WorldWideScience

Sample records for growth substrate depending

  1. Effect of Trichoderma on horticultural seedlings' growth promotion depending on inoculum and substrate type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Guirao, J I; Rodríguez-Romera, P; Lupión-Rodríguez, B; Camacho-Ferre, F; Tello-Marquina, J C

    2016-10-01

    The biostimulant effect of Trichoderma spp. on horticultural crops are highly variable. Thus, practical use of Trichoderma sp. requires feasible formulated products and suitable substrates. This study evaluates the survival and the growth-promotion effect of a Trichoderma saturnisporum rice formulation compared with a nonformulated conidia suspension (seven treatments in total), on tomato, pepper and cucumber seedlings grown in two substrates: (i) rich in organic matter (OM) and (ii) mineral substrate without OM. The results showed beneficial effects on seedling growth in the OM-rich substrate when T. saturnisporum rice formulation (mainly at maximum concentration) was applied, but the effects were opposite when the mineral substrate without OM was used. The effects were closely linked to the level of inoculum in the substrate, which was greater upon application of the formulated inoculum as opposed to the nonformulated one. The use of rice to prepare the inoculum of T. saturnisporum seems to be promising for seedling growth in the nursery when it is applied in a substrate that is rich in organic matter, but it must be considered that under certain conditions of food shortage, Trichoderma sp. could show pathogenicity to seedlings. This study provides evidence of the complexity inherent in the use of micro-organisms in agriculture, while also confirming that the activity of the biofertilizers based on Trichoderma depends on the type of inoculum and its concentration, as well as the properties of the medium in which the fungi develop. Further studies assessing the effectiveness or possible pathogenicity of Trichoderma in different soils under greenhouse conditions must be addressed. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Substrate-orientation dependent epitaxial growth of highly ordered diamond nanosheet arrays by chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Ji, Xixi; Ao, Yu; Yu, Jie

    2018-02-08

    Three-dimensional ordering of two-dimensional nanomaterials has long been a challenge. Simultaneously, diamond nanomaterials are difficult to synthesize due to the harsh synthesizing conditions required. Here, we report substrate-crystal-orientation dependent growth of diamond nanosheets (DNSs) by chemical vapor deposition, which generates different DNS arrays on different substrates. The DNSs are grown by the in-plane epitaxy of the diamond {111} planes. So the arrays are highly ordered and solely determined by the spatial orientation of the {111} planes in the diamond FCC structure. The DNSs grown on the {110}, {111}, {001}, and {113} oriented substrates show inclination angles ranging from 90 to 29.5°. The DNSs with larger inclination angles grow preferentially, forming parallelogram arrays with inclination angles of 90° on the {110} substrates and parallel-line arrays with inclination angles of 80° on the {113} substrates. The density, thickness, size, and morphology of the DNSs have been well controlled. The present understanding and materials are highly promising for many applications such as sensors, catalysis, photonics, thermal management, and electronics.

  3. Substrate structure dependence of the growth modes of p-quaterphenyl thin films on gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellegger, S.; Mitsche, S.; Poelt, P.; Haenel, K.; Birkner, A.; Woell, C.; Winkler, A.

    2005-01-01

    The variably oriented crystallite surfaces of a recrystallized polycrystalline gold sample served as substrates for the investigation of the structure dependence of p-quaterphenyl (4P) thin film growth. The films were prepared in ultrahigh vacuum by organic molecular beam evaporation. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, combined with laterally resolved electron backscatter diffraction and scanning tunnelling microscopy have been applied to determine the correlation between the substrate surface structure and 4P film morphology. Crystallite surfaces consisting of (110) terraces favour highly anisotropic needle-like 4P growth with the needle orientation normal to the Au directions. Atomic steps on vicinal planes with narrow terraces (< 2 nm) can also induce anisotropy in the 4P thin film growth, in particular elongated 4P islands normal to the step direction. In contrast to that, a nearly isotropic distribution of the needle orientations is observed on Au grains terminated by highly symmetric (111) or (100) crystal planes. Additionally, patches of continuous 4P layers can be found on these surfaces. There is strong evidence that the 4P molecules within the needle-like crystallites are oriented parallel to the Au surface, whereas for the continuous layers the 4P molecules are oriented nearly upright on the surface

  4. Growth and flowering of Helleborus argutifolius (Viviani grown in pots depending on substrate type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Henschke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted on the effect of substrate type on growth of Corsican hellebore (Helleborus argutifolius Viviani. Plants were grown for two years in pots with substrates whose components included Klasmann highmoor peat and Hartmann highmoor peat, mineral soil, expanded clay and perlite at various volumetric ratios. Vegetative growth and flowering were observed in hellebores. It was shown that substrates exhibited a varied effect on plant growth. Corsican hellebore in a substrate with a considerable addition of mineral soil was lower, but more branched, and it did not form inflorescences. An optimal medium for growing H. argutifolius in pots was Hartmann’s de-acidified peat + mineral soil (1:1 v:v. In this medium vegetative growth of plants was extensive, flowering was early and abundant, and long peduncles were produced.

  5. Highly textured Gd2Zr2O7 films grown on textured Ni-5 at.%W substrates by solution deposition route: Growth, texture evolution, and microstructure dependency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Napari, M.

    2012-01-01

    or crystallization in the thicker films. This work not only demonstrates a route for producing textured Gd2Zr2O7 buffer layers with dense structure directly on technical substrates, but also provides some fundamental understandings related to chemical solution derived films grown on metallic substrates.......Growth, texture evolution and microstructure dependency of solution derived Gd2Zr2O7 films deposited on textured Ni-5 at.%W substrates have been extensively studied. Influence of processing parameters, in particular annealing temperature and dwell time, as well as thickness effect on film texture...... the difference of interfacial energy along two directions in the anisotropic metallic substrate. Growth of Gd2Zr2O7 films displays an ultrafast kinetics under optimized conditions. Independency of sharp epitaxial (004) and polycrystalline (222) orientation is revealed from further synchrotron diffraction studies...

  6. Olive mill wastewater triggered changes in physiology and nutritional quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum mill) depending on growth substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounidou, G; Asfi, M; Sotirakis, N; Papadopoulou, P; Gaitis, F

    2008-10-30

    We have studied the changes in the physiology and nutritional quality of Lycopersicon esculentum exposed to olive mill wastewater (OMW) with regard to cultivation in sand and soil. Tomato plant performance decreased with increasing concentration of OMW to both substrates. Root was more sensitive to OMW than the upper parts of the plants, grown either in sand or in soil for 10 days and 3 months, respectively, probably due to the direct OMW toxicity on roots as compared to other parts. Significant restriction on uptake and translocation of nutrients (K, Na, Fe, Ca and Mg) under OMW application was found. The decrease in the photochemical efficiency of PSII photochemistry in the light adapted state and the big decrease in photochemical quenching, indicate that OMW resulted in diminished reoxidation of Q(A)(-) and started to inactivate the reaction centers of PSII. The OMW supply on soil and sand, resulted in leaf water stress and lesser water use efficiency. Plants treated with high OMW concentration, produced fewer but bigger tomatoes as compared to plants treated with lower OMW concentration. Generally, fruit yield and nutritional value was inhibited under OMW application.

  7. Growth-dependent modulation of casein kinase II and its substrate nucleolin in primary human cell cultures and HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Issinger, O G

    1989-01-01

    We have previously provided evidence that casein kinase II (CKII) and its substrate nucleolin increase concomitantly during certain development stages during embryogenesis (Schneider et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 161, 733-738). We now show that during normal growth of primary cell cultures and HeLa...... cells CKII activity is increased concomitant with cellular growth and that the activity declines when confluency is reached. Parallel to the CKII activity increase, nucleolin, which has been shown to be a potential substrate of CKII changes its phosphorylation status, reaching a maximum at the time when...

  8. Microbial growth and substrate utilization kinetics | Okpokwasili ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microbial growth on and utilization of environmental contaminants as substrates have been studied by many researchers. Most times, substrate utilization results in removal of chemical contaminant, increase in microbial biomass and subsequent biodegradation of the contaminant. These are all aimed at detoxification of the ...

  9. Growth of lettuce seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Rodrigues Peres

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This research studied the growth of lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Veronica cultivated under greenhouse conditions, using polystyrene trays with 128 cells and three different commercial substrates: Golden Mix, Plantmax and Plugmix. The statistical design was in the form of randomized blocks, with eight (8 replications. Fifteen days after sowing the seeds, samples (five in total of plants were taken to evaluate the height, number of leaves, leaf area, leaf specific area, leaf specific weight, absolute and relative growth rates and net assimilation rates. The evaluated growth indexes showed that seedlings produced with the Plantmax and Plugmix substrates could be planted 25 days after sowing, since they have at least four definitive leaves. The Plantmax substrate showed, at the end of the evaluation, the best results in height, dry weight, leaf specific area, absolute growth rates and net assimilation rates.

  10. Effect of substrate on the growth, nutritional and bioactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A completely randomized block design with two treatments replicated three times was done and a laboratory analysis was carried out on the nutritional and bioactive components. The results obtained indicated that the growth and yield of P. ostreatus and P. florida varied widely depending on the kind of substrate used.

  11. Microbial growth with vapor-phase substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, Joanna; Thullner, Martin; Harms, Hauke [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Wick, Lukas Y., E-mail: lukas.wick@ufz.de [UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Environmental Microbiology, Permoserstrasse 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Limited information exists on influences of the diffusive transport of volatile organic contaminants (VOC) on bacterial activity in the unsaturated zone of the terrestrial subsurface. Diffusion of VOC in the vapor-phase is much more efficient than in water and results in effective VOC transport and high bioavailability despite restricted mobility of bacteria in the vadose zone. Since many bacteria tend to accumulate at solid-water, solid-air and air-water interfaces, such phase boundaries are of a special interest for VOC-biodegradation. In an attempt to evaluate microbial activity toward air-borne substrates, this study investigated the spatio-temporal interplay between growth of Pseudomonas putida (NAH7) on vapor-phase naphthalene (NAPH) and its repercussion on vapor-phase NAPH concentrations. Our data demonstrate that growth rates of strain PpG7 were inversely correlated to the distance from the source of vapor-phase NAPH. Despite the high gas phase diffusivity of NAPH, microbial growth was absent at distances above 5 cm from the source when sufficient biomass was located in between. This indicates a high efficiency of suspended bacteria to acquire vapor-phase compounds and influence headspace concentration gradients at the centimeter-scale. It further suggests a crucial role of microorganisms as biofilters for gas-phase VOC emanating from contaminated groundwater or soil. - Research highlights: > Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene. > Bacteria influence NAPH vapor-phase concentration gradients at centimeter-scale. > Microbial growth on vapor-phase naphthalene is inversely correlated to its source. > Bacteria are good biofilters for gas-phase NAPH emanating from contaminated sites. - Suspended bacteria have a high efficiency to degrade vapor-phase naphthalene and effectively influence vapor-phase naphthalene concentration gradients at the centimeter scale.

  12. Directional growth of Ag nanorod from polymeric silver cyanide: A potential substrate for concentration dependent SERS signal enhancement leading to melamine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindita; Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Tara Shankar; Agarwal, Ratnesh; Pal, Tarasankar

    2017-08-01

    Attention has been directed to prepare exclusive one-dimensional silver nanostructure from the linear inorganic polymer AgCN. Successive color change from yellow to orange, to red and finally to green reflects the evolution of high yielding Ag nanorods (NRs) from well-known -[Ag-CN]- chains of polymeric AgCN at room temperature. The parental 1D morphology of AgCN is retained within the as-synthesized Ag NRs. So we could successfully exploit the Ag NR for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies for sensing a popular milk adulterant melamine down to picomolar level. We observed interesting concentration dependent selective SERS band enhancement of melamine. The enhanced 1327 cm- 1 SERS signal intensity at lower concentration (10- 9 and 10- 12 M) of melamine speaks for the preferential participation of -C-N of melamine molecule with Ag surface. On the other hand, '-NH2' group together with ring 'N' participation of melamine molecule onto Ag surface suggested an adsorptive stance at higher (10- 3-10- 7 M) concentration range. Thus the binding modes of the molecule at the Ag surface justify its fluxional behavior.

  13. Substrate affects growth and yield of shiitake mushroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... from all of the trees with equal ratio or rice straw to determine growth and fruiting characteristics. Cultivation on Jackfruit resulted in significantly faster mycelial growth compared to other substrates. With respect to fructification, culture on Jackfruit produced the first pinhead (primordium) earlier compared to other substrates.

  14. Unidirectional lateral nanowire formation during the epitaxial growth of GaAsBi on vicinal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, Kristen N.; Li, Jincheng; Jiao, Wenyuan; Kong, Wei; Brown, April S.

    2018-01-01

    We report on enhanced control of the growth of lateral GaAs nanowires (NWs) embedded in epitaxial (100) GaAsBi thin films enabled by the use of vicinal substrates and the growth-condition dependent role of Bi as a surfactant. Enhanced step-flow growth is achieved through the use of vicinal substrates and yields unidirectional nanowire growth. The addition of Bi during GaAsBi growth enhances Ga adatom diffusion anisotropy and modifies incorporation rates at steps in comparison to GaAs growth yielding lower density but longer NWs. The NWs grown on vicinal substrates grew unidirectionally towards the misorientation direction when Bi was present. The III/V flux ratio significantly impacts the size, shape and density of the resulting NWs. These results suggest that utilizing growth conditions which enhance step-flow growth enable enhanced control of lateral nanostructures.

  15. Nanocrystalline diamond growth on different substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulisch, W.; Popov, C.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Gibson, P. N.; Favaro, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 515, - (2006), s. 1005-1010 ISSN 0040-6090 Grant - others:EC Framework(XE) MEIF-CT-2004-500038; NATO(XE) CBP.EAP.CLG 981519 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * growth mechanisms * nucleation mechanisms * mechanical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.666, year: 2006

  16. Fluorination of some highly functionalized cycloalkanes: chemoselectivity and substrate dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remete, Attila Márió; Nonn, Melinda; Fustero, Santos; Haukka, Matti; Fülöp, Ferenc; Kiss, Loránd

    2017-01-01

    A study exploring the chemical behavior of some dihydroxylated β-amino ester stereo- and regioisomers, derived from unsaturated cyclic β-amino acids is described. The nucleophilic fluorinations involving hydroxy-fluorine exchange of some highly functionalized alicyclic diol derivatives have been carried out in view of selective fluorination, investigating substrate dependence, neighboring group assistance and chemodifferentiation.

  17. Fluorination of some highly functionalized cycloalkanes: chemoselectivity and substrate dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Márió Remete

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A study exploring the chemical behavior of some dihydroxylated β-amino ester stereo- and regioisomers, derived from unsaturated cyclic β-amino acids is described. The nucleophilic fluorinations involving hydroxy–fluorine exchange of some highly functionalized alicyclic diol derivatives have been carried out in view of selective fluorination, investigating substrate dependence, neighboring group assistance and chemodifferentiation.

  18. Effect of fluid dispersion on cybernetic control of microbial growth on substitutable substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, P R

    2003-03-01

    Many fermentation media contain two or more substrates, which a microorganism utilizes for similar purposes. Depending on the conditions prior to and during a fermentation, the substrates may be utilized in succession or simultaneously. Since it is difficult to portray this behavior through mechanistic models, a cybernetic method was proposed earlier. Here the microorganism chooses the mode of substrate utilization that maximizes its own survival, usually expressed by the growth rate. In a fully dispersed bioreactor, simultaneous utilization generates higher growth rates but leads to low biomass concentrations since this utilization pattern is preferred at low concentrations of the substrates. In this study it has been shown that by allowing less than complete dispersion in the broth it is possible to shift from sequential to simultaneous utilization at high concentrations, thereby enabling both high growth rates and large biomass concentrations. This strategy thus allows the natural incomplete dispersion in large bioreactors to be gainfully exploited.

  19. Influence of substrate surfaces on the growth of organic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A.; Salvan, G.; Kampen, T. U.; Hoyer, W.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2003-05-01

    3,4,9,10-Perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) films were grown by organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD) under UHV conditions on hydrogen terminated Si(1 0 0) and sulphur passivated GaAs(1 0 0) surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are employed to study the influence of substrate surfaces on the structural properties of the organic films. Both phases of PTCDA, α- and β-polymorphs, are found to grow on both substrates. The substrate surfaces determine the preferential growth of α- and β-phases of PTCDA crystals at room temperature.

  20. Compatibility waves drive crystal growth on patterned substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhaus, T; Schmiedeberg, M; Löwen, H

    2013-01-01

    We explore the crystallization in a colloidal monolayer on a structured template starting from a few-particle nucleus. The competition between the substrate structure and that of the growing crystal induces a new crystal growth scenario. Unlike with the crystal growth in the bulk where a well-defined and connected crystal–fluid interface grows into the fluid, we identify a mechanism where a ‘compatibility wave’ of the prescribed nucleus with the underlying substrate structure dictates the growth direction and efficiency. The growth process is strongly anisotropic and proceeds via transient island formation in front of an initial solid–fluid interface. We demonstrate the validity of this compatibility wave concept for a large class of substrate structures including a square lattice and a quasicrystalline pattern. Dynamical density functional theory that provides a microscopic approach to the crystallization process is employed for colloidal hard spheres. Our predictions can be verified in experiments on confined colloids and also bear consequences for molecular crystal growth on structured substrates. (paper)

  1. Acclimatization and growth of ornamental pineapple seedlings under organic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro propagation techniques are commonly used to produce ornamental pineapple seedlings in commercial scale, aiming to attend the growers with genetic and sanitary quality seedlings. However, the choice of the ideal substrate is essential for the acclimatization and growth stage of the seedlings propagated by this technique, since some substrates can increase the seedling mortality and/or limit the seedling growth due to its physical and chemical characteristics. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the acclimatization of ornamental pineapple [Ananas comosus (L. Merr. var. ananassoides (Baker Coppens & Leal] on different substrates. Seedlings with approximately seven centimeters, obtained from in vitro culture, were transplanted into styrofoam trays filled with the following substrates: sphagnum; semi-composed pine bark; carbonized rice husk; sphagnum + semicomposed pine bark; sphagnum + carbonized rice husk; and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk. Each treatment was replicated five times using 10 plants. At 180 days, there were evaluated the following variables: survival percentage, plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, largest root length, and shoot and root dry matter. The substrate semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk presented the lowest mean (62% for survival percentage. The semi-composed pine bark and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk treatments presented significant increments in some evaluated biometric characteristics. The semi-composed pine bark is the most favorable substrate for the A. comosus var. ananassoids acclimatization.

  2. Kinetic models of cell growth, substrate utilization and bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bio-decolorization kinetic studies of distillery effluent in a batch culture were conducted using Aspergillus fumigatus. A simple model was proposed using the Logistic Equation for the growth, Leudeking-Piret kinetics for bio-decolorization, and also for substrate utilization. The proposed models appeared to provide a suitable ...

  3. Effect of spent mushroom substrate on the growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nine week feeding study was conducted to determine the effect of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) as a replacement for wheat offal on the growth performance and economy of production of rabbits. The study was conducted at the rabbitary unit of the department of animal production, School of Agriculture, Lagos state ...

  4. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannat, Risat A.; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micro-machined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the KD of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against β2-integrins leads to a significant reduction but not an elimination of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation. PMID:20473350

  5. Neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis depend on substrate mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannat, Risat A; Hammer, Daniel A [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, 240 Skirkanich Hall, 210 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Robbins, Gregory P; Ricart, Brendon G [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 311A Towne Building, 220 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Dembo, Micah, E-mail: hammer@seas.upenn.ed [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2010-05-19

    Neutrophil adhesion to the vasculature and chemotaxis within tissues play critical roles in the inflammatory response to injury and pathogens. Unregulated neutrophil activity has been implicated in the progression of numerous chronic and acute diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and sepsis. Cell migration of anchorage-dependent cells is known to depend on both chemical and mechanical interactions. Although neutrophil responses to chemical cues have been well characterized, little is known about the effect of underlying tissue mechanics on neutrophil adhesion and migration. To address this question, we quantified neutrophil migration and traction stresses on compliant hydrogel substrates with varying elasticity in a micromachined gradient chamber in which we could apply either a uniform concentration or a precise gradient of the bacterial chemoattractant fMLP. Neutrophils spread more extensively on substrates of greater stiffness. In addition, increasing the stiffness of the substrate leads to a significant increase in the chemotactic index for each fMLP gradient tested. As the substrate becomes stiffer, neutrophils generate higher traction forces without significant changes in cell speed. These forces are often displayed in pairs and focused in the uropod. Increases in the mean fMLP concentration beyond the K{sub D} of the receptor lead to a decrease in chemotactic index on all surfaces. Blocking with an antibody against {beta}{sub 2}-integrins leads to a significant reduction, but not an elimination, of directed motility on stiff materials, but no change in motility on soft materials, suggesting neutrophils can display both integrin-dependent and integrin-independent motility. These findings are critical for understanding how neutrophil migration may change in different mechanical environments in vivo and can be used to guide the design of migration inhibitors that more efficiently target inflammation.

  6. Single-crystal metal growth on amorphous insulating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Pitner, Xue Bai; Yang, Rui; Nix, William D; Plummer, James D; Fan, Jonathan A

    2018-01-23

    Metal structures on insulators are essential components in advanced electronic and nanooptical systems. Their electronic and optical properties are closely tied to their crystal quality, due to the strong dependence of carrier transport and band structure on defects and grain boundaries. Here we report a method for creating patterned single-crystal metal microstructures on amorphous insulating substrates, using liquid phase epitaxy. In this process, the patterned metal microstructures are encapsulated in an insulating crucible, together with a small seed of a differing material. The system is heated to temperatures above the metal melting point, followed by cooling and metal crystallization. During the heating process, the metal and seed form a high-melting-point solid solution, which directs liquid epitaxial metal growth. High yield of single-crystal metal with different sizes is confirmed with electron backscatter diffraction images, after removing the insulating crucible. Unexpectedly, the metal microstructures crystallize with the [Formula: see text] direction normal to the plane of the film. This platform technology will enable the large-scale integration of high-performance plasmonic and electronic nanosystems.

  7. Growth mechanisms and crystallographic structure of InP nanowires on lattice-mismatched substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moewe, Michael; Chuang, Linus C.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2008-08-01

    We present a growth model that predicts the growth phase and mechanism of InP nanowires (NWs) and the experimental verifications of the model. The NWs were grown on lattice-mismatched GaAs substrates using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition via Au nanodrop-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth. Nanodrops with larger diameters are shown to grow longer NWs because growth is governed mainly by direct precursor impingement on the nanodrop surface. The theoretical and experimental results also show that growth phase is dependent on NW diameter. We show that InP NWs with a diameter less than a certain value exhibit coherent growth of a single crystalline wurtzite (WZ) phase, whereas larger diameter InP NWs often contain sequences of WZ and zincblende phases and stacking faults. These findings allow one to achieve coherent NW growth and WZ phases free from twinning if the NW diameter is below certain material-dependent critical diameters.

  8. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of GaAs on (631) Oriented Substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Hernandez, Esteban; Rojas Ramirez, Juan-Salvador; Contreras Hernandez, Rocio; Lopez Lopez, Maximo; Pulzara Mora, Alvaro; Mendez Garcia, Victor H.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we report the study of the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs on (631) oriented substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We observed the spontaneous formation of a high density of large scale features on the surface. The hilly like features are elongated towards the [-5, 9, 3] direction. We show the dependence of these structures with the growth conditions and we present the possibility of to create quantum wires structures on this surface

  9. Growth of white tabebuia seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marichel Canazza de Macedo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the white tabebuia (Tabebuia roseo-alba (Ridl. Sandwith seedlings emergence and growth in the beds according to different substrates. Two independent experiments were conducted. The emergence study was carried out in six substrates: 1- Plantmax®; 2- vermiculite; 3- sand; 4- soil + sand (1:1; 5- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 6- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (2:1:1 (v/v, and the experiment was set up according to a three-replicate randomized complete-block design. The growth study of seedlings was carried out according to a five-replicate randomized complete-block design with five substrates: 1- soil + sand (1:1; 2- soil + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1; 3- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 4- soil + sand + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1:1; 5- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (1:1:1 (v/v. The height results of seedling emergence, emergence speed index and the stem height were observed with Plantmax®, vermiculite, soil + carbonized rice husk and soil + sand + carbonized rice husk. The best results of seedling height, stem diameter, chlorophyll index, leaf area, root length and the stem dry mass weight and root were observed in the substrates with semi decomposed chicken manure. It is recommended the use of P, V, SC or SAC for seedling germination and emergence and SACF or SCF for seedling growth of white tabebuia.

  10. Solution growth of microcrystalline silicon on amorphous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimburger, Robert

    2010-07-05

    This work deals with low-temperature solution growth of micro-crystalline silicon on glass. The task is motivated by the application in low-cost solar cells. As glass is an amorphous material, conventional epitaxy is not applicable. Therefore, growth is conducted in a two-step process. The first step aims at the spatial arrangement of silicon seed crystals on conductive coated glass substrates, which is realized by means of vapor-liquid-solid processing using indium as the solvent. Seed crystals are afterwards enlarged by applying a specially developed steady-state solution growth apparatus. This laboratory prototype mainly consists of a vertical stack of a silicon feeding source and the solvent (indium). The growth substrate can be dipped into the solution from the top. The system can be heated to a temperature below the softening point of the utilized glass substrate. A temperature gradient between feeding source and growth substrate promotes both, supersaturation and material transport by solvent convection. This setup offers advantages over conventional liquid phase epitaxy at low temperatures in terms of achievable layer thickness and required growth times. The need for convective solute transport to gain the desired thickness of at least 50 {mu}m is emphasized by equilibrium calculations in the binary system indium-silicon. Material transport and supersaturation conditions inside the utilized solution growth crucible are analyzed. It results that the solute can be transported from the lower feeding source to the growth substrate by applying an appropriate heating regime. These findings are interpreted by means of a hydrodynamic analysis of fluid flow and supporting FEM simulation. To ensure thermodynamic stability of all materials involved during steady-state solution growth, the ternary phase equilibrium between molybdenum, indium and silicon at 600 C was considered. Based on the obtained results, the use of molybdenum disilicide as conductive coating

  11. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on Si (100) substrate. Deposition at higher substrate temperature causes the film to react with Si forming silicides at the film/Si substrate interface. Ti film undergoes a microstructural transition from hexagonal plate-like to round-shaped grains as the substrate temperature was raised from 300 to 50 °C during film deposition ...

  12. Growth and characterization of α and β-phase tungsten films on various substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Cho, Jaehun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The growth conditions of tungsten thin films were investigated using various substrates including Si, Si/SiO 2 , GaAs, MgO, and Al 2 O 3 , and recipes were discovered for the optimal growth conditions of thick metastable β-phase tungsten films on Si, GaAs, and Al 2 O 3 substrates, which is an important material in spin orbit torque studies. For the Si/SiO 2 substrate, the crystal phase of the tungsten films was different depending upon the tungsten film thickness, and the transport properties were found to dramatically change with the thickness owing to a change in phase from the α + β phase to the α-phase. It is shown that the crystal phase changes are associated with residual stress in the tungsten films and that the resistivity is closely related to the grain sizes

  13. Epitaxial growth of nobel metals on alumina substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mohammad, A.

    2007-06-01

    The influence of the reconstructed (0001) α-Al 2 O 3 surface on the heteroepitaxial growth and adhesion properties of small metal particles (gold, silver and copper) of noncontinuous thin films has been investigated. The crystallographic structure and morphology of substrate surfaces were examined by Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques. The reconstructed surfaces are terminated by one or more Aluminum atomic layers. By means of the Transmission Electronic Microscopy, the various granulometric and lattice parameters variations are investigated during different stages of the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. We estimated the adhesion energy values for each case of metal//(0001)α-Al 2 O 3 interfaces by two methods: the maximum cluster density and the Lifshits theory of Van der Waals energy of interfaces. The results of both methods are in good agreement. Using these methods, we found interfaces Hamaker's constants values and we investigated all the heteroepitaxial growth steps.(author)

  14. The effect of substrate modification on microbial growth on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, A A

    1998-01-01

    The principle aim of the program was to produce a novel, non-leaching antimicrobial surface for commercial development and future use in the liquid food packaging industry. Antimicrobial surfaces which exist presently have been produced to combat the growth of prokaryotic organisms and usually function as slow release systems. A system which could inhibit eukaryotic growth without contaminating the surrounding 'environment' with the inhibitor was considered of great commercial importance. The remit of this study was concerned with creating a surface which could control the growth of eukaryotic organisms found in fruit juice with particular interest in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Putative antimicrobial surfaces were created by the chemical modification of the test substrate polymers; nylon and ethylvinyl alcohol (EVOH). Surfaces were chemically modified by the covalent coupling of antimicrobial agents known to be active against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as ascertained by the screening process...

  15. Procedure for Substrate Temperature Control Using the Pyrometer During MBE Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Svensson, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    ...) computer control system that allow a user to automatically outgas and desorb the oxide from substrates before growth, as well as set substrate temperatures based on pyrometer readings during growths...

  16. Substrate Dependence of the Freezing Dynamics of Supercooled Water Films: A High-Speed Optical Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, E; Rodriguez, L; Verdaguer, A

    2018-01-18

    The freezing of supercooled water films on different substrates was investigated using a high-speed camera coupled to an optical microscope, obtaining details of the freezing process not described in the literature before. We observed the two well known freezing stages (fast dendritic growth and slow freezing of the water liquid left after the dendritic growth), but we separated the process into different phenomena that were studied separately: two-dimensional dendrite growth on the substrate interface, vertical dendrite growth, formation and evolution of ice domains, trapping of air bubbles and freezing of the water film surface. We found all of these processes to be dependent on both the supercooling temperature and the substrate used. Ice dendrite (or ice front) growth during the first stage was found to be dependent on thermal properties of the substrate but could not be unequivocally related to them. Finally, for low supercooling, a direct relationship was observed between the morphology of the dendrites formed in the first stage, which depends on the substrate, and the roughness and the shape of the surface of the ice, when freezing of the film was completed. This opens the possibility of using surfaces and coatings to control ice morphology beyond anti-icing properties.

  17. EVALUATION OF THE GROWTH OF SELECTED LACTOBACILLI IN PSEUDOCEREAL SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Liptáková

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth dynamics of Lactobacillus spp. in sweet water- and milk-based substrates from cooked buckwheat and amaranth flour were studied in this work. The numbers of lactobacilli were observed during fermentation in 5% CO2 atmosphere at 37 °C and storage (3 weeks at 6 °C. The earned data and estimated growth parameters showed that certain strains grew well in the milk-based gruels, even water-based amaranth gruel. This was also the case of the species under study characterized with the fastest growth. Based on the rates, only the strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and VT1 were able to grow with the values higher than 0.6 log CFU.ml-1.h-1 that can be expressed as the times to double (td lower than 0.5 h. This was found in both the amaranth and buckwheat milk-based gruels and water-based amaranth gruels but fermented only by the probiotic GG strain. The 3-week storage tests aimed on survival of the lactobacilli at 6 °C showed minimal decrease of the counts in buckwheat gruels with the average rates of -0.084 and -0.004 log CFU.ml-1.d-1 in water- and milk-based gruels, respectively. On the other hand in amaranth gruels, the numbers of lactobacilli slightly increased with the rate of 0.02 log CFU.ml-1.d-1, on average. The results of this pilot study pointed out that the selection of suitable lactic acid bacteria should be performed for optimal fermentation of pseudo-cereal substrates. The numbers of lactobacilli at the end of fermentation were not or very slightly affected by the type of substrate at 6 °C during three weeks.doi:10.5219/169

  18. Substrate heater for the growth of epitaxial silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Matthew; Varhue, Walter; Adams, Edward; Lavoie, Mark

    1999-03-01

    The single wafer processing of epitaxial Si films requires that special attention be paid to the design of the substrate heater assembly. This document describes the evolution and testing of an in situ heater used to deposit epitaxial Si films at temperatures as high as 700 °C. One problem encountered was the production of excessive levels of ultraviolet radiation which contributed to the desorption of water vapor from the vacuum chamber walls during the in situ cleaning process. A second problem involved the formation of a molybdenum containing film that poisoned epitaxial growth. A final proven in situ heater design is presented which avoids these problems.

  19. Growth of Quantum Wires on Step-Bunched Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feng

    2005-02-01

    This proposal initiates a combined theoretical and experimental multidisciplinary research effort to explore a novel approach for growing metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched semiconductor and dielectric substrates, and to lay the groundwork for understanding the growth mechanisms and the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of metallic and magnetic nanowires. The research will focus on four topics: (1) fundamental studies of step bunching and self-organization in a strained thin film for creating step-bunched substrates. (2) Interaction between metal adatoms (Al,Cu, and Ni) and semiconductor (Si and SiGe) and dielectric (CaF2) surface steps. (3) growth and characterization of metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched templates. (4) fabrication of superlattices of nanowires by growing multilayer films. We propose to attack these problems at both a microscopic and macroscopic level, using state-of-the-art theoretical and experimental techniques. Multiscale (electronic-atomic-continuum) theories will be applied to investigate growth mechanisms of nanowires: mesoscopic modeling and simulation of step flow growth of strained thin films, in particular, step bunching and self-organization will be carried out within the framework of continuum linear elastic theory; atomistic calculation of interaction between metal adatoms and semiconductor and dielectric surface steps will be done by large-scale computations using first-principles total-energy methods. In parallel, thin films and nanowires will be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the resultant structure and morphology will be characterized at the atomic level up to micrometer range, using a combination of different surface/interface probes, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, atomic resolution), atomic force microscopy (AFM, nanometer resolution), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM, micrometer resolution), reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and x

  20. Identification of secreted proteins of Aspergillus oryzae associated with growth on solid cereal substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Boussier, A.; Biezen, de N.; Hondel, van den C.; Punt, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Filamentous growth of Aspergillus oryzae on solid cereal substrates involves secretion of substrate converting enzymes and a solid substrate specific polarised hyphal growth phenotype. To identify proteins produced under these specific conditions, the extracts of A. oryzae grown on wheat-based media

  1. Hydrogen-surfactant-assisted coherent growth of GaN on ZnO substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingzhao; Zhang, Yiou; Tse, Kinfai; Zhu, Junyi

    2018-01-01

    Heterostructures of wurtzite based devices have attracted great research interest because of the tremendous success of GaN in light emitting diodes (LED) industry. High-quality GaN thin films on inexpensive and lattice matched ZnO substrates are both commercially and technologically desirable. Intrinsic wetting conditions, however, forbid such heterostructures as the energy of ZnO polar surfaces is much lower than that of GaN polar surfaces, resulting in 3D growth mode and poor crystal quality. Based on first-principles calculations, we propose the use of surfactant hydrogen to dramatically alter the growth mode of the heterostructures. Stable H-involved surface configurations and interfaces are investigated with the help of our newly developed modelling techniques. The temperature and chemical potential dependence of our proposed strategy, which is critical in experiments, is predicted by applying the experimental Gibbs free energy of H2. Our thermodynamic wetting condition analysis is a crucial step for the growth of GaN on ZnO, and we find that introducing H will not degrade the stability of ZnO substrate. This approach will allow the growth of high-quality GaN thin films on ZnO substrates. We believe that our new strategy may reduce the manufactory cost, improve the crystal quality, and improve the efficiency of GaN-based devices.

  2. Initial growth of Bauhinia forficata Link seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara Russi Nunes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of the pre-germination in the initial growth of Bauhinia forficata seeds in different substrates. The seeds were submitted to the pre-germination in humidified germitest paper with solution of cloranfenicol 1 mL.L-1 of distilled water. After, the paper was taken to the germination chamber at 25 ºC during eight days. After this period, the pre-germinated seeds and intact seeds (witness had been taken in local nursery and sown in different substrata: organic composition (50% + subsoil land (50%; sand (25% + subsoil earth (75% and subsoil erth (100%. The diameter of collects, height of the plants, leaf number, green mass of the aerial part and of root and dry mass of the aerial part and of root, 60 and 120 days after the sowing, were evaluated. After 60 days, no statistical difference was noted between tested substrate. However, the treatments of the seeds demonstrated significant difference and the pre-germinated seeds presented higher values in all of the evaluated parameters. After 120 days, the organic composition presented better result, except for de collect diameter, leaf number and dry mass of the root. For the treatment of the seeds, the pre-germination presented better results for all evaluated parameters, except for the leaf number. The results pointed out that the composed organic substratum and subsoil land are the best procedure for the production of the B. forficata. Moreover, the pre-germination provided more vigorous plantules and seedlings with higher weight and growth in comparison to the control.

  3. Growth and properties of ZnO films on polymeric substrate by spray pyrolysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriisa, Merike; Kärber, Erki; Krunks, Malle; Mikli, Valdek; Unt, Tarmo; Kukk, Mart; Mere, Arvo

    2014-01-01

    The growth of ZnO layers deposited by spray pyrolysis on polymeric substrate was studied. Zinc acetate precursor solution was sprayed onto preheated polyimide (PI) and glass reference substrates at 380 °C. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the layers were measured by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy and van der Pauw and Hall method. ZnO:In layers could be grown on PI when deposited onto undoped ZnO layer acting as a buffer layer on PI. Independent of the substrate type, the ZnO/ZnO:In bilayer showed a mixed morphology from smooth canvas-like surface to large scrolled belt grains dependent on buffer layer morphology. Due to the formation of scrolled belts, the ZnO:In layer shows no preferential orientation, yet the preferred orientation of the ZnO buffer crystallites is (100) plane parallel to the substrate. The bilayers deposited on PI exhibit high light scattering capability (haze factor of 85–95% in the spectral region of 350–1500 nm). The resistivity of the ZnO:In film in bilayer on PI is 4.4 × 10 −2 Ω cm mainly due to low carrier mobility of 1.5 cm 2 /Vs, the carrier concentration is 10 20 cm −3 . - Highlights: • ZnO:In layers were grown on polyimide substrate by spray pyrolysis. • The buffer layer morphology is controlled by the layer thickness and spray rate. • ZnO/ZnO:In bilayer morphology is dependent on the surface of buffer layer. • Rough buffer layer leads to rough bilayer with scrolled belts (diameter of 2–6 μm). • Due to scrolled belts layers show no preferential growth yet highly scatter light

  4. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which were ultrasonically cleaned with acetone and alcohol. Prior to deposition, substrates were etched with 2% HF solu- tion in order to remove native oxide layer on the surface. To ensure purity of deposited films, pre-sputtering of titanium target for about 5 min was done to remove surface oxides. In order to maintain ...

  5. Effect of concentration of substrates and products on the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae in chemostat cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutgers, M; Balk, P A; van Dam, K

    1989-11-23

    Non-equilibrium thermodynamics (NET) can be used to describe microbial growth. In this description, the concentrations of products contribute to the driving forces of the metabolic processes (anabolism and catabolism). Thus, in contrast to the model of bacterial growth of Monod (Recherches sur la Croissance les Cultures Bactériennes (1942) Herman et Cie, Paris), it is predicted that the growth rate of a bacterial chemostat culture is, in principle, dependent on the concentration of the catabolic product (for instance HCO3-) during catabolite limitation and on the concentration of the anabolic product (for instance biomass) during anabolite limitation. In order to test this prediction, Klebsiella pneumoniae was grown in aerobic citrate-limited, glucose-limited or ammonia-limited chemostat cultures. Ammonia-limited cultures were considered to be essentially anabolite-limited, whereas citrate limitation was used as a representative for catabolite limitation. In ammonia-limited or in glucose-limited cultures it was found that the growth rate was independent of the biomass concentration present. In the NET description this means that the 'back' reaction (i.e., in the direction from biomass to substrates) is saturated with respect to biomass. On the other hand, in citrate-limited cultures, the steady-state concentration of citrate increased with the concentration of the catabolic product HCO3-. At relatively low concentrations of HCO3-, 'thermodynamic back-pressure' of growth (i.e., increase in product concentration was compensated by an increase in substrate concentration so that the driving force for growth remained almost constant) was demonstrated as predicted by the NET model. At concentrations above 40 mM, a kinetic (allosteric) effect of HCO3- was detected. This was concluded from a reduced growth yield on citrate, and from a significant decrease in the maximal growth rate and the maximal oxygen consumption rate after relief of the citrate limitation.

  6. Single crystalline metal films as substrates for graphene growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeller, Patrick; Henss, Ann-Kathrin; Wintterlin, Joost [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Weinl, Michael; Schreck, Matthias [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Speck, Florian; Ostler, Markus [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Physik, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz (Germany); Seyller, Thomas [Institut fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Chemnitz (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Single crystalline metal films deposited on YSZ-buffered Si(111) wafers were investigated with respect to their suitability as substrates for epitaxial graphene. Graphene was grown by CVD of ethylene on Ru(0001), Ir(111), and Ni(111) films in UHV. For analysis a variety of surface science methods were used. By an initial annealing step the surface quality of the films was strongly improved. The temperature treatments of the metal films caused a pattern of slip lines, formed by thermal stress in the films, which, however, did not affect the graphene quality and even prevented wrinkle formation. Graphene was successfully grown on all three types of metal films in a quality comparable to graphene grown on bulk single crystals of the same metals. In the case of the Ni(111) films the originally obtained domain structure of rotational graphene phases could be transformed into a single domain by annealing. This healing process is based on the control of the equilibrium between graphene and dissolved carbon in the film. For the system graphene/Ni(111) the metal, after graphene growth, could be removed from underneath the epitaxial graphene layer by a pure gas phase reaction, using the reaction of CO with Ni to give gaseous Ni(CO){sub 4}. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. GaN layer growth by HVPE on m-plane sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usikov, Alexander; Shapovalov, Lisa; Ivantsov, Vladimir; Kovalenkov, Oleg; Syrkin, Alexander [Technologies and Devices International an Oxford Instruments Company, 12214 Plum Orchard Dr., Silver Spring, MD 20904 (United States); Spiberg, Philippe; Brown, Robert [Ostendo Technologies, Inc., 6185 Paseo del Norte, Suite 200, Carlsbad, CA 92011 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Semipolar GaN layers were grown on m-plane sapphire substrates by HVPE. Insertion of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N (x{proportional_to}0.1-0.6) layer in-between m-plane sapphire substrate and GaN layer promoted to improve crystalline quality and to grow of semipolar (11-22) plane GaN layers. X-ray diffraction (11-22){omega}-scan rocking curve FWHM of 298 arcsec was measured for a 30 {mu}m thick (11-22)GaN layer. Depending on growth conditions, m-plane GaN layer having micro-crystallites of other orientations (mainly of (11-24) plane GaN layer) was also grown. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Effect of substrate roughness on growth of diamond by hot filament ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Polycrystalline diamond coatings are grown on Si (100) substrate by hot filament CVD technique. We investigate here the effect of substrate roughening on the substrate temperature and methane concentra- tion required to maintain high quality, high growth rate and faceted morphology of the diamond coatings. It.

  9. Catalytic growth of carbon nanorods on a high-T{sub c} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien-Nga, L.; Hernadi, K.; Forro, L. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique

    2001-01-16

    Copper particles generated during the reduction of a superconducting substrate are found to catalyze the formation of carbon nanorods from acetylene (see Figure). The nanorods consist of stacked graphite planes parallel to the substrate. While this technique will not suit large-scale production its study does provide insight into the decomposition and growth mechanisms when compared to similar reactions on other substrates. (orig.)

  10. Adhesion, growth, and matrix production by fibroblasts on laminin substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Höök, M; Rees, D A

    1983-01-01

    and laminin-coated substrates with the development of microfilament bundles and focal adhesions. Antibodies to laminin, but not fibronectin, will prevent or reverse fibroblast adhesion to laminin, whereas antibodies to fibronectin but not laminin will give similar results on fibronectin-coated substrates...

  11. Effects of bamboo substrate and supplementary feed on growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    application as control (C), control and substrate installation (C + S) and, control and substrate with supplementary feeding (C + S + F) were randomly allotted to six earthen ponds each with an area of 100m2. Catfish fingerlings of mean weight 27.5g + 1.25 were stocked at the rate of 80 fish per 100m2. Water temperature, pH ...

  12. Silicon—a new substrate for GaN growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Generally, GaN-based devices are grown on silicon carbide or sapphire substrates. But these sub- strates are costly and insulating in nature and also are not available in large diameter. Silicon can meet the requirements for a low cost and conducting substrate and will enable integration of optoelectronic or high.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxial growth and characterization of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanbo; Zhang Yang; Zhang Yuwei; Wang Baoqiang; Zhu Zhanping; Zeng Yiping

    2012-01-01

    We report on the growth of GaSb layers on GaAs (0 0 1) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We investigate the influence of the GaAs substrate surface treatment, growth temperature, and V/III flux ratios on the crystal quality and the surface morphology of GaSb epilayers. Comparing to Ga-rich GaAs surface preparation, the Sb-rich GaAs surface preparation can promote the growth of higher-quality GaSb material. It is found that the crystal quality, electrical properties, and surface morphology of the GaSb epilayers are highly dependent on the growth temperature, and Sb/Ga flux ratios. Under the optimized growth conditions, we demonstrate the epitaxial growth of high quality GaSb layers on GaAs substrates. The p-type nature of the unintentionally doped GaSb is studied and from the growth conditions dependence of the hole concentrations of the GaSb, we deduce that the main native acceptor in the GaSb is the Ga antisite (Ga Sb ) defect.

  14. A substrate dependent biological containment systems for Pseudomonas putida based on the Escherichia coli gef gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Ramos, J. L.; Kaneva, Z.

    1993-01-01

    A model substrate-dependent suicide system to biologically contain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is reported. The system consists of two elements. One element carries a fusion between a synthetic lac promoter (PA1-04/03) and the gef gene, which encodes a killing function. This element is contained...... within a transposaseless mini-Tn5 transposon so that it can be integrated at random locations on the Pseudomonas chromosome. The second element, harbored by plasmid pCC102, is designed to control the first and bears a fusion between the promoter of the P. putida TOL plasmid-encoded meta-cleavage pathway...... operon (Pm) and the lacI gene, encoding the Lac repressor, plus xylS2, coding for a positive regulator of Pm. In liquid culture under optimal growth conditions and in sterile and nonsterile soil microcosms, P. putida KT2440 (pWWO) bearing the containment system behaves as designed. In the presence...

  15. Substrate-bound growth of Au-Pd diblock nanowire and hybrid nanorod-plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiating; Wang, Yawen; Fan, Zhanxi; Lam, Zhenhui; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin; Chen, Hongyu

    2015-04-01

    We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures.We expand the scope of the previously developed Active Surface Growth mode for growing substrate-bound ultrathin Pd (d = 4 nm) and Ag nanowires (d = 30 nm) in aqueous solution under ambient conditions. Using Au nanorods as the seeds, selective growth at the contact line between the rod and the substrate eventually leads to an attached Pd nanoplate. The unique growth mode also allows sequential growth of different materials via a single seed, giving substrate-bound Au-Pd diblock nanowires. The new abilities to use seed shape to pre-define the active sites and to apply sequential growth open windows for new pathways to hybrid nanostructures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supporting TEM and SEM images of control experiments with different reaction conditions and another type of diblock nanowires. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00361j

  16. Growth of tin oxide thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paloly, Abdul Rasheed; Satheesh, M. [Nano Functional Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682022, Kerala (India); Martínez-Tomás, M. Carmen; Muñoz-Sanjosé, Vicente [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de Valencia, c/Dr Moliner 50, Burjassot, Valencia 46100 (Spain); Rajappan Achary, Sreekumar [Nano Functional Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682022, Kerala (India); Bushiri, M. Junaid, E-mail: junaidbushiri@gmail.com [Nano Functional Materials Lab, Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi 682022, Kerala (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • SnO{sub 2} thin films were grown on hydrophilic and hydrophobic glass substrates. • Samples on hydrophobic substrates are having comparatively larger lattice volume. • Films on hydrophobic substrates have larger particles and low density distribution. • Substrate dependent photoluminescence emission is observed and studied. • SnO{sub 2} thin films grown over hydrophobic substrates may find potential applications. - Abstract: In this paper, we have demonstrated the growth of tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films composed of nanoparticles on hydrophobic (siliconized) and hydrophilic (non-siliconized) glass substrates by using the spray pyrolysis technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the formation of SnO{sub 2} thin films with tetragonal rutile-phase structure. Average particle size of nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 3–4 nm measured from the front view images obtained by a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FESEM), while the size of nanoparticle clusters, when present, were in the range of 11–20 nm. Surface morphology of SnO{sub 2} films grown over hydrophobic substrates revealed larger isolated particles which are less crowded compared to the highly crowded and agglomerated smaller particles in films on hydrophilic substrates. Blue shift in the band gap is observed in samples in which the average particle size is slightly larger than the exciton Bohr radius. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples grown over hydrophobic substrates exhibited an intense defect level emission and a weak near band edge emission. The enhanced visible emission from these SnO{sub 2} thin films is attributed to lattice defects formed during the film growth due to the mismatch between the film and the hydrophobic substrate surface.

  17. Prion disease tempo determined by host-dependent substrate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Charles E.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; van der Merwe, Jacques; Lau, Agnes; Yang, Jing; Grams, Jennifer; Di Bari, Michele A.; Nonno, Romolo; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Langeveld, Jan; McKenzie, Debbie; Westaway, David; Safar, Jiri G.

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of prion infection can take years or decades to manifest following the initial exposure. Molecular markers of prion disease include accumulation of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc), which is derived from its cellular precursor (PrPC), as well as downregulation of the PrP-like Shadoo (Sho) glycoprotein. Given the overlapping cellular environments for PrPC and Sho, we inferred that PrPC levels might also be altered as part of a host response during prion infection. Using rodent models, we found that, in addition to changes in PrPC glycosylation and proteolytic processing, net reductions in PrPC occur in a wide range of prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and cervid chronic wasting disease. The reduction in PrPC results in decreased prion replication, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique for generating PrPSc in vitro. While PrPC downregulation is not discernible in animals with unusually short incubation periods and high PrPC expression, slowly evolving prion infections exhibit downregulation of the PrPC substrate required for new PrPSc synthesis and as a receptor for pathogenic signaling. Our data reveal PrPC downregulation as a previously unappreciated element of disease pathogenesis that defines the extensive, presymptomatic period for many prion strains. PMID:24430187

  18. Calcium-dependent protein kinases from Arabidopsis show substrate specificity differences in an analysis of 103 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Amy; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chang, Chia-Lun; Garg, Shilpi; Miguel, Rodriguez Milla; Barron, Yoshimi D; Li, Ying; Romanowsky, Shawn; Cushman, John C; Gribskov, Michael; Harmon, Alice C; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2011-01-01

    The identification of substrates represents a critical challenge for understanding any protein kinase-based signal transduction pathway. In Arabidopsis, there are more than 1000 different protein kinases, 34 of which belong to a family of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CPKs). While CPKs are implicated in regulating diverse aspects of plant biology, from ion transport to transcription, relatively little is known about isoform-specific differences in substrate specificity, or the number of phosphorylation targets. Here, in vitro kinase assays were used to compare phosphorylation targets of four CPKs from Arabidopsis (CPK1, 10, 16, and 34). Significant differences in substrate specificity for each kinase were revealed by assays using 103 different substrates. For example CPK16 phosphorylated Serine 109 in a peptide from the stress-regulated protein, Di19-2 with K(M) ∼70 μM, but this site was not phosphorylated significantly by CPKs 1, 10, or 34. In contrast, CPKs 1, 10, and 34 phosphorylated 93 other peptide substrates not recognized by CPK16. Examples of substrate specificity differences among all four CPKs were verified by kinetic analyses. To test the correlation between in vivo phosphorylation events and in vitro kinase activities, assays were performed with 274 synthetic peptides that contained phosphorylation sites previously mapped in proteins isolated from plants (in vivo-mapped sites). Of these, 74 (27%) were found to be phosphorylated by at least one of the four CPKs tested. This 27% success rate validates a robust strategy for linking the activities of specific kinases, such as CPKs, to the thousands of in planta phosphorylation sites that are being uncovered by emerging technologies.

  19. Substrate dependent morphologies of self-assembled nanocrystalline manganite films: An atomic force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, S.N.; Mona, J.; Ganesan, V.; Choudhary, R.J.; Phase, D.M.

    2009-06-01

    Thin films of La 0 .7Sr 0 .3MnO 3 (LSMO) have been deposited on different substrates: Si (001), Al 2 O 3 (AlO) (0001) and LaAlO 3 (LAO) (001), using a pulsed laser deposition system. 100 nm films have been deposited at substrate temperature of 700 deg C and oxygen partial pressure of 400 mTorr. X-Ray diffraction analysis shows a polycrystalline growth of both layers on Si and Al 2 O 3 substrates, while a c-axis oriented growth on LAO substrate. Atomic force microscopy images exhibit interesting island-like morphology of grain size ∼ 250 nm on Si substrate. Similar morphology with much smaller (∼ 150 nm), closely packed islands are seen to grow on AlO substrate. Films on LAO show comparatively a smooth morphology with the grains size less than 100 nm, decorated by characteristic depressions at the grain boundaries. The formation of self-assembled nanostructures can be understood on the basis of film-substrate lattice misfit, strains in the systems and eventual growth of the films to attain energy minimization (author)

  20. Correlation between substrate bias, growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Aiping; Zhu Jiaqi; Han Jiecai; Wu Huaping; Jia Zechun

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the growth process and structural properties of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films which are deposited at different substrate biases by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique with PH 3 as the dopant source. The films are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, residual stress measurement, UV/VIS/NIR absorption spectroscopy and temperature-dependent conductivity measurement. The atomic fraction of phosphorus in the films as a function of substrate bias is obtained by XPS analysis. The optimum bias for phosphorus incorporation is about -80 V. Raman spectra show that the amorphous structures of all samples with atomic-scaled smooth surface are not remarkably changed when PH 3 is implanted, but some small graphitic crystallites are formed. Moreover, phosphorus impurities and higher-energetic impinging ions are favorable for the clustering of sp 2 sites dispersed in sp 3 skeleton and increase the level of structural ordering for ta-C:P films, which further releases the compressive stress and enhances the conductivity of the films. Our analysis establishes an interrelationship between microstructure, stress state, electrical properties, and substrate bias, which helps to understand the deposition mechanism of ta-C:P films

  1. Modeling the microbial growth of two Escherichia coli strains in a multi-substrate environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Poccia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The microbial growth in multi-substrate environments may be viewed as an optimal resources allocation problem. The optimization aims at maximizing some biological objective like the biomass growth. The models developed using this hypothesis are called "cybernetic" and they represent the complex cell structure as an optimizing function that regulates the intracellular enzymatic machinery. In this work, a cybernetic model was developed to represent the growth of two E. coli strains (JM 109 and BL 21 -DE3- on a medium containing glucose and glycerol as carbon and energy sources. The model was able to accurately simulate the biomass growth, the substrates consumption and the growth-rate profiles.

  2. A theoretical model describing the one-dimensional growth of single crystals on free sustained substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ziran; Wang, Ke; Lu, Chenxi; Jin, Ying; Sui, Chenghua; Yan, Bo; Gao, Fan; Cai, Pinggen; Lv, Bin; Li, Yun; Chen, Naibo; Sun, Guofang; Xu, Fengyun; Ye, Gaoxiang

    2018-03-01

    We develop a theoretical model that interprets the growth mechanism of zinc (Zn) crystal nanorods on a liquid substrate by thermal evaporation. During deposition, Zn atoms diffuse randomly on an isotropic and quasi-free sustained substrate, the nucleation of the atoms results in the primary nanorod (or seed crystal) growth. Subsequently, a characteristic one-dimensional atomic aggregation is proposed, which leads to the accelerating growth of the crystal nanorod along its preferential growth direction until the growth terminates. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  3. In silico substrate dependence increases community productivity but threatens biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Aisling J.; Baetens, Jan M.; De Baets, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The critical role that biodiversity plays in ecosystem functioning has motivated many studies of the mechanisms that sustain biodiversity, a notable example being cyclic competition. We extend existing models of communities with cyclic competition by incorporating variable community evenness and resource dependence in demographic processes, two features that have generally been neglected. In this way, we align previous approaches more closely with real-world microbial ecosystems. We demonstrate the existence of a trade-off between increasing biomass production and maintaining biodiversity. This supports experimental observations of a net negative biodiversity effect on biomass productivity, due to competition effects suffered by highly productive species in diverse communities. Our results also support the important role assigned by microbial ecologists to evenness in maintaining ecosystem stability, thus far largely overlooked in in silico approaches.

  4. Influence of bowl shaped substrate holder on growth of polymeric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma cleaning of the substrate was done for 5 min, after that the flow of methane was adjusted and the plasma was maintained at the required power level (300 W). Figure 3. IR absorbance spectra of DLC film deposited at diffe- rent bias on (I) holder (a) and (II) holder (b). for 2 h. These films were deposited at a relatively ...

  5. Kinetic models of cell growth, substrate utilization and bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... Bio-decolorization kinetic studies of distillery effluent in a batch culture were conducted using. Aspergillus .... (2). Where X0 is inoculum's concentration and S0 is initial substrate concentration in g/l, respectively. Rearranging equation 2 gives: sx sx. Y. X. SY. X. S .... generation and biodecolorization.

  6. Influence of bowl shaped substrate holder on growth of polymeric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The properties of diamond like carbon (DLC) films grown in modified microwave plasma CVD reactor is presented in this paper. By using bowl shaped steel substrate holder in a MW plasma CVD reactor (without ECR), films have been grown at relatively high pressure (20Torr) and at low temperature (without heating).

  7. Surface morphology of polyethylene glycol films produced by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE): Dependence on substrate temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, K.; Czuba, P.; Toftmann, B.

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of the surface morphology on the substrate temperature during film deposition was investigated for polyethylene glycol (PEG) films by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The surface structure was studied with a combined technique of optical imaging and AFM measurements....... There was a clear difference between the films produced below and above the melting point of PEG. For temperatures above the melting point, the polymer material was distributed non-uniformly over the substrate with growths areas, where cluster-like structures merge into large islands of micrometer size....... At these temperatures, the islands in the investigated growth areas cover most of the bottom layer which has a typical height of 50-150 nm. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman de Villoria, R; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A III; Wardle, B L [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Figueredo, S L; Slocum, A H, E-mail: rguzman@mit.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of {approx}1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s{sup -1}. Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport.

  9. Germanium growth on electron beam lithography patterned Si3N4/Si(001) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Subhendu Sinha; Katiyar, Ajit K.; Sarkar, Arijit; Dhar, Achintya; Rudra, Arun; Khatri, Ravinder K.; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2018-04-01

    It is important to investigate the growth dynamics of Ge adatoms under different surface stress regimes of the patterned dielectric to control the selective growth of self-assembled Ge nanostructures on silicon. In the present work, we have studied the growth of Ge by molecular beam epitaxy on nanometer scale patterned Si3N4/Si(001) substrates generated using electron beam lithography. The pitch of the patterns has been varied to investigate its effect on the growth of Ge in comparison to un-patterned Si3N4. For the patterned Si3N4 film, Ge did not desorbed completely from the Si3N4 film and hence no site selective growth pattern is observed. Instead, depending upon the pitch, Ge growth has occurred in different growth modes around the openings in the Si3N4. For the un-patterned substrate, the morphology exhibits the occurrence of uniform 3D clustering of Ge adatoms on Si3N4 film. This variation in the growth modes of Ge is attributed to the variation of residual stress in the Si3N4 film for different pitch of holes, which has been confirmed theoretically through Comsol Multiphysics simulation. The variation in stress for different pitches resulted in modulation of surface energy of the Si3N4 film leading to the different growth modes of Ge.

  10. Experimental Results and Integrated Modeling of Bacterial Growth on an Insoluble Hydrophobic Substrate (Phenanthrene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Iris K. U.; Rein, Arno; Miltner, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of a low-solubility substrate is limited by dissolution and availability and can hardly be determined. We developed a numerical model for simultaneously calculating dissolution kinetics of such substrates and their metabolism and microbial growth (Monod kinetics with decay) and tested ...

  11. Halo(natrono)archaea isolated from hypersaline lakes utilize cellulose and chitin as growth substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Toshchakov, S.V.; Kolganova, T.V.; Kublanov, I.V.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, extremely halophilic euryarchaeota were considered mostly as aerobic heterotrophs utilizing simple organic compounds as growth substrates. Almost nothing is known on the ability of these prokaryotes to utilize complex polysaccharides, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. Although

  12. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus

    2014-01-01

    utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions....... Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air...... permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions...

  13. Effects of mixed substrates on growth and vitamin production by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of mixed carbon sources on growth and production of vitamins E and A by Euglena gracilis cells were investigated in batch culture. The cells were grown mixotrophically in glucose (G), ethanol (E) and a mixture of glucose and ethanol (EG). Cell growth was measured by counting the cell number with microscope, ...

  14. Silicon—a new substrate for GaN growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of GaN devices based on silicon is the thermal mismatch of GaN and Si, which generates cracks. In 1998, the first MBE grown GaN based LED on Si was made and now the quality of material grown on silicon is compa- rable to that on sapphire substrate. It is only a question of time before Si based GaN devices appear on ...

  15. Silicon—a new substrate for GaN growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In 1998, the first MBE grown GaN based LED on Si was made and now the quality of material grown on silicon is comparable to that on sapphire substrate. It is only a question of time before Si based GaN devices appear on the market. This article is a review of the latest developments in GaN based devices on silicon.

  16. Substrate-dependent bioavailability of Deltamethrin for the epigeal spider Oedothorax apicatus (Blackwall) (Aranaea, Erigonidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagers op Akkerhuis, G.A.J.M.; Hamers, T.H.M.

    1992-01-01

    Terrestrial arthropods are mainly exposed to pesticides by uptake from the substrate e.g. “residual” uptake, which depends on the bioavailability of the pesticide. The residual uptake of deltamethrin by female Oedothorax apicatus (Blackwall), a linyphiid spider, was studied in relation to dependence

  17. Effect of Growth Pressure on Epitaxial Graphene Grown on 4H-SiC Substrates by Using Ethene Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Cai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Si(0001 face and C(000-1 face dependences on growth pressure of epitaxial graphene (EG grown on 4H-SiC substrates by ethene chemical vapor deposition (CVD was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM and micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-Raman. AFM revealed that EGs on Si-faced substrates had clear stepped morphologies due to surface step bunching. However, This EG formation did not occur on C-faced substrates. It was shown by μ-Raman that the properties of EG on both polar faces were different. EGs on Si-faced substrates were relatively thinner and more uniform than on C-faced substrates at low growth pressure. On the other hand, D band related defects always appeared in EGs on Si-faced substrates, but they did not appear in EG on C-faced substrate at an appropriate growth pressure. This was due to the μ-Raman covering the step edges when measurements were performed on Si-faced substrates. The results of this study are useful for optimized growth of EG on polar surfaces of SiC substrates.

  18. Aluminum Nitride Substrate Growth by Halide Vapor Transport Epitaxy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bliss, D. F; Tassev, V. L; Weyburne, D; Bailey, J. S

    2003-01-01

    .... This new technique eliminates the main difficulties of the conventional HVPE growth, where aluminum oxidation and the strong reactivity of aluminum chloride with quartz create the potential for oxygen contamination...

  19. Cell-substrate interaction with cell-membrane-stress dependent adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H; Yang, B

    2012-01-10

    Cell-substrate interaction is examined in a two-dimensional mechanics model. The cell and substrate are treated as a shell and an elastic solid, respectively. Their interaction through adhesion is treated using nonlinear springs. Compared to previous cell mechanics models, the present model introduces a cohesive force law that is dependent not only on cell-substrate distance but also on internal cell-membrane stress. It is postulated that a living cell would establish focal adhesion sites with density dependent on the cell-membrane stress. The formulated mechanics problem is numerically solved using coupled finite elements and boundary elements for the cell and the substrate, respectively. The nodes in the adhesion zone from either side are linked by the cohesive springs. The specific cases of a cell adhering to a homogeneous substrate and a heterogeneous bimaterial substrate are examined. The analyses show that the substrate stiffness affects the adhesion behavior significantly and regulates the direction of cell adhesion, in good agreement with the experimental results in the literature. By introducing a reactive parameter (i.e., cell-membrane stress) linking biological responses of a living cell to a mechanical environment, the present model offers a unified mechanistic vehicle for characterization and prediction of living cell responses to various kinds of mechanical stimuli including local extracellular matrix and neighboring cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New Crystal-Growth Methods for Producing Lattice-Matched Substrates for High-Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boatner, L.A.

    2008-06-24

    This effort addressed the technical problem of identifying and growing, on a commercial scale, suitable single-crystal substrates for the subsequent deposition of epitaxial thin films of high temperature semiconductors such as GaN/AlN. The lack of suitable lattice-matched substrate materials was one of the major problem areas in the development of semiconducting devices for use at elevated temperatures as well as practical opto-electronic devices based on Al- and GaN technology. Such lattice-matched substrates are necessary in order to reduce or eliminate high concentrations of defects and dislocations in GaN/AlN and related epitaxial thin films. This effort concentrated, in particular, on the growth of single crystals of ZnO for substrate applications and it built on previous ORNL experience in the chemical vapor transport growth of large single crystals of zinc oxide. This combined expertise in the substrate growth area was further complemented by the ability of G. Eres and his collaborators to deposit thin films of GaN on the subject substrates and the overall ORNL capability for characterizing the quality of such films. The research effort consisted of research on the growth of two candidate substrate materials in conjunction with concurrent research on the growth and characterization of GaN films, i.e. the effort combined bulk crystal growth capabilities in the area of substrate production at both ORNL and the industrial partner, Commercial Crystal Growth Laboratories (CCL), Naples, Florida, with the novel thin-film deposition techniques previously developed in the ORNL SSD.

  1. Time dependency of morphological remodeling of endothelial cells in response to substrate stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli-Malekabadi, Zahra; Tafazzoli-shadpour, Mohammad; Tamayol, Ali; Seyedjafari, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Substrate stiffness regulates cellular behavior as cells experience different stiffness values of tissues in the body. For example, endothelial cells (ECs) covering the inner layer of blood vessels are exposed to different stiffness values due to various pathologic and physiologic conditions. Despite numerous studies, cells by time span sense mechanical properties of the substrate, but the response is not well understood. We hypothesized that time is a major determinant influencing the behavior of cells seeded on substrates of varying stiffness. Methods: We monitored cell spreading, internal structure, 3D topography, and the viability of ECs over 24 hours of culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with two different degrees of elastic modulus. Results: Despite significant differences in cell spreading after cell seeding, cells showed a similar shape and internal structure after 24 hours of culture on both soft and stiff substrates. However, 3D topographical images confirmed existence of rich lamellipodia and filopodia around the cells cultured on stiffer PDMS substrates. Conclusion: It was concluded that the response of ECs to the substrate stiffness was time dependent with initial enhanced cellular spreading and viability on stiffer substrates. Results can provide a better comprehension of cell mechanotransduction for tissue engineering applications. PMID:28546952

  2. The effect of clay amendment on substrate properties and growth of woody plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Meisl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the effect of two clay products differing in particle size distribution on properties of growing substrate and on growth of containerized woody plants in substrates amended with these clay products. Fine and coarse clay were added to a peat substrate, each at two rates. The peat substrate without clay was used as a control. The substrates were tested in experiments with two woody ornamentals (Thuja occidentalis ’Smaragd’ and Prunus cistena. Chemical and physical properties of the substrates were measured according to European Standards before planting. Proportion of water categories differing in availability to the plants were calculated from retention curves measured on the sand box. Properties of substrates in containers with and without plants were evaluated in the same way at the end of the culture. Clay addition changed chemical and physical properties of the tested substrates in terms: available nutrients content, particle density, bulk density, total pore volume, easy available water, water buffering capacity, air capacity, and shrinkage. The effect of fine clay was much stronger. In comparison with the clear effect of clay addition on the substrate chemical and physical properties, the effect on the growth and quality of model woody plants was not so explicit.

  3. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources

  4. Substrate dependent hierarchical structures of RF sputtered ZnS films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalana, S. R.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2018-05-01

    RF magnetron sputtering technique was employed to fabricate ZnS nanostructures with special emphasis given to study the effect of substrates (quartz, glass and quartz substrate pre-coated with Au, Ag, Cu and Pt) on the structure, surface evolution and optical properties. Type of substrate has a significant influence on the crystalline phase, film morphology, thickness and surface roughness. The present study elucidates the suitability of quartz substrate for the deposition of stable and highly crystalline ZnS films. We found that the role of metal layer on quartz substrate is substantial in the preparation of hierarchical ZnS structures and these structures are of great importance due to its high specific area and potential applications in various fields. A mechanism for morphological evolution of ZnS structures is also presented based on the roughness of substrates and primary nonlocal effects in sputtering. Furthermore, the findings suggest that a controlled growth of hierarchical ZnS structures may be achieved with an ordinary RF sputtering technique by changing the substrate type.

  5. Thickness-controlled direct growth of nanographene and nanographite film on non-catalytic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Liu; Hu, Zhiting; Zhang, Jiazhen; Huang, Chunlai; Sun, Liaoxin; Wang, Lin; Wei, Dacheng; Gang, Chen; Lu, Wei

    2018-03-07

    Metal-catalysed chemical vapor deposition has been broadly employed for large-scale production of high-quality graphene. However, a following transfer process to targeted substrates is needed, which is incompatible with current silicon technology. We here report a new chemical vapor deposition approach to form nanographene and nanographite films with accurate thickness control directly on non-catalytic substrates such as silicon dioxide and quartz at 800℃. The growth time is as short as a few seconds. The approach includes using 9-bis(diethylamino)silylanthracene as the carbon source and an atomic layer deposition controlling system. The structure of the formed nanographene and nanographite films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The nanographite film exhibits a transmittance higher than 80% at 550 nm and a sheet electrical resistance of 2000 ohms per square at room temperature. A negative temperature-dependence of the resistance of the nanographite film is also observed. Moreover, the thickness of the films can be precisely controlled via the deposition cycles using an atomic layer deposition system, which promotes great application potential for optoelectronic and thermoelectronic-devices. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vikram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanotube (CNT films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i mirror polished, (ii catalyst patterned, (iii mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  7. Thickness-controlled direct growth of nanographene and nanographite film on non-catalytic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Yang, Liu; Hu, Zhiting; Zhang, Jiazhen; Huang, Chunlai; Sun, Liaoxin; Wang, Lin; Wei, Dacheng; Chen, Gang; Lu, Wei

    2018-05-01

    Metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been broadly employed for large-scale production of high-quality graphene. However, a following transfer process to targeted substrates is needed, which is incompatible with current silicon technology. We here report a new CVD approach to form nanographene and nanographite films with accurate thickness control directly on non-catalytic substrates such as silicon dioxide and quartz at 800 °C. The growth time is as short as a few seconds. The approach includes using 9-bis(diethylamino)silylanthracene as the carbon source and an atomic layer deposition (ALD) controlling system. The structure of the formed nanographene and nanographite films were characterized using atomic force microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The nanographite film exhibits a transmittance higher than 80% at 550 nm and a sheet electrical resistance of 2000 ohms per square at room temperature. A negative temperature-dependence of the resistance of the nanographite film is also observed. Moreover, the thickness of the films can be precisely controlled via the deposition cycles using an ALD system, which promotes great application potential for optoelectronic and thermoelectronic-devices.

  8. Effect of substrate on the growth, nutritional and bioactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bioactive components analysis revealed the presence of major bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, polyphenols, saponins, triterpenoids and steroids. Oyster mushroom cultivated on sawdust possesses better growth and nutritional properties than those cultivated on corn cobs. Keywords: Bioactive components ...

  9. The Aspergillus niger growth on the treated concrete substrate using variable antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parjo, U. K.; Sunar, N. M.; Leman, A. M.; Gani, P.; Embong, Z.; Tajudin, S. A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Aspergillus niger (A. niger) growth on substrates after incorporates with different compounds of antifungals which is normally used in food industry. The antifungals named as potassium sorbate (PS), calcium benzoate (CB) and zinc salicylate (ZS) were applied on concrete substrate covered with different wall finishing such as acrylic paint (AP), glycerol based paint (GBP), thin wallpaper (THIN) and thick wallpaper (THICK). The concrete substrate were inoculated with spore suspension, incubated at selected temperature (30oC) and relative humidity (90%)in plant growth chamber. The observations were done from the Day 3 until Day 27. The results showed that the growth of the A. niger for concrete treated by PS for AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 64%, 32%, 11% and 100%, respectively. Meanwhile for CB, the growth of A. niger on AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 100%, 12%, 41%, and 13%, respectively. Similarly, treated concrete by ZS revealed that the growth of A. niger on the same substrate cover were 33%, 47%, 40%, and 39%, respectively. The results obtained in this study provide a valuable knowledge on the abilities of antifungals to remediate A. niger that inoculated on the concrete substrate. Consequently, this study proved that the PS covering with THIN more efficiency compares CB and ZS to prevent A. niger growth.

  10. Substrates and oxygen dependent citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica: insights through transcriptome and fluxome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Wael; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Maheshwari, Garima; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Zeng, An-Ping

    2017-05-08

    Unlike the well-studied backer yeast where catabolite repression represents a burden for mixed substrate fermentation, Yarrowia lipolytica, an oleaginous yeast, is recognized for its potential to produce single cell oils and citric acid from different feedstocks. These versatilities of Y. lipolytica with regards to substrate utilization make it an attractive host for biorefinery application. However, to develop a commercial process for the production of citric acid by Y. lipolytica, it is necessary to better understand the primary metabolism and its regulation, especially for growth on mixed substrate. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration (pO 2 ) in Y. lipolytica cultures enhanced citric acid production significantly in cultures grown on glucose in mono- or dual substrate fermentations, whereas with glycerol as mono-substrate no significant effect of pO 2 was found on citrate production. Growth on mixed substrate with glucose and glycerol revealed a relative preference of glycerol utilization by Y. lipolytica. Under optimized conditions with pO 2 control, the citric acid titer on glucose in mono- or in dual substrate cultures was 55 and 50 g/L (with productivity of 0.6 g/L*h in both cultures), respectively, compared to a maximum of 18 g/L (0.2 g/L*h) with glycerol in monosubstrate culture. Additionally, in dual substrate fermentation, glycerol limitation was found to trigger citrate consumption despite the presence of enough glucose in pO 2 -limited culture. The metabolic behavior of this yeast on different substrates was investigated at transcriptomic and 13 C-based fluxomics levels. Upregulation of most of the genes of the pentose phosphate pathway was found in cultures with highest citrate production with glucose in mono- or in dual substrate fermentation with pO 2 control. The activation of the glyoxylate cycle in the oxygen limited cultures and the imbalance caused by glycerol limitation might be the reason for the re-consumption of citrate in

  11. Epitaxial growth on porous GaAs substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grym, Jan; Nohavica, Dušan; Gladkov, Petar; Hulicius, Eduard; Pangrác, Jiří; Piksová, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2013), s. 59-64 ISSN 1631-0748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1201; GA ČR GAP108/10/0253 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Electrochemical etching * Porous semiconductors * Epitaxial growth * GaAs Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers; JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.483, year: 2013

  12. Unbounded autocatalytic growth on diffusive substrate: The extinction transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moalem, Sasi; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of diffusively correlated spatial fluctuations on the proliferation-extinction transition of autocatalytic agents is investigated numerically. Reactants adaptation to spatio-temporal active regions is shown to lead to proliferation even if the mean field rate equations predict extinction, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions. While in the proliferation phase the system admits a typical time scale that dictates the exponential growth, the extinction times distribution obeys a power law at the parameter region considered

  13. Enhanced Graphene Mechanical Properties through Ultrasmooth Copper Growth Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Mark H; Sandoz-Rosado, Emil; Tumlin, Travis M; Wetzel, Eric

    2016-03-09

    The combination of extraordinary strength and stiffness in conjunction with exceptional electronic and thermal properties in lightweight two-dimensional materials has propelled graphene research toward a wide array of applications including flexible electronics and functional structural components. Tailoring graphene's properties toward a selected application requires precise control of the atomic layer growth process, transfer, and postprocessing procedures. To date, the mechanical properties of graphene are largely controlled through postprocess defect engineering techniques. In this work, we demonstrate the role of varied catalytic surface morphologies on the tailorability of subsequent graphene film quality and breaking strength, providing a mechanism to tailor the physical, electrical, and mechanical properties at the growth stage. A new surface planarization methodology that results in over a 99% reduction in Cu surface roughness allows for smoothness parameters beyond that reported to date in literature and clearly demonstrates the role of Cu smoothness toward a decrease in the formation of bilayer graphene defects, altered domain sizes, monolayer graphene sheet resistance values down to 120 Ω/□ and a 78% improvement in breaking strength. The combined electrical and mechanical enhancements achieved through this methodology allows for the direct growth of application quality flexible transparent conductive films with monolayer graphene.

  14. Influence of the Hydrothermal Method Growth Parameters on the Zinc Oxide Nanowires Deposited on Several Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Mejía-García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of ZnO nanowires grown on several substrates (PET, glass, and Si using a two-step process: (a preparation of the seed layer on the substrate by spin coating, from solutions of zinc acetate dihydrate and 1-propanol, and (b growth of the ZnO nanostructures by dipping the substrate in an equimolar solution of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetetramine. Subsequently, films were thermally treated with a commercial microwave oven (350 and 700 W for 5, 20, and 35 min. The ZnO nanowires obtained were characterized structurally, morphologically, and optically using XRD, SEM, and UV-VIS transmission, respectively. XRD patterns spectra revealed the presence of Zn(OH2 on the films grown on glass and Si substrates. A preferential orientation along c-axis directions for films grown on PET substrate was observed. An analysis by SEM revealed that the growth of the ZnO nanowires on PET and glass is better than the growth on Si when the same growth parameters are used. On glass substrates, ZnO nanowires less than 50 nm in diameter and between 200 nm and 1200 nm in length were obtained. The ZnO nanowires band gap energy for the films grown on PET and glass was obtained from optical transmission spectra.

  15. Direct Growth of Graphene Film on Germanium Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Yun; Ding, Guqiao; Jiang, Da; Guo, Qinglei; Liu, Su; Xie, Xiaoming; Chu, Paul K.; Di, Zengfeng; Wang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has been predicted to play a role in post-silicon electronics due to the extraordinary carrier mobility. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene on transition metals has been considered as a major step towards commercial realization of graphene. However, fabrication based on transition metals involves an inevitable transfer step which can be as complicated as the deposition of graphene itself. By ambient-pressure chemical vapor deposition, we demonstrate large-scale and uniform depositon of high-quality graphene directly on a Ge substrate which is wafer scale and has been considered to replace conventional Si for the next generation of high-performance metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). The immiscible Ge-C system under equilibrium conditions dictates graphene depositon on Ge via a self-limiting and surface-mediated process rather than a precipitation process as observed from other metals with high carbon solubility. Our technique is compatible with modern microelectronics technology thus allowing integration with high-volume production of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). PMID:23955352

  16. Threefold growth efficiency improvement of silica nanosprings by using silica nanosprings as a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Giancarlo; Brown, Justin; Rajabi, Negar; McIlroy, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    The growth efficiency of one-dimension (1D) nanostructures via the vapor–liquid–solid process is commonly attributed to parameters such as precursor vapor pressure, substrate temperature, and the choice of the catalyst. The work presented herein is an investigation of the use of silica nanosprings (SNs) as a 3D substrate for improving the growth efficiency of SN themselves. SNs are a 1D nanomaterial that form a nonwoven structure with optimal geometric characteristics and surface properties that mitigate collisions between growing nanosprings and ripening of the gold catalyst, which should improve SN yield. Nanospring growth, for an eight hour period, on an SN coated surface relative to an equivalent flat substrate increased from ≈25 mgh‑1 to ≈80 mgh‑1, respectively. All things being equal, by splitting the typical amount of catalyst, in this case gold, between the first and second growth, the double growth procedure produced more than three times more nanosprings than the equivalent single growth of a SN. In addition, using an SN as a substrate increased the sustained growth condition from four to eight hours, and thus increased by a factor of ten the gravimetric yield of SNs relative to the mass of gold used.

  17. Substrate temperature dependence of ZnTe epilayers grown on GaAs(0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Chao; Li, Yanbo

    2010-04-01

    ZnTe thin films have been grown on GaAs(0 0 1) substrates at different temperatures with constant Zn and Te beam equivalent pressures (BEPs) by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) observation indicates that two-dimensional (2D) growth mode can be established after around one-minute three-dimensional (3D) nucleation by increasing the substrate temperature to 340 °C. We found that Zn desorption from the ZnTe surface is much greater than that of Te at higher temperatures, and estimated the Zn sticking coefficient by the evolution of growth rate. The Zn sticking coefficient decreases from 0.93 to 0.58 as the temperature is elevated from 320 to 400 °C. The ZnTe epilayer grown at 360 °C displays the narrowest full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 660 arcsec from (0 0 4) reflection in double-crystal X-ray rocking curve (DCXRC) measurements. The surface morphology of ZnTe epilayers is strongly dependent on the substrate temperature, and the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness diminishes drastically with the increase in temperature.

  18. Amorphous carbon film growth on Si: Correlation between stress and generation of defects into the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusa, R.S.; Macchi, C.; Mariazzi, S.; Karwasz, G.P.; Laidani, N.; Bartali, R.; Anderle, M.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films of several thicknesses were prepared by graphite sputtering on crystalline silicon substrate. The samples were depth profiled with positron annihilation spectroscopy for open-volume measurements and characterized for their residual internal stress. It was found that after film growth the substrate presents vacancy-like defects decorated by oxygen in a layer extending in the substrate by several tens of nanometers beyond the film/Si interface. The width of the defected layer and the decoration of vacancy-like defects are directly and inversely proportional to the measured intensity of the residual stress, respectively. These findings indicate the existence of a relaxation mechanism of the stress in the films that involves deeply the substrate. The decorated vacancy-like defects are suggested to be bounded to dislocations induced in the substrate by the stress relaxation

  19. Regulation of integrin adhesions by varying the density of substrate-bound epidermal growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahal, Tamar; Geiger, Benjamin; Dunlop, Iain E; Spatz, Joachim P

    2012-12-01

    Substrates coated with specific bioactive ligands are important for tissue engineering, enabling the local presentation of extracellular stimulants at controlled positions and densities. In this study, we examined the cross-talk between integrin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors following their interaction with surface-immobilized Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) and EGF ligands, respectively. Surfaces of glass coverslips, modified with biotinylated silane-polyethylene glycol, were functionalized by either biotinylated RGD or EGF (or both) via the biotin-NeutrAvidin interaction. Fluorescent labeling of the adhering A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells for zyxin or actin indicated that EGF had a dual effect on focal adhesions (FA) and stress fibers: at low concentrations (0.1; 1 ng/ml), it stimulated their growth; whereas at higher concentrations, on surfaces with low to intermediate RGD densities, it induced their disassembly, leading to cell detachment. The EGF-dependent dissociation of FAs was, however, attenuated on higher RGD density surfaces. Simultaneous stimulation by both immobilized RGD and EGF suggest a strong synergy between integrin and EGFR signaling, in FA induction and cell spreading. A critical threshold level of EGF was required to induce significant variation in cell adhesion; beyond this critical density, the immobilized molecule had a considerably stronger effect on cell adhesion than did soluble EGF. The mechanisms underlying this synergy between the adhesion ligand and EGF are discussed.

  20. Aminoacid polymorphisms of insulin receptor substrate-1 in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, K; Bjørbaek, C; Vestergaard, H

    1993-01-01

    Since relative or absolute insulin deficiency and insulin insensitivity are involved in the aetiology of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we examined whether patients with NIDDM exhibit genetic variability in the coding region of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), a candidate...

  1. Kinetic characteristics and modelling of growth and substrate removal by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2016-04-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR has the capability of simultaneous ammonium and organic carbon removal under sole aerobic conditions. The growth and substrate removal characteristics of A. faecalis strain NR were studied and appropriate kinetic models were developed. The maximum substrate removal rate of NH4 (+)-N and TOC were determined as 2.27 mg NH4 (+)-N/L/h and 30.00 mg TOC/L/h, respectively with initial NH4 (+)-N = 80 mg/L and TOC = 800 mg/L. Single-substrate models and double-substrate models based on Monod, Contois, Moser and Teissier were employed to describe the bioprocess kinetic coefficients. As a result, two double-substrate models, Teissier-Contois and Contois-Contois, were considered to be appropriate to model growth kinetics with both NH4 (+)-N and TOC as limiting substrates. The kinetic constants of maximum growth rate (μ max) and half-saturation constant (K S and B S) were obtained by solving multiple equations with regression. This work can be used to further understand and predict the performance of heterotrophic nitrifiers, and thus provides specific guidance of these functional strains in practical wastewater treatment process.

  2. Mammalian cell growth on gold nanoparticle-decorated substrates is influenced by the nanoparticle coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Rosman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study epithelial cell growth on substrates decorated with gold nanorods that are functionalized either with a positively charged cytotoxic surfactant or with a biocompatible polymer exhibiting one of two different end groups, resulting in a neutral or negative surface charge of the particle. Upon observation of cell growth for three days by live cell imaging using optical dark field microscopy, it was found that all particles supported cell adhesion while no directed cell migration and no significant particle internalization occurred. Concerning cell adhesion and spreading as compared to cell growth on bare substrates after 3 days of incubation, a reduction by 45% and 95%, respectively, for the surfactant particle coating was observed, whereas the amino-terminated polymer induced a reduction by 30% and 40%, respectively, which is absent for the carboxy-terminated polymer. Furthermore, interface-sensitive impedance spectroscopy (electric cell–substrate impedance sensing, ECIS was employed in order to investigate the micromotility of cells added to substrates decorated with various amounts of surfactant-coated particles. A surface density of 65 particles/µm2 (which corresponds to 0.5% of surface coverage with nanoparticles diminishes micromotion by 25% as compared to bare substrates after 35 hours of incubation. We conclude that the surface coating of the gold nanorods, which were applied to the basolateral side of the cells, has a recognizable influence on the growth behavior and thus the coating should be carefully selected for biomedical applications of nanoparticles.

  3. Growth on elastic silicone substrate elicits a partial myogenic response in periodontal ligament derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pelaez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of cellular differentiation and phenotypic maintenance can be influenced by stimuli from a variety of different factors. One commonly overlooked factor is the mechanical properties of the growth substrate in which stem cells are maintained or differentiated down various lineages. Here we explored the effect that growth on an elastic silicone substrate had on the myogenic expression and cytoskeletal morphology of periodontal ligament derived stem cells. Cells were grown on either collagen I coated tissue culture polystyrene plates or collagen I coated elastic silicone membranes for a period of 4 days without further induction from soluble factors in the culture media. Following the 4-day growth, gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis for key cardiomyogenic markers was performed along with a morphological assessment of cytoskeletal organization. Results show that cells grown on the elastic substrate significantly upregulate key markers associated with contractile activity in muscle tissues. Namely, the myosin light chain polypeptides 2 and 7, as well as the myosin heavy chain polypeptide 7 genes underwent a statistically significant upregulation in the cells grown on elastic silicone membranes. Similarly, the cells on the softer elastic substrate stained positive for both sarcomeric actin and cardiac troponin t proteins following just 4 days of growth on the softer material. Cytoskeletal analysis showed that substrate stiffness had a marked effect on the organization and distribution of filamentous actin fibers within the cell body. Growth on silicone membranes produced flatter and shorter cellular morphologies with filamentous actin fibers projecting anisotropically throughout the cell body. These results demonstrate how crucial the mechanical properties of the growth substrate of cells can be on the ultimate cellular phenotype. These observations highlight the need to further optimize differentiation protocols to enhance

  4. Growth of Well-Aligned InN Nanorods on Amorphous Glass Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-05-01

    The growth of well-aligned nanorods on amorphous substrates can pave the way to fabricate large-scale and low-cost devices. In this work, we successfully prepared vertically well-aligned c-axis InN nanorods on amorphous glass substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The products formed directly on bare glass are randomly oriented without preferential growth direction. By inserting a GaN/Ti interlayer, the nanowire alignment can be greatly improved as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  5. Growth of Gold-assisted Gallium Arsenide Nanowires on Silicon Substrates via Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon M. delos Santos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gallium arsenide nanowires were grown on silicon (100 substrates by what is called the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS growth mechanism using a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE system. Good quality nanowires with surface density of approximately 108 nanowires per square centimeter were produced by utilizing gold nanoparticles, with density of 1011 nanoparticles per square centimeter, as catalysts for nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the nanowires are epitaxially grown on the silicon substrates, are oriented along the [111] direction and have cubic zincblende structure.

  6. Mycelial growth and substrate acidification of ectomycorrhizal fungi in response to different minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosling, Anna; Lindahl, Björn D; Taylor, Andy F S; Finlay, Roger D

    2004-01-01

    A colorimetric method was developed to permit semi-quantitative measurement of substrate acidification by different ectomycorrhizal and one saprotrophic fungus growing on media containing one of five different minerals. Overall, substrate acidification differed between fungal species and the degree of variation in acidification in response to different minerals was highly species-dependent. Mycena galopus and Cortinarius glaucopus produced the least biomass of all tested species and produced the highest amount of acidification per unit mycelial density. Substrate acidification by C. glaucopus was inversely related to mycelial density, with particularly high acidification at low mycelial density on medium enriched with tri-calcium phosphate. Substrate acidification by M. galopus was constant irrespective of mycelial density and varied only according to mineral treatment, with higher substrate acidification on tri-calcium phosphate compared to the other minerals.

  7. Resveratrol as a growth substrate for bacteria from the rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Zohre; Minoia, Marco; Spain, Jim C

    2018-03-09

    Resveratrol is among the best-known secondary plant metabolites because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. It also is an important allelopathic chemical widely credited with protection of plants from pathogens. The ecological role of resveratrol in natural habitats is difficult to establish rigorously because it does not seem to accumulate outside of plant tissue. It is likely that bacterial degradation plays a key role in determining the persistence, and thus the ecological role, of resveratrol in soil. Here we report the isolation of an Acinetobacter species that can use resveratrol as a sole carbon source from the rhizosphere of peanut plants. Both molecular and biochemical techniques indicate that the pathway starts with the conversion of resveratrol to 3,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. The aldehydes are oxidized to substituted benzoates that subsequently enter central metabolism. The gene that encodes the enzyme responsible for the oxidative cleavage of resveratrol was cloned, and expressed in E. coli to establish its function. Its physiological role in the resveratrol catabolic pathway was established by knockouts and by RT-qPCR demonstration of expression during growth on resveratrol. The results establish the presence and capabilities of resveratrol degrading bacteria in the rhizosphere of the peanut plants and set the stage for studies to evaluate the role of the bacteria in plant allelopathy. IMPORTANCE In addition to its antioxidant properties, resveratrol is an example of a broad array of allelopathic chemicals produced by plants to inhibit competitors, herbivores and pathogens. Bacterial degradation of such chemicals in the rhizosphere would reduce the effects of the chemicals. Therefore, it is important to understand the activity and ecological role of bacteria that biodegrade resveratrol near the plants that produce it. This study describes the isolation from the peanut rhizosphere of bacteria that can

  8. Surface evolution during crystalline silicon film growth by low-temperature hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Christine Esber; Park, Young-Bae; Atwater, Harry A.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the low-temperature growth of crystalline thin silicon films: epitaxial, twinned, and polycrystalline, by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). Using Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy, we find the relationship between surface roughness evolution and (i) the substrate temperature (230-350°C) and (ii) the hydrogen dilution ratio (H2/SiH4=0-480) . The absolute silicon film thickness for fully crystalline films is found to be the most important parameter in determining surface roughness, hydrogen being the second most important. Higher hydrogen dilution increases the surface roughness as expected. However, surface roughness increases with increasing substrate-temperature, in contrast to previous studies of crystalline Si growth. We suggest that the temperature-dependent roughness evolution is due to the role of hydrogen during the HWCVD process, which in this high hydrogen dilution regime allows for epitaxial growth on the rms roughest films through a kinetic growth regime of shadow-dominated etch and desorption and redeposition of growth species.

  9. Critical aspects of substrate nanopatterning for the ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagini, Francesca; Bengoechea-Encabo, Ana; Albert, Steven; Martinez, Javier; Sanchez García, Miguel Angel; Trampert, Achim; Calleja, Enrique

    2011-12-14

    Precise and reproducible surface nanopatterning is the key for a successful ordered growth of GaN nanocolumns. In this work, we point out the main technological issues related to the patterning process, mainly surface roughness and cleaning, and mask adhesion to the substrate. We found that each of these factors, process-related, has a dramatic impact on the subsequent selective growth of the columns inside the patterned holes. We compare the performance of e-beam lithography, colloidal lithography, and focused ion beam in the fabrication of hole-patterned masks for ordered columnar growth. These results are applicable to the ordered growth of nanocolumns of different materials.

  10. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karaca, Melis; Frigerio, Francesca; Migrenne, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1(-/-) mice resulted......Glucose, the main energy substrate used in the CNS, is continuously supplied by the periphery. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, is foreseen as a complementary energy contributor in the brain. In particular, astrocytes actively take up glutamate and may use it through oxidative....... Our data reveal the importance of glutamate as necessary energy substrate for the brain and the role of central GDH in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis....

  11. In situ studies of strain dependent transport properties of conducting polymers on elastomeric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Venugopalan; Rao, Arun D.; Narayan, K. S.

    2011-04-01

    We report the changes in the surface electrical resistance, R, of conducting polymer, Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films coated on appropriate flexible substrates in stretched conditions. These studies are important in the context of flexible organic electronic applications. In situ conductivity measurements on pristine PEDOT:PSS thin films on elastomeric substrates upon stretching reveal a minima in R as a function of strain, x, prior to the expected increase at higher strain levels. The studies emphasize (i) role of substrates, (ii) stress-induced anisotropic features, and temperature dependence of R (iii) in comparison of R(x) in polymer films to that of conventional metal films. The stress induced changes is modeled in terms of effective medium approximation.

  12. Modeling of metal nanocluster growth on patterned substrates and surface pattern formation under ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numazawa, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    are considered as local transition events constrained in potential energy wells over certain local time periods. These processes are represented by Markov chains of multi-dimensional Boolean valued functions in three dimensional lattice space. Consequently, the fluctuating system evolution process is implemented as a Markov chain of equivalence class objects. It is shown that the process can be characterized by the acceptance of metastable local transitions. The method is applied to a problem of Au and Ag cluster growth on a rippled surface. The simulation predicts the existence of a morphology dependent transition time limit from a local metastable to stable state for subsequent cluster growth by accretion. The third topic is the formation of ripple structures on ion bombarded semiconductor surfaces treated in the first topic as the prepatterned substrate of the metallic deposition. This intriguing phenomenon has been known since the 1960's and various theoretical approaches have been explored. These previous models are discussed and a new non-linear model is formulated, based on the local atomic flow and associated density change in the near surface region. Within this framework ripple structures are shown to form without the necessity to invoke surface diffusion or large sputtering as important mechanisms. The model can also be extended to the case where sputtering is important and it is shown that in this case, certain 'magic' angles can occur at which the ripple patterns are most clearly defined. The results including some analytic solutions of the nonlinear equation of motions are in very good agreement with experimental observation.

  13. Epitaxial Growth of GaN-based LEDs on Simple Sacrificial Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Ferguson; Chris Summers

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this project is to produce alternative substrate technologies for GaN-based LEDs by developing an ALD interlayer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on sacrificial substrates such as ZnO and Si. A sacrificial substrate is used for device growth that can easily be removed using a wet chemical etchant leaving only the thin GaN epi-layer. After substrate removal, the GaN LED chip can then be mounted in several different ways to a metal heat sink/reflector and light extraction techniques can then be applied to the chip and compared for performance. Success in this work will lead to high efficiency LED devices with a simple low cost fabrication method and high product yield as stated by DOE goals for its solid state lighting portfolio.

  14. Growth of bi- and tri-layered graphene on silicon carbide substrate via molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Tjun Kit; Yoon, Tiem Leong [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lim, Thong Leng [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Melaka Campus, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with simulated annealing method is used to study the growth process of bi- and tri-layered graphene on a 6H-SiC (0001) substrate via molecular dynamics simulation. Tersoff-Albe-Erhart (TEA) potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the atoms in the system. The formation temperature, averaged carbon-carbon bond length, pair correlation function, binding energy and the distance between the graphene formed and the SiC substrate are quantified. The growth mechanism, graphitization of graphene on the SiC substrate and characteristics of the surface morphology of the graphene sheet obtained in our MD simulation compare well to that observed in epitaxially grown graphene experiments and other simulation works.

  15. Vitamin B12 Production by Marine Bacteria in Organic Substrate Limited, Slow Growth Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Mendoza, J.; Cajal-Medrano, R.; Maske, H.

    2016-02-01

    The conditions and processes governing the B12 vitamin dissemination through planktonic organisms are little understood. It is generally assumed that bacteria produce B12 vitamin and the whole auxotrophic plankton community consumes it. We used natural marine bacteria communities and marine bacteria Dinoroseobacter shibae cultures, growing in substrate-limited continuous cultures at low specific growth rates [0.1 to 1 d-1] to measure intracellular and dissolved B12 production, bacterial and viral abundance, particulate organic carbon, and nitrogen, bacterial production, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, ETS activity, and taxonomic composition. We find dissolved B12 vitamin at concentrations between 0 to 1.4 pM with no relation to growth or respiration rates. The intracellular B12 vitamin normalized to cell volume ranged between 1x10-2 to 4.6x10-2 pmol μm3 showing a significant relationship with growth rate [y=0.02(m)1.07; r2=0.78; p≤0.05; y=intracellular B12 production, pmol μm3 day-1; m=specific growth rate, day-1], and respiration rates [y=2.4ln(x)-2.66; r2=0.87; p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The vitamin B12 producing bacteria D. shibae, showed a dissolved B12 concentration between 0 and 1.8 pM, whereas intracellular B12 normalized to cell volume varied between 1.1x10-2 to 1.8x10-2 pmol μm-3, responding significantly to growth rate [y=0.01(m)0.56; r2=0.85; p≤0.05], and to respiration rates [y=3.01ln(x)-7.56, r2=0.97, p≤0.05; x=CO2 production, μM day-1]. The lack of correlation of dissolved B12 vitamin with the metabolic activity suggests that the dissolved B12 concentration depends on the interactions among vitamin B12 producers and consumers while the bacterial metabolism is regulating the intracellular production of B12 vitamin.

  16. Interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on seedling growth of Salix nigra and Taxodium distichum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard H.; Doyle, T.W.; Draugelis-Dale, R. O.

    2006-01-01

    The large river swamps of Louisiana have complex topography and hydrology, characterized by black willow (Salix nigra) dominance on accreting alluvial sediments and vast areas of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) deepwater swamps with highly organic substrates. Seedling survival of these two wetland tree species is influenced by their growth rate in relation to the height and duration of annual flooding in riverine environments. This study examines the interactive effects of substrate, hydroperiod, and nutrients on growth rates of black willow and baldcypress seedlings. In a greenhouse experiment with a split-split-plot design, 1-year seedlings of black willow and baldcypress were subjected to two nutrient treatments (unfertilized versus fertilized), two hydroperiods (continuously flooded versus twice daily flooding/draining), and two substrates (sand versus commercial peat mix). Response variables included height, diameter, lateral branch count, biomass, and root:stem ratio. Black willow growth in height and diameter, as well as all biomass components, were significantly greater in peat substrate than in sand. Black willow showed a significant hydroperiod-nutrient interaction wherein fertilizer increased stem and root biomass under drained conditions, but flooded plants did not respond to fertilization. Baldcypress diameter and root biomass were higher in peat than in sand, and the same two variables increased with fertilization in flooded as well as drained treatments. These results can be used in Louisiana wetland forest models as inputs of seedling growth and survival, regeneration potential, and biomass accumulation rates of black willow and baldcypress.

  17. Product formation from thiophene by a mixed bacterial culture. Influence of benzene as growth substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivas, Isabelle Marie; Mosbæk, Hans; Arvin, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The influence of benzene as a growth substrate on the cometabolic conversion of thiophene was investigated in batch systems with microorganisms originating from an creosote contaminated site. Benzene was shown to stimulate the conversion of thiophene with a first-order rate, during the initial...

  18. Investment in secreted enzymes during nutrient-limited growth is utility dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2017-09-12

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete toxins and degradative enzymes that facilitate their growth by liberating nutrients from the environment. To understand bacterial growth under nutrient-limited conditions, we studied resource allocation between cellular and secreted components by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa during growth on a protein substrate that requires extracellular digestion by secreted proteases. We identified a quantitative relationship between the rate of increase of cellular biomass under nutrient-limiting growth conditions and the rate of increase in investment in secreted proteases. Production of secreted proteases is stimulated by secreted signals that convey information about the utility of secreted proteins during nutrient-limited growth. Growth modeling using this relationship recapitulated the observed kinetics of bacterial growth on a protein substrate. The proposed regulatory strategy suggests a rationale for quorum-sensing-dependent stimulation of the production of secreted enzymes whereby investment in secreted enzymes occurs in proportion to the utility they confer. Our model provides a framework that can be applied toward understanding bacterial growth in many environments where growth rate is limited by the availability of nutrients.

  19. Substrate temperature dependence of microcrystallinity in plasma-deposited, boron-doped hydrogenated silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajeswaran, G.; Kampas, F.J.; Vanier, P.E.; Sabatini, R.L.; Tafto, J.

    1983-01-01

    The glow-discharge decomposition of silane diluted in hydrogen using diborane as a dopant results in the deposition of p-type microcrystalline silicon films at relatively low temperatures. The conductivity of these films is critically dependent on the substrate temperature when the ratio of silane flow rate to total gas flow rate is 1%. Electron micrographs show that highly conducting films contain numerous clusters of 2.5-nm crystallites that are embedded in an amorphous medium

  20. Growth of dilute nitride GaAsN/GaAs heterostructure nanowires on Si substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Masahito; Ishikawa, Fumitaro

    2013-02-15

    The concept of band engineering dilute nitride semiconductors into nanowires is introduced. Using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, dilute nitride GaAsN/GaAs heterostructure nanowires are grown on silicon (111) substrates. Growth of the nanowires under high As overpressure results in a regular wire diameter of 350 nm with a length exceeding 3 μm. The GaAsN/GaAs nanowires show characteristics including favorable vertical alignment, hexagonal cross-sectional structure with {110} facets, regions of wurtzite and zinc-blende phases, and a core-shell-type heterostructure. The nanowires are composed of GaAsN shells containing up to 0.3% nitrogen surrounding GaAs cores. Panchromatic cathodoluminescence images show intensity modulation along the length of the nanowires that is possibly related to the interfaces of wurtzite/zinc-blende regions. Photoluminescence with peak wavelengths between 870 and 920 nm is clearly observed at room temperature. The spectral red shift depends on the amount of introduced nitrogen. These results reveal a method for precise lattice and band engineering of nanowires composed of dilute nitride semiconductors.

  1. Oligosaccharides Released from Milk Glycoproteins Are Selective Growth Substrates for Infant-Associated Bifidobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karav, Sercan; Le Parc, Annabelle; Leite Nobrega de Moura Bell, Juliana Maria; Frese, Steven A.; Kirmiz, Nina; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Milk, in addition to nourishing the neonate, provides a range of complex glycans whose construction ensures a specific enrichment of key members of the gut microbiota in the nursing infant, a consortium known as the milk-oriented microbiome. Milk glycoproteins are thought to function similarly, as specific growth substrates for bifidobacteria common to the breast-fed infant gut. Recently, a cell wall-associated endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) found in various infant-borne bifidobacteria was shown to remove a range of intact N-linked glycans. We hypothesized that these released oligosaccharide structures can serve as a sole source for the selective growth of bifidobacteria. We demonstrated that EndoBI-1 released N-glycans from concentrated bovine colostrum at the pilot scale. EndoBI-1-released N-glycans supported the rapid growth of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), a species that grows well on human milk oligosaccharides, but did not support growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis), a species which does not. Conversely, B. infantis ATCC 15697 did not grow on the deglycosylated milk protein fraction, clearly demonstrating that the glycan portion of milk glycoproteins provided the key substrate for growth. Mass spectrometry-based profiling revealed that B. infantis consumed 73% of neutral and 92% of sialylated N-glycans, while B. lactis degraded only 11% of neutral and virtually no (milk serve as selective substrates for the enrichment of infant-associated bifidobacteria capable of carrying out the initial deglycosylation. Moreover, released N-glycans were better growth substrates than the intact milk glycoproteins, suggesting that EndoBI-1 cleavage is a key initial step in consumption of glycoproteins. Finally, the variety of N-glycans released from bovine milk glycoproteins suggests that they may serve as novel prebiotic substrates with selective properties similar to those of human milk oligosaccharides

  2. Rational growth of semi-polar ZnO texture on a glass substrate for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B.; Ma, M. J.; Ye, Y. H.; Lu, J. G.; He, H. P.; Ye, Z. Z.

    2013-02-01

    Semi-polar ZnO films with surface texture were grown on glass substrates via pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) through Co-Ga co-doping. Oxygen pressure (PO2) was found to have significant effects on the structural and optical properties of the Zn(Co, Ga)O (ZCGO) films. A self-textured film with (1\\,0\\,\\bar {1}\\,1) preferred orientation (PO) was achieved by varying the growth conditions including a crucial narrow PO2 window and growth time. A possible mechanism underlying the PO evolution and the final texture of the films was proposed, which can be attributed to the collaboration of the doping effect and the PO2-dependent evolutionary selection process, in which certain grains can have increased vertical growth rate with respect to the substrate surface through interplane diffusion. Moreover, the growth of undoped pure ZnO films proceeded by using the (1\\,0\\,\\bar {1}\\,1) ZCGO film as a buffer layer. The ZnO layers retained a semi-polar characteristic with improved crystallinity and better optical quality. The epitaxy-like orientation of ZnO layers grown on (1\\,0\\,\\bar {1}\\,1) ZCGO films has applications in the development of semi-polar ZnO-based light-emitting diodes.

  3. Heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on a Si(0 0 1) substrate via AlSb buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, M.; Akae, N.; Uotani, K.; Fujimoto, N.; Tambo, T.; Tatsuyama, C.

    2003-01-01

    AlSb is a more suitable material as buffer layers for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on a Si(0 0 1) substrate than Ge. It reduces the large lattice mismatch of about 19.3% between Si and InSb to about 5.6%. The resistance of AlSb with stoichiometric composition is large enough for the measurement of electrical properties. InSb films grown on the AlSb/Si(0 0 1) substrates by the co-evaporation of elemental indium (In) and antimony (Sb) sources were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), as a function of growth temperature. The thickness of grown InSb films was about 0.8-1.0 μm. The surface morphology and the crystal quality of the grown films strongly depend on growth temperature. It is found that the optimized growth temperature is about 300 deg. C to obtain the InSb films with smooth surface and good crystal quality

  4. Substrate dependent physical properties of evaporated CdO thin films for optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Anuradha; Chander, S.; Patel, S.L. [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India); Rangra, K.J. [Sensors and Transducers Group, CSIR-CEERI, Pilani-333031 (India); Dhaka, M.S., E-mail: msdhaka75@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur-313001 (India)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Substrate dependent physical properties of CdO thin films are carried out. • XRD patterns reveal that the films have cubic structure of space group Fm3m. • Optical direct band gap is found to vary with the substrates. • SEM images show that the films are compact and homogeneous. • I–V characteristics show ohmic behavior of the deposited CdO films. - Abstract: In this study, CdO thin films were grown by e-beam evaporation technique on glass, indium tin oxide (ITO), fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) and silicon (Si) wafer. The deposited films were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–Vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and source meter (current–voltage) for structural, optical, surface morphological, elemental and electrical analysis, respectively. The films have single phase of cubic structure (space group Fm3m) with (200) preferred orientation. The structural parameters viz. inter-planar spacing, grain size, lattice constant, internal strain and dislocation density are calculated and found to vary with the nature of the substrates. The optical band gap was found in the range 2.24–3.95 eV and strongly dependents on the substrates. The SEM analysis shows that the films are compact, homogeneous and have granular structure without any defects like pin holes and cracks. The EDS spectra confirmed the presence of cadmium (Cd) and oxygen (O) in the films deposited on different substrates. The current–voltage characteristics of the films show ohmic behavior.

  5. Temperature-dependent respiration-growth relations in ancestral maize cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce N. Smith; Jillian L. Walker; Rebekka L. Stone; Angela R. Jones; Lee D. Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Shoots from 4- to 6-day old seedlings of seven ancestral or old cultivars of Zea mays L. were placed in a calorimeter. Dark metabolic heat rate (q) and CO2 production rate (RCO2) were measured at nine temperatures (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, and 45 °C). Temperature dependencies of q and RCO2 were used to model response of both growth and substrate carbon conversion...

  6. Stress-driven lithium dendrite growth mechanism and dendrite mitigation by electroplating on soft substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zeng, Wei; Hong, Liang; Xu, Wenwen; Yang, Haokai; Wang, Fan; Duan, Huigao; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Hanqing

    2018-03-01

    Problems related to dendrite growth on lithium-metal anodes such as capacity loss and short circuit present major barriers to next-generation high-energy-density batteries. The development of successful lithium dendrite mitigation strategies is impeded by an incomplete understanding of the Li dendrite growth mechanisms, and in particular, Li-plating-induced internal stress in Li metal and its effect on Li growth morphology are not well addressed. Here, we reveal the enabling role of plating residual stress in dendrite formation through depositing Li on soft substrates and a stress-driven dendrite growth model. We show that dendrite growth is mitigated on such soft substrates through surface-wrinkling-induced stress relaxation in the deposited Li film. We demonstrate that this dendrite mitigation mechanism can be utilized synergistically with other existing approaches in the form of three-dimensional soft scaffolds for Li plating, which achieves higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention than that for conventional copper substrates.

  7. [Nutrient transfer and growth of Pinus greggii Engelm. inoculated with edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in two substrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Chávez, María C; Pérez-Moreno, Jesús; Cetina-Alcalá, Víctor M; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    An ectomycorrhiza is a mutualistic symbiosis of paramount importance in forestry and tree production. One of the selection criteria of ectomycorrhizal fungi that has currently gained importance is their edibility due to the economic, ecological and cultural relevance of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms as a non-timber forest product. The effect of the inoculation with three edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms: Laccaria laccata, Laccaria bicolor y Hebeloma leucosarx, which are widely sold in Mexico, on the growth and nutrient contents of Pinus greggii grown in an experimental substrate and a commercial substrate enriched with a slow-release fertilizer, was evaluated. Two years after sowing, differences in terms of shoot and root biomass and macro and micronutrient contents between inoculated and non-inoculated plants, were recorded independently of the fungal species and the substrate. Despite the fact that plants grown in the commercial substrate had higher growth and nutrient contents, their ectomycorrhizal colonization percentages were smaller than those of the plants grown in the experimental substrate. The differences in the nutrient transfer to the inoculated plant shoots among the evaluated fungal species were recorded. Ca mobilization by L. laccata, Na by L. bicolor and Mn by H. leucosarx were observed in the plants growing in the experimental substrate. It has been demonstrated that the selection of substrates constitutes an important factor in the production of ectomycorrhizal plants and that the three evaluated species of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms have an enormous potential in the controlled mycorrhization of P. greggii. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melis Karaca

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose, the main energy substrate used in the CNS, is continuously supplied by the periphery. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, is foreseen as a complementary energy contributor in the brain. In particular, astrocytes actively take up glutamate and may use it through oxidative glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1−/− mice resulted in a central energy-deprivation state with increased ADP/ATP ratios and phospho-AMPK in the hypothalamus. This induced changes in the autonomous nervous system balance, with increased sympathetic activity promoting hepatic glucose production and mobilization of substrates reshaping peripheral energy stores. Our data reveal the importance of glutamate as necessary energy substrate for the brain and the role of central GDH in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis.

  9. Allosteric substrate inhibition of Arabidopsis NAD-dependent malic enzyme 1 is released by fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronconi, Marcos Ariel; Wheeler, Mariel Claudia Gerrard; Martinatto, Andrea; Zubimendi, Juan Pablo; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana

    2015-03-01

    Plant mitochondria can use L-malate and fumarate, which accumulate in large levels, as respiratory substrates. In part, this property is due to the presence of NAD-dependent malic enzymes (NAD-ME) with particular biochemical characteristics. Arabidopsis NAD-ME1 exhibits a non-hyperbolic behavior for the substrate L-malate, and its activity is strongly stimulated by fumarate. Here, the possible structural connection between these properties was explored through mutagenesis, kinetics, and fluorescence studies. The results indicated that NAD-ME1 has a regulatory site for L-malate that can also bind fumarate. L-Malate binding to this site elicits a sigmoidal and low substrate-affinity response, whereas fumarate binding turns NAD-ME1 into a hyperbolic and high substrate affinity enzyme. This effect was also observed when the allosteric site was either removed or altered. Hence, fumarate is not really an activator, but suppresses the inhibitory effect of l-malate. In addition, residues Arg50, Arg80 and Arg84 showed different roles in organic acid binding. These residues form a triad, which is the basis of the homo and heterotrophic effects that characterize NAD-ME1. The binding of L-malate and fumarate at the same allosteric site is herein reported for a malic enzyme and clearly indicates an important role of NAD-ME1 in processes that control flow of C4 organic acids in Arabidopsis mitochondrial metabolism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Homo-epitaxial diamond film growth on ion implanted diamond substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiser, P.S.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kostidis, L.I.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The nucleation of CVD diamond is a complicated process, governed by many interrelated parameters. In the present work we attempt to elucidate the effect of strain on the growth of a homo-epitaxial CVD diamond. We have employed laterally confined high dose (MeV) Helium ion implantation to produce surface swelling of the substrate. The strain is enhanced by the lateral confinement of the implanted region to squares of 100 x 100 {mu}m{sup 2}. After ion implantation, micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to map the surface strain. The substrates were then inserted into a CVD reactor and a CVD diamond film was grown upon them. Since the strained regions were laterally confined, it was then possible to monitor the effect of strain on diamond nucleation. The substrates were also analysed using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS), Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ion Beam induced Luminescence (IBIL). 7 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  12. Role of MYC in Anchorage-Dependent Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benaud, Christelle

    2000-01-01

    .... We have shown, here using a human mammary epithelial model, that the expression of the early growth control gene, c-Myc, is directly regulated by cell adhesion through a 1 integrin-dependent pathway...

  13. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  14. Thickness-Dependent Properties of YBCO Films Grown on GZO/CLO-Buffered NiW Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmivirta, M.; Huhtinen, H.; Yue, Zhao

    2017-01-01

    To study the role of novel Gd2Zr2O7/Ce0.9La0.1O2 buffer layer structure on a biaxially textured NiW substrate, a set of YBa2Cu3O7−δ (YBCO) films with different thicknesses were prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Interface imperfections as well as thickness-dependent structural properties...... were observed in the YBCO thin films. The structure is also reflected into the improved superconducting properties with the highest critical current densities in films with intermediate thicknesses. Therefore,it can be concluded that the existing buffer layers need more optimization before they can...... be successfully used for films with various thicknesses. This issue is linked to the extremely susceptible growth method of PLD when compared to the commonly used chemical deposition methods. Nevertheless, PLD-grown films can give a hint on what to concentrate to be able to further improve the buffer layer...

  15. Substrate mediated growth of organic semiconducting thin films; Templateffekte bei der Strukturierung organischer Halbleiterfilme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzen, Jan

    2010-09-17

    Since electronic properties of molecular materials are closely related to their structural order a precise control of the molecular packing and crystalline orientation of thin films is of vital interest for an optimization of organic electronic devices. Of particular interest in this respect is the initial stage of film formation which is largely governed by the interplay of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions. One approach to control the molecular film structure is based on substrate mediated growth. In this respect we have studied structural properties of thin films of pentacene, pentacene- 5,7,12,14-tetrone and perfluoro-pentacene which were grown onto various substrates including metals, metal oxides and graphite. On metal surfaces the molecules initially form a chemisorbed monolayer where molecules even can be uniformly aligned when using appropriate substrates with twofold symmetry. Further deposition, however, is accompanied by a pronounced dewetting and formation of disjoined islands which results from a large structural mismatch between the molecular arrangement in the monolayer and the crystalline phase. In some cases it is possible to orient such islands by utilizing step mediated nucleation and decoration of step bunches which allows the preparation of azimuthally well oriented elongated islands. On single crystalline oxides the growth parallels the situation found before for SiO{sub 2} where islands of upright oriented molecules are formed. The growth on graphite is somewhat particular since the lattice provides a natural template for acenes yielding epitaxially ordered monolayer films with planar adsorption geometry like in case of metals. Interestingly, however, no dewetting occurs upon further growth and instead rather smooth films are formed. The detailed analysis for the case of pentacene showed that the substrate-molecule interaction actually is weaker than the intermolecular interaction so that multilayer films can lift the

  16. Twin-assisted growth of nominally stable substrates underneath dewetted Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fang; Xie, Dong Yue [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Majdi, Tahereh [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7 (Canada); Zhu, Guo-zhen, E-mail: zhugz@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Rd., Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-03-15

    By applying a simple and inexpensive thermal treatment, we synthesized supported gold-oxide nanostructures, which have potential applications to plasmonic devices and biosensors. The regrowth of nominally stable substrates under gold nanoparticles is associated with the appearance of preferential orientations of dewetted nanoparticles and the formation of atomically sharp interfacial monolayers. Steps present at the interfacial monolayer usually occur at defects including the intersection points of twin planes at the interface. They were related to the nucleation and immigration of the interfacial monolayers, prompting the substrate regrowth. Accordingly, we proposed the twin-assisted growth mechanism, which provides insight on the synthesis of gold-oxide nanostructures. - Highlights: • The twin-assisted growth mechanism is proposed for the abnormal regrowth of substrate underneath Au nanoparticles. • The substrate regrowth is related to the steps and ledges that are present at the Au–MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} interfacial monolayers. • Interfacial steps are detected at defects such as the intersecting points of twin planes at the interface.

  17. Twin-assisted growth of nominally stable substrates underneath dewetted Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fang; Xie, Dong Yue; Majdi, Tahereh; Zhu, Guo-zhen

    2016-01-01

    By applying a simple and inexpensive thermal treatment, we synthesized supported gold-oxide nanostructures, which have potential applications to plasmonic devices and biosensors. The regrowth of nominally stable substrates under gold nanoparticles is associated with the appearance of preferential orientations of dewetted nanoparticles and the formation of atomically sharp interfacial monolayers. Steps present at the interfacial monolayer usually occur at defects including the intersection points of twin planes at the interface. They were related to the nucleation and immigration of the interfacial monolayers, prompting the substrate regrowth. Accordingly, we proposed the twin-assisted growth mechanism, which provides insight on the synthesis of gold-oxide nanostructures. - Highlights: • The twin-assisted growth mechanism is proposed for the abnormal regrowth of substrate underneath Au nanoparticles. • The substrate regrowth is related to the steps and ledges that are present at the Au–MgAl 2 O 4 interfacial monolayers. • Interfacial steps are detected at defects such as the intersecting points of twin planes at the interface.

  18. Effect of different substrates on growth of Mimosa bimucronata seedlings inoculate with rhizobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Müller Freire

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth response of Mimosa bimucronata (DC O. Kuntze seedlings in nursery conditions to inoculation with rhizobium strains previously selected using different substrates. An experimental design of randomized blocks with split plots was used, testing three substrates (pure organic-containing clay, sand and manure in 1: 1: 1 v: v: v ratio; organomineral mixed with 30% straw and sand with vermiculite in 1: 1 v: v and four N sources (inoculation with strains BR 3461 and BR 3470, control with N fertilization and control without fertilization, totalizing 12 treatments. Height and stem diameter were evaluate after 90 days and shoot, root and nodules dry mass were evaluate after 120 days. Organomineral substrates provided better seedling growth. However, only organic-substrate with straw and sand with vermiculite showed positive responses of plants inoculated with BR3470 strain. The performance of the inoculated seedlings was not higher than that of seedlings fertilized with N. The rate of N applied stimulated nodulation rather than inhibit it.

  19. Enhancing trichloroethylene degradation using non-aromatic compounds as growth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjin; Hwang, Jeongmin; Chung, Jinwook; Bae, Wookeun

    2014-06-30

    The effect of non-aromatic compounds on the trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation of toluene-oxidizing bacteria were evaluated using Burkholderia cepacia G4 that expresses toluene 2-monooxygenase and Pseudomonas putida that expresses toluene dioxygenase. TCE degradation rates for B. cepacia G4 and P. putida with toluene alone as growth substrate were 0.144 and 0.123 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively. When glucose, acetate and ethanol were fed as additional growth substrates, those values increased up to 0.196, 0.418 and 0.530 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for B. cepacia G4 and 0.319, 0.219 and 0.373 μg-TCE/mg-protein h, respectively for P. putida. In particular, the addition of ethanol resulted in a high TCE degradation rate regardless of the initial concentration. The use of a non-aromatic compound as an additional substrate probably enhanced the TCE degradation because of the additional supply of NADH that is consumed in co-metabolic degradation of TCE. Also, it is expected that the addition of a non-aromatic substrate can reduce the necessary dose of toluene and, subsequently, minimize the potential competitive inhibition upon TCE co-metabolism by toluene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemically Engineered Substrates for Patternable Growth of Two-Dimensional Chalcogenide Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingzhan; Wu, Jinxiong; Lin, Li; Liu, Yujing; Deng, Bing; Guo, Yunfan; Lin, Yuanwei; Xie, Tian; Dang, Wenhui; Zhou, Yubing; Peng, Hailin

    2016-11-22

    The key challenge of direct integration of two-dimensional (2D) chalcogenide crystals into functional modules is precise control of the nucleation sites of the building blocks. Herein, we exploit the chemical activities and surface engineering of the substrates to manipulate the nucleation energy barrier of 2D crystals and thereby realize the patternable growth of 2D crystals. The selective-region chemical modifications of the substrates are achieved via microcontact printing combined with the elegant self-assembly of octadecyltrichlorosilane molecules on the substrates. The patternable growth method is versatile and can be used as a general strategy for growing a broad class of high-quality 2D chalcogenide crystals with tailorable configurations on a variety of chemically engineered substrates. Moreover, we demonstrate flexible transparent electrodes based on large-scale patterned nanogrids of topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3 , which possess tailored trade-off between electric conductivity and optical transmittance across the visible to near-infrared regime. We hope this method may open an avenue to the efficient integration and batch production of 2D chalcogenide crystals and could inspire ongoing efforts of the fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures.

  1. Localized Technological Change and Path-Dependent Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bassanini, A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years the theory of macroeconomic growth has seen an expanding literature building upon the idea that technological change is localized (technology-specific) to investigate various phenomena such as leapfrogging, take-off, and social mobility. In this paper I explore the relationship between localized technological change and dependence on history of long-run aggregate output growth. The growth model I set forth show that, subject to mild assumptions on the stochastic process repres...

  2. Growth and BZO-doping of the nanostructured YBCO thin films on buffered metal substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huhtinen, H.; Irjala, M.; Paturi, P.

    2010-01-01

    The growth of the nanostructured YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) films is investigated for the first time on biaxially textured NiW substrates used in coated conductor technology. The optimization process of superconducting layers is made in wide magnetic field and temperature range in order to understand...... the vortex pinning structure and mechanism in our films prepared from nanostructured material. Structural analysis shows that growth mechanism in YBCO films grown on NiW is completely different when compared to YBCO on STO. Films on NiW are much rougher, there is huge in-plane variation of YBCO crystals...... and moreover out-of-plane long range lattice ordering is greatly reduced. Magnetic measurements demonstrate that jc in films grown on NiW is higher in high magnetic fields and low temperatures. This effect is connected to the amount of pinning centres observed in films on metal substrates which are effective...

  3. Growth of Horizonatal ZnO Nanowire Arrays on Any Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Qin, Yong

    2008-12-04

    A general method is presented for growing laterally aligned and patterned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays on any substrate as long as it is flat. The orientation control is achieved using the combined effect from ZnO seed layer and the catalytically inactive Cr (or Sn) layer for NW growth. The growth temperature (< 100 °C) is so low that the method can be applied to a wide range of substrates that can be inorganic, organic, single crystal, polycrystal, or amorphous. The laterally aligned ZnO NW arrays can be employed for various applications, such as gas sensor, field effect transistor, nanogenerator, and flexible electronics. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  4. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra E Benkwitt

    Full Text Available Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion.

  5. Graphitic carbon growth on crystalline and amorphous oxide substrates using molecular beam epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Christine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report graphitic carbon growth on crystalline and amorphous oxide substrates by using carbon molecular beam epitaxy. The films are characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formations of nanocrystalline graphite are observed on silicon dioxide and glass, while mainly sp2 amorphous carbons are formed on strontium titanate and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Interestingly, flat carbon layers with high degree of graphitization are formed even on amorphous oxides. Our results provide a progress toward direct graphene growth on oxide materials. PACS: 81.05.uf; 81.15.Hi; 78.30.Ly.

  6. Growth of higher fungi on wheat straw and their impact on the digestibility of the substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyson, E.; Verachtert, H. (Catholic Univ. of Leuven (Belgium). Faculty of Agriculture)

    1991-12-01

    The influence of the growth of three higher fungi on the composition of wheat straw was investigated. Pleurotus pulmonarius, P. sajor-caju and Lentinus edodes grew very well on lignocellulosic substrates, breaking down a considerable amount of lignin. The initial lignin concentration of straw was halved after 12 weeks of fungal growth, doubling the enzymic digestibility. Together with lignin, the higher fungi consumed half of the amount of hemicellulose (i.e. 15%), leaving cellulose fairly intact, which should remain as an energy source for ruminants. (orig.).

  7. Scaling of elongation transition thickness during thin-film growth on weakly interacting substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, B.; Souqui, L.; Elofsson, V.; Sarakinos, K.

    2017-08-01

    The elongation transition thickness ( θElong) is a central concept in the theoretical description of thin-film growth dynamics on weakly interacting substrates via scaling relations of θElong with respect to rates of key atomistic film-forming processes. To date, these scaling laws have only been confirmed quantitatively by simulations, while experimental proof has been left ambiguous as it has not been possible to measure θElong. Here, we present a method for determining experimentally θElong for Ag films growing on amorphous SiO2: an archetypical weakly interacting film/substrate system. Our results confirm the theoretically predicted θElong scaling behavior, which then allow us to calculate the rates of adatom diffusion and island coalescence completion, in good agreement with the literature. The methodology presented herein casts the foundation for studying growth dynamics and cataloging atomistic-process rates for a wide range of weakly interacting film/substrate systems. This may provide insights into directed growth of metal films with a well-controlled morphology and interfacial structure on 2D crystals—including graphene and MoS2—for catalytic and nanoelectronic applications.

  8. Time and substrate dependent exudation of carboxylates by Lupinus albus L. and Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimmo, Tanja; Hann, Stephan; Jaitz, Leonhard; Cesco, Stefano; Gessa, Carlo Emanuele; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2011-11-01

    Root exudates influence significantly physical, chemical and biological characteristics of rhizosphere soil. Their qualitative and quantitative composition is affected by environmental factors such as pH, soil type, oxygen status, light intensity, soil temperature, plant growth, nutrient availability and microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of growth substrate and plant age on the release of carboxylates from Lupinus albus L. and Brassica napus L. Both plant species were studied in continuously percolated microcosms filled with either sand, soil or sand + soil (1:1) mixture. Soil solution was collected every week at 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after planting (DAP). Carboxylate concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-TOFMS). Oxalate, citrate, succinate, malate and maleate were detected in soil solutions of both plant species. Their concentrations were correlated with the physiological status of the plant and the growth substrate. Oxalate was the predominant carboxylate detected within the soil solution of B. napus plants while oxalate and citrate were the predominant ones found in the soil solutions of L. albus plants. The sampling determination of carboxylates released by plant roots with continuous percolation systems seems to be promising as it is a non-destructive method and allows sampling and determination of soluble low molecular weight organic compounds derived from root exudation as well as the concentration of soluble nutrients, which both might reflect the nutritional status of plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Profiling of Substrates for Zinc‐dependent Lysine Deacylase Enzymes: HDAC3 Exhibits Decrotonylase Activity In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2012-01-01

    Systematic screening of the activities of the eleven human zinc-dependent lysine deacylases against a series of fluorogenic substrates (see scheme) as well as kinetic evaluation revealed substrates for screenings of histone deacetylases HDAC10 and HDAC11 at reasonably low enzyme concentrations...

  10. ROS-activated ATM-dependent phosphorylation of cytoplasmic substrates identified by large scale phosphoproteomics screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    checkpoints, initiating DNA repair and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach...... to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and A-T (ataxia-telangiectasia) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites......-dependent after H2O2 exposure and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM-dependence for translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These data provide new insights into the activation of ATM by oxidative stress through identification of novel substrates for ATM in the cytoplasm. 2....

  11. Effects of the Base Substrate and Dietary supplementson Growth Indices Florida Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Makenali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oystermush rooms contain a wide enzymatic system to catalyze lignocellu lose and naturally live in organs of plants that are protein-rich. Agricultural and industrial wastes contain organic cellulosic materials such as cereal straw, sawdust and leaves that are suitable substrate for growth of oyster mushrooms. Previous studies have shown that dietary supplements increase growth indices of oyster mushrooms. Materials and Methods: Spawn of Florida oyster mushrooms wereprovided experimentally on grains of wheat. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory of the Agricultural College of Mehr Shar, Islamic Azad University of Karaj, Iran in 2011. Two factors were considered in this study substrate (A and dietary supplements(B. Sugarcane bag asse (A1 and wheat straw (A2 were shed into polyethylene bags after they were pasteurized by boiling vapor and spawning was conducted according to wet weight of straw bags which was 4 kg. Supplements of Nitrogen werecottonseed powder, 2%soya flour, and urea0.5% that were added to substrate according to dry weight of substrate (1334 gr. Mushrooms were transferred to the laboratory after cropping in order to measure dry and wet weight. They were packed and dried in the oven during 24-72 hours at 60-70ºC. In order to estimate the biological efficiency, the produced crop was divided by weight consumed substrate that was multiplied by 100. A completely randomized factorial statistical experiment according to completely randomized design with 16 treatments and three replications was conducted. MSTAT soft ware was used for statistical analysis and the Dunkan test was used for comparing mean data with probability of 5%.Finally figures were drown using Excel. Results and Discussion: In wheat straw substrate mushrooms were produced with high biological efficiency and yield, because compared to sugarcane bagasse, wheat straw needs a shorter period for fermentation, contains more nutrients, catalyzed faster

  12. Modification of graphene chemistry for metal nanoparticle growth: the effect of substrate selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniewski, Anna; Nemanich, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow metal nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include silicon oxide, silicon, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. This work is supported through the National Science Foundation under Grant # DMR-1206935 .

  13. Halo(natronoarchaea isolated from hypersaline lakes utilize cellulose and chitin as growth substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Y Sorokin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, extremely halophilic euryarchaeota were considered mostly as aerobic heterotrophs utilizing simple organic compounds as growth substrates. Almost nothing is known on the ability of these prokaryotes to utilize complex polysaccharides as cellulose, xylan and chitin. Although few haloarchaeal cellulases and chitinases were recently characterized, the analysis of currently available haloarchaeal genomes deciphered numerous genes encoding glycosidases (GHs of various families including endoglucanases and chitinases. However, all these haloarchaea were isolated and cultivated on simple substrates and their ability to grow on polysaccharides in situ or in vitro is unknown. This study examines several halo(natronoarchaeal strains from geographically distant hypersaline lakes for the ability to grow on insoluble polymers as a sole growth substrate in salt-saturated mineral media. Some of them belonged to known taxa, while other represented novel phylogenetic lineages within the class Halobacteria. All isolates produced extracellular extremely salt tolerant cellulases or chitinases, either cell-free or cell-bound. Obtained results demonstrate a presence of diverse population of haloarchaeal cellulo/chitinotrophs in hypersaline habitats indicating that euryarchaea participate in aerobic mineralization of recalcitrant organic polymers in salt-saturated environments.

  14. Self-catalysed growth of InAs nanowires on bare Si substrates by droplet epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anyebe, E.A.; Zhuang, Q.; Lawson, S.; Robson, A.J.; Kolosov, O.; Sanchez, A.M.; Ponomarenko, L.; Zhukov, A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the self-catalyst growth of vertically aligned InAs nanowires on bare Si(111) by droplet epitaxy. The growth conditions of indium droplets suitable for nucleation and growth of nanowires have been identified. We have then realized vertically aligned and non-tapered InAs nanowires on bare Si(111) substrates through optimal indium droplets. It was found that the lateral dimensions and density of nano-wires are defined by the indium droplets. This technique unravels a controllable, cost-effective and time-efficient route to fabricating functional monolithic hybrid structures of InAs nanowires on silicon. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Effects of substrate type on growth and mortality of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) exposed to the predator Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    Structure and complexity of the substrate are important habitat characteristics for benthic epifauna. The specific growth and mortality rates and inducible defence characters on medium- sized blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) exposed to shore crabs (Carcinus maenas L.) were examined on three...... different substrate types in combined field and laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that complexity of the substrate increased blue mussel survival significantly, through a decrease in predation pressure. However, increased intraspecific competition for food on the complex substrate resulted...... in significantly lower growth rates of the mussels. Inducible defence characters were also influenced by substrate type. Blue mussels were more affected by predators on the structurally simple substrate, where they developed thicker shells and a larger posterior adductor muscle....

  16. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  17. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Room temperature growth of biaxially aligned yttria-stabilized zirconia films on glass substrates by pulsed-laser deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Li Peng; Mazumder, J

    2003-01-01

    Room temperature deposition of biaxially textured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films on amorphous glass substrates was successfully achieved by conventional pulsed-laser deposition. The influence of the surrounding gases, their pressure and the deposition time on the structure of the films was studied. A columnar growth process was revealed based on the experimental results. The grown biaxial texture appears as a kind of substrate independence, which makes it possible to fabricate in-plane aligned YSZ films on various substrates.

  19. Real-time characterization of film growth on transparent substrates by rotating-compensator multichannel ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Collins, R W

    1998-07-01

    A multichannel spectroscopic ellipsometer in the fixed-polarizer-sample-rotating-compensator-fixed-analyzer (PSC(R)A) configuration has been developed and applied for real-time characterization of the nucleation and growth of thin films on transparent substrates. This rotating-compensator design overcomes the major disadvantages of the multichannel ellipsometer in the rotating-polarizer-sample-fixed-analyzer (P(R)SA) configuration while retaining its high speed and precision for the characterization of thin-film processes in real time. The advantages of the PSC(R)A configuration include (i) its high accuracy and precision for the detection of low-ellipticity polarization states that are generated upon reflection of linearly polarized light from transparent film-substrate systems, and (ii) the ability to characterize depolarization of the reflected light, an effect that leads to errors in ellipticity when measured with the P(R)SA configuration. A comparison of the index of refraction spectra for a glass substrate obtained in the real-time PSC(R)A mode in 2.5 s and in the ex situ fixed-polarizer-fixed-compensator-sample-rotating-analyzer (PCSA(R)) mode in ~10 min show excellent agreement, with a standard deviation between the two data sets of 8 x 10(-4), computed over the photon energy range from 1.5 to 3.5 eV. First, we describe the PSC(R)A ellipsometer calibration procedures developed specifically for transparent substrates. In addition, we describe the application of the multichannel PSC(R)A instrument for a study of thin-film diamond nucleation and growth on glass in a low-temperature microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process.

  20. Direct growth of graphene nanowalls on quartz substrates as transparent conductive electrodes for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guanhua; Zhou, Yaqing; Wang, Yu; Yan, Xin; Wu, Baoshan; Huang, Feifei; Fu, Junchi; Cheng, Qijin; Yun, Daqin

    An effective method to directly produce high-quality graphene nanowalls (GNWs) on quartz substrates was demonstrated using an advanced self-assembled ratio-frequency plasma-enhanced horizontal tube furnace deposition system under different growth times from 60s to 150s at a substrate temperature of 850∘C without using any catalyst. The synthesized well-connected three-dimensional GNWs feature outstanding electrical and optical performance: the sheet resistance varies from 1053 Ω/□ to 342 Ω/□, while the corresponding transmittance ranges from 90.4% to 67.8% at a wavelength of 550nm under different growth times. We have also demonstrated that GNWs can be used as transparent conductive electrodes for perovskite solar cells. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 6.93% can be obtained for the GNWs deposited at a growth time of 120s. Hence, our study paves a new way of using GNWs as transparent conductive electrodes in perovskite solar cells.

  1. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth.

  2. Growth and phycocyanin synthesis in the heterotrophic microalga Galdieria sulphuraria on substrates made of food waste from restaurants and bakeries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jenni K; Jensen, Henriette Casper; Pleissner, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Galdieria sulphuraria 074G (Rhodophyta) was grown heterotrophically in defined medium and on amylolytic and proteolytic hydrolysed food waste from restaurants and bakeries. Substrate uptake, growth, and phycocyanin content were quantified in the cultures. The alga utilised carbohydrates and amino...

  3. Arachidonic acid supplementation enhances in vitro skeletal muscle cell growth via a COX-2-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markworth, James F; Cameron-Smith, David

    2013-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the metabolic precursor to a diverse range of downstream bioactive lipid mediators. A positive or negative influence of individual eicosanoid species [e.g., prostaglandins (PGs), leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids] has been implicated in skeletal muscle cell growth and development. The collective role of AA-derived metabolites in physiological states of skeletal muscle growth/atrophy remains unclear. The present study aimed to determine the direct effect of free AA supplementation and subsequent eicosanoid biosynthesis on skeletal myocyte growth in vitro. C2C12 (mouse) skeletal myocytes induced to differentiate with supplemental AA exhibited dose-dependent increases in the size, myonuclear content, and protein accretion of developing myotubes, independent of changes in cell density or the rate/extent of myogenic differentiation. Nonselective (indomethacin) or cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)-selective (NS-398) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs blunted basal myogenesis, an effect that was amplified in the presence of supplemental free AA substrate. The stimulatory effects of AA persisted in preexisting myotubes via a COX-2-dependent (NS-389-sensitive) pathway, specifically implying dependency on downstream PG biosynthesis. AA-stimulated growth was associated with markedly increased secretion of PGF(2α) and PGE(2); however, incubation of myocytes with PG-rich conditioned medium failed to mimic the effects of direct AA supplementation. In vitro AA supplementation stimulates PG release and skeletal muscle cell hypertrophy via a COX-2-dependent pathway.

  4. History-dependent excitability as a single-cell substrate of transient memory for information discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Baroni

    Full Text Available Neurons react differently to incoming stimuli depending upon their previous history of stimulation. This property can be considered as a single-cell substrate for transient memory, or context-dependent information processing: depending upon the current context that the neuron "sees" through the subset of the network impinging on it in the immediate past, the same synaptic event can evoke a postsynaptic spike or just a subthreshold depolarization. We propose a formal definition of History-Dependent Excitability (HDE as a measure of the propensity to firing in any moment in time, linking the subthreshold history-dependent dynamics with spike generation. This definition allows the quantitative assessment of the intrinsic memory for different single-neuron dynamics and input statistics. We illustrate the concept of HDE by considering two general dynamical mechanisms: the passive behavior of an Integrate and Fire (IF neuron, and the inductive behavior of a Generalized Integrate and Fire (GIF neuron with subthreshold damped oscillations. This framework allows us to characterize the sensitivity of different model neurons to the detailed temporal structure of incoming stimuli. While a neuron with intrinsic oscillations discriminates equally well between input trains with the same or different frequency, a passive neuron discriminates better between inputs with different frequencies. This suggests that passive neurons are better suited to rate-based computation, while neurons with subthreshold oscillations are advantageous in a temporal coding scheme. We also address the influence of intrinsic properties in single-cell processing as a function of input statistics, and show that intrinsic oscillations enhance discrimination sensitivity at high input rates. Finally, we discuss how the recognition of these cell-specific discrimination properties might further our understanding of neuronal network computations and their relationships to the distribution and

  5. Selective Growth of PZT Nanowires on Si Substrates Using Glancing Angle Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Acevedo, D.; Mateo, D.; Hordagoda, M.; Witanachchi, S.

    Thin films and nanostructures of the ferroelectric material Lead Zirconium Titanium Oxide (PZT) offer a multitude of applications in Piezotronics, and ferroelectric capacitor memories. While the growth of PZT thin films is well established, methodologies for the fabrication of vertically-aligned and spatially ordered PZT columns in nanoscale are not common. In this work an approach that uses a self-assembled nanoparticle template in a glancing angle pulsed laser deposition (GAPLD) process is presented. Lanthanum strontium manganite oxide (LSMO) was grown by laser ablation on a Si substrate masked by a monolayer of commercially available silica nanospheres (SNS) with diameter of 250nm self-assembled in a closed-pack hexagonal configuration (HCP) using Langmuir-Blodgett method. The HCP configuration of the mask will allows for the formation of LSMO islands on the crevices in between spheres, which will serve as seed layers for PZT growth. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the grown PZT's morphology. Due to the ballistic shadowing effect introduced by the GAPLD, PZT columns in the form of hexagonal nanopillars evolved over the spatially ordered nanotemplate. Tunability of growth was achieved for certain PZT growth conditions. Morphological and structural properties of these structures were studied and showed a preferred orientation of growth of the (200) tetragonal/rhombohedral phase.

  6. Stabilisation of spent mushroom substrate for application as a plant growth-promoting organic amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Fabiana S; Tatti, Enrico; Abram, Florence; Wilson, Jude; O'Flaherty, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Over three million tonnes of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) are produced in Europe every year as a by-product of the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus. The management of SMS has become an increasing challenge for the mushroom production industry, and finding environmentally and economically sustainable solutions for this organic residue is, therefore, highly desirable. Due to its physical properties and nutrient content, SMS has great potential to be employed in agricultural and horticultural sectors, and further contribute to reduce the use of non-renewable resources, such as peat. However, SMS is often regarded as not being stable and/or mature, which hampers its wide use for crop production. Here, we demonstrate the stabilisation of SMS and its subsequent use as organic fertiliser and partial peat replacement in horticulture. The stabilisation was performed in a laboratory-scale composting system, with controlled temperature and aeration. Physical and chemical parameters were monitored during composting and provided information on the progress of the process. Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) content was found to be the most reliable parameter to predict SMS stability. In situ oxygen consumption indicated the main composting phases, reflecting major changes in microbial activity. The structure of the bacterial community was also found to be a potential predictor of stability, as the compositional changes followed the composting progress. By contrast, the fungal community did not present clear successional process along the experiment. Maturity and quality of the stabilised SMS were assessed in a horticultural growing trial. When used as the sole fertiliser source, SMS was able to support Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) growth and significantly improved grass yield with a concentration-dependent response, increasing grass biomass up to 300%, when compared to the untreated control. In summary, the results indicated that the method employed was efficient in

  7. Nucleation and Growth of GaN on GaAs (001) Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, Timothy J.; Hafich, Michael J.; Heller, Edwin J.; Lee, Stephen R.; Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Ruvimov, Sergei; Sullivan, John P.

    1999-05-03

    The nucleation of GaN thin films on GaAs is investigated for growth at 620 "C. An rf plasma cell is used to generate chemically active nitrogen from N2. An arsenic flux is used in the first eight monolayer of nitride growth to enhance nucleation of the cubic phase. Subsequent growth does not require an As flux to preserve the cubic phase. The nucleation of smooth interfaces and GaN films with low stacking fault densities is dependent upon relative concentrations of active nitrogen species in the plasma and on the nitrogen to gallium flux ratio.

  8. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 4. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze frog Rana temporalis is influenced by genetic relatedness of the cohort. S Girish S K Saidapur. Articles Volume 28 Issue 4 June 2003 pp 489-496 ...

  9. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Girish S and Saidapur S K 2002 Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze frog Rana temporalis is influenced by genetic relatedness of the ... kin interaction during larval development in anurans seems to vary with the ... leaves were cut into small pieces of uniform size before boiling. Ten grams of ...

  10. SUBSTRATE COMPOSITION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF GROWTH OF SEEDLINGS GUAPURUVU (SCHIZOLOBIUM PARAHYBA VELL. BLAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Humberto Silva e Castro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizolobium parahyba Vell. Blake is a native species of the Atlantic river forest that its wood is very efficient to make doors, fruit packaging, to use in construction, interior works and other uses. This work aimed to evaluate the influence of substrate composition on emergence and growth physiological parameters of Schizolobium parahyba seedlings. Selected seeds were subjected to grow in the following compositions of the substrate: T1 witness (haplustox - LV, T2 LV + potato processing waste (1:1 + chemical treatment (TQ: 100 of limestone + 100 g of superphosphate, T 3 LV + earthworm humus (1:1 + TQ and T 4 LV + sand + cattle manure (1:1:2 + TQ. Seedling emergence was evaluated at 21 days after sowing (DAS and at 60 DAS measured the shoot height, root length, fresh weight of shoot, root fresh weight, dry weight of shoot and root dry weight. The use of earthworm compost, cattle manure and waste from potato processing proved effective for Schizolobium parahyba seedlings production, since no significant differences were verified among the treatments applied. The use of organic sources to supplement the substrate is of paramount importance for native species seedlings production.

  11. Plantago lanceolata growth and Cr uptake after mycorrhizal inoculation in a Cr amended substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Nogales

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from two chromium contaminated sites, one with 275 mg kg-1 of Cr (zone A and the other with 550 mg kg-1 Cr (zone B, were multiplied and tentatively identified. The effect of both fungal consortia on Plantago lanceolata plant growth in a substrate amended with 200 mg kg-1 of Cr and with 400 mg kg-1 Cr was assessed and compared with the growth of plants inoculated with Glomus intraradices BEG72. Only the plants inoculated with G. intraradices BEG72 and with the fungal consortia obtained from the area with a high Cr contamination (zone B grew in the soil with 400 mg kg-1 of Cr. The consortia of fungi from zone B, decreased the plant’s uptake/translocation of the heavy metal compared with G. intraradices BEG72. These results underscore the differential effect of AM fungi in conferring bioprotection in Cr contaminated soils.

  12. Growth mechanism and edge effect of buckling patterns in elastic films deposited on stiff substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Lin; Yu, Sen-Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Elastic tantalum films have been prepared on stiff substrates (glass slides) by direct current magnetron sputtering, and the growth mechanism and edge effect of buckling patterns originated from the release of large compressive stress are investigated. The buckling patterns are found to nucleate at the film edge, and then propagate into the central area and follow an exponential growth behaviour. In the vicinity of the film edge, they generally have first a straight-sided shape perpendicular to the edge, and then transform into bifurcation and buckle network (or telephone-cord structures). Various geometrical parameters including spacing, length and width of the straight-sided buckles near the film edge have been measured and analysed in detail.

  13. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth. - Highlights: ► Electron beam irradiation is effective against soil-borne pathogens. ► Application of irradiation at dose 1.5 kGy completely inhibited in vitro development of Phytophthora cinnamomi. ► Irradiation of horticultural substrata did not influence the growth of plants.

  14. Multiple growths of epitaxial lift-off solar cells from a single InP substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyusang; Shiu, Kuen-Ting; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Renshaw, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate multiple growths of flexible, thin-film indium tin oxide-InP Schottky-barrier solar cells on a single InP wafer via epitaxial lift-off (ELO). Layers that protect the InP parent wafer surface during the ELO process are subsequently removed by selective wet-chemical etching, with the active solar cell layers transferred to a thin, flexible plastic host substrate by cold welding at room temperature. The first- and second-growth solar cells exhibit no performance degradation under simulated Atmospheric Mass 1.5 Global (AM 1.5G) illumination, and have a power conversion efficiency of η p =14.4±0.4% and η p =14.8±0.2%, respectively. The current-voltage characteristics for the solar cells and atomic force microscope images of the substrate indicate that the parent wafer is undamaged, and is suitable for reuse after ELO and the protection-layer removal processes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation, and three-dimensional surface profiling show a surface that is comparable or improved to the original epiready wafer following ELO. Wafer reuse over multiple cycles suggests that high-efficiency; single-crystal thin-film solar cells may provide a practical path to low-cost solar-to-electrical energy conversion.

  15. Role of the substrate on the growth of Ni-Ti sputtered thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, R.M.S. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: rui.martins@esrf.fr; Schell, N.; Beckers, M. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Silva, R.J.C.; Mahesh, K.K.; Fernandes, F.M. Braz [CENIMAT, Campus da FCT/UNL, 2829-516 Monte de Caparica (Portugal)

    2008-05-25

    Ni-Ti thin films have been recognized as promising and high performance materials in the field of microelectromechanical system applications. However, important issues like formation of film texture and its control are still unresolved. Widening the scope of previous experiments concerning the influence of the deposition parameters on the Ni-Ti films structure, here we show how different crystallographic orientations can be obtained by changing the substrate type. The growth of near-equiatomic Ni-Ti films, deposited by magnetron co-sputtering from Ni-Ti and Ti targets on heated substrates ({approx}470 deg. C), has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction at a synchrotron radiation beamline. As mentioned in other studies for depositions on Si{sub 100}, a 1 1 0 fiber texture is observed for the B2 phase. However, a preferential stacking of 1 0 0 planes of the B2 phase parallel to the film surface was observed when using a MgO{sub 100} substrate. The preferential orientation of B2{sub 100}||MgO{sub 100} was very strong and was kept as such until the end of the deposition, which lasted for 7.2 ks ({approx}900 nm). Ni-Ti films were also deposited on a TiN layer ({approx}15 nm) previously deposited on top of a SiO{sub 2}/Si{sub 100} substrate. In this case, a crossover from 1 1 0 oriented grains dominating at small thicknesses, to 2 1 1 oriented grains taking over at larger thicknesses was observed. These are promising results concerning the manipulation of the crystallographic orientations of Ni-Ti thin films, since the texture has a strong influence on the extent of the strain recovery.

  16. Comparison of two metal-dependent pyruvate aldolases related by convergent evolution: substrate specificity, kinetic mechanism, and substrate channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weijun; Baker, Perrin; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2010-05-04

    HpaI and BphI are two pyruvate class II aldolases found in aromatic meta-cleavage degradation pathways that catalyze similar reactions but are not related in sequence. Steady-state kinetic analysis of the aldol addition reactions and product inhibition assays showed that HpaI exhibits a rapid equilibrium random order mechanism while BphI exhibits a compulsory order mechanism, with pyruvate binding first. Both aldolases are able to utilize aldehyde acceptors two to five carbons in length; however, HpaI showed broader specificity and had a preference for aldehydes containing longer linear alkyl chains or C2-OH substitutions. Both enzymes were able to bind 2-keto acids larger than pyruvate, but only HpaI was able to utilize both pyruvate and 2-ketobutanoate as carbonyl donors in the aldol addition reaction. HpaI lacks stereospecific control producing racemic mixtures of 4-hydroxy-2-oxopentanoate (HOPA) from pyruvate and acetaldehyde while BphI synthesizes only (4S)-HOPA. BphI is also able to utilize acetaldehyde produced by the reduction of acetyl-CoA catalyzed by the associated aldehyde dehydrogenase, BphJ. This aldehyde was directly channeled from the dehydrogenase to the aldolase active sites, with an efficiency of 84%. Furthermore, the BphJ reductive deacylation reaction increased 4-fold when BphI was catalyzing the aldol addition reaction. Therefore, the BphI-BphJ enzyme complex exhibits unique bidirectionality in substrate channeling and allosteric activation.

  17. Identification of new protein substrates for the chloroplast ATP-dependent Clp protease supports its constitutive role in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanne, Tara M; Sjögren, Lars L E; Koussevitzky, Shai; Clarke, Adrian K

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-dependent Clp protease in plant chloroplasts consists of a heterogeneous proteolytic core containing multiple ClpP and ClpR paralogues. In this study, we have examined in detail the only viable knockout mutant to date of one of these subunits in Arabidopsis thaliana, ClpR1. Loss of ClpR1 caused a slow-growth phenotype, with chlorotic leaves during early development that later partially recovered upon maturity. Analysis of the Clp proteolytic core in the clpR1 mutant (clpR1-1) revealed approx. 10% of the wild-type levels remaining, probably due to a relative increase in the closely related ClpR3 protein and its partial substitution of ClpR1 in the core complex. A proteomic approach using an in organello proteolytic assay revealed 19 new potential substrates for the chloroplast Clp protease. Many of these substrates were constitutive enzymes involved in different metabolic pathways, including photosynthetic carbon fixation, nitrogen metabolism and chlorophyll/haem biosynthesis, whereas others function in housekeeping roles such as RNA maturation, protein synthesis and maturation, and recycling processes. In contrast, degradation of the stress-related chloroplast proteins Hsp21 (heat-shock protein 21) and lipoxygenase 2 was unaffected in the clpR1-1 line and thus not facilitated by the Clp protease. Overall, we show that the chloroplast Clp protease is principally a constitutive enzyme that degrades numerous stromal proteins, a feature that almost certainly underlies its vital importance for chloroplast function and plant viability.

  18. A Xylenol Orange-Based Screening Assay for the Substrate Specificity of Flavin-Dependent para-Phenol Oxidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A. Ewing

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO and eugenol oxidase (EUGO are flavin-dependent enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of para-substituted phenols. This makes them potentially interesting biocatalysts for the conversion of lignin-derived aromatic monomers to value-added compounds. To facilitate their biocatalytic exploitation, it is important to develop methods by which variants of the enzymes can be rapidly screened for increased activity towards substrates of interest. Here, we present the development of a screening assay for the substrate specificity of para-phenol oxidases based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide using the ferric-xylenol orange complex method. The assay was used to screen the activity of VAO and EUGO towards a set of twenty-four potential substrates. This led to the identification of 4-cyclopentylphenol as a new substrate of VAO and EUGO and 4-cyclohexylphenol as a new substrate of VAO. Screening of a small library of VAO and EUGO active-site variants for alterations in their substrate specificity led to the identification of a VAO variant (T457Q with increased activity towards vanillyl alcohol (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl alcohol and a EUGO variant (V436I with increased activity towards chavicol (4-allylphenol and 4-cyclopentylphenol. This assay provides a quick and efficient method to screen the substrate specificity of para-phenol oxidases, facilitating the enzyme engineering of known para-phenol oxidases and the evaluation of the substrate specificity of novel para-phenol oxidases.

  19. A Xylenol Orange-Based Screening Assay for the Substrate Specificity of Flavin-Dependent para-Phenol Oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Tom A; van Noord, Aster; Paul, Caroline E; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2018-01-14

    Vanillyl alcohol oxidase (VAO) and eugenol oxidase (EUGO) are flavin-dependent enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of para -substituted phenols. This makes them potentially interesting biocatalysts for the conversion of lignin-derived aromatic monomers to value-added compounds. To facilitate their biocatalytic exploitation, it is important to develop methods by which variants of the enzymes can be rapidly screened for increased activity towards substrates of interest. Here, we present the development of a screening assay for the substrate specificity of para -phenol oxidases based on the detection of hydrogen peroxide using the ferric-xylenol orange complex method. The assay was used to screen the activity of VAO and EUGO towards a set of twenty-four potential substrates. This led to the identification of 4-cyclopentylphenol as a new substrate of VAO and EUGO and 4-cyclohexylphenol as a new substrate of VAO. Screening of a small library of VAO and EUGO active-site variants for alterations in their substrate specificity led to the identification of a VAO variant (T457Q) with increased activity towards vanillyl alcohol (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl alcohol) and a EUGO variant (V436I) with increased activity towards chavicol (4-allylphenol) and 4-cyclopentylphenol. This assay provides a quick and efficient method to screen the substrate specificity of para -phenol oxidases, facilitating the enzyme engineering of known para- phenol oxidases and the evaluation of the substrate specificity of novel para -phenol oxidases.

  20. Resolving nanoparticle growth mechanisms from size- and time-dependent growth rate analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichelstorfer, Lukas; Stolzenburg, Dominik; Ortega, John; Karl, Thomas; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.; Winkler, Paul M.

    2018-01-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation occurs frequently in the global atmosphere and may play a crucial role in climate by affecting cloud properties. The relevance of newly formed nanoparticles depends largely on the dynamics governing their initial formation and growth to sizes where they become important for cloud microphysics. One key to the proper understanding of nanoparticle effects on climate is therefore hidden in the growth mechanisms. In this study we have developed and successfully tested two independent methods based on the aerosol general dynamics equation, allowing detailed retrieval of time- and size-dependent nanoparticle growth rates. Both methods were used to analyze particle formation from two different biogenic precursor vapors in controlled chamber experiments. Our results suggest that growth rates below 10 nm show much more variation than is currently thought and pin down the decisive size range of growth at around 5 nm where in-depth studies of physical and chemical particle properties are needed.

  1. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of space dependent growth in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya D Gallo

    Full Text Available The relationship between growth rate and environmental space is an unresolved issue in teleosts. While it is known from aquaculture studies that stocking density has a negative relationship to growth, the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, primarily because the growth rate of populations rather than individual fish were the subject of all previous studies. Here we investigate this problem in the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, which consists of a sighted surface-dwelling form (surface fish and several blind cave-dwelling (cavefish forms. Surface fish and cavefish are distinguished by living in spatially contrasting environments and therefore are excellent models to study the effects of environmental size on growth. Multiple controlled growth experiments with individual fish raised in confined or unconfined spaces showed that environmental size has a major impact on growth rate in surface fish, a trait we have termed space dependent growth (SDG. In contrast, SDG has regressed to different degrees in the Pachón and Tinaja populations of cavefish. Mating experiments between surface and Pachón cavefish show that SDG is inherited as a dominant trait and is controlled by multiple genetic factors. Despite its regression in blind cavefish, SDG is not affected when sighted surface fish are raised in darkness, indicating that vision is not required to perceive and react to environmental space. Analysis of plasma cortisol levels showed that an elevation above basal levels occurred soon after surface fish were exposed to confined space. This initial cortisol peak was absent in Pachón cavefish, suggesting that the effects of confined space on growth may be mediated partly through a stress response. We conclude that Astyanax reacts to confined spaces by exhibiting SDG, which has a genetic component and shows evolutionary regression during adaptation of cavefish to confined environments.

  3. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs

  4. Solid-support substrates for plant growth at a lunar base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Galindo, C.; Henninger, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zeoponics is only in its developmental stages at the Johnson Space Center and is defined as the cultivation of plants in zeolite substrates that contain several essential plant growth cations on their exchange sites, and have minor amounts of mineral phases and/or anion-exchange resins that supply essential plant growth anions. Zeolites are hydrated aluminosilicates of alkali and alkaline earth cations with the ability to exchange most of their constituent exchange cations as well as hydrate/dehydrate without change to their structural framework. Because zeolites have extremely high cation exchange capabilities, they are very attractive media for plant growth. It is possible to partially or fully saturate plant-essential cations on zeolites. Zeoponic systems will probably have their greatest applications at planetary bases (e.g., lunar bases). Lunar raw materials will have to be located that are suited for the synthesis of zeolites and other exchange resings. Lunar 'soil' simulants have been or are being prepared for zeolite/smectite synthesis and 'soil' dissolution studies.

  5. Recipients and substrate for germination and growth of chrysanthemum and “Viola x wittrockiana” plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kelli pirola

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the substrate effect and recipient size on the germination and initial growth of chrysanthemum and perfect-love ornamental plants. The works was carried out in the Horticulture Nursery from UTFPR - Campus Dois Vizinhos - Paraná State, Brazil. The experimental design was in blocks randomized, in factorial 3 x 4 (recipient size x substrate, with four replications, considering 4 recipients by plot. It was used as recipients, small, medium and king container and as substrate the Plantmax® and the mixture Red Latosoil + Sand + Poultry Litter 1 (1:1:1 v/v, Red Latosoil + Sand + Poultry Litter 2 (1:1:1 v/v and Red Latosoil + Sand + Poultry Litter 1 + Poultry Litter 2 (1:1:1:1 v/v. The Poultry Litter 1 and 2 had wood shavings and sawdust as different ingredients, respectively. The germination (%, total lenght plants(cm, roots length(cm, height(cm, leaf number and plants dry mass matter(g, were evaluate 63 days after experiment installation. For germination and early development of perfect-love the best container was small with a mixture the red latosoil + sand + Poultry Litter 1 + Poultry Litter 2 (1:1:1:1 v/v. For Chrysanthemum, besides to this container and mixing, the mixtures were also important Red Latosoil + sand + Poultry Litter 1 (1:1:1 v/v e Red Latosoil + sand + Poultry Litter 2 (1:1:1 v/v.

  6. Growth and characterization of thick cBN coatings on silicon and tool substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, D-38108 Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: bew@ist.fraunhofer.de; Keunecke, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, D-38108 Braunschweig (Germany); Weigel, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, D-38108 Braunschweig (Germany); Wiemann, E. [Institute for Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University Berlin (Germany)

    2004-12-22

    Recently some research groups have achieved progress in the deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) coatings with a thickness of 2 {mu}m and more, which is necessary for cutting tool applications. In our laboratory, thick cBN coatings were sputter deposited on silicon substrates using a boron carbide target. Following a boron carbide interlayer (few 100 nm thick), a gradient layer with continuously increasing nitrogen content was prepared. After the cBN nucleation, the process parameters were modified for the cBN film growth to a thickness of more than 2 {mu}m. However, the transfer of this technology to technically relevant substrates, like cemented carbide cutting inserts, required some further process modifications. At first, a titanium interlayer had to be deposited followed by a more than 1-{mu}m-thick boron carbide layer. The next steps were identical to those on silicon substrates. The total coating thickness was in the range of 3 {mu}m with a 0.5- to nearly 1-{mu}m-thick cBN top layer. In spite of the enormous intrinsic stress, both the coatings on silicon and on cemented carbide exhibited a good adhesion and a prolonged stability in humid air. Oxidation experiments revealed a stability of the coating system on cemented carbide up to 700 deg. C and higher. Coated cutting inserts were tested in turning operations with different metallic workpiece materials. The test results will be compared to those of well-established cutting materials, like polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) and oxide ceramics, considering the wear of coated tools.

  7. Amino acids as substrates in children with growth hormone deficiency and hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFranchi, S; Buist, N R; Jhaveri, B; Klevit, H

    1981-08-01

    In order to investigate the role of amino acid (AA) substrates in the hypoglycemia associated with human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency, we measured 12-hour fasting blood glucose and total quantitative AA concentrations in 11 children with hGH deficiency during three study periods: (1) before hGH replacement; (2) after 12 months of hGH treatment; and (3) after discontinuation of hGH for three months. The results were compared to studies in 16 control subjects. Fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly (P less than .05) lower in the hGH-deficient children prior to hGH treatment as compared to the control subjects (67.0 +/- 5.3 vs 80.7 +/- 5.3 mg/100 ml, mean +/- SE). Fasting total serum AA concentrations were similar in the patients and in the control subjects; however, after 12 months of hGH replacement, there was a significant (P less than .01) elevation of serum AA (2,750 +/- 170 vs 2,283 micromoles/liter). Fasting serum concentrations of alanine, glycine, arginine, and tryptophan were also significantly elevated (P less than .01) with hGH treatment; ornithine, tyrosine, lysine, methionine, and phenylalanine showed lesser elevations (P less than 0.5), whereas threonine decreased significantly (P less than 0.01). The fasting hypoglycemia seen with isolated hGH deficiency is not an AA substrate-limited disorder. The finding of increased concentrations of AA with hGH replacement suggests increased retention of nitrogen and synthesis of AA for gluconeogenesis due to availability of other substrates.

  8. Custom fabrication of biomass containment devices using 3-D printing enables bacterial growth analyses with complex insoluble substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cassandra E; Beri, Nina R; Gardner, Jeffrey G

    2016-11-01

    Physiological studies of recalcitrant polysaccharide degradation are challenging for several reasons, one of which is the difficulty in obtaining a reproducibly accurate real-time measurement of bacterial growth using insoluble substrates. Current methods suffer from several problems including (i) high background noise due to the insoluble material interspersed with cells, (ii) high consumable and reagent cost and (iii) significant time delay between sampling and data acquisition. A customizable substrate and cell separation device would provide an option to study bacterial growth using optical density measurements. To test this hypothesis we used 3-D printing to create biomass containment devices that allow interaction between insoluble substrates and microbial cells but do not interfere with spectrophotometer measurements. Evaluation of materials available for 3-D printing indicated that UV-cured acrylic plastic was the best material, being superior to nylon or stainless steel when examined for heat tolerance, reactivity, and ability to be sterilized. Cost analysis of the 3-D printed devices indicated they are a competitive way to quantitate bacterial growth compared to viable cell counting or protein measurements, and experimental conditions were scalable over a 100-fold range. The presence of the devices did not alter growth phenotypes when using either soluble substrates or insoluble substrates. We applied biomass containment to characterize growth of Cellvibrio japonicus on authentic lignocellulose (non-pretreated corn stover), and found physiological evidence that xylan is a significant nutritional source despite an abundance of cellulose present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of substrate type and chlormequat on the growth and flowering of marigold (Tagetes L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maślanka Małgorzata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effect of various horticultural substrates (compost, peat-coconut, peat TS1, flower soil, lowmoor peat and a foliar spray of chlormequat (at a concentration of 1380 mg dm-3 on the growth and flowering of the marigold cultivars belonging to two species: Tagetes erecta - ʻMarvel Mixtureʼ and ʻTaishan Orangeʼ, and Tagetes patula - ʻDurango Redʼ and ʻBonanza Flameʼ. The obtained results show that the plants grown in peat TS1 and peat-coconut were taller, had longer internodes and leaves, and thicker stems than the plants grown in the other substrates. Chlormequat significantly reduced the height of ʻMarvel Mixtureʼ (in peat TS1, ʻTaishan Orangeʼ (in lowmoor peat and ‘Bonanza Flameʼ (in peat-coconut. The use of chlormequat also accelerated the development of flower heads in ʻTaishan Orangeʼ (in lowmoor peat.

  10. Study of the growth of inorganic and organic electrodes onto polyethylene terephthalate substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garganourakis, M.; Logothetidis, S.; Pitsalidis, C.; Hastas, N.A.; Breza, K.; Laskarakis, A.; Frangis, N.

    2009-01-01

    Aluminum doped ZnO (AZO) 2 wt.% and un-doped ZnO thin films of different thickness were deposited by Pulsed DC Magnetron Sputtering onto Poly-Ethylene Terephthalate (PET) substrates, whereas PEDOT:PSS was spin-coated onto the AZO/PET. The optical properties of the samples were measured by in-situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry in the Vis-fUV energy range (1.5-6.5 eV), where it was found that the ZnO energy gap decreases after a critical thickness while it remains constant for AZO thin films. Electrical characterization of ZnO films shows that the films exhibit metallic behavior independently of their thickness. Also, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy revealed the growth of polycrystalline ZnO onto PET substrates. Concerning the PEDOT: PSS/AZO/PET materials, the thickness of the AZO films has been found to affects neither the fundamental energy gap nor the other absorption peaks of PEDOT: PSS.

  11. Evolutionary selection growth of two-dimensional materials on polycrystalline substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V.; Stehle, Yijing; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Unocic, Raymond R.; Rack, Philip D.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; List, Frederick; Gupta, Nitant; Bets, Ksenia V.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Smirnov, Sergei N.

    2018-03-01

    There is a demand for the manufacture of two-dimensional (2D) materials with high-quality single crystals of large size. Usually, epitaxial growth is considered the method of choice1 in preparing single-crystalline thin films, but it requires single-crystal substrates for deposition. Here we present a different approach and report the synthesis of single-crystal-like monolayer graphene films on polycrystalline substrates. The technological realization of the proposed method resembles the Czochralski process and is based on the evolutionary selection2 approach, which is now realized in 2D geometry. The method relies on `self-selection' of the fastest-growing domain orientation, which eventually overwhelms the slower-growing domains and yields a single-crystal continuous 2D film. Here we have used it to synthesize foot-long graphene films at rates up to 2.5 cm h-1 that possess the quality of a single crystal. We anticipate that the proposed approach could be readily adopted for the synthesis of other 2D materials and heterostructures.

  12. Gold nanoparticle growth control - Implementing novel wet chemistry method on silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Ameer, Ammar

    2013-04-01

    Controlling particle size, shape, nucleation, and self-assembly on surfaces are some of the main challenges facing electronic device fabrication. In this work, growth of gold nanoparticles over a wide range of sizes was investigated by using a novel wet chemical method, where potassium iodide is used as the reducing solution and gold chloride as the metal precursor, on silicon substrates. Four parameters were studied: soaking time, solution temperature, concentration of the solution of gold chloride, and surface pre-treatment of the substrate. Synthesized nanoparticles were then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The precise control of the location and order of the grown gold overlayer was achieved by using focused ion beam (FIB) patterning of a silicon surface, pre-treated with potassium iodide. By varying the soaking time and temperature, different particle sizes and shapes were obtained. Flat geometrical shapes and spherical shapes were observed. We believe, that the method described in this work is potentially a straightforward and efficient way to fabricate gold contacts for microelectronics. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Direct growth of graphene on quartz substrate as saturable absorber for femtosecond solid-state laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, S C; Man, B Y; Jiang, S Z; Chen, C S; Liu, M; Yang, C; Gao, S B; Zhang, C; Feng, D J; Huang, Q J; Hu, G D; Chen, X F

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel method for the direct metal-free growth of graphene on quartz substrate. The direct-grown graphene yields excellent nonlinear saturable absorption properties and is demonstrated to be suitable as a saturable absorber (SA) for an ultrafast solid-state laser. Nearly Fourier-limited 367 fs was obtained at a central wavelength of 1048 nm with a repetition rate of 105.7 MHz. At a pump power of 7.95 W, the average output power was 1.93 W and the highest pulse energy reached 18.3 nJ, with a peak power of 49.8 kW. Our work opens an easy route for making a reliable graphene SA with a mode-locking technique and also displays an exciting prospect in making low-cost and ultrafast lasers. (letter)

  14. Initial stages of the growth of barium strontium titanate films on a semi-isolating silicon carbide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumarkin, A. V.; Serenkov, I. T.; Sakharov, V. I.; Razumov, S. V.; Odinets, A. A.; Zlygostov, M. V.; Sapego, E. N.; Afrosimov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The initial stages of the growth of ferroelectric barium strontium titanate films on single-crystal silicon carbide substrates have been studied for the first time. The choice of a substrate with high thermal conductivity has been due to the possibility of applying these structures in powerful microwave devices. The temperature ranges separating the mechanism of the surface diffusion of deposited atoms from the diffusion via a gaseous phase during the growth of multicomponent films have been determined. The studies show that the mass transfer by means of surface diffusion leads to the formation of small-height nuclei that cover a large area of the substrate, whereas the mass transfer via a gaseous phase leads to the formation of a "columnar" islandtype structure with small percentage of covering the substrate and larger island heights.

  15. Aerobic degradation of trichloroethylene by co-metabolism using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Bing; Wang, Cui-Ping; Fan, Jun-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Wen

    2014-05-22

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26×10⁷ cell/mL), initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE)/mg (biomass) and 5.1 μg (TCE)/mg (phenol), respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%). When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively). This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  16. Aerobic Degradation of Trichloroethylene by Co-Metabolism Using Phenol and Gasoline as Growth Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE is a common groundwater contaminant of toxic and carcinogenic concern. Aerobic co-metabolic processes are the predominant pathways for TCE complete degradation. In this study, Pseudomonas fluorescens was studied as the active microorganism to degrade TCE under aerobic condition by co-metabolic degradation using phenol and gasoline as growth substrates. Operating conditions influencing TCE degradation efficiency were optimized. TCE co-metabolic degradation rate reached the maximum of 80% under the optimized conditions of degradation time of 3 days, initial OD600 of microorganism culture of 0.14 (1.26 × 107 cell/mL, initial phenol concentration of 100 mg/L, initial TCE concentration of 0.1 mg/L, pH of 6.0, and salinity of 0.1%. The modified transformation capacity and transformation yield were 20 μg (TCE/mg (biomass and 5.1 μg (TCE/mg (phenol, respectively. Addition of nutrient broth promoted TCE degradation with phenol as growth substrate. It was revealed that catechol 1,2-dioxygenase played an important role in TCE co-metabolism. The dechlorination of TCE was complete, and less chlorinated products were not detected at the end of the experiment. TCE could also be co-metabolized in the presence of gasoline; however, the degradation rate was not high (28%. When phenol was introduced into the system of TCE and gasoline, TCE and gasoline could be removed at substantial rates (up to 59% and 69%, respectively. This study provides a promising approach for the removal of combined pollution of TCE and gasoline.

  17. Direct Growth of High-Quality InP Layers on GaAs Substrates by MOCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Yarn

    2003-01-01

    group V partial pressure, growth rate and V/III ratios. A mirror-like, uniform surface and high crystal quality of the metamorphic buffer layer directly grown on a GaAs substrate can be achieved. Finally, to investigate the performance of the metamorphic microwave devices, we also fabricate the InAlAs/InGaAs metamorphic HEMT on GaAs substrates.

  18. High Quality, Low Cost Bulk Gallium Nitride Substrates Grown by the Electrochemical Solution Growth Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seacrist, Michael [SunEdison Inc., St. Peters, MO (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this project was to develop the Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) method conceived / patented at Sandia National Laboratory into a commercially viable bulk gallium nitride (GaN) growth process that can be scaled to low cost, high quality, and large area GaN wafer substrate manufacturing. The goal was to advance the ESG growth technology by demonstrating rotating seed growth at the lab scale and then transitioning process to prototype commercial system, while validating the GaN material and electronic / optical device quality. The desired outcome of the project is a prototype commercial process for US-based manufacturing of high quality, large area, and lower cost GaN substrates that can drive widespread deployment of energy efficient GaN-based power electronic and optical devices. In year 1 of the project (Sept 2012 – Dec 2013) the overall objective was to demonstrate crystalline GaN growth > 100um on a GaN seed crystal. The development plan included tasks to demonstrate and implement a method for purifying reagent grade salts, develop the reactor 1 process for rotating seed Electrochemical Solution Growth (ESG) of GaN, grow and characterize ESG GaN films, develop a fluid flow and reaction chemistry model for GaN film growth, and design / build an improved growth reactor capable of scaling to 50mm seed diameter. The first year’s project objectives were met in some task areas including salt purification, film characterization, modeling, and reactor 2 design / fabrication. However, the key project objective of the growth of a crystalline GaN film on the seed template was not achieved. Amorphous film growth on the order of a few tenths of a micron has been detected with a film composition including Ga and N, plus several other impurities originating from the process solution and hardware. The presence of these impurities, particularly the oxygen, has inhibited the demonstration of crystalline GaN film growth on the seed template. However, the

  19. Nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Der Hofstadt, M. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Hüttener, M.; Juárez, A. [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Microbiologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Avinguda Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Gomila, G., E-mail: ggomila@ibecbarcelona.eu [Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya (IBEC), C/ Baldiri i Reixac 11-15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Departament d' Electronica, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Marti i Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    With the use of the atomic force microscope (AFM), the Nanomicrobiology field has advanced drastically. Due to the complexity of imaging living bacterial processes in their natural growing environments, improvements have come to a standstill. Here we show the in situ nanoscale imaging of the growth and division of single bacterial cells on planar substrates with the atomic force microscope. To achieve this, we minimized the lateral shear forces responsible for the detachment of weakly adsorbed bacteria on planar substrates with the use of the so called dynamic jumping mode with very soft cantilever probes. With this approach, gentle imaging conditions can be maintained for long periods of time, enabling the continuous imaging of the bacterial cell growth and division, even on planar substrates. Present results offer the possibility to observe living processes of untrapped bacteria weakly attached to planar substrates. - Highlights: • Gelatine coatings used to weakly attach bacterial cells onto planar substrates. • Use of the dynamic jumping mode as a non-perturbing bacterial imaging mode. • Nanoscale resolution imaging of unperturbed single living bacterial cells. • Growth and division of single bacteria cells on planar substrates observed.

  20. MOVPE growth of GaN on 6-inch SOI-substrates: effect of substrate parameters on layer quality and strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemettinen, J.; Kauppinen, C.; Rudzinski, M.; Haapalinna, A.; Tuomi, T. O.; Suihkonen, S.

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate that higher crystalline quality, lower strain and improved electrical characteristics can be achieved in gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxy by using a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate compared to a bulk silicon (Si) substrate. GaN layers were grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy on 6-inch bulk Si and SOI wafers using the standard step graded AlGaN and AlN approach. The GaN layers grown on SOI exhibited lower strain according to x-ray diffraction analysis. Defect selective etching measurements suggested that the use of SOI substrate for GaN epitaxy reduces the dislocation density approximately by a factor of two. Furthermore, growth on SOI substrate allows one to use a significantly thinner AlGaN buffer compared to bulk Si. Synchrotron radiation x-ray topography analysis confirmed that the stress relief mechanism in GaN on SOI epitaxy is the formation of a dislocation network to the SOI device Si layer. In addition, the buried oxide layer significantly improves the vertical leakage characteristics as the onset of the breakdown is delayed by approximately 400 V. These results show that the GaN on the SOI platform is promising for power electronics applications.

  1. Filled and unfilled temperature-dependent epoxy resin blends for lossy transducer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D C; Hossack, John A

    2009-04-01

    In the context of our ongoing investigation of low-cost 2-dimensional (2-D) arrays, we studied the temperature- dependent acoustic properties of epoxy blends that could serve as an acoustically lossy backing material in compact 2-D array-based devices. This material should be capable of being machined during array manufacture, while also providing adequate signal attenuation to mitigate backing block reverberation artifacts. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of 5 unfilled epoxy blends and 2 filled epoxy blends - tungsten and fiberglass fillers - were analyzed across a 35 degrees C temperature range in 5 degrees C increments. Unfilled epoxy materials possessed an approximately linear variation of impedance and sigmoidal variation of attenuation properties over the range of temperatures of interest. An intermediate epoxy blend was fitted to a quadratic trend line with R(2) values of 0.94 and 0.99 for attenuation and impedance, respectively. It was observed that a fiberglass filler induces a strong quadratic trend in the impedance data with temperature, which results in increased error in the characterization of attenuation and impedance. The tungsten-filled epoxy was not susceptible to such problems because a different method of fabrication was required. At body temperature, the tungsten-filled epoxy could provide a 44 dB attenuation of the round-trip backing block echo in our application, in which the center frequency is 5 MHz and the backing material is 1.1 mm thick. This is an 11 dB increase in attenuation compared with the fiberglass-filled epoxy in the context of our application. This work provides motivation for exploring the use of custom-made tungsten-filled epoxy materials as a substitute PCB-based substrate to provide electrical signal interconnect.

  2. SNOSite: exploiting maximal dependence decomposition to identify cysteine S-nitrosylation with substrate site specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation, the covalent attachment of a nitric oxide to (NO the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-nitrosylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 586 experimentally identified S-nitrosylation sites from SNAP/L-cysteine-stimulated mouse endothelial cells, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-nitrosylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition, the accessible surface area (ASA and physicochemical properties, i.e. positive charge and side chain interaction parameter. Due to the difficulty to obtain the conserved motifs by conventional motif analysis, maximal dependence decomposition (MDD has been applied to obtain statistically significant conserved motifs. Support vector machine (SVM is applied to generate predictive model for each MDD-clustered motif. According to five-fold cross-validation, the MDD-clustered SVMs could achieve an accuracy of 0.902, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the model was demonstrated on the correct identification of previously reported S-nitrosylation sites of Bos taurus dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1 and human hemoglobin subunit beta (HBB. Finally, the MDD-clustered model was adopted to construct an effective web-based tool, named SNOSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/SNOSite/, for identifying S-nitrosylation sites on the uncharacterized protein sequences.

  3. Filled and Unfilled Temperature-Dependent Epoxy Resin Blends for Lossy Transducer Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Matthew D.C.; Hossack, John A.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of our ongoing investigation of low-cost 2-dimensional (2-D) arrays, we studied the temperature-dependent acoustic properties of epoxy blends that could serve as an acoustically lossy backing material in compact 2-D array-based devices. This material should be capable of being machined during array manufacture, while also providing adequate signal attenuation to mitigate backing block reverberation artifacts. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of 5 unfilled epoxy blends and 2 filled epoxy blends—tungsten and fiberglass fillers—were analyzed across a 35°C temperature range in 5°C increments. Unfilled epoxy materials possessed an approximately linear variation of impedance and sigmoidal variation of attenuation properties over the range of temperatures of interest. An intermediate epoxy blend was fitted to a quadratic trend line with R2 values of 0.94 and 0.99 for attenuation and impedance, respectively. It was observed that a fiberglass filler induces a strong quadratic trend in the impedance data with temperature, which results in increased error in the characterization of attenuation and impedance. The tungsten-filled epoxy was not susceptible to such problems because a different method of fabrication was required. At body temperature, the tungsten-filled epoxy could provide a 44 dB attenuation of the round-trip backing block echo in our application, in which the center frequency is 5 MHz and the backing material is 1.1 mm thick. This is an 11 dB increase in attenuation compared with the fiberglass-filled epoxy in the context of our application. This work provides motivation for exploring the use of custom-made tungsten-filled epoxy materials as a substitute PCB-based substrate to provide electrical signal interconnect. PMID:19406716

  4. TEAD mediates YAP-dependent gene induction and growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Ye, Xin; Yu, Jindan; Li, Li; Li, Weiquan; Li, Siming; Yu, Jianjun; Lin, Jiandie D; Wang, Cun-Yu; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Lai, Zhi-Chun; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2008-07-15

    The YAP transcription coactivator has been implicated as an oncogene and is amplified in human cancers. Recent studies have established that YAP is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Here we demonstrate that the TEAD family transcription factors are essential in mediating YAP-dependent gene expression. TEAD is also required for YAP-induced cell growth, oncogenic transformation, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. CTGF is identified as a direct YAP target gene important for cell growth. Moreover, the functional relationship between YAP and TEAD is conserved in Drosophila Yki (the YAP homolog) and Scalloped (the TEAD homolog). Our study reveals TEAD as a new component in the Hippo pathway playing essential roles in mediating biological functions of YAP.

  5. Design and development of green roof substrate to improve runoff water quality: plant growth experiments and adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Raja, Franklin D

    2014-10-15

    Many studies worldwide have investigated the potential benefits achievable by transforming brown roofs of buildings to green roofs. However, little literature examined the runoff quality/sorption ability of green roofs. As the green roof substrate is the main component to alter the quality of runoff, this investigation raises the possibility of using a mixture of low-cost inorganic materials to develop a green roof substrate. The tested materials include exfoliated vermiculite, expanded perlite, crushed brick and sand along with organic component (coco-peat). Detailed physical and chemical analyses revealed that each of these materials possesses different characteristics and hence a mix of these materials was desirable to develop an optimal green roof substrate. Using factorial design, 18 different substrate mixes were prepared and detailed examination indicated that mix-12 exhibited desirable characteristics of green roof substrate with low bulk density (431 kg/m(3)), high water holding capacity (39.4%), air filled porosity (19.5%), and hydraulic conductivity (4570 mm/h). The substrate mix also provided maximum support to Portulaca grandiflora (380% total biomass increment) over one month of growth. To explore the leaching characteristics and sorption capacity of developed green roof substrate, a down-flow packed column arrangement was employed. High conductivity and total dissolved solids along with light metal ions (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were observed in the leachates during initial stages of column operation; however the concentration of ions ceased during the final stages of operation (600 min). Experiments with metal-spiked deionized water revealed that green roof substrate possess high sorption capacity towards various heavy metal ions (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cd). Thus the developed growth substrate possesses desirable characteristics for green roofs along with high sorption capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In-situ growth mode control of AlN on SiC substrate by sublimation closed space technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojima, Daichi; Ashida, Koji; Kaneko, Tadaaki

    2018-02-01

    For the growth of AlN single crystal with large diameter and low dislocation density on SiC substrate by physical vapor transport (PVT), a dislocation blocking buffer layer (DBBL) has been simply developed by optimizing the AlN growth parameters such as temperature gradient (ΔT), substrate temperature (Tsub), and N2 partial pressure (PN2) at the initial growth stage. Increase in ΔT resulted in the formation of an abrupt AlN/SiC interface due to the suppression of inhomogeneous thermal decomposition at the interface and the subsequent AlN unstable island growth. The well-defined AlN/SiC interface played an important role in controlling the two kinds of different AlN growth mode in-situ as functions of Tsub and PN2. One is a continuous step-flow growth mode, and the other is a discontinuous platelet-like growth. The discontinuous AlN layer, consisting of thin AlN platelets and air-gaps inserted between the two adjacent platelets, acted as the DBBL. By introducing the DBBL at the initial growth stage, followed by the step-flow growth, continuous AlN layer with dislocation density of 1.7 × 106 cm-2 was achieved at a total growth thickness of 60 μm, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the previously reported value.

  7. Growth kinetics of AlN and GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy on R-plane sapphire substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, R.; Moustakas, T. D.; Ozcan, A. S.; Ludwig, K. F.; Zhou, L.; Smith, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the growth by molecular beam epitaxy of AlN and GaN thin films on R-plane sapphire substrates. Contrary to previous findings that GaN grows with its (1120) A-plane parallel to the (1102) R-plane of sapphire, our results indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the III-nitride films is strongly dependent on the kinetic conditions of growth for the GaN or AlN buffer layers. Thus, group III-rich conditions for growth of either GaN or AlN buffers result in nitride films having (1120) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, and basal-plane stacking faults parallel to the growth direction. The growth of these buffers under N-rich conditions instead leads to nitride films with (1126) planes parallel to the sapphire surface, with inclined c-plane stacking faults that often terminate threading dislocations. Moreover, electron microscope observations indicate that slight miscut (∼0.5 deg. ) of the R-plane sapphire substrate almost completely suppresses the formation of twinning defects in the (1126) GaN films.

  8. Substrate dependence of electron-stimulated O - yields from dissociative electron attachment to physisorbed O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huels, M. A.; Parenteau, L.; Sanche, L.

    1994-03-01

    We present measurements of O- electron stimulated desorption yields obtained under identical experimental conditions from 0.15 monolayers (ML) of O2 deposited onto disordered substrates consisting of 4 ML of either Kr, Xe, C2H6, C2H4, N2O, CH3Cl, or H2O, all condensed on Pt (polycrystalline). The resulting O- yield functions, for incident electron energies below 20 eV, are compared to that obtained from the O2/Kr solid; this allows us to assess the order of magnitude effects of the local substrate environment on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) via the 2Πu and gas phase forbidden 2Σ+g,u resonances of O-2. We note that, in addition to electron energy losses in the substrate prior to DEA to O2 and post-dissociation interactions of the O- with the substrate molecules, charge or energy transfer from the O-2 transient anion to a substrate molecule, and capture of the incident electron into a dissociative anion resonance of the substrate molecule may contribute to a reduced O- yield from the physisorbed O2. In the case of O2 deposited on amorphous ice, we find that the O- signal from DEA to O2 is completely absent for electron energies below 14 eV; we attribute this to a complete quenching of the dissociative O-2(2Πu, 2Σ+) resonances by the adjacent water molecules.

  9. Temperature sensitivity of soil respiration is dependent on readily decomposable C substrate concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larionova, A. A.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.

    2007-06-01

    Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux by the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006) based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax) and half- saturation constant (Ks) cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of the data obtained in the incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data confirm the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate as glucose equivalent is an important factor controlling temperature sensitivity. The highest temperature sensitivity was observed when C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, explaining this phenomenon by changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate. It is worth noting that this pattern works regardless of the origin of C substrate: production by SOM decomposition, release into the soil by rhizodeposition, litter fall or drying-rewetting events.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Fatigue Strength of Diamond Coating-Substrate Interface Quantified via the Shear Failure Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skordaris, G.

    2015-09-01

    A dynamic 3D-finite element method (FEM) thermomechanical model is employed for quantifying the temperature-dependent fatigue strength of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coating-substrate interface. This model simulates dynamically the inclined impact test on NCD-coated cemented carbide inserts considering the temperature-dependent residual stresses in the NCD coating structure. A fatigue damage of the NCD coating-substrate interface develops after a certain number of repetitive impacts depending on the applied impact load and temperature. After the interface fatigue failure, the high compressive residual stresses of the NCD coating structure are released, and the detached coating hikes up at a certain maximum height (bulge formation). The critical impact forces for avoiding the fatigue failure of the NCD coating-substrate interface, and the subsequent film detachment after 106 impacts at various temperatures were determined by conducting inclined impact tests up to 400 °C. Considering the critical impact forces, using the mentioned FEM model, the related shear failure stresses in the NCD coating-substrate interface at various temperatures were predicted.

  11. Towards High-Mobility Heteroepitaxial -Ga2O3 on Sapphire - Dependence of the Substrate off-Axis Angle (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    oxygen (O2) as the precursors. N-type conductivity in silicon (Si) doped β-Ga2O3 thin films were demonstrated. It was found that the thin films...Ga) and oxygen (O2) as the precursors. N-type conductivity in silicon (Si) doped β-Ga2O3 thin films were demonstrated. It was found that the thin...incorporation kinetics are considered to be two key factors during thin film growth on off-axis substrates. For thin film growth on sapphire with 0o

  12. Growth pattern and growth dependent mortality of larval and pelagic juvenile North Sea cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rune; Munk, Peter

    2004-01-01

    and May 2001), and larval/juvenile growth history from each of the sampling sequences was outlined. Growth rate was estimated by fitting a Laird-Gompertz equation to lengths-at-age, and we found the mean specific growth rate in length at age 20 d was 3.2% d(-1), declining to 1.9% d(-1) at an age of 90 d....... Otolith radius and larval standard length were highly correlated, and otolith growth was used as a measure of larval somatic growth. The larvae were divided into 3 groups dependent on their hatch-date, and for each hatch group, the same period of past growth was compared between fish sampled in April...... and May. A 2-way repeated-measurement ANOVA revealed a significant higher past growth of fish sampled in May in 2 of the 3 hatch-groups, implying a higher mortality of the slow growing larvae. Additionally, otolith size at age differed significantly between the April and May sampling of the oldest larvae...

  13. Ubiquitination-dependent mechanisms regulate synaptic growth and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiAntonio, A; Haghighi, A P; Portman, S L; Lee, J D; Amaranto, A M; Goodman, C S

    2001-07-26

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to cellular proteins is a powerful mechanism for controlling protein activity and localization. Ubiquitination is a reversible modification promoted by ubiquitin ligases and antagonized by deubiquitinating proteases. Ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms regulate many important processes including cell-cycle progression, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Here we show that ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms regulate synaptic development at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Neuronal overexpression of the deubiquitinating protease fat facets leads to a profound disruption of synaptic growth control; there is a large increase in the number of synaptic boutons, an elaboration of the synaptic branching pattern, and a disruption of synaptic function. Antagonizing the ubiquitination pathway in neurons by expression of the yeast deubiquitinating protease UBP2 (ref. 5) also produces synaptic overgrowth and dysfunction. Genetic interactions between fat facets and highwire, a negative regulator of synaptic growth that has structural homology to a family of ubiquitin ligases, suggest that synaptic development may be controlled by the balance between positive and negative regulators of ubiquitination.

  14. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  15. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of flexible yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate via 3ω technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shivkant; Yarali, Milad; Mavrokefalos, Anastassios [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Shervin, Shahab [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Venkateswaran, Venkat; Olenick, Kathy; Olenick, John A. [ENrG Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston (TcSUH), Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Thermal management in flexible electronic has proven to be challenging thereby limiting the development of flexible devices with high power densities. To truly enable the technological implementation of such devices, it is imperative to develop highly thermally conducting flexible substrates that are fully compatible with large-scale fabrication. Here, we present the thermal conductivity of state-of-the-art flexible yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates measured using the 3ω technique, which is already commercially manufactured via roll-to-roll technique. We observe that increasing the grain size increases the thermal conductivity of the flexible 3 mol.% YSZ, while the flexibility and transparency of the sample are hardly affected by the grain size enlargement. We exhibit thermal conductivity values of up to 4.16 Wm{sup -1}K {sup -1} that is at least 4 times higher than state-of-the-art polymeric flexible substrates. Phonon-hopping model (PHM) for granular material was used to fit the measured thermal conductivity and accurately define the thermal transport mechanism. Our results show that through grain size optimization, YSZ flexible substrates can be realized as flexible substrates, that pave new avenues for future novel application in flexible electronics through the utilization of both their ceramic structural flexibility and high heat dissipating capability. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Epitaxial growth of YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films on LiNbO3 substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.G.; Koren, G.; Gupta, A.; Segmuller, A.; Chi, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    In situ epitaxial growth of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ thin films on Y-cut LiNbO 3 substrates using a standard laser ablation technique is reported. Resistance of the films shows a normal metallic behavior and a very sharp ( c (R=0) of 92 K. High critical current density of J c (77 K)=2x10 5 A/cm 2 is observed, which is in accordance with epitaxial growth. Film orientation observed from x-ray diffraction spectra indicates that the c axis is normal to the substrate plane and the a axis is at 45 degree to the [11.0] direction of the hexagonal lattice of the substrate with two domains in mirror image to the (110) plane

  17. Seedless Pattern Growth of Quasi-Aligned ZnO Nanorod Arrays on Cover Glass Substrates in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsanulhaq, Q.; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Hahn, Y. B.

    2010-03-01

    A hybrid technique for the selective growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on wanted areas of thin cover glass substrates was developed without the use of seed layer of ZnO. This method utilizes electron-beam lithography for pattern transfer on seedless substrate, followed by solution method for the bottom-up growth of ZnO nanorod arrays on the patterned substrates. The arrays of highly crystalline ZnO nanorods having diameter of 60 ± 10 nm and length of 750 ± 50 nm were selectively grown on different shape patterns and exhibited a remarkable uniformity in terms of diameter, length, and density. The room temperature cathodluminescence measurements showed a strong ultraviolet emission at 381 nm and broad visible emission at 585-610 nm were observed in the spectrum.

  18. Growth hormone, interferon-gamma, and leukemia inhibitory factor promoted tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, L S; Hsu, G W; Myers, M G

    1995-01-01

    The identification of JAK2 as a growth hormone (GH) receptor-associated, GH-activated tyrosine kinase has established tyrosyl phosphorylation as a signaling mechanism for GH. In the present study, GH is shown to stimulate tyrosyl phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), the princi...... characterized insulin-like metabolic effects of GH observed in a variety of cell types....

  19. Effect of substrate morphology slope distributions on light scattering, nc-Si:H film growth, and solar cell performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yun; Santbergen, Rudi; Jäger, Klaus; Sever, Martin; Krč, Janez; Topič, Marko; Hänni, Simon; Zhang, Chao; Heidt, Anna; Meier, Matthias; van Swaaij, René A C M M; Zeman, Miro

    2014-12-24

    Thin-film silicon solar cells are often deposited on textured ZnO substrates. The solar-cell performance is strongly correlated to the substrate morphology, as this morphology determines light scattering, defective-region formation, and crystalline growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H). Our objective is to gain deeper insight in these correlations using the slope distribution, rms roughness (σ(rms)) and correlation length (lc) of textured substrates. A wide range of surface morphologies was obtained by Ar plasma treatment and wet etching of textured and flat-as-deposited ZnO substrates. The σ(rms), lc and slope distribution were deduced from AFM scans. Especially, the slope distribution of substrates was represented in an efficient way that light scattering and film growth direction can be more directly estimated at the same time. We observed that besides a high σ(rms), a high slope angle is beneficial to obtain high haze and scattering of light at larger angles, resulting in higher short-circuit current density of nc-Si:H solar cells. However, a high slope angle can also promote the creation of defective regions in nc-Si:H films grown on the substrate. It is also found that the crystalline fraction of nc-Si:H solar cells has a stronger correlation with the slope distributions than with σ(rms) of substrates. In this study, we successfully correlate all these observations with the solar-cell performance by using the slope distribution of substrates.

  20. Growth and characterization of AlxGa1-xN LEO substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, H.S.; Sakong, T.; Lee, S.N.; Son, J.K.; Ryu, H.Y.; Nam, O.H.; Park, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the effect of Al composition on the properties of Al x Ga 1-x N LEO substrates. Al x Ga 1-x N LEO substrates were prepared on stripe-patterned 2μm-thick undoped GaN/sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. To investigate the dislocation and crack density, and the surface morphology of Al x Ga 1-x N LEO substrates with different Al compositions, photoluminescence and optical microscope were used. At a 1% of Al composition, we obtained crack-free and mirror-like substrates having a low dislocation density of ∼1E6cm -2 . We expect considerable reduction in threshold current density to be achieved from blue-violet laser diodes grown on Al x Ga 1-x N LEO substrates because of the increased optical gain, as compared to the laser diodes grown on Al-free LEO substrates

  1. Substrates for Efficient Fluorometric Screening Employing the NAD-Dependent Sirtuin 5 Lysine Deacylase (KDAC) Enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2012-01-01

    of individual isozymes has been a longstanding goal. Essential for the discovery of novel modulators, however, are good screening protocols and mechanistic insights with regard to the targets in question. We therefore evaluated the activities of the seven human sirtuin hydrolases against a panel of fluorogenic...... substrates. Both commonly used, commercially available substrates and novel chemotypes designed to address recent developments in the field of lysine post-translational modification were evaluated. Our investigations led to the discovery of two new fluorogenic ε-N-succinyllysine-containing substrates...... that enable highly efficient and enzyme-economical screening employing sirtuin 5 (SIRT5). Furthermore, optimized protocols for facile kinetic investigations were developed, which should be valuable for enzyme kinetic investigations. Finally, these protocols were applied to a kinetic analysis of the inhibition...

  2. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  3. The controlled growth of GaN microrods on Si(111) substrates by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltynski, Bartosz; Garro, Nuria; Vallo, Martin; Finken, Matthias; Giesen, Christoph; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Cantarero, Andrés; Heuken, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a selective area growth (SAG) approach for growing GaN microrods on patterned SiNx/Si(111) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) is studied. The surface morphology, optical and structural properties of vertical GaN microrods terminated by pyramidal shaped facets (six { 10 1 bar 1} planes) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), room temperature photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. Measurements revealed high-quality GaN microcolumns grown with silane support. Characterized structures were grown nearly strain-free (central frequency of Raman peak of 567±1 cm-1) with crystal quality comparable to bulk crystals (FWHM=4.2±1 cm-1). Such GaN microrods might be used as a next-generation device concept for solid-state lighting (SSL) applications by realizing core-shell InGaN/GaN multi-quantum wells (MQWs) on the n-GaN rod base.

  4. High Performance Bioanode Development for Fermentable Substrates via Controlled Electroactive Biofilm Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichihashi, Osamu [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

    2014-11-11

    A bioanode was optimized to generate current densities reaching 38.4 4.9 A m-2, which brings bioelectrochemical systems closer to commercial consideration. Glucose and lactate were fed together in a continuous or fed-batch mode. The current density increased from 2.3 A m-2 to 38.4 A m-2 over a 33 day period and remained stable thereafter. The coulombic efficiency ranged from 50% to 80%. A change in substrate concentration from 200 mg L-1 to 5 mg L-1 decreased maximum current density from 38.4 A m-2 to 12.3 A m-2. The anode consortia included Firmicutes (55.0%), Proteobacteria (41.8%) and Bacteroidetes (2.1%) constituting two potential electrogenic genera: Geobacter (6.8%) and Aeromonas (31.9%). The current production was found to be limited by kinetics during the growth period (33 days), and mass transfer, thereafter. The results indicate the necessity of removing spent biomass for efficient long term operation and treatment of wastewater streams.

  5. Concentration dependence of biotransformation in fish liver S9: Optimizing substrate concentrations to estimate hepatic clearance for bioaccumulation assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Justin C; Allard, Gayatri N; Otton, S Victoria; Campbell, David A; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2015-12-01

    In vitro bioassays to estimate biotransformation rate constants of contaminants in fish are currently being investigated to improve bioaccumulation assessments of hydrophobic contaminants. The present study investigates the relationship between chemical substrate concentration and in vitro biotransformation rate of 4 environmental contaminants (9-methylanthracene, pyrene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver S9 fractions and methods to determine maximum first-order biotransformation rate constants. Substrate depletion experiments using a series of initial substrate concentrations showed that in vitro biotransformation rates exhibit strong concentration dependence, consistent with a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. The results indicate that depletion rate constants measured at initial substrate concentrations of 1 μM (a current convention) could underestimate the in vitro biotransformation potential and may cause bioconcentration factors to be overestimated if in vitro biotransformation rates are used to assess bioconcentration factors in fish. Depletion rate constants measured using thin-film sorbent dosing experiments were not statistically different from the maximum depletion rate constants derived using a series of solvent delivery-based depletion experiments for 3 of the 4 test chemicals. Multiple solvent delivery-based depletion experiments at a range of initial concentrations are recommended for determining the concentration dependence of in vitro biotransformation rates in fish liver fractions, whereas a single sorbent phase dosing experiment may be able to provide reasonable approximations of maximum depletion rates of very hydrophobic substances. © 2015 SETAC.

  6. Spatiotemporal stability of neonatal rat cardiomyocyte monolayers spontaneous activity is dependent on the culture substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Boudreau-Béland

    Full Text Available In native conditions, cardiac cells must continuously comply with diverse stimuli necessitating a perpetual adaptation. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS is commonly used in cell culture to study cellular response to changes in the mechanical environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using PDMS substrates on the properties of spontaneous activity of cardiomyocyte monolayer cultures. We compared PDMS to the gold standard normally used in culture: a glass substrate. Although mean frequency of spontaneous activity remained unaltered, incidence of reentrant activity was significantly higher in samples cultured on glass compared to PDMS substrates. Higher spatial and temporal instability of the spontaneous rate activation was found when cardiomyocytes were cultured on PDMS, and correlated with decreased connexin-43 and increased CaV3.1 and HCN2 mRNA levels. Compared to cultures on glass, cultures on PDMS were associated with the strongest response to isoproterenol and acetylcholine. These results reveal the importance of carefully selecting the culture substrate for studies involving mechanical stimulation, especially for tissue engineering or pharmacological high-throughput screening of cardiac tissue analog.

  7. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses of substrate-dependent bacterial temporal dynamics in microbial fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husen Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the microbial community structure and genetic potential of anode biofilms is key to improve extracellular electron transfers in microbial fuel cells. We investigated effect of substrate and temporal dynamics of anodic biofilm communities using phylogenetic and metagenomic approaches in parallel with electrochemical characterizations. The startup non-steady state anodic bacterial structures were compared for a simple substrate, acetate, and for a complex substrate, landfill leachate, using a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell. Principal coordinate analysis showed that distinct community structures were formed with each substrate type. The bacterial diversity measured as Shannon index decreased with time in acetate cycles, and was restored with the introduction of leachate. The change of diversity was accompanied by an opposite trend in the relative abundance of Geobacter-affiliated phylotypes, which were acclimated to over 40% of total Bacteria at the end of acetate-fed conditions then declined in the leachate cycles. The transition from acetate to leachate caused a decrease in output power density from 243±13 mW/m2 to 140±11 mW/m2, accompanied by a decrease in Coulombic electron recovery from 18±3% to 9±3%. The leachate cycles selected protein-degrading phylotypes within phylum Synergistetes. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing showed that leachate-fed communities had higher cell motility genes including bacterial chemotaxis and flagellar assembly, and increased gene abundance related to metal resistance, antibiotic resistance, and quorum sensing. These differentially represented genes suggested an altered anodic biofilm community in response to additional substrates and stress from the complex landfill leachate.

  8. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) island growth under SiO(2) nanodisks patterned on GaAs substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjana, Liliana; Wang, Benzhong; Tanoto, Hendrix; Chua, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Soon Fatt

    2010-05-14

    We report a growth phenomenon where uniform gallium arsenide (GaAs) islands were found to grow underneath an ordered array of SiO(2) nanodisks on a GaAs(100) substrate. Each island eventually grows into a pyramidal shape resulting in the toppling of the supported SiO(2) nanodisk. This phenomenon occurred consistently for each nanodisk across a large patterned area of approximately 50 x 50 microm(2) (with nanodisks of 210 nm diameter and 280 nm spacing). The growth mechanism is attributed to a combination of 'catalytic' growth and facet formation.

  9. A novel, substrate independent three-step process for the growth of uniform ZnO nanorod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, D.; McGlynn, E.; Henry, M.O.; Kumar, K.; Hughes, G.

    2010-01-01

    We report a three-step deposition process for uniform arrays of ZnO nanorods, involving chemical bath deposition of aligned seed layers followed by nanorod nucleation sites and subsequent vapour phase transport growth of nanorods. This combines chemical bath deposition techniques, which enable substrate independent seeding and nucleation site generation with vapour phase transport growth of high crystalline and optical quality ZnO nanorod arrays. Our data indicate that the three-step process produces uniform nanorod arrays with narrow and rather monodisperse rod diameters (∼ 70 nm) across substrates of centimetre dimensions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to study the growth mechanism and characterise the nanostructures.

  10. Effects of substrate anisotropy and edge diffusion on submonolayer growth during molecular beam epitaxy: A Kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devkota, J.; Shrestha, S.P.

    2007-12-01

    We have performed Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation work to study the effect of diffusion anisotropy, bonding anisotropy and edge diffusion on island formation at different temperatures during the sub-monolayer film growth in Molecular Beam Epitaxy. We use simple cubic solid on solid model and event based Bortz, Kalos and Labowitch (BKL) algorithm on the Kinetic Monte Carlo method to simulate the physical phenomena. We have found that the island morphology and growth exponent are found to be influenced by substrate anisotropy as well as edge diffusion, however they do not play a significant role in island elongation. The growth exponent and island size distribution are observed to be influenced by substrate anisotropy but are negligibly influenced by edge diffusion. We have found fractal islands when edge diffusion is excluded and compact islands when edge diffusion is included. (author)

  11. Effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of the red sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Senhao; Dong, Shuanglin; Gao, Qinfeng; Ren, Yichao; Wang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    Three color variants of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus are recognized, the red one is highly valued in the market. When the red variant is cultured in ponds in China, its body color changes from red to celadon in 3-6 months. The effects of water depth and substrate color on the growth and body color of this animal were investigated. Juveniles of red A. japonicus were cultured in cages suspended at a range of water depths (20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm). The specific growth rate of red sea cucumbers was significantly higher in animals cultured at deeper water layers compared with those grown at shallowers. Body weights were greatest for sea cucumbers cultured at a depth of 150 cm and their survival rates were highest at a depth of 200 cm. A scale to evaluate the color of red sea cucumbers ( R value) was developed using a Pantone standard color card. All stocked animals in the 9-month trial retained a red color, however the red body color was much more intense in sea cucumbers cultured at shallower depths, while animals suspended in deeper layers became pale. In a separate trial, A. japonicus were cultured in suspended cages with seven different colored substrates. Substrate color had a significant effect on the growth and body-color of red A. japonicus. The yield were greatest for A. japonicus cultured on a yellow substrate, followed by green > white > orange > red > black and blue. All sea cucumbers in the 7-month trial retained a red color, although the red was most intense (highest R value) in animals cultured on a blue substrate and pale (lowest R value) for animals cultured on a green substrate.

  12. Electrophoretic deposition of ZnO nanostructures: Au nanoclusters on Si substrates induce self-assembled nanowire growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Claudia [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Marin, Oscar [CONICET – LAFISO, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Real, Silvina [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Comedi, David [CONICET – LAFISO, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina); Tirado, Mónica, E-mail: mtirado@herrera.unt.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Nanomateriales y Propiedades Dieléctricas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, San Miguel de Tucumán (Argentina)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires were grown on silicon substrate by electrophoretic deposition technique without use a porous template. • The growth was induced by Au nanoclusters and was performed at room temperature. • The photoluminescence spectrum for the nanowires obtained shows a broad UV-blue excitonic emission peak and a low emission in the green region. - Abstract: The present work reports the self-assembled growth of ZnO nanowires on silicon substrate with nanometer sized Au clusters using electrophoretic deposition technique at room temperature without a sacrificial template. A colloidal suspension of ≈5 nm sized ZnO nanoparticles dispersed in 2-propanol was used (nanoparticle bandgap of 3.47 eV as determined from absorbance measurements). The results show that the Au nanoclusters on the silicon substrate induce the self-assembly of the ZnO nanoparticles into vertically aligned ZnO nanowires. This effect is tentatively explained as being due to increased electric field intensities near the Au nanoclusters during the electrophoretic deposition. Photoluminescence measurements reveal the presence of quantum confined excitons and a relatively low concentration of deep defects in the nanowires. The electric field guided growth of semiconductor nanostructures at room temperature has great industrial potential as it minimizes production costs and enables the use of substrate materials not withstanding high temperatures.

  13. Epitaxial growth of manganese oxide films on MgAl2O4 (001) substrates and the possible mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lizhu; Wu, Shuxiang; Zhou, Wenqi; Li, Shuwei

    2014-03-01

    Three types of manganese oxide films were grown on MgAl2O4 (001) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PA-MBE) under different growth rates and substrate temperatures. The structural characteristics and chemical compositions of the films were investigated by using in-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), ex-situ X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). At a lower substrate temperature (730 K), the epitaxial film tends to form mixed phases with a coexistence of Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in order to relieve the mismatch-strain. However, at a higher substrate temperature (750 K), all of the films crystallize into Mn3O4; the critical thickness of the film grown under a lower growth rate (7 Å/min) is much larger than that under a high growth rate (10 Å/min). When the film reaches a certain critical thickness, the surface will become fairly rough, and another oriented phase Mn3O4 would crystallize on such a surface.

  14. Growth and characterization of epitaxial layers of Ge on Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathy, D.; White, C.W.; Holland, O.W.

    1987-03-01

    Thin single crystalline layers of Ge with atomically sharp boundaries have been formed epitaxially on (100) Si substrates. This was done by 74 Ge ion implantation into Si followed by steam oxidation. Using both Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have found that a Ge layer forms as a result of Ge segregated at the moving SiO 2 interface during steam oxidation. For a SiO 2 layer that has swept through the implanted region, essentially all of the Ge is snow-ploughed and no Ge is lost to the oxide layer. The Ge layers and its two bounding interfaces, i.e., Ge/SiO 2 and Ge/Si, have been characterized as a function of the implantation dose and energy. The thickness of the Ge layer formed is dependent on the implantation dose. Thicknesses from a fraction of a monolayer to greater than 50 monolayers of Ge can be formed on Si by this mechanism. Initially the Ge layer forms a coherent interface with the underlying Si with no misfit dislocations, and misfit dislocations only appear as the thickness of the film is increased

  15. Synthetic LPETG-containing peptide incorporation in the Staphylococcus aureus cell-wall in a sortase A- and growth phase-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Hansenová Maňásková

    Full Text Available The majority of Staphylococcus aureus virulence- and colonization-associated surface proteins contain a pentapeptide recognition motif (LPXTG. This motif can be recognized and cleaved by sortase A (SrtA which is a membrane-bound transpeptidase. After cleavage these proteins are covalently incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Therefore, SrtA plays a key role in S. aureus virulence. We aimed to generate a substrate mimicking this SrtA recognition motif for several purposes: to incorporate this substrate into the S. aureus cell-wall in a SrtA-dependent manner, to characterize this incorporation and to determine the effect of substrate incorporation on the incorporation of native SrtA-dependent cell-surface-associated proteins. We synthesized substrate containing the specific LPXTG motif, LPETG. As a negative control we used a scrambled version of this substrate, EGTLP and a S. aureus srtA knockout strain. Both substrates contained a fluorescence label for detection by FACScan and fluorescence microscope. A spreading assay and a competitive Luminex assay were used to determine the effect of substrate treatment on native LPXTG containing proteins deposition in the bacterial cell-wall. We demonstrate a SrtA-dependent covalent incorporation of the LPETG-containing substrate in wild type S. aureus strains and several other Gram-positive bacterial species. LPETG-containing substrate incorporation in S. aureus was growth phase-dependent and peaked at the stationary phase. This incorporation negatively correlated with srtA mRNA expression. Exogenous addition of the artificial substrate did not result in a decreased expression of native SrtA substrates (e.g. clumping factor A/B and protein A nor induced a srtA knockout phenotype.

  16. Physical growth in children with transfusion-dependent thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish K Pemde

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Harish K Pemde, Jagdish Chandra, Divya Gupta, Varinder Singh, Rajni Sharma, AK DuttaDepartment of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College, Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, IndiaObjective: To describe physical growth and related factors in transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients.Methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of the records of the patients registered at and being followed up by the Thalassemia Day Care Center (TDCC at Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded on a spreadsheet for analysis. Clinical parameters included weight, height, sexual maturity ratings, and general and systemic physical examination. Laboratory parameters included pretransfusion hemoglobin (Hb, periodic serum ferritin, and tests for viral markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis B and C. Z-scores for weight, height, and body mass index (BMI were calculated using World Health Organization reference data. Statistical analysis was carried out using Microsoft Excel® and Stata® software.Results: Out of 214 patients registered at the TDCC since 2001, 154 were included in this study. The mean age of patients was 9.19 years (range 0.5–20 years. Pretransfusion Hb was well maintained (mean 9.21 g/dL; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.06–9.36, but the mean serum ferritin levels were approximately three times (3112 ng/mL the desired value despite the patients being on deferiprone (72% or deferasirox (25%. One-third (33.11% of the patients had short stature, 13% were thin, and 10.82% were very thin (BMI z-score <-3. No patient was overweight or obese. Linear regression coefficient showed that for every 1-year increase in age, the mean ferritin value increased by 186.21 pg/mL (95% CI: 143.31–228.27. Height z-scores had significant correlation with mean ferritin levels, whereas correlation with mean pretransfusion Hb was not significant statistically. Mean ferritin levels

  17. Temperature dependence of the aggregation behavior of aluminum nanoparticles on liquid substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Qi-Fa; Cheng, Yi; Tao, Xiang-Ming; Yang, Bo; Li, Bao-Xing; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) nanoparticle aggregates have been fabricated by thermal evaporation method on silicone oil surfaces at different substrate temperatures. The average diameter and height of the Al nanoparticles, namely Φ avg and H avg , are of the order of 10 1 and 10 0 nm, respectively. As the substrate temperature T s increases from 293 to 393 K, to the first order of approximation, Φ avg increases exponentially and H avg increases quickly between 333 and 373 K. By transmission electron microscopy measurement, we find that the Al nanoparticles and their aggregates exhibit amorphous structure over the whole temperature range. A simple theoretical model is established to explain the coalescence process of the nanoparticles with T s

  18. Sumo-dependent substrate targeting of the SUMO protease Ulp1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westerbeck Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the essential small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO protease Ulp1 is responsible for both removing SUMO/Smt3 from specific target proteins and for processing precursor SUMO into its conjugation-competent form. Ulp1 localizes predominantly to nuclear pore complexes but has also been shown to deconjugate sumoylated septins at the bud-neck of dividing cells. How Ulp1 is directed to bud-neck localized septins and other cytoplasmic deconjugation targets is not well understood. Results Using a structure/function approach, we set out to elucidate features of Ulp1 that are required for substrate targeting. To aid our studies, we took advantage of a catalytically inactive mutant of Ulp1 that is greatly enriched at the septin ring of dividing yeast cells. We found that the localization of Ulp1 to the septins requires both SUMO and specific structural features of Ulp1's catalytic domain. Our analysis identified a 218-amino acid, substrate-trapping mutant of the catalytic domain of Ulp1, Ulp1(3(C580S, that is necessary and sufficient for septin localization. We also used the targeting and SUMO-binding properties of Ulp1(3(C580S to purify Smt3-modified proteins from cell extracts. Conclusions Our study provides novel insights into how the Ulp1 SUMO protease is actively targeted to its substrates in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we found that a substrate-trapping Ulp1(3(C580S interacts robustly with human SUMO1, SUMO2 and SUMO2 chains, making it a potentially useful tool for the analysis and purification of SUMO-modified proteins.

  19. THICKNESS DEPENDENCE OF BUCKLING PATTERNS OF Ta FILMS SPUTTERED ON GLASS SUBSTRATES

    OpenAIRE

    YONG-JU ZHANG; SEN-JIANG YU; HONG ZHOU; MIAO-GEN CHEN; ZHI-WEI JIAO

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) films deposited on glass substrates have been prepared by a direct current magnetron sputtering method, and buckling patterns induced by residual compressive stress are investigated in detail. When the film thickness increases, the buckling morphologies evolve from straight-sided buckle network to wavy or wormlike wrinkles gradually, and finally change into telephone cord buckles. The geometrical parameters of the buckling patterns are found to increase linearly with the film th...

  20. Reynolds-number dependence of turbulence enhancement on collision growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Onishi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the Reynolds-number dependence of turbulence enhancement on the collision growth of cloud droplets. The Onishi turbulent coagulation kernel proposed in Onishi et al. (2015 is updated by using the direct numerical simulation (DNS results for the Taylor-microscale-based Reynolds number (Reλ up to 1140. The DNS results for particles with a small Stokes number (St show a consistent Reynolds-number dependence of the so-called clustering effect with the locality theory proposed by Onishi et al. (2015. It is confirmed that the present Onishi kernel is more robust for a wider St range and has better agreement with the Reynolds-number dependence shown by the DNS results. The present Onishi kernel is then compared with the Ayala–Wang kernel (Ayala et al., 2008a; Wang et al., 2008. At low and moderate Reynolds numbers, both kernels show similar values except for r2 ∼ r1, for which the Ayala–Wang kernel shows much larger values due to its large turbulence enhancement on collision efficiency. A large difference is observed for the Reynolds-number dependences between the two kernels. The Ayala–Wang kernel increases for the autoconversion region (r1, r2 < 40 µm and for the accretion region (r1 < 40 and r2 > 40 µm; r1 > 40 and r2 < 40 µm as Reλ increases. In contrast, the Onishi kernel decreases for the autoconversion region and increases for the rain–rain self-collection region (r1, r2 > 40 µm. Stochastic collision–coalescence equation (SCE simulations are also conducted to investigate the turbulence enhancement on particle size evolutions. The SCE with the Ayala–Wang kernel (SCE-Ayala and that with the present Onishi kernel (SCE-Onishi are compared with results from the Lagrangian Cloud Simulator (LCS; Onishi et al., 2015, which tracks individual particle motions and size evolutions in homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The SCE-Ayala and SCE-Onishi kernels show consistent

  1. Methylene blue improves mitochondrial respiration and decreases oxidative stress in a substrate-dependent manner in diabetic rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duicu, Oana M; Privistirescu, Andreea; Wolf, Adrian; Petruş, Alexandra; Dănilă, Maria D; Raţiu, Corina D; Muntean, Danina M; Sturza, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been systematically associated with compromised mitochondrial energetics and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that underlie its progression to heart failure. Methylene blue is a redox drug with reported protective effects mainly on brain mitochondria. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the effects of acute administration of methylene blue on mitochondrial respiration, H 2 O 2 production, and calcium sensitivity in rat heart mitochondria isolated from healthy and 2 months (streptozotocin-induced) diabetic rats. Mitochondrial respiratory function was assessed by high-resolution respirometry. H 2 O 2 production and calcium retention capacity were measured spectrofluorimetrically. The addition of methylene blue (0.1 μmol·L -1 ) elicited an increase in oxygen consumption of mitochondria energized with complex I and II substrates in both normal and diseased mitochondria. Interestingly, methylene blue elicited a significant increase in H 2 O 2 release in the presence of complex I substrates (glutamate and malate), but had an opposite effect in mitochondria energized with complex II substrate (succinate). No changes in the calcium retention capacity of healthy or diabetic mitochondria were found in the presence of methylene blue. In conclusion, in cardiac mitochondria isolated from diabetic and nondiabetic rat hearts, methylene blue improved respiratory function and elicited a dichotomic, substrate-dependent effect on ROS production.

  2. Thermal oxidation of seeds for the hydrothermal growth of WO{sub 3} nanorods on ITO glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Chai Yan [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Department of Mechanical and Material Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Sungai Long, Bandar Sungai Long, Cheras, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdul Razak, Khairunisak, E-mail: khairunisak@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); NanoBiotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Lockman, Zainovia, E-mail: zainovia@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-11-30

    This work reports a simple seed formation method for the hydrothermal growth of tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) nanorods. A WO{sub 3} seed layer was prepared by thermal oxidation, where a W-sputtered substrate was heated and oxidized in a furnace. Oxidation temperatures and periods were varied at 400–550 °C and 5–60 min, respectively, to determine an appropriate seed layer for nanorod growth. Thermal oxidation at 500 °C for 15 min was found to produce a seed layer with sufficient crystallinity and good adhesion to the substrate. These properties prevented the seed from peeling off during the hydrothermal process, thereby allowing nanorod growth on the seed. The nanorod film showed better electrochromic behavior (higher current density of − 1.11 and + 0.65 mA cm{sup −2}) than compact film (lower current density of − 0.54 and + 0.28 mA cm{sup −2}). - Highlights: • A simple seed formation method (thermal oxidation) on sputtered W film is reported. • Crystalline seed with good adhesion to substrate is required for nanorod growth. • The appropriate temperature and period for seed formation were 500 °C and 15 min. • WO{sub 3} nanorods exhibited higher electrochromic current density than WO{sub 3} compact film.

  3. Epitaxial growth of highly-crystalline spinel ferrite thin films on perovskite substrates for all-oxide devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Jarrett A; Gao, Ran; Schiffer, Peter; Martin, Lane W

    2015-06-01

    The potential growth modes for epitaxial growth of Fe3O4 on SrTiO3 (001) are investigated through control of the energetics of the pulsed-laser deposition growth process (via substrate temperature and laser fluence). We find that Fe3O4 grows epitaxially in three distinct growth modes: 2D-like, island, and 3D-to-2D, the last of which is characterized by films that begin growth in an island growth mode before progressing to a 2D growth mode. Films grown in the 2D-like and 3D-to-2D growth modes are atomically flat and partially strained, while films grown in the island growth mode are terminated in islands and fully relaxed. We find that the optimal structural, transport, and magnetic properties are obtained for films grown on the 2D-like/3D-to-2D growth regime boundary. The viability for including such thin films in perovskite-based all-oxide devices is demonstrated by growing a Fe3O4/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 spin valve epitaxially on SrTiO3.

  4. Preference of Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 acyl amido synthetase for growth versus defense hormone acyl substrates is dictated by concentration of amino acid substrate aspartate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelprang, Rebecca; Okrent, Rachel A; Wildermuth, Mary C

    2017-11-01

    The GH3 family of adenylating enzymes conjugate acyl substrates such as the growth hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) to amino acids via a two-step reaction of acyl substrate adenylation followed by amino acid conjugation. Arabidopsis thaliana GH3.5 was previously shown to be unusual in that it could adenylate both IAA and the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoate). Our detailed studies of the kinetics of GH3.5 on a variety of auxin and benzoate substrates provides insight into the acyl preference and reaction mechanism of GH3.5. For example, we found GH3.5 activity on substituted benzoates is not defined by the substitution position as it is for GH3.12/PBS3. Most importantly, we show that GH3.5 strongly prefers Asp as the amino acid conjugate and that the concentration of Asp dictates the functional activity of GH3.5 on IAA vs. SA. Not only is Asp used in amino acid biosynthesis, but it also plays an important role in nitrogen mobilization and in the production of downstream metabolites, including pipecolic acid which propagates defense systemically. During active growth, [IAA] and [Asp] are high and the catalytic efficiency (k cat /K m ) of GH3.5 for IAA is 360-fold higher than with SA. GH3.5 is expressed under these conditions and conversion of IAA to inactive IAA-Asp would provide fine spatial and temporal control over local auxin developmental responses. By contrast, [SA] is dramatically elevated in response to (hemi)-biotrophic pathogens which also induce GH3.5 expression. Under these conditions, [Asp] is low and GH3.5 has equal affinity (K m ) for SA and IAA with similar catalytic efficiencies. However, the concentration of IAA tends to be very low, well below the K m for IAA. Therefore, GH3.5 catalyzed formation of SA-Asp would occur, fine-tuning localized defensive responses through conversion of active free SA to SA-Asp. Taken together, we show how GH3.5, with dual activity on IAA and SA, can integrate cellular metabolic status via Asp to

  5. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  6. Investigation of growth, structural and electronic properties of V2O3 thin films on selected substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nateprov, Alexei

    2006-08-01

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of the MI transition in V 2 O 3 thin films, grown on different substrates. The main goal of the work was to develop a technology of growth of V 2 O 3 thin films on substrates with different electrical and structural properties (diamond and LiNbO 3 ), designed for specific applications. The structural and electrical properties of the obtained films were characterized in detail with a special focus on their potential applications. The MIT of V 2 O 3 was investigated by SAW using first directly deposited V 2 O 3 thin film onto a LiNbO 3 substrate. (orig.)

  7. Structural properties, crystal quality and growth modes of MOCVD-grown AlN with TMAl pretreatment of sapphire substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haiding

    2017-08-08

    The growth of high quality AlN epitaxial films relies on precise control of the initial growth stages. In this work, we examined the influence of the trimethylaluminum (TMAl) pretreatment of sapphire substrates on the structural properties, crystal quality and growth modes of heteroepitaxial AlN films on (0001) sapphire substrates. Without the pretreatment, the AlN films nucleated on the smooth surface but exhibited mixed crystallographic Al- (N-) polarity, resulting in rough AlN film surfaces. With increasing the pretreatment time from 1 to 5 s, the N-polarity started to be impeded. However, small islands were formed on sapphire surface due to the decompostion of TMAl. As a result, small voids became noticeable at the nucleation layer (NL) because the growth started as quasi three-dimensional (3D) but transformed to 2D mode as the film grew thicker and got coalesced, leading to smoother and Al-polar films. On the other hand, longer pretreatment time of 40 s formed large 3D islands on sapphire, and thus initiated a 3D-growth mode of the AlN film, generating Al-polar AlN nanocolumns with different facets, which resulted into rougher film surfaces. The epitaxial growth modes and their correlation with the AlN film crystal quality under different TMAl pretreatments are also discussed.

  8. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  9. The effect of substrate orientation on the kinetics and thermodynamics of initial oxide-film growth on metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichel, Friederike

    2007-11-19

    This thesis addresses the effect of the parent metal-substrate orientation on the thermodynamics and kinetics of ultra-thin oxide-film growth on bare metals upon their exposure to oxygen gas at low temperatures (up to 650 K). A model description has been developed to predict the thermodynamically stable microstructure of a thin oxide film grown on its bare metal substrate as function of the oxidation conditions and the substrate orientation. For Mg and Ni, the critical oxide-film thickness is less than 1 oxide monolayer and therefore the initial development of an amorphous oxide phase on these metal substrates is unlikely. Finally, for Cu and densely packed Cr and Fe metal surfaces, oxide overgrowth is predicted to proceed by the direct formation and growth of a crystalline oxide phase. Further, polished Al single-crystals with {l_brace}111{r_brace}, {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} surface orientations were introduced in an ultra-high vacuum system for specimen processing and analysis. After surface cleaning and annealing, the bare Al substrates have been oxidized by exposure to pure oxygen gas. During the oxidation, the oxide-film growth kinetics has been established by real-time in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry. After the oxidation, the oxide-film microstructures were investigated by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. Finally, high-resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis was applied to study the microstructure and morphology of the grown oxide films on an atomic scale. (orig.)

  10. Thickness Dependence of Buckling Patterns of Ta Films Sputtered on Glass Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Ju; Yu, Sen-Jiang; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Miao-Gen; Jiao, Zhi-Wei

    2012-06-01

    Tantalum (Ta) films deposited on glass substrates have been prepared by a direct current magnetron sputtering method, and buckling patterns induced by residual compressive stress are investigated in detail. When the film thickness increases, the buckling morphologies evolve from straight-sided buckle network to wavy or wormlike wrinkles gradually, and finally change into telephone cord buckles. The geometrical parameters of the buckling patterns are found to increase linearly with the film thickness. Based on the geometrical parameters of the buckling patterns, the mechanical properties of the Ta films are also discussed in the frame of continuum elastic theory.

  11. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlich, Michael; Franken, Philipp; Graefe, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT) plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC) mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6-1500 kPa) was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  12. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bitterlich

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6–1500 kPa was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  13. Transport properties of bilayer graphene due to charged impurity scattering: Temperature-dependent screening and substrate effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linh, Dang Khanh; Khanh, Nguyen Quoc

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the zero-temperature conductivity of bilayer graphene (BLG) impacted by Coulomb impurity scattering using four different screening models: unscreened, Thomas-Fermi (TF), overscreened and random phase approximation (RPA). We also calculate the conductivity and thermal conductance of BLG using TF, zero- and finite-temperature RPA screening functions. We find large differences between the results of the models and show that TF and finite-temperature RPA give similar results for diffusion thermopower Sd. Using the finite-temperature RPA, we calculate temperature and density dependence of Sd in BLG on SiO2, HfO2 substrates and suspended BLG for different values of interlayer distance c and distance between the first layer and the substrate d.

  14. High Momentum Particle Identification Detector The Study of Cesium Iodide Quantum Efficiency Dependency on Substrate Material, Temperature and Quartz Window

    CERN Document Server

    Wisna, Gde Bimananda M

    2014-01-01

    The Cesium Iodide (CsI) is used as a material for detecting Cherenkov radiation produced by high momentum particle in High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (HMPID) at ALICE Experiment at CERN. This work provides investigation and analysis of The Quantum Efficiency (QE) result of CsI which is deposited on five samples substrates such as copper passivated red, copper passivated yellow, aluminium, copper coated with nickel and copper coated with nickel then coated with gold. The measurement of five samples is held under temperature $60^{0}$ C and $25^{0}$ C (room temperature) and also with optical quartz window which can be adjusted to limit the wavelength range which reach the CsI. The result shows there are dependency of substrate, temperature due to enhancement effect and also quartz windows usage on QE of CsI. The results of five samples is then compared and analyzed.

  15. Growth of monolayer MoS2 films in a quasi-closed crucible encapsulated substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Pu, Hongbin; Lin, Tao; Li, Lianbi; Zhang, Shan; Sun, Gaopeng

    2017-07-01

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (m-MoS2) has attracted significant interest due to its unique electronic and optical properties. Herein, we report the successful fabrication of high quality and continuous m-MoS2 films in a quasi-closed crucible encapsulated substrates via a three-zone chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system. Quasi-closed crucible lowers the concentration of precursors around substrates and makes the sulfurization rate gentle, which is beneficial for invariable m-MoS2 growth. Characterization results indicate that as-grown m-MoS2 films are of high crystallinity and high quality comparable to the exfoliated MoS2. This approach is also adapted to the growth of other transition metal dichalcogenides.

  16. Aldopentoses as new substrates for the membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glycerol (polyol) dehydrogenase of Gluconobacter sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushi, Toshiharu; Terada, Yuka; Ozaki, Seishiro; Kataoka, Naoya; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Adachi, Osao; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2018-04-01

    Membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH, or polyol dehydrogenase) of Gluconobacter sp. oxidizes various secondary alcohols to produce the corresponding ketones, such as oxidation of D-sorbitol to L-sorbose in vitamin C production. Substrate specificity of GLDH is considered limited to secondary alcohols in the D-erythro configuration at the next to the last carbon. Here, we suggest that L-ribose, D- and L-lyxoses, and L-tagatose are also substrates of GLDH, but these sugars do not meet the substrate specificity rule of GLDH. The oxygen consumption activity of wild-type Gluconobacter frateurii cell membranes depends on several kinds of sugars as compared with that of the membranes of a GLDH-negative variant. Biotransformation of those sugars with the membranes was examined to determine the reaction products. A time course measuring the pH in the reaction mixture and the increase or decrease in substrates and products on TLC suggested that oxidation products of L-lyxose and L-tagatose were ketones with unknown structures, but those of L-ribose and D-lyxose were acids. The oxidation product of L-ribose was purified and revealed to be L-ribonate by HRMS and NMR analysis. Biotransformation of L-ribose with the membranes and also with the whole cells produced L-ribonate in nearly stoichiometric amounts, indicating that the specific oxidation site in L-ribose is recognized by GLDH. Since purified GLDH produced L-ribonate without any intermediate-like compounds, we propose here a reaction model where the first carbon in the pyranose form of L-ribose is oxidized by GLDH to L-ribonolactone, which is further hydrolyzed spontaneously to produce L-ribonate.

  17. Size- and phase-dependent mechanical properties of ultrathin Si films on polyimide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlich, Franziska F.; Spolenak, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin Si films in the nanometer range are extensively used for electronic and optoelectronic devices. Their mechanical properties have a high impact on the durability of the devices during lifetime. Here, fragmentation and buckling of 8–103 nm thin amorphous and polycrystalline (poly-) Si films on polyimide substrates have been studied by in situ light microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and resistance measurements. Generally, a smaller film thickness and a compressive residual stress delays the fracture of the film. The fracture strength of poly-Si films is larger compared to that of amorphous Si films while the adhesion to the substrate is better for amorphous Si compared to poly-Si. The onset delamination as a function of film thickness differs for the two phases and is described by two different models. Thin-film models for fracture toughness (amorphous Si: K 1C  = 1.49 ± 0.22, poly-Si: K 1C  = 3.36 ± 1.37) are applied, discussed, and found to be consistent with literature values.

  18. Temperature dependence of lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As on GaAs substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We measure the temperature dependence of the lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As by X-ray diffraction. The result shows that the lattice parameter of (Ga,Mn)As shows similar temperature dependence to that of GaAs, and no obvious change is observed in the vicinity of its Curie temperature.

  19. Modelling the Effect of Different Substrates and Temperature on the Growth and Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531T in Batch Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonija Trontel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amylolytic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531T utilised glucose, sucrose and starch as a sole carbon and energy source. The three substrates were completely depleted from MRS medium during batch cultivations carried out in a laboratory scale stirred tank bioreactor at constant temperature (40 °C and pH value (5.5. Under the tested conditions, the bacterium was capable of conducting simultaneously starch hydrolysis and fermentation. A mixture of two stereoisomers, D-(–- and L-(+-lactic acid, was produced in all cases by highly efficient homofermentative bioprocess with 0.93 to 1 g of lactate produced per g of total (consumed substrate. The effect of temperature on the kinetics of cell growth and lactic acid production by the amylolytic strain in the starch-containing medium was also investigated. Efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF was obtained at 35, 40 and 45 °C with completely degraded complex carbohydrate in 8 to 12 h and the product yield coefficient in the range from 0.91 to 0.93 g/g. Maximum values for substrate consumption rate (0.89 h^–1, maximum specific growth rate (0.87 h^–1, product formation rate (2.01 h^–1, and productivity of lactic acid (1.45 g/(L·h were obtained at 45 °C, while maximum biomass concentration (4.38 g/L was attained at 40 °C. The ratio of the two stereoisomeric forms of produced lactic acid was strongly affected by the temperature. Unstructured kinetic model was used to describe the consumption of the three substrates, bacterial biomass formation and lactic acid production by L. amylovorus DSM 20531T. The dependence of biokinetic parameters on temperature was described by cardinal temperature model. The applied models successfully predicted all experimental data.

  20. A study of size dependent structure, morphology and luminescence behavior of CdS films on Si substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Diksha; Singh, Ragini Raj; Sharma, Madhulika; Gupta, D.K.; Lalla, N.P.; Pandey, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Size tunable cadmium sulfide (CdS) films deposited by a dip coating technique on silicon (100) and indium tin oxide/glass substrates have been characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectivity, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The structural characterization indicated growth of an oriented phase of cadmium sulfide. Transmission electron microscopy used to calculate the particle size indicated narrow size dispersion. The tendency of nanocrystalline CdS films to form ordered clusters of CdS quantum dots on silicon (100) substrate has been revealed by morphological studies using atomic force microscopy. The photoluminescence emission spectroscopy of the cadmium sulfide films has also been investigated. It is shown that the nanocrystalline CdS exhibit intense photoluminescence as compared to the large grained polycrystalline CdS films. The effect of quantum confinement also manifested as a blue shift of photoluminescence emission. It is shown that the observed photoluminescence behavior of CdS is substantially enhanced when the nanocrystallites are assembled on silicon (100) substrate

  1. Molecular dynamics study of growth and interface structure during aluminum deposition on Ni(1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco); Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Hassani, A.; Makan, A.; er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Sbiaai, K.; er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory of Radiation and Matter, Faculty of Science and Technology, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Tabyaoui, A.; er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" data-affiliation=" (Univ Hassan 1er, Laboratory LS3M, Faculté Polydisciplinaire of Khouribga, 26000 Settat (Morocco))" >Hasnaoui, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum thin film growth on Ni(1 0 0) substrate was investigated. • Molecular dynamics simulation based on EAM interaction potential was considered. • Hexagonal and fourfold structures coexisted in the first layer. • Interface mismatch was revealed by wavy effect occurring in both lateral directions. • Film growth followed a layer-by-layer mode only in the first three deposited layers. - Abstract: We investigate aluminum thin film growth on Ni(1 0 0) substrate by means of molecular dynamics simulation. Embedded Atom Method interaction potential is considered. The simulation is performed at 300 K using an incident energy of 1 eV. The substrate-grown film interface shows the coexistence of hexagonal and fourfold structures in the first layer during the initial stage of deposition. As the deposition proceeds, the hexagonal geometry transforms to fourfold one which becomes dominant toward the end of deposition. The coverage of this layer exceeded 100%. Moreover, the deposited Al atoms with fourfold geometry adopt the lattice parameter of Ni as the thickness of deposited film increases. The interface mismatch investigation revealed that the roughness is dictated by how the Al(1 1 1) fits to the Ni(1 0 0) substrate, which may be reflected by a wavy effect occurring in both lateral directions. Furthermore, the film grows by a layer-by-layer mode with a coverage rate greater than 66.7% in the first three layers, while it follows an island mode with a coverage rate lower than the previous value (66.7%) beyond the third layer. Overall, a detailed analysis of each layer growth has established a relationship between the number of deposited atoms and the coverage rate of each layer

  2. JORDANIAN ZEOLITIC TUFF AS A RAW MATERIAL FOR THE PREPARATION OF SUBSTRATES USED FOR PLANT GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Manolov

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems faced in front of industry for potting media is limited amount of quality row materials (mainly peat for unlimited production of quality substrates in the future. The using of natural minerals for production of substrates or as amendments for existing substrates is possible solution for this problem. The natural zeolites with their specific properties – high CEC, high content of macro and microelements are one of good alternatives to the traditional potting media. Each zeolite deposit has unique chemical composition, physical and mechanical properties. That is why obligatory preliminary condition for their successful application in agriculture is caring out of biological study with agricultural plants for determination of the optimal parameters of chemical and physicochemical properties of the substrates.

  3. Determination of Nitrate Reductase Assay Depending on the Microbial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kabbany, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid micro-dilution assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of different bacterial isolates was developed. This assay is based on the ability of the most of viable organisms to reduce nitrates. The MIC or MBC could be determined by nitrate reductase (NR) only after 30 to 90 min of incubation depending on the behaviour of microbial growth. Bacterial viability is detected by a positive nitrite reduction rather than visible turbidity. The nitrate reduction assay was compared with standard micro-assay using 250 isolates of different taxa against 10 antibiotics belonging to different classes. An excellent agreement of 82.5 % was found between the two methods and only 17.5 % of 1794 trials showed difference in the determined MIC by tow-dilution interval above or below the MIC determined by the turbidimetric method under the same test conditions. However, the nitrate reduction assay was more rapid and sensitive in detecting viable bacteria and so, established an accurate estimate of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the minimal bacterial concentration (MBC). The nitrate reduction assay offers the additional advantage that it could be used to determine the MBC without having to subculture the broth. 232 cases of resistance were detected by NR and 4 different media were tested for susceptibility test. The bacterial isolates were exposed to ultra violet (UV) light for different period

  4. Growth Studies of Probiotic Bacteria on Short Chain Glucomannan, a Potential Prebiotic Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ON SHORT CHAIN GLUCOMANNAN, A POTENTIAL PREBIOTIC SUBSTRATE by Wayne S. Muller Steve Arcidiacono Adam Liebowitz Ken Racicot... PROBIOTIC BACTERIA ON SHORT CHAIN GLUCOMANNAN, A POTENTIAL PREBIOTIC SUBSTRATE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER PE...prebiotic potential of glucomannan (GM) oligosaccharides as a novel dietary approach to assist in alleviating gastrointestinal distress in deployed troops

  5. Recent progress in integration of III-V nanowire transistors on Si substrate by selective-area growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Katsuhiro; Fukui, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    We report on the recent progress in electronic applications using III-V nanowires (NWs) on Si substrates using the selective-area growth method. This method could align vertical III-V NWs on Si under specific growth conditions. Detailed studies of the III-V NW/Si heterointerface showed the possibility of achieving coherent growth regardless of misfit dislocations in the III-V/Si heterojunction. The vertical III-V NWs grown using selective-area growth were utilized for high performance vertical field-effect transistors (FETs). Furthermore, III-V NW/Si heterointerfaces with fewer misfit dislocations provided us with a unique band discontinuity with a new functionality that can be used for the application of tunnel diodes and tunnel FETs. These demonstrations could open the door to a new approach for creating low power switches using III-V NWs as building-blocks of future nanometre-scaled electronic circuits on Si platforms.

  6. Growth and characterization of semi-polar (11-22) GaN on patterned (113) Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J; Yu, X; Gong, Y; Hou, Y N; Zhang, Y; Wang, T

    2015-01-01

    Patterned (113) Si substrates have been fabricated for the growth of (11-22) semi-polar GaN, which completely eliminates one of the great issues in the growth of semi-polar GaN on silicon substrates, ‘Ga melting-back’. Furthermore, unlike any other mask patterning approaches which normally lead to parallel grooves along a particular orientation, our approach is to form periodic square window patterns. As a result, crack-free semi-polar (11-22) GaN with a significant improvement in crystal quality has been achieved, in particular, basal stacking faults (BSFs) have been significantly reduced. The mechanism for the defect suppression has been investigated based on detailed transmission electron microscopy measurements. It has been found that the BSFs can be impeded effectively at an early growth stage due to the priority growth along the 〈0001〉 direction. The additional 〈1-100〉 lateral growth above the masks results in a further reduction in dislocation density. The significant reduction in BSFs has been confirmed by low temperature photoluminescence measurements. (paper)

  7. Study of graded Ni-Ti shape memory alloy film growth on Si(100) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, R.M.S.; Muecklich, A.; Reuther, H.; Beckers, M. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, P.O. Box 510119, Dresden (Germany); Schell, N. [Institute for Materials Research, GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Silva, R.J.C.; Pereira, L.; Braz Fernandes, F.M. [CENIMAT, Monte de Caparica (Portugal)

    2008-05-15

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to study the effect of the deliberate change of the Ti/Ni ratio during the deposition of Ni-Ti films. Thus, graded films were deposited exhibiting distinctive composition and crystalline structure along the growth direction. The as-sputtered films were ex-situ characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), and electrical resistivity (ER) measurements (during thermal cycling). In this paper results are presented concerning a film (thickness of {approx} 420 nm) with a Ti-rich composition in the central part (ranging from 50 to {approx}60 at. %) and near-equiatomic composition in the extremities, following four distinct deposition periods (different Ti target powers). During the initial deposition step (near-equiatomic composition) the Ni-Ti B2 phase starts by stacking onto (h00) planes on the naturally oxidized Si(100) substrate due to the presence of the native Si oxide (2-3 nm). The increase of the power of the Ti target in the second and third steps induced the precipitation of Ti{sub 2}Ni. When stopping the Ti co-sputtering, Ti{sub 2}Ni dissolves and, thus, plays the role of a Ti reservoir for the formation of B2 phase now preferentially stacking onto (110) with the system approaching again the equiatomic composition. The ex-situ study of the morphology of the interface has shown the presence of NiSi{sub 2} silicides (A-NiSi{sub 2} and B-NiSi{sub 2}), Ti{sub 4}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 7}, Ti{sub 2}Ni and a non-identified phase constituted by Ni, Ti and Si, most likely amorphous. During thermal cycling, ER measurements revealed phase transitions associated with the B2, R-phase and B19' phases. These type of studies allow the identification of intermediate states during deposition and annealing, and the correlation with the final structure of the film, being useful for the optimisation of the deposition parameters in order to fabricate films with a two

  8. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Takayuki; Murata, Kazuko; Murata, Ryo; Sun, Shu-lan; Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Moriya, Kunihiko; Kasai, Noriyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs flox/flox ;mb1 cre/+ :Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Murata, Kazuko, E-mail: murata-k@iwakimu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Murata, Ryo [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Sun, Shu-lan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Moriya, Kunihiko [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kasai, Noriyuki [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sugamura, Kazuo [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Ishii, Naoto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  10. Substrate-Dependent Differences in the Crystal Structures and Optical Properties of ZnSe Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keumyoung Seo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical and structural properties of ZnSe nanowires directly grown on three different substrates, SiO2, ITO, and graphene, were investigated. ZnSe nanowires grown on graphene and SiO2 were found to have cubic structures, while ZnSe nanowires grown on ITO had a mixed cubic and hexagonal structure. The main peaks in the photoluminescence spectra of ZnSe nanowires grown on SiO2, ITO, and graphene were located at 459, 627, and 627/460 nm, respectively. In addition, a field-emission light-emitting device was fabricated using ZnSe nanowires as a phosphor and graphene as an electrode. The device showed a red emission peak with Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage coordinates of (0.621, 0.315.

  11. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Goudriaan, A.E.; Joos, L.; Dom, G.; Pattij, T.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control

  12. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Goudriaan, A. E.; Joos, L.; Dom, G.; Pattij, T.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in

  13. Growth of InGaN multiple quantum wells and GaN eplilayer on GaN substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung-Nam; Paek, H.S.; Son, J.K.; Sakong, T.; Yoon, E.; Nam, O.H.; Park, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated that the surface morphology of GaN epilayers was significantly affected by the surface tilt orientation of GaN substrate. Surface morphologies of GaN epilayers on GaN substrates show three types: mirror, wavy, and hillock. These surface morphologies are dependent on the surface orientation of GaN substrates. It is found that the hillock morphology of GaN epilayer was formed on the GaN substrate with surface tilt orientation less than 0.1 o . As the surface tilt angle increased to 0.35 o , the surface morphology varied from hillock to wavy morphology. Above a surface tilt angle of 0.4 o , surface morphology changed to the mirror-like type morphology. Additionally, these three types of GaN surface morphology also affected the optical quality of GaN epilayers as well as InGaN multiple quantum wells on GaN substrates by non-uniform In incorporation on the different surface morphologies of GaN epilayers

  14. Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: Evidence for a Substrate Access Channel in the FAD-Dependent Monooxygenase Coq6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coq6 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q, a polyisoprenylated benzoquinone lipid essential to the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase is proposed to hydroxylate the benzene ring of coenzyme Q (ubiquinone precursor at position C5. We show here through biochemical studies that Coq6 is a flavoprotein using FAD as a cofactor. Homology models of the Coq6-FAD complex are constructed and studied through molecular dynamics and substrate docking calculations of 3-hexaprenyl-4-hydroxyphenol (4-HP6, a bulky hydrophobic model substrate. We identify a putative access channel for Coq6 in a wild type model and propose in silico mutations positioned at its entrance capable of partially (G248R and L382E single mutations or completely (a G248R-L382E double-mutation blocking access to the channel for the substrate. Further in vivo assays support the computational predictions, thus explaining the decreased activities or inactivation of the mutated enzymes. This work provides the first detailed structural information of an important and highly conserved enzyme of ubiquinone biosynthesis.

  15. Phosphorylation-Dependent PIH1D1 Interactions Define Substrate Specificity of the R2TP Cochaperone Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hořejší

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The R2TP cochaperone complex plays a critical role in the assembly of multisubunit machines, including small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs, RNA polymerase II, and the mTORC1 and SMG1 kinase complexes, but the molecular basis of substrate recognition remains unclear. Here, we describe a phosphopeptide binding domain (PIH-N in the PIH1D1 subunit of the R2TP complex that preferentially binds to highly acidic phosphorylated proteins. A cocrystal structure of a PIH-N domain/TEL2 phosphopeptide complex reveals a highly specific phosphopeptide recognition mechanism in which Lys57 and 64 in PIH1D1, along with a conserved DpSDD phosphopeptide motif within TEL2, are essential and sufficient for binding. Proteomic analysis of PIH1D1 interactors identified R2TP complex substrates that are recruited by the PIH-N domain in a sequence-specific and phosphorylation-dependent manner suggestive of a common mechanism of substrate recognition. We propose that protein complexes assembled by the R2TP complex are defined by phosphorylation of a specific motif and recognition by the PIH1D1 subunit.

  16. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES ON THE GROWTH AND YIELD OF TOMATO (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill UNDER GREENHOUSE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Daniel Ortega-Martínez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill is the world's second most important vegetable. In Mexico, the crop gains economic and social relevance by the generation of foreign exchange and jobs, the production systems of this vegetable have been diversified in order to increase performance, incorporating innovative technologies such as plastic covers, drop irrigation and hydroponics. One of the main factors determining the success of the crop is the substrate, being the medium in which roots were developed which have great influence on the growth and development. In thisstudy, we evaluated during the crop season 2008-2009, the effect of substrate: pine sawdust, compost of sheep manure, agricultural land and red volcanic rock, on growth and yield of tomato. The experimental design used was randomized complete block with four repetitions and ten treatments were evaluated results from a combination of substrates in a volume of 1:1, each experimental unit consisted of four plants, the studied variables were subjected to an analysis of variance (ANOVA using the statistical package Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. The genotype used was Sun 7705. Significant differences between substrates, composting with sawdust mixing affected to a greater response for the variables height 4.61 m, 2.1 cm thick of stem, the fruits of greater weight 107.8 g, yield per plant and 4 kg and 25 kg/m-2. However, the number of flowers and clusters was higher in the sawdust substrate, so the composting with sawdust mixture may be a viable option for greenhouse tomato production.

  17. Temperature dependences of growth rates and carrying capacities of marine bacteria depart from metabolic theoretical predictions

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2015-09-11

    Using the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) framework, we evaluated over a whole annual cycle the monthly responses to temperature of the growth rates (μ) and carrying capacities (K) of heterotrophic bacterioplankton at a temperate coastal site. We used experimental incubations spanning 6oC with bacterial physiological groups identified by flow cytometry according to membrane integrity (live), nucleic acid content (HNA and LNA) and respiratory activity (CTC+). The temperature dependence of μat the exponential phase of growth was summarized by the activation energy (E), which was variable (-0.52 to 0.72 eV) but followed a seasonal pattern, only reaching the hypothesized value for aerobic heterotrophs of 0.65 eV during the spring bloom for the most active bacterial groups (live, HNA, CTC+). K (i.e. maximum experimental abundance) peaked at 4 × 106 cells mL-1 and generally covaried with μbut, contrary to MTE predictions, it did not decrease consistently with temperature. In the case of live cells, the responses of μand K to temperature were positively correlated and related to seasonal changes in substrate availability, indicating that the responses of bacteria to warming are far from homogeneous and poorly explained by MTE at our site. © FEMS 2015.

  18. Nickel enhanced graphene growth directly on dielectric substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wofford, Joseph M., E-mail: joewofford@gmail.com, E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J., E-mail: joewofford@gmail.com, E-mail: lopes@pdi-berlin.de; Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institut für Physik, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-07-28

    The efficacy of Ni as a surfactant to improve the crystalline quality of graphene grown directly on dielectric Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is examined. Simultaneously exposing the substrate to a Ni flux throughout C deposition at 950 °C led to improved charge carrier mobility and a Raman spectrum indicating less structural disorder in the resulting nanocrystalline graphene film. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed that no residual Ni could be detected in the film and showed a decrease in the intensity of the defect-related component of the C1s level. Similar improvements were not observed when a lower substrate temperature (850 °C) was used. A close examination of the Raman spectra suggests that Ni reduces the concentration of lattice vacancies in the film, possibly by catalytically assisting adatom incorporation.

  19. Characterization of TiO2 Thin Films on Glass Substrate Growth Using DC Sputtering Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agus Santoso; Tjipto Sujitno; Sayono

    2002-01-01

    It has been fabricated and characterization a TiO 2 thin films deposited on glass substrate using DC sputtering technique. Fabrication of TiO 2 thin films were carried out at electrode voltage 4 kV, sputtering current 5 mA, vacuum pressure 5 x 10 -4 torr, deposition time 150 minutes, and temperature of the substrate were varied from 150 -350 o C, while as a gas sputter was argon. The results was tested their micro structure using SEM, and crystal structure using XRD and found that the crystal structure of TiO 2 powder before deposited on glass substrate was rutile and anatase with orientation (110) and (200) for anatase and (100) and (111) rutile structure. While the crystal structure which deposited at temperature 150 o C and deposition time 2.5 hours was anatase with orientation (001) and (200). (author)

  20. Fluorinated Graphene Enables the Growth of Inorganic Thin Films by Chemical Bath Deposition on Otherwise Inert Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woo-Kyung; Hernández, Sandra C; Robinson, Jeremy T; Walton, Scott G; Sheehan, Paul E

    2017-01-11

    Chemically modified graphenes (CMGs) offer a means to tune a wide variety of graphene's exceptional properties. Critically, CMGs can be transferred onto a variety of substrates, thereby imparting functionalities to those substrates that would not be obtainable through conventional functionalization. One such application of CMGs is enabling and controlling the subsequent growth of inorganic thin films. In the current study, we demonstrated that CMGs enhance the growth of inorganic films on inert surfaces with poor growth properties. Fluorinated graphene transferred onto polyethylene enabled the dense and homogeneous deposition of a cadmium sulfide (CdS) film grown via chemical bath deposition. We showed that the coverage of the CdS film can be controlled by the degree of fluorination from less than 20% to complete coverage of the film. The approach can also be applied to other technologically important materials such as ZnO. Finally, we demonstrated that electron beam-generated plasma in a SF 6 -containing background could pattern fluorine onto a graphene/PE sample to selectively grow CdS films on the fluorinated region. Therefore, CMG coatings can tailor the surface properties of polymers and control the growth of inorganic thin films on polymers for the development of flexible electronics.

  1. Gas Diffusivity-Based Design and Characterization of Greenhouse Growth Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; Møldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    major aspects (physical, chemical, and biological) of growth media characterization for optimal growth media design. A simple approach toward designing a gas diffusivity mixing model is presented to assist with selection of optimal mixing ratios of growth media with markedly different Dp/Do behavior....... combinations thereof, are commonly used as growth media, detailed and comparable physical characterization is key to identify the best performing media. In this study, five potential growth media and two mixtures thereof were characterized based on soil gas diffusivity (Dp/Do, where Dp and Do are gas diffusion...

  2. Effects of substrate water potential in root growth of Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA B PEÑA-VALDIVIA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that root of maguey (Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dyck seedlings reacts during the first 24 h to low substrate water potential (Yw, by anatomical modifications. Three-4 cm root length seedlings were planted in vermiculite for 24 h at Yw between -0.03 and -2.35 MPa. Root dimensions, proline content and anatomy were evaluated. Substrate ψw between -0.65 and -2.35 MPa did not significantly affect longitudinal root growth. However, proline content significantly increased from 1.6 to 2.1 emoles mg-1. Significant reductions of transverse root area (41 %, thickness of mucilage covering the epidermis (47 %, thickness of epidermis (between 15 and 46 %, area of the parenchyma (between 35 and 41 % and number of vessels (up to 28 % were observed with Yw of -2.35 MPa. In contrast, thickness of xylem wall, diameter of xylem vessels and the number of cells of the cortex of the differentiation root region significantly increased (64, 17, and 97 %, respectively. The anatomical changes associated with low substrate Yw indicate a net increase of root apoplatic paths; structures involved in water conduction increased their diameter under low substrate Yw conditions and anatomical changes occurred during the first 24 h of water stress.

  3. Epitaxial growth of fcc-CoxNi100-x thin films on MgO(110) single-crystal substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Nukaga, Yuri; Sato, Yoichi; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Co x Ni 100-x (x=100, 80, 20, 0 at. %) epitaxial thin films were prepared on MgO(110) single-crystal substrates heated at 300 deg. C by ultrahigh vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The growth mechanism is discussed based on lattice strain and crystallographic defects. CoNi(110) single-crystal films with a fcc structure are obtained for all compositions. Co x Ni 100-x film growth follows the Volmer-Weber mode. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the out-of-plane and the in-plane lattice spacings of the Co x Ni 100-x films are in agreement within ±0.5% with the values of the respective bulk Co x Ni 100-x crystals, suggesting that the strain in the film is very small. High-resolution cross-sectional transmission microscopy shows that an atomically sharp boundary is formed between a Co(110) fcc film and a MgO(110) substrate, where periodical misfit dislocations are preferentially introduced in the film at the Co/MgO interface. The presence of such periodical misfit dislocations relieves the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate.

  4. Growth hormone-dependent phosphorylation of tyrosine 333 and/or 338 of the growth hormone receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1995-01-01

    and a reduction of GH-dependent phosphorylation of the full-length receptor. Consistent with Tyr333 and/or Tyr338 serving as substrates of JAK2, these substitutions resulted in a loss of tyrosyl phosphorylation of truncated receptor in an in vitro kinase assay using substantially purified GH.GHR.JAK2 complexes...

  5. Substrate dependent reaction channels of the Wolff–Kishner reduction reaction: A theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff–Kishner reduction reactions were investigated by DFT calculations for the first time. B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p SCRF=(PCM, solvent = 1,2-ethanediol optimizations were carried out. To investigate the role of the base catalyst, the base-free reaction was examined by the use of acetone, hydrazine (H2N–NH2 and (H2O8. A ready reaction channel of acetone → acetone hydrazine (Me2C=N–NH2 was obtained. The channel involves two likely proton-transfer routes. However, it was found that the base-free reaction was unlikely at the N2 extrusion step from the isopropyl diimine intermediate (Me2C(H–N=N–H. Two base-catalyzed reactions were investigated by models of the ketone, H2N–NH2 and OH−(H2O7. Here, ketones are acetone and acetophenone. While routes of the ketone → hydrazone → diimine are similar, those from the diimines are different. From the isopropyl diimine, the N2 extrusion and the C–H bond formation takes place concomitantly. The concomitance leads to the propane product concertedly. From the (1-phenylethyl substituted diimine, a carbanion intermediate is formed. The para carbon of the phenyl ring of the anion is subject to the protonation, which leads to a 3-ethylidene-1,4-cyclohexadiene intermediate. Its [1,5]-hydrogen migration gives the ethylbenzene product. For both ketone substrates, the diimines undergoing E2 reactions were found to be key intermediates.

  6. Brain substrates of social decision-making in dual diagnosis: cocaine dependence and personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-Garcia, Antonio; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Albein-Urios, Natalia; Martínez-González, José M; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2017-03-01

    Cocaine dependence frequently co-occurs with personality disorders, leading to increased interpersonal problems and greater burden of disease. Personality disorders are characterised by patterns of thinking and feeling that divert from social expectations. However, the comorbidity between cocaine dependence and personality disorders has not been substantiated by measures of brain activation during social decision-making. We applied functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare brain activations evoked by a social decision-making task-the Ultimatum Game-in 24 cocaine dependents with personality disorders (CDPD), 19 cocaine dependents without comorbidities and 19 healthy controls. In the Ultimatum Game participants had to accept or reject bids made by another player to split monetary stakes. Offers varied in fairness (in fair offers the proposer shares ~50 percent of the money; in unfair offers the proposer shares <30 percent of the money), and participants were told that if they accept both players get the money, and if they reject both players lose it. We contrasted brain activations during unfair versus fair offers and accept versus reject choices. During evaluation of unfair offers CDPD displayed lower activation in the insula and the anterior cingulate cortex and higher activation in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and superior frontal and temporal gyri. Frontal activations negatively correlated with emotion recognition. During rejection of offers CDPD displayed lower activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum and midbrain. Dual diagnosis is linked to hypo-activation of the insula and anterior cingulate cortex and hyper-activation of frontal-temporal regions during social decision-making, which associates with poorer emotion recognition. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Dry spot growth criterion for isothermal liquid films on a horizontal substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, L. I.; Podzharov, Yu. S.; Kabov, O. A.

    2017-05-01

    A criterion was elaborated for the phenomenon of dry spot evolution in isothermal liquid films on a horizontal substrate. The formulas are presented for gravity force and surface tension acting upon an element of the rim around the dry spot. The forces balance gives the evolution of initial dry spot: to expand or to contract.

  8. Nitrogen immobilization in plant growth substrates: clean chip residual, pine bark and peat moss

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was undertaken to determine the extent of nitrogen (N) immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate (clean chip residual (CCR)). Control treatments of pine bark (PB) and peat moss (PM) were compared to two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm) of CCR for micro...

  9. The effect of sulphur-terminated GaAs substrates on the MOVPE growth of CuGaS{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, P.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa)]. E-mail: pearl.berndt@nmmu.ac.za; Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Branch, M.S. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Leitch, A.W.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Kirmse, H. [Institute of Physics, Chair of Crystallography, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, W. [Institute of Physics, Chair of Crystallography, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Weber, J. [Institute for Applied Physics-Semiconductor Physics, University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-05-31

    In this study, various CuGaS{sub 2} layers were grown on GaAs (001) substrates using metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy, for the purpose of studying the effect of sulphur-termination of the substrate on layer quality. The resultant films were investigated using X-ray diffractometry, and transmission electron microscopy, with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy providing additional insights into crystallite growth on the control substrates. This paper will demonstrate that sulphur-termination limits substrate degradation. In the absence of sulphur-termination, atypical three-dimensional MOVPE growth is observed, with epitaxial crystallites varying in size from 10 nm to 200 nm. Substrate degradation inhibits lateral growth at the interface resulting in amorphous regions, cavities, and epitaxial crystallites demonstrating overgrowth into mushroom-like structures.

  10. The effect of sulphur-terminated GaAs substrates on the MOVPE growth of CuGaS2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, P.R.; Botha, J.R.; Branch, M.S.; Leitch, A.W.R.; Kirmse, H.; Neumann, W.; Weber, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, various CuGaS 2 layers were grown on GaAs (001) substrates using metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy, for the purpose of studying the effect of sulphur-termination of the substrate on layer quality. The resultant films were investigated using X-ray diffractometry, and transmission electron microscopy, with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy providing additional insights into crystallite growth on the control substrates. This paper will demonstrate that sulphur-termination limits substrate degradation. In the absence of sulphur-termination, atypical three-dimensional MOVPE growth is observed, with epitaxial crystallites varying in size from 10 nm to 200 nm. Substrate degradation inhibits lateral growth at the interface resulting in amorphous regions, cavities, and epitaxial crystallites demonstrating overgrowth into mushroom-like structures

  11. Basal metabolic state governs AIF-dependent growth support in pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Andrew J.; Wilkinson, Amanda S.; Wilkinson, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), named for its involvement in cell death pathways, is a mitochondrial protein that regulates metabolic homeostasis. In addition to supporting the survival of healthy cells, AIF also plays a contributory role to the development of cancer through its enzymatic activity, and we have previously shown that AIF preferentially supports advanced-stage prostate cancer cells. Here we further evaluated the role of AIF in tumorigenesis by exploring its function in pancreatic cancer, a disease setting that most often presents at an advanced stage by the time of diagnosis. A bioinformatics approach was first employed to investigate AIF mRNA transcript levels in pancreatic tumor specimens vs. normal tissues. AIF-deficient pancreatic cancer cell lines were then established via lentiviral infection. Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein quantities within cells. Cell viability was measured by flow cytometry; in vitro and Matrigel™ growth/survival using Coulter™ counting and phase contrast microscopy; and glucose consumption in the absence and presence of Matrigel™ using spectrophotometric methods. Archival gene expression data revealed a modest elevation of AIF transcript levels in subsets of pancreatic tumor specimens, suggesting a possible role in disease progression. AIF expression was then suppressed in a panel of five pancreatic cancer cell lines that display diverse metabolic phenotypes. AIF ablation selectively crippled the growth of cells in vitro in a manner that directly correlated with the loss of mitochondrial respiratory chain subunits and altered glucose metabolism, and these effects were exacerbated in the presence of Matrigel™ substrate. This suggests a critical metabolic role for AIF to pancreatic tumorigenesis, while the spectrum of sensitivities to AIF ablation depends on basal cellular metabolic phenotypes. Altogether these data indicate that AIF supports the growth and survival of metabolically defined

  12. Dependence of Plasmonic Properties of Silver Island Films on Nanoparticle Size and Substrate Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized surface plasmon resonance displayed by metal nanoparticles has been studied in silver island films prepared by the simple technique of vacuum evaporation, which is one of the options that is easily adaptable for large area and low cost applications. Silver island films with varying island sizes and areal coverages are prepared by depositing silver films with varying thicknesses followed by annealing. The optical properties of the samples have been explained in terms of dependence of scattering and absorption on the metal island size, interparticle interaction and matrix effects, and the wavelength range over which the plasmonic effects are present.

  13. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelin Barbacci

    Full Text Available Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  14. Another Brick in the Cell Wall: Biosynthesis Dependent Growth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  15. Growth of Al-doped ZnO films with tilted nano-columns on r-cut sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Hwan [Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Lu, Tianlin; Cho, Sungmee; Khatkatay, Fauzia [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Chen, Li [Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Wang, Haiyan, E-mail: wangh@ece.tamu.edu [Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films in both single layer and bi-layer forms were deposited on {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (011{sup Macron }2) (r-cut) and (0001) (c-cut) substrates by a pulsed laser deposition technique. Single layer AZO films were grown under either vacuum or 33.3 Pa of O{sub 2} pressure. Bilayer AZO films were grown with a sequential deposition of a uniform template layer under vacuum and a nano-column-structured layer under 33.3 Pa of O{sub 2} pressure. Interestingly, single layer AZO film grown on r-cut sapphire in high oxygen pressure (33.3 Pa) shows tilted grain boundaries along [1{sup Macron }102{sup Macron }]{sub AZO}. The bilayer film deposited on r-cut substrate shows tilted nano-column growth while the film grown on c-cut substrate has vertically grown nano-columns. The results of X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission electron microscopy studies show a systematic variation of the d-spacing of (0002){sub AZO} and (112{sup Macron }0){sub AZO} for all AZO films. Electrical resistivity was measured and found to be strongly dependent on the different microstructures achieved under different oxygen pressures and substrates. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2 wt.% Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin film grown on r-cut sapphire under 33.3 Pa of O{sub 2} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tiled boundary along [1{sup Macron }102{sup Macron }]{sub AZO} observed as a result of internal lattice strain Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tilted nano-column processed after sequential deposition under vacuum and 33.3 Pa of O{sub 2} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significantly reduced electrical resistivity observed for the films on r-cut sapphire.

  16. Wafer bowing control of free-standing heteroepitaxial diamond (100) films grown on Ir(100) substrates via patterned nucleation growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Taro; Kodama, Hideyuki; Kono, Shozo; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2015-01-01

    The potential of patterned nucleation growth (PNG) technique to control the wafer bowing of free-standing heteroepitaxial diamond films was investigated. The heteroepitaxial diamond (100) films were grown on an Ir(100) substrate via PNG technique with different patterns of nucleation regions (NRs), which were dot-arrays with 8 or 13 μm pitch aligned to < 100 > or < 110 > direction of the Ir(100) substrate. The wafer bows and the local stress distributions of the free-standing films were measured using a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. For each NR pattern, the stress evolutions within the early stage of diamond growth were also studied together with a scanning electron microscopic observation of the coalescing diamond particles. These investigations revealed that the NR pattern, in terms of pitch and direction of dot-array, strongly affects the compressive stress on the nucleation side of the diamond film and dominantly contributes to the elastic deformation of the free-standing film. This indicates that the PNG technique with an appropriate NR pattern is a promising solution to fabricate free-standing heteroepitaxial diamond films with extremely small bows. - Highlights: • Wafer bowing control of free-standing heteroepitaxial diamond (100) films • Effect of patterned nucleation and growth (PNG) technique on wafer bowing reduction • Influence of nucleation region patterns of PNG on wafer bowing • Internal stress analysis of PNG films via confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy

  17. The dilemma for lipid productivity in green microalgae: importance of substrate provision in improving oil yield without sacrificing growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kenneth Wei Min; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2016-01-01

    Rising oil prices and concerns over climate change have resulted in more emphasis on research into renewable biofuels from microalgae. Unlike plants, green microalgae have higher biomass productivity, will not compete with food and agriculture, and do not require fertile land for cultivation. However, microalgae biofuels currently suffer from high capital and operating costs due to low yields and costly extraction methods. Microalgae grown under optimal conditions produce large amounts of biomass but with low neutral lipid content, while microalgae grown in nutrient starvation accumulate high levels of neutral lipids but are slow growing. Producing lipids while maintaining high growth rates is vital for biofuel production because high biomass productivity increases yield per harvest volume while high lipid content decreases the cost of extraction per unit product. Therefore, there is a need for metabolic engineering of microalgae to constitutively produce high amounts of lipids without sacrificing growth. Substrate availability is a rate-limiting step in balancing growth and fatty acid (FA) production because both biomass and FA synthesis pathways compete for the same substrates, namely acetyl-CoA and NADPH. In this review, we discuss the efforts made for improving biofuel production in plants and microorganisms, the challenges faced in achieving lipid productivity, and the important role of precursor supply for FA synthesis. The main focus is placed on the enzymes which catalyzed the reactions supplying acetyl-CoA and NADPH.

  18. In vitro effect of substrate, temperature and photoperiod on Phakopsora pachyrhizi urediniospore germination and germ tube growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Casa Blum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In vitro experiments were conducted to assess the effects of substrate, temperature and time of exposure to temperature and photoperiod on P. pachyrhizi uredospore germination and germ tube growth. The following substrates were tested: water-agar and soybean leaf extract-agar at different leaf concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 g of leaves and 15g agar/L water, temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35oC and times of exposure (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 hours to temperature and 12 different photoperiods. The highest germination and germ tube length was found for the soybean leaf extract agar. Maximum P. pachyrhizi uredospore germination was obtained at 21.8 and 22.3°C, and maximum germ tube growth at 21.4 and 22.1°C. The maximum uredospore germination was found at 6.4 hours exposure, while the maximum germ tube length was obtained at 7.7 h exposure. Regarding photoperiod, the maximum spore germination and the maximum uredospore germ tube length were found in the dark. Neither spore germination nor uredospore germ tube growth was completely inhibited by the exposure to continuous light.

  19. Effects of bamboo substrate and supplemental feeding on growth and production of hybrid red tilapia fingerlings (Oreochromis mossambicusxOrechromis niloticus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keshavanath, P.; Gangadhar, B.; Ramesh, T.J.; Dam, van A.A.; Beveridge, M.C.M.; Verdegem, M.C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Periphyton growing on artificial substrates can increase the production of herbivorous fish in aquaculture ponds. Periphyton may be an alternative or a complement for supplemental feed in fingerling production. Growth and production of hybrid red tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus x Oreochromis

  20. Direct growth and patterning of multilayer graphene onto a targeted substrate without an external carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongseok; Kim, Won-Jun; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won

    2012-07-25

    Using only a simple tube furnace, we demonstrate the synthesis of patterned graphene directly on a designed substrate without the need for an external carbon source. Carbon atoms are absorbed onto Ni evaporator sources as impurities, and incorporated into catalyst layers during the deposition. Heat treatment conditions were optimized so that the atoms diffused out along the grain boundaries to form nanocrystals at the catalyst-substrate interfaces. Graphene patterns were obtained under patterned catalysts, which restricted graphene formation to within patterned areas. The resultant multilayer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to verify the high crystallinity and two-dimensional nanomorphology. Finally, a metal-semiconductor diode with a catalyst-graphene contact structure were fabricated and characterized to assess the semiconducting properties of the graphene sheets with respect to the display of asymmetric current-voltage behavior.

  1. Direct evidence of strain transfer for InAs island growth on compliant Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marçal, L. A. B.; Magalhães-Paniago, R.; Malachias, Angelo, E-mail: angeloms@fisica.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos 6627, CEP 31270-901, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Richard, M.-I. [European Synchrotron (ESRF), ID01 beamline, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Aix-Marseille University, IM2NP-CNRS, Faculté des Sciences de St Jérôme, 13397 Marseille (France); Cavallo, F. [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Lagally, M. G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Schmidt, O. G. [Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, IFW-Dresden, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Schülli, T. Ü. [European Synchrotron (ESRF), ID01 beamline, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Deneke, Ch. [Laboratório Nacional de Nanotecnologia (LNNano/CNPEM), C.P. 6192, CEP 13083-970, Campinas (Brazil)

    2015-04-13

    Semiconductor heteroepitaxy on top of thin compliant layers has been explored as a path to make inorganic electronics mechanically flexible as well as to integrate materials that cannot be grown directly on rigid substrates. Here, we show direct evidences of strain transfer for InAs islands on freestanding Si thin films (7 nm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements using a beam size of 300 × 700 nm{sup 2} can directly probe the strain status of the compliant substrate underneath deposited islands. Using a recently developed diffraction mapping technique, three-dimensional reciprocal space maps were reconstructed around the Si (004) peak for specific illuminated positions of the sample. The strain retrieved was analyzed using continuous elasticity theory via Finite-element simulations. The comparison of experiment and simulations yields the amount of strain from the InAs islands, which is transferred to the compliant Si thin film.

  2. Growth and characterization of indium tin oxide thin films deposited on PET substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Jung, Hakkee; Lee, Jongin; Lim, Donggun; Yang, Keajoon; Yi, Junsin; Song, Woo-Chang

    2008-01-01

    Transparent and conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were deposited onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) by d.c. magnetron sputtering as the front and back electrical contact for applications in flexible displays and optoelectronic devices. In addition, ITO powder was used for sputter target in order to reduce the cost and time of the film formation processes. As the sputtering power and pressure increased, the electrical conductivity of ITO films decreased. The films were increasingly dark gray colored as the sputtering power increased, resulting in the loss of transmittance of the films. When the pressure during deposition was higher, however, the optical transmittance improved at visible region of light. ITO films deposited onto PET have shown similar optical transmittance and electrical resistivity, in comparison with films onto glass substrate. High quality films with resistivity as low as 2.5 x 10 -3 Ω cm and transmittance over 80% have been obtained on to PET substrate by suitably controlling the deposition parameters

  3. Direct Growth of Copper Oxide Films on Ti Substrate for Nonenzymatic Glucose Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxu Ji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO films directly grown on Ti substrate have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method and used to construct an amperometric nonenzymatic glucose sensor. XRD and SEM were used to characterize the samples. The electrochemical performances of the electrode for detection of glucose were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The CuO films based glucose sensors exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic properties which show very high sensitivity (726.9 μA mM−1 cm−2, low detection limit (2 μM, and fast response (2 s. In addition, reproducibility and long-term stability have been observed. Low cost, convenience, and biocompatibility make the CuO films directly grown on Ti substrate electrodes a promising platform for amperometric nonenzymatic glucose sensor.

  4. Oriented growth of polyaniline nanofiber arrays onto the glass and flexible substrates using a facile method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Xu, Shaoqin; Cheng, Huan; Liu, Wenfeng; Chen, Fang; Liu, Xueqing; Liu, Jiyan; Chen, Shaoyun; Hu, Chenglong

    2018-01-01

    The oriented 1D nanostructure arrays of PANI have great potential applications in various devices. In this paper, we report a simple and facile one-step template-free way to assemble highly oriented arrays of PANI nanofibers using chemical oxidative polymerization on the glass and polymer flexible substrates. The diameters of the individual nanofibers range from 10 nm to 33 nm, and the average length of the aligned nanofibers is up to 48-139 nm. The PANI nanofiber arrays can be uniformly distributed on the whole substrates via this method, which are confirmed by the results of SEM images and Raman mapping. The as-prepared PANI nanofiber arrays can be potentially used in flexible low-voltage electronics, anti coatings, self-cleaning surfaces and chemical sensors, and so on.

  5. Bulk AlN crystal growth: self-seeding and seeding on 6H-SiC substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. H.; Liu, L.; Liu, B.; Zhuang, D.; Chaudhuri, J.; Kuball, M.; Rajasingam, S.

    2002-12-01

    The properties of bulk AlN crystals grown by sublimation recondensation and either randomly nucleated (i.e. self-seeded) or seeded on 6H-SiC substrates or compared. Self-seeding produces crystals of the highest perfection, lowest stress, and low Si and C impurity content, but the crystals grow in random crystallographic orientations. Crystals grown in boron nitride crucibles typically form thin platelets with the fastest growth occurring in the c-axis direction. Growth striations run the length of the crystals in the c-axis direction. Anisotropic etching in aqueous 45 wt% KOH solutions shows that the growth (0 0 0 1) planes exposed to the AlN source predominately have an aluminum polarity. AlN crystals seeded on 6H-SiC(0 0 0 1) have a single crystallographic orientation and the largest dimensions are perpendicular to the c-axis, determined by the size of the substrate. Cracking and voids in the AlN layer produced by differences in thermal expansion coefficients of AlN and SiC and decomposition of the SiC were ameliorated by depositing an AlN-SiC alloy layer on the SiC before growing the AlN layer. Raman spectroscopy measurements suggest the AlN and AlN-SiC alloy layer are both under tensile stress. The defect density in AlN crystals grown on composite AlN-SiC/6H-SiC substrates was 3.7×10 5 cm -2, as determined by synchrotron white beam X-ray topography.

  6. Effects of combined growth of biogenic and xenobiotic substrates on degradation of xenobiotic by activated sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Nguyen Phuc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to research about supplementation of different concentrations of the substrate on the degradation rate of xenobiotic and to determine the optimal concentrations of the auxiliary substrates that are most beneficial of xenobiotic degradation rate. 2,4-dichlorophenol acid (2,4-D was used representative xenobiotic organic compounds, while peptone and sugar used for auxiliary substrates. The activated sludge was completely break down 100 mg/l of 2,4-D for three consecutive times. The different concentrations between biogenic substracts of sucrose and peptone were fed separately or combined into the medium containing 200 mg/l of 2,4-D and 140 mg SS/l of activated sludge. The results showed that sugar and peptone could affect 2,4-D degradation rate to several different degree at different concentrations. In separate supplementation, 2,4-D degradation completed within 25 hours, 40 mg/l sugar and 150 mg/l peptone concentrations were found to be the optimal concentrations. In combined case, 2,4-D was consumed totally within 20 hours and the optimal concentration of the combined sugar and peptone concentrations were 40 and 150 mg/l, respectively.

  7. Influence of synthesis parameters on CCVD growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes over aluminum substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Anna; Kecsenovity, Egon; Pápa, Zsuzsanna; Gyulavári, Tamás; Németh, Krisztián; Horvath, Endre; Hernadi, Klara

    2017-08-25

    In the past two decades, important results have been achieved in the field of carbon nanotube (CNT) research, which revealed that carbon nanotubes have extremely good electrical and mechanical properties The range of applications widens more, if CNTs form a forest-like, vertically aligned structure (VACNT) Although, VACNT-conductive substrate structure could be very advantageous for various applications, to produce proper system without barrier films i.e. with good electrical contact is still a challenge. The aim of the current work is to develop a cheap and easy method for growing carbon nanotubes forests on conductive substrate with the CCVD (Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition) technique at 640 °C. The applied catalyst contained Fe and Co and was deposited via dip coating onto an aluminum substrate. In order to control the height of CNT forest several parameters were varied during the both catalyst layer fabrication (e.g. ink concentration, ink composition, dipping speed) and the CCVD synthesis (e.g. gas feeds, reaction time). As-prepared CNT forests were investigated with various methods such as scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. With such an easy process it was possible to tune both the height and the quality of carbon nanotube forests.

  8. Nitrogen Immobilization in Plant Growth Substrates: Clean Chip Residual, Pine Bark, and Peatmoss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl R. Boyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rising costs of potting substrates have caused horticultural growers to search for alternative, lower-cost materials. Objectives of this study were to determine the extent of nitrogen immobilization and microbial respiration in a high wood-fiber content substrate, clean chip residual. Microbial activity and nitrogen availability of two screen sizes (0.95 cm and 0.48 cm of clean chip residual were compared to control treatments of pine bark and peatmoss in a 60-day incubation experiment. Four rates (0, 1, 2, or 3 mg of supplemental nitrogen were assessed. Peatmoss displayed little microbial respiration over the course of the study, regardless of nitrogen rate; followed by pine bark, 0.95 cm clean chip residual, and 0.48 cm clean chip residual. Respiration increased with increasing nitrogen. Total inorganic nitrogen (plant available nitrogen was greatest with peatmoss; inorganic nitrogen in other treatments were similar at the 0, 1, and 2 mg supplemental nitrogen rates, while an increase occurred with the highest rate (3 mg. Clean chip residual and pine bark were similar in available nitrogen compared to peatmoss. This study suggests that nitrogen immobilization in substrates composed of clean chip residual is similar to pine bark and can be treated with similar fertilizer amendments during nursery production.

  9. Regulation of AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 and Thr308 by endoplasmic reticulum stress modulates substrate specificity in a severity dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wa Yung

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a common factor in the pathophysiology of diverse human diseases that are characterised by contrasting cellular behaviours, from proliferation in cancer to apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders. Coincidently, dysregulation of AKT/PKB activity, which is the central regulator of cell growth, proliferation and survival, is often associated with the same diseases. Here, we demonstrate that ER stress modulates AKT substrate specificity in a severity-dependent manner, as shown by phospho-specific antibodies against known AKT targets. ER stress also reduces both total and phosphorylated AKT in a severity-dependent manner, without affecting activity of the upstream kinase PDK1. Normalisation to total AKT revealed that under ER stress phosphorylation of Thr308 is suppressed while that of Ser473 is increased. ER stress induces GRP78, and siRNA-mediated knock-down of GRP78 enhances phosphorylation at Ser473 by 3.6 fold, but not at Thr308. Substrate specificity is again altered. An in-situ proximity ligation assay revealed a physical interaction between GRP78 and AKT at the plasma membrane of cells following induction of ER stress. Staining was weak in cells with normal nuclear morphology but stronger in those displaying rounded, condensed nuclei. Co-immunoprecipitation of GRP78 and P-AKT(Ser473 confirmed the immuno-complex consists of non-phosphorylated AKT (Ser473 and Thr308. The interaction is likely specific as AKT did not bind to all molecular chaperones, and GRP78 did not bind to p70 S6 kinase. These findings provide one mechanistic explanation for how ER stress contributes to human pathologies demonstrating contrasting cell fates via modulation of AKT signalling.

  10. Growth hormone, interferon-gamma, and leukemia inhibitory factor utilize insulin receptor substrate-2 in intracellular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argetsinger, L S; Norstedt, G; Billestrup, Nils

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrate that insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) is tyrosyl-phosphorylated following stimulation of 3T3-F442A fibroblasts with growth hormone (GH), leukemia inhibitory factor and interferon-gamma. In response to GH and leukemia inhibitory factor, IRS-2 is immediately...... for GH is further demonstrated by the finding that GH stimulates association of IRS-2 with the 85-kDa regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase and with the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. These results are consistent with the possibility that IRS-2 is a downstream signaling partner...

  11. Enhanced growth of highly lattice-mismatched CdSe on GaAs substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jyh-Shyang; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Hsiao-Hua; Ke, Han-Xiang; Tong, Shih-Chang; Yang, Chu-Shou; Wu, Chih-Hung; Shen, Ji-Lin

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the improvement of the molecular beam epitaxial growth of zinc-blende CdSe on (0 0 1) GaAs substrate with a large lattice mismatch by introducing a small amount of Te atoms. Exposing the growing surface to Te atoms changes the reflection high-energy electron diffraction pattern from spotty to streaky together with (2 × 1) surface reconstruction, and greatly reduces the full width at half maximum of the X-ray rocking curve and increases the integral intensity of room-temperature photoluminescence by a factor of about nine.

  12. Spotlight on the Underdogs-An Analysis of Underrepresented Alternaria Mycotoxins Formed Depending on Varying Substrate, Time and Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickel, Theresa; Kahl, Sandra M; Klaffke, Horst; Rychlik, Michael; Müller, Marina E H

    2016-11-19

    Alternaria (A.) is a genus of widespread fungi capable of producing numerous, possibly health-endangering Alternaria toxins (ATs), which are usually not the focus of attention. The formation of ATs depends on the species and complex interactions of various environmental factors and is not fully understood. In this study the influence of temperature (7 °C, 25 °C), substrate (rice, wheat kernels) and incubation time (4, 7, and 14 days) on the production of thirteen ATs and three sulfoconjugated ATs by three different Alternaria isolates from the species groups A. tenuissima and A. infectoria was determined. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantification. Under nearly all conditions, tenuazonic acid was the most extensively produced toxin. At 25 °C and with increasing incubation time all toxins were formed in high amounts by the two A. tenuissima strains on both substrates with comparable mycotoxin profiles. However, for some of the toxins, stagnation or a decrease in production was observed from day 7 to 14. As opposed to the A. tenuissima strains, the A. infectoria strain only produced low amounts of ATs, but high concentrations of stemphyltoxin III. The results provide an essential insight into the quantitative in vitro AT formation under different environmental conditions, potentially transferable to different field and storage conditions.

  13. Spotlight on the Underdogs—An Analysis of Underrepresented Alternaria Mycotoxins Formed Depending on Varying Substrate, Time and Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickel, Theresa; Kahl, Sandra M.; Klaffke, Horst; Rychlik, Michael; Müller, Marina E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Alternaria (A.) is a genus of widespread fungi capable of producing numerous, possibly health-endangering Alternaria toxins (ATs), which are usually not the focus of attention. The formation of ATs depends on the species and complex interactions of various environmental factors and is not fully understood. In this study the influence of temperature (7 °C, 25 °C), substrate (rice, wheat kernels) and incubation time (4, 7, and 14 days) on the production of thirteen ATs and three sulfoconjugated ATs by three different Alternaria isolates from the species groups A. tenuissima and A. infectoria was determined. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used for quantification. Under nearly all conditions, tenuazonic acid was the most extensively produced toxin. At 25 °C and with increasing incubation time all toxins were formed in high amounts by the two A. tenuissima strains on both substrates with comparable mycotoxin profiles. However, for some of the toxins, stagnation or a decrease in production was observed from day 7 to 14. As opposed to the A. tenuissima strains, the A. infectoria strain only produced low amounts of ATs, but high concentrations of stemphyltoxin III. The results provide an essential insight into the quantitative in vitro AT formation under different environmental conditions, potentially transferable to different field and storage conditions. PMID:27869760

  14. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  15. The limitations of seedling growth and drought tolerance to novel soil substrates in arid systems: Implications for restoration success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Amber; Lewandrowski, Wolfgang; Stevens, Jason; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam

    2016-04-01

    Introduction With the limited knowledge available regarding the impact of drought on seedling growth, an understanding of seedling tolerance to arid conditions is crucial for restoration success (James et al., 2013; Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2014). However, restoration in semi-arid areas faces the challenge of re-establishing plant communities on altered soil substrates (Muñoz-Rojas et al., 2015). These substrates are a result of anthropogenic disturbances such as mining which have altered the plant-soil-water dynamics of the ecosystem (Machado et al., 2013). The aim of this study was to assess the impact of mining on the plant-soil-water dynamics of an arid ecosystem of Western Australia (Pilbara region, North Western Australia) and the implications these altered relationships have on seedling growth and their responses to drought. Methods Drought responses of native plant species were assessed through a series of glasshouse experiments. Firstly, 21 species dominant to the Pilbara region were subjected to drought in a topsoil growth media to assess variation in responses (leaf water potential at the time of stomatal closure) across species and identify traits associated with drought tolerance. Secondly, four species ranging in their drought tolerance identified previously, were grown to two leaf stages (second and fourth leaf stage) in three mining substrates (topsoil, a topsoil and waste mix and waste) to assess seedling drought responses to various potential restoration substrates and how that varied with plant development stage. Results and discussion Four morphological traits were found to be significantly associated with drought indicators (leaf mass ratio, stem area, stem length, stem weight), however, these were weak correlations. Waste substrate and its addition to topsoil reduced plant total biomass but did not alter species responses to drought. However, the soil physical properties of the waste reduced water retention and water availability for plant uptake

  16. Macrophage motility is driven by frontal-towing with a force magnitude dependent on substrate stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hind, Laurel E; Dembo, Micah; Hammer, Daniel A

    2015-04-01

    The ability of macrophages to properly migrate is crucial to their success as early responders during the innate immune response. Furthermore, improper regulation of macrophage migration is known to contribute to several pathologies. The signaling mechanisms underlying macrophage migration have been previously studied but to date the mechanical mechanism of macrophage migration has not been determined. In this study, we have created the first traction maps of motile primary human macrophages by observing their migration on compliant polyacrylamide gels. We find that the force generated by migrating macrophages is concentrated in the leading edge of the cell - so-called frontal towing - and that the magnitude of this force is dependent on the stiffness of the underlying matrix. With the aid of chemical inhibitors, we show that signaling through the RhoA kinase ROCK, myosin II, and PI3K is essential for proper macrophage force generation. Finally, we show that Rac activation by its GEF Vav1 is crucial for macrophage force generation while activation through its GEF Tiam1 is unnecessary.

  17. Chemical bath deposited (CBD) CuO thin films on n-silicon substrate for electronic and optical applications: Impact of growth time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Jenifar; Paul, Somdatta; Karmakar, Anupam; Yi, Ren; Dalapati, Goutam Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sanatan

    2017-10-01

    Thin film of p-type cupric oxide (p-CuO) is grown on silicon (n-Si) substrate by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique and a precise control of thickness from 60 nm to 178 nm has been achieved. The structural properties and stoichiometric composition of the grown films are observed to depend significantly on the growth time. The chemical composition, optical properties, and structural quality are investigated in detail by employing XRD, ellipsometric measurements and SEM images. Also, the elemental composition and the oxidation states of Cu and O in the grown samples have been studied in detail by XPS measurements. Thin film of 110 nm thicknesses exhibited the best performance in terms of crystal quality, refractive index, dielectric constant, band-gap, and optical properties. The study suggests synthesis route for developing high quality CuO thin film using CBD method for electronic and optical applications.

  18. The influence of substrate source on the growth of Ralstonia eutropha, aiming at the production of polyhydroxyalkanoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marangoni C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of producing polyhydroxyalkanoates, a study of the influence of culture conditions (nitrogen and carbon sources and temperature on the growth of Ralstonia eutropha in stirred flasks was carried out and the use of some low-cost sources (hydrolyzed lactose, inverted sugar and corn steep liquor as evaluated. The best specific growth rate was obtained when inverted sugar was utilized as the substrate (mumax = 0.26 h-1. Two different phases in the assimilation of the carbon source were observed when hydrolyzed lactose was present, suggesting the assimilation first of glucose and then of galactose. To confirm the growth of Ralstonia eutropha using galactose as the only carbon source, experiments were carried out and the results showed that this bacterium is able to grow in the presence of this sugar at a growth rate of 0.13 h-1. The use of galactose by Ralstonia eutropha for its growth has not been reported in the literature until now. Corn steep liquor was found to be a viable alternative nitrogen source to ammonium sulfate. The results of experiments carried out at 30°C and 34°C were similar.

  19. Density-dependent growth of the polychaete Diopatra aciculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada Safarik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of intraspecific density on growth of the tube-building polychaete Diopatra aciculata (Onuphidae were examined over a three-month period within a marine worm aquaculture facility. Three polychaete densities (500, 1000 and 2000 worms/m2 were represented within triplicate 0.30 m2 boxes containing late juvenile D. aciculata, sandy sediment and recirculating seawater. Daily food ration per worm was held constant across all density levels. Total length, weight and number of segments were recorded for 20 polychaetes randomly removed from each of nine treatment boxes at weeks 1, 7 and 14. Mean daily growth was higher during weeks 1-7 than during weeks 7-14 for all growth variables at each density level. Polychaetes at the highest density level exhibited lower rates of growth and more broken and/or regenerating posterior segments than those at low density. High D. aciculata density was also associated with reduced dissolved oxygen concentrations and high polychaete mortality (20%. At medium polychaete density (1000/m2, D. aciculata exhibited low levels of apparent stress and high biomass return per unit area, both of which are important considerations in the aquaculture rearing of this species. We suggest that further studies focus on age- and size-related factors contributing to density effects on polychaete growth.

  20. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaal, L; Goudriaan, A E; Joos, L; Dom, G; Pattij, T; van den Brink, W; Veltman, D J

    2014-10-01

    Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in various psychiatric disorders. However, the effects of modafinil on delay discounting and its underlying neural correlates have not been investigated as yet. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of modafinil on neural correlates of impulsive decision making in abstinent AD patients and healthy control (HC) subjects. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects cross-over study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted in 14 AD patients and 16 HC subjects. All subjects participated in two fMRI sessions in which they either received a single dose of placebo or 200 mg of modafinil 2 h before the session. During fMRI, subjects completed a delay-discounting task to measure impulsive decision making. Modafinil improved impulsive decision making in AD pateints, which was accompanied by enhanced recruitment of frontoparietal regions and reduced activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, modafinil-induced enhancement of functional connectivity between the superior frontal gyrus and ventral striatum was specifically associated with improvement in impulsive decision making. These findings indicate that modafinil can improve impulsive decision making in AD patients through an enhanced coupling of prefrontal control regions and brain regions coding the subjective value of rewards. Therefore, the current study supports the implementation of modafinil in future clinical trials for AD.

  1. Substrate dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires with remarkable pseudocapacitance

    KAUST Repository

    Baby, Rakhi Raghavan

    2012-05-09

    A scheme of current collector dependent self-organization of mesoporous cobalt oxide nanowires has been used to create unique supercapacitor electrodes, with each nanowire making direct contact with the current collector. The fabricated electrodes offer the desired properties of macroporosity to allow facile electrolyte flow, thereby reducing device resistance and nanoporosity with large surface area to allow faster reaction kinetics. Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on carbon fiber paper collectors self-organize into a brush-like morphology with the nanowires completely surrounding the carbon microfiber cores. In comparison, Co 3O 4 nanowires grown on planar graphitized carbon paper collectors self-organize into a flower-like morphology. In three electrode configuration, brush-like and flower-like morphologies exhibited specific capacitance values of 1525 and 1199 F/g, respectively, at a constant current density of 1 A/g. In two electrode configuration, the brush-like nanowire morphology resulted in a superior supercapacitor performance with high specific capacitances of 911 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 784 F/g at 40 A/g. In comparison, the flower-like morphology exhibited lower specific capacitance values of 620 F/g at 0.25 A/g and 423 F/g at 40 A/g. The Co 3O 4 nanowires with brush-like morphology exhibited high values of specific power (71 kW/kg) and specific energy (81 Wh/kg). Maximum energy and power densities calculated for Co 3O 4 nanowires with flower-like morphology were 55 Wh/kg and 37 kW/kg respectively. Both electrode designs exhibited excellent cycling stability by retaining ∼91-94% of their maximum capacitance after 5000 cycles of continuous charge-discharge. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. Growth of ZnO nanowires through thermal oxidation of metallic zinc films on CdTe substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, O., E-mail: oscar@fmc.uva.es [Optronlab Group, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Edificio I-D, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011, Valladolid (Spain); Hortelano, V.; Jimenez, J. [Optronlab Group, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Edificio I-D, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011, Valladolid (Spain); Plaza, J.L.; Dios, S. de; Olvera, J.; Dieguez, E. [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fath, R.; Lozano, J.G.; Ben, T.; Gonzalez, D. [Dpto. Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Q.I., Facultad de Ciencias, Apdo. 40, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Mass, J. [Dpto. de Fisica, Universidad del Norte, Km.5 Via Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2011-04-28

    Research highlights: > ZnO nanowires grown from thermal Zn oxidation. > TEM reveals high quality thin nanowires several microns long. > New phase formation at long oxidation time. > Good spectroscopic properties measured by Raman, Photo and Cathodoluminsecence spectroscopies. - Abstract: <112-bar 0> wurtzite ZnO nanowires (NWs) have been obtained by oxidizing in air at 500 deg. C thermally evaporated Zn metal films deposited onto CdTe substrates. The presence of Cd atoms from the substrate on the ZnO seeding layer and NWs seems to affect the growth of the NWs. The effects of the oxidation time on the structural and optical properties of the NWs are described in detail. It is shown that the NWs density decreases and their length increases when increasing the oxidation time. Thicker Zn layers result in thinner and longer ZnO NWs. Very long oxidation times also lead to the formation of a new CdO phase which is related to the partial destruction and quality reduction of the NWs. The possible process for ZnO NW formation on CdTe substrates is discussed.

  3. CVD growth of large-area and high-quality HfS2 nanoforest on diverse substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binjie; Wang, Zegao; Qi, Fei; Wang, Xinqiang; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Wanli; Chen, Yuanfu

    2018-03-01

    Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have attracted burgeoning attention due to their various properties and wide potential applications. As a new TMD, hafnium disulfide (HfS2) is theoretically predicted to have better electrical performance than widely studied MoS2. The experimental researches also confirmed the extraordinary feature in electronics and optoelectronics. However, the maximal device performance may not be achieved due to its own limitation of planar structure and challenge of transfer without contamination. Here, through the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique, inch-size HfS2 nanoforest has been directly grown on diverse objective substrates covering insulating, semiconducting and conducting substrates. This direct CVD growth without conventional transfer process avoids contamination and degradation in quality, suggesting its promising and wide applications in high-quality and multifarious devices. It is noted that all the HfS2 nanoforests grown on diverse substrates are constructed with vertically aligned few-layered HfS2 nanosheets with high crystalline quality and edge orientation. Moreover, due to its unique structure, the HfS2 nanoforest owns abundant exposed edge sites and large active surface area, which is essential to apply in high-performance catalyst, sensor, and energy storage or field emitter.

  4. Influence of AlGaN Buffer Growth Temperature on GaN Epilayer based on Si(lll) Substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Meng; Wang Xiaoliang; Pan Xu; Xiao Hongling; Wang Cuimei; Zhang Minglan; Wang Zhanguo

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigated the influence of AlGaN buffer growth temperature on strain status and crystal quality of the GaN film on Si(111) sbustrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. It was demonstrated by the optical microscopy that AlGaN buffer gorwth temperature had a remarkable effect on compensating tensil stress in top GaN layer and preventing the formation of cracks. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis showed crystal quality and surface morphology of the GaN epilayer could be improved through increasing AlGaN buffer growth temperature. 1μm crack-free GaN epilayer on Si (111) substrates was obtained with graded AlGaN buffer layer at optimized temperature of 1050 deg. C. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that a significant reduction in threading dislocations was achieved in GaN epilayer.

  5. Growth and phycocyanin synthesis in the heterotrophic microalga Galdieria sulphuraria on substrates made of food waste from restaurants and bakeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloth, Jenni Katrine; Jensen, Henriette Casper; Pleissner, Daniel; Eriksen, Niels Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Galdieria sulphuraria 074G (Rhodophyta) was grown heterotrophically in defined medium and on amylolytic and proteolytic hydrolysed food waste from restaurants and bakeries. Substrate uptake, growth, and phycocyanin content were quantified in the cultures. The alga utilised carbohydrates and amino acids from the waste but ammonium and other inorganic nutrients were needed to stimulate phycocyanin synthesis. Highest specific phycocyanin contents (20-22mgg -1 ) were observed in cells grown at 25°C or 34°C on the food wastes. Growth inhibition was observed when the hydrolysates were used in quantities resulting in glucose concentrations of 10 and 50gL -1 for bakery and restaurant waste, respectively. Still, G. sulphuraria 074G grew and produced phycocyanin efficiently on food waste under adequate conditions and may potentially be utilised for synthesise of high-valuable products from food waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria isolated from cucumber seedling substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuxuan; Han, Yuzhu; Shang, QingMao; Li, Pinglan

    2015-04-20

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens L-H15 is a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from the cucumber seedling substrate collected in Beijing, China. The complete genome of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 consists of one single circular chromosome (3,864,316 bp) without any plasmid. From the genome, we identified clusters responsible for non-ribosomal synthesis of secondary metabolites, and genes related to the plant growth promotion hormone such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and acetoin secretion. In addition, genes that contribute to biofilm formation were also found on the genome of L-H15. Complete genome information enables further study on the beneficial interactions between B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 and host plants, and the future application of B. amyloliquefaciens L-H15 as biofertilizer and biocide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on quartz substrate by spray pyrolysis of hexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghian, Zahra

    2008-01-01

    Vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes were grown by spray pyrolysis of hexane as the carbon source in the presence of ferrocene as catalyst precursor on a quartz substrate. In recent work we used optimal experimental parameters for the feeding method, reactor conditions, reaction temperature and time, concentration of catalyst and flow rate of feed and gas. The process parameters were chosen so as to obtain multiwall carbon nanotubes and aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes. The tubes are around 15-80 nm in diameter. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses

  8. The growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on quartz substrate by spray pyrolysis of hexane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghian, Zahra [Department of Gas, Research Institute of Petroleum Industry (RIPI), PO Box 14857-3311, West Boulevard Azadi Sport Complex, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sadeghianz@ripi.ir

    2008-06-18

    Vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes were grown by spray pyrolysis of hexane as the carbon source in the presence of ferrocene as catalyst precursor on a quartz substrate. In recent work we used optimal experimental parameters for the feeding method, reactor conditions, reaction temperature and time, concentration of catalyst and flow rate of feed and gas. The process parameters were chosen so as to obtain multiwall carbon nanotubes and aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes. The tubes are around 15-80 nm in diameter. The morphology and structure of the samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analyses.

  9. Composition and growth procedure-dependent properties of electrodeposited CuInSe 2 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, S. Moorthy; Ennaoui, A.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.

    2005-02-01

    CuInSe 2 thin films were deposited on molybdenum-coated glass substrates by electrodeposition. Deposition was carried out with a variety of electrochemical bath compositions. The quality of the deposits depends very much on the source materials as well as the concentration of the same in the electrolyte. The deposition potential was varied from -0.4 to -0.75 V vs. SCE. The pH of the solution was adjusted to 1.5-2 using diluted sulphuric acid. Chloride salts containing bath yield good surface morphology, but there is always excess of the metallic content in the deposited films. Different growth procedures, like initial metallic layers of copper or indium, layers of copper selenide or indium selenide before the actual deposition of ternary chalcopyrite layers were attempted. Fabrication pathway, morphological and compositional changes due to the different precursor route has been analysed. The quality of the deposits prepared by one-step electrodeposition is better than the deposits with a two-stage process. The deposited films were characterized with XRD, SEM-EDAX, UV-visible spectroscopy and I- V characteristics. The deposited films were annealed in air as well as in nitrogen atmosphere. The influence of annealing temperature, environment and annealing time on the properties of the films are evaluated. Attempts were made to fabricate solar cell structure from the deposited absorber films. The structure of Mo/CuInSe 2/CdS/ZnO/Ni was characterized with surface, optical and electrical studies.

  10. Frank-ter Haar syndrome protein Tks4 regulates epidermal growth factor-dependent cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögel, Gábor; Gujdár, Annamária; Geiszt, Miklós; Lányi, Árpád; Fekete, Anna; Sipeki, Szabolcs; Downward, Julian; Buday, László

    2012-09-07

    Mutations in the SH3PXD2B gene coding for the Tks4 protein are responsible for the autosomal recessive Frank-ter Haar syndrome. Tks4, a substrate of Src tyrosine kinase, is implicated in the regulation of podosome formation. Here, we report a novel role for Tks4 in the EGF signaling pathway. In EGF-treated cells, Tks4 is tyrosine-phosphorylated and associated with the activated EGF receptor. This association is not direct but requires the presence of Src tyrosine kinase. In addition, treatment of cells with LY294002, an inhibitor of PI 3-kinase, or mutations of the PX domain reduces tyrosine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of Tks4. Furthermore, a PX domain mutant (R43W) Tks4 carrying a reported point mutation in a Frank-ter Haar syndrome patient showed aberrant intracellular expression and reduced phosphoinositide binding. Finally, silencing of Tks4 was shown to markedly inhibit HeLa cell migration in a Boyden chamber assay in response to EGF or serum. Our results therefore reveal a new function for Tks4 in the regulation of growth factor-dependent cell migration.

  11. Dependence on the growth direction of the strain in AlGaSb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Lopez, M; Delgado-Macuil, R; Gayou, V L; Orduna-Diaz, A [CIBA-Tlaxcala, IPN, Tlaxcala, Tlax. (Mexico); Momox-Beristain, E [FC-BUAP, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Salazar-Hernandez, B [CIICAp-UAEM, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Rodriguez, A G, E-mail: marlonrl@yahoo.com.m [IICO-UASLP, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P. (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    High resolution x-ray diffraction profiles were obtained from Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}Sb layers grown on (001) and (111) GaSb substrates. The out of plane lattice parameter, was estimated directly from the symmetrical diffractions for (001) and (111) alloys. These results show that all the layers are strained, and those grown on (001) GaSb are slightly more strained than the corresponding layers grown on (111) GaSb. This difference is explained by the dependence of the strain ratio on growth direction. The out of plane lattice parameter as a function of Al content is higher than the corresponding bulk lattice parameter of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}Sb layers obtained with Vegard's law. Also, the perpendicular and the in-plane lattice parameter expected for pseudomorphic alloys, was estimated from the strain ratios, assuming an elastic deformation and using the EDX alloy composition to interpolate the elastic constants C{sub ij}. This estimation also shows that almost all the layers are fully strained.

  12. Perversities of Extreme Dependence and Unequal Growth in the TAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis first in a series of independent analyses by Andrew Martin Fischer, commissioned by Tibet Watch, a research-based organisation established in London in 2006, examines the rapid growth that has been generated in the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) through the extremely heavy

  13. Perversities of Extreme Dependence and Unequal Growth in the TAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe official Chinese press recently came out with a series of articles reporting the latest statistics on the phenomenally rapid economic growth that has been taking place in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) since the mid-1990s through sheer force of Central Government subsidies.

  14. Microbial utilization of low molecular weight organic substrates in soil depends on their carbon oxidation state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anna; Smith, Andrew; Jones, Davey; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Removal of low molecular weight organic substances (LMWOS), originating from plants and microorganisms, from soil solution is regulated by microbial uptake. In addition to the concentration of LMWOS in soil solution, the chemical properties of each substance (e.g. C oxidation state, number of C atoms, number of -COOH groups) can affect their uptake and subsequent partitioning of C within the soil microbial community. The aim of this study was to trace the initial fate of three dominant classes of LMWOS in soil (sugars, carboxylic and amino acids), including their removal from solution and utilization by microorganisms, and to reveal the effect of substance chemical properties on these processes. Soil solution, spiked at natural abundance levels with 14C-labelled glucose, fructose, malate, succinate, formate, alanine or glycine, was added to the soil and 14C was traced in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CO2, cytosol and soil organic carbon (SOC) over 24 hours. The half-life time of all LMWOS in the DOC (T1 /2-solution) varied between 0.6-5.0 min showing extremely fast initial uptake of LMWOS. The T1 /2-solution of substances was dependent on C oxidation state, indicating that less oxidized organic substances (with C oxidation state "0") were retained longer in soil solution than oxidized substances. The LMWOS-C T1 /2-fast, characterizing the half-life time of 14C in the fast mineralization pool, ranged between 30 and 80 min, with the T1 /2-fast of carboxylic acids (malic acid) being the fastest and the T1 /2-fast of amino acids (glycine) being the slowest. An absence of correlation between T1 /2-fast and either C oxidation state, number of C atoms, or number of -COOH groups suggests that intercellular metabolic pathways are more important for LMWOS transformation in soil than their basic chemical properties. The CO2 release during LMWOS mineralization accounted for 20-90% of 14C applied. Mineralization of LMWOS was the least for sugars and the greatest for

  15. Molecular beam epitaxy of quasi-freestanding transition metal disulphide monolayers on van der Waals substrates: a growth study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Joshua; Pielić, Borna; Murray, Clifford; Jolie, Wouter; Wekking, Tobias; Busse, Carsten; Kralj, Marko; Michely, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    Based on an ultra-high vacuum compatible two-step molecular beam epitaxy synthesis with elemental sulphur, we grow clean, well-oriented, and almost defect-free monolayer islands and layers of the transition metal disulphides MoS2, TaS2 and WS2. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and low energy electron diffraction we investigate systematically how to optimise the growth process, and provide insight into the growth and annealing mechanisms. A large band gap of 2.55 eV and the ability to move flakes with the scanning tunneling microscope tip both document the weak interaction of MoS2 with its substrate consisting of graphene grown on Ir(1 1 1). As the method works for the synthesis of a variety of transition metal disulphides on different substrates, we speculate that it could be of great use for providing hitherto unattainable high quality monolayers of transition metal disulphides for fundamental spectroscopic investigations.

  16. Total contents of arsenic and associated health risks in edible mushrooms, mushroom supplements and growth substrates from Galicia (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, M J; Alonso, J; García, M A

    2014-11-01

    The levels of arsenic (As) in the main commercial species of mushrooms present in Galicia, in their growth substrates, and mushroom supplements have been analysed by ICP-MS, with the intention of assessing potential health risks involved with their consumption. The mean concentrations of As in wild and cultivated mushrooms was 0.27mg/kg dw, in mushroom supplements 0.40mg/kg dw, in soils 5.10mg/kg dw, and in growth substrate 0.51mg/kg dw. No significant differences were observed between species, although the species Lactarius deliciosus possessed a slightly more elevated mean concentration (at 0.49mg/kg dw) than the other species investigated. In soils, statistically significant differences (pmushroom supplements, although low, were higher than in wild or cultivated mushrooms. Measured arsenic levels were within the normal range in samples analysed in unpolluted areas. Because of the low As concentrations found in fungi and mushroom supplements from Galicia, and considering the relatively small inclusion of these foods in people's diet, it can be concluded that there is no toxicological risk of arsenic associated with the consumption of the species of mushrooms analysed or at the dosages indicated for mushroom supplements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth of Bi2Se3 topological insulator thin film on Ge(1 1 1) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungyeon; Lee, Sangsoo; Woo, Jeongseok; Lee, Geunseop

    2018-02-01

    Atomically smooth, single crystalline Bi2Se3 thin films were grown on a Ge(1 1 1) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. Crystallinities of both the surface and the bulk as well as the stoichiometry of the grown film were characterized by using low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopies. Hexagonal atomic structures, quintuple layer steps observed in STM images confirmed that the Bi2Se3 film with a (0 0 0 1) surface was grown. Diffraction peak positions as well as the chemical composition determined from the core-level photoelectron spectra coincide well with those expected for the Bi2Se3 crystal. The surface state with a Dirac cone was observed in the valence photoelectron spectra, which also support that a high-quality Bi2Se3 film was grown on the Ge(1 1 1) substrate. The interface between Ge(1 1 1) and Bi2Se3(0 0 0 1) is expected to be abrupt due to the small lattice between them.

  18. Growth of InAs Quantum Dots on Germanium Substrate Using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Renu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on germanium substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique. Effects of growth temperature and InAs coverage on the size, density, and height of quantum dots were investigated. Growth temperature was varied from 400 to 450 °C and InAs coverage was varied between 1.40 and 2.35 monolayers (MLs. The surface morphology and structural characteristics of the quantum dots analyzed by atomic force microscope revealed that the density of the InAs quantum dots first increased and then decreased with the amount of InAs coverage; whereas density decreased with increase in growth temperature. It was observed that the size and height of InAs quantum dots increased with increase in both temperature and InAs coverage. The density of QDs was effectively controlled by growth temperature and InAs coverage on GaAs buffer layer.

  19. Impact of phenolic substrate and growth temperature on the arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E.; Shah, Manesh; Zhang, Bing; Ruckert, Christian; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2009-02-15

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol or phenol at 5 C and 28 C; both for the wild type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol-degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  20. Survival and growth of epiphytic ferns depend on resource sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Zheng eLu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Locally available resources can be shared within clonal plant systems through physiological integration, thus enhancing their survival and growth. Most epiphytes exhibit clonal growth habit, but few studies have tested effects of physiological integration (resource sharing on survival and growth of epiphytes and whether such effects vary with species. We conducted two experiments, one on individuals (single ramets and another on groups (several ramets within a plot, with severed and intact rhizome treatments (without and with physiological integration on two dominant epiphytic ferns (Polypodiodes subamoena and Lepisorus scolopendrium in a subtropical montane moist forest in Southwest China. Rhizome severing (preventing integration significantly reduced ramet survival in the individual experiment and number of surviving ramets in the group experiment, and it also decreased biomass of both species in both experiments. However, the magnitude of such integration effects did not vary significantly between the two species. We conclude that resource sharing may be a general strategy for clonal epiphytes to adapt to forest canopies where resources are limited and heterogeneously distributed in space and time.

  1. Female promiscuity and maternally dependent offspring growth rates in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Michael; Brooks, Robert C; Lemaître, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    Conflicts between family members are expected to influence the duration and intensity of parental care. In mammals, the majority of this care occurs as resource transfer from mothers to offspring during gestation and lactation. Mating systems can have a strong influence on the severity of familial conflict--where female promiscuity is prevalent, conflict is expected to be higher between family members, causing offspring to demand more resources. If offspring are capable of manipulating their mothers and receive resources in proportion to their demands, resource transfer should increase with elevated promiscuity. We tested this prediction, unexplored across mammals, using a comparative approach. The total durations of gestation and lactation were not related to testes mass, a reliable proxy of female promiscuity across taxa. Offspring growth during gestation, however, and weaning mass, were positively correlated with testes mass, suggesting that offspring gain resources from their mothers at faster rates when familial conflict is greater. During gestation, the relationship between offspring growth and testes mass was also related to placenta morphology, with a stronger relationship between testes mass and growth observed in species with a less invasive placenta. Familial conflict could have a pervasive influence on patterns of parental care in mammals. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Microbial ecology of extreme environments: Antarctic dry valley yeasts and growth in substrate limited habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    The multiple stresses temperature, moisture, and for chemoheterotrophs, sources of carbon and energy of the Dry Valley Antarctica soils allow at best depauperate communities, low in species diversity and population density. The nature of community structure, the operation of biogeochemical cycles, the evolution and mechanisms of adaptation to this habitat are of interest in informing speculations upon life on other planets as well as in modeling the limits of gene life. Yeasts of the Cryptococcus vishniacil complex (Basidiobiastomycetes) are investigated, as the only known indigenes of the most hostile, lichen free, parts of the Dry Valleys. Methods were developed for isolating these yeasts (methods which do not exclude the recovery of other microbiota). The definition of the complex was refined and the importance of nitrogen sources was established as well as substrate competition in fitness to the Dry Valley habitats.

  3. Growth and Transfer of Monolithic Horizontal ZnO Nanowire Superstructures onto Flexible Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Sheng

    2010-04-28

    A method of fabricating horizontally aligned ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays with full control over the width and length is demonstrated. A cross-sectional view of the NWs by transmission electron microscopy shows a "mushroom-like" structure. Novel monolithic multisegment superstructures are fabricated by making use of the lateral overgrowth. Ultralong horizontal ZnO NWs of an aspect ratio on the order often thousand are also demonstrated. These horizontal NWs are lifted off and transferred onto a flexible polymer substrate, which may have many great applications in horizontal ZnO NW-based nanosensor arrays, light-emitting diodes, optical gratings, integrated circuit interconnects, and high-output-power alternating-current nanogenerators. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Comparison of date-palm wastes and perlite as growth substrates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... Today, various organic matters are used as growth media. Most of them are combined with various materials, such as a mixture of peat moss and pine bark, or a mixture of peat moss and pine bark with mineral materials like perlite or vermiculite. All over the world, stone wool and other materials like perlite ...

  5. Dual substrate feedback control of specific growth-rate in vaccine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeleman, R.; Beuvery, E.C.; Vries, D.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Unexpectedly, primary concern of bio-pharmaceutical industry is not optimisation of product yield or cost reduction, but consistency in production and product quality. This paper describes the methodology and experimental results of specific growth-rate control for vaccine production. The

  6. Anisotropic corner diffusion as origin for dendritic growth on hexagonal substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brune, H.; Röder, H.; Bromann, K.

    1996-01-01

    and stick mechanism, form. Dendrites are characterized by preferential growth in the [2]-directions, i.e., perpendicular to A-steps. The key process for their formation has been found to be diffusion of one-fold comer atoms towards neighboring steps. Calculations with the effective medium...

  7. Growth of n-alkane films on a single-crystal substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Z. U.; Ehrlich, S. N.; Matthies, B.

    2001-01-01

    The structure and growth mode of alkane films (n-C/sub n/H/sub 2n+2/; n=4, 6, 7) adsorbed on a Ag(111) surface have been investigated by synchrotron X-ray scattering. New models are proposed for the butane (n=4) and hexane (n=6) monolayer and butane bilayer structures. Specular reflectivity scans...

  8. RhoA-Mediated Functions in C3H10T1/2 Osteoprogenitors Are Substrate Topography Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yoichiro; Liang, Ruiwei; Mendonça, Daniela B S; Mendonça, Gustavo; Nagasawa, Masako; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-03-01

    Surface topography broadly influences cellular responses. Adherent cell activities are regulated, in part, by RhoA, a member of the Rho-family of GTPases. In this study, we evaluated the influence of surface topography on RhoA activity and associated cellular functions. The murine mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells (osteoprogenitor cells) were cultured on titanium substrates with smooth topography (S), microtopography (M), and nanotopography (N) to evaluate the effect of surface topography on RhoA-mediated functions (cell spreading, adhesion, migration, and osteogenic differentiation). The influence of RhoA activity in the context of surface topography was also elucidated using RhoA pharmacologic inhibitor. Following adhesion, M and N adherent cells developed multiple projections, while S adherent cells had flattened and widespread morphology. RhoA inhibitor induced remarkable longer and thinner cytoplasmic projections on all surfaces. Cell adhesion and osteogenic differentiation was topography dependent with S topography roughness dependent (S topography. Smooth surface adherent cells appear highly sensitive to RhoA function, while nano-scale topography adherent cell may utilize alternative cellular signaling pathway(s) to influence adherent cellular functions regardless of RhoA activity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Characterization of Angle Dependent Color Travel of Printed Multi-Color Effect Pigment on Different Color Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirica Karlovits

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Color-travel pigments, which exhibit much more extensive color change as well provide angle-dependent optical effect can be used in many industrial products. In present paper the multi-color effect pigment printed on three different foils with different background color (black, silver and transparent was investigated. The pigment was based on synthetically produced transparent silicon dioxide platelets coated with titanium dioxide. CIEL*a*b* values and reflection of prints were measured by multi-angle spectrophotometer at constant illumination at an angle of 45º and different viewing angles (-15º, 15°, 25º, 45º, 75º and 110º were used. The measurements of printed multi-color pigment showed that CIEL*a*b* color coordinates varied to great extents, depending on detection angles as well on color of the printing substrate. The study revealed that pigmnet printed on black background obtained significant change in color. The study has also shown that when viewing angle increases, the reflection curves decreases.

  10. Electrochemical behaviour and nanoscale characteristics of CNT-based fibers as new substrate for cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizu, S.; Yahia, L.H. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire d' innovation et d' analyse de la bioperformance; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P. [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, Bordeaux (France); Rouabhia, M. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which carbon nanotube (CNT) macroscopic fibers were formulated by a newly developed non-covalent method for fabricating fibrous substrate. The covalent and noncovalent chemistry of CNTs has been widely used in the development of CNT-based biomaterials as active substrates for living cells. Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) analysis was used to determine the surface characteristics of the CNT-based fibers produced by wet spinning method. The structure and texture of fibers were imaged using Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) for microanalysis. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging revealed the structure of fibers. Cyclic Voltametry (CV) measurements were performed to examine the electrochemical behaviour of fibers. Sulfuric acid and a cell culture medium was used as the 2 different electrolytes. The influences of environmental parameters on the electrochemical phenomena taking place were identified. The intrinsic electrochemical characteristics of fibers were revealed through measurements in acid environment. The cell culture medium simulated the physiological conditions. It was concluded that the newly developed wet spinning method is very efficient for making CNT-based fibers as electroactive biomaterials. The structural nanoscale details evidenced a good alignment of nanotubes in the thread and the critical role it plays in electrochemical interactions. The differences induced by the variation of electrolytes suggest that a relationship could be established between the fiber chemistry and the electrochemical response. This correlation has considerably potential for the design of new biomedical devices. 2 refs.

  11. Strain-Dependence of the Structure and Ferroic Properties of Epitaxial NiTiO3 Thin Films Grown on Different Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Varga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polarization-induced weak ferromagnetism has been predicted a few years back in perovskite MTiO3 (M = Fe, Mn, and Ni. We set out to stabilize this metastable perovskite structure by growing NiTiO3 epitaxially on different substrates and to investigate the dependence of polar and magnetic properties on strain. Epitaxial NiTiO3 films were deposited on Al2O3, Fe2O3, and LiNbO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition and characterized using several techniques. The effect of substrate choice on lattice strain, film structure, and physical properties was investigated. Our structural data from X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy shows that substrate-induced strain has a marked effect on the structure and crystalline quality of the films. Physical property measurements reveal a dependence of the weak ferromagnetism and lattice polarization on strain and highlight our ability to control the ferroic properties in NiTiO3 thin films by the choice of substrate. Our results are also consistent with the theoretical prediction that the ferromagnetism in acentric NiTiO3 is polarization induced. From the substrates studied here, the perovskite substrate LiNbO3 proved to be the most promising one for strong multiferroism.

  12. New Mechanistic Insight from Substrate- and Product-Bound Structures of the Metal-Dependent Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Lyase DddQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Adam E; Dey, Mishtu

    2016-11-08

    The marine microbial catabolism of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) by the lyase pathway liberates ∼300 million tons of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) per year, which plays a major role in the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur. Recent biochemical and structural studies of some DMSP lyases, including DddQ, reveal the importance of divalent transition metal ions in assisting DMSP cleavage. While DddQ is believed to be zinc-dependent primarily on the basis of structural studies, excess zinc inhibits the enzyme. We examine the importance of iron in regulating the DMSP β-elimination reaction catalyzed by DddQ as our as-isolated purple-colored enzyme possesses ∼0.5 Fe/subunit. The UV-visible spectrum exhibited a feature at 550 nm, consistent with a tyrosinate-Fe(III) ligand-to-metal charge transfer transition. Incubation of as-isolated DddQ with added iron increases the intensity of the 550 nm peak, whereas addition of dithionite causes a bleaching as Fe(III) is reduced. Both the Fe(III) oxidized and Fe(II) reduced species are active, with similar k cat values and 2-fold differences in their K m values for DMSP. The slow turnover of Fe(III)-bound DddQ allowed us to capture a substrate-bound form of the enzyme. Our DMSP-Fe(III)-DddQ structure reveals conformational changes associated with substrate binding and shows that DMSP is positioned optimally to bind iron and is in the proximity of Tyr 120 that acts as a Lewis base to initiate catalysis. The structures of Tris-, DMSP-, and acrylate-bound forms of Fe(III)-DddQ reported here illustrate various states of the enzyme along the reaction pathway. These results provide new insights into DMSP lyase catalysis and have broader significance for understanding the mechanism of oceanic DMS production.

  13. Codon 972 polymorphism in the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene, obesity, and risk of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigal, R.J.; Doria, A.; Warram, J.H.; Krolewski, A.S. [Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Because of the role of insulin receptor substrate-1 in insulin action, the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene is a candidate gene for noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Modest associations between NIDDM and a GGG-AGG single base substitution (corresponding to a glycine-arginine amino acid substitution) in codon 972 of the gene have been found, but none reached statistical significance. To examine further how large a proportion of NIDDM cases could be caused by the mutation, we performed a stratified analysis combining the results from the 6 earlier studies and those from our panel of 192 unrelated NIDDM subjects and 104 healthy controls. In addition, we looked for a possibility that the codon 972 mutation plays a role only in the presence of certain conditions. Genomic DNA samples obtained from NIDDM cases and healthy controls were genotyped using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism protocol modified for genomic DNA. The GGG{r_arrow}AGG substitution was found in 5.7% of the diabetic subjects (11 of 192) and 6.9% of the controls (7 of 104). The difference between groups was not statistically significant, and it was not different from the results of other studies. The Mantel-Haenszel summary odds ratio across all studies was 1.49 (P < 0.05; 95% confidence intervals, 1.01-2.2). This summary odds ratio is consistent with a small proportion of NIDDM cases ({approximately}3%) being caused by the mutation. Exploratory subgroup analyses on our panel suggested a clustering of NIDDM, the codon 972 mutation, and overweight, raising the hypothesis that the mutation may predispose to NIDDM only in the presence of excess body weight. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Effects of substrate type on growth and mortality of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) exposed to the predator Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    different substrate types in combined field and laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that complexity of the substrate increased blue mussel survival significantly, through a decrease in predation pressure. However, increased intraspecific competition for food on the complex substrate resulted...

  15. Dysprosium-Catalyzed Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Arrays on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this letter, we report that dysprosium is an effective catalyst for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs growth via a chemical vapor deposition (CVD process for the first time. Horizontally superlong well-oriented SWNT arrays on SiO2/Si wafer can be fabricated by EtOH-CVD under suitable conditions. The structure and properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that the SWNTs from dysprosium have better structural uniformity and better conductivity with fewer defects. This rare earth metal provides not only an alternative catalyst for SWNTs growth, but also a possible method to generate high percentage of superlong semiconducting SWNT arrays for various applications of nanoelectronic device.

  16. Role of polymers in CVD growth of nanocrystalline diamond films on foreign substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kromka, Alexander; Potocký, Štěpán; Rezek, Bohuslav; Babchenko, Oleg; Kozak, Halyna; Vaněček, Milan; Michalka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 246, 11-12 (2009), s. 2654-2657 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ploymer coating * nucleation * diamond growth Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.150, year: 2009

  17. RETRACTED: Nucleation and growth behavior of well-aligned ZnO nanorods on organic substrates in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ching; Chen, San-Yuan; Cheng, Syh-Yuh

    2005-09-01

    Available online : 21 July 2005 This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief. Two papers published in the Journal of Crystal Growth are being retracted due to a case of misrepresentation and reuse of data. A reader of the Journal has brought to our attention the reuse of data within two published papers: Growth behavior and microstructure evolution of ZnO nanorods grown on Si in aqueous solution, Sz-Chian Liou, Chi-Sheng Hsiao, San-Yuan Chen, Journal of Crystal Growth 274 (2005) 438-446. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2004.10.025 Nucleation and growth behavior of well-aligned ZnO nanorods on organic substrates in aqueous solutions, Chin-Ching Lin, San-Yuan Chen, and Syh-Yuh Cheng, Journal of Crystal Growth 283 (2005) 141-146. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2005.05.065 In these papers the same transmission electron micrograph was used to describe two different experimental situations and results bringing into question the content of these papers. The reuse of data without proper attribution is not acceptable within the scientific publishing community. In the present case, this is compounded by the attribution of the micrograph to a different experimental situation and drawing , as a result, new conclusions from data obtained from different samples. Such behavior undermines the integrity of the scientific publishing endeavor and is not acceptable. The authors are responsible for the content of their papers.

  18. An Efficient Explicit Finite-Difference Scheme for Simulating Coupled Biomass Growth on Nutritive Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel explicit finite-difference (FD method is presented to simulate the positive and bounded development process of a microbial colony subjected to a substrate of nutrients, which is governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equations (PDE system. Our explicit FD scheme is uniquely designed in such a way that it transfers the nonlinear terms in the original PDE into discrete sets of linear ones in the algebraic equation system that can be solved very efficiently, while ensuring the stability and the boundedness of the solution. This is achieved through (1 a proper design of intertwined FD approximations for the diffusion function term in both time and spatial variations and (2 the control of the time-step through establishing theoretical stability criteria. A detailed theoretical stability analysis is conducted to reveal that our FD method is indeed stable. Our examples verified the fact that the numerical solution can be ensured nonnegative and bounded to simulate the actual physics. Numerical examples have also been presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed scheme. The present scheme is applicable for solving similar systems of PDEs in the investigation of the dynamics of biological films.

  19. High-Salinity Growth Conditions Promote Tat-Independent Secretion of Tat Substrates in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Rene; Monteferrante, Carmine G.; Piersma, Sjouke; Barnett, James P.; Kouwen, Thijs R. H. M.; Robinson, Colin; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis contains two Tat translocases, which can facilitate transport of folded proteins across the plasma membrane. Previous research has shown that Tat-dependent protein secretion in B. subtilis is a highly selective process and that heterologous proteins,

  20. Growth of linked silicon/carbon nanospheres on copper substrate as integrated electrodes for Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zailei; Wang, Yanhong; Tan, Qiangqiang; Li, Dan; Chen, Yunfa; Zhong, Ziyi; Su, Fabing

    2014-01-07

    We report the growth of linked silicon/carbon (Si/C) nanospheres on Cu substrate as an integrated anode for Li-ion batteries. The Si/C nanospheres were synthesized by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) on Cu substrate as current collector using methyltrichlorosilane as precursor, a cheap by-product of the organosilane industry. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the linked Si/C nanospheres with a diameter of 400-500 nm contain Si, Cu(x)Si, and Cu nanocrystals, which are highly dispersed in the amorphous carbon nanospheres. A CCVD mechanism was tentatively proposed, in which the evaporated Cu atoms play a critical role to catalytically grown Si nanocrystals embedded within linked Si/C nanospheres. The electrochemical measurement shows that these Si/C nanospheres delivered a capacity of 998.9, 713.1, 320.6, and 817.8 mA h g(-1) at 50, 200, 800, and 50 mA g(-1) respectively after 50 cycles, much higher than that of commercial graphite anode. This is because the amorphous carbon, Cu(x)Si, and Cu in the Si/C nanospheres could buffer the volume change of Si nanocrystals during the Li insertion and extraction reactions, thus hindering the cracking or crumbling of the electrode. Furthermore, the incorporation of conductive Cu(x)Si and Cu nanocrystals and the integration of active electrode materials with Cu substrate may improve the electrical conductivity from the current collector to individual Si active particles, resulting in a remarkably enhanced reversible capacity and cycling stability. The work will be helpful in the fabrication of low cost binder-free Si/C anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

  1. Oil palm waste and synthetic zeolite: an alternative soil-less growth substrate for lettuce production as a waste management practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasinghe, G.Y.; Tokashiki, Y.; Kitou, M.; Kinjo, K. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan). United Graduate School of Agricultural Science

    2008-12-15

    A study was conducted to assess the characteristics and the prospective utilization of oil palm waste (OP) and synthetic zeolite (SZ) developed by coal fly ash, as an alternative substrate to peat and commercial perlite for lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) production. The SZ, OP, sphagnum peat (PE), perlite (PL) and two different SZ-OP mixtures (v/v) at the ratio of 1 : 3 and 1 : 10 were utilized as the substrates under this study. The substrates formulated by mixing SZ with OP at the ratio of 1 : 3 and 1 : 10 showed improved substrate physical and chemical properties such as air space, bulk density, particle density, water-holding capacity, pH and electrical conductivity (EC), which were in the ideal substrate range when compared with PL. Furthermore, the water-holding capacity of the substrate having a 1 : 10 mixing ratio of SZ with OP was higher than that of the PL by 28.23%, whereas the bulk density was lower than that of PL by 35%. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to assess the influence of the substrates on the growth and development of lettuce. The results of the study suggest that the SZ-OP-based substrates and OP can be successfully utilized as alternatives to the commercial perlite and to substitute the conventional peat substrate for lettuce cultivation. In addition, this can be proposed as an alternative waste management practice.

  2. GROWTH AND LEVELS OF N, P AND K IN ROOTSTOCKS OF TAMARIND TREES USING ORGANIC SUBSTRATES AND DOSES OF PHOSPHORUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO CASTRO PEREIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate different organic substrates and phosphorus doses on the growth and leaf content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in rootstocks of Tamarindus indica L. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse nursery located on the campus of the Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido (UFERSA, from March to October 2013. The treatments consisted of three organic sources at a concentration of 40% (v/v (bovine manure, goat manure and a commercial organic compound and four doses of simple superphosphate (0, 0 kg m-3, 2.5 kg m-3, 5.0 kg m-3 and 7.5 kg m-3. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design (RBD, with 12 treatments (substrates, four replications and 10 plants per plot, totaling 480 plants. The goat manure and the organic compound were the most suitable treatments for the production of rootstocks of the tamarind tree. The maximum dose of 7.5 g kg-1 of simple superphosphate caused the highest levels of phosphorus and potassium in the dry mass of shoots. The nutrients in the dry matter of shoots accumulated in the following order: N > K > P.

  3. Paleotopography and substrate lithology as controls on initiation of Waulsortian Reef Growth: examples from Sacramento Mountains, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahr, W.M.; Blount, W.M.; George, P.G.; Morey, E.D.

    1986-05-01

    Frameless mud mounds, usually called Waulsortian reefs, are common in Osagean and Kinderhookian rocks of North America and western Europe. Spectacular Waulsortian reefs crop out in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico along 10 mi of continuous exposure, where detailed petrographic studies and field measurements of the strata between the top of the Devonian and the base of the reefs reveal: (1) down-to-the-southwest paleoslope on an uneven, gently dipping ramp; (2) widespread deposition of skeletal packstones and siliciclastics to the northeast; (3) patchy, local thicks of skeletal packstones surrounded by shaly wackestones to the southwest; (4) relict highs on the Devonian surface beneath the skeletal packstone pods; (5) clusters of sheetlike reefs weakly associated with paleotopography in the northern outcrops; and (6) large, dome-like individual reefs strongly associated with depositional topography and skeletal packstone/grainstone substrates in the southern outcrops. The pre-reef strata do not exhibit abrupt changes in thickness or lithology to indicate a break in regional slope, and the reefs are not aligned with patterns in thickness of facies that would distinguish shelf-edge environments from lagoonal environments. Like their European counterparts, the Osagean reefs in the Sacramento Mountains grew on a ramp where the nonreef facies were grainy updip and muddy downdip, and reef anatomy varied from sheetlike updip to dome-like downdip. The association between paleotopography, substrate lithology, and the initiation of Waulsortian reef growth provides new information about regional depositional patterns in the Early Mississippian.

  4. Effect of precursor concentration on the growth of zinc oxide nanorod arrays on pre-treated substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urgessa, Z.N.; Oluwafemi, O.S.; Botha, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Well aligned zinc oxide nanorod arrays (ZNAs) synthesized by a simple chemical bath deposition method were fabricated on pre-treated Si substrates. By keeping the molar VI/II ratio constant, the effect of precursor concentration on the growth and optical quality of the ZNAs was investigated. The as-synthesized ZNAs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). FESEM images show that both the diameter and aspect ratio of the ZNAs increase dramatically as the precursor concentration increases. The XRD analysis indicates that all the as-grown ZNAs are crystalline and are preferentially oriented along the c-axis. The high intensity ratio of the UV emission to visible emission in the room temperature PL spectra illustrate that high optical quality ZNAs were produced.

  5. Effect of precursor concentration on the growth of zinc oxide nanorod arrays on pre-treated substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgessa, Z.N. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Oluwafemi, O.S., E-mail: oluwafemi.oluwatobi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha Campus, Private Bag XI, 5117 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Well aligned zinc oxide nanorod arrays (ZNAs) synthesized by a simple chemical bath deposition method were fabricated on pre-treated Si substrates. By keeping the molar VI/II ratio constant, the effect of precursor concentration on the growth and optical quality of the ZNAs was investigated. The as-synthesized ZNAs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). FESEM images show that both the diameter and aspect ratio of the ZNAs increase dramatically as the precursor concentration increases. The XRD analysis indicates that all the as-grown ZNAs are crystalline and are preferentially oriented along the c-axis. The high intensity ratio of the UV emission to visible emission in the room temperature PL spectra illustrate that high optical quality ZNAs were produced.

  6. Controlling the size of gold nanoparticles grown on indium tin oxide substrates prepared by seed mediated growth method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzia, Vivi; Pratiwi, Nur Intan; Adela, Faiz; Djuhana, Dede

    2016-01-01

    One of the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles is the enhanced absorption and scattering light around metal nanoparticles commonly called the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) effect of gold nanoparticles. This property is determined by the shape and size of gold nanoparticles. In this work, we observed the role of three materials used in synthesis process on the morphology and the LSPR effect of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were directly grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates using the seed mediated growth method with three different concentrations of trisodium citrate (Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 ), C 16 TAB and ascorbic acid (C 6 H 8 O 6 ). Based on the FESEM image and optical absorption spectrum of gold nanoparticles, it was found that the higher concentration of those materials has decreased the size of gold nananoparticles and shifted the LSPR peaks to lower wavelength.

  7. GROWTH KINETIC PARAMETERS AND BIOSYNTHESIS OF POLYHYDROXY-BUTYRATE IN Cupriavidus necator DSMZ 545 ON SELECTED SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. KHODABANDEH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model for Cupriavidus necator in batch culture using glucose, fructose and molasses as carbon sources was obtained. The experimental data was also fitted with the modified logistic equation that can provide adequate description for PHB synthesized by C. necator. The Lineweaver-Burk plot defined biokinetic coefficients which were described by a simplified Monod’s rate model. The specific growth rates, μmax and the Monod constants, Ks, for various substrates such as glucose, fructose and molasses were 0.18, 1.25, 0.42 h-1 and 107.53, 30.342 and 188.16 g/l, respectively. The kinetic constants were evaluated on the basis of non-linear regression solved using MATLAB soft¬ware. Good agreement was found between the experimental and the predicted values, which indicated that the model with differential equations would describe fermentation process for the PHB formation.

  8. Preferential orientation growth of ITO thin film on quartz substrate with ZnO buffer layer by magnetron sputtering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenhan; Yang, Jingjing; Xiong, Chao; Zhao, Yu; Zhu, Xifang

    2017-07-01

    In order to improve the photoelectric transformation efficiency of thin-film solar cells, one plausible method was to improve the transparent conductive oxides (TCO) material property. In-doped tin oxide (ITO) was an important TCO material which was used as a front contact layer in thin-film solar cell. Using magnetron sputtering deposition technique, we prepared preferential orientation ITO thin films on quartz substrate. XRD and SEM measurements were used to characterize the crystalline structure and morphology of ITO thin films. The key step was adding a ZnO thin film buffer layer before ITO deposition. ZnO thin film buffer layer increases the nucleation center numbers and results in the (222) preferential orientation growth of ITO thin films.

  9. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Epitaxial Growth of Metallic Nanoclusters Softly Deposited on Substrates with Very Different Lattice Parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez-Saez, J C; Perez-MartIn, A M C; Jimenez-RodrIguez, J J

    2007-01-01

    The soft deposition of Cu and Au clusters on Au(001) and Cu(001) surfaces respectively is studied by constant-temperature molecular-dynamics simulations. The initial shape of the nanoclusters is icosahedral or truncated octahedral (Wulff type). Their number of atoms ranges between 12 and 1289 atoms. Bombardment energy is of the order of a few meV/atom. The atomic interactions are mimicked by a many-body potential based on the tightbinding model. The effect of the temperature as activation to get the complete epitaxy is analysed. We have found that Cu clusters manage to align their {002} planes with the substrate by increasing the temperature. However, there is not epitaxial growth in any case since the lattice becomes bcc or important stacking faults are generated. For Au clusters, the alignment of these planes is practically independent of the temperature

  10. Comparison of different grading schemes in InGaAs metamorphic buffers on GaAs substrate: Tilt dependence on cross-hatch irregularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Bag, Ankush; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Das, Subhashis; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • InGaAs graded MBs with different grading scheme has been grown by MBE on GaAs. • Continuously graded MB exhibits smoother surface morphology. • Grading scheme has been found to have little impact on lattice relaxation. • Grading schemeaffects the lattice tilt significantly. • Cross-hatch surface irregularities affect the crystallographic tilt. - Abstract: InGaAs graded metamorphic buffers (MBs) with different grading strategies have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs (0 0 1) substrate. A detailed comparative analysis of surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and bulk properties using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) of grown MBs have been presented to comprehend the effectiveness of different grading scheme on InGaAs MBs. Conventional, statistical and fractal analysis on measured AFM data has been performed for in-depth investigation of these surfaces. The grading scheme has been found to have little impact on residual strain while it affects the epitaxial tilt significantly. Moreover, the tilt has been found to depend on growth front irregularities. Tilt magnitude in a graded MB has been found to vary with composition while tilt azimuth has been found to be almost same in the graded layers. PL Intensity and a shift in the PL peaks have been used to study the quality of the MB and residual strain comparatively.

  11. Comparison of different grading schemes in InGaAs metamorphic buffers on GaAs substrate: Tilt dependence on cross-hatch irregularities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rahul, E-mail: rkp203@gmail.com [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Bag, Ankush [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Partha [Rajendra Mishra School of Engineering Entrepreneurship, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Das, Subhashis [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Biswas, Dhrubes [Department of Electronics & Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • InGaAs graded MBs with different grading scheme has been grown by MBE on GaAs. • Continuously graded MB exhibits smoother surface morphology. • Grading scheme has been found to have little impact on lattice relaxation. • Grading schemeaffects the lattice tilt significantly. • Cross-hatch surface irregularities affect the crystallographic tilt. - Abstract: InGaAs graded metamorphic buffers (MBs) with different grading strategies have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs (0 0 1) substrate. A detailed comparative analysis of surface using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and bulk properties using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) of grown MBs have been presented to comprehend the effectiveness of different grading scheme on InGaAs MBs. Conventional, statistical and fractal analysis on measured AFM data has been performed for in-depth investigation of these surfaces. The grading scheme has been found to have little impact on residual strain while it affects the epitaxial tilt significantly. Moreover, the tilt has been found to depend on growth front irregularities. Tilt magnitude in a graded MB has been found to vary with composition while tilt azimuth has been found to be almost same in the graded layers. PL Intensity and a shift in the PL peaks have been used to study the quality of the MB and residual strain comparatively.

  12. Facile Five-Step Heteroepitaxial Growth of GaAs Nanowires on Silicon Substrates and the Twin Formation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Maoqing; Sheng, Chunyang; Ge, Mingyuan; Chi, Chun-Yung; Cong, Sen; Nakano, Aiichiro; Dapkus, P Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-02-23

    Monolithic integration of III-V semiconductors with Si has been pursued for some time in the semiconductor industry. However, the mismatch of lattice constants and thermal expansion coefficients represents a large technological challenge for the heteroepitaxial growth. Nanowires, due to their small lateral dimension, can relieve strain and mitigate dislocation formation to allow single-crystal III-V materials to be grown on Si. Here, we report a facile five-step heteroepitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires on Si using selective area growth (SAG) in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, and we further report an in-depth study on the twin formation mechanism. Rotational twin defects were observed in the nanowire structures and showed strong dependence on the growth condition and nanowire size. We adopt a model of faceted growth to demonstrate the formation of twins during growth, which is well supported by both a transmission electron microscopy study and simulation based on nucleation energetics. Our study has led to twin-free segments in the length up to 80 nm, a significant improvement compared to previous work using SAG. The achievements may open up opportunities for future functional III-V-on-Si heterostructure devices.

  13. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL IN THE GROWTH OF LEGUMINOUS TREES ON COALMINE WASTE ENRICHED SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantau Camargo Gomes Stoffel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation in the growth, colonization and absorption of P and trace elements of leguminous trees on coal mine wastes. Independent assays for Mimosa scabrella Benth. (common name bracatinga, Mimosa bimucronata (DC. Kuntze (maricá and Parapiptadenia rigida (Benth. Brenan (angico-vermelho were carried out in a greenhouse on an entirely casualized experimental delineation composed of six treatments. Five coal mine autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal isolates were tested, including Acaulospora colombiana, Acaulospora morrowiae, Dentiscutata heterogama, Rhizophagus clarus and Rhizophagus irregulars, aside from a control treatment, with four replications each. Results show that arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization was greater than 60% for Mimosa species, and up to 26% for Parapiptadenia. Overall, the fungal inoculation promoted better plant growth, with increments of up to 1430%. Phosphorous absorption was favored, especially when inoculation was done with A. colombiana, R. irregularis and A. morrowiae. Even though there was a conclusive reduction in the levels of trace elements in the plant´s shoots, the inoculation with those species of fungi promoted significant increments in the accumulated levels of As, Cu, Zn and Cr for all plant species tested. Therefore, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi play important roles in these poor, degraded and often contaminated environments.

  14. The growth of Micrococcus varians by utilizing sugar cane blackstrap molasses as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Luís A. S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies on the growth of Micrococcus varians were carried out in BHI culture medium (control as well as in a culture medium with 2% diluted sugar cane blackstrap molasses, enriched with 0.1% yeast extract. The experiment was conducted with three samples of the experimental and control media in a 5 liter fermentor with working volume of 3.5 liters, continuous agitation (150 rpm, 35 ± 0.1°C temperature, 0.7 L air. l-1 medium. min -1, initial pH 7.0 ± 0.2, 24 hour fermentation period, and approximate inoculum of 6.0 log10 CFU/ml. Samples were collected at 2-hour intervals. Micrococcus varians grew in the two culture media studied, which confirms the experimental medium viability for the growth of this species. The final average concentration of biomass was higher in the control medium than in the experimental medium: 0.99 g.l-1 and 0.78 g.l-1, respectively. The final number of viable cells at the end of fermentation was 20.65 log10 CFU/ml for the control medium (BHI, while in the experimental medium the number of viable cells was 19.43 log10 CFU/ml. The consumption of total sugars was higher for the biomass in the control medium (79.78%, while only 50.53% was consumed for the experimental medium.

  15. Temperature dependence of protein solubility-determination, application to crystallization, and growth kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1993-01-01

    A scintillation method was developed for determinations of the temperature dependence of the solubility, and of nucleation induction times of proteins, in 50-100 mu(l) volumes of solution. Solubility data for lysozyme and horse serum albumin were obtained for various combinations of pH and precipitant concentrations. These data and the nucleation induction information were used for dynamic crystallization control, that is, for the controlled separation of nucleation and growth stages. Individual lysozyme and horse serum albumin crystals were grown in 15-20 mu(l) solution volumes contained in x-ray capillaries. The morphology and kinetics of the growth and dissolution of lysozyme in aqueous solutions with 2.5 percent NaCl and at pH = 4.5 was studied in situ with a depth resolution of 300 A (4 unit cells) by high resolution optical microscopy and digital image processing. The bulk super- or under saturation, sigma, of the solution inside a closed growth cell was controlled by temperature. The growth habit was bound by (110) and (101) faces that grew through layer spreading, although with different growth rate dependencies on supersaturation/temperature. At sigma less than 10 (obtained at higher temperatures) growth was purely kinetic ally controlled, with impurity effects (macrostep formation and kinetic hindrance) becoming significant for sigma less than 2. At sigma greater than 10 (lower temperatures), anisotropies in the interfacial kinetics were more pronounced, with interfacial kinetics and bulk transport becoming equally important to the growth morphology. Growth rates were growth history dependent. The formation of striations (layers of irregularly incorporated solution) was unambiguously correlated with growth temperature variations. Etching exposed dislocations and various high-index faces whose growth morphologies were studied during return to the steady state growth form. Growth steps were observed to originate from two-dimensional nuclei or from outcrops

  16. ZnO nanofiber (NFs) growth from ZnO nanowires (NWs) by controlling growth temperature on flexible Teflon substrate by CBD technique for UV photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, O. F.; Halim, M. M.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Qaeed, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, ZnO nanofibers (ZnO NFs) were successfully grown for the first time on Teflon substrates using CBD technique. The well-aligned ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) were transformed to ZnO nanofibers (NFs) by varying growth temperature and growth time. The high intensity and distinct growth orientation of peaks observed in the XRD spectra of the NFs indicate high crystal quality. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) revealed high density of small diameter sized and long ZnO nanofibers (NFs) that are distributed in random directions. Raman analyses revealed a high E2 (high) peak at 436 nm, which indicates the wurtzite structure of ZnO. A flexible ZnO nanofiber (NFs)-based metal-semiconductor-metal UV detector was fabricated and analyzed for photo response and sensitivity under low power illumination (375 nm, 1.5 mW/cm2). The results showed a sensitivity of 4045% which can be considered a relatively high response and baseline recovery for UV detection.

  17. Substrate Dependent Ad-Atom Migration on Graphene and the Impact on Electron-Beam Sculpting Functional Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Goyal, Gaurav; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-05-10

    The use of atomically thin graphene for molecular sensing has attracted tremendous attention over the years and, in some instances, could displace the use of classical thin films. For nanopore sensing, graphene must be suspended over an aperture so that a single pore can be formed in the free-standing region. Nanopores are typically drilled using an electron beam (e-beam) which is tightly focused until a desired pore size is obtained. E-beam sculpting of graphene however is not just dependent on the ability to displace atoms but also the ability to hinder the migration of ad-atoms on the surface of graphene. Using relatively lower e-beam fluxes from a thermionic electron source, the C-atom knockout rate seems to be comparable to the rate of carbon ad-atom attraction and accumulation at the e-beam/graphene interface (i.e., R knockout ≈ R accumulation ). Working at this unique regime has allowed the study of carbon ad-atom migration as well as the influence of various substrate materials on e-beam sculpting of graphene. We also show that this information was pivotal to fabricating functional graphene nanopores for studying DNA with increased spatial resolution which is attributed to atomically thin membranes.

  18. Growth, Structural and Optical Characterization of ZnO Nanotubes on Disposable-Flexible Paper Substrates by Low-Temperature Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Soomro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of vertically aligned ZnO nanotubes (NTs on paper substrates by low-temperature hydrothermal method. The growth of ZnO NTs on the paper substrate is discussed; further, the structural and optical properties are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and cathodoluminescence (CL, and it was found that the ZnO NTs on paper substrate fulfill the structural and optical properties of ZnO NTs grown on other conventional substrates. This will be more beneficial in future usage of ZnO NTs in different fields and applications. Particularly, this approach opens the ways in research and development for high volume manufacturing of low-cost, flexible optoelectronics devices on disposable paper substrates and can be used in the future miniaturization trends.

  19. No effect of growth hormone administration on substrate oxidation during exercise in young, lean men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Morthorst, Rikke; Larsson, Benny

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of increased fat availability induced by growth hormone (GH) administration on the oxidative metabolism during exercise. Seven well-trained males (age 25 +/- 2 years (mean +/- S.E.M.); peak oxygen consumption : 62 +/- 1 ml min(-1) kg(-1......) (completed four randomised trials: 120 min bicycling at 55% 4 h after receiving either 7.5 IU (2.5 mg) GH or placebo (Plc), and during rest after receiving either GH or Plc. In all studies a standardized meal was given 2 h after GH or Plc injection. GH administration resulted in an approximately 60-fold......: 328%, P administration combined with aerobic exercise increased lipolytic parameters substantially more than exercise alone, but did not further augment whole...

  20. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  1. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  2. Photoabsorption properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} nanoislands grown on Si(111) and Si(001): Dependence on substrate orientation studied by nano-spectroscopic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naruse, Nobuyasu, E-mail: naruse@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Ibaraki, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nakamura, Yoshiaki, E-mail: nakamura@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Toyonaka, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Mera, Yutaka; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Maeda, Koji [Department of Applied Physics, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2011-10-03

    Photoabsorption properties of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} nanoislands epitaxially grown on Si(111) and Si(001) have been discussed using photoabsorption nano-spectroscopy based on scanning tunneling microscope. The obtained spectra exhibit clear features around 0.86-0.91 eV and around 0.71-0.74 eV, which are explained as a direct and an indirect photoabsorption edge of {beta}-FeSi{sub 2}, respectively. We also observed a blue shift of spectrum obtained from {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} nanoislands on Si(111) substrates, compared to those on Si(001) substrates. We attributed the dependence on Si-substrate orientation not to a quantum confinement effect but to an effect of elastic strain in the {beta}-FeSi{sub 2} nanoislands epitaxially grown on the substrate.

  3. Growth of AlGaSb Compound Semiconductors on GaAs Substrate by Metalorganic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Ramelan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitaxial AlxGa1-xSb layers on GaAs substrate have been grown by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapour deposition using TMAl, TMGa, and TMSb. We report the effect of V/III flux ratio and growth temperature on growth rate, surface morphology, electrical properties, and composition analysis. A growth rate activation energy of 0.73 eV was found. For layers grown on GaAs at 580∘C and 600∘C with a V/III ratio of 3 a high quality surface morphology is typical, with a mirror-like surface and good composition control. It was found that a suitable growth temperature and V/III flux ratio was beneficial for producing good AlGaSb layers. Undoped AlGaSb grown at 580∘C with a V/III flux ratio of 3 at the rate of 3.5 μm/hour shows p-type conductivity with smooth surface morphology and its hole mobility and carrier concentration are equal to 237 cm2/V.s and 4.6 × 1017 cm-3, respectively, at 77 K. The net hole concentration of unintentionally doped AlGaSb was found to be significantly decreased with the increased of aluminium concentration. All samples investigated show oxide layers (Al2O3, Sb2O3, and Ga2O5 on their surfaces. In particular the percentage of aluminium-oxide was very high compared with a small percentage of AlSb. Carbon content on the surface was also very high.

  4. Magnetophotoluminescence study of the influence of substrate orientation and growth interruption on the electronic properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godefroo, S.; Maes, J.; Hayne, M.; Moshchalkov, V.V.; Henini, M.; Pulizzi, F.; Patane, A.; Eaves, L.

    2004-01-01

    We have used photoluminescence in pulsed (≤50 T) and dc (≤12 T) magnetic fields to investigate the influence of substrate orientation and growth interruption (GI) on the electronic properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots, grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 480 deg. C. Dot formation is very efficient on the (100) substrate: electronic confinement is already strong without GI and no significant change in confinement is observed with GI. On the contrary, for the (311)B substrate strong confinement of the charges only occurs after a GI is introduced. When longer GIs are applied the dots become higher

  5. Evolution of surface morphology at the early stage of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film growth on a rough substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filatova, E O [St Petersburg State University, Institute of Physics, St Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Peverini, L; Ziegler, E [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Kozhevnikov, I V [Institute of Crystallography, Moscow 119333 (Russian Federation); Jonnard, P; Andre, J-M [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS-UMR 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2010-09-01

    We present an experimental study of the evolution of the surface of a growing film as a function of the statistical parameters of the virgin substrate roughness. The growth of sputter-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films onto Si substrates was followed in situ using an x-ray scattering technique. Despite the use of substrates presenting different roughness correlation length and crystallographic orientation, the evolution of the film roughness is demonstrated to obey the same scaling law, i.e., with the same static and dynamic exponents. Approaches to accurately determine the scaling exponents from x-ray scattering data are discussed.

  6. Delivery of CdiA nuclease toxins into target cells during contact-dependent growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Julia S; Nikolakakis, Kiel C; Willett, Julia L E; Aoki, Stephanie K; Hayes, Christopher S; Low, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is mediated by the CdiB/CdiA family of two-partner secretion proteins. CDI systems deploy a variety of distinct toxins, which are contained within the polymorphic C-terminal region (CdiA-CT) of CdiA proteins. Several CdiA-CTs are nucleases, suggesting that the toxins are transported into the target cell cytoplasm to interact with their substrates. To analyze CdiA transfer to target bacteria, we used the CDI system of uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536 (UPEC536) as a model. Antibodies recognizing the amino- and carboxyl-termini of CdiA(UPEC536) were used to visualize transfer of CdiA from CDI(UPEC536+) inhibitor cells to target cells using fluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the entire CdiA(UPEC536) protein is deposited onto the surface of target bacteria. CdiA(UPEC536) transfer to bamA101 mutants is reduced, consistent with low expression of the CDI receptor BamA on these cells. Notably, our results indicate that the C-terminal CdiA-CT toxin region of CdiA(UPEC536) is translocated into target cells, but the N-terminal region remains at the cell surface based on protease sensitivity. These results suggest that the CdiA-CT toxin domain is cleaved from CdiA(UPEC536) prior to translocation. Delivery of a heterologous Dickeya dadantii CdiA-CT toxin, which has DNase activity, was also visualized. Following incubation with CDI(+) inhibitor cells targets became anucleate, showing that the D.dadantii CdiA-CT was delivered intracellularly. Together, these results demonstrate that diverse CDI toxins are efficiently translocated across target cell envelopes.

  7. Investigation of a growth model incorporating density dependence for the mackerel management plan simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunel, T.P.A.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a framework to model density dependent growth for the North East Atlantic mackerel. The model used is the classical von Bertalanffy equation, but modified so that growth is reduced when stock size increases. The model developed was able to reproduce quite closely the trends in

  8. Schottky barrier diode based on β-Ga2O3 (100) single crystal substrate and its temperature-dependent electrical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiming; Mu, Wenxiang; Dong, Hang; Long, Shibing; Jia, Zhitai; Lv, Hangbing; Liu, Qi; Tang, Minghua; Tao, Xutang; Liu, Ming

    2017-02-01

    The Pt/β-Ga2O3 Schottky barrier diode and its temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics were investigated for power device application. The edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) technique was utilized to grow the (100)-oriented β-Ga2O3 single crystal substrate that shows good crystal quality characterized by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ohmic and Schottky electrodes were fabricated by depositing Ti and Pt metals on the two surfaces, respectively. Through the current-voltage (I-V) measurement under different temperature and the thermionic emission modeling, the fabricated Pt/β-Ga2O3 Schottky diode was found to show good performances at room temperature, including rectification ratio of 1010, ideality factor (n) of 1.1, Schottky barrier height (ΦB) of 1.39 eV, threshold voltage (Vbi) of 1.07 V, ON-resistance (RON) of 12.5 mΩ.cm2, forward current density at 2 V (J@2V) of 56 A/cm2, and saturation current density (J0) of 2 × 10-16 A/cm2. The effective donor concentration Nd - Na was calculated to be about 2.3 × 1014 cm3. Good temperature dependent performance was also found in the device. The Schottky barrier height was estimated to be about 1.3 eV-1.39 eV at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 150 °C. With increasing temperature, parameters such as RON and J@2V become better, proving that the diode can work well at high temperature. The EFG grown β-Ga2O3 single crystal is a promising material to be used in the power devices.

  9. Effect of nickel on the initial growth behavior of electroless Ni-Co-P alloy on silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, W.L.; Chen, W.J.; Tsai, T.K.; Hsieh, S.H.; Chang, S.Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the small amounts of NiSO 4 was added to a basic electroless plating bath of CoSO 4 with Na 2 H 2 PO 2 as reducing agent for the deposition of Co-Ni-P film on a silicon substrate. The initial growth behavior, containing plating rate, chemical composition, crystal structure, surface morphology and micro-structure, of the electroless plating film was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results showed that the growth morphology variation of the Co-Ni-P films deposited in the basic CoSO 4 + small amounts of NiSO 4 bath is the same as that of Co-P film deposited in the basic CoSO 4 bath, the plating rate of the Co-Ni-P film is much more rapid than that of the Co-P film, the Ni/Co wt.% in the Co-Ni-P film is greatly larger than that in the plating bath, and the structure of as-deposited film is crystalline at first stage and later stage

  10. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sunflower seed for human consumption as a substrate for the growth of mycopopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrinjar Marija M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available These mycological investigations are implicating samples of protein sunflower seed from regular cultivation in the Vojvodina Province. Samples are examined in different stages of production: reception in the silo, separation of massive fraction on peeler and then peeling, kernel after peeling, hull, final product, i.e. kernels separated from visible impurities on conveyor bel, that are later manually divided in two fractions - a seemingly whole, undamaged kernels, without change of colour, and b seemingly damaged kernels, broken, with change of colour. For the determination of viable count of moulds and their isolation, two different media are used in parallel: Sabouraud maltose agar (SMA and malt/yeast extract with 50% of glucose (MY50G, favourable for growth of xerophilic moulds. All samples tested were contaminated with fungi. Total viable mould count per seed varied from 1.6 (SMA respecting 1.3 (MY50G on reception, to 5.6 (SMA and 7.5 (MY50G cfu/seed in visually damaged sunflower kernels (final product. From seeds, kernels and hull, numerous moulds were isolated, belonging to 8 genera and 13 species (Alternaria alternata, Arthrinium phaeospermum, Aspergillus candidus, A. flavus, A. niger, A. ochraceus, A. versicolor, A. wentii, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium herbariorum, Penicillium aurantiogriseum, Rhizopus stolonifer and Trichoderma harzianum. Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, A.ochraceus, A. versicolor and Eurotium herbariorum were isolated on both media. Aspergillus candidus, A. versicolor, C. Cladosporioides, P. aurantiogriseum and T. harzianum were isolated only on SMA, while A. niger, A. wentii and R. stolonifer were exclusively isolated on MY50G. Most ubiquitous species is A. alternata, which is isolated from all tested samples, while A. candidus, C. cladosporioides and T. harzianum were isolated from sunflower seed on reception in silo, using SMA medium.

  12. From nanodroplets to continuous films: how the morphology of polyelectrolyte multilayers depends on the dielectric permittivity and the surface charge of the supporting substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillaume-Gentil, Orane; Zahn, Raphael; Lindhoud, Saskia; Graf, Norma; Voros, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2011-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated how the morphology of layer-by-layer deposited polyelectrolyte multilayers is influenced by the physical properties of the supporting substrate. The surface coverage of the assembly and its topography were found to be dependent on the dielectric

  13. Optical properties of large-area MoS2 thin films grown via magnetron sputtering: Thickness and substrate dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkabsh, Asma; Samassekou, Hassana; Mazumdar, Dipanjan

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDS) have gained exceptional attention because of their thickness dependent electronic structure which makes them suitable for electronic and optoelectronic applications. MoS2 is among the most promising material in this family. Recently we have successfully developed growth of large-area MoS2 using magnetron sputtering. In this work, we investigated the large-area optical properties of few and bilayer MoS2 grown on different amorphous underlayers (BN and SiO2) using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), UV-VIS and Raman spectroscopy. SE spectra provided thickness and optical constants within 1.0-3.0 eV range, whereas broadband (0.5-6.5 eV) transmission and reflectance measurements provided direct measurements of optical constants through Glover-Tinkham analysis. A comprehensive analysis of thickness and substance dependence of optical properties of our large-area films will be presented and compared with existing literature reports and first-principles electronic structure. Also, Raman measurements reveal interesting disorder related effects on our MoS2 films.

  14. Has substrate-dependent co-evolution of enzyme function occured in the attine ant-fungus symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    as substrate for their fungus gardens, whereas the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down...... the plant material that the ants provide or different efficiencies of enzyme function. Here we present the fist partial amino acid sequences from a fungal xylanase gene to test the hypothesis that fungal enzymes that degrade plant cell walls have functionally co-evolved with the ants....

  15. Has substrate-dependent co-evolution of enzyme function occured in the attine ant-fungus symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    The conspicuous leaf-cutter ants in the genus Atta build huge nests displacing several cubic meters of soil, whereas lower attine genera such as Cyphomyrmex have small nests with a fungus garden the size of a table-tennis ball. Only the leaf-cutter ants are specialized on using fresh leaves...... as substrate for their fungus gardens, whereas the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down...

  16. Toward Improved Lifetimes of Organic Solar Cells under Thermal Stress: Substrate-Dependent Morphological Stability of PCDTBT:PCBM Films and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Ho Chiu, Kar; Shahid Ashraf, Raja; Fearn, Sarah; Dattani, Rajeev; Cheng Wong, Him; Tan, Ching-Hong; Wu, Jiaying; Cabral, João T.; Durrant, James R.

    2015-10-01

    Morphological stability is a key requirement for outdoor operation of organic solar cells. We demonstrate that morphological stability and lifetime of polymer/fullerene based solar cells under thermal stress depend strongly on the substrate interface on which the active layer is deposited. In particular, we find that the stability of benchmark PCDTBT/PCBM solar cells under modest thermal stress is substantially increased in inverted solar cells employing a ZnO substrate compared to conventional devices employing a PEDOT:PSS substrate. This improved stability is observed to correlate with PCBM nucleation at the 50 nm scale, which is shown to be strongly influenced by different substrate interfaces. Employing this approach, we demonstrate remarkable thermal stability for inverted PCDTBT:PC70BM devices on ZnO substrates, with negligible (stress and minimal thermally induced “burn-in” effect. We thus conclude that inverted organic solar cells, in addition to showing improved environmental stability against ambient humidity exposure as widely reported previously, can also demonstrate enhanced morphological stability. As such we show that the choice of suitable substrate interfaces may be a key factor in achieving prolonged lifetimes for organic solar cells under thermal stress conditions.

  17. Experimental and numerical study of frequency-dependent transport loss in YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrate and copper stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guole; Zhang, Guomin; Yu, Hui; Jing, Liwei; Ai, Liwang; Liu, Qi

    2017-06-01

    Although AC transport losses of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) coated conductors (CCs) have been studied extensively, the frequency dependence of transport losses still needs more investigations. This paper presents a study on the frequency dependence (in the range of 50-1000 Hz) of the transport losses in YBCO CCs with ferromagnetic substrate and copper stabilizer by the use of both experimental and finite element methods (FEMs). The finite element model (FEM) is based on H-formulation and E-J power law, and calculated AC transport losses accord with the experimental ones. The contributions of ferromagnetic (Ni-5at.%W substrate), eddy current (conventional metal), and hysteresis (superconducting YBCO) losses are extracted. It is shown that the AC transport loss per cycle increases with the frequency due to the growing contribution of eddy current loss. More than 80% of eddy current loss comes from the copper stabilizer adjacent to the ferromagnetic substrate. The influence of magnetic substrate on AC loss is also studied, and it is found that YBCO CCs with non-magnetic substrates are more suitable for high-frequency applications.

  18. Growth of simplified buffer template on flexible metallic substrates for YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Yan; Zhang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Fei; Zhao, Rui-Peng; Wang, Hui; Xiong, Jie; Tao, Bo-Wan

    2016-01-01

    A much simplified buffer structure, including a three-layer stack of LaMnO 3 /MgO/composite Y 2 O 3 –Al 2 O 3 , was proposed for high performance YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) coated conductors. In this structure, biaxially textured MgO films were prepared on solution deposition planarized amorphous substrate through ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) technology. By the use of in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction monitor, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscope, the influence of deposition parameters, such as film deposition rate, ion penetrate energy and ion beam flux, on crystalline orientation, texture, lattice parameter and surface morphology was systematically investigated. Moreover, stopping and range of ion in mater simulation was performed to study the effects of ion bombardment on MgO films. By optimizing IBAD process parameters, the best biaxial texture showed ω-scan of (002) MgO and Φ-scan of (220) MgO yield full width at half maximum values of 2.4° and 3.7°, indicating excellent biaxial texture. Subsequently, LaMnO 3 films were directly deposited on the IBAD-MgO template to improve the lattice mismatch between MgO and YBCO. Finally, YBCO films grown on this simplified buffer template exhibited a critical current density of 2.4 MA/cm 2 at 77 K and self-field, demonstrating the feasibility of this buffer structure. - Highlights: • Simplified buffer structure for YBCO coated conductors. • Growth of biaxially textured MgO films on flexible amorphous substrates. • Studying the influence of film deposition rate, ion energy and ion beam flux on the development of biaxial texture. • Demonstrating highly oriented YBCO films with a critical current density of 2.4 MA/cm 2 at self-field and 77 K.

  19. Study on ECR dry etching and selective MBE growth of AlGaN/GaN for fabrication of quantum nanostructures on GaN (0001) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Sato, Taketomo; Hashizume, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    This paper attempts to form AlGaN/GaN quantum wire (QWR) network structures on patterned GaN (0001) substrates by selective molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. Substrate patterns were prepared along - and -directions by electron cyclotron resonance assisted reactive-ion beam etching (ECR-RIBE) process. Selective growth was possible for both directions in the case of GaN growth, but only in the -direction in the case of AlGaN growth. A hexagonal QWR network was successfully grown on a hexagonal mesa pattern by combining the -direction and two other equivalent directions. AFM observation confirmed excellent surface morphology of the grown network. A clear cathodoluminescence (CL) peak coming from the embedded AlGaN/GaN QWR structure was clearly identified

  20. Atomic control of substrate termination and heteroepitaxial growth of SrTiO sub 3 /LaAlO sub 3 films

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, D W; Choi, C; Lim, K D; Noh, T W; Lee, D R; Park, J H; Lee, K B

    2000-01-01

    The roles of substrate termination in the growth behaviors of SrTiO sub 3 (STO) films were investigated. With heat treatment and an atomic layer deposition technique, LaAlO sub 3 (LAO) substrates with two kinds of terminations, i.e., LaO- and AlO sub 2 -terminated ones, could be prepared. On top of them STO films were grown by using laser molecular beam epitaxy. In the case of the STO/LaO-LAO film, a transition from layer-by-layer growth to island growth was observed after growth of about 10 monolayers (ML). On the other hand, the STO/AlO sub 2 -LAO film could be grown in a layer-by-layer mode with a flat surface up to 40 ML. We suggest that defects induced by charge compensation influence the strain states and the physical properties of oxide heterostructures significantly.

  1. Species-Dependent Variation in the Interaction of Substrate-Bound Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) and Rubisco Activase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yuan; Snyder, Gordon W.; Esau, Brian D.; Portis, Archie R.; Ogren, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Purified spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase supported 50 to 100% activation of substrate-bound Rubisco from spinach, barley, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), soybean (Glycine max L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.), Arabidopsis thaliana, maize (Zea mays L.), and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii but supported only 10 to 35% activation of Rubisco from three Solanaceae species, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), petunia (Petunia hybrida L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Conversely, purified tobacco and petunia Rubisco activase catalyzed 75 to 100% activation of substrate-bound Rubisco from the three Solanacee species but only 10 to 25% activation of substrate-bound Rubisco from the other species. Thus, the interaction between substrate-bound Rubisco and Rubisco activase is species dependent. The species dependence observed is consistent with phylogenetic relationships previously derived from plant morphological characteristics and from nucleotide and amino acid sequence comparisons of the two Rubisco subunits. Species dependence in the Rubisco-Rubisco activase interaction and the absence of major anomalies in the deduced amino acid sequence of tobacco Rubisco activase compared to sequences in non-Solanaceae species suggest that Rubisco and Rubisco activase may have coevolved such that amino acid changes that have arisen by evolutionary divergence in one of these enzymes through spontaneous mutation or selection pressure have led to compensatory changes in the other enzyme. PMID:16653209

  2. Epitaxial growth of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta. thin films on LiNbO sub 3 substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.G.; Koren, G.; Gupta, A.; Segmuller, A.; Chi, C.C. (IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (US))

    1989-09-18

    {ital In} {ital situ} epitaxial growth of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} thin films on {ital Y}-cut LiNbO{sub 3} substrates using a standard laser ablation technique is reported. Resistance of the films shows a normal metallic behavior and a very sharp ({lt}1 K) superconducting transition with {ital T}{sub {ital c}}({ital R}=0) of 92 K. High critical current density of {ital J}{sub {ital c}}(77 K)=2{times}10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} is observed, which is in accordance with epitaxial growth. Film orientation observed from x-ray diffraction spectra indicates that the {ital c} axis is normal to the substrate plane and the {ital a} axis is at 45{degree} to the (11.0) direction of the hexagonal lattice of the substrate with two domains in mirror image to the (110) plane.

  3. Mechanical tension applied to substrate films specifies location of neuritogenesis and promotes major neurite growth at the expense of minor neurite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhang-Qi; Franz, Eric W; Leach, Michelle K; Winterroth, Frank; White, Christina M; Rastogi, Arjun; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Corey, Joseph M

    2016-04-01

    One obstacle in neural repair is facilitating axon growth long enough to reach denervated targets. Recent studies show that axonal growth is accelerated by applying tension to bundles of neurites, and additional studies show that mechanical tension is critical to all neurite growth. However, no studies yet describe how individual neurons respond to tensile forces applied to cell bodies and neurites simultaneously; neither do any test motor neurons, a phenotype critical to neural repair. Here we examine the growth of dissociated motor neurons on stretchable substrates. E15 spinal motor neurons were cultured on poly-lactide-co-glycolide films stretched at 4.8, 9.6, or 14.3 mm day(-1). Morphological analysis revealed that substrate stretching has profound effects on developing motor neurons. Stretching increases major neurite length; it also forces neuritogenesis to occur nearest poles of the cell closest to the sources of tension. Stretching also reduces the number of neurites per neuron. These data show that substrate stretching affects neuronal morphology by specifying locations on the cell where neuritogenesis occurs and favoring major neurite growth at the expense of minor neurites. These results serve as a building block for development of new techniques to control and improve the growth of neurons for nerve repair purposes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Nanosheet controlled epitaxial growth of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 thin films on glass substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayraktar, Muharrem; Chopra, A.; Bijkerk, Frederik; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Integration of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) films on glass substrates is of high importance for device applications. However, to make use of the superior ferro- and piezoelectric properties of PZT, well-oriented crystalline or epitaxial growth with control of the crystal orientation is a prerequisite. In

  5. EFFECTS OF TUNGSTATE ON THE GROWTH OF DESULFOVIBRIO-GIGAS NCIMB-9332 AND OTHER SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA WITH ETHANOL AS A SUBSTRATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENSGENS, CMH; NIENHUISKUIPER, ME; HANSEN, TA

    Growth of Desulfovibrio gigas NCIMB 9332 in mineral, vitamin-supplemented media with ethanol as substrate was strongly stimulated by the addition of tungstate (optimal level approximately 10(-7) M). At suboptimal tungstate concentrations, up to 1.0 mM acetaldehyde was detected in the culture

  6. AFM, XPS and RBS studies of the growth process of CdS thin films on ITO/glass substrates deposited using an ammonia-free chemical process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazon-Montijo, D.A.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L.; Huerta, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with a detailed study of the growth stages of CdS thin films on ITO/glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD). The chemical and morphological characterization was done through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. On the other hand, optical transmission and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were performed in order to study the optical and structural properties of the films. The time, the chemistry, and morphology of the different stages that form the growth process by CBD were identified through these results. Furthermore, clear evidence was obtained of the formation of Cd(OH) 2 as the first chemical species adhered to the substrate surface which forms the first nucleation centers for a good CdS formation and growth. On the other hand, the ITO coating caused growth stages to occur earlier than in just glass substrates, with which we can obtain a determined thickness in a shorter deposition time. We were able to prove that CBD is a good technique for the manufacture of thin films of semiconductor materials, since the CdS film does not have any impurities. Completely formed films were transparent, uniform, with good adherence to the substrate, of a polycrystalline nature with a hexagonal structure. These results indicate that films obtained by CBD are good candidates to be applied in different optoelectronic devices.

  7. High resolution x-ray diffraction study of the substrate temperature and thickness dependent microstructure of reactively sputtered epitaxial ZnO films

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Devendra

    2017-08-24

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on c-sapphire by reactive sputtering of zinc target in Ar-O2 mixture. High resolution X-ray diffraction measurements were carried out to obtain lateral and vertical coherence lengths, crystallite tilt and twist, micro-strain and densities of screw and edge dislocations in epilayers of different thickness (25 - 200 nm) and those grown at different temperatures (100 - 500 °C). phgr-scans indicate epitaxial growth in all the cases, although epilayers grown at lower substrate temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C) and those of smaller thickness (25 nm and 50 nm) display inferior microstructural parameters. This is attributed to the dominant presence of initially grown strained 2D layer and subsequent transition to an energetically favorable mode. With increase in substrate temperature, the transition shifts to lower thickness and growth takes place through the formation of 2D platelets with intermediate strain, over which 3D islands grow. Consequently, 100 nm thick epilayers grown at 300 °C display the best microstructural parameters (micro-strain ~1.2 x 10-3, screw and edge dislocation densities ~1.5 x 1010 cm-2 and ~2.3 x 1011 cm-2, respectively). A marginal degradation of microstructural parameters is seen in epilayers grown at higher substrate temperatures, due to the dominance of 3D hillock type growth.

  8. Market Structure, Financial Dependence and Industrial Growth: Evidence from the Banking Industry in Emerging Asian Economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Habib Hussain; Ahmad, Rubi Binit; Gee, Chan Sok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine the role of market structure for growth in financially dependent industries from 10 emerging Asian economies over the period of 1995-2011. Our approach departs from existing studies in that we apply four alternative measures of market structure based on structural and non-structural approaches and compare their outcomes. Results indicate that higher bank concentration may slow down the growth of financially dependent industries. Bank competition on the other hand, allows financially dependent industries to grow faster. These findings are consistent across a number of sensitivity checks such as alternative measures of financial dependence, institutional factors (including property rights, quality of accounting standards and bank ownership), and endogeneity consideration. In sum, our study suggests that financially dependent industries grow more in more competitive/less concentrated banking systems. Therefore, regulatory authorities need to be careful while pursuing a consolidation policy for banking sector in emerging Asian economies.

  9. Market Structure, Financial Dependence and Industrial Growth: Evidence from the Banking Industry in Emerging Asian Economies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Habib Hussain; Ahmad, Rubi Binit; Gee, Chan Sok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine the role of market structure for growth in financially dependent industries from 10 emerging Asian economies over the period of 1995–2011. Our approach departs from existing studies in that we apply four alternative measures of market structure based on structural and non-structural approaches and compare their outcomes. Results indicate that higher bank concentration may slow down the growth of financially dependent industries. Bank competition on the other hand, allows financially dependent industries to grow faster. These findings are consistent across a number of sensitivity checks such as alternative measures of financial dependence, institutional factors (including property rights, quality of accounting standards and bank ownership), and endogeneity consideration. In sum, our study suggests that financially dependent industries grow more in more competitive/less concentrated banking systems. Therefore, regulatory authorities need to be careful while pursuing a consolidation policy for banking sector in emerging Asian economies. PMID:27490847

  10. Epitaxial growth and properties of AlGaN-based UV-LEDs on Si(111) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saengkaew, Phannee

    2010-07-08

    An increasing demand for bright and efficient ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UVLEDs) is generated by numerous applications such as biochemical sensors, purification and sterilization, and solid-state white lighting. Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N is a promising material to develop UVLEDs due to the direct wide-bandgap material for emission wavelengths in the UV range and the capability of n- and p-type doping. To develop UV-LEDs on Si substrates is very interesting for low-cost UV-light sources since the Si substrate is available at low cost, in large-diameter size enabling the integration with well-known Si electronics. This work presents the first crack-free AlGaN-based UV-LEDs on Si(111) substrates by MOVPE growth. This AlGaN-based UV-LED on Si(111) substrate consists of Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N:Si layers on LT-AlN/HT-AlN SL buffer layers and an active layer of GaN/Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N MQWs followed by Mg-doped (GaN/Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N) superlattices and GaN:Mg cap layers. It yields a {proportional_to}350 nm UV electroluminescence at room temperature and a turn-on voltage in a range of 2.6-3.1 V by current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The novel LT-AlN/HT-AlN superlattice buffer layers efficiently improve the crystalline quality of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N layers and compensate a thermal tensile strain in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N layers after cooling as observed by in-situ curvature measurements. The dislocation density could be reduced from 8.4 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} in the AlN-based SLs to 1.8 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} in the Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N layers as determined by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Crack-free Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N layers grown on these LT-AlN/HT-AlN superlattices with 0.05{<=}x{<=} 0.65 are achieved on Si substrates with good crystalline, optical, and electrical properties. The best crystalline quality of Al{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.9}N is obtained with {omega}-FWHMs of the (0002) and (10-10) reflections of

  11. Thresholds of time dependent intergranular crack growth in a nickel disc alloy Alloy 720Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hangyue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At high temperatures in air, introducing a dwell period at the peak stress of fatigue cycles promotes time dependent intergranular crack growth which can increase crack growth rates by upto a few orders of magnitude from the rates of transgranular fatigue crack growth in superalloys. It is expected that time dependent intergranular crack growth in nickel-based superalloys may not occur below a critical mechanical driving force, ΔKth−IG, analogous to a fatigue threshold (ΔKth and a critical temperature, Tth. In this study, dwell fatigue crack growth tests have been carefully designed and conducted on Alloy 720Li to examine such thresholds. Unlike a fatigue threshold, the threshold stress intensity factor range for intergranular crack growth is observed to be highly sensitive to microstructure, dwell time and test procedure. The near threshold crack growth behaviour is made complex by the interactions between grain boundary oxidation embrittlement and crack tip stress relaxation. In general, lower ΔKth−IG values are associated with finer grain size and/or shorter dwell times. Often a load increasing procedure promotes stress relaxation and tends to lead to higher ΔKth−IG. When there is limited stress relaxation at the crack tip, similar ΔKth−IG values are measured with load increasing and load shedding procedures. They are generally higher than the fatigue threshold (ΔKth despite faster crack growth rates (da/dN in the stable crack growth regime. Time dependent intergranular crack growth cannot be activated below a temperature of 500 ∘C.

  12. Controlling the size of gold nanoparticles grown on indium tin oxide substrates prepared by seed mediated growth method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauzia, Vivi, E-mail: vivi@sci.ui.ac.id; Pratiwi, Nur Intan; Adela, Faiz; Djuhana, Dede [Departemen Fisika, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    One of the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles is the enhanced absorption and scattering light around metal nanoparticles commonly called the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) effect of gold nanoparticles. This property is determined by the shape and size of gold nanoparticles. In this work, we observed the role of three materials used in synthesis process on the morphology and the LSPR effect of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were directly grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates using the seed mediated growth method with three different concentrations of trisodium citrate (Na{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7}), C{sub 16}TAB and ascorbic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6}). Based on the FESEM image and optical absorption spectrum of gold nanoparticles, it was found that the higher concentration of those materials has decreased the size of gold nananoparticles and shifted the LSPR peaks to lower wavelength.

  13. The impact of SiC substrate treatment on the heteroepitaxial growth of GaN by plasma assisted MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, A.S.; Kim, T.H.; Choi, S.; Morse, M.; Wu, P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27709 (United States); Losurdo, M.; Giangregorio, M.M.; Capezzuto, P.; Bruno, G. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, and INSTM via Orabona 4 -70126, Bari (Italy)

    2005-11-01

    We report on the impact of the preparation of the Si-face 4H-SiC(0001){sub Si} substrate using a Ga flash-off process on the epitaxial growth of GaN by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The nucleation, as well as the resultant structural and morphological properties of GaN grown directly on 4H-SiC(0001){sub Si} are strongly influenced by the chemical and morphological modifications of the SiC surface induced by the Ga flash-off process. Herein we describe the impact of the specific concentration of Ga incident on the surface (quantified in terms of monolayer (ML) coverage): of 0.5 ML, 1ML and 2ML. The residual oxygen at the SiC surface, unintentional SiC nitridation and the formation of cubic GaN grains during the initial nucleation stage, are all reduced when a 2 ML Ga flash is used. All of the above factors result in structural improvement of the GaN epitaxial layers. The correlation between the SiC surface modification, the initial nucleation stage, and the GaN epitaxial layer structural quality has been articulated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry data. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Dependence of adhesion strength between GaN LEDs and sapphire substrate on power density of UV laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Junsu [Department of Nano-Manufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of); Sin, Young-Gwan [Department of Nano-Mechatronics, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), 217 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hyun [Department of Nano-Mechanics, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jaegu, E-mail: gugu99@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano-Manufacturing Technology, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental relationship between laser irradiation and adhesion strength, between gallium-nitride light emitted diode and sapphire substrate, is proposed during selective laser lift-off. • Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate. • Ga precipitation caused by thermal decomposition and roughened interface caused by thermal damage lead to the considerable difference of adhesion strength at the interface. - Abstract: Selective laser lift-off (SLLO) is an innovative technology used to manufacture and repair micro-light-emitting diode (LED) displays. In SLLO, laser is irradiated to selectively separate micro-LED devices from a transparent sapphire substrate. The light source used is an ultraviolet (UV) laser with a wavelength of 266 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns, and repetition rate of 30 kHz. Controlled adhesion between a LED and the substrate is key for a SLLO process with high yield and reliability. This study examined the fundamental relationship between adhesion and laser irradiation. Two competing mechanisms affect adhesion at the irradiated interface between the GaN LED and sapphire substrate: Ga precipitation caused by the thermal decomposition of GaN and roughened interface caused by thermal damage on the sapphire. The competition between these two mechanisms leads to a non-trivial SLLO condition that needs optimization. This study helps understand the SLLO process, and accelerate the development of a process for manufacturing micro-LED displays via SLLO for future applications.

  15. Selective growth of Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer on patterned SiO2/Si substrate by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Wakana; Washizu, Tomoya; Ike, Shinichi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated the selective growth of a Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer on a line/space-patterned SiO2/Si substrate by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. We examined the behavior of a Sn precursor of tributyl(vinyl)tin (TBVSn) during the growth on Si and SiO2 substrates and investigated the effect of the Sn precursor on the selective growth. The selective growth of the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer was performed under various total pressures and growth temperatures of 300 and 350 °C. The selective growth of the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer on the patterned Si region is achieved at a low total pressure without Ge1‑ x Sn x growth on the SiO2 region. In addition, we found that the Sn content in the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer increases with width of the SiO2 region for a fixed Si width even with low total pressure. To control the Sn content in the selective growth of the Ge1‑ x Sn x epitaxial layer, it is important to suppress the decomposition and migration of Sn and Ge precursors.

  16. Modeling of scale-dependent bacterial growth by chemical kinetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Haydee; Sánchez, Joaquín; Cruz, José-Manuel; Ayala, Guadalupe; Rivera, Marco; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We applied the so-called chemical kinetics approach to complex bacterial growth patterns that were dependent on the liquid-surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V) of the bacterial cultures. The kinetic modeling was based on current experimental knowledge in terms of autocatalytic bacterial growth, its inhibition by the metabolite CO2, and the relief of inhibition through the physical escape of the inhibitor. The model quantitatively reproduces kinetic data of SA/V-dependent bacterial growth and can discriminate between differences in the growth dynamics of enteropathogenic E. coli, E. coli JM83, and Salmonella typhimurium on one hand and Vibrio cholerae on the other hand. Furthermore, the data fitting procedures allowed predictions about the velocities of the involved key processes and the potential behavior in an open-flow bacterial chemostat, revealing an oscillatory approach to the stationary states.

  17. Individualism in plant populations: using stochastic differential equations to model individual neighbourhood-dependent plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiming; Schneider, Manuel K; Pitchford, Jonathan W

    2008-08-01

    We study individual plant growth and size hierarchy formation in an experimental population of Arabidopsis thaliana, within an integrated analysis that explicitly accounts for size-dependent growth, size- and space-dependent competition, and environmental stochasticity. It is shown that a Gompertz-type stochastic differential equation (SDE) model, involving asymmetric competition kernels and a stochastic term which decreases with the logarithm of plant weight, efficiently describes individual plant growth, competition, and variability in the studied population. The model is evaluated within a Bayesian framework and compared to its deterministic counterpart, and to several simplified stochastic models, using distributional validation. We show that stochasticity is an important determinant of size hierarchy and that SDE models outperform the deterministic model if and only if structural components of competition (asymmetry; size- and space-dependence) are accounted for. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of plant ecology and in more general modelling situations.

  18. Selective-area growth of GaN nanocolumns on Si(111) substrates for application to nanocolumn emitters with systematic analysis of dislocation filtering effect of nanocolumns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishino, Katsumi; Ishizawa, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    The growth of highly uniform arrays of GaN nanocolumns with diameters from 122 to 430 nm on Si (111) substrates was demonstrated. The employment of GaN film templates with flat surfaces (root mean square surface roughness of 0.84 nm), which were obtained using an AlN/GaN superlattice (SL) buffer on Si, contributed to the high-quality selective-area growth of nanocolumns using a thin Ti mask of 5 nm thickness by rf-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although the GaN template included a large number of dislocations (dislocation density ∼10 11 cm −2 ), the dislocation filtering effect of nanocolumns was enhanced with decreasing nanocolumn diameters (D). Systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation enabled us to explain the dependence of the dislocation propagation behavior in nanocolumns on the nanocolumn diameter for the first time. Plan-view TEM analysis was performed for nanocolumns with D = 120–324 nm by slicing the nanocolumns horizontally at a height of ∼300 nm above their bottoms and dislocation propagation through the nanocolumns was analyzed by the cross-sectional TEM observation of nanocolumns with D ∼ 200 nm. It was clarified that dislocations were effectively filtered in the bottom 300 nm region of the nanocolumns, the dislocation density of the nanocolumns decreased with decreasing D, and for narrow nanocolumns with D < 200 nm, dislocation-free crystals were obtained in the upper part of the nanocolumns. The dramatic improvement in the emission properties of GaN nanocolumns observed with decreasing diameter is discussed in relation to the decreased dislocation density. The laser action of InGaN/GaN-based nanocolumn arrays with a nanocolumn diameter of 170 nm and a period of 200 nm on Si under optical excitation was obtained with an emission wavelength of 407 nm. We also fabricated red-emitting InGaN-based nanocolumn light-emitting diodes on Si that operated at a wavelength of 652 nm, demonstrating vertical conduction

  19. Size-dependent standard deviation for growth rates: Empirical results and theoretical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Boris; Horvatic, Davor; Pammolli, Fabio; Wang, Fengzhong; Stanley, H. Eugene; Grosse, I.

    2008-05-01

    We study annual logarithmic growth rates R of various economic variables such as exports, imports, and foreign debt. For each of these variables we find that the distributions of R can be approximated by double exponential (Laplace) distributions in the central parts and power-law distributions in the tails. For each of these variables we further find a power-law dependence of the standard deviation σ(R) on the average size of the economic variable with a scaling exponent surprisingly close to that found for the gross domestic product (GDP) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3275 (1998)]. By analyzing annual logarithmic growth rates R of wages of 161 different occupations, we find a power-law dependence of the standard deviation σ(R) on the average value of the wages with a scaling exponent β≈0.14 close to those found for the growth of exports, imports, debt, and the growth of the GDP. In contrast to these findings, we observe for payroll data collected from 50 states of the USA that the standard deviation σ(R) of the annual logarithmic growth rate R increases monotonically with the average value of payroll. However, also in this case we observe a power-law dependence of σ(R) on the average payroll with a scaling exponent β≈-0.08 . Based on these observations we propose a stochastic process for multiple cross-correlated variables where for each variable (i) the distribution of logarithmic growth rates decays exponentially in the central part, (ii) the distribution of the logarithmic growth rate decays algebraically in the far tails, and (iii) the standard deviation of the logarithmic growth rate depends algebraically on the average size of the stochastic variable.

  20. Molecular Basis of Substrate Promiscuity for the SAM-Dependent O-Methyltransferase NcsB1, Involved in the Biosynthesis of the Enediyne Antitumor Antibiotic Neocarzinostatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, H.; Guenther, E; Luo, Y; Shen, B; Bruner, S

    2009-01-01

    The small molecule component of chromoprotein enediyne antitumor antibiotics is biosynthesized through a convergent route, incorporating amino acid, polyketide, and carbohydrate building blocks around a central enediyne hydrocarbon core. The naphthoic acid moiety of the enediyne neocarzinostatin plays key roles in the biological activity of the natural product by interacting with both the carrier protein and duplex DNA at the site of action. We have previously described the in vitro characterization of an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent O-methyltransferase (NcsB1) in the neocarzinostatin biosynthetic pathway [Luo, Y., Lin, S., Zhang, J., Cooke, H. A., Bruner, S. D., and Shen, B. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 14694-14702]. Here we provide a structural basis for NcsB1 activity, illustrating that the enzyme shares an overall architecture with a large family of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent proteins. In addition, NcsB1 represents the first enzyme to be structurally characterized in the biosynthetic pathway of neocarzinostatin. By cocrystallizing the enzyme with various combinations of the cofactor and substrate analogues, details of the active site structure have been established. Changes in subdomain orientation were observed via comparison of structures in the presence and absence of substrate, suggesting that reorientation of the enzyme is involved in binding of the substrate. In addition, residues important for substrate discrimination were predicted and probed through site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro biochemical characterization.

  1. Catalyst and its diameter dependent growth kinetics of CVD grown GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Chandan; Chander, D. Sathish; Ramkumar, J.; Dhamodaran, S.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: GaN nanowires with controlled diameter and aspect ratio has been grown using a simple CVD technique. The growth kinetics of CVD grown nanowires investigated in detail for different catalysts and their diameters. A critical diameter important to distinguish the growth regimes has been discussed in detail. The results are important which demonstrates the growth of diameter and aspect ratio controlled GaN nanowires and also understand their growth kinetics. Highlights: ► Controlled diameter and aspect ratio of GaN nanowires achieved in simple CVD reactor. ► Nanowire growth kinetics for different catalyst and its diameters were understood. ► Adatoms vapor pressure inside reactor plays a crucial role in growth kinetics. ► Diffusion along nanowire sidewalls dominate for gold and nickel catalysts. ► Gibbs–Thomson effect dominates for palladium catalyst. -- Abstract: GaN nanowires were grown using chemical vapor deposition with controlled aspect ratio. The catalyst and catalyst-diameter dependent growth kinetics is investigated in detail. We first discuss gold catalyst diameter dependent growth kinetics and subsequently compare with nickel and palladium catalyst. For different diameters of gold catalyst there was hardly any variation in the length of the nanowires but for other catalysts with different diameter a strong length variation of the nanowires was observed. We calculated the critical diameter dependence on adatoms pressure inside the reactor and inside the catalytic particle. This gives an increasing trend in critical diameter as per the order gold, nickel and palladium for the current set of experimental conditions. Based on the critical diameter, with gold and nickel catalyst the nanowire growth was understood to be governed by limited surface diffusion of adatoms and by Gibbs–Thomson effect for the palladium catalyst.

  2. Effect of initial growth on the quality of GaN on patterned sapphire substrate with ex situ physical vapor deposition AlN seed layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Daigo, Yoshiaki; Seino, Takuya; Ishibashi, Sotaro; Sugiyama, Masakazu

    2016-10-01

    GaN epitaxy was explored on a cone-patterned sapphire substrate with an ex situ AlN seed layer prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD). The effect of initial growth on the quality of the GaN epilayer was investigated using both ex situ PVD-AlN seed layers with various thicknesses and various deposition parameters such as temperature and reactor pressure in metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). It was found that the quality of GaN is insensitive to both the thickness of the ex situ PVD-AlN seed layer and the MOVPE growth conditions. A high-quality GaN film was realized, as indicated by room-temperature CL mapping (dark spot density of 1.6 × 108 cm-2), on a patterned sapphire substrate with a wide growth condition window by simply employing an ex situ PVD-AlN seed layer.

  3. Evidence for dose-dependent effects on plant growth by Stenotrophomonas strains from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckstorff, I; Berg, G

    2003-01-01

    To assess the influence of Stenotrophomonas on plants, the interaction of 16 Stenotrophomonas strains from clinical and environmental sources with strawberry plant seedlings was analysed. In vitro, all Stenotrophomonas strains influenced plant growth when applied to seedlings. Whereas most of the Stenotrophomonas strains promoted root growth and hair development, a statistically significantly negative influence on the length of stem was found. Although strains from a clinical origin also showed statistically significant effects on plants, this was generally lower when compared with environmental strains. For three selected strains, a strong dose-dependent effect was observed for all parameters. In vitro, a correlation was found between plant growth promotion and production of a plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Xanthomonas campestris, a phylogenetically very closely related species to Stenotrophomonas, was used as a phytopathogenic control. It too confirmed the reduction of plant growth in this in vitro system. Independent of their origin, Stenotrophomonas strains can produce IAA in vitro and subsequently, influence plant growth. The effect of Stenotrophomonas presence on plants was dose-dependent. The dose-dependent effect of Stenotrophomonas, a bacterium of both biotechnological and medical interest, is of great interest for biocontrol applications of plant-associated strains. This paper is the first report that clearly demonstrates the phytopathogenic capacity of Stenotrophomonas.

  4. Growth and time dependent alignment of KCl crystals in Hemoglobin LB monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahato, Mrityunjoy; Pal, Prabir; Tah, Bidisha; Kamilya, Tapanendu; Talapatra, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Nature and organism often use the biomineralization technique to build up various highly regular structures such as bone, teeth, kidney stone etc., and recently this becomes the strategy to design and synthesis of novel biocomposite materials. We report here the controlled crystallization of KCl in Langmuir and Langmuir Blodgett (LB) monolayer of Hemoglobin (Hb) at ambient condition. The nucleation and growth of KCl crystals in Hb monolayer has temporal and KCl concentration dependency. The growth of KCl crystals in LB film of Hb has distinct behavior in the alignment of crystals from linear to fractal like structures depending on growth time. The crystallographic identity of the biomineralized KCl crystal is confirmed from HR-TEM, XRD, and from powder diffraction simulation. Our results substantiated that the template of Langmuir monolayer of proteins plays a crucial role in biomineralization as well as in designing and synthesizing of novel biocomposite materials. Highlights: ► Biomineralization of KCl crystal has been studied in Hemoglobin LB film. ► KCl crystal growth is time and concentration of KCl dependent. ► The alignment of KCl crystal growth is fractal nature with time. ► The unfolding of Hb and evaporation factor has some role in crystallization and fractal growth.

  5. Effect of interfacial interactions on the initial growth of Cu on clean SiO sub 2 and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane-modified SiO sub 2 substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Hu Ming Hui; Tsuji, Y; Okubo, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Komiyama, H

    2002-01-01

    The effect of interfacial interactions on the initial growth of Cu on clean SiO sub 2 and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS)-modified SiO sub 2 substrates by sputter deposition was studied using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Plasma damage during sputter deposition makes surfaces of MPTMS-modified SiO sub 2 substrates consist of small MPTMS islands several tens of nanometers in diameter and bare SiO sub 2 areas. These MPTMS islands are composed of disordered multilayer MPTMS aggregates. The initial growth behavior of Cu on MPTMS-modified SiO sub 2 substrates differs from that on clean SiO sub 2 substrates, although Cu grows in three-dimensional-island mode on both of them. After a 2.5-monolayer Cu deposition on clean SiO sub 2 substrates, spherical Cu particles were formed at a low number density of 1.3x10 sup 1 sup 6 /m sup 2 and at a long interparticle distance of 5 nm. In contrast, after the same amount of deposition on MP...

  6. Chirality-Dependent Vapor-Phase Epitaxial Growth and Termination of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Chongwu; USC nanolab Team

    2014-03-01

    Chirality-pure single-wall carbon nanotubes are highly desired for both fundamental study and many of their technological applications. Recently, we have shown that chirality-pure short nanotubes can be used as seeds for vapor-phase epitaxial cloning growth, opening up a new route toward chirality-controlled carbon nanotube synthesis. Nevertheless, the yield of vapor-phase epitaxial growth is rather limited at the present stage, due to the lack of mechanistic understanding of the process. Here we report chirality-dependent growth kinetics and termination mechanism for the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of seven single- chirality nanotubes of (9, 1), (6, 5), (8, 3), (7, 6), (10, 2), (6, 6), and (7, 7), covering near zigzag, medium chiral angle, and near armchair semiconductors, as well as armchair metallic nanotubes. Our results reveal that the growth rates of nanotubes increase with their chiral angles while the active lifetimes of the growth hold opposite trend. Consequently, the chirality distribution of a nanotube ensemble is jointly determined by both growth rates and lifetimes. These results correlate nanotube structures and properties with their growth behaviors and deepen our understanding of chirality-controlled growth of nanotubes.

  7. Vitamin B12–dependent taurine synthesis regulates growth and bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Garcia, Pablo; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Mottram, Lynda; Lieben, Liesbet; Sharan, Kunal; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; Tubio, Jose; Lewis, Kirsty; Wilkinson, Debbie; Santhanam, Balaji; Sarper, Nazan; Clare, Simon; Vassiliou, George S.; Velagapudi, Vidya R.; Dougan, Gordon; Yadav, Vijay K.

    2014-01-01

    Both maternal and offspring-derived factors contribute to lifelong growth and bone mass accrual, although the specific role of maternal deficiencies in the growth and bone mass of offspring is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in a murine genetic model results in severe postweaning growth retardation and osteoporosis, and the severity and time of onset of this phenotype in the offspring depends on the maternal genotype. Using integrated physiological and metabolomic analysis, we determined that B12 deficiency in the offspring decreases liver taurine production and associates with abrogation of a growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF1) axis. Taurine increased GH-dependent IGF1 synthesis in the liver, which subsequently enhanced osteoblast function, and in B12-deficient offspring, oral administration of taurine rescued their growth retardation and osteoporosis phenotypes. These results identify B12 as an essential vitamin that positively regulates postweaning growth and bone formation through taurine synthesis and suggests potential therapies to increase bone mass. PMID:24911144

  8. Use of artificial substrate in pond culture of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii: a new approach regarding growth performance and economic return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilshad Milky Tuly

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted for six months to evaluate the effects of artificial substrates on the survival, growth and production of Macrobrachium rosenbergii juveniles. The treatment T1 contained locally available bamboo-made substrate both vertical and horizontal and treatment T2 received no substrate. Juvenile prawns (0.40±0.13 g were stocked at the rate of 19,760 prawns ha-1. The water quality parameters range such as temperature, pH and DO were 22.06-33.45°C, 7.70-8.40 and 4.75-6.15 mgl-1 respectively which was no significant difference (P0.05 than T2 (56.87%. The specific growth rate, food conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio were 1.19 % and 1.14 %, 3.15 and 4.39, 0.98 and 0.71 in T1 and T2 respectively which were not significantly different (P0.05 than T2. Thus growth and survival of prawn juveniles improved in presence of artificial substrate which could be economically viable technique for the freshwater prawn culture.

  9. Effect of AlSb buffer layer thickness on heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on a Si(001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, M. [Nano and Functional Material Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of TOYAMA, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: morimasa@eng.u-toyama.ac.jp; Murata, K.; Fujimoto, N.; Tatsuyama, C.; Tambo, T. [Nano and Functional Material Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, University of TOYAMA, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2007-07-31

    Aluminum antimonide (AlSb) layers with various thickness ranged from about 8 to 250 nm were grown at 520 deg. C as the buffer layer for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on Si(001) substrates. InSb films were grown at 400 deg. C on the AlSb/Si(001), and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, as a function of the thickness of the AlSb layer. The XRD patterns of the InSb films grown on the AlSb layers show that even if the AlSb buffer layer, whose surface consists of many islands, is as thin as 8 nm, it is effective for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb film on a Si(001) substrate, and the AlSb layer of about 40 nm is thick enough to grow heteroepitaxial InSb films on the Si(001) substrate. The results of the {phi} scan patterns of the films show that InSb films on a Si(001) substrate with AlSb buffer layer were heteroepitaxially grown without any rotation in the growth plane.

  10. Effect of AlSb buffer layer thickness on heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on a Si(001) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, M.; Murata, K.; Fujimoto, N.; Tatsuyama, C.; Tambo, T.

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum antimonide (AlSb) layers with various thickness ranged from about 8 to 250 nm were grown at 520 deg. C as the buffer layer for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb films on Si(001) substrates. InSb films were grown at 400 deg. C on the AlSb/Si(001), and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, as a function of the thickness of the AlSb layer. The XRD patterns of the InSb films grown on the AlSb layers show that even if the AlSb buffer layer, whose surface consists of many islands, is as thin as 8 nm, it is effective for the heteroepitaxial growth of InSb film on a Si(001) substrate, and the AlSb layer of about 40 nm is thick enough to grow heteroepitaxial InSb films on the Si(001) substrate. The results of the φ scan patterns of the films show that InSb films on a Si(001) substrate with AlSb buffer layer were heteroepitaxially grown without any rotation in the growth plane

  11. The frequency-dependent AC photoresistance behavior of ZnO thin films grown on different sapphire substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholula-Díaz, Jorge L; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Videa, Marcelo; Yin, Chunhai; Esquinazi, Pablo

    2017-09-13

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were grown by pulsed layer deposition under an N 2 atmosphere at low pressures on a- and r-plane sapphire substrates. Structural studies using X-ray diffraction confirmed that all films had a wurtzite phase. ZnO thin films on a- and r-plane sapphire have grown with orientations along the [0002] and [112[combining macron]0] directions, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements indicate that the presence of native point defects (interstitial zinc, oxygen vacancies, oxygen antisites and zinc vacancies) is more preponderant for ZnO thin films grown on the r-plane sapphire substrate than the sample grown on the a-plane sapphire substrate. Room temperature impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed in an alternating current frequency range from 40 to 10 5 Hz in the dark and under normal light. An unusual positive photoresistance effect is observed at frequencies above 100 kHz, which we suggest to be due to intrinsic defects present in the ZnO thin films. Furthermore, an analysis of the optical time response revealed that the film grown on the r-plane sapphire substrate responds faster (characteristic relaxation times for τ 1 , τ 2 and τ 3 of 0.05, 0.26 and 6.00 min, respectively) than the film grown on the a-plane sapphire substrate (characteristic relaxation times for τ 1 , τ 2 and τ 3 of 0.10, 0.73 and 4.02 min, respectively).

  12. Buffer free MOCVD growth of GaN on 4H-SiC: Effect of substrate treatments and UV-photoirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, Maria; Giangregorio, Maria M.; Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR and INSTM UdR Bari, via Orabona, 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Kim, Tong-Ho; Choi, Soojeong; Brown, April [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27709 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    GaN has been grown directly on the Si-face 4H-SiC(0001) substrates using remote plasma-assisted metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (RP-MOCVD) with UV-light irradiation. The effects of substrate pre-treatments and UV-photoirradiation of the growth surface on GaN nucleation and film morphology are investigated. Optical data from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements and morphological data show an improvement in nucleation and material quality with UV-light irradiation. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Temperature-dependent templated growth of porphine thin films on the (111) facets of copper and silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diller, Katharina; Klappenberger, Florian; Allegretti, Francesco; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Fischer, Sybille; Duncan, David A.; Lloyd, Julian A.; Oh, Seung Cheol; Barth, Johannes V.; Maurer, Reinhard J.; Reuter, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    The templated growth of the basic porphyrin unit, free-base porphine (2H-P), is characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy measurements and density functional theory (DFT). The DFT simulations allow the deconvolution of the complex XPS and NEXAFS signatures into contributions originating from five inequivalent carbon atoms, which can be grouped into C–N and C–C bonded species. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS measurements reveal an intriguing organizational behavior: On both Cu(111) and Ag(111), for coverages up to one monolayer, the molecules adsorb undeformed and parallel to the respective metal surface. Upon increasing the coverage, however, the orientation of the molecules in the thin films depends on the growth conditions. Multilayers deposited at low temperatures exhibit a similar average tilting angle (30° relative to the surface plane) on both substrates. Conversely, for multilayers grown at room temperature a markedly different scenario exists. On Cu(111) the film thickness is self-limited to a coverage of approximately two layers, while on Ag(111) multilayers can be grown easily and, in contrast to the bulk 2H-P crystal, the molecules are oriented perpendicular to the surface. This difference in molecular orientation results in a modified line-shape of the C 1s XPS signatures, which depends on the incident photon energy and is explained by comparison with depth-resolved DFT calculations. Simulations of ionization energies for differently stacked molecules show no indication for a packing-induced modification of the multilayer XP spectra, thus indicating that the comparison of single molecule calculations to multilayer data is justified

  14. Growth and characterization of GaN thin film on Si substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundakçı, Mutlu; Mantarcı, Asim; Erdoğan, Erman

    2017-01-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) is an attractive material with a wide-direct band gap (3.4 eV) and is one of the significant III-nitride materials, with many advantageous device applications such as high electron mobility transistors, lasers, sensors, LEDs, detectors, and solar cells, and has found applications in optoelectronic devices. GaN could also be useful for industrial research in the future. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), sputter, and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) are some of the methods used to fabricate GaN thin film. In this research, a GaN thin film grown on a silicon substrate using the thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technique has been extensively studied. Fast deposition, short production time, homogeneity, and uniform nanostructure with low roughness can be seen as some of the merits of this method. The growth of the GaN was conducted at an operating pressure of 1× {{10}-6} \\text{Torr} , a plasma current 0.6 \\text{A} and for a very short period of time of 40 s. For the characterization process, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted to determine the structure and surface morphology of the material. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to comprehend the elemental analysis characterization of the film. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to analyze the structure of the film. Raman measurements were taken to investigate the phonon modes of the material. The morphological properties of the material were analyzed in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  15. Low-temperature growth of well-aligned zinc oxide nanorod arrays on silicon substrate and their photocatalytic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ameer Azam,1 Saeed Salem Babkair21Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Center of Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Well-aligned and single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on silicon (Si substrate using a wet chemical route for the photodegradation of organic dyes. Structural analysis using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction confirmed the formation of ZnO nanorods grown preferentially oriented in the (001 direction and with a single phase nature with a wurtzite structure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy micrographs showed that the length and diameter of the well-aligned rods were about ~350–400 nm and ~80–90 nm, respectively. Raman scattering spectra of ZnO nanorod arrays revealed the characteristic E2 (high mode that is related to the vibration of oxygen atoms in the wurtzite ZnO. The photodegradation of methylene blue (MB using ZnO nanorod arrays was performed under ultraviolet light irradiation. The results of photodegradation showed that ZnO nanorod arrays were capable of degrading ~80% of MB within 60 minutes of irradiation, whereas ~92% of degradation was achieved in 120 minutes. Complete degradation of MB was observed after 270 minutes of irradiation time. Owing to enhanced photocatalytic degradation efficiency and low-temperature growth method, prepared ZnO nanorod arrays may open up the possibility for the successful utilization of ZnO nanorod arrays as a future photocatalyst for environmental remediation.Keywords: ZnO, nanorods, XRD, photodegradation

  16. Time dependent fracture growth in intact crystalline rock: new laboratory procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backers, T.; Stephansson, O.

    2008-01-01

    Short term laboratory tests to determine the strength of rock material are commonly used to assess stability of rock excavations. However, loading the rock below its short term strength may lead to delayed failure due to slow stable fracture growth. This time-dependent phenomenon is called subcritical fracture growth. A fracture mechanics based approach is applied in this study to determine the parameters describing subcritical fracture growth under Mode Ⅰ (tensile) and Mode Ⅱ (in-plane shear) loading in terms of the stress intensity factors of saturated granodiorite from the) Aespoe HRL. A statistical method is applied to data from three-point bending (tension) and Punch-Through Shear with Confining Pressure, PTS/CP, (shear) experiments. One population of each set-up was subjected to rapid loading tests yielding a strength probability distribution. A second population was loaded up to a certain fraction of the statistical percentage for failure and the time-to-failure was determined. From these two populations the subcritical fracture growth parameters were determined successfully. Earlier studies demonstrated subcritical fracture growth under Mode I loading conditions, but this study shows that under a Mode Ⅱ load time-dependent fracture growth exists as well. (authors)

  17. STATUS OF BONE METABOLISM AND LINEAR GROWTH OF INFANTS DEPENDENT ON MOTHER'S CALCIUM PROVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Shcheplyagina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analytical findings of the mineral metabolism, bone metabolism and linear growth along with the bone strength of the infants dependent on the mother's calcium and vitamin D provision during pregnancy. The researchers have prospectively examined 160 mother–newborn infant pairs and 87 children for 6–8 months. They confirmed that infant's calcium and vitamin D provision depends on calcium and vitamin d contained in mother's body. Prophylaxis and correction of the calcium and vitamin D deficit in the mother's body will ensure necessary rates of the linear growth, mineral metabolism, and bone remodeling both during antenatal period and within the first 6–8 months, following the birth, increase the bone strength and reduce the frequency of rachitic and rachiticblike changes in the infant skeleton.Key words: newborn infants, infants, calcium provision, bone metabolism, linear growth, bone strength.

  18. Lattice dynamics and substrate-dependent transport properties of (In, Yb)-doped CoSb3 skutterudite thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2011-10-24

    Lattice dynamics, low-temperature electrical transport, and high-temperature thermoelectric properties of (In, Yb)-doped CoSb3thin films on different substrates are reported. Pulsed laser deposition under optimized conditions yielded single-phase polycrystalline skutterudite films. Raman spectroscopy studies suggested that In and Yb dopants occupy the cage sites in the skutterudite lattice. Low-temperature electrical transport studies revealed the n-type semiconducting nature of the films with extrinsic and intrinsic conduction mechanisms, in sharp contrast to the degenerate nature reported for identical bulk samples. Calculations yielded a direct bandgap close to 50 meV with no evidence of an indirect gap. The carrier concentration of the films was identical to that reported for the bulk and increased with temperature beyond 250 K. The higher resistivity exhibited is attributed to the enhanced grain boundary scattering in films with a high concentration of grains. The maximum power factor of ∼0.68 W m−1 K−1 obtained at 660 K for the film on glass is found to be nearly four times smaller compared to that reported for the bulk. The observed difference in the power factors of the films on different substrates is explained on the basis of the diffusion of oxygen from the substrates and the formation of highly conducting CoSb2 phase upon the oxidation of CoSb3.

  19. Fuel-Stimulated Insulin Secretion Depends upon Mitochondria Activation and the Integration of Mitochondrial and Cytosolic Substrate Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Cline

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The pancreatic islet β-cell is uniquely specialized to couple its metabolism and rates of insulin secretion with the levels of circulating nutrient fuels, with the mitochondrial playing a central regulatory role in this process. In the β-cell, mitochondrial activation generates an integrated signal reflecting rates of oxidativephosphorylation, Kreb's cycle flux, and anaplerosis that ultimately determines the rate of insulin exocytosis. Mitochondrial activation can be regulated by proton leak and mediated by UCP2, and by alkalinization to utilize the pH gradient to drive substrate and ion transport. Converging lines of evidence support the hypothesis that substrate cycles driven by rates of Kreb's cycle flux and by anaplerosis play an integral role in coupling responsive changes in mitochondrial metabolism with insulin secretion. The components and mechanisms that account for the integrated signal of ATP production, substrate cycling, the regulation of cellular redox state, and the production of other secondary signaling intermediates are operative in both rodent and human islet β-cells.

  20. Probing the structural dependency of photoinduced properties of colloidal quantum dots using metal-oxide photo-active substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patty, Kira; Campbell, Quinn; Hamilton, Nathan; West, Robert G. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Sadeghi, Seyed M., E-mail: seyed.sadeghi@uah.edu [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Nano and Micro Device Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Mao, Chuanbin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephenson Life Sciences Research Center, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    We used photoactive substrates consisting of about 1 nm coating of a metal oxide on glass substrates to investigate the impact of the structures of colloidal quantum dots on their photophysical and photochemical properties. We showed during irradiation these substrates can interact uniquely with such quantum dots, inducing distinct forms of photo-induced processes when they have different cores, shells, or ligands. In particular, our results showed that for certain types of core-shell quantum dot structures an ultrathin layer of a metal oxide can reduce suppression of quantum efficiency of the quantum dots happening when they undergo extensive photo-oxidation. This suggests the possibility of shrinking the sizes of quantum dots without significant enhancement of their non-radiative decay rates. We show that such quantum dots are not influenced significantly by Coulomb blockade or photoionization, while those without a shell can undergo a large amount of photo-induced fluorescence enhancement via such blockade when they are in touch with the metal oxide.

  1. Investigation of growth, structural and electronic properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on selected substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nateprov, Alexei

    2006-08-15

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of the MI transition in V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films, grown on different substrates. The main goal of the work was to develop a technology of growth of V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on substrates with different electrical and structural properties (diamond and LiNbO{sub 3}), designed for specific applications. The structural and electrical properties of the obtained films were characterized in detail with a special focus on their potential applications. The MIT of V{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated by SAW using first directly deposited V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film onto a LiNbO{sub 3} substrate. (orig.)

  2. The evaluation of the growth and nutrition conditions of the garden nursery material Prunus and Thuja according to the use of various cultivating substrates and systems of fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Meisl

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different peat-based cultivating substrates and the system of fertilization on the nutrition conditions and growth characteristics of garden nursery material Prunus kurilensis ‘Brillant’ and Thuja occidentalis ‘Smaragd’ were observed during a three-year experiment. Three kinds of substrates were tested: peat + pumice (pemza proportioned 8:2, fermented bark + peat + clay proportioned 4:4:2, fermented bark + peat + clay proportioned 4:4:2. Two fertilizers were used: granular controlled-release fertilizer – Osmocote, and watersoluble with irrigation – Kristalon.A higher content of macroelements was observed in the leaves of Prunus. The only exception was potassium, the quantity of which was demonstrably higher in the assimilative organs of Thuja. On the contrary, Thuja had a higher content of trace elements except for copper and iron. The highest contents of nitrogen, potassium, and iron were statistically proved in leaves of woods grown in the substrate of peat and pumice due to its higher sorption capability. A better nutrition conditions in almost all nutrients were observed at plants where the gradually effective Osmocote was applied. The exceptions were calcium, molybdenum and iron, the content of which was, on the contrary, higher where Kristalon with irrigation were used. Physical characteristics of the growing substrates that contained bark were significantly worse at the end of the experiment. This was even intensified by clay. The substrate containing peat and pumice were less stable. The best growth was observed in woods grown in the substrate of peat and pumice, ie where peat was not substituted by bark, and, at the same time, expanded clay was used instead of classic clay. Higher values of growth characteristics were demonstratively observed after the Osmocote fertilizer was applied.The results of the experiment reveal that pumice should be recommended, pemza with a high sorption capability and the

  3. Optimal litter size for individual growth of European rabbit pups depends on their thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, H G; Hudson, R; von Holst, D

    2008-04-01

    In altricial mammals and birds, the presence of a large number of litter or brood mates often affects the development of individual offspring by reducing the share of resources provided by the parents. However, sibling presence can also be favourable, conferring thermoregulatory benefits when ambient temperatures are low. Consequently, shifts in the relation between costs and benefits of sibling presence can be expected as a function of the thermal environment. In a study of a European rabbit population (Oryctolagus cuniculus) living in a field enclosure, we investigated the effects of litter size and soil temperature on pup growth over 7 years. Temperatures inside the subterranean nests were positively correlated with soil temperature and with litter size. Soil temperature varied strongly across the breeding season, ranging from 3 to 21 degrees C. Under warmer soil temperature conditions (10-15 degrees C and >15 degrees C), pup growth decreased with increasing litter size, where litters of two pups (smallest litter size considered) showed the highest growth rates. In contrast, under colder soil temperature conditions (growth rates were found in litters of three pups. We also asked if such temperature-dependent differences in the optimal pup growth rates might be explained by differences in maternal characteristics, which might affect lactational performance. We assessed maternal performance using females' postpartum body mass and social rank. However, we did not find consistent differences in maternal characteristics between females giving birth to different-sized litters during different soil temperature conditions, which would have provided an alternative explanation for the observed differences in litter size-dependent pup growth. We conclude that under colder soil temperature conditions, the thermal benefits of a greater number of littermates outweigh the negative consequences of competition for milk, leading to an environment-dependent shift in the optimal

  4. Growth dependence of conjugation explains limited plasmid invasion in biofilms: an individual‐based modelling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkey, Brian; Lardon, Laurent; Seoane, Jose Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid invasion in biofilms is often surprisingly limited in spite of the close contact of cells in a biofilm. We hypothesized that this poor plasmid spread into deeper biofilm layers is caused by a dependence of conjugation on the growth rate (relative to the maximum growth rate) of the donor...... and scan speed) and spatial reach (EPS yield, conjugal pilus length) are more important for successful plasmid invasion than the recipients' growth rate or the probability of segregational loss. While this study identifies one factor that can limit plasmid invasion in biofilms, the new individual....... By extending an individual‐based model of microbial growth and interactions to include the dynamics of plasmid carriage and transfer by individual cells, we were able to conduct in silico tests of this and other hypotheses on the dynamics of conjugal plasmid transfer in biofilms. For a generic model plasmid...

  5. Density Dependence and Growth Rate: Evolutionary Effects on Resistance Development to Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jeannette C; Caprio, Michael A; Friedenberg, Nicholas A

    2018-02-09

    It has long been recognized that pest population dynamics can affect the durability of a pesticide, but dose remains the primary component of insect resistance management (IRM). For transgenic pesticidal traits such as Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae)), dose (measured as the mortality of susceptibles caused by a toxin) is a relatively fixed characteristic and often falls below the standard definition of high dose. Hence, it is important to understand how pest population dynamics modify durability and what targets they present for IRM. We used a deterministic model of a generic arthropod pest to examine how timing and strength of density dependence interacted with population growth rate and Bt mortality to affect time to resistance. As in previous studies, durability typically reached a minimum at intermediate doses. However, high population growth rates could eliminate benefits of high dose. The timing of density dependence had a more subtle effect. If density dependence operated simultaneously with Bt mortality, durability was insensitive to its strengths. However, if density dependence was driven by postselection densities, decreasing its strength could increase durability. The strength of density dependence could affect durability of both single traits and pyramids, but its influence depended on the timing of density dependence and size of the refuge. Our findings suggest the utility of a broader definition of high dose, one that incorporates population-dynamic context. That maximum growth rates and timing and strength of interactions causing density dependent mortality can all affect durability, also highlights the need for ecologically integrated approaches to IRM research. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Sapling growth rates reveal conspecific negative density dependence in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, Benjamin S; Johnson, Daniel J; Gonzalez-Akre, Erika; McShea, William J; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Bourg, Norman A; Clay, Keith

    2017-10-01

    Local tree species diversity is maintained in part by conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). This pervasive mechanism occurs in a variety of forms and ecosystems, but research to date has been heavily skewed toward tree seedling survival in tropical forests. To evaluate CNDD more broadly, we investigated how sapling growth rates were affected by conspecific adult neighbors in a fully mapped 25.6 ha temperate deciduous forest. We examined growth rates as a function of the local adult tree neighborhood (via spatial autoregressive modeling) and compared the spatial positioning of faster-growing and slower-growing saplings with respect to adult conspecific and heterospecific trees (via bivariate point pattern analysis). In addition, to determine whether CNDD-driven variation in growth rates leaves a corresponding spatial signal, we extended our point pattern analysis to a static, growth-independent comparison of saplings and the next larger size class. We found that negative conspecific effects on sapling growth were most prevalent. Five of the nine species that were sufficiently abundant for analysis exhibited CNDD, while only one species showed evidence of a positive conspecific effect, and one or two species, depending on the analysis, displayed heterospecific effects. There was general agreement between the autoregressive models and the point pattern analyses based on sapling growth rates, but point pattern analyses based on single-point-in-time size classes yielded results that differed markedly from the other two approaches. Our work adds to the growing body of evidence that CNDD is an important force in temperate forests, and demonstrates that this process extends to sapling growth rates. Further, our findings indicate that point pattern analyses based solely on size classes may fail to detect the process of interest (e.g., neighborhood-driven variation in growth rates), in part due to the confounding of tree size and age.

  7. Nanoelectroablation of Murine Tumors Triggers a CD8-Dependent Inhibition of Secondary Tumor Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Nuccitelli

    Full Text Available We have used both a rat orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model and a mouse allograft tumor model to study liver tumor ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF. We confirm that nsPEF treatment triggers apoptosis in rat liver tumor cells as indicated by the appearance of cleaved caspase 3 and 9 within two hours after treatment. Furthermore we provide evidence that nsPEF treatment leads to the translocation of calreticulin (CRT to the cell surface which is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern indicative of immunogenic cell death. We provide direct evidence that nanoelectroablation triggers a CD8-dependent inhibition of secondary tumor growth by comparing the growth rate of secondary orthotopic liver tumors in nsPEF-treated rats with that in nsPEF-treated rats depleted of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. The growth of these secondary tumors was severely inhibited as compared to tumor growth in CD8-depleated rats, with their average size only 3% of the primary tumor size after the same one-week growth period. In contrast, when we depleted CD8+ T-cells the second tumor grew more robustly, reaching 54% of the size of the first tumor. In addition, we demonstrate with immunohistochemistry that CD8+ T-cells are highly enriched in the secondary tumors exhibiting slow growth. We also showed that vaccinating mice with nsPEF-treated isogenic tumor cells stimulates an immune response that inhibits the growth of secondary tumors in a CD8+-dependent manner. We conclude that nanoelectroablation triggers the production of CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells resulting in the inhibition of secondary tumor growth.

  8. MOVPE growth of N-polar AlN on 4H-SiC: Effect of substrate miscut on layer quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemettinen, J.; Okumura, H.; Kim, I.; Kauppinen, C.; Palacios, T.; Suihkonen, S.

    2018-04-01

    We present the effect of miscut angle of SiC substrates on N-polar AlN growth. The N-polar AlN layers were grown on C-face 4H-SiC substrates with a miscut towards 〈 1 bar 1 0 0 〉 by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The optimal V/III ratios for high-quality AlN growth on 1 ° and 4 ° miscut substrates were found to be 20,000 and 1000, respectively. MOVPE grown N-polar AlN layer without hexagonal hillocks or step bunching was achieved using a 4H-SiC substrate with an intentional miscut of 1 ° towards 〈 1 bar 1 0 0 〉 . The 200-nm-thick AlN layer exhibited X-ray rocking curve full width half maximums of 203 arcsec and 389 arcsec for (0 0 2) and (1 0 2) reflections, respectively. The root mean square roughness was 0.4 nm for a 2 μm × 2 μm atomic force microscope scan.

  9. Substrate-dependent modulation of the enzymatic catalytic activity: reduction of nitrate, chlorate and perchlorate by respiratory nitrate reductase from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Jacopo; Paes de Sousa, Patrícia M; Moura, Isabel; Brondino, Carlos D; Moura, José J G; González, Pablo J

    2012-07-01

    The respiratory nitrate reductase complex (NarGHI) from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus 617 (Mh, formerly Pseudomonas nautica 617) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. This reaction is the first step of the denitrification pathway and is coupled to the quinone pool oxidation and proton translocation to the periplasm, which generates the proton motive force needed for ATP synthesis. The Mh NarGH water-soluble heterodimer has been purified and the kinetic and redox properties have been studied through in-solution enzyme kinetics, protein film voltammetry and spectropotentiometric redox titration. The kinetic parameters of Mh NarGH toward substrates and inhibitors are consistent with those reported for other respiratory nitrate reductases. Protein film voltammetry showed that at least two catalytically distinct forms of the enzyme, which depend on the applied potential, are responsible for substrate reduction. These two forms are affected differentially by the oxidizing substrate, as well as by pH and inhibitors. A new model for the potential dependence of the catalytic efficiency of Nars is proposed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Clamfication) Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever 𔃼 PERSONAL AjTHOR(S...FELD GROUP SUBGROUP Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever . 19...clinically diagnosed as dengue hemorrhagic fever . Antibody-dependent enhancement of virus growth was quantitated by measurement of virus yields in

  11. Real-time observation of growth and orientation of Sm-Ba-Cu-O phases on a Sm-211 whisker substrate by high-temperature optical microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sun, J.L.; Huang, Y.B.; Cheng, L.; Yao, X.; Lai, Y.J.; Jirsa, Miloš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2009), 898-902 ISSN 1528-7483 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0722 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : high-temperature optical microscopy * growth and orientation of Sm-Ba-Cu-O phases * Sm-211 whisker substrate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.162, year: 2009

  12. Critical issues for homoepitaxial GaN growth by molecular beam epitaxy on hydride vapor-phase epitaxy-grown GaN substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, D. F.; Hardy, M. T.; Katzer, D. S.; Nepal, N.; Downey, B. P.; Meyer, D. J.; McConkie, Thomas O.; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.

    2016-12-01

    While the heteroepitaxial growth of gallium nitride-based materials and devices on substrates such as SiC, sapphire, and Si has been well-documented, the lack of a cost-effective source of bulk GaN crystals has hindered similar progress on homoepitaxy. Nevertheless, freestanding GaN wafers are becoming more widely available, and there is great interest in growing GaN films and devices on bulk GaN substrates, in order to take advantage of the greatly reduced density of threading dislocations, particularly for vertical devices. However, homoepitaxial GaN growth is far from a trivial task due to the reactivity and different chemical sensitivities of N-polar (0001) and Ga-polar (0001) GaN surfaces, which can affect the microstructure and concentrations of impurities in homoepitaxial GaN layers. In order to achieve high quality, high purity homoepitaxial GaN, it is necessary to investigate the effect of the ex situ wet chemical clean, the use of in situ cleaning procedures, the sensitivity of the GaN surface to thermal decomposition, and the effect of growth temperature. We review the current understanding of these issues with a focus on homoepitaxial growth of GaN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on c-plane surfaces of freestanding GaN substrates grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), as HVPE-grown substrates are most widely available. We demonstrate methods for obtaining homoepitaxial GaN layers by plasma-assisted MBE in which no additional threading dislocations are generated from the regrowth interface and impurity concentrations are greatly reduced.

  13. H2-dependent attachment kinetics and shape evolution in chemical vapor deposition graphene growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca, Esteban; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Lowengrub, John

    2017-09-01

    Experiments on graphene growth through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) involving methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gases reveal a complex shape evolution and a non-monotonic dependence on the partial pressure of H2 ({{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} ). To explain these intriguing observations, we develop a microkinetic model for the stepwise decomposition of CH4 into mobile radicals and consider two possible mechanisms of attachment to graphene crystals: CH radicals to hydrogen-decorated edges of the crystals and C radicals to bare crystal edges. We derive an effective mass flux and an effective kinetic coefficient, both of which depend on {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} , and incorporate these into a phase field model. The model reproduces both the non-monotonic dependence on {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} and the characteristic shapes of graphene crystals observed in experiments. At small {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} , growth is limited by the kinetics of attachment while at large {{p}{{\\text{H}2}}} growth is limited because the effective mass flux is small. We also derive a simple analytical model that captures the non-monotone behavior, enables the two mechanisms of attachment to be distinguished and provides guidelines for CVD growth of defect-free 2D crystals.

  14. ATP-dependent Conformational Changes Trigger Substrate Capture and Release by an ECF-type Biotin Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Friedrich; Sippach, Michael; Landmesser, Heidi; Kirsch, Franziska; Ogienko, Anastasia; Grunzel, Miriam; Kiesler, Cornelia; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Schneider, Erwin; Eitinger, Thomas

    2015-07-03

    Energy-coupling factor (ECF) transporters for vitamins and metal ions in prokaryotes consist of two ATP-binding cassette-type ATPases, a substrate-specific transmembrane protein (S component) and a transmembrane protein (T component) that physically interacts with the ATPases and the S component. The mechanism of ECF transporters was analyzed upon reconstitution of a bacterial biotin transporter into phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs. ATPase activity was not stimulated by biotin and was only moderately reduced by vanadate. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was a competitive inhibitor. As evidenced by cross-linking of monocysteine variants and by site-specific spin labeling of the Q-helix followed by EPR-based interspin distance analyses, closure and reopening of the ATPase dimer (BioM2) was a consequence of ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. A previously suggested role of a stretch of small hydrophobic amino acid residues within the first transmembrane segment of the S units for S unit/T unit interactions was structurally and functionally confirmed for the biotin transporter. Cross-linking of this segment in BioY (S) using homobifunctional thiol-reactive reagents to a coupling helix of BioN (T) indicated a reorientation rather than a disruption of the BioY/BioN interface during catalysis. Fluorescence emission of BioY labeled with an environmentally sensitive fluorophore was compatible with an ATP-induced reorientation and consistent with a hypothesized toppling mechanism. As demonstrated by [(3)H]biotin capture assays, ATP binding stimulated substrate capture by the transporter, and subsequent ATP hydrolysis led to substrate release. Our study represents the first experimental insight into the individual steps during the catalytic cycle of an ECF transporter in a lipid environment. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Growth and Comparison of Residual Stress of AlN Films on Silicon (100), (110) and (111) Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Akhilesh; Dutta, Shankar; Prakash, Ravi; Raman, R.; Kapoor, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Davinder

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports on the comparison of residual stresses in AlN thin films sputter-deposited in identical conditions on Si (100) (110) and (111) substrates. The deposited films are of polycrystalline wurtzite structure with preferred orientation along the (002) direction. AlN film on the Si (111) substrate showed a vertical columnar structure, whereas films on Si (100) and (110) showed tilted columnar structures. Residual stress in the AlN films is estimated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), infra-red absorption method and wafer curvature technique. Films residual stress are found compressive and values are in the range of - 650 (± 50) MPa, - 730 (± 50) MPa and - 300 (± 50) MPa for the AlN films grown on Si (100), (110) and (111) substrates, respectively, with different techniques. The difference in residual stresses can be attributed to the microstructure of the films and mismatch between in plane atomic arrangements of the film and substrates.

  16. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  17. Temperature-dependent growth of Geomyces destructans, the fungus that causes bat white-nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verant, Michelle L.; Boyles, Justin G.; Waldrep, William; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Blehert, David S.

    2012-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emergent disease estimated to have killed over five million North American bats. Caused by the psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans, WNS specifically affects bats during hibernation. We describe temperature-dependent growth performance and morphology for six independent isolates of G. destructans from North America and Europe. Thermal performance curves for all isolates displayed an intermediate peak with rapid decline in performance above the peak. Optimal temperatures for growth were between 12.5 and 15.8°C, and the upper critical temperature for growth was between 19.0 and 19.8°C. Growth rates varied across isolates, irrespective of geographic origin, and above 12°C all isolates displayed atypical morphology that may have implications for proliferation of the fungus. This study demonstrates that small variations in temperature, consistent with those inherent of bat hibernacula, affect growth performance and physiology of G. destructans, which may influence temperature-dependent progression and severity of WNS in wild bats.

  18. Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires on patterned Si substrates using self-catalyzed growth for vertical-type optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, Kenichi, E-mail: ken-kawa@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (NanoQuine), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Sudo, Hisao; Matsuda, Manabu; Takemoto, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi [Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197 (Japan); Arakawa, Yasuhiko [Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (NanoQuine), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-01-05

    Radial InP/InAsP/InP heterostructure nanowires (NWs) on SiO{sub 2}-mask-pattered Si substrates were reported using self-catalyzed InP NWs. Self-catalyzed growth was performed using low growth temperatures and high group-III flow rates, and vertical InP NWs were formed on the mask openings. The diameter and tapering of the self-catalyzed InP NWs were controlled by the introduction of HCl and H{sub 2}S gases during the NW growth, and InP NWs that have a straight region with decreased diameter were formed. Radial InP/InAsP/InP quantum wells (QWs) were grown on the sidewall of the vertical InP NWs on Si substrates. Room-temperature photoluminescence of single NWs from the QW was clearly observed, which exhibited the potential of building blocks for vertical-type optical devices on Si substrates.

  19. L-carnosine affects the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a metabolism-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Stephanie P; Bill, Roslyn M; Hipkiss, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    The dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metabolism in which aerobic respiration is down regulated. L-Carnosine exhibited both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on yeast cells, dependent upon the carbon source in the growth medium. When yeast cells were not reliant on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation (e.g. when grown on a fermentable carbon source such as 2% glucose), 10-30 mM L-carnosine slowed growth rates in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell death by up to 17%. In contrast, in media containing a non-fermentable carbon source in which yeast are dependent on aerobic respiration (e.g. 2% glycerol), L-carnosine did not provoke cell death. This latter observation was confirmed in the respiratory yeast, Pichia pastoris. Moreover, when deletion strains in the yeast nutrient-sensing pathway were treated with L-carnosine, the cells showed resistance to its inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that L-carnosine affects cells in a metabolism-dependent manner and provide a rationale for its effects on different cell types.

  20. ITO films deposited by rf-PERTE on unheated polymer substrates--properties dependence on In-Sn alloy composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes de Carvalho, C.; Lavareda, G.; Fortunato, E.; Vilarinho, P.; Amaral, A.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the influence of different tin concentrations in the In-Sn alloy on the properties of indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films deposited by radio frequency (rf) plasma enhanced reactive thermal evaporation (rf-PERTE) onto flexible polymer and window glass substrates at room temperature is presented. The polymer substrate used is polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The tin concentration in the source alloy varied in the range 5-20 wt.%. The average thickness of the ITO films is of about 90 nm. Results show that ITO thin films deposited on PET from the evaporation of a 85%In:15%Sn alloy exhibit the following characteristics: an average visible transmittance of 80% and an electrical resistivity of 1.6x10 -3 Ω cm. On glass the value of the average visible transmittance increases (85%) and the resistivity decreases to 7.6x10 -4 Ω cm. The electrical properties of ITO films on PET are largely affected by the low carrier mobility

  1. Fast Homoepitaxial Growth of 4H-SiC Films on 4° off-Axis Substrates in a SiH4-C2H4-H2 System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bin; Sun Guo-Sheng; Liu Xing-Fang; Zhang Feng; Dong Lin; Zheng Liu; Yan Guo-Guo; Liu Sheng-Bei; Zhao Wan-Shun; Wang Lei; Zeng Yi-Ping; Wang Zhan-Guo; Li Xi-Guang; Yang Fei

    2013-01-01

    Homoepitaxial growth of 4H-SiC epilayers is conducted in a SiH 4 -C 2 H 4 -H 2 system by low pressure hot-wall vertical chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Thick epilayers of 45 μm are achieved at a high growth rate up to 26 μm/h under an optimized growth condition, and are characterized by using a Normaski optical microscope, a scanning electronic microscope (SEM), an atomic force microscope (AFM) and an x-ray diffractometer (XRD), indicating good crystalline quality with mirror-like smooth surfaces and an rms roughness of 0.9 nm in a 5 μm × 5μm area. The dependence of the 4H-SiC growth rate on growth conditions on 4° off-axis 4H-SiC substrates and its mechanism are investigated. It is found that the H 2 flow rate could influence the surface roughness, while good surface morphologies without Si droplets and epitaxial defects such as triangular defects could be obtained by increasing temperature

  2. Dependence of morphometric allometries on the growth kinetics of body parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhout, H Frederik

    2011-11-07

    As overall size varies, the sizes of body parts of many animals often appear to be related to each other by a power law, commonly called the allometric equation. Orderly scaling relationships among body parts are widespread in the animal world, but there is no general agreement about how these relationships come about. Presumably they depend on the patterns of growth of body parts, and simple analyses have shown that exponential growth can lead to size relationships that are well-described by the allometric equation. Exponential growth kinetics also allow for a simple biological interpretation of the coefficients of the power relationship. Nevertheless, many tissues do not grow with exponential kinetics, nor do they grow for the same period of time, and the consequences of more realistic growth patterns on the resulting allometric relationships of body parts are not well understood. In this paper I derive a set of allometric equations that assume different kinetics of growth: linear, exponential and sigmoidal. In these derivations I also include differences in development times as a variable, in addition to differences in the growth rates and initial sizes of the two structures whose allometric relationship is compared. I show how these equations can be used to deduce the effect of different causes of variation in absolute size on the resulting allometry. Variation in size can be due to variation in the duration of development, variation in growth rate or variation in initial size. I show that the meaning of the coefficients of the allometric equation depends on exactly how size variation comes about. I show that if two structures are assumed to grow with sigmoidal kinetics (logistic and Gompertz) the resulting allometric equations do not have a simple and intuitive structure and produce graphs that, over a sufficiently large range of sizes, can vary from linear, to sigmoidal to hump-shaped. Over a smaller range of absolute sizes, these sigmoid growth kinetics can

  3. TiO2 coatings via atomic layer deposition on polyurethane and polydimethylsiloxane substrates: Properties and effects on C. albicans growth and inactivation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, R. S.; dos Santos, V. P.; Cardoso, S. B.; Doria, A. C. O. C.; Figueira, F. R.; Rodrigues, B. V. M.; Testoni, G. E.; Fraga, M. A.; Marciano, F. R.; Lobo, A. O.; Maciel, H. S.

    2017-11-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) surges as an attractive technology to deposit thin films on different substrates for many advanced biomedical applications. Herein titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were successful obtained on polyurethane (PU) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates using ALD. The effect of TiO2 films on Candida albicans growth and inactivation process were also systematic discussed. TiCl4 and H2O were used as precursors at 80 °C, while the reaction cycle number ranged from 500 to 2000. Several chemical, physical and physicochemical techniques were used to evaluate the growth kinetics, elemental composition, material structure, chemical bonds, contact angle, work of adhesion and surface morphology of the ALD TiO2 thin films grown on both substrates. For microbiological analyses, yeasts of standard strains of C. albicans were grown on non- and TiO2-coated substrates. Next, the antifungal and photocatalytic activities of the TiO2 were also investigated by counting the colony-forming units (CFU) before and after UV-light treatment. Chlorine-doped amorphous TiO2 films with varied thicknesses and Cl concentration ranging from 2 to 12% were obtained. In sum, the ALD TiO2 films suppressed the yeast-hyphal transition of C. albicans onto PU, however, a high adhesion of yeasts was observed. Conversely, for PDMS substrate, the yeast adhesion did not change, as observed in control. Comparatively to control, the TiO2-covered PDMS had a reduction in CFU up to 59.5% after UV treatment, while no modification was observed to TiO2-covered PU. These results pointed out that ALD chlorine-doped amorphous TiO2 films grown on biomedical polymeric surfaces may act as fungistatic materials. Furthermore, in case of contamination, these materials may also behave as antifungal materials under UV light exposure.

  4. Rate-Independent Processes with Linear Growth Energies and Time-Dependent Boundary Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kružík, Martin; Zimmer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2012), s. 591-604 ISSN 1937-1632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/10/0357 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : concentrations * oscillations * time-dependent boundary conditions * rate-independent evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/MTR/kruzik-rate-independent processes with linear growth energies and time-dependent boundary conditions.pdf

  5. Plasmin-driven fibrinolysis facilitates skin tumor growth in a gender-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Andreas; Eickhardt, Hanne; Maerkedahl, Rasmus Baadsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Rearrangement of the skin during wound healing depends on plasmin and plasminogen, which serve to degrade fibrin depositions in the provisional matrix and thereby facilitate keratinocyte migration. In the current study, we investigated whether plasmin and plasminogen likewise played a role during...... by maintaining patency of the tumor vasculature.-Hald, A., Eickhardt, H., Maerkedahl, R. B., Feldborg, C. W., Egerod, K. L., Engelholm. L. H., Laerum, O. D., Lund, L. R., Rønø, B. Plasmin-driven fibrinolysis facilitates skin tumor growth in a gender-dependent manner....

  6. Hydrogen-enhanced fatigue crack growth in steels and its frequency dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-06-01

    In the context of the fatigue life design of components, particularly those destined for use in hydrogen refuelling stations and fuel cell vehicles, it is important to understand the hydrogen-induced, fatigue crack growth (FCG) acceleration in steels. As such, the mechanisms for acceleration and its influencing factors are reviewed and discussed in this paper, with a special focus on the peculiar frequency dependence of the hydrogen-induced FCG acceleration. Further, this frequency dependence is debated by introducing some potentially responsible elements, along with new experimental data obtained by the authors. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  7. Collagen remodeling by phagocytosis is determined by collagen substrate topology and calcium-dependent interactions of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA in cell adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P. D.; Wang, Y.; Bresnick, A.; Dawson, J.; Janmey, P. A.; McCulloch, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We examine how collagen substrate topography, free intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i, and the association of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMIIA) at collagen adhesions are regulated to enable collagen phagocytosis. Fibroblasts plated on planar, collagen-coated substrates show minimal increase of [Ca2+]i, minimal colocalization of gelsolin and NMMIIA in focal adhesions, and minimal intracellular collagen degradation. In fibroblasts plated on collagen-coated latex beads there are large increases of [Ca2+]i, time- and Ca2+-dependent enrichment of NMMIIA and gelsolin at collagen adhesions, and abundant intracellular collagen degradation. NMMIIA knockdown retards gelsolin recruitment to adhesions and blocks collagen phagocytosis. Gelsolin exhibits tight, Ca2+-dependent binding to full-length NMMIIA. Gelsolin domains G4–G6 selectively require Ca2+ to interact with NMMIIA, which is restricted to residues 1339–1899 of NMMIIA. We conclude that cell adhesion to collagen presented on beads activates Ca2+ entry and promotes the formation of phagosomes enriched with NMMIIA and gelsolin. The Ca2+ -dependent interaction of gelsolin and NMMIIA in turn enables actin remodeling and enhances collagen degradation by phagocytosis. PMID:23325791

  8. Growth Mechanism of Strain-Dependent Morphological Change in PEDOT:PSS Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo-Yong; Choi, Gwang Mook; Lim, Seung-Min; Cho, Ju-Young; Choi, In-Suk; Nam, Ki Tae; Joo, Young-Chang

    2016-04-29

    Understanding the mechanism of the strain-dependent conductivity change in polymers in stretched conditions is important. We observed a strain-induced growth of the conductive regions of PSS films, induced by a coalescence of conductive PEDOT-rich cores. This growth due to coalescence leads to a gradual decrease in the electrical resistivity up to 95%, independent of the thickness of the PSS films. The primary mechanism for the evolution of the PEDOT-rich cores proceeds by the cores growing larger as they consuming relatively smaller cores. This process is caused by a strain-induced local rearrangement of PEDOT segments in the vicinity of PSS shells around the cores and also changes the chemical environment in PEDOT, induced by the electron-withdrawing effects around the PEDOT chains. The strain-induced growth mechanism is beneficial to understanding the phenomenon of polymeric chain rearrangement in mechanical deformation and to modulating the electrical conductivity for practical applications.

  9. Influence of a silicon (Si14)-based coating substrate for biomaterials on fibroblast growth and human C5a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebl, B; Hopperdietzel, C; Hünigen, H; Jung, F; Scharnagl, N

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts in biomaterial development there is still a lack on substrates for cardiovascular tissue engineering approaches which allow the establishment of a tight a functional endothelial layer on their surface to provide hemocompatibility. The study aimed to test the biocompatibility of a silicon (Si14)-based coating substrate (Supershine Medicare, Permanon) which was designed to resist temperatures from -40°C up to 300°C and which allows the use of established heat-inducing sterilization techniques respectively. By X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it could be validated that this substrate is able to establish a 40-50 nm thick layer of silica, oxygen and carbon without including any further elements from the substrate on an exemplary selection of materials (silicone, soda-lime-silica glass, stainless steel). Analysis of the LDH-release, the cell activity/proliferation (MTS assay) and the cell phenotype after growing 3T3 cells with extracts of the coated materials did not indicate any signs of cytotoxicity. Additionally by measuring the C5a release after exposure of the coated materials with human serum it could be demonstrated, that the coating had no impact on the activation of the complement system. These results generally suggest the tested substrate as a promising candidate for the coating of materials which are aimed to be used in cardiovascular tissue engineering approaches.

  10. Population and prehistory I: Food-dependent population growth in constant environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Charlotte T; Tuljapurkar, Shripad

    2008-06-01

    We present a demographic model that describes the feedbacks between food supply, human mortality and fertility rates, and labor availability in expanding populations, where arable land area is not limiting. This model provides a quantitative framework to describe how environment, technology, and culture interact to influence the fates of preindustrial agricultural populations. We present equilibrium conditions and derive approximations for the equilibrium population growth rate, food availability, and other food-dependent measures of population well-being. We examine how the approximations respond to environmental changes and to human choices, and find that the impact of environmental quality depends upon whether it manifests through agricultural yield or maximum (food-independent) survival rates. Human choices can complement or offset environmental effects: greater labor investments increase both population growth and well-being, and therefore can counteract lower agricultural yield, while fertility control decreases the growth rate but can increase or decrease well-being. Finally we establish equilibrium stability criteria, and argue that the potential for loss of local stability at low population growth rates could have important consequences for populations that suffer significant environmental or demographic shocks.

  11. Random mutagenesis identifies factors involved in formate-dependent growth of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Christian; Wolf, Sandro; Fersch, Julia; Goetz, Stefan; Rother, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methane is a key intermediate in the carbon cycle and biologically produced by methanogenic archaea. Most methanogens are able to conserve energy by reducing CO2 to methane using molecular hydrogen as electron donor (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis), but several hydrogenotrophic methanogens can also use formate as electron donor for methanogenesis. Formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) oxidizes formate to CO2 and is involved in funneling reducing equivalents into the methanogenic pathway, but details on other factors relevant for formate-dependent physiology of methanogens are not available. To learn more about the factors involved in formate-dependent growth of Methanococcus maripaludis strain JJ, we used a recently developed system for random in vitro mutagenesis, which is based on a modified insect transposable element to create 2,865 chromosomal transposon mutants and screened them for impaired growth on formate. Of 12 M. maripaludis transposon-induced mutants exhibiting this phenotype, the transposon insertion sites in the chromosome were mapped. Among the genes, apparently affecting formate-dependent growth were those encoding archaeal transcription factor S, a regulator of ion transport, and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase. Interestingly, in seven of the mutants, transposons were localized in a 10.2 kb region where Fdh1, one of two Fdh isoforms in the organism, is encoded. Two transcription start sites within the 10.2 kb region could be mapped, and quantification of transcripts revealed that transposon insertion in this region diminished fdhA1 expression due to polar effects.

  12. Effect of substrate on the growth and properties of thin 3R NbS2 films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhakhmetov, Azimkhan; Choudhury, Tanushree H.; Al Balushi, Zakaria Y.; Chubarov, Mikhail; Redwing, Joan M.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of substrate (c-plane sapphire versus epitaxial graphene/6H-SiC) on the CVD growth and properties of thin 3R NbS2 films was investigated using niobium (v) pentachloride (NbCl5) and hydrogen disulfide (H2S) as precursors in a hydrogen carrier gas. The growth temperature ranged from 400 °C to 800 °C and the sulfur to niobium ratio (S/Nb) ranged between 640 and 5100 under 100 Torr total pressure. Growth on sapphire resulted in fine grained nanocrystalline NbS2 films under all conditions studied whereas smooth NbS2 films with triangular-shaped domains, on the order of 1-2 μm in size, were obtained on epitaxial graphene under identical conditions. The differences in growth morphology were attributed to enhanced surface diffusion of Nb adatoms on the passivated graphene surface compared to that of c-plane sapphire. This work demonstrates that the substrate choice plays a very crucial role in the deposition of 3R NbS2.

  13. Substrate specificity of flavin-dependent vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum. Evidence for the production of 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols from 4-allylphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraaije, M W; Veeger, C; van Berkel, W J

    1995-11-15

    The substrate specificity of the flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum was investigated. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase catalyzes besides the oxidation of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohols, the oxidative deamination of 4-hydroxybenzylamines and the oxidative demethylation of 4-(methoxymethyl)phenols. During the conversion of vanillylamine to vanillin, a transient intermediate, most probably vanillylimine, is observed. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase weakly interacts with 4-hydroxyphenylglycols and a series of catecholamines. These compounds are converted to the corresponding ketones. Both enantiomers of (nor)epinephrine are substrates for vanillyl-alcohol oxidase, but the R isomer is preferred. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase is most active with chavicol and eugenol. These 4-allylphenols are converted to coumaryl alcohol and coniferyl alcohol, respectively. Isotopic labeling experiments show that the oxygen atom inserted at the C gamma atom of the side chain is derived from water. The 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol products and the substrate analog isoeugenol are competitive inhibitors of vanillyl alcohol oxidation. The binding of isoeugenol to the oxidized enzyme perturbs the optical spectrum of protein-bound FAD. pH-dependent binding studies suggest that vanillyl-alcohol oxidase preferentially binds the phenolate form of isoeugenol (pKa < 6, 25 degrees C). From this and the high pH optimum for turnover, a hydride transfer mechanism involving a p-quinone methide intermediate is proposed for the vanillyl-alcohol-oxidase-catalyzed conversion of 4-allylphenols.

  14. The growth of high density network of MOF nano-crystals across macroporous metal substrates - Solvothermal synthesis versus rapid thermal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, James W.; Gonzalo, Cristina Pozo; Merenda, Andrea; Kong, Lingxue; Schütz, Jürg A.; Dumée, Ludovic F.

    2018-01-01

    Fabrication of metal organic framework (MOF) films and membranes across macro-porous metal substrates is extremely challenging, due to the large pore sizes across the substrates, poor wettability, and the lack of sufficient reactive functional groups on the surface, which prevent high density nucleation of MOF crystals. Herein, macroporous stainless steel substrates (pore size 44 × 40 μm) are functionalized with amine functional groups, and the growth of ZIF-8 crystals investigated through both solvothermal synthesis and rapid thermal deposition (RTD), to assess the role of synthesis routes in the resultant membranes microstructure, and subsequently their performance. Although a high density of well interconnected MOF crystals was observed across the modified substrates following both techniques, RTD was found to be a much more efficient route, yielding high quality membranes under 1 h, as opposed to the 24 h required for solvothermal synthesis. The RTD membranes also exhibited high gas permeance, with He permeance of up to 2.954 ± 0.119 × 10-6 mol m-2 s-1 Pa-1, and Knudsen selectivities for He/N2, Ar/N2 and CO2/N2, suggesting the membranes were almost defect free. This work opens up route for efficient fabrication of MOF films and membranes across macro-porous metal supports, with potential application in electrically mediated separation applications.

  15. A simple technique for direct growth of Au into a nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glass as a reusable SERS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiajie; Shen, Muzhong; Liu, Siyu; Li, Feng; Sun, Dongping; Wang, Tianhe

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). PAOCG was attached firmly with a small piece of steel and was then immersed in a HAuCl4 solution. Electro-induced electrons from steel were employed to reduce AuCl4- on PAOCG. The galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) was adopted as the fundamental mechanism for reducing metal precursors. This mechanism was further studied by open circuit potential-time (OCP-t) experiment and the result demonstrated that steel induced the continuous proceeding of this reaction. This strategy presents a simple and general protocol for preparation of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) on conductive glass substrates. The SERS properties of Au/PAOCG were investigated using aqueous crystal violet (CV) and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as probe molecules. Au/PAOCG allowed as low as 10-9 M CV and 10-8 M 4-Mpy to be detected. The reusability of this substrate was achieved by measuring the SERS spectrum of the probe molecules followed with a 400 °C heat treatment for 10 min to remove the residuals. This substrate could be reused for at least ten cycles without any significantly reduced SERS performance. Therefore, this surface can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS substrate and has a potential for commercial applications.

  16. Growth-Rate Dependent Regulation of tRNA Level and Charging in Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Iolanda; Liebeton, Klaus; Ignatova, Zoya

    2017-10-13

    Cellular growth crucially depends on protein synthesis and the abundance of translational components. Among them, aminoacyl-tRNAs play a central role in biosynthesis and shape the kinetics of mRNA translation, thus influencing protein production. Here, we used microarray-based approaches to determine the charging levels and tRNA abundance of Bacillus licheniformis. We observed an interesting cross-talk among tRNA expression, charging pattern, and growth rate. For a large subset of tRNAs, we found a co-regulated and augmented expression at high growth rate. Their tRNA aminoacylation level is kept relatively constant through riboswitch-regulated expression of the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase (AARS). We show that AARSs with putative riboswitch-controlled expression are those charging tRNAs with amino acids which disfavor cell growth when individually added to the nutrient medium. Our results suggest that the riboswitch-regulated AARS expression in B. licheniformis is a powerful mechanism not only to maintain a constant ratio of aminoacyl-tRNA independent of the growth rate but concomitantly to control the intracellular level of free amino acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A study of the effects of aligned vertically growth time on ZnO nanorods deposited for the first time on Teflon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, O. F.; Halim, M. M.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Oglat, Ammar A.; Abuelsamen, A. A.; Bououdina, M.; Qaeed, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, ZnO nanorods (NRs) were well deposited on Teflon substrates (PTFE) via a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at low temperature. The consequences of growth time (1 h-4 h) on the structural and optical properties of the aligned ZnO (NRs) were investigated through X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and photoluminescence (PL) analyses. The results show that the ZnO (NRs) were preferred to grew aligned along the c-axis as hexagonal wurtzite structure as proved by the sharp and strong ZnO (002) peaks of the ZnO (NRs). Irrespective of the growth continuation, FESEM photos confirmed that the ZnO nanorods arrays were fit to be aligned along the c-axis and perpendicular to (PTFE) substrates. The ZnO nanorods that exhibited the sharper stand most intense PL peaks among the sample were grown for 3hs as demonstrated by PL spectra. The device further showed a sensitivity of 4068 to low-power (1.25 mW/cm2) 375 nm light pulses without an external bias. The measurements of photoresponse demonstrated the highly reproducible characteristics of the fabricated UV detector with rapid response and baseline recovery times of 48.05 ms. Thus, this work introduced a simple, low-cost method of fabricating rapid-response, and highly photosensitive UV detectors with zero power consumption on Teflon substrates.

  18. Proximity-Dependent Inhibition of Growth of Mannheimia haemolytica by Pasteurella multocida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Dassanayake, Rohana P.; Kugadas, Abirami; Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Call, Douglas R.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Bibersteinia trehalosi have been identified in the lungs of pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis). Of these pathogens, M. haemolytica has been shown to consistently cause fatal pneumonia in BHS under experimental conditions. However, M. haemolytica has been isolated by culture less frequently than the other bacteria. We hypothesized that the growth of M. haemolytica is inhibited by other bacteria in the lungs of BHS. The objective of this study was to determine whether P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica. Although in monoculture both bacteria exhibited similar growth characteristics, in coculture with P. multocida there was a clear inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica. The inhibition was detected at mid-log phase and continued through the stationary phase. When cultured in the same medium, the growth of M. haemolytica was inhibited when both bacteria were separated by a membrane that allowed contact (pore size, 8.0 μm) but not when they were separated by a membrane that limited contact (pore size, 0.4 μm). Lytic bacteriophages or bactericidal compounds could not be detected in the culture supernatant fluid from monocultures of P. multocida or from P. multocida-M. haemolytica cocultures. These results indicate that P. multocida inhibits the growth of M. haemolytica by a contact- or proximity-dependent mechanism. If the inhibition of growth of M. haemolytica by P. multocida occurs in vivo as well, it could explain the inconsistent isolation of M. haemolytica from the lungs of pneumonic BHS. PMID:22798357

  19. A-plane GaN growth on (11-20) 4H-SiC substrate with an ultrathin interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Song, Peifeng; Nitta, Shugo; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    A-plane GaN was attempted to be grown on (11-20) 4H-SiC bulk substrate without using a traditional thick buffer layer. By inducing TMAl treatment before the GaN growth step and using both a low pressure and V/III ratio, the interlayer thickness of the a-plane GaN/SiC was reduced to 1.7+0.5 nm. The ultrathin interlayer was observed to be either AlN or AlGaN with a low Ga composition. This study is aimed to contribute to the understanding of GaN growth on the sidewalls of c-plane trench structure SiC. The ultrathin growth technique is also hoped to be applied to the fabrication of GaN-based vertical structure nonpolar optical or electrical devices.

  20. Polarity driven simultaneous growth of free-standing and lateral GaAsP epitaxial nanowires on GaAs (001) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wen; Xu, Hongyi [Materials Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 40732 (Australia); Guo, Yanan [Materials Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 40732 (Australia); Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Gao, Qiang; Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Zou, Jin, E-mail: j.zou@uq.edu.au [Materials Engineering, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 40732 (Australia); Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2013-11-25

    Simultaneous growth of 〈111〉{sub B} free-standing and ±[110] lateral GaAsP epitaxial nanowires on GaAs (001) substrates were observed and investigated by electron microscopy and crystallographic analysis. It was found that the growth of both free-standing and lateral ternary nanowires via Au catalysts was driven by the fact that Au catalysts prefer to maintain low-energy (111){sub B} interfaces with surrounding GaAs(P) materials: in the case of free-standing nanowires, Au catalysts maintain (111){sub B} interfaces with their underlying GaAsP nanowires; while in the case of lateral nanowires, each Au catalyst remain their side (111){sub B} interfaces with the surrounding GaAs(P) material during the lateral nanowire growth.

  1. History-dependent coupled growth of creep damage under variable stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M.

    1998-08-01

    A multiaxial constitutive model is presented for the description of the history-dependent inelastic and damage behavior of polycrystalline metallic materials in the high-temperature range under variable loading conditions. A particular emphasis is placed on a new formulation for the history-dependent material degradation which is based on a coupling between hardening and damage. The total damage is given by the sum of damage components which have different history dependence. The associated continuum damage variables are defined through their evolution equations coupled with hardening parameters involved with a kinematic hardening model. The non-classical coupling between hardening and damage is incorporated into the modified kinematic hardening model which has. been developed for describing the complicated hardening and softening behavior under repeated stress changes. Numerical simulations for different material parameters show that the proposed damage-coupled constitutive model can predict an acceleration as well as a deceleration of creep damage growth due to stress variations.

  2. Density regulation in Northeast Atlantic fish populations: Density dependence is stronger in recruitment than in somatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Fabian; Ricard, Daniel; Heino, Mikko

    2018-01-30

    Population regulation is a central concept in ecology, yet in many cases its presence and the underlying mechanisms are difficult to demonstrate. The current paradigm maintains that marine fish populations are predominantly regulated by density-dependent recruitment. While it is known that density-dependent somatic growth can be present too, its general importance remains unknown and most practical applications neglect it. This study aimed to close this gap by for the first time quantifying and comparing density dependence in growth and recruitment over a large set of fish populations. We fitted density-dependent models to time-series data on population size, recruitment and age-specific weight from commercially exploited fish populations in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. Data were standardized to enable a direct comparison within and among populations, and estimated parameters were used to quantify the impact of density regulation on population biomass. Statistically significant density dependence in recruitment was detected in a large proportion of populations (70%), whereas for density dependence in somatic growth the prevalence of density dependence depended heavily on the method (26% and 69%). Despite age-dependent variability, the density dependence in recruitment was consistently stronger among age groups and between alternative approaches that use weight-at-age or weight increments to assess growth. Estimates of density-dependent reduction in biomass underlined these results: 97% of populations with statistically significant parameters for growth and recruitment showed a larger impact of density-dependent recruitment on population biomass. The results reaffirm the importance of density-dependent recruitment in marine fishes, yet they also show that density dependence in somatic growth is not uncommon. Furthermore, the results are important from an applied perspective because density dependence in somatic growth affects productivity and

  3. Step-flow growth of fluorescent 4H-SiC layers on 4 degree off-axis substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schimmel, S.; Kaiser, M.; Hens, P.

    2013-01-01

    Homoepitaxial layers of fluorescent 4H-SiC were grown on 4 degree off-axis substrates by sublimation epitaxy. Luminescence in the green spectral range was obtained by co-doping with nitrogen and boron utilizing donor-acceptor pair luminescence. This concept opens possibilities to explore green...... light emitting diodes using a new materials platform....

  4. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  5. High-quality III-V semiconductor MBE growth on Ge/Si virtual substrates for metal-oxide-semiconductor device fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Donghun; Harris, James S.; Kim, Eunji; McIntyre, Paul C.; Cagnon, Joel; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-03-01

    We describe the molecular-beam epitaxial (MBE) growth and fabrication of III-V metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices on Ge/Si virtual substrates. We show that high-temperature in-situ H 2 annealing in the chemical-vapor deposition system changes the Ge surface configuration and produces a surface with predominantly double-step-layer conditions, which is crucial for the growth of single-domain GaAs. In addition, the surface morphology of III-V on Ge/Si improved significantly with an annealing treatment of the Ge surface carried out under high arsenic background pressure in the MBE chamber. This facilitates uniform As-monolayer formation on the entire Ge surface. Low-temperature migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and low-temperature conventional GaAs growth not only enhance the growth of single-domain GaAs without Ge outdiffusion but also produce a sufficiently smooth surface for high-k dielectric deposition, achieving low leakage current. A 300-nm-thick GaAs buffer layer was grown, followed by a 10 nm growth of In 0.2Ga 0.8As high-mobility channel layer. A 7-8-nm-thick Al 2O 3 layer was deposited ex-situ by atomic-layer deposition (ALD). We verify the quality of III-V growth using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The C-V characteristics show unpinning of the Fermi level, which is a necessary condition for gate voltage control of the drain current. This work suggests this materials combination is a promising candidate for the realization of advanced, nonclassical complementary-MOS and optoelectronic devices on Si substrates.

  6. Fitness Impact of Obligate Intranuclear Bacterial Symbionts Depends on Host Growth Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Chiara; Koehler, Lars; Grosser, Katrin; Berendonk, Thomas U; Petroni, Giulio; Schrallhammer, Martina

    2016-01-01

    According to text book definition, parasites reduce the fitness of their hosts whereas mutualists provide benefits. But biotic and abiotic factors influence symbiotic interactions, thus under certain circumstances parasites can provide benefits and mutualists can harm their host. Here we addressed the question which intrinsic biotic factors shape a symbiosis and are crucial for the outcome of the interaction between the obligate intranuclear bacterium Holospora caryophila ( Alphaproteobacteria; Rickettsiales ) and its unicellular eukaryotic host Paramecium biaurelia (Alveolata; Ciliophora). The virulence of H. caryophila , i.e., the negative fitness effect on host division and cell number, was determined by growth assays of several P. biaurelia strains. The performances of genetically identical lines either infected with H. caryophila or symbiont-free were compared. Following factors were considered as potentially influencing the outcome of the interaction: (1) host strain, (2) parasite strain, and (3) growth phases of the host. All three factors revealed a strong effect on the symbiosis. In presence of H. caryophila , the Paramecium density in the stationary growth phase decreased. Conversely, a positive effect of the bacteria during the exponential phase was observed for several host × parasite combinations resulting in an increased growth rate of infected P. biaurelia . Furthermore, the fitness impact of the tested endosymbionts on different P. biaurelia lines was not only dependent on one of the two involved strains but distinct for the specific combination. Depending on the current host growth phase, the presence of H. caryophila can be harmful or advantageous for P. biaurelia . Thus, under the tested experimental conditions, the symbionts can switch from the provision of benefits to the exploitation of host resources within the same host population and a time-span of less than 6 days.

  7. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-01

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed [ 32 P]ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-α/sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-α/sub i/ or anti-α 0 antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed

  8. Growth and Device Performance of AlGaN/GaN Heterostructure with AlSiC Precoverage on Silicon Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hoon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A crack-free AlGaN/GaN heterostructure was grown on 4-inch Si (111 substrate with initial dot-like AlSiC precoverage layer. It is believed that introducing the AlSiC layer between AlN wetting layer and Si substrate is more effective in obtaining a compressively stressed film growth than conventional Al precoverage on Si surface. The metal semiconductor field effect transistor (MESFET, fabricated on the AlGaN/GaN heterostructure grown with the AlSiC layer, exhibited normally on characteristics, such as threshold voltage of −2.3 V, maximum drain current of 370 mA/mm, and transconductance of 124 mS/mm.

  9. Influence of substrate temperature on epitaxial growth of YBa2Cu3O6.9 superconducting films under laser sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparov, V.A.; Dite, A.F.; Ovchinnikov, I.M.; Sorokin, N.M.; Khasanov, S.S.; Yaremenko, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    Using ac resistivity measurements, X-ray diffraction and Auger spectroscopy we have investigated the influence of SrTiO 3 substrate temperature (T s ) on the epitaxial growth of superconducting YBaCu 3 O 6.9 films evaporated by a moderate energy (∼ c films and to investigate their surface properties (Auger spectra) in situ. The Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films were evaporated from a rotated cyylindrical target of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.9 superconducting ceramic onto a SrTiO 3 (100) single crystal substrate which also has been rotated.The films were subsequently annealed for one hour at different temperatures in an O 2 flow in the same chamber immediatly after evaporation and cooled down slowly (100 deg C/hour) to room temperature

  10. L-carnosine affects the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a metabolism-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie P Cartwright

    Full Text Available The dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metabolism in which aerobic respiration is down regulated. L-Carnosine exhibited both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on yeast cells, dependent upon the carbon source in the growth medium. When yeast cells were not reliant on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation (e.g. when grown on a fermentable carbon source such as 2% glucose, 10-30 mM L-carnosine slowed growth rates in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell death by up to 17%. In contrast, in media containing a non-fermentable carbon source in which yeast are dependent on aerobic respiration (e.g. 2% glycerol, L-carnosine did not provoke cell death. This latter observation was confirmed in the respiratory yeast, Pichia pastoris. Moreover, when deletion strains in the yeast nutrient-sensing pathway were treated with L-carnosine, the cells showed resistance to its inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that L-carnosine affects cells in a metabolism-dependent manner and provide a rationale for its effects on different cell types.

  11. Density dependent growth changes through juvenile and early adult life of North East Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Burns, F.

    2015-01-01

    . The effect of adult density was minor, but increasing with age. The ontogenetic progression in density dependant regulation of growth appeared to reflect the spatial dynamics (migration patterns) in the feeding season. This is the first time growth patterns quantified in the adult mackerel population have......Density dependence of somatic growth has an important, but overlooked, impact on fisheries management advice. We therefore examined how growth relates to abundance in a case where growth has been observed to vary substantially in recent years, namely North East Atlantic mackerel, one of the most...... widespread and commercially important fish stocks in the North Atlantic. Growth of juvenile and early adult North East Atlantic mackerel was found to be decreasing since the late 1990s. Modelling showed that growth was related to density. Mean growth rate during the first year was tightly correlated...

  12. Substrate Inhibition of VanA by d-Alanine Reduces Vancomycin Resistance in a VanX-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aart, Lizah T.; Lemmens, Nicole; van Wamel, Willem J.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing resistance of clinical pathogens against the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin, a last-resort drug against infections with Gram-positive pathogens, is a major problem in the nosocomial environment. Vancomycin inhibits peptidoglycan synthesis by binding to the d-Ala–d-Ala terminal dipeptide moiety of the cell wall precursor lipid II. Plasmid-transferable resistance is conferred by modification of the terminal dipeptide into the vancomycin-insensitive variant d-Ala–d-Lac, which is produced by VanA. Here we show that exogenous d-Ala competes with d-Lac as a substrate for VanA, increasing the ratio of wild-type to mutant dipeptide, an effect that was augmented by several orders of magnitude in the absence of the d-Ala–d-Ala peptidase VanX. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that high concentrations of d-Ala led to the production of a significant amount of wild-type cell wall precursors, while vanX-null mutants produced primarily wild-type precursors. This enhanced the efficacy of vancomycin in the vancomycin-resistant model organism Streptomyces coelicolor, and the susceptibility of vancomycin-resistant clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecium (VRE) increased by up to 100-fold. The enhanced vancomycin sensitivity of S. coelicolor cells correlated directly to increased binding of the antibiotic to the cell wall. Our work offers new perspectives for the treatment of diseases associated with vancomycin-resistant pathogens and for the development of drugs that target vancomycin resistance. PMID:27270282

  13. Minimal sulfur requirement for growth and sulfur-dependent metabolism of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Staphylothermus marinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Hao

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylothermus marinus is an anaerobic hyperthermophilic archaeon that uses peptides as carbon and energy sources. Elemental sulfur (S° is obligately required for its growth and is reduced to H2S. The metabolic functions and mechanisms of S° reduction were explored by examining S°-dependent growth and activities of key enzymes present in this organism. All three forms of S° tested—sublimed S°, colloidal S° and polysulfide—were used by S. marinus, and no other sulfur-containing compounds could replace S°. Elemental sulfur did not serve as physical support but appeared to function as an electron acceptor. The minimal S° concentration required for optimal growth was 0.05% (w/v. At this concentration, there appeared to be a metabolic transition from H2 production to S° reduction. Some enzymatic activities related to S°-dependent metabolism, including sulfur reductase, hydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase and electron transfer activities, were detected in cell-free extracts of S. marinus. These results indicate that S° plays an essential role in the heterotrophic metabolism of S. marinus. Reducing equivalents generated by the oxidation of amino acids from peptidolysis may be transferred to sulfur reductase and hydrogenase, which then catalyze the production of H2S and H2, respectively.

  14. Growth of gallium nitride based devices on silicon(001) substrates by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy; Wachstum von Galliumnitrid-basierten Bauelementen auf Silizium(001)-Substraten mittels metallorganischer Gasphasenepitaxie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiher, Fabian

    2009-02-25

    The main topic of this thesis is to investigate GaN-based layer systems grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on Si(001) substrates. A temperature shift up to 45 K is measured for a complete device structure on a 2-inch silicon substrate. By using a 40 nm thin LT-AlN-seed layer (680 C), the GaN crystallites on Si(001) substrates are almost oriented with their GaN(10 anti 12)-planes parallel to the Si(001)-plane. A four-fold azimuthal symmetry occurs for these layers, with the GaN[10 anti 11]-direction is aligned parallel to one of the four equivalent left angle 110 right angle -directions, respectively. However, a mono-crystalline and fully coalesced GaN-layer with this crystallographic orientation could not yet been obtained. If a deposition temperature of more than 1100 C is used for the AlN-seed layer, solely the GaN[0001]- growth direction of crystallites occurs in the main GaN layer on Si(001) substrates. These c-axis oriented GaN columns feature two opposite azimuthal alignments that are rotated by 90 with respect to each other and with GaN[11 anti 20] parallel Si[110] and GaN[10 anti 10] parallel Si[110], respectively. By using 4 off-oriented substrates towards the Si[110]-direction, one certain azimuthal texture component can be selected. The critical value of the miscut angle corresponds to theoretical calculations predicting the occurrence of atomic double steps on the Si(001) surface. The achieved crystallographic quality of the GaN layers on Si(001) is characterized by having a tilt of FWHM=0.27 and a twist of FWHM=0.8 of the crystallites, determined by X-ray diffraction. A completely crack-free, up to 2.5 {mu}m thick, and mono-crystalline GaN-template can be realized on Si(001), integrating 4 or 5 LT-AlN-interlayers in the GaN buffer structure. Based on this structure, the first successful implementation of an (InGaN/GaN)-LED on Si(001) is achieved. Furthermore, the possible fabrication of GaN-based FET-structures is demonstrated with a fully

  15. A simple technique for direct growth of Au into a nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glass as a reusable SERS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jiajie [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Shen, Muzhong [School of Engineering, AnHui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Liu, Siyu; Li, Feng [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Sun, Dongping, E-mail: sundpe301@163.com [School of Engineering, AnHui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Wang, Tianhe, E-mail: thwang56@126.com [Chemicobiology and Functional Materials Institute, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). Gold was uniformly distributed in porous alumina layer. Au/PAOCG can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS substrate. - Highlights: • A simple method of producing nanoporous alumina layer on conductive glasses. • A facile technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into PAOCG. • It presents a general protocol for preparation of (MNPs) on conductive glasses. • Au/PAOCG exhibits high SERS sensitivity and excellent reusability. - Abstract: In this paper, we describe a simple technique for direct growth of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into a nanostructured porous alumina layer on conductive glass slide (PAOCG). PAOCG was attached firmly with a small piece of steel and was then immersed in a HAuCl{sub 4} solution. Electro-induced electrons from steel were employed to reduce AuCl{sub 4}{sup −} on PAOCG. The galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) was adopted as the fundamental mechanism for reducing metal precursors. This mechanism was further studied by open circuit potential-time (OCP-t) experiment and the result demonstrated that steel induced the continuous proceeding of this reaction. This strategy presents a simple and general protocol for preparation of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) on conductive glass substrates. The SERS properties of Au/PAOCG were investigated using aqueous crystal violet (CV) and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as probe molecules. Au/PAOCG allowed as low as 10{sup −9} M CV and 10{sup −8} M 4-Mpy to be detected. The reusability of this substrate was achieved by measuring the SERS spectrum of the probe molecules followed with a 400 °C heat treatment for 10 min to remove the residuals. This substrate could be reused for at least ten cycles without any significantly reduced SERS performance. Therefore, this surface can serve as a portable, durable and reusable SERS

  16. New parametrization for the scale dependent growth function in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, James B.; Dutta, Sourish; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2009-01-01

    We study the scale-dependent evolution of the growth function δ(a,k) of cosmological perturbations in dark energy models based on general relativity. This scale dependence is more prominent on cosmological scales of 100h -1 Mpc or larger. We derive a new scale-dependent parametrization which generalizes the well-known Newtonian approximation result f 0 (a)≡(dlnδ 0 /dlna)=Ω(a) γ (γ=(6/11) for ΛCDM) which is a good approximation on scales less than 50h -1 Mpc. Our generalized parametrization is of the form f(a)=(f 0 (a)/1+ξ(a,k)), where ξ(a,k)=(3H 0 2 Ω 0m )/(ak 2 ). We demonstrate that this parametrization fits the exact result of a full general relativistic evaluation of the growth function up to horizon scales for both ΛCDM and dynamical dark energy. In contrast, the scale independent parametrization does not provide a good fit on scales beyond 5% of the horizon scale (k≅0.01h -1 Mpc).

  17. Dependence of growth of the phases of multiphase binary systems on the diffusion parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokhina