement after an ultrasound guided glenohumeral corticosteroid injection for adhesive capsulitis. Our patients experience the majority of their pain and functional relief within the first three months after an ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injection with

  16. Anterior approach v. posterior approach - ultrasound-guided shoulder arthrogram injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merle Neethling-du Toit

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Anterior approach ultrasound guided arthrogram injections are a quick reliable way of injecting contrast prior to MRI scan. We did a retrospective study on patients, previously injected and scanned at our clinic, to compare the more manifested posterior approach with the anterior approach. The success rate for successful intra-articular injections for the anterior approach far outweighs the posterior approach. Also the anterior approach is more tolerable for patients as the injections are much quicker and seemingly less painful. In our knowledge it is thus far better to perform anterior approach shoulder arthrogram injections than posterior approach injections

  17. Magnetic resonance guided focalized ultrasound thermo-ablation: A promising oncologic local therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iannessi, A.; Doyen, J.; Leysalle, A.; Thyss, A.

    2014-01-01

    Pain management of bone metastases is usually made using systemic and local therapy. Even though radiations are nowadays the gold standard for painful metastases, innovations regarding minimally invasive treatment approaches have been developed because of the existing non-responder patients [1]. Indeed, cementoplasty and thermo-ablations like radiofrequency or cryotherapy have shown to be efficient on pain [2-4]. Among thermo-therapy, magnetic resonance guided focalized ultrasound is now a new non-invasive weapon for bone pain palliation. (authors)

  18. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy for benign non-thyroid cystic mass in the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Surgical excision has traditionally been the treatment of choice for benign non-thyroid cystic neck masses, including lymphatic malformation, ranula, branchial cleft cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst, and parathyroid cyst. However, there is a tendency toward recurrence after surgery, and surgery may be accompanied by complications, including nerve injuries, vascular injuries, and scar formation. Ultrasound-guided sclerotherapy using various agents has been challenged and successfully applied as an alternative treatment for benign non-thyroid cystic neck masses. This report reviews the available sclerosing agents and describes the applications of sclerotherapy to the treatment of benign cystic masses in the neck.

  19. Percutaneous cryoablation of prostate cancer guided by rectal ultrasound: a retrospectively analysis of 42 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Wenge; Guo Zhi; Wang Haitao; Liu Fang; Li Baoguo; Yu Haipeng; Li Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of rectal ultrasound-guided agon-hilium percutaneous cryoablation in treatment of patients with median and or late-stage prostate cancer patients. Methods: Retrospectively analysis of 42 cases of with stage C and D prostate cancer patients treated by rectal ultrasound-guided argon-hilium percutaneous cryoablation during the follow-up of 1-12 months. The prostate specific antigen (PSA), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), PSA objective response, transrectal ultrasound of the prostate (TRUS), TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate, the maximum urinary flow rate(MFR), MRI examination at before, and 3,6,12 months after cryoablation were recorded and evaluated. The results were statistically evaluated by using variance analysis. Results: The PSA value at before and 3,6, 12 months after cryoablation were (4.48±1.35), (3.54±1.67), (3.18±1.76), (2.87±1.89) μg/L, respectively; TRUS-measured prostate volumes at before and 3, 6,12 months after cryoablation were (59.7± 8.2), (46.9±8.3), (26.2±3.9), (25.9±3.7) mm 3 , respectively; MFR before and 3, 6,12 months after cryoablation were (10.4±0.8), (14.3±1.2), (18.3±1.3), (18.9±1.3) ml/s, respectively; Compared with before cryoablation, the differences between before and after cryoablation was statistically significant (F= 53.93,747.92,3843.03, respectively, P<0.01). The bPFS rates in 3 months,6 months and 12 months were 95.2% (40/42), 95.2% (40/42), and 90.5% (38/42), respectively. According to the PSA response, the total effective rate (CR 16 cases, PR 15 cases) at 12 months was 73.8%, and SD was 16.7% (7/42), PD was 9.5% (4/42). Complications included temporary incontinence 2.4% (1/42), Penile tingling/numbness 2.4% (1/42), pelvic pain 4.9% (2/41) and Scrotum Edema 2.4% (1/42). There was no case with severe complications such as severe infection or urethrorectal fistula, etc. Conclusions: Rectal ultrasound-guided agon-hilium percutaneous cryoablation showed

  20. Ultrasound-Guided real-time pterygopalatine block for analgesia in an oral cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishkarsh Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancers are one of the most common cancers in India. These patients have pain during the course of the disease. Various drugs including opioid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug have been used to manage pain. However, these are associated with side effects such as constipation and vomiting. An early interventional block may decrease the requirement for analgesics and improve the overall quality of life. We describe a case of oral carcinoma successfully managed with ultrasound-guided pterygopalatine block.

  1. Is ultrasound-guided injection more effective in chronic subacromial bursitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Lin, Yi-Jia; Wu, Shih-Hui; Chang, Kae-Chwen; Chang, Hsiao-Lan

    2013-12-01

    Although ultrasound (US)-guided subacromial injection has shown increased accuracy in needle placement, whether US-guided injection produces better clinical outcome is still controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroid injection under US guidance with palpation-guided subacromial injection in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis. Patients with chronic subacromial bursitis were randomized to a US-guided injection group and a palpation-guided injection group. The subjects in each group were injected with a mixture of 0.5 mL dexamethasone suspension and 3 mL lidocaine into the subacromial bursa. The primary outcome measures were the visual analog scale for pain and active and passive ranges of motion of the affected shoulder. Secondary outcome measures were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The primary outcome measures were evaluated before, immediately, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection; the secondary outcome measures were evaluated before, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection. Of the 145 subjects screened, 46 in each group completed the study. Significantly greater improvement in passive shoulder abduction and in physical functioning and vitality scores on the SF-36 were observed in the US-guided group. The pre- and postinjection within-group comparison revealed significant improvement in the visual analog scale for pain and range of motion, as well as in the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and SF-36 scores, in both groups. The US-guided subacromial injection technique produced significantly greater improvements in passive shoulder abduction and in some items of the SF-36. US is effective in guiding the needle into the subacromial bursa in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis.

  2. Review Paper: A Review on Brain Stimulation Using Low Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Rezayat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain stimulation techniques are important in both basic and clinical studies. Majority of well-known brain stimulating techniques have low spatial resolution or entail invasive processes. Low intensity focused ultrasound (LIFU seems to be a proper candidate for dealing with such deficiencies. This review recapitulates studies which explored the effects of LIFU on brain structures and its function, in both research and clinical areas. Although the mechanism of LIFU action is still unclear, its different effects from molecular level up to behavioral level can be explored in animal and human brain. It can also be coupled with brain imaging assessments in future research.

  3. Influence of the abdominal wall on the nonlinear propagation of focused therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhen-Bo, Liu; Ting-Bo, Fan; Dong, Zhang; Xiu-Fen, Gong

    2009-01-01

    This article theoretically studies the influence of inhomogeneous abdominal walls on focused therapeutic ultrasound based on the phase screen model. An inhomogeneous tissue is considered as a combination of a homogeneous medium and a phase aberration screen. Variations of acoustic parameters such as peak positive pressure, peak negative pressure, and acoustic intensity are discussed with respect to the phase screen statistics of human abdominal walls. Results indicate that the abdominal wall can result in energy loss of the sound in the focal plane. For a typical human abdominal wall with correlation length of 7.9 mm and variance of 0.36, the peak acoustic intensity radiated from a 1 MHz transmitter with a radius of 30 mm can be reduced by about 14% at the focal plane. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  4. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer using Sonablate-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Ohkusa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Hideyuki; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2005-03-01

    We evaluated 181 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for biochemical disease-free rate, safety, morbidity and predictors of biochemical outcome. A total of 181 patients underwent HIFU with the Sonablate-500 and with at least 12 months of follow-up. Biochemical failure was defined according to the criteria recommended by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Consensus Panel. The biochemical disease-free rates at 1, 3 and 5 years in all patients were 84%, 80% and 78%, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rates at 3 years for patients with pretreatment PSA less than 10 ng/ml, 10.01 to 20.0 ng/ml and more than 20.0 ng/ml were 94%, 75% and 35%, respectively (ppatients with localized prostate cancer, especially those with a pretreatment PSA level less than 20 ng/ml.

  5. Accumulation of Phase-Shift Nanoemulsions to Enhance MR-Guided Ultrasound-Mediated Tumor Ablation In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A. Kopechek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU is being explored as a non-invasive technology to treat solid tumors. However, the clinical use of HIFU for tumor ablation applications is currently limited by the long treatment times required. Phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE, consisting of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into microbubbles, are being developed to accelerate HIFU-mediated heating. The purpose of this study was to examine accumulation of PSNE in intramuscular rabbit tumors in vivo. MR images were acquired before and after intravenous injection of gadolinium-containing PSNE. MR signal enhancement was observed in rabbit tumors up to six hours after injection, indicating that PSNE accumulated in the tumors. In addition, PSNE vaporization was detected in the tumor with B-mode ultrasound imaging, and MR thermometry measurements indicated that PSNE accelerated the rate of HIFU-mediated heating. These results suggest that PSNE could dramatically improve the efficiency and clinical feasibility of MRgHIFU.

  6. The Complete Guide to Focus Group Marketing Research for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, Robert S.

    This guide discusses the use of focus groups in marketing research for higher education. It describes the differences between qualitative and quantitative research, and examines when it is appropriate to use focus group research, when it is not, and why. The guide describes a step-by-step approach in how to plan, formulate, moderate, and report…

  7. Preliminary assessment of one-dimensional MR elastography for use in monitoring focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeYuan; Glaser, Kevin J.; Rouviere, Olivier; Gorny, Krzysztof R.; Chen, Shigao; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L.; Felmlee, Joel P.

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess a fast technique that measures tissue stiffness and temperature during focused ultrasound thermal therapy (FUS). A one-dimensional (1D) MR elastography (MRE) pulse sequence was evaluated for the purpose of obtaining rapid measurements of thermally induced changes in tissue stiffness and temperature for monitoring FUS treatments. The accuracy of the 1D measurement was studied by comparing tissue displacements measured by 1D MRE with those measured by the well-established 2D MRE pulse sequence. The reproducibility of the 1D MRE measurement was assessed, in gel phantoms and ex vivo porcine tissue, for varied FUS intensity levels (31.5 199.9 W cm-2) and over a range of displacements at the focus (0.1 1 µm). Temperature elevations in agarose gel phantoms were measured using 1D MRE and calibrated using fiberoptic-thermometer-based measurements. The 1D MRE displacement measurements are highly correlated with those obtained with the 2D technique (R2 = 0.88 0.93), indicating that 1D MRE can successfully measure tissue displacement. Ten repeated trials at each FUS power level yielded a minimum detectable displacement change of 0.2 µm in phantoms and 0.4 µm in tissue (at 95% confidence level). The 1D MRE temperature measurements correlated well with temperature changes measured simultaneously with fiberoptic thermometers (R2 = 0.97). The 1D MRE technique is capable of detecting tissue displacements as low as 0.4 µm, which is an order of magnitude smaller than 5 µm displacements expected during FUS therapy (Le et al 2005 AIP Conf. Proc.: Ther. Ultrasound 829 186 90). Additionally, 1D MRE was shown to provide adequate measurements of temperature elevations in tissue. These findings indicate that 1D MRE may be an effective tool for monitoring FUS treatments.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Arias-Buría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US- guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n=17 group or exercise (n=19 group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions. Shoulder pain (NPRS and disability (DASH were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P<0.01: individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  9. Glenohumeral joint injection: a comparative study of ultrasound and fluoroscopically guided techniques before MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Janssen, Caroline M.M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Collins, James M.P.; Maresch, Bas J.; Smeets, Jacques H.J.M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the variability in accuracy of contrast media introduction, leakage, required time and patient discomfort in four different centres, each using a different image-guided glenohumeral injection technique. Each centre included 25 consecutive patients. The ultrasound-guided anterior (USa) and posterior approach (USp), fluoroscopic-guided anterior (FLa) and posterior (FLp) approach were used. Number of injection attempts, effect of contrast leakage on diagnostic quality, and total room, radiologist and procedure times were measured. Pain was documented with a visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score. Access to the joint was achieved in all patients. A successful first attempt significantly occurred more often with US (94%) than with fluoroscopic guidance (72%). Leakage of contrast medium did not cause interpretative difficulties. With US guidance mean room, procedure and radiologist times were significantly shorter (p < 0.001). The USa approach was rated with the lowest pre- and post-injection VAS scores. The four image-guided injection techniques are successful in injection of contrast material into the glenohumeral joint. US-guided injections and especially the anterior approach are significantly less time consuming, more successful on the first attempt, cause less patient discomfort and obviate the need for radiation and iodine contrast. (orig.)

  10. The role of ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted removal of gynecomastia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Me [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    To evaluate the role of performing ultrasound (US)-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsies for the treatment (mammotome excision) of gynecomastia. Between November 2005 and December 2006, nine male patients underwent US-guided mammotome excision for eleven cases of true gynecomastia. The patient ages ranged from 14 to 55 years (mean age, 32.3 years). US-guided mammotome excision was performed with an 11-gauge needle in seven cases and an 8-gauge needle in four cases. After the procedure, the cigarette method using gauze packing was performed. The number of samples, procedure time and presence of complications were evaluated. Scheduled follow-up physical and US examinations were performed after three and six months. For 11 cases of US-guided mammotome excision of gynecomastia, the number of samples ranged from 12-126 (mean, 66) and the procedure time ranged from 10-42 minutes (mean time, 25.1 minutes). Clinical significant complications did not occur immediately after the procedure and complications were not seen after a follow-up examination in any of the cases. At the 3-and 6-month follow up examinations, all of the patients showed a normal male physical appearance on a physical examination and there was no evidence of hypoechoic glandular tissues as seen on ultrasonograms. US-guided mammotome excision is effective for the treatment of small, glandular true gynecomastia and is suggested as a new modality to replace the need for surgery or liposuction.

  11. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chap 66. Cosgrove DO, Eckersley RJ, Harvey CJ, Lim A. Ultrasound. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. ... by: Jason Levy, MD, Northside Radiology Associates, Atlanta, GA. Also ...

  12. Update on the role of ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation for thyroid nodule treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radzina, Maija; Cantisani, Vito; Rauda, Madara

    2017-01-01

    in significant reduction of thyroid nodule mean volume and improvement of the patient symptoms. However, future multicenter studies are warranted to better clarify the multi-parametric patient selection criteria and evaluate RFA technique efficacy, advantages and limitations in the variety of thyroid nodular......Thyroid nodules can be frequently detected in general population, most of them are benign, however malignant cases are rising in the past decades. Ultrasound (US) is the most common imaging modality to assess thyroid nodular lesions, plan patient work-up and guide minimally invasive treatment...... with other ablation techniques has been provided as well. US guided Radiofrequency ablation has been proved to be effective and safe in cases of benign thyroid nodules and a promising treatment method alternative to surgery for patients with recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. It's major role lies...

  13. Brief reports: ultrasound-guided obturator nerve block: a proximal interfascial technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ahmad Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    In this report, I describe and evaluate a proximal ultrasound (US)-guided obturator nerve block technique using an interfascial local anesthetic (LA) injection deep to the pectineus muscle. The pectineus muscle was identified and followed, while the US probe was tilted cranially until the superior pubic ramus was visualized. In this plane, LA was injected interfascially between the pectineus and obturator externus. The median time required to identify the injection site was 4 seconds (95% confidence interval, 3-5 seconds). The median motor block onset was 4 minutes (95% confidence interval, 3-5 minutes). Both obturator nerve branches were blocked successfully in all patients (100%). The US-guided obturator nerve block using interfascial LA injection inferior to the superior pubic ramus, between the pectineus and obturator externus muscles, was shown to be a simple and successful technique.