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Sample records for growth performance physiological

  1. growth and physiological performance of west african dwarf goats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-09-02

    Sep 2, 2014 ... experiment revealed that growth rate was significantly better in animals reared under intensive system of management as indices measured such as average daily weight gain, (kg) and metabolic weight (W. 0.75 ... as rectal temperature, pulse rate, respiratory rate and ambient temperature revealed some.

  2. Effects of different diets on growth performance, physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contents of triiodothyronine (T3) and growth hormone (GH) in Group 3 were the highest, thereinto the content of T3 in Group 3 was more than other groups except Group 2, and the content of GH in Group 3 was more than Groups 5 and 6 (P < 0.05). The digestive enzyme activity in intestinal tract in Group 3 was the most, ...

  3. Effects of ractopamine hydrochloride on growth performance, carcass characteristics, and physiological response to different handling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmaier, J A; Reinhardt, C D; Ritter, M J; Calvo-Lorenzo, M S; Vogel, G J; Guthrie, C A; Siemens, M G; Lechtenberg, K F; Rezac, D J; Thomson, D U

    2017-05-01

    Feedlot cattle ( = 128; BW = 549 ± 60 kg) were used to evaluate the effects of ractopamine hydrochloride (RAC) on growth performance, physiological response to handling, and mobility during shipment for slaughter in a study utilizing a split-plot design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments: 1) diet (CON [no β-adrenergic agonist] vs. RAC [400 mg·animal·d ractopamine hydrochloride for 28 d]) and 2) handling intensity (HI; low-stress handling [LSH; cattle moved at a walking pace with no electric prod use] vs. high-stress handling [HSH; cattle moved at a minimum of a trot and an electric prod applied while in the alley for posthandling restraint and during loading for shipment to the abattoir]). Cattle fed RAC tended to have greater ADG and G:F ( = 0.06), and had greater HCW and LM area ( = 0.04). The HI treatments were applied on the day after the 28-d growth performance period. Blood samples were collected before HI treatment (baseline), after HI treatments (POSTHAND), after transport to the abattoir (POSTTRANS), and during exsanguination at slaughter. A diet × HI interaction ( = 0.01) was observed in the change in cortisol from baseline to POSTTRANS, and there tended ( ≤ 0.07) to be diet × HI interactions for the change in epinephrine from baseline to POSTHAND and for the change in creatine kinase (CK) from baseline to POSTTRANS. Feeding RAC and HSH both increased the change from baseline to POSTHAND in norepinephrine and pH ( ≤ 0.05). The HSH cattle also had greater changes from baseline to POSTHAND in blood HCO, base excess, partial pressure of CO, lactate, cortisol, and glucose ( ≤ 0.01). Ractopamine and HSH both produced greater increases in CK concentrations from baseline to slaughter ( < 0.01). Mobility was not affected by RAC at the feedlot or following an average 6-h lairage ( ≥ 0.43). This study confirms RAC improves growth performance and suggests metabolic acidosis, a precursor to fatigued cattle syndrome, develops in cattle

  4. Post-fertilization physiology and growth performance of loblolly pine clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.T. King; J.R. Seiler; T.R. Fox; KurtH. Johnsen

    2008-01-01

    The physiological processes leading to enhanced growth of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) following fertilization are not clearly understood. Part of the debate revolves around the temporal response of net photosynthetic rate (An) to fertilization and whether the An response is always positive. We measured light-saturated photosynthetic rate (Asat), dark respiration...

  5. Is There a Positive Synergistic Effect of Biochar and Compost Soil Amendments on Plant Growth and Physiological Performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lukas Seehausen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The combination of biochar (BC with compost has been suggested to be a promising strategy to promote plant growth and performance, but although “synergistic” effects have been stated to occur, full-factorial experiments are few, and explicit tests for synergism are lacking. We tested the hypothesis that a combination of BC and spent mushroom substrate (SMS has a positive synergistic effect on plant growth and physiological performance in a nutrient-limited growing media. A greenhouse experiment with a full factorial design was conducted using mixed-wood BC (3.0 kg·m−2 and SMS (1.5 kg·m−2 (the combination was not co-composted as organic soil amendments for the annual Abutilon theophrasti and the perennial Salix purpurea. Several measurements related to plant growth and physiological performance were taken throughout the experiment. Contrary to the hypothesis, we found that the combination of BC + SMS had neutral or antagonistic interactive effects on many plant growth traits. Antagonistic effects were found on maximum leaf area, above- and belowground biomass, reproductive allocation, maximum plant height, chlorophyll fluorescence, and stomatal conductance of A. theophrasti. The effect on S. purpurea was mostly neutral. We conclude that the generalization that BC and compost have synergistic effects on plant performance is not supported.

  6. Improvement of Nannochloropsis oceanica growth performance through chemical mutation and characterization of fast growth physiology by transcriptome profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sijie; Guo, Li; Lin, Genmei; Zhang, Zhongyi; Ding, Haiyan; Wang, Yamei; Yang, Guanpin

    2017-07-01

    Nannochloropsis oceanica promises to be an industrial-level producer of polyunsaturated fatty acids. In this study, the fastest and slowest growing N. oceanica mutants were selected through N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutation, and two mutant strains and the wild type (WT) subjected to transcriptome profiling. It was found that the OD680 reads at stationary growth phase of both WT and its mutants were proportional to their cell density, thus indicating their division rate and growth speed during culture. This chemical mutation was effective for improving growth performance, and the fast strain divided faster by upregulating the expression of genes functioning in the cell cycle and downregulating genes involved in synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, and sugars as well as the construction of ribosome and photosynthetic machinery. However, the relationship among the effected genes responsible for cell cycle, metabolism of fatty and amino acids, and construction of ribosome and photosynthetic machinery remained unclear. Further genetic studies are required for clarifying the genetic/metabolic networks underpinning the growth performance of N. oceanica. These findings demonstrated that this mutation strategy was effective for improving the growth performance of this species and explored a means of microalgal genetic improvement, particularly in species possessing a monoploid nucleus and asexual reproduction.

  7. Growth and Physiological Performance of Aerobic and Lowland Rice as Affected by Water Stress at Selected Growth Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadzariah Kamarul Zaman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic rice technology is still new in Malaysia, and information regarding MARDI Aerob 1 (MA1, the first local aerobic rice variety, is still lacking. Therefore, comparative studies were carried out to determine the physiological performance of aerobic rice variety MA1 and lowland rice variety MR253 under water stress given at the panicle initiation, flowering and ripening stages. This experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block design. Stomatal conductance (gs, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Fv/Fm, leaf relative water content (leaf RWC, and soil moisture content (SMC as well as yield component parameters such as panicle number, grain yield and 100-grain weight were measured. Results revealed that gs and leaf RWC for both varieties decreased with depletion of SMC. The correlation study between the physiological parameters and SMC indicated that Fv/Fm was not affected by water stress, regardless of varieties. The yield components (panicle number, grain yield and 100-grain weight for both varieties greatly decreased when water stress was imposed at the panicle initiation stage. This study showed that the panicle initiation period was the most sensitive stage to water stress that contributed to a substantial reduction in yield for both varieties. Under the aerobic condition (control, MR253 produced higher panicle number, 100-grain weight and yield than MA1. Although MR253 is bred for lowland, it is well adapted to aerobic condition.

  8. Interactive effects of ambient temperature and light sources at high relative humidity on growth performance and blood physiological variables in broilers grown to 42 day of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interactive effects of ambient temperature and light sources at high relative humidity on growth performance and blood physiological reactions in broilers grown to 42 day of age were investigated. The experiment consisted of 2 levels (Moderate=21.1, High=26.7 °C) of temperatures and 2 light sour...

  9. Effects of Garlic (Alliumsativum and chloramphenicol on growth performance, physiological parameters and survival of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Shalaby

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied and compared the effects of chloramphenicol antibiotic and garlic (Allium sativum, used as immunostimulants and growth promoters, on some physiological parameters, growth performance, survival rate, and bacteriological characteristics of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus. Fish (7±1g/fish were assigned to eight treatments, with three replicates each. Treatment groups had a different level of Allium sativum (10, 20, 30, and 40g/kg diet and chloramphenicol (15, 30, and 45mg/kg diet added to their diets; the control group diet was free from garlic and antibiotic. Diets also contained 32% crude protein (CP and were administered at a rate of 3% live body weight twice daily for 90 days. Results showed that the final weight and specific growth rate (SGR of O. niloticus increased significantly with increasing levels of Allium sativum and chloramphenicol. The highest growth performance was verified with 30g Allium sativum / kg diet and 30mg chloramphenicol / kg diet. The lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR was observed with 30g Allium sativum / kg diet and 30mg chloramphenicol / kg diet. There were significant differences in the protein efficiency ratio (PER with all treatments, except with 45mg chloramphenicol / kg diet. No changes in the hepatosomatic index and survival rate were observed. Crude protein content in whole fish increased significantly in the group fed on 30g Allium sativum / kg diet, while total lipids decreased significantly in the same group. Ash of whole fish showed significantly high values with 30g Allium sativum and 15mg chloramphenicol / kg diet while the lowest value was observed in the control group. Blood parameters, erythrocyte count (RBC, and hemoglobin content in fish fed on diets containing 40g Allium sativum and all levels of chloramphenicol were significantly higher than in control. Significantly higher hematocrit values were seen with 30 and 45mg chloramphenicol / kg diet. There were no significant differences

  10. Impact of microcystin containing diets on physiological performance of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) concerning stress and growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ziková, A.; Trubiroha, A.; Wiegand, C.; Wuertz, S.; Rennert, B.; Pflugmacher, S.; Kopp, Radovan; Mareš, J.; Kloas, W.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2010), s. 561-568 ISSN 0730-7268 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : microcystin * Nile tilapia * physiological performance Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.026, year: 2010

  11. Physiological factors influencing capillary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egginton, S

    2011-07-01

    (1) Angiogenesis (growth of new capillaries from an existing capillary bed) may result from a mismatch in microvascular supply and metabolic demand (metabolic error signal). Krogh examined the distribution and number of capillaries to explore the correlation between O(2) delivery and O(2) consumption. Subsequently, the heterogeneity in angiogenic response within a muscle has been shown to reflect either differences in fibre type composition or mechanical load. However, local control leads to targetted angiogenesis in the vicinity of glycolytic fibre types following muscle stimulation, or oxidative fibres following endurance training, while heterogeneity of capillary spacing is maintained during ontogenetic growth. (2) Despite limited microscopy resolution and lack of specific markers, Krogh's interest in the structure of the capillary wall paved the way for understanding the mechanisms of capillary growth. Angiogenesis may be influenced by the response of perivascular or stromal cells (fibroblasts, macrophages and pericytes) to altered activity, likely acting as a source for chemical signals modulating capillary growth such as vascular endothelial growth factor. In addition, haemodynamic factors such as shear stress and muscle stretch play a significant role in adaptive remodelling of the microcirculation. (3) Most indices of capillarity are highly dependent on fibre size, resulting in possible bias because of scaling. To examine the consequences of capillary distribution, it is therefore helpful to quantify the area of tissue supplied by individual capillaries. This allows the spatial limitations inherent in most models of tissue oxygenation to be overcome generating an alternative approach to Krogh's tissue cylinder, the capillary domain, to improve descriptions of intracellular oxygen diffusion. © 2010 The Author. Acta Physiologica © 2010 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  12. Effect of Replacing Soybean Meal by Raw or Extruded Pea Seeds on Growth Performance and Selected Physiological Parameters of the Ileum and Distal Colon of Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuśnio, Anna; Taciak, Marcin; Barszcz, Marcin; Święch, Ewa; Bachanek, Ilona; Skomiał, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The use of pea seeds is limited due to the content of antinutritional factors that may affect gut physiology. Heat treatment such as extrusion may reduce heat-labile antinutritional factors and improve the nutritional value of pea seeds. This study determined the effect of partial replacement of soybean meal in pig diets by raw or extruded pea seeds on growth performance, nitrogen balance and physiology of the ileum and distal colon. The experiment was carried out in 18 castrated male piglets of initial body weight of 11 kg, divided into three groups. The animals were fed cereal-based diets with soybean meal (C), which was partly replaced by raw (PR) or extruded pea (PE) seeds. Nitrogen balance was measured at about 15 kg body weight. After 26 days of feeding, tissue samples were taken from the ileum and distal colon for histological measurements, and colonic digesta samples for analyses of microbial activity indices. The animals fed the PE diet had a significantly greater average daily gain than those fed the C diet and better apparent protein digestibility than those on the PR diet. Pigs fed the PR diet had a significantly greater butyric acid concentration and lower pH in the colon than pigs fed PE and C diets. There was no significant effect of the diet on other indices of microbial activity or morphological parameters. In conclusion, feeding a diet with extruded pea seeds improved growth performance of pigs, did not affect intestinal morphology and had a negligible effect on microbial activity in the distal colon.

  13. Effects of starving and re-feeding strategies on the growth performance and physiological characteristics of the juvenile tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ziheng; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin

    2017-06-01

    Starving and re-feeding trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of starvation duration and recovery times on the growth performance and physiological characteristics of juvenile tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis, which included growth, body composition, intestinal morphology and digestive enzymes activities. The fish starved for one (D1), two (D2) and four (D4) days, respectively, were recovered for three (R3, R6, R12), seven (R7, R14, R28) and eleven (R11, R22, R44) folds of starvation days while the control fish were fed constantly. The experiment was conducted for 96 days. The fish individuals in D1R11, D2R14 and D2R22 caught up in weight with the control, indicating that complete compensatory growth existed in these fish individuals. The highest body weight gain and total specific growth rates were observed in D2R22. Food intake increased significantly in most treatments in comparison with that of the control except for D1R7 and D2R22 ( P liver and hindgut trypsin, also midgut and hindgut lipase in D2R22 were significantly higher than those of the control ( P < 0.05). The fold height (HF) of foregut and midgut increased significantly in D2R22, and HF decreased significantly in D1R3, D2R6 and D4R12 ( P < 0.05). On our findings, we may conclude that the optimum starving and re-feeding strategy is starving for 2 days and re-feeding for 22 days. And in this starving and re-feeding strategy, the compensatory growth could be mostly attributed to the promotion of food conversion efficiency and digestibility coefficiency.

  14. The physiology of growth hormone and sport.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Widdowson, W Matthew

    2012-02-01

    The growth hormone (GH)\\/ insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis exerts short-and long-term metabolic effects that are potentially important during exercise. Exercise is a potent stimulus to GH release and there is some evidence that the acute increase in GH is important in regulating substrate metabolism post-exercise. Regular exercise also increases 24-hour GH secretion rates, which potentially contributes to the physiologic changes induced by training. The effects of GH replacement in GH-deficient adults provide a useful model with which to study the effects of the more long-term effects of the GH\\/ IGF-I axis. There is convincing evidence that GH replacement increases exercise capacity. Measures of exercise performance including maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and ventilatory threshold (VeT) are impaired in GH deficiency and improved by GH replacement, probably through some combination of increased oxygen delivery to exercising muscle, increased fatty acid availability with glycogen sparing, increased muscle strength, improved body composition and improved thermoregulation. Administration of supraphysiologic doses of GH to athletes increases fatty acid availability and reduces oxidative protein loss particularly during exercise, and increases lean body mass. It is not known whether these effects translate to improved athletic performance, although recombinant human GH is known to be widely abused in sport. The model of acromegaly provides evidence that long-term GH excess does not result in improved performance but it is possible that a "window" exists in which the protein anabolic effects of supraphysiologic GH might be advantageous.

  15. Germination, growth and physiological responses of Senegalia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For plants growth and physiological responses, seedlings were individually cultivated in plastic bags (25×12 cm) containing non-sterile soil and watered with four salt solutions (0, 86, 171 and 257 mM NaCl). Four months after the plants' cultivation, the results showed that for all species, the salinity reduced significantly the ...

  16. A Brief History of Bacterial Growth Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moselio eSchaechter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Arguably, microbial physiology started when Leeuwenhoek became fascinated by observing a Vorticella beating its cilia, my point being that almost any observation of microbes has a physiological component. With the advent of modern microbiology in the mid 19th century, the field became recognizably distinctive with such discoveries as anaerobiosis, fermentation as a biological phenomenon, and the nutritional requirements of microbes. Soon came the discoveries of Winogradsky and his followers of the chemical changes in the environment that result from microbial activities. Later, during the first half of the 20th century, microbial physiology became the basis for much of the elucidation of central metabolism.Bacterial physiology then became a handmaiden of molecular biology and was greatly influenced by the discovery of cellular regulatory mechanisms. Microbial growth, which had come of age with the early work of Hershey, Monod, and others, was later pursued by studies on a whole cell level by what became known as the Copenhagen School. During this time, the exploration of physiological activities became coupled to modern inquiries into the structure of the bacterial cell.Recent years have seen the development of a further phase in microbial physiology, one seeking a deeper quantitative understanding of phenomena on a whole cell level. This pursuit is exemplified by the emergence of systems biology, which is made possible by the development of technologies that permit the gathering of information in huge amounts. As has been true through history, the research into microbial physiology continues to be guided by the development of new methods of analysis. Some of these developments may well afford the possibility of making stunning breakthroughs.

  17. Growth form defines physiological photoprotective capacity in intertidal benthic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alexandre; Méléder, Vona; Blommaert, Lander; Lepetit, Bernard; Gaudin, Pierre; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Dupuy, Christine; Lavaud, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In intertidal marine sediments, characterized by rapidly fluctuating and often extreme light conditions, primary production is frequently dominated by diatoms. We performed a comparative analysis of photophysiological traits in 15 marine benthic diatom species belonging to the four major morphological growth forms (epipelon (EPL), motile epipsammon (EPM-M) and non-motile epipsammon (EPM-NM) and tychoplankton (TYCHO)) found in these sediments. Our analyses revealed a clear relationship between growth form and photoprotective capacity, and identified fast regulatory physiological photoprotective traits (that is, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the xanthophyll cycle (XC)) as key traits defining the functional light response of these diatoms. EPM-NM and motile EPL showed the highest and lowest NPQ, respectively, with EPM-M showing intermediate values. Like EPL, TYCHO had low NPQ, irrespective of whether they were grown in benthic or planktonic conditions, reflecting an adaptation to a low light environment. Our results thus provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of a trade-off between behavioural (motility) and physiological photoprotective mechanisms (NPQ and the XC) in the four major intertidal benthic diatoms growth forms using unialgal cultures. Remarkably, although motility is restricted to the raphid pennate diatom clade, raphid pennate species, which have adopted a non-motile epipsammic or a tychoplanktonic life style, display the physiological photoprotective response typical of these growth forms. This observation underscores the importance of growth form and not phylogenetic relatedness as the prime determinant shaping the physiological photoprotective capacity of benthic diatoms.

  18. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized when discussing the physiology, assessment, and performance effects of dehydration. The underappreciated physiologic distinction between a loss of hypo-osmotic body water (intracellular dehydration) and an iso-osmotic loss of body water (extracellular dehydration) is presented and argued as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. The importance of diagnostic and biological variation analyses to dehydration assessment methods is reviewed and their use in gauging the true potential of any dehydration assessment method highlighted. The necessity for establishing proper baselines is discussed, as is the magnitude of dehydration required to elicit reliable and detectable osmotic or volume-mediated compensatory physiologic responses. The discussion of physiologic responses further helps inform and explain our analysis of the literature suggesting a ≥ 2% dehydration threshold for impaired endurance exercise performance mediated by volume loss. In contrast, no clear threshold or plausible mechanism(s) support the marginal, but potentially important, impairment in strength, and power observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small and related primarily to distraction or discomfort. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (e.g., endurance, strength, cognitive, and motor skill). © 2014 American Physiological Society.

  19. Effect of dietary cottonseed meal on growth performance, physiological response, and gossypol accumulation in pre-adult grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idellus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haokun; Yan, Quangen; Han, Dong; Jin, Junyan; Zhu, Xiaoming; Yang, Yunxia; Xie, Shouqi

    2016-09-01

    Cottonseed meal (CM) was used at up to 36.95% content in the diet (replacing 60% of dietary fish meal protein) without any negative eff ects on growth performance of pre-adult grass carp (initial body weight, 761 g) under outdoor conditions. A culture trial was conducted in net cages installed in a large concrete pond. Seven isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets containing a gradient of CM concentrations (0, 12.2%, 24.4%, 36.6%, 48.8%, 54.8%, and 61.0%) as replacement for dietary fish meal protein (0, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 90%, and 100%) were formulated. Dietary non-resistant starch (from maize) was inverse to dietary CM. Growth performance and feed utilization of fish fed the diets containing CM replacing 0-40% fishmeal protein were not aff ected after the 6-week feeding trial. Accumulation of hepatopancreatic total gossypol in the hepatopancreas was significantly correlated with free gossypol content in the diets (HTG=88.6+1.5×DFG, R 2=0.89, Preplacement). Increasing dietary CM content increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels but decreased serum alkaline phosphatase, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and albumin ( P<0.05).

  20. Fermentation performance and physiology of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during growth in high gravity spruce hydrolysate and spent sulphite liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Emma; Xiros, Charilaos; Larsson, Christer

    2014-05-21

    Lignocellulosic materials are a diverse group of substrates that are generally scarce in nutrients, which compromises the tolerance and fermentation performance of the fermenting organism. The problem is exacerbated by harsh pre-treatment, which introduces sugars and substances inhibitory to yeast metabolism. This study compares the fermentation behaviours of two yeast strains using different types of lignocellulosic substrates; high gravity dilute acid spruce hydrolysate (SH) and spent sulphite liquor (SSL), in the absence and presence of yeast extract. To this end, the fermentation performance, energy status and fermentation capacity of the strains were measured under different growth conditions. Nutrient supplementation with yeast extract increased sugar uptake, cell growth and ethanol production in all tested fermentation conditions, but had little or no effect on the energy status, irrespective of media. Nutrient-supplemented medium enhanced the fermentation capacity of harvested cells, indicating that cell viability and reusability was increased by nutrient addition. Although both substrates belong to the lignocellulosic spruce hydrolysates, their differences offer specific challenges and the overall yields and productivities largely depend on choice of fermenting strain.

  1. The effect of dietary faba bean and non-starch polysaccharide degrading enzymes on the growth performance and gut physiology of young turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, D; Juskiewicz, J; Przybylska-Gornowicz, B; Sosnowska, E; Slominski, B A; Jankowski, J; Zdunczyk, Z

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary replacement of soya bean meal (SBM) with faba bean (FB) and a blend of non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) degrading enzymes on the gastrointestinal function, growth performance and welfare of young turkeys (1 to 56 days of age). An experiment with a 2×2 factorial design was performed to compare the efficacy of four diets: a SBM-based diet and a diet containing FB, with and without enzyme supplementation (C, FB, CE and FBE, respectively). In comparison with groups C, higher dry matter content and lower viscosity of the small intestinal digesta were noted in groups FB. The content of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the small intestinal digesta was higher in groups FB, but SCFA concentrations in the caecal digesta were comparable in groups C and FB. In comparison with control groups, similar BW gains, higher feed conversion ratio (FCR), higher dry matter content of excreta and milder symptoms of footpad dermatitis (FPD) were noted in groups FB. Enzyme supplementation increased the concentrations of acetate, butyrate and total SCFAs, but it did not increase the SCFA pool in the caecal digesta. The enzymatic preparation significantly improved FCR, reduced excreta hydration and the severity of FPD in turkeys. It can be concluded that in comparison with the SBM-based diet, the diet containing 30% of FB enables to achieve comparable BW gains accompanied by lower feed efficiency during the first 8 weeks of rearing. Non-starch polysaccharide-degrading enzymes can be used to improve the nutritional value of diets for young turkeys, but more desirable results of enzyme supplementation were noted in the SBM-based diet than in the FB-based diet.

  2. Impact of physico-chemical parameters on the physiological growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of physico-chemical parameters on the physiological growth of Arthrospira (Spirulina platensis) exogenous strain UTEXLB2340. Yahia Mustafa A Fagiri, Aisha Salleh, Saifeldin Ahmed F El-Nagerabi ...

  3. Growth and other physiological responses of bivalves in laboratory experiments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Milford lab maintains data sets relating to a variety of growth and physiology trials. These include husbandry techniques (i.e. stocking density, container size,...

  4. Growth, physiology and flowering of chrysanthemum var. Punch as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth retardants have been proven to prevent excessive stem elongation and reduce internode length in plants by inhibiting the effect of cell division and enlargement of cell in plants. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of concentrations of daminozide and maleic hydrazide on growth, physiology and flowering of ...

  5. Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was conducted to detect changes in growth, physiology and nutrient concentration in response to two watering regimes (well-watered and water-stress conditions) and to two nutrient regimes (with or without fertilization) of oil palm. Under stress conditions, changes in plant growth, dry matter allocation, relative ...

  6. Physiological responses and physical performance during football in the heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nybo, Lars; Grantham, Justin

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of hot ambient conditions on physical performance and physiological responses during football match-play.......To examine the impact of hot ambient conditions on physical performance and physiological responses during football match-play....

  7. Growth and physiological aspects of bell pepper ( Capsicum annuum )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate growth and physiological aspects of 'All Big' bell pepper, under saline stress and exogenous application of proline on the leaves. The research was conducted in pots adapted as drainage lysimeters under greenhouse conditions, using sandy-loam eutrophic Regolithic Neosol, in the ...

  8. Growth, physiology and yield responses of Amaranthus cruentus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amaranthus cruentus, Corchorus olitorius and Vigna unguiculata are traditional leafy vegetables with potential to improve nutritional security of vulnerable people. The promotion of these crops is partly hindered by the lack of agronomic information. The effect of plant spacing on growth, physiology and yield of these three ...

  9. Effects of Cadmium on the Growth and Physiological Characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... The effects of cadmium (Cd) stress on the growth and physiological characteristics were studied in 3 sorghum species viz., sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. cv. Hunnigreen], sorghum hybrid sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor × Sorghum sudanense, cv. Everlush) and sudangrass [Sorghum.

  10. Growth and physiological aspects of bell pepper (Capsicum annuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-08-24

    Aug 24, 2016 ... This study aimed to evaluate growth and physiological aspects of 'All Big' bell pepper, under saline stress and exogenous application of proline on the leaves. The research was conducted in pots .... data were obtained in the transition of vegetative and reproductive stages, at 40 DAT. In the same period, ...

  11. Effects of cadmium on the growth and physiological characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) stress on the growth and physiological characteristics were studied in 3 sorghum species viz., sweet sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench. cv. Hunnigreen], sorghum hybrid sudangrass (Sorghum bicolor × Sorghum sudanense, cv. Everlush) and sudangrass [Sorghum sudanense (Piper) Stapf ...

  12. Effect of polyethylene coated calcium carbide on physiology, photosynthesis, growth and yield of sweet pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, W.; Yaseen, M.; Arshad, M.; Shahid, M.

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene coated calcium carbide (PCC) is a potent and continuous slowly releasing source of acetylene and ethylene. It potentially improves plant growth by affecting physiology of plant. A pot study was conducted to investigate comparative effects of different rates of PCC on growth and yield attributes of sweet pepper. PCC performed better when applied with soil applied fertilizers. Results revealed that hormonal properties of calcium carbide significantly influenced physiological nutrient use efficiency and vegetative growth by affecting photosynthetic and physiological parameters of sweet pepper. Application of 20 mg PCC kg/sup -1/ soil with soil applied recommended dose of NPK fertilizers significantly improved the net photosynthetic rate by 32%, stomatal conductance by 11%, transpiration rate by 14%, carboxylation efficiency by 47%, physiological water use efficiency by 13%, physiological nitrogen use efficiency by 29% over the control treatment. This improvement in physiological attributes resulted in increase in leaf area by 20%, leaf area index by 78%, total plant dry weight by 35%, flower and fruits by 29% and fruit yield by 24% compared to the treatment of alone recommended dose of NPK fertilizers. Present study suggests that application of PCC particularly at the rate of 20mg PCC kg/sup -1/ soil plus recommended dose of NPK fertilizers improved about 25% sweet pepper production compared to its production in the alone recommended fertilizer treatment. (author)

  13. Taxonomy, physiology and growth of Lactococcus lactis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Samaržija

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis species is one of the most important groups of lactic acid bacteria that are used in the dairy industry. The major functions of this species in dairy fermentation are the production of lactic acid from lactose, hydrolysis of casein and citric acid fermentation. Thus their metabolic end products and enzymes directly or indirectly have significant influence in determining the texture and flavour of the final products. In recent years, genetics and physiological properties of lactococci have considerable changed. Therefore, both for basic research and for application purposes in this paper the general view of the new taxonomic classification of Lactococcus lactis, the role of their plasmids and the physiology and nutritional requirements during growth are discussed.

  14. Microbial growth and physiology: a call for better craftsmanship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Virtually every microbiological experiment starts with the cultivation of microbes. Consequently, as originally pointed out by Monod (1949), handling microbial cultures is a fundamental methodology of microbiology and mastering different cultivation techniques should be part of every microbiologist’s craftsmanship. This is particularly important for research in microbial physiology, as the composition and behavior of microbes is strongly dependent on their growth environment. It has been pointed out repeatedly by eminent microbiologists that we should give more attention to the media and culturing conditions. However, this is obviously not adhered to with sufficient rigor as mistakes in basic cultivation principles are frequently found in the published research literature. The most frequent mistakes are the use of inappropriate growth media and little or no control of the specific growth rate, and some examples will be discussed here in detail. Therefore, this is a call for better microbiological craftsmanship when cultivating microbial cultures for physiological experiments. This call is not only addressed to researchers but it is probably even more important for the teaching of our discipline. PMID:25926822

  15. Microbial growth and physiology: a call for better craftsmanship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Virtually every microbiological experiment starts with the cultivation of microbes. Consequently, as originally pointed out by Monod (1949), handling microbial cultures is a fundamental methodology of microbiology and mastering different cultivation techniques should be part of every microbiologist's craftsmanship. This is particularly important for research in microbial physiology, as the composition and behavior of microbes is strongly dependent on their growth environment. It has been pointed out repeatedly by eminent microbiologists that we should give more attention to the media and culturing conditions. However, this is obviously not adhered to with sufficient rigor as mistakes in basic cultivation principles are frequently found in the published research literature. The most frequent mistakes are the use of inappropriate growth media and little or no control of the specific growth rate, and some examples will be discussed here in detail. Therefore, this is a call for better microbiological craftsmanship when cultivating microbial cultures for physiological experiments. This call is not only addressed to researchers but it is probably even more important for the teaching of our discipline.

  16. Morphology and physiology of the epiphyseal growth plate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Klepacz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The epiphyseal growth plate develops from the cartilaginous-orientated mesenchymal cells that express SOX family genes. This multilayer structure is formed by the proliferation and hypertrophy of cells that synthesize the extracellular matrix composed of collagen (mainly type II, IX, X, XI and proteoglycans (aggrecan, decorin, annexin II, V and VI. The resting zone is responsible for protein synthesis and maintaining a germinal structure. In the proliferative zone, cells rapidly duplicate. The subsequent morphological changes take place in the transformation zone, divided into the upper and lower hypertrophic layers. In the degenerative zone, the mineralization process becomes intensive due to increased release of alkaline phosphate, calcium and matrix vesicles by terminally differentiated chondrocytes and some other factors e.g., metaphyseal ingrowth vessels. At this level, as well as in the primary and secondary spongiosa zones, chondrocytes undergo apoptosis and are physiologically eliminated. Unlike adult cartilage, in fetal and early formed growth plates, unusual forms such as authophagal bodies, paralysis and dark chondrocytes were also observed. Their ultrastructure differs greatly from apoptotic and normal cartilage cells. Chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are regulated by various endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine agents such as growth, thyroid and sex hormones, beta-catenin, bone morphogenetic proteins, insulin-like growth factor, iodothyronine deiodinase, leptin, nitric oxide, transforming growth factor beta and vitamin D metabolites. However, the most significant factor is parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP which is synthesized in the perichondrium by terminally differentiated chondrocytes. Secondary to activation of PTH/PTHrP receptors, PTHrP stimulates cell proliferation by G protein activation and delays their transformation into prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. When proliferation is completed

  17. Active Learning Improves Student Performance in a Respiratory Physiology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alex M.; Liachovitzky, Carlos; Abdullahi, Abass S.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the introduction of active learning exercises into the anatomy and physiology curriculum in a community college setting. Specifically, the incorporation of a spirometry-based respiratory physiology lab resulted in improved student performance in two concepts (respiratory volumes and the hallmarks of…

  18. Flooding, root temperature, physiology and growth of two Annona species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Maritza; Schaffer, Bruce; Davies, Frederick S

    2004-09-01

    The effects of root zone temperature (RZT) and flooding on physiology and growth of Annona glabra L. (pond apple) and A. muricata L. (soursop) were investigated. Trees planted in containers were exposed to RZTs of 5, 10, 20, 25 or 35 degrees C in controlled root temperature chambers. Trees at each RZT were either non-flooded (control) or continuously flooded. There were four replications over time for each treatment combination. Pond apple was more flood-tolerant than soursop. A combination of flooding and RZTs of 5 and 10 degrees C resulted in tree mortality of both species by Week 4. Only trees that appeared to develop morphological adaptations survived continuous flooding. In both species, net CO2 assimilation (A) decreased to nearly zero within 1 week following exposure to RZTs of 5 or 10 degrees C and became consistently negative over the remaining experimental period. Flooding reduced leaf chlorophyll index (measured with a SPAD meter), A and plant growth, and increased root electrolyte leakage from soursop. Optimum growth occurred at RZTs of 25 to 35 degrees C for non-flooded pond apple trees and at 20 to 25 degrees C for flooded trees. Soursop exhibited maximum growth at RZTs of 35 degrees C under non-flooded conditions and at 25 degrees C under flooded conditions.

  19. Physiological Influences upon the Work Performance of Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    based on the material remembered . Memory effects due to learning prior to sleep loss with testing during the sleep-loss session as well as due to...NORFOLK, VIRGINIA Progress Report PR-79-23 PHYSIOLOGICAL INFLUENCES UPON THE WORK PERFORMANCE OF MEN AND WOMEN > Raymond H. Kirby Nancy K. Eberhardt...UNIVERSITY NORFOLK, VIRGINIA Progress Report PR-79-23 PHYSIOLOGICAL INFLUENCES UPON THE WORK PERFORMANCE OF MEN AND WOMEN By Raymond H. Kirby Nancy K

  20. Enhanced growth, yield and physiological characteristics of rice under elevated carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abzar, A.; Ahmad, Wan Juliana Wan; Said, Mohd Nizam Mohd; Doni, Febri; Zaidan, Mohd Waznul Adly Mohd; Fathurahman, Zain, Che Radziah Che Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is rapidly increasing in the atmosphere. It is an essential element for photosynthesis which attracts attention among scientists on how plants will perform in the rising CO2 level. Rice as one of the most important staple food in the world has been studied on the growth responses under elevated CO2. The present research was carried out to determine the growth and physiology of rice in elevated CO2 condition. This research was carried out using complete randomized design with elevated (800 ppm) and ambient CO2. Results showed that growth parameters such as plant height, tillers and number of leaves per plant were increased by elevated CO2. The positive changes in plant physiology when exposed to high CO2 concentration includes significant change (p<0.05) in yield parameters such as panicle number, grain number per panicle, biomass and 1000 grain weight under the elevated CO2 of 800 ppm.

  1. Physiological Factors Contributing to Postflight Changes in Functional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Feedback, D. L.; Feiverson, A. H.; Lee, S. M. C.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Platts, S. H.; Reschke, M. F.; Ryder, J.; Spiering, B. A.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. These physiological changes include sensorimotor disturbances, cardiovascular deconditioning and loss of muscle mass and strength. These changes might affect the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission tasks immediately after landing on lunar and Martian surfaces. To date, changes in functional performance have not been systematically studied or correlated with physiological changes. To understand how changes in physiological function impact functional performance an interdisciplinary pre/postflight testing regimen (Functional Task Test, FTT) has been developed that systematically evaluates both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The overall objectives of the FTT are to: Develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for Constellation. Determine the ability to perform these tasks after flight. Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements. Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures. The functional test battery was designed to address high priority tasks identified by the Constellation program as critical for mission success. The set of functional tests making up the FTT include the: 1) Seat Egress and Walk Test, 2) Ladder Climb Test, 3) Recovery from Fall/Stand Test, 4) Rock Translation Test, 5) Jump Down Test, 6) Torque Generation Test, and 7) Construction Activity Board Test. Corresponding physiological measures include assessments of postural and gait control, dynamic visual acuity, fine motor control, plasma volume, orthostatic intolerance, upper and lower body muscle strength, power, fatigue, control and neuromuscular drive. Crewmembers will perform both functional and physiological tests before and after short (Shuttle) and long-duration (ISS) space flight. Data will be collected on R+0 (Shuttle only), R

  2. Performance in physiology evaluation: possible improvement by active learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrezor, Luís H

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages interaction with their peers, and stimulates thinking about physiological mechanisms. This study examined the performance of medical students on physiology over four semesters with and without active engagement methodologies. Four activities were used: a puzzle, a board game, a debate, and a video. The results show that engaging in activities with active methodologies before a physiology cognitive monitoring test significantly improved student performance compared with not performing the activities. We integrate the use of these methodologies with classic lectures, and this integration appears to improve the teaching/learning process in the discipline of physiology and improves the integration of physiology with cardiology and neurology. In addition, students enjoy the activities and perform better on their evaluations when they use them. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  3. Brazilian propolis effects on performance, gut characteristics and physiological changes in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was to determine the effect of dietary propolis on the growth performance, physiological homeostasis and gut characteristics in broiler chickens reared under mild chronic heat stress (32 celsius), 9 hours daily for 28 days. Five hundred and four 15-d-old male broiler chicks were fed one o...

  4. Potassium applied under drought improves physiological and nutrient uptake performances of wheat (Triticum Aestivun L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raza, M.A.S.; Saleem, M.F.; Shah, G.M.; Jamil, M.; Khan, I.H.

    2013-01-01

    The physiological and nutrient uptake performance of two wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars (Lasani-2008 and Auqab-2000) to foliar application of 1% potassium (K) at three different growth stages (tillering, flower initiation and grain filling) was investigated under water limited environment in

  5. Physiological performance of the soybean crosses in salinity stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, F.; Armaniar

    2018-02-01

    Plants grown in saline soils will experience salinity stress. Salinity stresses, one of which causes oxidative stress, that cause an imbalance in the production ROS compounds (Reactive Oxygen Species), antioxidants and chlorophyll. Where the reaction of this compound can affect plant growth and plant production. This study aims to inform performance and action gene to soybean physiological character that potential to tolerant from salinity soil that characterized by the presence of SOD and POD antioxidant compounds and chlorophyll. This research used a destructive analysis from crossbred (AxN) and (GxN). A = Anjasmoro varieties and G = Grobogan varieties as female elders and N = Grobogan varieties as male elders (N1, N2, N3, N4, N5) that have been through the stage of saline soil selection. Research result can be concluded that GxN cross is more potential for Inheritance of the offspring. This can be seen from the observed skewness of character SOD, POD compounds, Chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b.

  6. Isolation, purification and studies on radiation induced biochemical and physiological changes of bovine growth hormone in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Salam, H.M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Growth hormone has a great importance in the field of animal physiology. Bovine growth hormone was extracted by alteration of the hydrogen ion concentration of phosphate buffer extract of frozen pituitary glands. The extracted bovine growth hormone has similar absorption peaks at UV and infrared spectra, bands of the same location on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis plate and had a molecular weight exactly as the standard bovine growth hormone and equal to 20.9 KD. Labelling of bovine growth hormone with 131 I was carried out with fast and least expensive method. The biological and physiological effects of labelled and non labelled bovine growth hormone were studied on rabbits. The labelled bovine growth hormone decreased the biological and physiological effects of the hormone. Bovine growth hormone (unlabelled) and different effects on growth performance traits, body chemical composition (water, fat,protein and ash), and also on the serum biochemical parameters. We conclude that the bovine growth hormone affects on the biological and physiological properties but this depends on the dose, type of delivery of hormone, time of treatment, and the diet content of the animal. 6 tabs., 13.2 figs., 110 refs

  7. Cultivation, growth physiology, and chemotaxonomy of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieck, Eva; Lipski, André

    2011-01-01

    Lithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) are known as fastidious microorganisms, which are hard to maintain and not many groups are trained to keep them in culture. They convert nitrite stoichiometrically to nitrate and growth is slow due to the poor energy balance. NOB are comprised of five genera, which are scattered among the phylogenetic tree. Because NOB proliferate in a broad range of environmental conditions (terrestrial, marine, acidic) and have diverse lifestyles (lithoautotrophic, mixotrophic, and heterotrophic), variation in media composition is necessary to match their individual growth requirements in the laboratory. From Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus relatively high cell amounts can be achieved by consumption of high nitrite concentrations, whereas accumulation of cells belonging to Nitrospira, Nitrospina, or the new candidate genus Nitrotoga needs prolonged feeding procedures. Isolation is possible for planktonic cells by dilution series or plating techniques, but gets complicated for strains with a tendency to develop microcolonies like Nitrospira. Physiological experiments including determination of the temperature or pH-optimum can be conducted with active laboratory cultures of NOB, but the attainment of reference values like cell protein content or cell numbers might be hard to realize due to the formation of flocs and the low cell density. Monitoring of laboratory enrichments is necessary especially if several species or genera coexist within the same culture and due to population shifts over time. Chemotaxonomy is a valuable method to identify and quantify NOB in biofilms and pure cultures alike, since fatty acid profiles reflect their phylogenetic heterogeneity. This chapter focusses on methods to enrich, isolate, and characterize NOB by various cultivation-based techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Petroleum coke and plants : impact on growth and physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, C.; Renault, S.

    2006-01-01

    Petroleum coke, a by-product of the oil sand processing industry in Alberta, contains fairly significant concentrations of arsenic, boron, iron, nickel, sulphur, titanium, and vanadium embedded in a carbon matrix. Through weathering and biological degradation, these components may be released from coke and absorbed by plant tissues where they may restrict growth and interfere with physiological activities. In order to study the effects of petroleum coke on plants, several greenhouse experiments were conducted by growing Agropyron trachycaulum, Deschampsia caespitosa, Calamagrostis canadensis, Oryzopsis hymenoides, Triticum aestivum, Cornus sericea and Fragaria virginiana for 3 months in control soil, Syncrude Canada Ltd. coke; and Suncor Energy Inc.coke. It was found that in all coke treated plants, shoot biomass was lower than controls. Root biomass followed this same trend, with the exception of Triticum aestivum. Several results were presented in this study abstract. It was concluded that the short term effects of coke on plants are most likely due to water stress and nutrient deficiency and that further research is needed

  9. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: physiology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S I; Stevenson, J L; Roupas, P

    1994-07-01

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular form(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR.

  10. Growth hormone receptor/binding protein: Physiology and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herington, A.C.; Ymer, S.I.; Stevenson, J.L.; Roupas, P. [Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Soluble truncated forms of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) are present in the circulation of many species and are also produced by many tissues/cell types. The major high-affinity forms of these GH-binding proteins (GHBP) are derived by alternative splicing of GHR mRNA in rodents, but probably by proteolytic cleavage in other species. Questions still remain with respect to the origins, native molecular forms(s), physiology, and function of the GHBPs, however. The observation that GH induces dimerization of the soluble GHBP and a membrane GHR, and that dimerization of GHR appears to be critical for GH bioactivity suggests that the presentation of GH to target cells, in an unbound form or as a monomeric or dimeric complex with GHBP, may have significant implications for the ability of GH to activate specific postreceptor signaling pathways (tyrosine kinase, protein kinase C, G-protein pathways) known to be utilized by GH for its diverse biological effects. This minireview addresses some of these aspects and highlights several new questions which have arisen as a result of recent advances in our understanding of the structure, function, and signaling mechanisms of the membrane bound GHR. 43 refs.

  11. Unique aspects of competitive weightlifting: performance, training and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Adam; Smith, Heather K

    2012-09-01

    development of weightlifters is ~15-20% and ~13-16% greater, respectively, than in other strength and power athletes. In addition, weightlifting training has been shown to reduce the typical sex-related difference in the expression of neuromuscular strength and power. However, this apparent sex-related difference appears to be augmented with increasing adult age demonstrating that women undergo a greater age-related decline in muscle shortening velocity and peak power when compared with men. Weightlifting training and competition has been shown to induce significant structural and functional adaptations of the cardiovascular system. The collective evidence shows that these adaptations are physiological as opposed to pathological. Finally, the acute exercise-induced testosterone, cortisol and growth hormone responses of weightlifters have similarities to that of following conventional strength and hypertrophy protocols involving large muscle mass exercises. The routine assessment of the basal testosterone : cortisol ratio may be beneficial when attempting to quantify the adaptive responses to weightlifting training. As competitive weightlifting is becoming increasingly popular around the world, further research addressing the physiological responses and adaptations of female weightlifters and younger (i.e. ≤17 years of age) and older (i.e. ≥35 years of age) weightlifters of both sexes is required.

  12. Physiological Plasticity Is Important for Maintaining Sugarcane Growth under Water Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo E. R. Marchiori

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The water availability at early phenological stages is critical for crop establishment and sugarcane varieties show differential performance under drought. Herein, we evaluated the relative importance of morphological and physiological plasticity of young sugarcane plants grown under water deficit, testing the hypothesis that high phenotypic plasticity is associated with drought tolerance. IACSP95-5000 is a high yielding genotype and IACSP94-2094 has good performance under water limiting environments. Plants were grown in rhizotrons for 35 days under three water availabilities: high (soil water matric potential [Ψm] higher than -20 kPa; intermediate (Ψm reached -65 and -90 kPa at the end of experimental period and low (Ψm reached values lower than -150 kPa. Our data revealed that morphological and physiological responses of sugarcane to drought are dependent on genotype and intensity of water deficit. In general, IACSP95-5000 showed higher physiological plasticity given by leaf gas exchange and photochemical traits, whereas IACSP94-2094 showed higher morphological plasticity determined by changes in leaf area (LA and specific LA. As IACSP94-2094 accumulated less biomass than IACSP95-5000 under varying water availability, it is suggested that high morphological plasticity does not always represent an effective advantage to maintain plant growth under water deficit. In addition, our results revealed that sugarcane varieties face water deficit using distinct strategies based on physiological or morphological changes. When the effectiveness of those changes in maintaining plant growth under low water availability is taken into account, our results indicate that the physiological plasticity is more important than the morphological one in young sugarcane plants.

  13. The Limits of Exercise Physiology: From Performance to Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-05-02

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have been informed by studying highly trained athletes, in addition to healthy or unhealthy people. Recent progress has been made in regard to skeletal muscle metabolism and personalized exercise regimes. In this perspective, we review some of the historical milestones of exercise physiology, discuss how these inform contemporary knowledge, and speculate on future questions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance and physiological responses of milk-fed calves to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mojgan

    Sodium-butyrate as a growth promoter in milk replacer formula for young calves. J. Dairy Sci. 92, 1038-1049. Hammon, H. M., Schiessler, G., Nussbaum, A. & Blum, J.W., 2002. Feed intake patterns, growth performance, and metabolic and endocrine traits in calves fed unlimited amounts of colostrum and milk by automate, ...

  15. Comparative physiology of a central hardwood old-growth forest canopy and forest gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. R. Gillespie; J. Waterman; K. Saylors

    1993-01-01

    Concerns of poor oak regeneration, changing climate, biodiversity patterns, and carbon cycling in the Central Hardwoods have prompted ecological and physiological studies of old-growth forests and their role in maintaining the landscape. To examine the effects of old-growth canopy structure on the physiological productivity of overstory and understory species, we...

  16. Physiological and cognitive military related performances after 10-kilometer march.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovich, Ran; Hadid, Amir; Erlich, Tomer; Moran, Daniel S; Heled, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Prior operational activities such as marching in diverse environments, with heavy backloads may cause early fatigue and reduce the unit's readiness. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the effect of 10-kilometer (km) march on selected, military oriented, physiological and cognitive performances. Eight healthy young males (age 25 ± 3 years) performed a series of cognitive and physiological tests, first without any prior physiological strain and then after a 10 km march in comfort laboratory conditions (24°C, 50%RH) consisting a 5 km/h speed and 2-6% incline with backload weighing 30% of their body weight. We found that the subjects' time to exhaustion (TTE) after the march decreased by 27% with no changes in anaerobic performance. Cognitive performance showed a significant (20%) reduction in accuracy and a tendency to reduce reaction time after the march. We conclude that a moderate-intensity march under relatively comfort environmental conditions may differently decrease selected military related physical and cognitive abilities. This phenomenon is probably associated with the type and intensity of the pre-mission physical activity and the magnitude of the associated mental fatigue. We suggest that quantifying these effects, as was presented in this preliminary study, by adopting this practical scientific approach would assist in preserving the soldiers' performance and health during training and military operations.

  17. Peer tutoring improves student performance in an advanced physiology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, D A

    1999-06-01

    Effectiveness of a peer tutoring system developed for an advanced physiology course was assessed in terms of academic performance and perceived value. Forty-five students took the course without the peer tutoring system, and sixty-nine students took the course with peer tutoring. Grades from both groups of students were compared with grades earned in an introductory physiology course. Tutored students were asked how much they valued the peer tutoring. There was a decline in grades received by the students in the advanced physiology course compared with their scores in the introductory physiology course in both tutored and untutored groups. However, the decline in the tutored group was significantly (P = 0.015) less than that in the untutored group of students. Tutored students reacted very favorably to the tutoring sessions and expressed a desire to see tutoring expanded to other courses. This was the first demonstration of the effectiveness of peer tutoring in college science teaching. Peer tutoring appears to be effective in enhancing student performance as well as being perceived as beneficial by the students.

  18. Intelligent Growth Automaton of Virtual Plant Based on Physiological Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingsheng; Guo, Mingwei; Qu, Hongchun; Deng, Qingqing

    In this paper, a novel intelligent growth automaton of virtual plant is proposed. Initially, this intelligent growth automaton analyzes the branching pattern which is controlled by genes and then builds plant; moreover, it stores the information of plant growth, provides the interface between virtual plant and environment, and controls the growth and development of plant on the basis of environment and the function of plant organs. This intelligent growth automaton can simulate that the plant growth is controlled by genetic information system, and the information of environment and the function of plant organs. The experimental results show that the intelligent growth automaton can simulate the growth of plant conveniently and vividly.

  19. Cadmium effects on growth and physiology of Ulva lactuca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markham, J.W.; Kremer, B.P.; Sperling, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    The chlorophycean Ulva lactuca L. was grown in the laboratory in unialgal culture to sufficient size so that up to 70 discs, 24 mm in diameter, could be punched out of a single plant. Using such discs, U. lactuca was then tested with various concentrations of Cd under continuous-flow conditions. A concentration of 4.5 ppm Cd was lethal to U. lactuca within 6 days. Control discs in unpolluted water increased in diameter at a rate of 8 to 13% day/sup -1/ over a 6-day period. At sublethal concentration of Cd a sharp reduction in growth rate was observed at increasing concentrations up to approximately 0.3 ppm Cd, whereas from 0.3 ppm Cd to the lethal concentrations the reduction of the growth rate was significantly less. Reduction in photosynthetic performance corresponded closely to the recuction in growth rate. At ambient concentrations of 0.8 ppm Cd, the plants concentrated Cd by a factor of approximately 50 in 6 days. Much higher concentration factors were attained in lower ambient concentrations. After removal from Cd-polluted water into flow-through culture in unpolluted water, a subsequent loss of Cd was indicated and the plants recovered rapidly. Plants exposed up to 3 d to 0.7 ppm Cd recovered sufficiently to produce viable gametes 7 days after removal from Cd. Because it has a relatively short life span and apparently loses Cd subsequent to exposure to Cd-polluted water, Ulva lactuca is not recommended as an alga for monitoring in-situ environmental pollution.

  20. Physiological and anthropometric determinants of rhythmic gymnastics performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douda, Helen T; Toubekis, Argyris G; Avloniti, Alexandra A; Tokmakidis, Savvas P

    2008-03-01

    To identify the physiological and anthropometric predictors of rhythmic gymnastics performance, which was defined from the total ranking score of each athlete in a national competition. Thirty-four rhythmic gymnasts were divided into 2 groups, elite (n = 15) and nonelite (n = 19), and they underwent a battery of anthropometric, physical fitness, and physiological measurements. The principal-components analysis extracted 6 components: anthropometric, flexibility, explosive strength, aerobic capacity, body dimensions, and anaerobic metabolism. These were used in a simultaneous multiple-regression procedure to determine which best explain the variance in rhythmic gymnastics performance. Based on the principal-component analysis, the anthropometric component explained 45% of the total variance, flexibility 12.1%, explosive strength 9.2%, aerobic capacity 7.4%, body dimensions 6.8%, and anaerobic metabolism 4.6%. Components of anthropometric (r = .50) and aerobic capacity (r = .49) were significantly correlated with performance (P gymnasts, 92.5% of the variation was explained by VO2max (58.9%), arm span (12%), midthigh circumference (13.1%), and body mass (8.5%). Selected anthropometric characteristics, aerobic power, flexibility, and explosive strength are important determinants of successful performance. These findings might have practical implications for both training and talent identification in rhythmic gymnastics.

  1. Physiological performance and thermal tolerance of major Red Sea macrophytes

    KAUST Repository

    Weinzierl, Michael S.

    2017-12-01

    As anthropogenically-forced ocean temperatures continue to rise, the physiological response of marine macrophytes becomes exceedingly relevant. The Red Sea is a semi-isolated sea- the warmest in the world (SST up to 34°C) - already exhibiting signs of rapid warming rates exceeding those of other tropical oceans. This will have profound effects on the physiology of marine organisms, specifically marine macrophytes, which have direct influence on the dynamic carbonate system of the Red Sea. The aim of this paper is to define the physiological capability and thermal optima and limits of six ecologically important Red Sea macrophytes- ranging from seagrasses to calcifying and non-calcifying algae- and to describe the effects of increasing thermal stress on the performance and limits of each macrophyte in terms of activation energy. Of the species considered, Halophila stipulacae, Halimeda optunia, Halimeda monile and Padina pavonica thrive in thermal extremes and may be more successful in future Red Sea warming scenarios. Specifically, Halimeda opuntia increased productivity and calcification rates up to 38°C, making it the most thermally resilient macrophyte. Halophila stipulacae is the most productive seagrass, and hence has the greatest positive effect on Omega saturation state and offers chemical buffer capacity to future ocean acidification.

  2. THERMOREGULATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank E Marino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vol 53 (Medicine & Sport Science This collection on the latest interpretation of research data about the relationship between thermoregulation, exercise performance and fatigue is published as the 53rd volume of Medicine and Sport Science Journal. PURPOSE The book aims to explain how the advances in technology and methodology allowed studying the affects of the changing body temperature on metabolism and the role played by the nervous system in shaping human performance under challenging thermal situations. FEATURES This publication provides different interpretations of recent research for a better understanding of the limitations of thermoregulation in nine titles. The presented titles are: The Evolutionary Basis of Thermoregulation and Exercise Performance; Comparative Thermoregulation and the Quest for Athletic Supremacy; Thermoregulation, Fatigue and Exercise Modality; Neuromuscular Response to Exercise Heat Stress; Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction, Endotoxemia and Gastrointestinal Symptoms: The 'Canary in the Coal Mine' during Exercise-Heat Stress?; Effects of Peripheral Cooling on Characteristics of Local Muscle; Cooling Interventions for the Protection and Recovery of Exercise Performance from Exercise-Induced Heat Stress; Ethnicity and Temperature Regulation; Exercise Heat Stress and Metabolism. The evidence for the human's ability to adjust their performance according to the thermal limits in order to preserve cellular homeostasis is particularly noteworthy. AUDIENCE This is a fundamental book for any students and/or researchers involved in the fields of medicine, exercise physiology and human performance with special reference to thermal regulation. ASSESSMENT This publication is a must-read text for all those working in thermal medicine, exercise physiology and human performance fields

  3. Genetic and physiological controls of growth under water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, François; Parent, Boris; Caldeira, Cecilio F; Welcker, Claude

    2014-04-01

    The sensitivity of expansive growth to water deficit has a large genetic variability, which is higher than that of photosynthesis. It is observed in several species, with some genotypes stopping growth in a relatively wet soil, whereas others continue growing until the lower limit of soil-available water. The responses of growth to soil water deficit and evaporative demand share an appreciable part of their genetic control through the colocation of quantitative trait loci as do the responses of the growth of different organs to water deficit. This result may be caused by common mechanisms of action discussed in this paper (particularly, plant hydraulic properties). We propose that expansive growth, putatively linked to hydraulic processes, determines the sink strength under water deficit, whereas photosynthesis determines source strength. These findings have large consequences for plant modeling under water deficit and for the design of breeding programs.

  4. The effect of salinity on the growth, morphology and physiology of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The salinity of water and soil decreases the growth and yield of agricultural products. Salinity affects many physiological and morphological processes of plant by influencing soil solution osmotic potential and ion absorption and accumulation of minerals. To evaluate the effect of salinity on some physiological and ...

  5. Physiological and Growth Responses of Midrotation Loblolly Pine to Treatments of Fire, Herbicide, and Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily J. Goodwin; Lisa M. Marino McInnis; Hans M. Williams; Brian P. Oswald; Kenneth W. Farrish

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of fertilizer and understory vegetation control (herbicide and prescribed fire) on mature tree physiology and to link observed physiological responses with tree growth. Photosynthetic rate (photosynthesis), transpiration, stomatal conductance, stem diameter, and crown area were measured in two midrotation...

  6. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  7. Hypohydration and Human Performance: Impact of Environment and Physiological Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawka, Michael N; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Body water losses of >2 % of body mass are defined as hypohydration and can occur from sweat loss and/or diuresis from both cold and altitude exposure. Hypohydration elicits intracellular and extracellular water loss proportionate to water and solute deficits. Iso-osmotic hypovolemia (from cold and high-altitude exposure) results in greater plasma loss for a given water deficit than hypertonic hypovolemia from sweat loss. Hypohydration does not impair submaximal intensity aerobic performance in cold-cool environments, sometimes impairs aerobic performance in temperate environments, and usually impairs aerobic performance in warm-hot environments. Hypohydration begins to impair aerobic performance when skin temperatures exceed 27 °C, and with each additional 1 °C elevation in skin temperature there is a further 1.5 % impairment. Hypohydration has an additive effect on impairing aerobic performance in warm-hot high-altitude environments. A commonality of absolute hypovolemia (from plasma volume loss) combined with relative hypovolemia (from tissue vasodilation) is present when aerobic performance is impaired. The decrement in aerobic exercise performance due to hypohydration is likely due to multiple physiological mechanisms, including cardiovascular strain acting as the 'lynchpin', elevated tissue temperatures, and metabolic changes which are all integrated through the CNS to reduce motor drive to skeletal muscles.

  8. Physiology Data - Characterization of Sexual Growth Dimorphism in Sablefish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sexual growth dimorphism (SGD) is a common phenomenon in nature. Numerous marine fishes exhibit SGD, with females often growing faster and attaining larger sizes...

  9. Fifth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings (abstracts).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janette R. Thompson; Richard C. Schultz; J.W. Van Sambeek

    1993-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities in field performance of planted trees, seedling propagation, physiology, genetics, acorn germination, and natural regeneration for oaks are described in 30 abstracts.

  10. Physiological and growth responses to water deficit in the bioenergy crop Miscanthus x giganteus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eIngs

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High yielding perennial biomass crops of the species Miscanthus are widely recognized as one of the most promising lignocellulosic feedstocks for the production of bioenergy and bioproducts. Miscanthus is a C4 grass and thus has relatively high water use efficiency. Cultivated Miscanthus comprises primarily of a single clone, Miscanthus x giganteus, a sterile hybrid between M. sacchariflorus and M. sinensis. M. x giganteus is high yielding and expresses desirable combinations of many traits present in the two parental species types; however, it responds poorly to low water availability. To identify the physiological basis of the response to water stress in M. x giganteus and to identify potential targets for breeding improvements we characterised the physiological responses to water-deficit stress in a pot experiment. The experiment has provided valuable insights into the temporal aspects of drought-induced responses of M. x giganteus. Withholding water resulted in marked changes in plant physiology with growth-associated traits among the first affected, the most rapid response being a decline in the rate of stem elongation. A reduction in photosynthetic performance was among the second set of changes observed; indicated by a decrease in stomatal conductance followed by decreases in chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll content. Measures reflecting the plant water status were among the last affected by the drought treatment. Metabolite analysis indicated that proline was a drought stress marker in M. x giganteus, metabolites in the proline synthesis pathway were more abundant when stomatal conductance decreased and dry weight accumulation ceased. The outcomes of this study in terms of drought-induced physiological changes, accompanied by a proof-of-concept metabolomics investigation, provide a platform for identifying targets for improved drought-tolerance of the Miscanthus bioenergy crop.

  11. Eva Physiology, Systems, and Performance (EPSP) Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Extravehicular activity (EVA) is any activity performed by astronauts outside their space vehicle or habitat. EVA may be performed on orbit, such as outside the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station, or on a planetary surface such as Mars or on the moon. Astronauts wear a pressurized suit that provides environmental protection, mobility, life support, and communications while they work in the harsh conditions of a microgravity environment. Exploration missions to the moon and Mars may last many days and will include many types of EVAs; exploration, science, construction and maintenance. The effectiveness and success of these EVA-filled missions is dependent on the ability to perform tasks efficiently. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) project will conduct a number of studies to understand human performance during EVA, from a molecular level to full-scale equipment and suit design aspects, with the aim of developing safe and efficient systems for Exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The EPSP project will 1) develop Exploration Mission EVA suit requirements for metabolic and thermal loading, optional center of gravity location, biomedical sensors, hydration, nutrition, and human biomedical interactions; 2) develop validated EVA prebreathe protocols that meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints while minimizing crew time and thus increasing EVA work efficiency; and 3) define exploration decompression sickness (DCS) risks, policy, and mission success statistics and develop a DCS risk definition report.

  12. Growth and physiological responses to water and nutrient stress in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... young carambola plants in relation to water stress. Sci. Hort. 60: 101-. 114. Jose S, Merritt S, Ramsey CL (2003). Growth, nutrition, photosynthesis and transpiration responses of longleaf pine seedlings to light, water and nitrogen. Forest Ecol Manag. 180: 335-344. Kallarackal J, Suman P, George J (2004).

  13. A physiological and genetic analysis of growth characteristics in Hordeum spontaneum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, C.P.E. van; Poorter, H.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this project was to determine to what extent physiological, morphological and chemical growth characteristics are genetically linked and/or caused by common factors. First, 84 accessions of H. spontaneum from different habitats in Israel were screened for their variation in growth traits.

  14. Stress tolerance and growth physiology of yeast strains from the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Bianca, B E; Gombert, A K

    2013-12-01

    Improved biofuels production requires a better understanding of industrial microorganisms. Some wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from the fuel ethanol industry in Brazil, present exceptional fermentation performance, persistence and prevalence in the harsh industrial environment. Nevertheless, their physiology has not yet been systematically investigated. Here we present a first systematic evaluation of the widely used industrial strains PE-2, CAT-1, BG-1 and JP1, in terms of their tolerance towards process-related stressors. We also analyzed their growth physiology under heat stress. These strains were evaluated in parallel to laboratory and baker's strains. Whereas the industrial strains performed in general better than the laboratory strains under ethanol or acetic acid stresses and on industrial media, high sugar stress was tolerated equally by all strains. Heat and low pH stresses clearly distinguished fuel ethanol strains from the others, indicating that these conditions might be the ones that mostly exert selective pressure on cells in the industrial environment. During shake-flask cultivations using a synthetic medium at 37 °C, industrial strains presented higher ethanol yields on glucose than the laboratory strains, indicating that they could have been selected for this trait-a response to energy-demanding fermentation conditions. These results might be useful to guide future improvements of large-scale fuel ethanol production via engineering of stress tolerance traits in other strains, and eventually also for promoting the use of these fuel ethanol strains in different industrial bioprocesses.

  15. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  16. Exogenously applied plant growth regulators enhance the morpho-physiological growth and yield of rice under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Fahad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT and high night temperature (HNT. Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc, alpha-tocopherol (Ve, brassinosteroids (Br, methyl jasmonates (MeJA and triazoles (Tr were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above- and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  17. Key physiological properties contributing to rhizosphere adaptation and plant growth promotion abilities of Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibach-Paldi, Sharon; Burdman, Saul; Okon, Yaacov

    2012-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that is being increasingly used in agriculture in a commercial scale. Recent research has elucidated key properties of A. brasilense that contribute to its ability to adapt to the rhizosphere habitat and to promote plant growth. They include synthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid, nitric oxide, carotenoids, and a range of cell surface components as well as the ability to undergo phenotypic variation. Storage and utilization of polybetahydroxyalkanoate polymers are important for the shelf life of the bacteria in production of inoculants, products containing bacterial cells in a suitable carrier for agricultural use. Azospirillum brasilense is able to fix nitrogen, but despite some controversy, as judging from most systems evaluated so far, contribution of fixed nitrogen by this bacterium does not seem to play a major role in plant growth promotion. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of physiological properties of A. brasilense that are important for rhizosphere performance and successful interactions with plant roots. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Growth and Physiological Responses of Phaseolus Species to Salinity Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Bayuelo-Jiménez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the changes on growth, photosynthesis, water relations, soluble carbohydrate, and ion accumulation, for two salt-tolerant and two salt-sensitive Phaseolus species grown under increasing salinity (0, 60 and 90 mM NaCl. After 20 days exposure to salt, biomass was reduced in all species to a similar extent (about 56%, with the effect of salinity on relative growth rate (RGR confined largely to the first week. RGR of salt-tolerant species was reduced by salinity due to leaf area ratio (LAR reduction rather than a decline in photosynthetic capacity, whereas unit leaf rate and LAR were the key factors in determining RGR on salt-sensitive species. Photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance decreased gradually with salinity, showing significant reductions only in salt-sensitive species at the highest salt level. There was little difference between species in the effect of salinity on water relations, as indicated by their positive turgor. Osmotic adjustment occurred in all species and depended on higher K+, Na+, and Cl− accumulation. Despite some changes in soluble carbohydrate accumulation induced by salt stress, no consistent contributions in osmotic adjustment could be found in this study. Therefore, we suggest that tolerance to salt stress is largely unrelated to carbohydrate accumulation in Phaseolus species.

  19. Productivity Growth : Industries, Spillovers and Economic Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Raa, T.; Wolff, E.N.

    2012-01-01

    Productivity growth is the main vehicle to increase the standard of living. This book explains the relationships between technological change, efficiency, productivity growth and performance. The emphasis is on the interplay between industries in modern economies. The book provides a broad yet

  20. The influence of climatic and physiological performance on population dynamics of Mytilus edulis in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Blicher, Martin; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2014-01-01

    . Results show an overall decline in blue mussel abundance along the coast from south to north Greenland. Physiological adaptation and plasticity of blue mussels was found across latitudes spanning from the temperate to the High Arctic region. Combined our results indicate that low ocean temperature per se....... The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) has recently expanded its northern distribution in Greenland and is considered to be a sensitive indicator of climate changes. Blue mussels could be a species that would respond to a warmer climate by increased abundance and growth rates in the Arctic. However, adequate...... data on current distribution and physiological performance of blue mussels in the Arctic is lacking, and knowledge of how “climate” in a broad sense specifically influence population dynamics of this species is unknown. Here, we present data on abundance, age and mortality of blue mussels in West...

  1. Growth performance, haematological characteristic and serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance, haematological characteristic and serum biochemistry of Japanese quails fed with diets containing African pear seed meal. ... haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) serum total protein (PRO), Albumin (ALB), glucose (GLU), creatinine (CREAT), cholesterol (CHOL) and Alkaline phosphatase (ALP).

  2. Growth performance and some haematological changes associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    day feeding trial to evaluate growth performance and some haematological changes associated with yam peel meal inclusions in finisher diet of broiler chicks in Ghana. The birds were separated into four treatment groups (each group consisting ...

  3. Physiological Responses and Physical Performance during Football in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Magni; Nybo, Lars; Grantham, Justin; Racinais, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of hot ambient conditions on physical performance and physiological responses during football match-play. Methods Two experimental games were completed in temperate (∼21°C; CON) and hot ambient conditions (∼43°C; HOT). Physical performance was assessed by match analysis in 17 male elite players during the games and a repeated sprint test was conducted after the two game trials. Core and muscle temperature were measured and blood samples were obtained, before and after the games. Results Muscle and core temperatures were ∼1°C higher (P14 km⋅h−1) by 26% in HOT compared to CON), but peak sprint speed was 4% higher (P24 km⋅h−1) between CON and HOT. In HOT, success rates for passes and crosses were 8 and 9% higher (Pheat (r = 0.85 and r = 0.53, respectively; Pheat, but these changes were not directly related to the absolute or relative changes in core or muscle temperature. However, peak sprinting speed and execution of successful passes and crosses were improved in the HOT condition. PMID:22723963

  4. Aerobic exercise: bioenergetics, physiological adjustments, fatigue and performance indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Caputo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to present relevant updated information regarding the physiological determinants of aerobic training and performance. In contrast to common concepts, the aerobic metabolism rapidly responds to energy requirements,with the anaerobic and aerobic energy systems equally contributing to total energy production during maximal exercise lasting about 75 s. However, in the case of longer exercise duration the possible mechanisms of fatigue related to anaerobic metabolism are still the main determinants of exercise tolerance. Prolonged exercise (more than one hour can be limited by several factors such as substrate depletion, water and electrolyte disturbance, or problems related to thermoregulation leading to an increase in body temperature. The most important variables of endurance performance have been organizedinto a model that integrates factors such as maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max, blood lactate thresholds, and muscle efficiency. For highly trained athletes, in addition to a high VO2max, success in endurance events also requires the ability to exercise forprolonged periods at a high percentage of VO2max, as well as to efficiently convert the energy produced into muscle work. Depending on the duration of the aerobic event, the training sessions should be aimed at improving VO2max, anaerobic lactate capacity andacidosis tolerance in the case of short-lasting events and aerobic capacity for events of intermediate duration, and at increasing muscle glycogen content and fat utilization in the case of long-lasting events.

  5. Time dependent physiological characterization of yeast oxidative stress response and growth modulation of protein kinase/phosphatase mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintas, Ali; Workman, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    .25, 0.50 and 1.0 mM). Understanding the growth physiology of S. cerevisiae allows us to estimate the link between genotype and stress-response phenotype. Growth physiology parameters, such as growth rate, diauxic shift times, stress-induced stasis times, were measured in fermentative batch cultures...

  6. Physiological and biochemical performances of menthol-induced aposymbiotic corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Terng Wang

    Full Text Available The unique mutualism between corals and their photosynthetic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp. is the driving force behind functional assemblages of coral reefs. However, the respective roles of hosts and Symbiodinium in this endosymbiotic association, particularly in response to environmental challenges (e.g., high sea surface temperatures, remain unsettled. One of the key obstacles is to produce and maintain aposymbiotic coral hosts for experimental purposes. In this study, a simple and gentle protocol to generate aposymbiotic coral hosts (Isopora palifera and Stylophora pistillata was developed using repeated incubation in menthol/artificial seawater (ASW medium under light and in ASW in darkness, which depleted more than 99% of Symbiodinium from the host within 4∼8 days. As indicated by the respiration rate, energy metabolism (by malate dehydrogenase activity, and nitrogen metabolism (by glutamate dehydrogenase activity and profiles of free amino acids, the physiological and biochemical performances of the menthol-induced aposymbiotic corals were comparable to their symbiotic counterparts without nutrient supplementation (e.g., for Stylophora or with a nutrient supplement containing glycerol, vitamins, and a host mimic of free amino acid mixture (e.g., for Isopora. Differences in biochemical responses to menthol-induced bleaching between Stylophora and Isopora were attributed to the former digesting Symbiodinium rather than expelling the algae live as found in the latter species. Our studies showed that menthol could successfully bleach corals and provided aposymbiotic corals for further exploration of coral-alga symbioses.

  7. Priming and physiological performance of rocket salad seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbas Alves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rocket salad is a leafy vegetable that has become a popular food in various regions of Brazil. Its multiplication is only possible with seeds and, therefore, high quality propagation material is necessary for establishing a good crop. Studies show that seed conditioning promotes physiological improvements in the speed and uniformity of seedling establishment in the field. The present work was carried out in order to verify the effect of priming on the performance of rocket salad seeds. Five seed lots of rocket salad, cultivar Cultivada, were primed for 24 hours, using the potentials of 0.0, -0.1, -0.2, -0.3MPa, in a polyethylene glycol (Carbonax 6000 solution. A completely randomized design with 20 treatments (5 seed lots × 4 potentials was used, with four replications. Means were compared by Tukey’s test and regression analyses were conducted for the osmotic potential. The data showed that priming improved germination and the percentage of strong plants in relation to vigor.

  8. Growth performance, carcass and hematological characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance, carcass and hematological characteristics of rabbits fed graded levels of tiger nuts ( Cyperus esculentus ) ... (p>0.05) difference between treatments. Results demonstrated that (Cyperus esculentus) could be used up to 5% in rabbit's diets without adverse effect on the animals' performance and health.

  9. Physiological and biochemical characterization of Azospirillum brasilense strains commonly used as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Salvo, Luciana P; Silva, Esdras; Teixeira, Kátia R S; Cote, Rosalba Esquivel; Pereyra, M Alejandra; García de Salamone, Inés E

    2014-12-01

    Azospirillum is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) genus vastly studied and utilized as agriculture inoculants. Isolation of new strains under different environmental conditions allows the access to the genetic diversity and improves the success of inoculation procedures. Historically, the isolation of this genus has been performed by the use of some traditional culture media. In this work we characterized the physiology and biochemistry of five different A. brasilense strains, commonly used as cereal inoculants. The aim of this work is to contribute to pose into revision some concepts concerning the most used protocols to isolate and characterize this bacterium. We characterized their growth in different traditional and non-traditional culture media, evaluated some PGPR mechanisms and characterized their profiles of fatty acid methyl esters and carbon-source utilization. This work shows, for the first time, differences in both profiles, and ACC deaminase activity of A. brasilense strains. Also, we show unexpected results obtained in some of the evaluated culture media. Results obtained here and an exhaustive knowledge revision revealed that it is not appropriate to conclude about bacterial species without analyzing several strains. Also, it is necessary to continue developing studies and laboratory techniques to improve the isolation and characterization protocols. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Simulated firefighting task performance and physiology under very hot conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna eLarsen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the impact of very hot (45°C conditions on the performance of, and physiological responses to, a simulated firefighting manual-handling task compared to the same work in a temperate environment (18°C.Methods: 10 male volunteer firefighters performed a 3-hour protocol in both 18°C (CON and 45°C (VH. Participants intermittently performed 12 × 1-minute bouts of raking, 6 × 8-minute bouts of low-intensity stepping, and 6 × 20-minute rest periods. The area cleared during the raking task determined work performance. Core temperature, skin temperature, and heart rate were measured continuously. Participants also periodically rated their perceived exertion (RPE and thermal sensation. Firefighters consumed water ad libitum. Urine specific gravity and changes in body mass determined hydration status.Results: Firefighters raked 19% less debris during the VH condition. Core and skin temperature were 0.99 ± 0.20°C and 5.45 ± 0.53°C higher, respectively, during the VH trial, and heart rate was 14-36 beats.min-1 higher in the VH trial. Firefighters consumed 2950 ± 1034 mL of water in the VH condition, compared to 1290 ± 525 in the CON trial. Sweat losses were higher in the VH (1886 ± 474 mL compared to the CON trial (462 ± 392 mL, though both groups were hydrated upon protocol completion (USG < 1.020. Participants’ average RPE was higher in the VH (15.6 ± 0.9 compared to the CON trial (12.6 ± 0.9. Similarly, the firefighers' thermal sensation scores were significantly higher in the VH (6.4 ± 0.5 compared to the CON trial (4.4 ± 0.4.Conclusions: Despite the decreased work output and aggressive fluid replacement observed in the VH trial, firefighters’ experienced increases in thermal stress and exertion. Fire agencies should prioritise the health and safety of fire personnel in very hot temperatures, and consider the impact of reduced productivity on fire suppression efforts.

  11. Growth performance of Nigerian fish stocks

    OpenAIRE

    King, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    Parameters of the von Bertalanffy growth function are presented for 42 fish stocks belonging to 16 families, 22 genera and 27 species. The growth performance index, Phi '(= log K + 2logL sub( infinity )), was computed for each stock and was found to be highest in male Gymnarchus niloticus (Gymnarchidae) from Lake Chad and lowest in Chrysichthys auratus (Bagridae) from the Cross River. Mean Phi ' for major fish genera and families are also presented and was highest in brackishwater fishes, clo...

  12. Injury Patterns, Physiological Profile, and Performance in University Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Shane; Halaki, Mark; Sharp, Tristan; Orr, Rhonda

    2018-01-01

    Rugby union is a physically demanding collision sport with high injury rates. There is a common perception that higher training loads result in greater injury risk in field-based sports. To determine injury, anthropometric, and physical-performance characteristics in junior rugby union players and investigate the interaction between training load and injury across a competitive season. Prospective cohort study. Fifty-one players (age 19.2 ± 0.7 y) from an under-20 university rugby union team (forwards, n = 27; backs, n = 24) participated in a study conducted over a competition season. Training load, injury characteristics, anthropometry, physiological performance, and match time-loss injury incidence were observed. Backs had significantly lower body mass (ES [95% CI] = 1.6 [0.9, 2.2]), skinfold thickness (ES = 1.1 [0.5, 1.7]), strength (squat ES = 0.6 [0.0, 1.2], deadlift ES = 0.6 [0.0, 1.1], bench press ES = 0.9 [0.4, 1.5]), lower-body power (ES = 0.4 [-0.2, 1.0]), and higher maximal aerobic capacity (ES = -0.3 [-0.8, 0.3]) than forwards. Match injury incidence was 107.3 injuries/1000 player hours (forwards 91.4/1000, backs 125.5/1000) during preseason and 110.7 injuries/1000 player hours (forwards 124.1/1000, backs 95.2/1000) during in-season. Forwards showed higher incidence of joint and ligament (P = .049) and upper-limb (P = .011) injuries than backs. No significant relationship between overall training load and match injury incidence was found. However, lower match injury incidence was associated with higher weekly training volume in backs (P = .007). Positional differences in body composition, performance, injury characteristics, and match injury patterns were identified in junior university rugby union players, indicating the need for position-specific training programs to reduce risk of injury.

  13. Growth and physiological responses to varied environments among populations of Pinus ponderosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwei Zhang; Bert M. Cregg

    2005-01-01

    We investigated population responses in physiology, morphology, and growth of mature Pinus ponderosa trees to an environmental gradient across Nebraska, USA. Ten populations from western Nebraska and eastern Wyoming were grown in three 26-year-old provenance tests from the warmest and wettest site in the east (Plattsmouth) to the intermediate site in...

  14. Effects of dietary protein level on growth, health and physiological parameters in growing-furring mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Birthe Marie; Larsen, Peter F.; Clausen, Tove

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the dietary protein level and the feeding strategy on growth, health and physiological blood and liver parameters in growing-furring male mink. Effects of dietary protein levels ranging from 22% of metabolizable energy (MEp) to experimental p...

  15. Variation in growth, physiology, and yield of six sugarcane cultivars from across the globe in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of sugarcane cultivars with diverse genetic background under similar location can help in better understanding cultivar response to environment and in identifying various physiological traits that could lead to improved yields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth, yield...

  16. Feeding strategies and energy to protein ratio on tambaqui performance and physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Quara de Carvalho Santos

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of feed deprivation and refeeding with diets containing different energy to protein ratios (E/P on the performance and physiology of juvenile tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum. A 4x2 factorial arrangement with three replicates was used, with four E/P ratios (11.5, 10.5, 9.5, and 8.5 kcal g-1 digestible energy per protein and two feeding regimens (with and without deprivation, during 60 days. Fish from the food-deprived group were fasted for 14 days and refed from the fifteenth to the sixtieth day, whereas the remaining fish were fed for 60 days. At the end of the experimental period, weight of fish subjected to food deprivation was lower than that of those continuously fed; however, this condition did not influence the physiological parameters analyzed. Tambaqui fed 11.5 kcal g-1 achieved lower final weight than those fed with the other diets, in both regimens. Among the physiological parameters, only plasma protein presented significant increase in fish fed 8.5 kcal g-1, in both feeding regimens, probably due to the higher dietary protein concentration. These results indicate that fish show a partial compensatory growth, and that 10.5 kcal g-1 can be recommended for the diet of juvenile tambaqui.

  17. Was Dinosaurian Physiology Inherited by Birds? Reconciling Slow Growth in Archaeopteryx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Gregory M.; Rauhut, Oliver W. M.; Zhou, Zhonghe; Turner, Alan H.; Inouye, Brian D.; Hu, Dongyu; Norell, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Archaeopteryx is the oldest and most primitive known bird (Avialae). It is believed that the growth and energetic physiology of basalmost birds such as Archaeopteryx were inherited in their entirety from non-avialan dinosaurs. This hypothesis predicts that the long bones in these birds formed using rapidly growing, well-vascularized woven tissue typical of non-avialan dinosaurs. Methodology/Principal Findings We report that Archaeopteryx long bones are composed of nearly avascular parallel-fibered bone. This is among the slowest growing osseous tissues and is common in ectothermic reptiles. These findings dispute the hypothesis that non-avialan dinosaur growth and physiology were inherited in totality by the first birds. Examining these findings in a phylogenetic context required intensive sampling of outgroup dinosaurs and basalmost birds. Our results demonstrate the presence of a scale-dependent maniraptoran histological continuum that Archaeopteryx and other basalmost birds follow. Growth analysis for Archaeopteryx suggests that these animals showed exponential growth rates like non-avialan dinosaurs, three times slower than living precocial birds, but still within the lowermost range for all endothermic vertebrates. Conclusions/Significance The unexpected histology of Archaeopteryx and other basalmost birds is actually consistent with retention of the phylogenetically earlier paravian dinosaur condition when size is considered. The first birds were simply feathered dinosaurs with respect to growth and energetic physiology. The evolution of the novel pattern in modern forms occurred later in the group's history. PMID:19816582

  18. Was dinosaurian physiology inherited by birds? Reconciling slow growth in archaeopteryx.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M Erickson

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Archaeopteryx is the oldest and most primitive known bird (Avialae. It is believed that the growth and energetic physiology of basalmost birds such as Archaeopteryx were inherited in their entirety from non-avialan dinosaurs. This hypothesis predicts that the long bones in these birds formed using rapidly growing, well-vascularized woven tissue typical of non-avialan dinosaurs.We report that Archaeopteryx long bones are composed of nearly avascular parallel-fibered bone. This is among the slowest growing osseous tissues and is common in ectothermic reptiles. These findings dispute the hypothesis that non-avialan dinosaur growth and physiology were inherited in totality by the first birds. Examining these findings in a phylogenetic context required intensive sampling of outgroup dinosaurs and basalmost birds. Our results demonstrate the presence of a scale-dependent maniraptoran histological continuum that Archaeopteryx and other basalmost birds follow. Growth analysis for Archaeopteryx suggests that these animals showed exponential growth rates like non-avialan dinosaurs, three times slower than living precocial birds, but still within the lowermost range for all endothermic vertebrates.The unexpected histology of Archaeopteryx and other basalmost birds is actually consistent with retention of the phylogenetically earlier paravian dinosaur condition when size is considered. The first birds were simply feathered dinosaurs with respect to growth and energetic physiology. The evolution of the novel pattern in modern forms occurred later in the group's history.

  19. The Growth Hormone Receptor: Mechanism of Receptor Activation, Cell Signaling, and Physiological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Dehkhoda

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The growth hormone receptor (GHR, although most well known for regulating growth, has many other important biological functions including regulating metabolism and controlling physiological processes related to the hepatobiliary, cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, and reproductive systems. In addition, growth hormone signaling is an important regulator of aging and plays a significant role in cancer development. Growth hormone activates the Janus kinase (JAK–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT signaling pathway, and recent studies have provided a new understanding of the mechanism of JAK2 activation by growth hormone binding to its receptor. JAK2 activation is required for growth hormone-mediated activation of STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5, and the negative regulation of JAK–STAT signaling comprises an important step in the control of this signaling pathway. The GHR also activates the Src family kinase signaling pathway independent of JAK2. This review covers the molecular mechanisms of GHR activation and signal transduction as well as the physiological consequences of growth hormone signaling.

  20. Growth performances and carcass characteristics of cavies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An 8 week trial to evaluate the effect of supplementation with Asteraceae or a protein enriched ration on the growth performances and carcass characteristics of cavies was conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm (FAR) of the University of Dschang. Prior to the experimental phase a two weeks acceptability trial was ...

  1. Growth performance, serum thiocyanate and haematological indices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth performance, serum thiocyanate and haematological indices of pigs fed Whole Cassava Chips (WCC) supplemented with brewer's yeast as substitute to maize in a twelve weeks feeding trial. Forty-eight crossbred growing pigs of Landrace and Hampshire breeds ...

  2. GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF GRASSCUTTERS FED DIETS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. A total of ninety six-week old grasscutters were used in a study conducted to investigate the growth performance of grasscutters fed diets containing Moringa oleifera leaf meal (MOLM) and/or soybean meal. (SBM). The ninety (90) grasscutters were randomly assigned to three experimental groups consisting of ...

  3. Growth performance and immunological responses of broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the growth performance and immune response of broiler chickens fed synbiotic and diet acidifier to Newcastle disease vaccinations. One hundred and forty four (144) day old broiler chickens were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments replicated thrice with 12 birds per replicate ...

  4. Growth performance, blood parameters and carcass characteristics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out with one hundred and twenty (120) day-old marshal chicks to investigate the effect of Maxigrain® enzyme supplementation of corn bran based diets on growth performance, carcass characteristics, haematology and serum biochemistry of broilers in an eight weeks experiment. Four experimental ...

  5. Growth performance, hematological and serum biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A twelve (12) weeks feeding trial was carried out to determine the effect of varying dietary inclusions of Microdesmis puberula leaf meal (MPLM) on the growth performance, hematological indices and serum biochemical constituents of growing rabbits. Four grower rabbit diets were formulated to contain the leaf meal at ...

  6. Growth and physiological responses of some Capsicum frutescens varieties to copper stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadid, Nurul; Maziyah, Rizka; Nurcahyani, Desy Dwi; Mubarokah, Nilna Rizqiyah

    2017-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient participating in various physiological processes. However, excessive uptake of this micronutrient could potentially affect plant growth and development as well as plant productivity. In this present work, growth and physiological responses of some Capsicum frustescens varieties to Cu stress were determined. Three C. frutescens varieties used in this work were var. Bara, CF 291, and Genie. In addition, these varieties were treated with different concentration of Cu (0, 30, 70, and 120 ppm). The growth and physiological responses measured in this work included plant height, root length, malondialdehyde (MDA), and chlorophyll. The result showed that all varieties tested relatively displayed plant growth reduction including plant height and root length. Likewise, an increase of MDA level, a major bioindicator for oxidative damage was also found in all varieties following exposure to elevated Cu concentration. Finally, the chlorophyll content was also affected indicated by a decreased amount of chlorophyll, especially in var. CF291. The overall results demonstrated that elevated Cu concentration might decrease C. frutescens productivity where among the three varieties tested, var CF 291 seemed to be the most sensitive varieties to Cu stress.

  7. Growth, physiological response and phytoremoval capability of two willow clones exposed to ibuprofen under hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iori, Valentina; Zacchini, Massimo; Pietrini, Fabrizio

    2013-11-15

    Ibuprofen (IBU) is one of the most widespread pharmaceuticals in the aquatic ecosystem, despite the high removal rate that occurs in wastewater treatment plants. Phytoremediation represents a technology to improve the performance of existing wastewater treatment. This study was conducted under hydroponics to evaluate the ability of Salicaceae plants to tolerate and reduce IBU concentration in contaminated water. To this end, we combined growth, physiological and biochemical data to study the effects of different IBU concentrations on two clones of Salix alba L. Data demonstrated that clone SS5 was more tolerant and showed a higher ability to reduce IBU concentration in the solution than clone SP3. The high tolerance to IBU shown by SS5 was likely due to several mechanisms including the capacity to maintain an elevated photosynthetic activity and an efficient antioxidative defence. These results illustrate the remarkable potential of willow to phytoremediate IBU-contaminated waters in natural and constructed wetlands. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining the Physiological Factors that Contribute to Postflight Changes in Functional Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Arzeno, N.; Buxton, R.; Feiveson, A. H.; Kofman, I.; Lawrence, E.; Lee, S. M. C.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Platts, S. H.; hide

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. These physiological changes include sensorimotor disturbances, cardiovascular deconditioning and loss of muscle mass and strength. These changes might affect the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission tasks immediately after landing on lunar and Martian surfaces. To date, changes in functional performance have not been systematically studied or correlated with physiological changes. To understand how changes in physiological function impact functional performance an interdisciplinary pre/postflight testing regimen (Functional Task Test, FTT) has been developed that systematically evaluates both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The overall objective of the FTT is to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to performance of functional tests that are representative of critical mission tasks. This study will identify which physiological systems contribute the most to impaired performance on each functional test. This will allow us to identify the physiological systems that play the largest role in decrement in functional performance. Using this information we can then design and implement countermeasures that specifically target the physiological systems most responsible for the altered functional performance associated with space flight. The functional test battery was designed to address high priority tasks identified by the Constellation program as critical for mission success. The set of functional tests making up the FTT include the: 1) Seat Egress and Walk Test, 2) Ladder Climb Test, 3) Recovery from Fall/Stand Test, 4) Rock Translation Test, 5) Jump Down Test, 6) Torque Generation Test, and 7) Construction Activity Board Test. Corresponding physiological measures include assessments of postural and gait control, dynamic visual acuity, fine motor

  9. Physiological Correlations with Short, Medium, and Long Cycling Time-Trial Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borszcz, Fernando K.; Tramontin, Artur F.; de Souza, Kristopher M.; Carminatti, Lorival J.; Costa, Vitor P.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated that physiological variables predict cycling endurance performance. However, it is still unclear whether the predictors will change over different performance durations. The aim of this study was to assess the correlations between physiological variables and cycling time trials with different durations.…

  10. Interactive effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on growth and physiology of southern red spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Andersen, C.P.; Hanson, P.J.; Norby, R.J.; Edwards, N.T.; Tardiff, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies are underway to characterize physiologial changes associated with the decline of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) at high elevations in the Great Smocky Mountains National Park. Two research plots have been established on Clingman's Dome at 1720 m and 1935 m elevations to document the magnitude of growth changes at sites experiencing varying degrees of growth decline and to explore the physiological basis of observed differences. The objective is to evaluate likely mechanisms of action and identify natural and anthropogenic factors influencing the observed growth patterns. Field measurements include historical and current radial growth of mature trees and saplings, and seasonal patterns of carbon assimilation, carbon allocation, and water relations of saplings. Laboratory experiments include dose response exposures with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, toxicity screening studies with Al, Mn, and Ca, and characterization of the foliar uptake and metabolism of nitrogen oxides. 9 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Growth and physiological characteristics of the weed false johnsongrass ( Sorghum arundinaceum (Desv. Stapf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Amorim Martins

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sorghum arundinaceum (Desv. Stapf is a weed that belongs to the Poaceae family and is widespread throughout Brazil. Despite the frequent occurrence, infesting cultivated areas, there is little research concerning the biology and physiology of this species. The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth, carbon partitioning and physiological characteristics of the weed Sorghum arundinaceum in greenhouse. Plants were collected at regular intervals of seven days, from 22 to 113 days after transplanting (DAT. In each sample, we determined plant height, root volume, leaf area and dry matter, and subsequently we perfomed the growth analysis, we have determined the dry matter partitioning among organs, the accumulation of dry matter, the specific leaf area, the relative growth rate and leaf weight ratio. At 36, 78 and 113 DAT, the photosynthetic and transpiration rates, stomatal conductance, CO2 concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. The Sorghum arundinaceum reached 1.91 in height, with slow initial growth and allocated much of the biomass in the roots. The photosynthetic rate and the maximum quantum yield of FSII are similar throughout the growth cycle. At maturity the Sorghum arundinaceum presents higher values of transpiration rate, stomatal conductance and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ.

  12. Growth performance, haematological and serum biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total protein (4.03g/l) and globulin (2.63g/dl) were highest in broilers on diet B and least values of urea (16.00 mg/dl) and alkaline phosphatase (64.75μ/l). In conclusion diet B was best considering the growth performance, haematology and serum biochemistry of the broiler chickens fed cassava composite meal. Keywords: ...

  13. Petal Growth Physiology of Cut Rose Flowers: Progress and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horibe Takanori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Roses are the most important crop in the floriculture industry and attract both pollinators and human admirers. Until now, a lot of research focusing on postharvest physiology including flower senescence has been conducted, leading to improvement in vase life. However, few studies have focused on the physiology of petal growth, the perception of light by petals, and the relationship between petal growth and environmental conditions. Regarding roses, whose ornamental value lies in the process of blooming from buds, it is also important to understand their flowering mechanisms and establish methods to control such mechanisms, as well as focus on slowing the aging process, in order to achieve high quality of postharvest cut roses. Elucidation of the mechanisms of rose flower opening would contribute to enhanced quality and commercial production of floricultural crops as well as greatly advance basic scientific knowledge regarding plant biology. In this review, we describe the progress and future prospects in the study of petal growth physiology of cut roses.

  14. Physiological correlates of stress-induced decrements in human perceptual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Stress-induced changes in human performance have been thought to result from alterations in the "multidimensional arousal state" of the individual, as indexed by alterations in the physiological and psychological mechanisms controlling performance. I...

  15. Response of Physiological Growth Indices and Bulb Dry Yield of Onion (Allium cepa L. Genotypes to Priming and Seed Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Izadkhah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Priming is one of the most common methods of improving seed quality, which significantly affects their storability. Seed priming is a seed treatment that allows imbibition and activation of the initial metabolic events associated with seed germination, but prevents radicle emergence and growth. In other words, phase one and two of seed water imbibition curve are passed, but seeds do not enter the third phase of water uptake. Then seeds are dried back to their original water content. Seed priming is a pre-sowing strategy for influencing seed germination and seedling development by modulating pre-germination metabolic activity prior to emergence of the radicle and generally enhances germination rate and plant performance. Naturally, when speed and percentage emergence of germinating seeds are being high, growing sources like light, water and nutrient will be more used. Another factor that can affect the seed germination and seedling establishment is the seed size. As generally known, among producing factors, seed as the first consumer store, plays an important role in the transfer of genetic characters and improvement of qualitative and quantitative traits of production. One of the most important factors in maximizing crop yield is planting high quality seed. Seed size is an important physical indicator of seed quality that affects vegetative growth and is frequently related to yield, market grade factors and harvest efficiency. In the present paper, effects of different pre-sowing treatments and seed size on physiological growth indices and bulb dry yield of onion cultivars were investigated. Materials and Methods In order to determine the response of physiological growth indices and bulb dry yield of onion to priming and seed size, a field experiment was conducted in 2012-2013 cropping season at Agriculture and Natural Resources Research Center of East, Azarbayjan, Iran. This experiment was a factorial experiment based on a

  16. Physiological responses and scope for growth of Ruditapes decussatus from Ria Formosa, southern Portugal, exposed to increased ambient ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sobral

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the effects of exposure to increased ambient ammonia-N concentrations as a cause of decreased scope for growth and mortality of R.decussatus during the summer months in Ria Formosa, southern Portugal. The physiological measurements were performed at 20 ºC and average total ammonia-N concentrations (TA-N were 9, 48, 85, 134 and 260 µmol l-1 (corresponding to 0.2, 1.1, 2.0, 3.2 and 6.2 µmol l-1 NH3. No mortality was observed. Our results show that during short term exposure to TA-N concentrations >48 µmol l-1 (1.1 µmol NH3, R.decussautus survives at the expense of energy reserves. No energy is available for growth and reproduction. Though it is uncertain how intermittent exposures during tidal cycles will affect the long-term survival of R.decussatus in the Ria Formosa, high ammonia concentrations together with unfavourable physical and chemical summer gradients in the sediment can clearly contribute to the high mortality that has been registered in recent years (Ferreira et al. 1989. The sensitivity of the physiological energetics approach and the need to assess tolerance of infaunal bivalves addressing endpoints that can provide insight into the condition for growth and reproduction of the population is stressed.

  17. Protocol: optimising hydroponic growth systems for nutritional and physiological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydroponic growth systems are a convenient platform for studying whole plant physiology. However, we found through trialling systems as they are described in the literature that our experiments were frequently confounded by factors that affected plant growth, including algal contamination and hypoxia. We also found the way in which the plants were grown made them poorly amenable to a number of common physiological assays. Results The drivers for the development of this hydroponic system were: 1) the exclusion of light from the growth solution; 2) to simplify the handling of individual plants, and 3) the growth of the plant to allow easy implementation of multiple assays. These aims were all met by the use of pierced lids of black microcentrifuge tubes. Seed was germinated on a lid filled with an agar-containing germination media immersed in the same solution. Following germination, the liquid growth media was exchanged with the experimental solution, and after 14-21 days seedlings were transferred to larger tanks with aerated solution where they remained until experimentation. We provide details of the protocol including composition of the basal growth solution, and separate solutions with altered calcium, magnesium, potassium or sodium supply whilst maintaining the activity of the majority of other ions. We demonstrate the adaptability of this system for: gas exchange measurement on single leaves and whole plants; qRT-PCR to probe the transcriptional response of roots or shoots to altered nutrient composition in the growth solution (we demonstrate this using high and low calcium supply); producing highly competent mesophyll protoplasts; and, accelerating the screening of Arabidopsis transformants. This system is also ideal for manipulating plants for micropipette techniques such as electrophysiology or SiCSA. Conclusions We present an optimised plant hydroponic culture system that can be quickly and cheaply constructed, and produces plants with similar

  18. Physiological Influences upon the Work Performance of Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Modificzzionni della soglia del dorore cutaneo durante il ciclo menstruale . Boll. Soc. Ital. Biol. Sper., 1968, 44, 235-236. Chambers, E.S., Johnson...SEX DIFFERENCES SLEEP LOSS MENSTRUAL CYCLE PERFORMANCE DECREMENTS WORK PERFORMANCE 20. A TRACT (Continue m reerse sai It neceewr and Idendiftr by...period (i.e., Menstrual vs Mid-Cycle) and whether or not the subjects were using contraceptive pills (i.e., Pill vs Normally Cycling). The performances

  19. Physiological, Biomechanical, and Maximal Performance Evaluation of Medium Rucksack Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    physical training vs. a weightlifting -based program: Effects on soldier physical performance [Abstract]. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 38(5...Effect of resistance training on women’s strength /power and occupational performances. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 33, 1011-1025...road march increased as load mass increased. 30-m Rush The 3- to 5-s rush is a basic activity Soldiers are trained to perform that has been

  20. Muscle variables of importance for physiological performance in competitive football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Thomassen, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine how match performance parameters in trained footballers relate to skeletal muscle parameters, sprint ability and intermittent exercise performance. METHODS: 19 male elite football players completed an experimental game with physical performance determined by video analysis...... and exercise capacity assessed by intermittent Yo-Yo IR1 and IR2 tests, and a repeated sprint test (RST). Muscle tissue was obtained for analysis of metabolic enzyme maximal activity and key muscle protein expression. RESULTS: Total game distance, distance deficit from first to second half and high......-intensity running in the final 15 min of the game were all correlated to the players' Yo-Yo IR1 performance (r = 0.55-0.87) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD) maximal activity (r = 0.55-0.65). Furthermore, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) protein expression was weakly (r = 0...

  1. Vaginal semisolid products: Technological performance considering physiologic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Rita Monteiro; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita

    2017-11-15

    Vaginal semisolid products are frequently used to treat vaginal infections and atrophy-related symptoms of menopause. Formulations composition and the methods for their characterization, especially those developed concerning the target epithelia, are key tools to predict in vivo results at early stages of product development. However, recent studies on this subject have been almost exclusively focused on anti-HIV preparations. The aim of this work consists on improving traditional characterization methods by using physiological parameters in order to construct predictive tools to characterize a new ideal vaginal semisolid formulation whatever target it may have. Ten vaginal antimicrobial and hormonal products already available in the market were studied (Gino-Canesten®, Sertopic®, Dermofix®, Gyno-pevaryl®, Lomexin®, Gino Travogen®, Dalacin V®, Ovestin®, Blissel®, Colpotrophine®). Furthermore, Universal Placebo gel and Replens® were used for comparison. Products were characterized in terms of: pH and buffering capacity in a vaginal fluid simulant (VFS); osmolality - directly and upon dilution in VFS; textural parameters (firmness, adhesiveness and bioadhesion) using vaginal ex vivo porcine epithelium; and viscosity (including VFS dilution at 37°C and after administration on an ex vivo model). Interestingly, the majority of the tested commercial vaginal formulations did not present technological characteristics close to the ideal ones when tested under target biological conditions. The inclusion of such methodologic adaptations is expected to optimize cost-efficiency of new formulations development by predicting efficacy and safety profiles at early stages of product development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth and physiological responses of maize (Zea mays L.) to porous silica nanoparticles in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suriyaprabha, R.; Karunakaran, G.; Yuvakkumar, R.; Prabu, P.; Rajendran, V., E-mail: veerajendran@gmail.com [K. S. Rangasamy College of Technology, Centre for Nano Science and Technology (India); Kannan, N. [K. S. Rangasamy College of Arts and Science, Department of Biotechnology (India)

    2012-12-15

    The present study aims to explore the effect of high surface area (360.85 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) silica nanoparticles (SNPs) (20-40 nm) extracted from rice husk on the physiological and anatomical changes during maize growth in sandy loam soil at four concentrations (5-20 kg ha{sup -1}) in comparison with bulk silica (15-20 kg ha{sup -1}). The plant responses to nano and bulk silica treatments were analyzed in terms of growth characteristics, phyto compounds such as total protein, chlorophyll, and other organic compounds (gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy), and silica accumulation (high-resolution scanning electron microscopy). Growth characteristics were much influenced with increasing concentration of SNPs up to 15 kg ha{sup -1} whereas at 20 kg ha{sup -1}, no significant increments were noticed. Silica accumulation in leaves was high at 10 and 15 kg ha{sup -1} (0.57 and 0.82 %) concentrations of SNPs. The observed physiological changes show that the expression of organic compounds such as proteins, chlorophyll, and phenols favored to maize treated with nanosilica especially at 15 kg ha{sup -1} compared with bulk silica and control. Nanoscale silica regimes at 15 kg ha{sup -1} has a positive response of maize than bulk silica which help to improve the sustainable farming of maize crop as an alternative source of silica fertilizer.

  3. Genotypic Differences in Growth and Physiological Responses to Transplanting and Direct Seeding Cultivation in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The field experiments were conducted to investigate the growth and physiological responses of six super hybrid rice combinations to two planting methods, transplanting (TP and direct seeding (DS during 2006–2007 and 2007–2008. The 1000-grain weight and number of tillers per plant at the early growth stage, the maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm and transpiration rate (Tr were higher in DS plants than in TP ones, whereas the grain yield, number of panicles per square meter, seed setting rate, net photosynthetic rate (Pn and stomatal conductance were lower in DS plants. However, little difference was detected in number of grains per panicle, stem (shoot and leaf weight between the combinations in the two planting methods. The responses of plant growth and physiological traits to planting method differed greatly among the six combinations. In both planting methods, Chouyou 58 and Yongyou 6 had the highest and lowest panicle biomass and Pn, respectively. The higher yield of Chunyou 58 was associated with more numbers of panicles per square meter and grains per panicle in both planting methods. The results indicate that lower grain yield in DS relative to TP is attributed to more excessive tillers at the early stage, lower leaf biomass and photosynthetic rate at the late stage.

  4. Representation of the Physiological Factors Contributing to Postflight Changes in Functional Performance Using Motion Analysis Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2010-01-01

    Astronauts experience changes in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. To understand how changes in physiological function influence functional performance, a testing procedure has been developed that evaluates both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. Astronauts complete seven functional and physiological tests. The objective of this project is to use motion tracking and digitizing software to visually display the postflight decrement in the functional performance of the astronauts. The motion analysis software will be used to digitize astronaut data videos into stick figure videos to represent the astronauts as they perform the Functional Tasks Tests. This project will benefit NASA by allowing NASA scientists to present data of their neurological studies without revealing the identities of the astronauts.

  5. Performance and physiological responses of milk-fed calves to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CCB) on calf performance and some blood parameters. Sixteen female Holstein calves with a mean age of 3 ± 1 d were divided into two equal groups and fed a milk replacer supplemented with 3 g of coated calcium butyrate (CCB)/day or with no ...

  6. The influence of agility training on physiological and cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennemann, Lynette M; Sidrow, Kathryn M; Johnson, Erica M; Harrison, Catherine R; Vojta, Christopher N; Walker, Thomas B

    2013-12-01

    Agility training (AT) has recently been instituted in several military communities in hopes of improving combat performance and general fitness. The purpose of this study was to determine how substituting AT for traditional military physical training (PT) influences physical and cognitive performance. Forty-one subjects undergoing military technical training were divided randomly into 2 groups for 6 weeks of training. One group participated in standard military PT consisting of calisthenics and running. A second group duplicated the amount of exercise of the first group but used AT as their primary mode of training. Before and after training, subjects completed a physical and cognitive battery of tests including V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, reaction time, Illinois Agility Test, body composition, visual vigilance, dichotic listening, and working memory tests. There were significant improvements within the AT group in V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, Illinois Agility Test, visual vigilance, and continuous memory. There was a significant increase in time-to-exhaustion for the traditional group. We conclude that AT is as effective or more effective as PT in enhancing physical fitness. Further, it is potentially more effective than PT in enhancing specific measures of physical and cognitive performance, such as physical agility, memory, and vigilance. Consequently, we suggest that AT be incorporated into existing military PT programs as a way to improve war-fighter performance. Further, it seems likely that the benefits of AT observed here occur in various other populations.

  7. Physiological Investigation of Localized Temperature Effects on Vigilance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Lazarus & Folkman , 1984). Past research has shown that people who are challenged perform better on tasks than those who are threatened (Tomaka et al...Cues to Enhance Screener Vigilance (Doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona). Lazarus , R. S., & Folkman , S. (1984). Stress, appraisal, and

  8. Physiological factors associated with declining repeated sprint performance in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatterer, Hannes; Menz, Verena; Untersteiner, Christian; Klarod, Kultida; Burtscher, Martin

    2017-03-08

    Performance loss in hypoxia might not only be caused by reduced oxygen availability, but might also be influenced by other factors, as for example oxidative stress, perceived exertion or breathing patterns. This study aimed to investigate the influence of these factors on running performance during hypoxic and normoxic shuttle-run sprinting. Eight male amateur soccer players performed shuttle-run sprints in hypoxia (FiO2∼14.8%) and normoxia (random order). Each session comprised 3-sets of 5x10s back and forth sprints (4.5m) with recovery times between repetitions and sets of 20s and 5min, respectively. Sprinting distance, acceleration patterns, heart rate (HR) and breathing frequency were measured during each session (Zephyr-PSM Training System). Redox state and lactate concentration ([La]) were determined before and after each session, whereas rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was assessed after the sprint sessions. Overall distance covered was similar during hypoxia and normoxia sprinting (Δ -8.3±14.3m, 95% CI -20.2 to 3.6, p>0.05). During the 3 set, distance tended to be reduced in hypoxia compared to normoxia (169±6m, 95% CI 164 to 174 vs. 175±4m, 95% CI 171 to 178, p=0.070). Differences in breathing frequency during sprinting in hypoxia and normoxia were associated with individual reductions in sprinting distance (r=-0.792, p=0.019). Despite a somewhat lower running distance during the 3 set and similar [La], RPE, HR, and redox responses, the preserved overall running distance indicates that the training stimulus might be enhanced in hypoxia compared to normoxia. Alteration of the respiratory patterns during repeated sprinting in hypoxia might be one factor, beside others, responsible for a potential performance loss. It could be hypothesized that respiratory pattern adaptations are involved in potential performance improvements after hypoxia repeated sprint training.

  9. Human Performance: Psychological and Physiological Sex Differences (A Selected Bibliography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Peabody College for Teachers , Nashville, TN, 1971. 51. Ong, J.j & Rodman, T. Sex and eye-hand preferential difference in star- tracing performance...Developmental Psychology, 1978, Ui_, 263-267. 79. Schuell, H. Sex differences in relation to stuttering : Part I» Journal of Speech Disorders, 1946, U^, 277...298. 80. Schuell, H. Sex differences in relation to stutterings Part II. Journal of Speech Disorders, 1947, J[2, 23-38. Bis Semlear, T. M« Sex

  10. Physiological aspects of soccer refereeing performance and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Carlo; Abt, Grant; D'Ottavio, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    The role of the referee is far from minimal in the economy of soccer, as very often, particularly in professional soccer, a wrong judgment may have profound implications on the outcome of the game. In this regard, a better knowledge of soccer refereeing can obviously benefit the game. Recent studies have shown that during a competitive match, an elite soccer referee may cover 9-13 km attaining approximately 85-90% and approximately 70-80% of maximal heart rate and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), respectively. Of the total distance covered about 4-18% is covered at high intensity. Blood lactate concentration has been reported to be in the range of 4-5 mmol/L; however, during competitive matches, blood lactate concentrations as high as 14 mmol/L have been observed. This figure is similar to that extensively reported for soccer players, specifically paralleling that observed in midfield players. However, compared with players, referees are 15-20 years older, often have a non-professional status and cannot be substituted during the game. Furthermore, this important physical stress superimposes onto a high perceptual-cognitive workload throughout the entire game. In relation to fitness status, referees possess VO2max values somewhat lower than the players they officiate, with mean values in the range of 44-50 mL/kg/min. However, the methods used by the Federation Internationale de Football Association and the Union of European Football Associations to test referee fitness need to be changed as the current fitness tests do not relate to match performance. More task-specific tests such as the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (YYIRT) have been devised and validated for use with referees. Given that aerobic performance is positively correlated with match performance, it is important that referees are trained to improve their ability to cover large distances during a match and also to repeat high-intensity efforts. A number of studies have shown large improvements in YYIRT

  11. Eighth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings (abstracts). 2001 September 9-12; Hiwassee, GA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Sung; P.P. Kormanik; W.J. Ostrosina; J.G. Isebrands

    2002-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities in field performance of planted trees, seedling propagation, physiology, genetics, acorn germination, and natural regeneration for oaks are described in 21 abstracts.

  12. Sixth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings (abstracts); 1995 September 18-20; Tomahawk, WI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald M. Teclaw

    1996-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities in field performance of planted trees, seedling propagation, physiology, genetics, acorn germination ,and natural regeneration for oaks are described in 29 abstracts.

  13. The effects of drought and shade on the performance, morphology and physiology of Ghanaian tree species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Amissah

    Full Text Available In tropical forests light and water availability are the most important factors for seedling growth and survival but an increasing frequency of drought may affect tree regeneration. One central question is whether drought and shade have interactive effects on seedling growth and survival. Here, we present results of a greenhouse experiment, in which seedlings of 10 Ghanaian tree species were exposed to combinations of strong seasonal drought (continuous watering versus withholding water for nine weeks and shade (5% irradiance versus 20% irradiance. We evaluated the effects of drought and shade on seedling survival and growth and plasticity of 11 underlying traits related to biomass allocation, morphology and physiology. Seedling survival under dry conditions was higher in shade than in high light, thus providing support for the "facilitation hypothesis" that shade enhances plant performance through improved microclimatic conditions, and rejecting the trade-off hypothesis that drought should have stronger impact in shade because of reduced root investment. Shaded plants had low biomass fraction in roots, in line with the trade-off hypothesis, but they compensated for this with a higher specific root length (i.e., root length per unit root mass, resulting in a similar root length per plant mass and, hence, similar water uptake capacity as high-light plants. The majority (60% of traits studied responded independently to drought and shade, indicating that within species shade- and drought tolerances are not in trade-off, but largely uncoupled. When individual species responses were analysed, then for most of the traits only one to three species showed significant interactive effects between drought and shade. The uncoupled response of most species to drought and shade should provide ample opportunity for niche differentiation and species coexistence under a range of water and light conditions. Overall our greenhouse results suggest that, in the

  14. Growth temperature exerts differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Francisco J; Jewett, Michael C; Nielsen, Jens; Agosin, Eduardo

    2008-10-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been widely used as a model for studying eukaryotic cells and mapping the molecular mechanisms of many different human diseases. Industrial wine yeasts, on the other hand, have been selected on the basis of their adaptation to stringent environmental conditions and the organoleptic properties that they confer to wine. Here, we used a two-factor design to study the responses of a standard laboratory strain, CEN.PK113-7D, and an industrial wine yeast strain, EC1118, to growth temperatures of 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C in nitrogen-limited, anaerobic, steady-state chemostat cultures. Physiological characterization revealed that the growth temperature strongly impacted the biomass yield of both strains. Moreover, we found that the wine yeast was better adapted to mobilizing resources for biomass production and that the laboratory yeast exhibited higher fermentation rates. To elucidate mechanistic differences controlling the growth temperature response and underlying adaptive mechanisms between the strains, DNA microarrays and targeted metabolome analysis were used. We identified 1,007 temperature-dependent genes and 473 strain-dependent genes. The transcriptional response was used to identify highly correlated gene expression subnetworks within yeast metabolism. We showed that temperature differences most strongly affect nitrogen metabolism and the heat shock response. A lack of stress response element-mediated gene induction, coupled with reduced trehalose levels, indicated that there was a decreased general stress response at 15 degrees C compared to that at 30 degrees C. Differential responses among strains were centered on sugar uptake, nitrogen metabolism, and expression of genes related to organoleptic properties. Our study provides global insight into how growth temperature affects differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of S. cerevisiae.

  15. What can imaging tell us about physiology? Lung growth and regional mechanical strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Connie C W; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2012-09-01

    The interplay of mechanical forces transduces diverse physico-biochemical processes to influence lung morphogenesis, growth, maturation, remodeling and repair. Because tissue stress is difficult to measure in vivo, mechano-sensitive responses are commonly inferred from global changes in lung volume, shape, or compliance and correlated with structural changes in tissue blocks sampled from postmortem-fixed lungs. Recent advances in noninvasive volumetric imaging technology, nonrigid image registration, and deformation analysis provide valuable tools for the quantitative analysis of in vivo regional anatomy and air and tissue-blood distributions and when combined with transpulmonary pressure measurements, allow characterization of regional mechanical function, e.g., displacement, strain, shear, within and among intact lobes, as well as between the lung and the components of its container-rib cage, diaphragm, and mediastinum-thereby yielding new insights into the inter-related metrics of mechanical stress-strain and growth/remodeling. Here, we review the state-of-the-art imaging applications for mapping asymmetric heterogeneous physical interactions within the thorax and how these interactions permit as well as constrain lung growth, remodeling, and compensation during development and following pneumonectomy to illustrate how advanced imaging could facilitate the understanding of physiology and pathophysiology. Functional imaging promises to facilitate the formulation of realistic computational models of lung growth that integrate mechano-sensitive events over multiple spatial and temporal scales to accurately describe in vivo physiology and pathophysiology. Improved computational models in turn could enhance our ability to predict regional as well as global responses to experimental and therapeutic interventions.

  16. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ≤ 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes.

  17. Factors affecting growth in infants with single ventricle physiology: a report from the Pediatric Heart Network Infant Single Ventricle Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard V; Zak, Victor; Ravishankar, Chitra; Altmann, Karen; Anderson, Jeffrey; Atz, Andrew M; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Ghanayem, Nancy; Lambert, Linda; Lurito, Karen; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara; Margossian, Renee; Pemberton, Victoria L; Russell, Jennifer; Stylianou, Mario; Hsu, Daphne

    2011-12-01

    To describe growth patterns in infants with single ventricle physiology and determine factors influencing growth. Data from 230 subjects enrolled in the Pediatric Heart Network Infant Single Ventricle Enalapril Trial were used to assess factors influencing change in weight-for-age z-score (z) from study enrollment (0.7 ± 0.4 months) to pre-superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC; 5.1 ± 1.8 months, period 1) and pre-SCPC to final study visit (14.1 ± 0.9 months, period 2). Predictor variables included patient characteristics, feeding regimen, clinical center, and medical factors during neonatal (period 1) and SCPC hospitalizations (period 2). Univariate regression analysis was performed, followed by backward stepwise regression and bootstrapping reliability to inform a final multivariable model. Weights were available for 197 of 230 subjects for period 1 and 173 of 197 subjects for period 2. For period 1, greater gestational age, younger age at study enrollment, tube feeding at neonatal hospitalization discharge, and clinical center were associated with a greater negative z (poorer growth) in multivariable modeling (adjusted R(2) = 0.39, P SCPC and greater daily caloric intake were associated with greater positive z (better growth; R(2) = 0.10, P = .002). Aggressive nutritional support and earlier SCPC are modifiable factors associated with a favorable change in weight-for-age z-score. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Impacting Growth in Infants with Single Ventricle Physiology: A Report from Pediatric Heart Network Infant Single Ventricle Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard V.; Zak, Victor; Ravishankar, Chitra; Altmann, Karen; Anderson, Jeffrey; Atz, Andrew M.; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Ghanayem, Nancy; Lambert, Linda; Lurito, Karen; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara; Margossian, Renee; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Russell, Jennifer; Stylianou, Mario; Hsu, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To describe growth patterns in infants with single ventricle physiology and determine factors influencing growth. Study design Data from 230 subjects enrolled in the Pediatric Heart Network Infant Single Ventricle Enalapril Trial were used to assess factors influencing change in weight-for-age z-score (Δz) from study enrollment (0.7 ± 0.4 months) to pre-superior cavopulmonary connection (SCPC) (5.1 ± 1.8 months, period 1), and pre-SCPC to final study visit (14.1 ± 0.9 months, period 2). Predictor variables included patient characteristics, feeding regimen, clinical center, and medical factors during neonatal (period 1) and SCPC hospitalizations (period 2). Univariate regression analysis was performed, followed by backward stepwise regression and bootstrapping reliability to inform a final multivariable model. Results Weights were available for 197/230 subjects for period 1 and 173/197 for period 2. For period 1, greater gestational age, younger age at study enrollment, tube feeding at neonatal discharge, and clinical center were associated with a greater negative Δz (poorer growth) in multivariable modeling (adjusted R2 = 0.39, p SCPC and greater daily caloric intake were associated with greater positive Δz (better growth) (R2 = 0.10, p = 0.002). Conclusions Aggressive nutritional support and earlier SCPC are modifiable factors associated with a favorable change in weight-for-age z-score. PMID:21784436

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Growth, Sex Steroids, and IGF-1 in Boys With Physiological Gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieritz, Mikkel G; Rakêt, Lars L; Hagen, Casper P; Nielsen, John E; Talman, Maj-Lis M; Petersen, Jørgen H; Sommer, Stefan H; Main, Katharina M; Jørgensen, Niels; Juul, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Physiological gynecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, although this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. This study aimed to describe the frequency of physiological gynecomastia and to determine possible etiological factors (eg, auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal setup. A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8-16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study. The boys were examined every 6 months during an 8-year follow-up. Median number of examinations was 10 (2-15). Blood samples were analyzed for FSH, LH, testosterone, estradiol, SHBG, inhibin B, anti-Müllerian hormone, IGF-1, and IGF binding protein-3 by immunoassays. Auxological parameters, pubertal development, and the presence of gynecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Fifty-two of 106 boys (49%) developed gynecomastia, of which 10 (19%) presented with intermittent gynecomastia. Boys with physiological gynecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who did not develop gynecomastia (13.5 versus 13.9 years, P = .027), and they had significantly higher serum levels of IGF-1 (P = .000), estradiol (P = .013), free testosterone (P Gynecomastia is frequent in pubertal boys. Increased IGF-1 levels and pubertal growth appear to be associated, whereas changes in estrogen to testosterone ratio seem negligible.

  20. Growth physiology and fate of diatoms in the ocean: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarthou, Géraldine; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Blain, Stéphane; Tréguer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Diatoms are a major component of phytoplankton community. They tend to dominate under natural high-nutrient concentrations, as well as during artificial Fe fertilisation experiments. They are main players in the biogeochemical cycle of carbon (C), as they can account for 40% of the total primary production in the Ocean and dominate export production, as well as in the biogeochemical cycles of the other macro-nutrients, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and silicon (Si). Another important nutrient is Fe, which was shown to have a direct or indirect effect on nearly all the biogeochemical parameters of diatoms. In the present paper, an inventory is made of the growth, physiology and fate of many diatom species, including maximum growth rate, photosynthetic parameters (maximum specific rate of photosynthesis, photosynthetic efficiency and light adaptation parameter), nutrient limitation (half-saturation constant for growth/uptake), cellular elemental ratios, and loss terms (sinking rates, autolysis rates and grazing rates). This is a first step for improvement of the parameterisation of physiologically based phytoplankton growth and global 3D carbon models. This review is a synthesis of a large number of published laboratory experiments using monospecific cultures as well as field data. Our compilation confirms that size is an important factor explaining variations of biogeochemical parameters of diatoms (e.g. maximum growth rate, photosynthesis parameters, half-saturation constants, sinking rate, and grazing). Some variations of elemental ratios can be explained by adaptation of intracellular requirements or storage of Fe, and P, for instance. The important loss processes of diatoms pointed out by this synthesis are (i) sinking, as single cells as well as through aggregation which generally greatly increases sinking rate, (ii) cell autolysis, which can significantly reduce net growth rates, especially under nutrient limitation when gross growth rates are low, and (iii

  1. Prognosis of physiological disorders in physic nut to N, P, and K deficiency during initial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elcio Ferreira; Macedo, Fernando Giovannetti; Zanchim, Bruno José; Lima, Giuseppina Pace Pereira; Lavres, José

    2017-06-01

    The description of physiological disorders in physic nut plants deficient in nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) may help to predict nutritional imbalances before the appearance of visual symptoms and to guide strategies for early nutrient supply. The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth of physic nuts (Jatropha curcas L.) during initial development by analyzing the gas exchange parameters, nutrient uptake and use efficiency, as well as the nitrate reductase and acid phosphatase activities and polyamine content. Plants were grown in a complete nutrient solution and solutions from which N, P or K was omitted. The nitrate reductase activity, phosphatase acid activity, polyamine content and gas exchange parameters from leaves of N, P and K-deficient plants indicates earlier imbalances before the appearance of visual symptoms. Nutrient deficiencies resulted in reduced plant growth, although P- and K-deficient plants retained normal net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s ) and instantaneous carboxylation efficiency (k) during the first evaluation periods, as modulated by the P and K use efficiencies. Increased phosphatase acid activity in P-deficient plants may also contribute to the P use efficiency and to A and gs during the first evaluations. Early physiological and biochemical evaluations of N-, P- and K-starved plants may rely on reliable, useful methods to predict early nutritional imbalances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of growth environment and physiological state on metal immobilization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Ryan C; Phoenix, Vernon R; Saxena, Anuradha; Beveridge, Terry J

    2010-07-01

    Environmental growth conditions and cell physiology have the potential to influence bacterial surface-metal interactions in both planktonic and biofilm systems. Here, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied to determine the influence of these factors (pH, redox potential, and active respiration) on surface electrostatics and metal immobilization. Acid-base titrations revealed a decrease in ionizable ligands at pKa 5 (putative carboxyls) in cells grown below pH 6.2 and in cells grown anaerobically relative to cells grown under oxic and circumneutral pH conditions. This observation correlates with Western immunoblotting assays that revealed a reduction in carboxylated B-band lipopolysaccharide in these cells. Furthermore, spectrophotometric analysis revealed a decrease in zinc, copper, and iron immobilization in these cells, suggesting that lipopolysaccharide modification in response to environmental stimuli influences metal binding. The effect of active versus inactive metabolism on metal adsorption was also examined using respiration inhibitors carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and sodium azide. Cells treated with these compounds bound more zinc, copper, and iron than untreated controls, suggesting proton extrusion through respiration competes with metal cations for reactive groups on the cell surface. Accumulation of gold did not show the same trend, and transmission electron microscopy studies confirmed it was not a surface-mediated process. These results suggest that variations in growth environment and cell physiology influence metal accumulation by bacterial cell surfaces and may help to explain discontinuous accumulation of metal observed throughout microbial communities.

  3. Effect of coastal eutrophication on growth and physiology of Spartina alterniflora Loisel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Cui, Baoshan; Xie, Tian; Wang, Qing; Yan, Jiaguo

    2018-02-01

    Coastal eutrophication has become a driver of coastal wetlands loss. Eutrophication caused by the increase of nitrogen content was one of the most main reasons. We analyzed that exogenous ammonium nitrogen (EAN) of different concentration influenced on the growth and physiology of Spartina alterniflora Loisel (S. alterniflora) through simulated conditions. The results showed that growth of the root system largely depended on the environment conditions around S. alterniflora. Higher nitrogen concentration promoted aboveground biomass and increased plant height. On the other hand, as the increase of growth period, higher nitrogen concentration could inhibit the elongation growth of root and reduce the underground biomass. We showed that activity of POD, SOD and MDA content changed in an upward trend along with the increased nitrogen level. There was a significant positive correlation between H+ flux and NO3- flux (r = 0.601, P < 0.01), and a significant negative correlation between H+ flux and NH4+ flux (r = -0.713, P < 0.01) within 1.5 mm from the root tip of S. alterniflora. Efflux and influx of ions were associated with changes of nitrogen levels. This research will provide data supporting for coastal wetland restoration of biodiversity reduction caused by coastal eutrophication.

  4. MORPHOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF PLANTS IN HIGH SALINITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Vasilyuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of increasing salinity to the morpho-metric parameters of Salix alba L., which dominated in the coastal areas on rivers of Steppe Dnieper, is investigated. We added Mg as salt MgSO4 * 3H2O in the range of concentration: 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 g/l in a solution of willow cuttings. In the solution was added and plant growth regulator "Kornevin" the synthetic origin. The negative effect of salt at a concentration from 1.0 g/l to 2.5 g/l in the dynamics of growth and development was found. The correlation between the size and salinity in dynamics of growth and development of plant were demonstrated: in the growth of shoots (R = 0.83, 0.91 and 0.95, in the growth of roots (R = 0.92, 0.68 and 0.84 respectively depended from salt concentration. The length of the leaf blade was from 4% to 8%, from 7% to 43%, from 333% to 11% (R = 0,68, 0,93, 0,61, depending on the concentration of salt and during observing compared with control (distilled water. "Kornevin" and combined effect of salt increased the length of the leaf blade growth by 4-5, 2-4, 3-5 times, the roots by7 and 3-14 times, the shoots by 3-4, 6-7 and 5-7 times in the dynamics of growth compared with control (MgSO4, 2,5 g/l. The recommendations regarding for the advisability of using the plant growth regulator "Kornevin", as very effective plant growth preparation that promoted rooting and activated physiological processes of plant organism, expressed protective effect in conditions of excessive salinity, were provided. Key words: the morpho-metric index, the plant growth regulators, abiotic factors, salinity factor, the adaptation.

  5. Upwelling-derived oceanographic conditions impact growth performance and growth-related gene expression in intertidal fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Eduardo N; Zuloaga, Rodrigo; Almarza, Oscar; Mendez, Katterinne; Valdés, Juan Antonio; Molina, Alfredo; Pulgar, Jose

    2017-12-01

    Growth is one of the main biological processes in aquatic organisms that is affected by environmental fluctuations such as upwelling (characterized by food-rich waters). In fish, growth is directly related with skeletal muscle increase; which represents the largest tissue of body mass. However, the effects of upwelling on growth, at the physiological and molecular level, are unknown. This study used Girella laevifrons (one of the most abundant intertidal fish in Eastern South Pacific) as a biological model, considering animals from upwelling (U) and non-upwelling (NU) areas. Here, we evaluated the effect of nutritional composition and food availability on growth performance and expression of key growth-related genes (insulin-kike growth factor 1 (igf1) and myosin heavy-chain (myhc)) and atrophy-related genes (muscle ring-finger 1 (murf1), F-box only protein 32 (atrogin-1) and BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19kDa-interacting protein 3 (bnip3)). We reported that, among zones, U fish displayed higher growth performance in response to nutritional composition, specifically between protein- and fiber-rich diets (~1g). We also found in NU fish that atrophy-related genes were upregulated with fiber-rich diet and during fasting (~2-fold at minimum respect U). In conclusion, our results suggest that the growth potential of upwelling fish may be a consequence of differential muscle gene expression. Our data provide a preliminary approach contributing on how upwelling influence fish growth at the physiological and molecular levels. Future studies are required to gain further knowledge about molecular differences between U and NU animals, as well as the possible applications of this knowledge in the aquaculture industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mort, Alasdair J.; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M. J.; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth? Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were ...

  7. Our ancestral physiological phenotype: An adaptation for hypoxia tolerance and for endurance performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Hochachka, Peter W.; Gunga, Hanns Christian; Kirsch, Karl

    1998-01-01

    There are well known mechanistic similarities in human physiology between adaptations for endurance performance and hypoxia tolerance. By using background principles arising from recent studies of the evolution of the diving response in marine mammals, here we analyze human responses to hypobaric hypoxia based on studies with several different low and high altitude human lineages. As in the evolution of the diving response in pinnipeds, we found “conservative” and “adaptable” physiological ch...

  8. Nickel accumulation and its effect on growth, physiological and biochemical parameters in millets and oats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vibha; Jatav, Pradeep Kumar; Verma, Raini; Kothari, Shanker Lal; Kachhwaha, Sumita

    2017-10-01

    With the boom in industrialization, there is an increase in the level of heavy metals in the soil which drastically affect the growth and development of plants. Nickel is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, but elevated level of Ni causes stunted growth, chlorosis, nutrient imbalance, and alterations in the defense mechanism of plants in terms of accumulation of osmolytes or change in enzyme activities like guiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Ni-induced toxic response was studied in seedlings of finger millet, pearl millet, and oats in terms of seedling growth, lipid peroxidation, total chlorophyll, proline content, and enzymatic activities. On the basis of germination and growth parameters of the seedling, finger millet was found to be the most tolerant. Nickel accumulation was markedly lower in the shoots as compared to the roots, which was the highest in finger millet and the lowest in shoots of oats. Plants treated with a high concentration of Ni showed significant reduction in chlorophyll and increase in proline content. Considerable difference in level of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and activity of antioxidative enzymes indicates generation of redox imbalance in plants due to Ni-induced stress. Elevated activities of POD and SOD were observed with high concentrations of Ni while CAT activity was found to be reduced. It was observed that finger millet has higher capability to maintain homeostasis by keeping the balance between accumulation and ROS scavenging system than pearl millet and oats. The data provide insight into the physiological and biochemical changes in plants adapted to survive in Ni-rich environment. This study will help in selecting the more suitable crop species to be grown on Ni-rich soils.

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Express Type 1 Fimbriae Only in Surface Adherent Populations Under Physiological Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stærk, Kristian; Khandige, Surabhi; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Andersen, Thomas Emil

    2016-02-01

    Most uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains harbor genes encoding adhesive type 1 fimbria (T1F). T1F is a key factor for successful establishment of urinary tract infection. However, UPEC strains typically do not express T1F in the bladder urine, and little is understood about its induction in vivo. A flow chamber infection model was used to grow UPEC under conditions simulating distinct infection niches in the bladder. Type 1 fimbriation on isolated UPEC was subsequently determined by yeast cell agglutination and immunofluorescence microscopy, and the results were correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade cultured human bladder cells. Although inactive during planktonic growth in urine, T1F expression occurs when UPEC settles on and infects bladder epithelial cells or colonizes catheters. As a result, UPEC in these sessile populations enhances bladder cell adhesion and invasion potential. Only T1F-negative UPEC are subsequently released to the urine, thus limiting T1F expression to surface-associated UPEC alone. Our results demonstrate that T1F expression is strictly regulated under physiological growth conditions with increased expression during surface growth adaptation and infection of uroepithelial cells. This leads to separation of UPEC into low-expression planktonic populations and high-expression sessile populations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Effect of Salicylic Acid on the Growth and Physiological Characteristics of Maize under Stress Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzoor, K.; Ilyas, N.; Batool, N.; Arshad, M.; Ahmad, B.

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring signaling molecule and growth regulator that enhances plant growth particularly in stress conditions. The present study was planned to evaluate the effects of different levels of SA on maize growth under drought and salt stress conditions. An experiment was conducted to test the morphological, physiological and biochemical changes in two cultivar of maize D-1184 and TG-8250. Varying levels of salicylic acid, i.e. 5mM, 10mM and 15mM were applied through foliar method. Exogenous applications of salicylic acid were done after 20 days of germination of the maize plants. Salicylic acid significantly affects root and shoot dry matter under drought and salt stress. Foliar application of SA significantly increased proline concentration (11 percentage and 12 percentage), amino acid accumulation (25 percentage and 18 percentage), relative water (17 percentage and 14 percentage) and Chlorophyll content. Overall, it can be concluded that SA at lower concentration is effective to minimize the effect of stress conditions. Maize cultivar TG-8250 showed better tolerance under drought and salt stress condition as compared to D-1184 cultivar. (author)

  11. Effect of microwave irradiation on germination and seedling growth physiological characteristics of alfalfa seeds after storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liyu; Zhang Shuqing; Li Jianfeng; Shi Shangli; Huo Pinghui

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effect of microwave irradiation on germination and growth physiological characteristics of seeds that stored for years, the irradiated alfalfa seeds that stored at room temperature for 2 years were used to conduct the germination and pot culture tests, and the germination rate, radical elongation, growth height, individual nodule, nitrogenase activity, chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were measured. On the 15th day of germination, the germination rates of all the treatments are higher than that of the control, which decrease with the elongation of time. On the llst day of germination, the radical length of all the treatments is lower than that of the control. Growth height, individual nodule, fresh weight and dry weight for the 40 s irradiation treatment are higher than that of the control. Nitrogenase activity of all the treatments is lower than that of the control (P < O.05). The chlorophyll content reaches its maximum when being irradiated for 10 s, and the variation for F 0 and F v /F m of all treatments indicates that the light conversion efficiency of the leaves derived from the irradiated alfalfa seeds that stored for 2 a at room temperature is still relatively stressed. (authors)

  12. Ocean acidification modulates expression of genes and physiological performance of a marine diatom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yahe; Zhuang, Shufang; Wu, Yaping; Ren, Honglin; Chen, Fangyi; Lin, Xin; Wang, Kejian; Beardall, John; Gao, Kunshan

    2017-01-01

    Ocean Acidification (OA) is known to affect various aspects of physiological performances of diatoms, but little is known about the underlining molecular mechanisms involved. Here, we show that in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the expression of key genes associated with photosynthetic light harvesting as well as those encoding Rubisco, carbonic anhydrase, NADH dehydrogenase and nitrite reductase, are modulated by OA (1000 μatm, pHnbs 7.83). Growth and photosynthetic carbon fixation were enhanced by elevated CO2. OA treatment decreased the expression of β-carbonic anhydrase (β-ca), which functions in balancing intracellular carbonate chemistry and the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM). The expression of the genes encoding fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c protein (lhcf type (fcp)), mitochondrial ATP synthase (mtATP), ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit gene (rbcl) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ndh2), were down-regulated during the first four days (< 8 generations) after the cells were transferred from LC (cells grown under ambient air condition; 390 μatm; pHnbs 8.19) to OA conditions, with no significant difference between LC and HC treatments with the time elapsed. The expression of nitrite reductase (nir) was up-regulated by the OA treatment. Additionally, the genes for these proteins (NiR, FCP, mtATP synthase, β-CA) showed diel expression patterns. It appeared that the enhanced photosynthetic and growth rates under OA could be attributed to stimulated nitrogen assimilation, increased CO2 availability or saved energy from down-regulation of the CCM and consequently lowered cost of protein synthesis versus that of non-nitrogenous cell components. PMID:28192486

  13. Vermicompost substitution influences growth, physiological disorders, fruit yield and quality of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajbir; Sharma, R R; Kumar, Satyendra; Gupta, R K; Patil, R T

    2008-11-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of vermicompost on growth, physiological disorders, fruit yield and quality of 'Chandler' strawberry. For this, 4 levels of vermicompost (2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0tha(-1)) were supplemented with inorganic fertilizers to balance fertilizer requirement of strawberry under semi-arid region of northern India. The vermicompost was incorporated into top 10cm layer of soil, which was supplemented on the basis of chemical analysis, with amount of inorganic N, P, K fertilizer calculated to equalize the recommended dose of nutrients. Vermicompost application increased plant spread (10.7%), leaf area (23.1%) and dry matter (20.7%), and increased total fruit yield (32.7%). Substitution of vermicompost drastically reduced the incidence of physiological disorders like albinism (16.1-4.5%); fruit malformation (11.5-4.0%) and occurrence of grey mould (10.4-2.1%) in strawberry indicating that vermicompost had significant role in reducing nutrient-related disorders and disease like Botrytis rot, and thereby increasing the marketable fruit yield up to 58.6% with better quality parameters. Fruit harvested from plant receiving vermicompost were firmer, have higher TSS, ascorbic acid content and lower acidity, and have attractive colour. All these parameters appeared to be dose dependent and best results were achieved @ 7.5tha(-1), however, beyond this dose of vermicompost, there was not significant influence on these parameters.

  14. Growth, metabolism and physiological response of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus Selenka during periods of inactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rongbin; Zang, Yuanqi; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin

    2013-03-01

    The growth, metabolism and physiological response of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus, were investigated during periods of inactivity. The body weight, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), activities of acidic phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and content of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the body wall and coelomic fluid of A. japonicus were measured during starvation, experimental aestivation and aestivation. The results showed that the body weight of sea cucumber in the three treatments decreased significantly during the experimental period ( P < 0.05). The OCR of sea cucumber reduced in starvation and experimental aestivation treatments, but increased gradually in natural aestivation treatment. The activities of ACP and AKP of sea cucumber decreased gradually in all treatments, whereas those of SOD and CAT as well as Hsp70 content decreased in the starvation and experimental aestivation treatments and increased in natural aestivation treatment. The sea cucumber entered a state of aestivation at 24°C. To some extent, the animals in experimental aestivation were different from those in natural aestivation in metabolism and physiological response. These findings suggested that the aestivation mechanism of A. japonicus is complex and may not be attributed to the elevated temperature only.

  15. Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells Increase Tumor Growth Rates and Modify Tumor Physiology: Relevance for Therapeutic Targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagan, Jonathan; Przybyla, Beata; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gupta, Kalpna; Griffin, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell precursors from human peripheral blood have been shown to home to areas of neovascularization and may assist tumor growth by increasing or fortifying blood vessel growth. In the present study, the influence of these cells on tumor growth and physiology was investigated and the role of these cells as a therapeutic target or in determining treatment sensitivity was tested. After isolation from human blood and expansion in vitro, actively growing cells with verified endothelial phenotype (Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cell, BOEC) were injected i.v. into tumor bearing mice for three consecutive days. The growth rate was significantly enhanced in relatively small RERF human lung tumors (i.e., less than 150 mm 3 ) grown in immunocompromised mice by an average of 1.5-fold while it had no effect when injections were given to animals bearing larger tumors. There were no signs of toxicity or unwanted systemic effects. We also observed evidence of increased perfusion, vessel number, response to 15 Gy radiation and oxygenation in RERF tumors of animals injected with BOECs compared to control tumors. In addition, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma tumors were found to grow faster upon injection of BOECs. When FSaII tumors were subjected to a partial thermal ablation treatment using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) there was consistently elevated detection of fluorescently labeled and i.v. injected endothelial precursors in the tumor when analyzed with optical imaging and/or histological preparations. Importantly, we also observed that BOECs treated with the novel anti-angiogenic peptide anginex in-vitro, show decreased proliferation and increased sensitivity to radiation. In vivo, the normal increase in FSaII tumor growth induced by injected BOECs was blunted by the addition of anginex treatment. It appears that endothelial precursors may significantly contribute to tumor vessel growth, tumor progression and/or repair of tumor damage and may improve the

  16. Meteorite-associated growth physiology of the iron oxidising extremophile Metallosphaera sedula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebec, Ziga; Rittmann, Simon; Schleper, Christa; Milojevic, Tetyana

    2015-04-01

    Extremophiles cherry pick the habitats at the edge of living limits, shaping the life under inhospitable conditions. Such microbes are characterised by functional capabilities required for survival in harsh and extreme environments. These living entities serve as models for a life on early Earth with its severe and ancient habitats, providing an understanding of the extent of biology on Earth, and enabling a discovery of its wider presence in the universe. The Fe-oxidising archaeon Metallosphaera sedula inhabits extreme environments, flourishing in hot acid and exhibiting unusual heavy-metal resistance. This chemolithotrophic archaea thrives at 73°C and pH 2, utilizing energy derived from metal oxidation. Iron and sulphur compounds are preferentially required for its growth. Owing its physiological versatility, M. sedula is able to grow efficiently chemoauto- and chemomixotrophically using pyrite, chalcopyrite or sulfur compounds as an energy source and can also grow heterotrophically using yeast extract representing an excellent model organism for basic research into bioleaching processes. Stimulated by its exceptional physiological properties, we have set out to assess the survival potential of M. sedula by investigating the viability of this archaeon living on and interacting with minerals of non-terrestrial origin. Initial results demonstrate that the iron oxidising thermoacidophile M. sedula utilizes metals trapped within stony meteorites as the most preferential energy source, resulting in i) one order of magnitude higher growth rate comparatively to the other energy substrates of terrestrial origin (sulfide ores, hydrogen, iron sulfate) ii) a drastic shift in a lower temperature limit for this microbe. A comprehensive complex of genetic, biochemical and geochemical techniques will be applied to analyze microbial-meteorite liaison.

  17. Thermal comfort, physiological responses and performance during exposure to a moderate temperature drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; de Wit, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effects of a moderate temperature drift on human thermal comfort, physiological responses, productivity and performance. A dynamic thermophysiological model was used to examine the possibility of simulating human thermal responses and thermal comfort...... under moderate transient conditions. To examine the influence of a moderate temperature ramp, a climate room set-up with experimental subjects was used. Eight subjects visited the climate room on two occasions: 1) exposure to a transient condition (a moderate temperature ramp) and 2) a steady...... temperature corresponding with a neutral thermal sensation (control situation). During the experiments both physiological responses and thermal sensation were measured. Productivity and performance were assessed with a ‘Remote Performance Measurement’ (RPM) method. Physiological and thermal sensation data...

  18. Lichen physiological traits and growth forms affect communities of associated invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhorst, Stef; Asplund, Johan; Kardol, Paul; Wardle, David A

    2015-09-01

    While there has been much interest in the relationships between traits of primary producers and composition of associated invertebrate consumer communities, our knowledge is largely based on studies from vascular plants, while other types of functionally important producers, such as lichens, have rarely been considered. To address how physiological traits of lichens drive community composition of invertebrates, we collected thalli from 27 lichen species from southern Norway and quantified the communities of associated springtails, mites, and nematodes. For each lichen species, we measured key physiological thallus traits and determined whether invertebrate communities were correlated with these traits. We also explored whether invertebrate communities differed among lichen groups, categorized according to nitrogen-fixing ability, growth form, and substratum. Lichen traits explained up to 39% of the variation in abundances of major invertebrate groups. For many invertebrate groups, abundance was positively correlated with lichen N and P concentrations, N:P ratio, and the percentage of water content on saturation (WC), but had few relationships with concentrations of carbon-based secondary compounds. Diversity and taxonomic richness of invertebrate groups were sometimes also correlated with lichen N and N:P ratios. Nitrogen-fixing lichens showed higher abundance and diversity of some invertebrate groups than did non-N-fixing lichens. However, this emerged in part because most N-fixing lichens have a foliose growth form that benefits invertebrates, through, improving the microclimate, independently of N concentration. Furthermore, invertebrate communities associated with terricolous lichens were determined more by their close proximity to the soil invertebrate pool than by lichen traits. Overall, our results reveal that differences between lichen species have a large impact on the invertebrate communities that live among the thalli. Different invertebrate groups show

  19. Growth performance, haematological and biochemical study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant difference (P<0.05) was established in the growth parameters determined in the C. gariepinus fingerlings fed with the four frog formulations, namely, final weight, total weight, and mean feed gain, mean weight gain and feed conversion ratio The 40% R. galamensis ration elicited higher growth values than all ...

  20. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome. © 2013.

  1. Sleep and athletic performance: the effects of sleep loss on exercise performance, and physiological and cognitive responses to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullagar, Hugh H K; Skorski, Sabrina; Duffield, Rob; Hammes, Daniel; Coutts, Aaron J; Meyer, Tim

    2015-02-01

    Although its true function remains unclear, sleep is considered critical to human physiological and cognitive function. Equally, since sleep loss is a common occurrence prior to competition in athletes, this could significantly impact upon their athletic performance. Much of the previous research has reported that exercise performance is negatively affected following sleep loss; however, conflicting findings mean that the extent, influence, and mechanisms of sleep loss affecting exercise performance remain uncertain. For instance, research indicates some maximal physical efforts and gross motor performances can be maintained. In comparison, the few published studies investigating the effect of sleep loss on performance in athletes report a reduction in sport-specific performance. The effects of sleep loss on physiological responses to exercise also remain equivocal; however, it appears a reduction in sleep quality and quantity could result in an autonomic nervous system imbalance, simulating symptoms of the overtraining syndrome. Additionally, increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines following sleep loss could promote immune system dysfunction. Of further concern, numerous studies investigating the effects of sleep loss on cognitive function report slower and less accurate cognitive performance. Based on this context, this review aims to evaluate the importance and prevalence of sleep in athletes and summarises the effects of sleep loss (restriction and deprivation) on exercise performance, and physiological and cognitive responses to exercise. Given the equivocal understanding of sleep and athletic performance outcomes, further research and consideration is required to obtain a greater knowledge of the interaction between sleep and performance.

  2. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Salt tolerance of precocious-dwarf cashew rootstocks: physiological and growth indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro Paulo Torres

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The cashew crop (Anacardium occiedentale L. is of great economic and social importance for Northeast Brazil, a region usually affected by water and soil salinity. The present study was conducted in a greenhouse to evaluate the effects of four salinity levels established through electrical conductivity of irrigation water (ECw: 0.7, 1.4, 2.1 and 2.8 dS m-1, at 25ºC, on growth and physiological indexes of five rootstocks of dwarf-precocious cashew varieties CCP06, CCP09, CCP1001, EMBRAPA50, and EMBRAPA51. Plant height, leaf area, dry weight of root, shoot and total; water content of leaves, root/shoot ratio, leaf area ratio, absolute and relative growth rates and rate of net assimilation were evaluated. The majority of the evaluated variables were found to be affected by ECw and the effects varied among clones; however, no significant interactive effects were observed for factors. The value of ECw = 1.39 dS m-1 was considered as a threshold tolerance for the precocious cashew rootstocks used in this study. The dwarf-precocious cashew is moderately sensible to soil salinity during the formation phase of rootstock. Clones EMBRAPA51 and EMBRAPA50 presented, respectively, the least and the best development indexes.

  4. Flexibility of Physiological Traits Underlying Inter-Individual Growth Differences in Intertidal and Subtidal Mussels Mytilusgalloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Fernández-Reiriz

    Full Text Available Mussel seed (Mytilusgalloprovincialis gathered from the intertidal and subtidal environments of a Galician embayment (NW, Spain were maintained in the laboratory during five months to select fast (F and slow (S growing mussels. The physiological basis underlying inter-individual growth variations were compared for F and S mussels from both origins. Fast growing seemed to be a consequence of greater energy intake (20% higher clearance and ingestion rate and higher food absorption rate coupled with low metabolic costs. The enhanced energy absorption (around 65% higher resulted in 3 times higher Scope for Growth in F mussels (20.5±4.9 J h(-1 than S individuals (7.3±1.1 J h(-1. The higher clearance rate of F mussels appears to be linked with larger gill filtration surface compared to S mussels. Intertidal mussels showed higher food acquisition and absorption per mg of organic weight (i.e. mass-specific standardization than subtidal mussels under the optimal feeding conditions of the laboratory. However, the enhanced feeding and digestive rates were not enough to compensate for the initial differences in tissue weight between mussels of similar shell length collected from the intertidal and subtidal environments. At the end of the experiment, subtidal individuals had higher gill efficiency, which probably lead to higher total feeding and absorption rates relative to intertidal individuals.

  5. Timing effects of heat-stress on plant physiological characteristics and growth: a field study with prairie vegetation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available More intense, more frequent, and longer heat-waves are expected in the future due to global warming, which could have dramatic agricultural, economic and ecological impacts. This field study examined how plant responded to heat-stress (HS treatment at different timing in naturally-occurring vegetation. HS treatment (5 days at 40.5 ºC were applied to 12 1m2 plots in restored prairie vegetation dominated by Andropogon gerardii (warm-season C4 grass and Solidago canadensis (warm-season C3 forb at different growing stages. During and after HS, air, canopy, and soil temperature were monitored; net CO2 assimilation (Pn, quantum yield of photosystem II (ФPSII, stomatal conductance (gs, and internal CO2 level (Ci of the dominant species were measured. One week after the last HS treatment, all plots were harvested and the biomass of above-ground tissue and flower weight of the two dominant species was determined. HS decreased physiological performance and growth for both species, with S. canadensis being affected more than A. gerardii, indicated by negative heat stress effect on both physiological and growth responses. There were significant timing effect of heat stress on the two species, with greater reductions in the photosynthesis and productivity occurred when heat stress was applied at later-growing season. The reduction in aboveground productivity in S. canadensis but not A. gerardii could have important implications for plant community structure by increasing the competitive advantage of A. gerardii in this grassland. The present experiment showed that heat stress, though ephemeral, may promote long-term effects on plant community structure, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning of terrestrial biomes when more frequent and severe heat stress occur in the future.

  6. Effects of Salicylic Acid on the Growth and Physiological Characteristics in Cyclocarya Paliurus Seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Y.; Guo, N.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Yang, W.; Fang, S.

    2016-01-01

    Field studies were conducted to examine the effects of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth and physiological characteristics of Cyclocarya paliurus seedlings by spraying the foliage with 0.0 (control), 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 mM salicylic acid (SA). Proper concentrations of SA improved the relative growth yield of seedling stems and the soluble protein and sugar content of the leaves. It also increased the content of secondary metabolites including triterpenoids, flavonoids, quercetin and kaempferol, mineral elements K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe and Cu. Moreover, it stimulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POX) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) in the leaves. The effects of SA on these indices were dose dependent. The relative growth of seedling stem diameter and quercetin content increased gradually with an increase in concentration of SA from 0.0-2.0 mM. A concentration of 0.2 mM was optimal to promote content of soluble protein, sugars, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, and Cu, and SOD activity and significantly increased by 38.6 percentage, 22.1 percentage, 17.7 percentage, 8.2 percentage, 20.3 percentage, 23.2 percentage, 15.6 percentage, and 52.4 percentage, respectively, as compared with the control (CK). However, the maximal increase in activities of PAL, POX, and content of triterpenoids, kaempferol, and flavonoids was attained at 1.0 mM treatment, which significantly increased by 76.5 percentage, 78.4 percentage, 76.4 percentage, 96.3 percentage, and 107.4 percentage, respectively, compared with CK. Correlation analysis revealed positive relationships between activities of PAL, POX and content of triterpenoids, quercetin, kaempferol, and flavonoids within a certain concentration range of SA. These results suggested that an appropriate concentration (0.2-1.0 mM) of SA was not only effective in the improvement of physiological function of C. paliurus, but also increased seedling resistance; additionally, it helped to stimulate the synthesis of medicinal

  7. Response of morphological and physiological growth attributes to foliar application of plant growth regulators in gladiolus 'white prosperity'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, Y.; Jaskani, M. J.; Qasim, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gladiolus is very popular among ornamental bulbous plants mainly used as cut flower and greatly demanded in the world floral market. Production of inferior quality spikes is one of the major hurdles for their export. The research was conducted under Faisalabad conditions to evaluate the use of plant growth regulators in order to improve the vegetative, floral and physiological attributes. Gladiolus plants were sprayed thrice with different concentrations (0.1, 0.4, 0.7 and 1mM) of gibberellic acid, benzylaminopurine and salicylic acid at three leaf stage, five leaf stage and slipping stage. Foliar application of 1mM gibberellic acid increased the plant height (122.14cm), spike length (58.41cm), florets spike-1 (13.49), corm diameter (4.43cm), corm weight (25.34g) and total cormel weight (20.45g) compared to benzylaminopurine and salicylic acid. Gibberellic acid at 1mM concentration also increased the total chlorophyll content to 7.72mg/g, total carotenoids (1.61mg/g), total soluble sugars (3.68mg/g) followed by application of benzylaminopurine. Salicylic acid application at 1mM concentration decreased the number of days to flower (64.93) compared to 76.12 days in non treated plants. (author)

  8. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) in physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajdaniuk, Dariusz; Marek, Bogdan; Borgiel-Marek, Halina; Kos-Kudła, Beata

    2013-01-01

    This review describes precisely the consequence of TGFβ1 prevalence in the organism, and its significant influence on physiological and pathophysiological processes. Organ and tissue distinctiveness hinder unambiguous characterisation of the cytokine. However, there are constant functions of TGFβ1 inducing no controversy: it participates in foetal development, control of cell growth and differentiation, induces fibrosis and scar formation (the process of 'wound healing'), causes the suppression of immune response, is involved in angiogenesis, the development of tumours, and inflammatory processes. Thus, TGFβ1 is a multifunctional cytokine. There are three fundamental directions of its activities: I. TGFβ1 regulates cell proliferation, growth, differentiation and cells movement. II. TGFβ1 has immunomodulatory effects. III. TGFβ1 has profibrogenic effects. TGFβ1 action can be local and systemic. This review describes TGFβ1 in pathology: colitis ulcerosa, Crohn's disease, coeliac disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic foot, pulmonary hypertension, and Alzheimer's disease. TGFβ1 and its receptors are also of interest to endocrinologists. Lack of TGFβ1-dependent growth control may result in oncogenesis: papillary, follicular and anaplastic thyroid cancers, prostate, breast and uterine cervical cancer, oesophagus, gastric, colorectal and liver cancers, NSCLC, and malignant melanoma. Excessive TGFβ1 activity is an integral part of the fibrotic processes occurring in the response to injury. An increased TGFβ1 expression has been observed in patients with pulmonary, kidney, and liver fibrosis. In chronic hepatitis, the prolonged stimulation of hepatic stellate cells being the result of chronic damage to hepatocytes results in the release of profibrogenic abundant factors such as TGFβ1 and leads to the development of liver cirrhosis. The results of experimental procedures and treatment known as anti-TGFβ1 strategy acting against the

  9. Growth and Physiology of Senegalia senegal (L. Britton Seedlings as Influenced by Seed Origin and Salinity and Fertility Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mame Sokhna Sarr

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Multipurpose trees such as Senegalia senegal are widespread in arid and semi-arid lands that have natural or induced saline soils and poor soil fertility. Such environmental problems impact growth and have the potential to influence plant physiological adaptations. Identifying superior genotypes better adapted to these environmental stresses will be of great importance for tree selection for reclamation of degraded drylands. The main objective of this study was to examine the growth performance, and physiological and morphological adaptations to salinity, and fertility treatments of different Senegalia senegal families. We used five families (DB16, DB14, K4B19, K17B19, NB1 selected from 60 families of a Senegalia senegal progeny trial in Dahra, Senegal. Seedlings were grown under greenhouse conditions by watering all plants for three weeks and then stopping all watering for three more weeks. In a randomized complete block design, a two-level factorial combination was used for salinity (zero and 183.1 mM NaCl added and fertility (zero and 100 kg/ha N-P-K added treatments. A significant family × salt × fertilizer interaction was found for all biomass parameters (leaf dry matter, stem dry matter, root dry matter, and leaf area. The fertilizer application resulted in a significant increase of total biomass of all families, ranging from 63% to 237% for NB1 and K17B19, respectively. In contrast, salt only decreased total biomass of NB1 and K17B19 increased growth. Despite similar net photosynthetic rates before treatment started, fertilizer and salinity induced different effects between families. Prior to drought stress, fertilizer did not affect photosynthesis of DB16, while salt significantly decreased stomatal conductance of all families. DB16 and N1B1, despite significant differences of stomata size and density, significantly decreased transpiration, and thereby increased their intrinsic water use efficiency. Under drought, relative growth rate

  10. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder K A; Pillai, Sharmila G K; Tan, Sin Thien; Tai, Chu Chiau; Shahar, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA), a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests. One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males), aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61), participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST), short physical performance battery (SPPB), functional reach test (FRT), static balance test (SBT), TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS), and gait speed test (GST) were also performed. Spearman's rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests) with falls risk (dependent variable). Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (Page, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (Pphysiological falls risk (Pfalls screening to categorize high and low physiological falls risk among community-dwelling older adults. A more comprehensive assessment of falls risk can be performed thereafter for more specific intervention of underlying impairments.

  11. Is Physiological Performance a Good Predictor for Fitness? Insights from an Invasive Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Montenegro, Marco A.; Salgado-Luarte, Cristian; Oses, Rómulo; Torres-Díaz, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Is physiological performance a suitable proxy of fitness in plants? Although, several studies have been conducted to measure some fitness-related traits and physiological performance, direct assessments are seldom found in the literature. Here, we assessed the physiology-fitness relationship using second-generation individuals of the invasive plant species Taraxacum officinale from 17 localities distributed in five continents. Specifically, we tested if i) the maximum quantum yield is a good predictor for seed-output ii) whether this physiology-fitness relationship can be modified by environmental heterogeneity, and iii) if this relationship has an adaptive consequence for T. officinale individuals from different localities. Overall, we found a significant positive relationship between the maximum quantum yield and fitness for all localities evaluated, but this relationship decreased in T. officinale individuals from localities with greater environmental heterogeneity. Finally, we found that those individuals from localities where environmental conditions are highly seasonal performed better under heterogeneous environmental conditions. Contrarily, under homogeneous controlled conditions, those individuals from localities with low environmental seasonality performed much better. In conclusion, our results suggest that the maximum quantum yield seem to be good predictors for plant fitness. We suggest that rapid measurements, such as those obtained from the maximum quantum yield, could provide a straightforward proxy of individual’s fitness in changing environments. PMID:24204626

  12. Effect of altitude on physiological performance: a statistical analysis using results of international football games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, Patrick E

    2007-12-22

    To assess the effect of altitude on match results and physiological performance of a large and diverse population of professional athletes. Statistical analysis of international football (soccer) scores and results. FIFA extensive database of 1460 football matches in 10 countries spanning over 100 years. Altitude had a significant (Pnegative impact on physiological performance as revealed through the overall underperformance of low altitude teams when playing against high altitude teams in South America. High altitude teams score more and concede fewer goals with increasing altitude difference. Each additional 1000 m of altitude difference increases the goal difference by about half of a goal. The probability of the home team winning for two teams from the same altitude is 0.537, whereas this rises to 0.825 for a home team with an altitude difference of 3695 m (such as Bolivia v Brazil) and falls to 0.213 when the altitude difference is -3695 m (such as Brazil v Bolivia). Altitude provides a significant advantage for high altitude teams when playing international football games at both low and high altitudes. Lowland teams are unable to acclimatise to high altitude, reducing physiological performance. As physiological performance does not protect against the effect of altitude, better predictors of individual susceptibility to altitude illness would facilitate team selection.

  13. Is physiological performance a good predictor for fitness? Insights from an invasive plant species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Molina-Montenegro

    Full Text Available Is physiological performance a suitable proxy of fitness in plants? Although, several studies have been conducted to measure some fitness-related traits and physiological performance, direct assessments are seldom found in the literature. Here, we assessed the physiology-fitness relationship using second-generation individuals of the invasive plant species Taraxacum officinale from 17 localities distributed in five continents. Specifically, we tested if i the maximum quantum yield is a good predictor for seed-output ii whether this physiology-fitness relationship can be modified by environmental heterogeneity, and iii if this relationship has an adaptive consequence for T. officinale individuals from different localities. Overall, we found a significant positive relationship between the maximum quantum yield and fitness for all localities evaluated, but this relationship decreased in T. officinale individuals from localities with greater environmental heterogeneity. Finally, we found that those individuals from localities where environmental conditions are highly seasonal performed better under heterogeneous environmental conditions. Contrarily, under homogeneous controlled conditions, those individuals from localities with low environmental seasonality performed much better. In conclusion, our results suggest that the maximum quantum yield seem to be good predictors for plant fitness. We suggest that rapid measurements, such as those obtained from the maximum quantum yield, could provide a straightforward proxy of individual's fitness in changing environments.

  14. Physiological performance of juvenile Haliotis rufescens and Haliotis discus hannai abalone exposed to the withering syndrome agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roxana C; Brokordt, Katherina; Lohrmann, Karin B

    2012-09-15

    Withering syndrome (WS) is a serious chronic disease caused by infection with the bacterium Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis, a Rickettsiales-like organism (WS-RLO) that affects multiple abalone species in both natural and farmed populations. However, there is no available information regarding the effects of this disease on the physiological performance of infected abalone. We studied the effect of different levels of infection on components of energy balance and physiological indices (rates of absorption and assimilation, O/N ratio, and scope for growth) in the abalone species Haliotis rufescens and Haliotis discus hannai. Juveniles were exposed to C. X. californiensis transmission for 130 days, during which time the presence/absence of WS-RLOs was evaluated by PCR (following DNA sequencing-based confirmation of 100% identity with the sequence of C. X. californiensis from California), and the prevalence and intensity of infection were evaluated via histological analysis. Among H. rufescens juveniles exposed to the bacterium, 92% became infected (positive by histology), and the intensity of infection ranged from low (degree 1) to moderate (degree 2). In contrast, no H. discus hannai juveniles were positive for WS-RLO by histology, although 23% were positive by PCR, possibly indicating incipient WS-RLO infection that did not develop during the experimental period or to mere presence of WS-RLO DNA in the sample. Infection of H. rufescens juveniles by WS-RLOs negatively affected all components of the energy balance and physiological indices, such as scope for growth and the O/N ratio, in direct relation to the degree of infection. The most strongly affected functions were the rate of ingestion, standard metabolism, and production of feces, which were reduced by 60-80% in the most highly infected individuals. The reduced energy intake in the organisms produced a strong energy imbalance such that the energy available for growth was reduced by 49% in infected

  15. Growth and physiological responses to cadmium stress of two populations of Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández, R.; Bertrand, A. [Departamento de Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, Universidad de Oviedo, Catedrático Rodrigo Uría s/n, 33071 Oviedo (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Biotecnología de Asturias (Spain); Reis, R.; Mourato, M.P.; Martins, L.L. [Departamento de Química Agrícola e Ambiental, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda 1349-017, Lisboa (Portugal); González, A., E-mail: aidag@uniovi.es [Departamento de Biología de Organismos y Sistemas, Universidad de Oviedo, Catedrático Rodrigo Uría s/n, 33071 Oviedo (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Biotecnología de Asturias (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Cd tolerance and accumulation are constitutive traits in D. viscosa. ► The physiological mechanisms involved in Cd stress differed between clones. ► The metallicolous clone was more Cd tolerant than the non-metallicolous one. ► Antioxidant enzymes had important roles in each clone, especially peroxidases. -- Abstract: Two clones of Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter from contrasting populations, DV-A (metallicolous) and DV-W (non-metallicolous), were studied to compare Cd accumulation and tolerance. After 10 days of hydroponic culture with 0, 5, 10, and 15 mg Cd L{sup −1}, metal accumulation and plant growth were measured as well as other stress markers such as decrease in the content of photosynthetic pigments, lipid peroxidation, phenols, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and free proline. We also analyzed the activity of the antioxidant enzymes guaiacol and ascorbate peroxidases, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase as well as their isoform patterns. Our results confirmed a high Cd tolerance and accumulation in both clones of D. viscosa, which suggests that these traits are constitutive in this species. However, when the Cd concentration in solution exceeded 10 mg Cd L{sup −1}, DV-A was more tolerant than DV-W. The physiological mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance also differed between them, although phenols and guaiacol peroxidase played an important role in both clones. The effective Cd detoxification of DV-A consisted mainly in a promoted ascorbate peroxidase activity and better efficiency of catalase and glutathione reductase enzymes.

  16. Growth and physiological responses to cadmium stress of two populations of Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, R.; Bertrand, A.; Reis, R.; Mourato, M.P.; Martins, L.L.; González, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cd tolerance and accumulation are constitutive traits in D. viscosa. ► The physiological mechanisms involved in Cd stress differed between clones. ► The metallicolous clone was more Cd tolerant than the non-metallicolous one. ► Antioxidant enzymes had important roles in each clone, especially peroxidases. -- Abstract: Two clones of Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter from contrasting populations, DV-A (metallicolous) and DV-W (non-metallicolous), were studied to compare Cd accumulation and tolerance. After 10 days of hydroponic culture with 0, 5, 10, and 15 mg Cd L −1 , metal accumulation and plant growth were measured as well as other stress markers such as decrease in the content of photosynthetic pigments, lipid peroxidation, phenols, H 2 O 2 , and free proline. We also analyzed the activity of the antioxidant enzymes guaiacol and ascorbate peroxidases, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase as well as their isoform patterns. Our results confirmed a high Cd tolerance and accumulation in both clones of D. viscosa, which suggests that these traits are constitutive in this species. However, when the Cd concentration in solution exceeded 10 mg Cd L −1 , DV-A was more tolerant than DV-W. The physiological mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance also differed between them, although phenols and guaiacol peroxidase played an important role in both clones. The effective Cd detoxification of DV-A consisted mainly in a promoted ascorbate peroxidase activity and better efficiency of catalase and glutathione reductase enzymes

  17. The growth and physiological responses of tambaqui Colossoma macropomum fed on the high dose of clove oil-supplemented diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Tiara Eka Diana Puteri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In this study, tambaqui Colossoma macropomum juvenile were given feed supplemented with clove oil Syzygium aromaticum at a dose of 0 and 100 mg/100 g diet. This study purposed to assessment the effect of clove oil supplementation at high dose (100 mg/100 g diet on growth performance and health status of freshwater tambaqui. As many as 25 fishes with initial body weight 7.62±0.44 g maintained in 15 aquariums for 45 days. Each treatment consisted of three replications. Data were analyzed by t-test. The results showed that tambaqui growth performance on both treatments were not significantly different. However, supplementation of high doses 100 mg clove oil/100 g diet showed reduce on the blood parameters and declining the abundant of intestinal microflora in tambaqui gut, but the types seen more diverse. The observation of fish liver histology showed that hepatocyte cells in the treatment of 100 mg clove oil become smaller and dense compared with 0 mg clove oil treatment. The use of high doses of clove oil does not interfere with the tambaqui growth performance despite the downturn in the physiological responses were observed. Keywords: clove oil, Syzygium aromaticum, Colossoma macropomum, growth performance  ABSTRAK Di dalam penelitian ini, benih ikan bawal tawar Colossoma macropomum dipelihara dengan pemberian pakan yang ditambah minyak cengkeh Syzygium aromaticum pada kadar 0 dan 100 mg/100 g pakan. Tujuannya untuk melihat pengaruh penambahan minyak cengkeh di dalam pakan pada dosis tinggi (100 mg/100 g pakan terhadap performa pertumbuhan dan respons fisiologis ikan bawal. Sebanyak 25 ekor ikan bawal dengan bobot individu awal 7,62 ± 0,44 g dipelihara pada 15 akuarium selama 45 hari. Data yang diperoleh dianalisis dengan uji komparasi t-test antar dua perlakuan dengan tiga ulangan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa tidak ada pengaruh dari kedua perlakuan terhadap parameter pertumbuhan. Namun, pemberian pakan yang mengandung

  18. Comparative evaluation of growth performance, carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted at the poultry unit of the Teaching and Research farm, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike to evaluate growth traits, ... Each strain was allotted into five replicates of 9 birds per replicate in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) Data were collected at both the starter phase ...

  19. Growth performance, body measurements, carcass composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gizzard percentage was significantly greater in males, and heart percentage was significantly greater in females. Due to their high bodyweight, good FCR, and favourable carcass composition, SM3 Heavy male ducks are more useful as broiler duck than females. Keywords: carcasses, digestive system, growth, Pekin duck, ...

  20. N, P, and K supply to Pinot noir grapevines. I. Impact on vine nutrient status, growth, physiology, and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinot noir grapevines (self-rooted, Pommard clone) were grown in a pot-in-pot sand culture vineyard to examine the impact of low N, P, and K supply on vine growth and physiology. Four-year-old vines were given either full nutrition (Control) or reduced levels of each N, P, and K supplied at 50%, 20...

  1. Water stress and recovery in the performance of two Eucalyptus globulus clones: physiological and biochemical profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Barbara; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Neves, Lucinda; Brossa, Ricard; Dias, Maria Celeste; Costa, Armando; Castro, Bruno B; Araújo, Clara; Santos, Conceição; Chaves, Maria Manuela; Pinto, Glória

    2014-04-01

    Eucalyptus plantations are among the most productive forest stands in Portugal and Spain, being mostly used for pulp production and, more recently, as an energy crop. However, the region's Mediterranean climate, with characteristic severe summer drought, negatively affects eucalypt growth and increases mortality. Although the physiological response to water shortage is well characterized for this species, evidence about the plants' recovery ability remains scarce. In order to assess the physiological and biochemical response of Eucalyptus globulus during the recovery phase, two genotypes (AL-18 and AL-10) were submitted to a 3-week water stress period at two different intensities (18 and 25% of field capacity), followed by 1 week of rewatering. Recovery was assessed 1 day and 1 week after rehydration. Drought reduced height, biomass, water potential, NPQ and gas exchange in both genotypes. Contrarily, the levels of pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (F(v) /F(m) and (φPSII)), MDA and ABA increased. During recovery, the physiological and biochemical profile of stressed plants showed a similar trend: they experienced reversion of altered traits (MDA, ABA, E, g(s), pigments), while other parameters did not recover ((φPSII), NPQ). Furthermore, an overcompensation of CO(2) assimilation was achieved 1 week after rehydration, which was accompanied by greater growth and re-establishment of oxidative balance. Both genotypes were tolerant to the tested conditions, although clonal differences were found. AL-10 was more productive and showed a more rapid and dynamic response to rehydration (namely in carotenoid content, (φPSII) and NPQ) compared to clone AL-18. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  2. Relationship between physiological indices and aerobic performance tests in short and medium term of elite cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Bernardo Sangali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Few studies allow usto verify which physiological responses are associated with performance in anational elite cycling group. Therefore, this study aimed to determine and correlate various physiological and aerobic indices with performance in 4 and 20 km time trials in high-level cyclists. The sample consisted of 14 male professional cyclists of the national elite group (28.5 ± 4.7 years old, 73.47 ± 8.29 kg, 176 ± 6.76cm, who performed a progressive test in laboratory to determine maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max: 62.23 ± 8.28 ml•kg-1•min-1, intensity relative to VO2max(iVO2max: 500.83 ± 58.65w, movement economy (EM: 0.1166 ± 0.0362 ml•kg•min•w-1, and the first and second ventilatory threshold (LV1: 348.21 ±43.26 w; LV2: 417.86 ± 60.79 w, respectively. They also performed two time trial performance tests of 4 and 20km. For the correlation between physiological indices and trial performance, Pearson correlation coefficient(p< 0.05 was used. No correlation was found between the physiological indices (VO2max absolute and relative, iVO2max, EM, LV1 and LV2 andperformance in 4 km (r= 0.38; 0.16; -0.33; 0.20; -0.50; -0.20, respectivelyand 20 km (r= 0.24; 0.01; -0.13; -0.12; -0.48; -0.19, respectively time trialin high level athletes. These results suggest that these variables are not able to explain the performance in time trials in the respective lengths, probably due to the subjects’ homogeneity.

  3. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh DK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Devinder KA Singh,1 Sharmila GK Pillai,1 Sin Thien Tan,1 Chu Chiau Tai,1 Suzana Shahar2 1Physiotherapy Programme, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, 2Nutrition and Dietetics Programme, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA, a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests.Methods: One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males, aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61, participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST, short physical performance battery (SPPB, functional reach test (FRT, static balance test (SBT, TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS, and gait speed test (GST were also performed. Spearman’s rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests with falls risk (dependent variable.Results: Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (P<0.05 were demonstrated for age, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (P<0.01 weak correlation

  4. Growth and physiology of loblolly pine in response to long-term resource management: defining growth potential in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa J. Samuelson; John Butnor; Chris Maier; Tom A. Stokes; Kurt Johnsen; Michael Kane

    2008-01-01

    Leaf physiology and stem growth were assessed in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in response to 10 to 11 years of treatment with weed control (W), weed control plus irrigation (WI), weed control plus irrigation and fertigation (WIF), or weed control plus irrigation, fertigation, and pest control (WIFP) to determine whether increased resource...

  5. [Effects of different mulches on rhizosphere temperature, growth, and physiological properties of fluecured tobacco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhihong; Yi, Jianhua; Sun, Zaijun

    2006-11-01

    With greenhouse plastic film, rice straw plus greenhouse plastic film, soil-mulching plastic film, rice straw, rice straw plus sun-shading net, and sun-shading net as test mulches, this paper studied their effects on the rhizosphere temperature, growth, and physiological properties of flue-cured tobacco. The results showed that after mulching for 22 days, the accumulative rhizosphere temperature at the depth of 5 cm was the highest (424.75 degrees C) for greenhouse plastic film and the lowest (378.75 degrees C) for rice straw plus sun-shading net, while that at the depth of 15 cm was the highest (396.75 degrees C) for greenhouse plastic film and the lowest (368.31 degrees C) for sun-shading net. With the increase of accumulative rhizosphere temperature, the dry weight of above- and underground parts, photosynthesis, and root vigor of flue-cured tobacco tended to increase, and at the 10th day after mulches removal, root biomass had the largest increment in the treatment of soil-mulching plastic film and the smallest increment in the treatment of rice straw plus sun-shading net.

  6. Growth, physiological and molecular traits in Salicaceae trees investigated for phytoremediation of heavy metals and organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmiroli, Marta; Pietrini, Fabrizio; Maestri, Elena; Zacchini, Massimo; Marmiroli, Nelson; Massacci, Angelo

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, there are many large areas moderately contaminated with heavy metals and/or organics that have not been remediated due to the high cost and technical drawbacks of currently available technologies. Methods with a good potential for coping with these limitations are emerging from phytoremediation techniques, using, for example, specific amendments and/or plants selected from various candidates proven in several investigations to be reasonably efficient in extracting heavy metals from soil or water, or in co-metabolizing organics with bacteria flourishing or inoculated in their rhizospheres. Populus and Salix spp., two genera belonging to the Salicaceae family, include genotypes that can be considered among the candidates for this phytoremediation approach. This review shows the recent improvements in analytical tools based on the identification of useful genetic diversity associated with classical growth, physiological and biochemical traits, and the importance of plant genotype selection for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Particularly interesting are studies on the application of the phytoremediation of heavy metals and of chlorinated organics, in which microorganisms selected for their degradation capabilities were bioaugmented in the rhizosphere of Salicaceae planted at a high density for biomass and bioenergy production.

  7. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptors in the brain: physiological and pathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Haim; LeRoith, Derek

    2014-12-01

    The involvement of insulin, the insulin-like growth factors (IGF1, IGF2) and their receptors in central nervous system development and function has been the focus of scientific interest for more than 30 years. The insulin-like peptides, both locally-produced proteins as well as those transported from the circulation into the brain via the blood-brain barrier, are involved in a myriad of biological activities. These actions include, among others, neuronal survival, neurogenes, angiogenesis, excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission, regulation of food intake, and cognition. In recent years, a linkage between brain insulin/IGF1 and certain neuropathologies has been identified. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between diabetes (mainly type 2) and Alzheimer׳s disease. In addition, an aberrant decline in IGF1 values was suggested to play a role in the development of Alzheimer׳s disease. The present review focuses on the expression and function of insulin, IGFs and their receptors in the brain in physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  8. EFFECT OF PHYSIOLOGICAL AGE AND GROWTH REGULATORS ON CALLUS BROWNING OF COCONUT ENDOSPERM CULTURE IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAZARUS AGUS SUKAMTO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of physiological age and growth regulators affecting callus browning ofcoconut endosperm was investigated. Solid endosperm explants of four coconut fruits fromsame brunches of two coconut cultivars “Samoan Dwarf ” were grown on modified Murashigeand Skoog (MS formula with addition of 10 mg l putresine, 2.50 g l activated charcoal (AC,1.70 g l phytagel, 0, 10 , 10 , 10 , 10 M 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D or 4-amino-3,5,6-trichloropicolinic acid (Picloram combined with 10 M 6-benzylaminopurine (BA.Callogenesis occurred on 98.83% of explants. Callus browning between different physiologicalages (antipodal and micropylar tissues of coconut endosperm at 9, 26 and 31 weeks of culture(WOC was significantly different, but not at 16 and 21 WOC. Auxins of 2,4-D and Picloramdid not affect significantly callus browning of endosperm cultures. Auxin doses at 10 , 10 , and10 M decreased significantly callus browning at 9 and 16 WOC, respectively, but at 10 Mbrowning was less significant compared to other doses at 21 WOC. Auxin dose at 10 M causedless significant browning compared to other doses at 31 WOC. The addition of BA decreasedsignificantly callus browning at 9 WOC, but did not affect callus browning thereafter.

  9. SUBSTRATE COMPOSITION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF GROWTH OF SEEDLINGS GUAPURUVU (SCHIZOLOBIUM PARAHYBA VELL. BLAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Humberto Silva e Castro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizolobium parahyba Vell. Blake is a native species of the Atlantic river forest that its wood is very efficient to make doors, fruit packaging, to use in construction, interior works and other uses. This work aimed to evaluate the influence of substrate composition on emergence and growth physiological parameters of Schizolobium parahyba seedlings. Selected seeds were subjected to grow in the following compositions of the substrate: T1 witness (haplustox - LV, T2 LV + potato processing waste (1:1 + chemical treatment (TQ: 100 of limestone + 100 g of superphosphate, T 3 LV + earthworm humus (1:1 + TQ and T 4 LV + sand + cattle manure (1:1:2 + TQ. Seedling emergence was evaluated at 21 days after sowing (DAS and at 60 DAS measured the shoot height, root length, fresh weight of shoot, root fresh weight, dry weight of shoot and root dry weight. The use of earthworm compost, cattle manure and waste from potato processing proved effective for Schizolobium parahyba seedlings production, since no significant differences were verified among the treatments applied. The use of organic sources to supplement the substrate is of paramount importance for native species seedlings production.

  10. RESPONSE OF RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L. UNDER ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AT EARLY GROWTH STAGE: PHYSIOLOGICAL MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kazim Ali

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A reliable and rapid assessment technique, for evaluation of cultivars having potential to combat harsh environmental conditions is imperative. This experiment was carried out to screen 8 local (Pakistan accessions of rice at early growth stage (germination and seedling at control and heat shock for different time periods (24, 48, 72 h. Heat stress indices, including promptness index (P.I. and germination stress index (G.S.I., were used to explore thermotolerance at germination stage. At seedling stage, relative membrane permeability (RMP were assessed through measurement of electrolyte leakage (EC, melondialdehyde (MDA and production of hydrogen peroxide. It is observed that heat stress delayed germination and decreased germination percentage at germination stage. However cultivars showed significantly different response. Among all, "Kanwal-95" showed more thermotolerance in terms of maximum number of germination as well as in speediness to germination. Physiological indicators manifested, increased electrolyte leakage is associated with increased level of lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide. It can be concluded that antioxidants enzymes could play major role in thermotolerance by scavenging free radicals to protect lipid peroxidation consequently improve cell membrane thermostability. Results analysis revealed that these indicators were simple and accurate selection criteria to assess heat stress effect and can be adopted to save resources and time of formers.

  11. Effect of phosphogypsum on growth, physiology, and the antioxidative defense system in sunflower seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloumi, Nada; Zouari, Mohamed; Chaari, Leila; Abdallah, Ferjani Ben; Woodward, Steve; Kallel, Monem

    2015-10-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is the solid waste product of phosphate fertilizer production and is characterized by high concentrations of salts, heavy metals, and certain natural radionuclides. The work reported in this paper examined the influence of PG amendment on soil physicochemical proprieties, along with its potential impact on several physiological traits of sunflower seedlings grown under controlled conditions. Sunflower seedlings were grown on agricultural soil substrates amended with PG at rates of 0, 2.5, and 5 %. The pH of the soil decreased but electrical conductivity and organic matter, calcium, phosphorus, sodium, and heavy metal contents increased in proportion to PG concentration. In contrast, no variations were observed in magnesium content and small increases were recorded in potassium content. The effects of PG on sunflower growth, leaf chlorophyll content, nutritional status, osmotic regulator content, heavy metal accumulation, and antioxidative enzymes were investigated. Concentrations of trace elements in sunflower seedlings grown in PG-amended soil were considerably lower than ranges considered phytotoxic for vascular plants. The 5 % PG dose inhibited shoot extension and accumulation of biomass and caused a decline in total protein content. However, chlorophyll, lipid peroxidation, proline and sugar contents, and activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase increased. Collectively, these results strongly support the hypothesis that enzymatic antioxidation capacity is an important mechanism in tolerance of PG salinity in sunflower seedlings.

  12. Prebiotic effect of fructo–oligosaccharides on growth and physiological state of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Řehulka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainbow trout at an average weight of 240 g were examined for the effect of dietary fructo–oligosaccharides in the diet on their growth and physiological state through selected biochemical parameters of the blood plasma. The prebiotic product Profeed® (experimental group, EG was administered on a continuous basis at a rate of g kg−1 of pellets for 105 days. The best growth performance for the EG was found in 42 days (363 ± 34.7 g vs. 340 ± 36.7 g, P = 0.003 and in 63 days (387 ± 35.6 g vs. 364 ± 42.3 g, P = 0.011. SGR of the fish from the EG was 0.69% and from the control group (CG was 0.70%. The feed conversion level was 0.82 in the EG and 0.86 in the CG. Survival rate was 99% (EG and 98% (CG. The results of the biochemical examination indicate significant differences in the creatinine (28 ± 5.5 vs. 22 ± 3.05 µmol L−1 and the sodium cation (157.9 1.66 vs. 155.7 ± 1.49 mmol L−1 level and in the catalytic concentration of alkaline phosphatase (5.18 ± 1.57 vs. 3.43 ± 0.78 µkat L−1. The positive results of the growth and biochemical tests as well as the favourable feed conversion suggest that it would be worthwhile to test higher concentrations of the Profeed® prebiotic product.

  13. An overview of artificial gravity. [effects on human performance and physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The unique characteristics of artificial gravity that affect human performance and physiology in an artificial gravity environment are reviewed. The rate at which these unique characteristics change decreases very rapidly with increasing radius of a rotating vehicle used to produce artificial gravity. Reducing their influence on human performance or physiology by increasing radius becomes a situation of very rapidly diminishing returns. A review of several elements of human performance has developed criteria relative to the sundry characteristics of artificial gravity. A compilation of these criteria indicates that the maximum acceptable rate of rotation, leg heaviness while walking, and material handling are the factors that define the minimum acceptable radius. The ratio of Coriolis force to artificial weight may also be significant. Based on current knowledge and assumptions for the various criteria, a minimum radius between 15.2 and 16.8 m seems desirable.

  14. Effects of oil spill response technologies on the physiological performance of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toxværd, Kirstine; Pančić, Marina; Eide, Helene O.

    2018-01-01

    A mesocosm study with oil in ice was performed in Van Mijenfjorden in Svalbard to compare effects of the oil spill responses (OSR) in situ burning, chemical dispersion and natural attenuation on the physiological performance of the Arctic copepod Calanus glacialis. Seawater collected from...... the mesocosms in winter and spring was used in laboratory incubation experiments, where effects on fecal pellet production, egg production and hatching success were investigated over a period of 14 days. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) seawater concentrations were lowest in winter. Brine channel formation...... in spring resulted in an 18 times increase in PAH concentration in the chemical dispersion treatment (1.67 μg L−1), and a 3 fold increase in the natural attenuation (0.36 μg L−1) and in situ burning (0.04 μg L−1) treatments. The physiological performance of female C. glacialis was unaffected by the PAH...

  15. Growth performance and nutrient utilization of Clarias gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth performance and nutrient utilization of C. gariepinus fingerlings under different water quality conditions (static renewal; flow through and aeration with static renewal) was investigated under laboratory condition for 63 days. Growth performance in terms of weight gain indicated that fish raise in flow through ...

  16. Growth performance, haemo-biochemical parameters and meat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NWUUser

    2017-09-04

    Sep 4, 2017 ... quail diets at 25 g/kg feed promoted similar growth performance, health status, and carcass and meat quality traits as ... to enhance growth performance and the quality of meat in Japanese quails. ..... plasma amylase and bilirubin is also indicative of tissue damage in liver (Evans, 2009) while creatinine is a.

  17. Effect of crowding stress on growth performance and carcass quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of the effect of crowding stress on growth performance of juvenile Clarias gariepinus fed varying crude protein levels might be useful in determining the optimal stocking density in relation to optimal dietary crude protein level and consequently better growth performance. The effect of crowding stress on ...

  18. Physiological performance of intertidal coralline algae during a simulated tidal cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Rebecca J; Martone, Patrick T

    2014-04-01

    Intertidal macroalgae endure light, desiccation, and temperature variation associated with sub-merged and emerged conditions on a daily basis. Physiological stresses exist over the course of the entire tidal cycle, and physiological differences in response to these stresses likely contribute to spatial separation of species along the shore. For example, marine species that have a high stress tolerance can live higher on the shore and are able to recover when the tide returns, whereas species with a lower stress tolerance may be relegated to living lower on the shore or in tidepools, where low tide stresses are buffered. In this study, we monitored the physiological responses of the tidepool coralline Calliarthron tuberculosum (Postels and Ruprecht) E.Y. Dawson and the nontidepool coralline Corallina vancouveriensis Yendo during simulated tidal conditions to identify differences in physiology that might underlie differences in habitat. During high tide, Corallina was more photosynthetically active than Calliarthron as light levels increased. During low tide, Corallina continued to out-perform Calliarthron when submerged in warming tidepools, but photosynthesis abruptly halted for both species when emerged in air. Surprisingly, pigment composition did not differ, suggesting that light harvesting does not account for this difference. Additionally, Corallina was more effective at resisting desiccation by retaining water in its branches. When the tide returned, only Corallina recovered from combined temperature and desiccation stresses associated with emergence. This study broadens our understanding of intertidal algal physiology and provides a new perspective on the physiological and morphological underpinnings of habitat partitioning. © 2013 Phycological Society of America.

  19. Dietary fiber for pregnant sows: influence on sow physiology and performance during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, H; Meunier-Salaün, M-C; Hamard, A; Guillemet, R; Etienne, M; Farmer, C; Dourmad, J-Y; Père, M-C

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding sows a bulky diet during gestation on their physiological and metabolic adaptations during the peripartum period, and to determine how these effects may relate to sow and piglet performances. From d 26 of gestation until farrowing, gilts were fed diets that contained 2.8 or 11.0% crude fiber (control and high-fiber diets, respectively, n = 9/group). Daily feed allowance provided the same amount of DE daily (33 MJ of DE/d). Throughout lactation, sows were allowed to consume a standard lactating sow diet ad libitum. Litters were standardized to 12 piglets beyond 48 h after birth. On d 105 of gestation, a jugular catheter was surgically implanted. Preprandial blood samples were collected from d 109 of gestation to the day after farrowing and on d 4, 18, and 26 of lactation. Meal tests and glucose tolerance tests were performed on d 109 of gestation and d 4 and 18 of lactation. During gestation, BW and backfat gain did not differ between treatment groups. During lactation, sows fed the high-fiber diet ate an average of 0.94 kg/d more than control sows (P fiber diet grew faster than piglets from control sows (P = 0.03). Body weight and backfat losses did not differ between the 2 treatment groups. Sows fed the high-fiber diet during gestation had lesser concentrations of leptin before farrowing than control sows (P fiber diet than in control sows (P effect. Glucose half-life was shorter in late gestation than during both stages of lactation, but did not differ between sows in the 2 groups. In late gestation, the postprandial increases in glucose and insulin were delayed, and smaller, after a high-fiber meal than after a control meal. During lactation, glucose and insulin profiles after a standard meal did not differ between sows from treatment groups. In conclusion, the greater appetite of lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet during gestation does not seem related to changes in glucose and insulin metabolism

  20. Modelling of salad plants growth and physiological status in vitamin space greenhouse during lighting regime optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Irina; Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana; Erokhin, Alexei; Yakovleva, Olga; Lapach, Sergij; Radchenko, Stanislav; Znamenskii, Artem; Tarakanov, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of the photoautotrophic element as part of bio-engineering life-support systems is determined substantially by lighting regime. The artificial light regime optimization complexity results from the wide range of plant physiological functions controlled by light: trophic, informative, biosynthetical, etc. An average photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), light spectral composition and pulsed light effects on the crop growth and plant physiological status were studied in the multivariate experiment, including 16 independent experiments in 3 replicates. Chinese cabbage plants (Brassica chinensis L.), cultivar Vesnianka, were grown during 24 days in a climatic chamber under white and red light-emitting diodes (LEDs): photoperiod 24 h, PPFD from 260 to 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s), red light share in the spectrum varying from 33% to 73%, pulsed (pulse period from 30 to 501 µs) and non-pulsed lighting. The regressions of plant photosynthetic and biochemical indexes as well as the crop specific productivity in response to the selected parameters of lighting regime were calculated. Developed models of crop net photosynthesis and dark respiration revealed the most intense gas exchange area corresponding to PPFD level 450 - 500 µM/(m ^{2}*s) with red light share in the spectrum about 60% and the pulse length 30 µs with a pulse period from 300 to 400 µs. Shoot dry weight increased monotonically in response to the increasing PPFD and changed depending on the pulse period under stabilized PPFD level. An increase in ascorbic acid content in the shoot biomass was revealed when increasing red light share in spectrum from 33% to 73%. The lighting regime optimization criterion (Q) was designed for the vitamin space greenhouse as the maximum of a crop yield square on its ascorbic acid concentration, divided by the light energy consumption. The regression model of optimization criterion was constructed based on the experimental data. The analysis of the model made it

  1. Playing vs. Nonplaying Aerobic Training in Tennis: Physiological and Performance Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pialoux, Vincent; Genevois, Cyril; Capoen, Arnaud; Forbes, Scott C.; Thomas, Jordan; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years) completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy...

  2. Light and soil humidity influencing oak seedling growth and physiology in mixed hardwood gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raddi S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In “S. Rossore, Migliarino, Massaciuccoli” Natural Park (Pisa, I six-month-old pedunculate oak seedlings (Quercus robur L. were transplanted within natural gaps of a mixed oak forest. Micro-environmental variability for radiation and water soil content were measured for 145 seedlings during the year. Irradiation relative to the open field (IR ranged from 5% to 57%. Seven classes of IR each with 20 seedlings were selected. Leaf mass per area was strongly influenced by IR. In the first 3 years survival was high (95, 76 and 75%, respectively and seedling reached 14±6 cm, 27±13 cm and 39±19 (sd cm of height. Even if IR and soil water content (SWC were negatively associated, indicating a lower SWC at the centre of the gaps, height and its relative growth rate increased with IR (explored range: 8-40% with a significant interaction with SWC in the 1st year, indicating the positive effect of soil moisture. In the 3rd year dimensional traits were higher in L+W+ (high light and humidity followed by L-W+ (low light and high humidity, L+W- and finally by L-W-. Summer drought typical of the Mediterranean climate was evaluated by chlorophyll fluorescence of PSII on apical leaves of seedlings and mature trees at the beginning (21 June and in mid-summer (20 July. While in June physiological traits did not differ between low and high IR, in mid-summer (at the peak of water-stress seedlings of the two highest light classes showed chronic photoinhibition (Fv/Fm<0.75 and an increase in thermal dissipation (D by constitutive term (Dc=1-Fv/Fm and by regulated mechanisms of dissipation through xanthophyll-cycle term (Dx. Moreover, in July seedling leaf physiology largely differed with IR: leaves acclimated to high IR have higher photosynthetic potentialities, as shown by electron transport rate (ETR and quantum yield (P at saturating light maintained by an increase of the fraction of open reaction centres (qP, counterbalancing the efficiency decrease of the

  3. Playing vs. nonplaying aerobic training in tennis: physiological and performance outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Pialoux

    Full Text Available This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR, blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy of the serve, and forehand and backhand strokes were evaluated. The results demonstrated that both HIIT sessions achieved an average HR greater than 90% HRmax. The physiological demands (average HR were greater during the playing session compared to the nonplaying session, despite similar lactate concentrations and a lower RPE. The results also indicate a reduction in shot velocity after both HIIT sessions; however, the playing HIIT session had a more deleterious effect on stroke accuracy. These findings suggest that 1 both HIIT sessions may be sufficient to develop maximal aerobic power, 2 playing HIIT sessions provide a greater physiological demand with a lower RPE, and 3 playing HIIT has a greater deleterious effect on stroke performance, and in particular on the accuracy component of the ground stroke performance, and should be incorporated appropriately into a periodization program in young male tennis players.

  4. Playing vs. Nonplaying Aerobic Training in Tennis: Physiological and Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pialoux, Vincent; Genevois, Cyril; Capoen, Arnaud; Forbes, Scott C.; Thomas, Jordan; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years) completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy of the serve, and forehand and backhand strokes were evaluated. The results demonstrated that both HIIT sessions achieved an average HR greater than 90% HRmax. The physiological demands (average HR) were greater during the playing session compared to the nonplaying session, despite similar lactate concentrations and a lower RPE. The results also indicate a reduction in shot velocity after both HIIT sessions; however, the playing HIIT session had a more deleterious effect on stroke accuracy. These findings suggest that 1) both HIIT sessions may be sufficient to develop maximal aerobic power, 2) playing HIIT sessions provide a greater physiological demand with a lower RPE, and 3) playing HIIT has a greater deleterious effect on stroke performance, and in particular on the accuracy component of the ground stroke performance, and should be incorporated appropriately into a periodization program in young male tennis players. PMID:25816346

  5. Playing vs. nonplaying aerobic training in tennis: physiological and performance outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pialoux, Vincent; Genevois, Cyril; Capoen, Arnaud; Forbes, Scott C; Thomas, Jordan; Rogowski, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the effects of playing and nonplaying high intensity intermittent training (HIIT) on physiological demands and tennis stroke performance in young tennis players. Eleven competitive male players (13.4 ± 1.3 years) completed both a playing and nonplaying HIIT session of equal distance, in random order. During each HIIT session, heart rate (HR), blood lactate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored. Before and after each HIIT session, the velocity and accuracy of the serve, and forehand and backhand strokes were evaluated. The results demonstrated that both HIIT sessions achieved an average HR greater than 90% HRmax. The physiological demands (average HR) were greater during the playing session compared to the nonplaying session, despite similar lactate concentrations and a lower RPE. The results also indicate a reduction in shot velocity after both HIIT sessions; however, the playing HIIT session had a more deleterious effect on stroke accuracy. These findings suggest that 1) both HIIT sessions may be sufficient to develop maximal aerobic power, 2) playing HIIT sessions provide a greater physiological demand with a lower RPE, and 3) playing HIIT has a greater deleterious effect on stroke performance, and in particular on the accuracy component of the ground stroke performance, and should be incorporated appropriately into a periodization program in young male tennis players.

  6. Growth Performance of Cockerels Administered Crude Follicular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This Study was conducted to assess the performance of cockerels administered crude follicular and testicular fluids. Two hundred (200) day old Hyaline white cockerel chicks were randomly assigned to five different treatments namely control (T1), 0.5mls follicular fluid (T2), 25% testicular fluid (T3), 0.25ml follicular fluid (T4) ...

  7. Growth, Feedlot Performance and Carcass Characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    x x

    usually thin tailed. Various studies have been conducted in order to improve meat production and carcass quality of Turkey's native sheep breeds via crossbreeding. In the studies done to determine fattening performance and carcass characteristics of Ile de France x Akkaraman (F1) and their back-crosses (G1), it has.

  8. GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF BROILER CHICKS FED DIETS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. A.O. Ani

    2012-06-15

    Jun 15, 2012 ... The effects of graded levels of raw bambara nut (Voandzeia subterranea L) waste and supplementary enzyme (Roxayzme G) on performance of broiler chicks ... nut waste in the diets increased (P < 0.05) average daily feed intake and feed cost per kg weight gain, but decreased (P < 0.05) final body weight, ...

  9. Halophytic Companion Plants Improve Growth and Physiological Parameters of Tomato Plants Grown under Salinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, S.; Cullu, M. A.; Kaya, C.; Dikilitas, M.

    2016-01-01

    Salinity becomes a major concern when soil salt concentration becomes excessive in growth medium. Halophytes are capable of accumulating high concentrations of NaCl in their tissues, thus using halophytic plants in crop rotations or even in mixed cropping systems may be a promising management practices to mitigate salt stress related yield loses. Salinity induced yield losses and related physiological parameters on tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. SC2121) grown with or without halophytic companion plants (SalsolasodaL. and Portulacaoleracea L.) were investigated in pot experiment. Treatments consist of four soil type (collected from Harran plain-Turkey) with similar physical properties but varying in salinity level: electrical conductivity (EC): 0.9, 4.2, 7.2, and 14.1 dS m/sup -1/. The reduction in plant total dry weight was 24, 19, and 48 percent in soils with slight (4.2dS m/sup -1/), moderate (7.2 dS m/sup -1/) and high (14.1 dS m/sup -1/) salinity as compared to non-saline soil (0.9 dS m/sup -1/), respectively. Leaf content of proline, malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) enzyme activity increased with increasing level of salinity. In tomato plants grown in consociation with Salsolasoda, salinity induced DM decrease was only 6, 12 and 28% in soils with slight, moderate and high salinity as compared to non-saline soil, respectively. However, when Portulaca oleracea used as companion plant, no significant change in biomass or fruit yield was observed. This study showed that mixed planting with Salsolasodain high saline soils may be an effective phyto-remediation technique that may secure yield formation and quality of tomato. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the Physiological Challenges in Extreme Environments: Implications for Enhanced Training, Operational Performance and Sex-Specific Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Evaluation of the physiological challenges in extreme environments: Implications for enhanced training, operational performance and sex-specific... evaluated . Furthermore, actual performance based measures must be evaluated after a period of training/acclimation. The aim of this project is...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0075 TITLE: Evaluation of the Physiological Challenges in Extreme Environments: Implications for Enhanced Training

  11. Acoustic monitoring of first responder's physiology for health and performance surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2002-08-01

    Acoustic sensors have been used to monitor firefighter and soldier physiology to assess health and performance. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique body-contacting acoustic sensor that can monitor the health and performance of firefighters and soldiers while they are doing their mission. A gel-coupled sensor has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin that facilitate the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repel ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. This technology can monitor heartbeats, breaths, blood pressure, motion, voice, and other indicators that can provide vital feedback to the medics and unit commanders. Diverse physiological parameters can be continuously monitored with acoustic sensors and transmitted for remote surveillance of personnel status. Body-worn acoustic sensors located at the neck, breathing mask, and wrist do an excellent job at detecting heartbeats and activity. However, they have difficulty extracting physiology during rigorous exercise or movements due to the motion artifacts sensed. Rigorous activity often indicates that the person is healthy by virtue of being active, and injury often causes the subject to become less active or incapacitated making the detection of physiology easier. One important measure of performance, heart rate variability, is the measure of beat-to-beat timing fluctuations derived from the interval between two adjacent beats. The Lomb periodogram is optimized for non-uniformly sampled data, and can be applied to non-stationary acoustic heart rate features (such as 1st and 2nd heart sounds) to derive heart rate variability and help eliminate errors created by motion artifacts. Simple peak-detection above or below a certain threshold or waveform derivative parameters can produce the timing and amplitude features necessary for the Lomb periodogram and cross-correlation techniques. High-amplitude motion artifacts may contribute to a different

  12. Impact of lead tolerant plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on growth, physiology, antioxidant activities, yield and lead content in sunflower in lead contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Muhammad; Asghar, Hafiz Naeem; Zahir, Zahir Ahmad; Shahid, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    Present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of lead tolerant plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (LTPGPR) on growth, physiology, yield, antioxidant activities and lead uptake in sunflower in soil contaminated with lead under pot conditions. Three pre-characterized LTPGP strains (S2 (Pseudomonas gessardii strain BLP141), S5 (Pseudomonas fluorescens A506) and S10 (Pseudomonas fluorescens strain LMG 2189)) were used to inoculate sunflower growing in soil contaminated with different levels (300, 600 and 900 mg kg -1 ) of lead by using lead nitrate salt as source of lead. Treatments were arranged according to completely randomized design with factorial arrangements. At harvesting, data regarding growth attributes (root shoot length, root shoot fresh and dry weights), yield per plant, physiological attributes (Chlorophyll 'a', 'b' and carotenoids content), antioxidant activities (Ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase), proline and malanodialdehyde content, and lead content in root, shoot and achenes of sunflower were recorded. Data were analysed by standard statistical procedures. Results showed that lead contamination reduced the plants growth, physiology and yield at all levels of lead stress. But application of LTPGPR in soil contaminated with lead improved plant growth, physiology, yield, and antioxidant activities, proline, and reduced the malanodialdehyde content (that is reduced by the application of different strains in lead contamination) of sunflower as compared to plants grown in soil without inoculation. Inoculation also promoted the uptake of lead in root, shoots and reduced the uptake of lead in achenes of plants as compared to plants in lead contamination without inoculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Arginine: New Insights into Growth Performance and Urinary Metabolomic Profiles of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangmang Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arginine regulates growth performance, nutrient metabolism and health effects, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of dietary arginine supplementation on rat growth performance and urinary metabolome through 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Twenty rats were randomly assigned to two groups supplemented with 0% or 1.0% l-arginine for 4 weeks. Urine samples were analyzed through NMR-based metabolomics. Arginine supplementation significantly increased the urine levels of 4-aminohippurate, acetate, creatine, creatinine, ethanolamine, formate, hippurate, homogentisate, indoxyl sulfate, and phenylacetyglycine. Conversely, arginine decreased the urine levels of acetamide, β-glucose, cirtulline, ethanol, glycine, isobutyrate, lactate, malonate, methymalonate, N-acetylglutamate, N-methylnicotinamide, and propionate. Results suggested that arginine can alter common systemic metabolic processes, including energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbiota metabolism. Moreover, the results also imply a possible physiological role of the metabolism in mediating the arginine supplementation-supported growth of rats.

  14. Physiological quality of seed and seedling performance of crambe genotypes under water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando H. B. Machado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Water stress is a condition that causes physiological changes in different species and even genotypes of the same species. One of the osmotic agents most used to simulate this condition is polyethylene glycol 6000. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of water stress on the physiological quality of seeds and performance of seedlings of crambe genotypes. A completely randomized design was used, in a factorial scheme with two genotypes (one cultivar and one line and five osmotic potentials simulated with aqueous solutions of polyethylene glycol 6000 (control = 0, -0.25, -0.50, -1.0, -1.50 MPa, with four replicates of 50 seeds per treatment. The effects of the treatments were evaluated by means of germination, first count, germination speed index and fresh and dry matter of seedlings. The physiological quality of seeds and the performance of crambe seedlings are negatively affected under water stress from -0.25 MPa on. Seeds of the genotype FMSCR 1101 have greater tolerance to drought stress, regardless of the osmotic potential used.

  15. Constraint lines and performance envelopes in behavioral physiology: the case of the aerobic dive limit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eHorning

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Constraint lines - the boundaries that delimit point clouds in bivariate scattergrams - have been applied in macro-ecology to quantify the effects of limiting factors on response variables, but have not been applied to the behavioral performance and physiological ecology of individual vertebrates. I propose that behavioral scattergrams of air-breathing, diving vertebrates contain informative edges that convey insights into physiological constraints that shape the performance envelopes of divers. In the classic example of repeated cycles of apnea and eupnea in diving, airbreathing vertebrates, the need to balance oxygen consumption and intake should differentially constrain recovery for dives within or exceeding the aerobic dive limit. However, the bulk of variance observed in recovery versus dive duration scattergrams originates from undetermined behavioral variables, and deviations from overall stasis may become increasingly apparent at progressively smaller scales of observation. As shown on dive records from 79 Galápagos fur seals, the selection of appropriate time scales of integration yields two distinct recovery boundaries for dive series within and beyond the estimated aerobic dive limit. An analysis of the corresponding constraint lines is independent of central tendencies in data and avoids violating parametric assumptions for large data sets where variables of interest account for only a small portion of observed variance. I hypothesize that the intercept between these constraint lines represents the effective aerobic dive limit, and present physiological and ecological considerations to support this hypothesis.

  16. Measuring mental workload and physiological reactions in marine pilots: Building bridges towards redlines of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Luca; Brooks, Benjamin

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the effects of shiphandling manoeuvres on mental workload and physiological reactions in ten marine pilots. Each pilot performed four berthings in a ship simulator. Those berthings were differentiated by two factors, level of difficulty and familiarity with the port. Each berthing could also be divided into five phases, three during the execution and two resting periods, one before and one after the execution (dedicated to baseline physiological data collection). Mental workload was measured through two self assessment scales: the NASA TLX and a Likert scale. Power spectral densities on Beta bands 1 and 2 were obtained from EEG. Heart rate and heart rate variability were obtained from ECG. Pupil dilation was obtained from eye tracking. Workload levels were higher as berthings increased in difficulty level and/or the pilots completed the berthings in unfamiliar ports. Responses differed across specific phases of the berthings. Physiological responses could indirectly monitor levels of mental workload, and could be adopted in future applications to evaluate training improvements and performance. This study provides an example of an applied methodology aiming to define an upper redline of task demands in the context of marine pilotage. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The effect of water stress and salinity on growth and physiology of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakoula Anastasia E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids like lycopene are important pigments found in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in plants. They are responsible for the bright colors of fruits and vegetables and perform various functions in photosynthesis. Our research has shown that the application of moderate salt stress on tomato plants can enhance lycopene and potentially other antioxidant concentrations in fruits. The increase in lycopene in response to salt stress in the tomato fruits varied from 20% to 80%. Although the specific biological mechanisms involved in increasing fruit lycopene deposition has not been clearly elucidated, evidence suggests that increasing antioxidant concentrations is a primary physiological response of the plant to salt stress. Additionally drought stress during cultivation increased the antioxidant capacity of tomato fruit while maintaining the lycopene concentration. In addition, the effects of silicium were investigated, added to the nutrient solution either at low concentration or at an increased concentration. The present study clearly indicates that an enhanced silicium supply to tomato increases markedly the lycopene contents, irrespective of the salinity status in the tomato fruit.

  18. Growth performance and nutrient digestibility of Wistar albino rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance and nutrient digestibility of Wistar albino rats fed processed dehulled jack bean ( Canavalia ensiformis ) ... had the highest value for all the growth indices, feed intake (210.90g), final body weight (103.40g), body weight changes (41.90g), feed conversion ratio (5.10) and protein efficiency ratio (1.41).

  19. Early growth performances of various seed sources of black (Prunus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Early growth performances of various seed sources of black (Prunus serotina Erhr.) and wild cherry ( Prunus avium L.) seedlings on low and high elevation sites in ... Unlike the LES results, a collection of BC (Michigan 1 and Ukraine) and WC SSs (Dirgine, Germany, and Tefen) displayed the best seedling growth over five ...

  20. Growth performance of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) in spent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) in spent engine oil contaminated soil amended with compost of Urena lobata L. ... The growth parameters decreased with increase in the levels of contamination, however the application of Urena lobata significantly increased the plant height, number of leaves, leaf ...

  1. Growth, feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of Karakas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth, feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of Karakas and crossbred lambs (F 1 ) (Ile de France x Akkaraman (G 1 ) x Karakas) under rural farm conditions in ... South African Journal of Animal Science ... A total of 97 KAR and IDFAK lambs reared under farm conditions was evaluated for growth characteristics.

  2. Evaluation of the growth performance of calves from different dams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth performance of seven calves from different Muturu dams served by same bull was studied in a mini cattle ranch. Body measurements were taken and observed for growth over a period of 12 months. The result indicates an apparent difference among the calves in all parameters measured including body weight, ...

  3. Fertility, hatchability and growth performance of native and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fertility and hatchability serve as measures of genetic and reproductive fitness of individual bird. These two along with growth performance are important yardsticks in evaluating the economic efficiency of parent stocks. There is no previous study on the evaluation of Goliath and Sussex chickens for hatchability, growth and ...

  4. Multiple Days of Heat Exposure on Firefighters' Work Performance and Physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Larsen

    Full Text Available This study assessed the accumulated effect of ambient heat on the performance of, and physiological and perceptual responses to, intermittent, simulated wildfire fighting tasks over three consecutive days. Firefighters (n = 36 were matched and allocated to either the CON (19°C or HOT (33°C condition. They performed three days of intermittent, self-paced simulated firefighting work, interspersed with physiological testing. Task repetitions were counted (and converted to distance or area to determine work performance. Participants were asked to rate their perceived exertion and thermal sensation after each task. Heart rate, core temperature (Tc, and skin temperature (Tsk were recorded continuously throughout the simulation. Fluids were consumed ad libitum. Urine volume was measured throughout, and urine specific gravity (USG analysed, to estimate hydration. All food and fluid consumption was recorded. There was no difference in work output between experimental conditions. However, significant variation in performance responses between individuals was observed. All measures of thermal stress were elevated in the HOT, with core and skin temperature reaching, on average, 0.24 ± 0.08°C and 2.81 ± 0.20°C higher than the CON group. Participants' doubled their fluid intake in the HOT condition, and this was reflected in the USG scores, where the HOT participants reported significantly lower values. Heart rate was comparable between conditions at nearly all time points, however the peak heart rate reached each circuit was 7 ± 3% higher in the CON trial. Likewise, RPE was slightly elevated in the CON trial for the majority of tasks. Participants' work output was comparable between the CON and HOT conditions, however the performance change over time varied significantly between individuals. It is likely that the increased fluid replacement in the heat, in concert with frequent rest breaks and task rotation, assisted with the regulation of

  5. PHYSIOLOGICAL, BIOMECHANICAL AND ANTHROPOMETRICAL PREDICTORS OF SPRINT SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ADOLESCENT SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Lätt

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR, stroke length and stroke index (SI were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (?La. The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3% explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8% and physiological (45.2% parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers.

  6. Effects of modified multistage field test on performance and physiological responses in wheelchair basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissland, Thierry; Faupin, Arnaud; Borel, Benoit; Berthoin, Serge; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A bioenergetical analysis of manoeuvrability and agility performance for wheelchair players is inexistent. It was aimed at comparing the physiological responses and performance obtained from the octagon multistage field test (MFT) and the modified condition in "8 form" (MFT-8). Sixteen trained wheelchair basketball players performed both tests in randomized condition. The levels performed (end-test score), peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2peak), minute ventilation (VEpeak), heart rate (HRpeak), peak and relative blood lactate (Δ[Lact(-)] = peak--rest values), and the perceived rating exertion (RPE) were measured. MFT-8 induced higher VO2peak and VEpeak values compared to MFT (VO2peak: 2.5 ± 0.6 versus 2.3 ± 0.6 L · min(-1) and VEpeak: 96.3 ± 29.1 versus 86.6 ± 23.4 L · min(-1); P < 0.05) with no difference in other parameters. Significant relations between VEpeak and end-test score were correlated for both field tests (P < 0.05). At exhaustion, MFT attained incompletely VO2peak and VEpeak. Among experienced wheelchair players, MFT-8 had no effect on test performance but generates higher physiological responses than MFT. It could be explained by demands of wheelchair skills occurring in 8 form during the modified condition.

  7. Effects of increasing and decreasing physiological arousal on anticipation timing performance during competition and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Smith, Mike; Bryant, Elizabeth; Eyre, Emma; Cook, Kathryn; Hankey, Joanne; Tallis, Jason; Clarke, Neil; Jones, Marc V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if the effects of changes in physiological arousal on timing performance can be accurately predicted by the catastrophe model. Eighteen young adults (8 males, 10 females) volunteered to participate in the study following ethical approval. After familiarisation, coincidence anticipation was measured using the Bassin Anticipation Timer under four incremental exercise conditions: Increasing exercise intensity and low cognitive anxiety, increasing exercise intensity and high cognitive anxiety, decreasing exercise intensity and low cognitive anxiety and decreasing exercise intensity and high cognitive anxiety. Incremental exercise was performed on a treadmill at intensities of 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% heart rate reserve (HRR) respectively. Ratings of cognitive anxiety were taken at each intensity using the Mental Readiness Form 3 (MRF3) followed by performance of coincidence anticipation trials at speeds of 3 and 8 mph. Results indicated significant condition × intensity interactions for absolute error (AE; p = .0001) and MRF cognitive anxiety intensity scores (p = .05). Post hoc analysis indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in AE across exercise intensities in low-cognitive anxiety conditions. In high-cognitive anxiety conditions, timing performance AE was significantly poorer and cognitive anxiety higher at 90% HRR, compared to the other exercise intensities. There was no difference in timing responses at 90% HRR during competitive trials, irrespective of whether exercise intensity was increasing or decreasing. This study suggests that anticipation timing performance is negatively affected when physiological arousal and cognitive anxiety are high.

  8. Effects of Modified Multistage Field Test on Performance and Physiological Responses in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Weissland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A bioenergetical analysis of manoeuvrability and agility performance for wheelchair players is inexistent. It was aimed at comparing the physiological responses and performance obtained from the octagon multistage field test (MFT and the modified condition in “8 form” (MFT-8. Sixteen trained wheelchair basketball players performed both tests in randomized condition. The levels performed (end-test score, peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2peak, minute ventilation (VEpeak, heart rate (HRpeak, peak and relative blood lactate (Δ[Lact−] = peak – rest values, and the perceived rating exertion (RPE were measured. MFT-8 induced higher VO2peak and VEpeak values compared to MFT (VO2peak: 2.5 ± 0.6 versus 2.3 ± 0.6 L·min−1 and VEpeak: 96.3 ± 29.1 versus 86.6 ± 23.4 L·min−1; P<0.05 with no difference in other parameters. Significant relations between VEpeak and end-test score were correlated for both field tests (P<0.05. At exhaustion, MFT attained incompletely VO2peak and VEpeak. Among experienced wheelchair players, MFT-8 had no effect on test performance but generates higher physiological responses than MFT. It could be explained by demands of wheelchair skills occurring in 8 form during the modified condition.

  9. Growth and some physiological parameters of four sugar beet (Beta vulgaris l.) cultivars as affected by salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavari-Nejad, R A; Najafi, F; Khavari-Nejad, S

    2008-05-15

    The comparative responses of certain biochemical and physiological characteristics to salinity were studied in 4 cultivars of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) plants. Eight weeks old plants were treated with NaCl at 0, 25 and 50 mM in nutrient solutions. Plants were grown under controlled environment and harvested after 3 weeks for measurements of biochemical and physiological parameters. Results showed that in 25 mM NaCl for cultivars of ET5 and C3-3, soluble sugars in leaves, photosynthetic rate and growth parameters were significantly increased as compared to those of other cultivars. In 50 mM NaCl photosynthetic rate and soluble sugars were significantly increased only in ET5 cultivar as compared with those of others. Results indicated that in 25 mM NaCl, ET5 cultivar showed high growth responses and tolerated to 50 mM NaCl.

  10. Influence of β-galacto-oligosaccharide on growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GOS) on growth performance, organ development and intestinal microarchitecture of broilers during heat stress. Day-old chicks (n = 125) were divided into five groups. The control or thermoneutral zone group (TNZ) was raised under standard ...

  11. Growth performance and certain body measurements of ostrich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance and certain body measurements of ostrich chicks as affected by dietary protein levels during 2–9 weeks of age. Kh M Mahrose, AI Attia, IE Ismail, DE Abou-Kassem, ME Abd El-Hack ...

  12. Seed priming with chitosan improves maize germination and seedling growth in relation to physiological changes under low temperature stress*

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Ya-jing; Hu, Jin; Wang, Xian-ju; Shao, Chen-xia

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature stress during germination and early seedling growth is an important constraint of global production of maize. The effects of seed priming with 0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75% (w/v) chitosan solutions at 15 °C on the growth and physiological changes were investigated using two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines, HuangC (chilling-tolerant) and Mo17 (chilling-sensitive). While seed priming with chitosan had no significant effect on germination percentage under low temperature stress, it en...

  13. Speed endurance training is a powerful stimulus for physiological adaptations and performance improvements of athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaia, F. M.; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-01-01

    The present article reviews the physiological and performance effects of speed endurance training consisting of exercise bouts at near maximal intensities in already trained subjects. Despite a reduction in training volume, speed endurance training of endurance-trained athletes can maintain...... the oxidative capacity and improve intense short-duration/repeated high-intensity exercise performance lasting 30 s to 4 min, as it occurs in a number of sports. When combined with a basic volume of training including some aerobic high-intensity sessions, speed endurance training is also useful in enhancing...... performance during longer events, e.g. 40 K cycling and 10 K running. Athletes in team sports involving intense exercise actions and endurance aspects can also benefit from performing speed endurance training. These improvements don't appear to depend on changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), muscle...

  14. Physiological responses and performance in a simulated trampoline gymnastics competition in elite male gymnasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter; Scott, Suzanne; Krustrup, Peter

    2013-01-01

     EX1, EX2 and EX3, respectively, and was 4.8% lower (P post-competition. 20-MTJ flight time was ∼1% shorter (P EX2 and 24 h post STC. T m increased (P ...Abstract Physiological responses and performance were examined during and after a simulated trampoline competition (STC). Fifteen elite trampoline gymnasts participated, of which whereas eight completed two routines (EX1 and EX2) and a competition final (EX3). Trampoline-specific activities were...... quantified by video-analysis. Countermovement jump (CMJ) and 20 maximal trampoline jump (20-MTJ) performances were assessed. Heart rate (HR) and quadriceps muscle temperature (T m) were recorded and venous blood was drawn. A total of 252 ± 16 jumps were performed during the STC. CMJ performance declined (P...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to the Growth and Physiology of an Extremophile Cultured with Dielectric Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Kathleen D; Lin, Baochuan; Malanoski, Anthony P; Strycharz-Glaven, Sarah M; Cockrell-Zugell, Allison; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Cramer, Jeffrey A; Barlow, Daniel E; Boyd, Thomas J; Biffinger, Justin C

    2016-10-15

    The effect of microwave frequency electromagnetic fields on living microorganisms is an active and highly contested area of research. One of the major drawbacks to using mesophilic organisms to study microwave radiation effects is the unavoidable heating of the organism, which has limited the scale (60°C). This study identified changes in global gene expression profiles during the growth of Thermus scotoductus SA-01 at 65°C using dielectric (2.45 GHz, i.e., microwave) heating. RNA sequencing was performed on cultures at 8, 14, and 24 h after inoculation to determine the molecular mechanisms contributing to long-term cellular growth and survival under microwave heating conditions. Over the course of growth, genes associated with amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and defense mechanisms were upregulated; the number of repressed genes with unknown function increased; and at all time points, transposases were upregulated. Genes involved in cell wall biogenesis and elongation were also upregulated, consistent with the distinct elongated cell morphology observed after 24 h using microwave heating. Analysis of the global differential gene expression data enabled the identification of molecular processes specific to the response of T. scotoductus SA-01 to dielectric heating during growth. The residual heating of living organisms in the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum has complicated the identification of radiation-only effects using microorganisms for 50 years. A majority of the previous experiments used either mature cells or short exposure times with low-energy high-frequency radiation. Using global differential gene expression data, we identified molecular processes unique to dielectric heating using Thermus scotoductus SA-01 cultured over 30 h in a commercial microwave digestor. Genes associated with amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and defense mechanisms were upregulated; the number of repressed genes with unknown

  16. Impact of plant growth promoting bacillus subtilis on growth and physiological parameters of bassia indica (indian bassia) grown udder salt stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abeer, H.; Asma, A. H.; Allah, A.; Qarawi, A.; Shalawi, A.; Dilfuza, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of a salt-tolerant plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPR), Bacillus subtilis, in the alleviation of salinity stress during the growth of Indian bassia (Bassia indica (Wight) A.J. Scott), was studied under ccontrolled growth chamber conditions following seed inoculation. Physiological parameters such as neutral and phospholipids, fatty acid composition as well as photosynthetic pigments, were investigated. Salinity inhibited shoot and root length by 16 and 42 percentage, dry weight by 37 and 23 percentage respectively and negatively affected physiological parameters. Inoculation of unstressed and salt-stressed Indian bassia with B. subtilis significantly improved root and shoot growth, total lipid content, the phospholipid fraction, photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a and b and carotenoid contents) and also increased oleic (C 18:1 ), linoleic (C 18:2 ) and linolenic (C 18:3 ) acids in plant leaves compared to uninoculated plants. The salt-tolerant PGPR, B. subtilis could act synergistically to promote the growth and fitness of Indian bassia plants under salt stress by providing an additional supply of an auxin (IAA) and induce salt stress resistance by reducing stress ethylene levels. (author)

  17. Effects of playing surface on physiological responses and performance variables in a controlled football simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael G; Birdsey, Laurence; Meyers, Rob; Newcombe, Daniel; Oliver, Jon Lee; Smith, Paul M; Stembridge, Michael; Stone, Keeron; Kerwin, David George

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the increased acceptance of artificial turf in football, few studies have investigated if matches are altered by the type of surface used and no research has compared physiological responses to football activity on artificial and natural surfaces. In the present study, participants performed a football match simulation on high-quality artificial and natural surfaces. Neither mean heart rate (171 ± 9 beats · min(-1) vs. 171 ± 9 beats · min(-1); P > 0.05) nor blood lactate (4.8 ± 1.6 mM vs. 5.3 ± 1.8 mM; P > 0.05) differed between the artificial and natural surface, respectively. Measures of sprint, jumping and agility performance declined through the match simulation but surface type did not affect the decrease in performance. For example, the fatigue index of repeated sprints did not differ (P > 0.05) between the artificial, (6.9 ± 2.1%) and natural surface (7.4 ± 2.4%). The ability to turn after sprinting was affected by surface type but this difference was dependent on the type of turn. Although there were small differences in the ability to perform certain movements between artificial and natural surfaces, the results suggest that fatigue and physiological responses to football activity do not differ markedly between surface-type using the high-quality pitches of the present study.

  18. Modelling of tomato stem diameter growth rate based on physiological responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.; Tan, J.; Lv, T.

    2017-01-01

    The stem diameter is an important parameter describing the growth of tomato plant during vegetative growth stage. A stem diameter growth model was developed to predict the response of plant growth under different conditions. By analyzing the diurnal variations of stem diameter in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), it was found that the stem diameter measured at 3:00 am was the representative value as the daily basis of tomato stem diameter. Based on the responses of growth rate in stem diameter to light and temperature, a linear regression relationship was applied to establish the stem diameter growth rate prediction model for the vegetative growth stage in tomato and which was further validated by experiment. The root mean square error (RMSE) and relative error (RE) were used to test the correlation between measured and modeled stem diameter variations. Results showed that the model can be used in prediction for stem diameter growth rate at vegetative growth stage in tomato. (author)

  19. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N.; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA) and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature s...

  20. Do physiological measures predict selected CrossFit(®) benchmark performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Scotty J; Neyedly, Tyler J; Horvey, Karla J; Benko, Chad R

    2015-01-01

    CrossFit(®) is a new but extremely popular method of exercise training and competition that involves constantly varied functional movements performed at high intensity. Despite the popularity of this training method, the physiological determinants of CrossFit performance have not yet been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physiological and/or muscle strength measures could predict performance on three common CrossFit "Workouts of the Day" (WODs). Fourteen CrossFit Open or Regional athletes completed, on separate days, the WODs "Grace" (30 clean and jerks for time), "Fran" (three rounds of thrusters and pull-ups for 21, 15, and nine repetitions), and "Cindy" (20 minutes of rounds of five pull-ups, ten push-ups, and 15 bodyweight squats), as well as the "CrossFit Total" (1 repetition max [1RM] back squat, overhead press, and deadlift), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), and Wingate anaerobic power/capacity testing. Performance of Grace and Fran was related to whole-body strength (CrossFit Total) (r=-0.88 and -0.65, respectively) and anaerobic threshold (r=-0.61 and -0.53, respectively); however, whole-body strength was the only variable to survive the prediction regression for both of these WODs (R (2)=0.77 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant associations or predictors for Cindy. CrossFit benchmark WOD performance cannot be predicted by VO2max, Wingate power/capacity, or either respiratory compensation or anaerobic thresholds. Of the data measured, only whole-body strength can partially explain performance on Grace and Fran, although anaerobic threshold also exhibited association with performance. Along with their typical training, CrossFit athletes should likely ensure an adequate level of strength and aerobic endurance to optimize performance on at least some benchmark WODs.

  1. Efficiency of biogas slurry and Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN to improve growth, physiology, and antioxidant activity of Brassica napus L. in chromium-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafees, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Naveed, Muhammad; Rizwan, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    Contamination of soil is a major problem globally with colligated danger for ecosystem and human health. Chromium (Cr) is a toxic heavy metal and caused harmful effect on growth and development of plants. Phytostabilization reduced the mobility of heavy metals with addition of amendments which can significantly decrease metal solubility in soil. Phytostabilization can be achieved by application of biogas slurry (BGS) and endophytic bacteria as amendments in the contaminated soils. The present study revealed that the Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN and BGS improved the growth, physiology, and antioxidant activity and reduced Cr uptake under a pot experiment spiked with Cr (20 mg kg -1 soil). The experiment was designed under completely randomized design, four treatments with three replications in normal and Cr-contaminated soil. The inoculation of endophytic bacteria improved the growth and physiology of Brassica. This study showed that the inoculation of endophytic bacteria stabilized the Cr levels in soil and minimized the uptake by the plant shoots and roots in BGS-amended soil. Similarly, activity of antioxidants such as catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and glutathione s-transferase (GST) was decreased to normal with combined treatment of BGS and endophytic bacteria in Cr-stressed soil. Overall, the best results were analyzed by combined treatment of BGS and endophytic bacteria to improve growth, physiology, and antioxidant activity of Brassica and immobilize Cr in soil. Moreover, results emphasized the need to use BGS alone or in combination with endophytic bacteria to optimize crop performance, stabilize Cr concentration, and improve environmental efficiency.

  2. Passive acoustic monitoring of human physiology during activity indicates health and performance of soldiers and firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-04-01

    The Army Research Laboratory has developed a unique gel-coupled acoustic physiological monitoring sensor that has acoustic impedance properties similar to the skin. This facilitates the transmission of body sounds into the sensor pad, yet significantly repels ambient airborne noises due to an impedance mismatch. The sensor's sensitivity and bandwidth produce excellent signatures for detection and spectral analysis of diverse physiological events. Acoustic signal processing detects heartbeats, breaths, wheezes, coughs, blood pressure, activity, motion, and voice for communication and automatic speech recognition. The health and performance of soldiers, firefighters, and other first responders in strenuous and hazardous environments can be continuously and remotely monitored with body-worn acoustic sensors. Comfortable acoustic sensors can be in a helmet or in a strap around the neck, chest, and wrist. Noise-canceling sensor arrays help remove out-of-phase motion noise and enhance covariant physiology by using two acoustic sensors on the front sides of the neck and two additional acoustic sensors on each wrist. Pulse wave transit time between neck and wrist acoustic sensors will indicate systolic blood pressure. Larger torso-sized arrays can be used to acoustically inspect the lungs and heart, or built into beds for sleep monitoring. Acoustics is an excellent input for sensor fusion.

  3. A novel impeller configuration to improve fungal physiology performance and energy conservation for cephalosporin C production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiming; Xia, Jianye; Li, Jianhua; Chu, Ju; Li, Liang; Wang, Yonghong; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2012-10-31

    Effects of impeller configuration on fungal physiology and cephalosporin C production were investigated by an industrial strain Acremonium chrysogenum in a 12 m(3) bioreactor equipped with conventional and novel impeller configuration, respectively. The cell growth and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profiles were little affected by the impeller configurations. However, differing impeller combinations significantly affected the morphology, which in turn influenced cephalosporin C production. Under the novel impeller configuration, the production of cephalosporin C was 10% higher and an excessive amount of dispersed arthrospores was also observed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation further revealed that poor mass and energy exchange as well as inhomogeneous environment existed in the bioreactor equipped with conventional impeller configuration. For equivalent power dissipation, the volume oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)a) could be enhanced by 15% compared with that of conventional impeller configuration. Power consumption was dramatically decreased by 25% by using novel impeller configuration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Physiological signal variability in hMT+ reflects performance on a direction discrimination task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Graciela Wutte

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to perceive visual motion is critically dependent on the human motion complex (hMT+ in the dorsal visual stream. Extensive electrophysiological research in the monkey equivalent of this region has demonstrated how neuronal populations code for properties such as speed and direction, and that neurometric functions relate to psychometric functions within the individual monkey. In humans, the physiological correlates of inter-individual perceptual differences are still largely unknown. To address this question, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while participants viewed translational motion in different directions, and we measured thresholds for direction discrimination of moving stimuli in a separate psychophysics experiment. After determining hMT+ in each participant with a functional localizer, we were able to decode the different directions of visual motion from it using pattern classification (PC. We also characterized the variability of fMRI signal in hMT+ during stimulus and rest periods with a generative model. Relating perceptual performance to physiology, individual direction discrimination thresholds were significantly correlated with the variability measure in hMT+, but not with PC accuracies. Individual differences in PC accuracy were driven by non-physiological noise like head-movement, which makes this method a poor tool to investigate inter-individual differences. In contrast, variability analysis of the fMRI signal was robust to non-physiological noise, and variability characteristics in hMT+ correlated with psychophysical thresholds in the individual participants. Higher levels of fMRI signal variability compared to rest correlated with lower discrimination thresholds. This result is in line with theories on stochastic resonance in the context of neuronal populations, which suggest that endogenous or exogenous noise can increase the sensitivity of neuronal populations to incoming signals.

  5. Do physiological measures predict selected CrossFit® benchmark performance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher SJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scotty J Butcher,1,2 Tyler J Neyedly,3 Karla J Horvey,1 Chad R Benko2,41Physical Therapy, University of Saskatchewan, 2BOSS Strength Institute, 3Physiology, University of Saskatchewan, 4Synergy Strength and Conditioning, Saskatoon, SK, CanadaPurpose: CrossFit® is a new but extremely popular method of exercise training and competition that involves constantly varied functional movements performed at high intensity. Despite the popularity of this training method, the physiological determinants of CrossFit performance have not yet been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physiological and/or muscle strength measures could predict performance on three common CrossFit "Workouts of the Day" (WODs.Materials and methods: Fourteen CrossFit Open or Regional athletes completed, on separate days, the WODs "Grace" (30 clean and jerks for time, "Fran" (three rounds of thrusters and pull-ups for 21, 15, and nine repetitions, and "Cindy" (20 minutes of rounds of five pull-ups, ten push-ups, and 15 bodyweight squats, as well as the "CrossFit Total" (1 repetition max [1RM] back squat, overhead press, and deadlift, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, and Wingate anaerobic power/capacity testing.Results: Performance of Grace and Fran was related to whole-body strength (CrossFit Total (r=-0.88 and -0.65, respectively and anaerobic threshold (r=-0.61 and -0.53, respectively; however, whole-body strength was the only variable to survive the prediction regression for both of these WODs (R2=0.77 and 0.42, respectively. There were no significant associations or predictors for Cindy.Conclusion: CrossFit benchmark WOD performance cannot be predicted by VO2max, Wingate power/capacity, or either respiratory compensation or anaerobic thresholds. Of the data measured, only whole-body strength can partially explain performance on Grace and Fran, although anaerobic threshold also exhibited association with performance. Along with their typical training

  6. Effects of quinoa hull meal on piglet performance and intestinal epithelial physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Dorthe; Fernandez, J.A.; Poulsen, H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Saponin-containing feed additives have shown positive effects on pig performance. Quinoa hull has high saponin content and may be of interest as a feed additive. This study aimed to evaluate quinoa hull meal (QHM) as a feed additive in a pig diet. The effects of QHM were assessed for three dosage...... that consumed 100 or 300 mg/kg SA-QHM. The secretory response to 5-HT was not affected (p = 0.59) by dietary treatments, but the theophylline-induced secretion decreased (p = 0.02) with increasing dietary SA-QHM. The changes in epithelial physiology mea...

  7. Audience entrainment during live contemporary dance performance: Physiological and cognitive measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asaf eBachrach

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Perceiving and synchronizing to a piece of dance is a remarkable skill in humans. Research in this area is very recent and has been focused mainly on entrainment produced by regular rhythms. Here, we investigated entrainment effects on spectators perceiving a non-rhythmic and extremely slow performance issued from contemporary dance. More specifically, we studied the relationship between subjective experience and entrainment produced by perceiving this type of performance. We defined two types of entrainment. Physiological entrainment corresponded to cardiovascular and respiratory coordinated activities. Cognitive entrainment was evaluated through cognitive tasks that quantified time distortion. These effects were thought to reflect attunement of a participant' internal temporal clock to the particularly slow pace of the danced movement. Each participant' subjective experience – in the form of responses to questionnaires – were collected and correlated with cognitive and physiological entrainment. We observe: a a positive relationship between psychological entrainment and attention to breathing (their own one or that of dancers; b a positive relationship between cognitive entrainment (reflected as an under-estimation of time following the performance and attention to their own breathing, and attention to the muscles’ dancers. Overall, our results suggest a close relationship between attention to breathing and entrainment. This proof-of-concept pilot study was intended to prove the feasibility of a quantitative situated paradigm. This research is inscribed in a large-scale interdisciplinary project of dance spectating (labodanse.org.

  8. Digestive physiology of the Burmese python: broad regulation of integrated performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M

    2008-12-01

    As an apparent adaptation to predictably long episodes of fasting, the sit-and-wait foraging Burmese python experiences unprecedented regulation of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular performance with feeding and fasting. The ingestion of a meal signals the quiescent gut tissues to start secreting digestive acid and enzymes, to upregulate intestinal brush-border enzymes and nutrient transporters, and to grow. An integrated phenomenon, digestion is also characterized by increases in the mass, and presumably the function, of the heart, pancreas, liver and kidneys. Once digestion is complete, the python's stomach and small intestine rapidly downregulate performance. Much of the modulation of intestinal function can be explained by the 5-fold increase in microvillus length and apical surface area with feeding, and the subsequent shortening of the microvilli after digestion has finished. Digestion for the Burmese python is a relatively expensive endeavor, evident by the as much as a 44-fold increase in metabolic rate and equivalent in cost to as much as 37% of the meal's energy. Their large metabolic response is supported by substantial increases in ventilation and cardiac output and the apparent catabolism of glucose and lipids. Unmatched in the magnitude of its numerous physiological responses to feeding, the Burmese python is a very attractive model for examining the capacities and regulatory mechanisms of physiological performance.

  9. The ecological and physiological bases of variation in the phenology of gonad growth in an urban and desert songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Scott; Lane, Samuel; Meddle, Simone L; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Deviche, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    Birds often adjust to urban areas by advancing the timing (phenology) of vernal gonad growth. However, the ecological and physiological bases of this adjustment are unclear. We tested whether the habitat-related disparity in gonad growth phenology of male Abert's towhees, Melozone aberti, is due to greater food availability in urban areas of Phoenix, Arizona USA or, alternatively, a habitat-related difference in the phenology of key food types. To better understand the physiological mechanism underlying variation in gonad growth phenology, we compared the activity of the reproductive system at all levels of hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. We found no habitat-associated difference in food availability (ground arthropod biomass), but, in contrast to the seasonal growth of leaves on desert trees, the leaf foliage of urban trees was already developed at the beginning of our study. Multiple estimates of energetic status did not significantly differ between the non-urban and urban towhees during three years that differed in the habitat-related disparity in gonad growth and winter precipitation levels. Thus, our results provide no support for the hypothesis that greater food abundance in urban areas of Phoenix drives the habitat-related disparity in gonad growth phenology in Abert's towhees. By contrast, they suggest that differences in the predictability and magnitude of change in food availability between urban and desert areas of Phoenix contribute to the observed habitat-related disparity in gonad growth. Endocrine responsiveness of the gonads may contribute to this phenomenon as desert - but not urban - towhees had a marked plasma testosterone response to GnRH challenge. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance of First-Year Health Sciences Students in a Large, Diverse, Multidisciplinary, First-Semester, Physiology Service Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufts, Mark; Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Health Science students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal perform better in their professional modules compared with their physiology modules. The pass rates of physiology service modules have steadily declined over the years. While a system is in place to identify "at-risk" students, it is only activated after the first semester. As a…

  11. Transition from exponential to linear photoautotrophic growth changes the physiology of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, R.M.; Matthijs, J.C.P.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    Phototrophic microorganisms like cyanobacteria show growth curves in batch culture that differ from the corresponding growth curves of chemotrophic bacteria. Instead of the usual three phases, i.e., lag-, log-, and stationary phase, phototrophs display four distinct phases. The extra growth phase is

  12. Rethinking butterflies: the affective, physiological, and performance effects of reappraising arousal during social evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltzer, Miranda L; Nock, Matthew K; Peters, Brett J; Jamieson, Jeremy P

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of reappraising stress arousal on affective displays, physiological responses, and social performance during an evaluative situation. Participants were sampled from across the social anxiety spectrum and instructed to reappraise arousal as beneficial or received no instructions. Independent raters coded affective displays, nonverbal signaling, and speech performance. Saliva samples collected at baseline and after evaluation were assayed for salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), a protein that indexes sympathetic activation. Arousal reappraisal participants exhibited less shame and anxiety, less avoidant nonverbal signaling, and performed marginally better than no instruction controls. Reappraisal participants also exhibited increased levels of sAA and increased appraisals of coping resources compared with controls. Furthermore, stress appraisals mediated relationships between reappraisal and affective displays. This research indicates that reframing stress arousal can improve behavioral displays of affect during evaluative situations via altering cognitive appraisals.

  13. Physiology, anatomy, and plasticity of the cerebral cortex in relation to musical instrument performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramo, Mark Jude

    2004-05-01

    The acquisition and maintenance of fine-motor skills underlying musical instrument performance rely on the development, integration, and plasticity of neural systems localized within specific subregions of the cerebral cortex. Cortical representations of a motor sequence, such as a sequence of finger movements along the keys of a saxophone, take shape before the figure sequence occurs. The temporal pattern and spatial coordinates are computed by networks of neurons before and during the movements. When a finger sequence is practiced over and over, performance gets faster and more accurate, probably because cortical neurons generating the sequence increase in spatial extent, their electrical discharges become more synchronous, or both. By combining experimental methods such as single- and multi-neuron recordings, focal stimulation, microanatomical tracers, gross morphometry, evoked potentials, and functional imaging in humans and nonhuman primates, neuroscientists are gaining insights into the cortical physiology, anatomy, and plasticity of musical instrument performance.

  14. Ecophysiology of cognition: How do environmentally induced changes in physiology affect cognitive performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maille, Audrey; Schradin, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive performance is based on brain functions, which have energetic demands and are modulated by physiological parameters such as metabolic hormones. As both environmental demands and environmental energy availability change seasonally, we propose that cognitive performance in free-living animals might also change seasonally due to phenotypic plasticity. This is part of an emerging research field, the 'ecophysiology of cognition': environmentally induced changes in physiological traits, such as blood glucose and hormone levels, are predicted to influence cognitive performance in free-living animals. Energy availability for the brain might change, and as such cognition, with changing energetic demands (e.g. reproduction) and changes of energy availability in the environment (e.g. winter, drought). Individuals spending more energy than they can currently obtain from their environment (allostatic overload type I) are expected to trade off energy investment between cognition and other life-sustaining processes or even reproduction. Environmental changes reducing energy availability might thus impair cognition. However, selection pressures such as predation risk, mate choice or social demands may act on the trade-off between energy saving and cognition. We assume that different environmental conditions can lead to three different trade-off outcomes: cognitive impairment, resilience or enhancement. Currently we cannot understand these trade-offs, because we lack information about changes in cognitive performance due to seasonal changes in energy availability and both the resulting changes in homeostasis (for example, blood glucose levels) and the associated changes in the mechanisms of allostasis (for example, hormone levels). Additionally, so far we know little about the fitness consequences of individual variation in cognitive performance. General cognitive abilities, such as attention and associative learning, might be more important in determining fitness than

  15. The effect of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria on the growth, physiology, and Cd uptake of Arundo donax L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarathambal, Chinnathambi; Khankhane, Premraj Jagoji; Gharde, Yogita; Kumar, Bhumesh; Varun, Mayank; Arun, Sellappan

    2017-04-03

    In this study, plant growth-promoting potential isolates from rhizosphere of 10 weed species grown in heavy metal-contaminated areas were identified and their effect on growth, antioxidant enzymes, and cadmium (Cd) uptake in Arundo donax L. was explored. Plant growth-promoting traits of isolates were also analyzed. These isolates were found to produce siderophores and enzymes such as 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, and aid in solubilization of mineral nutrients and modulate plant growth and development. Based on the presence of multiple plant growth-promoting traits, isolates were selected for molecular characterization and inoculation studies. Altogether, 58 isolates were obtained and 20% of them were able to tolerate Cd up to 400 ppm. The sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes indicates that the isolates belong to the phylum Firmicutes. Bacillus sp. along with mycorrhizae inoculation significantly improves the growth, the activity of antioxidants enzymes, and the Cd uptake in A. donax than Bacillus alone. Highly significant correlations were observed between Cd uptake, enzymatic activities, and plant growth characteristics at 1% level of significance. The synergistic interaction effect between these organisms helps to alleviate Cd effects on soil. Heavy metal-tolerant isolate along with arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) could be used to improve the phytoremedial potential of plants.

  16. Effects of culture systems on growth and economic performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IFEOMA PIUS

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... Key words: Culture system, growth performance, economic performance, Oreochromic niloticus. INTRODUCTION. Food is a basic necessity of life, second only to air and water. The global food equation recognizes two major components namely; food crop component and animal protein component ...

  17. The relative investment performance of the community growth fund ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the impact of social criteria on the investment performance of the Community Growth Fund, a trade-union-controlled South African unit trust. It gives a brief history of the fund, discusses reasons for performance deviations, and shows that there may be reason for believing that some social criteria ...

  18. Analysis of growth, yield potential and horticultural performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complete randomized block design was applied to evaluate and compare the growth, yield and field performance of in vitro derived turmeric plants with conventional rhizome under field condition. In vitro propagated plants manifest consistently superior horticultural performance over the conventional rhizome. Among the ...

  19. Effects of dietary chitosan on growth performance and immune ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    2011-08-18

    Aug 18, 2011 ... CONCLUSION. The dietary chitosan supplementation therefore provided further insight into the role of growth performance and immune system development in ducks. As expected, most of the effects of dietary chitosan were enhancement of performance and improving the immune function macroscopically ...

  20. A longitudinal study of growth, sex steroids and IGF-1 in boys with physiological gynaecomastia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Mikkel G.; Raket, Lars Lau; Hagen, Casper P.

    2015-01-01

    , pubertal development and the presence of gynaecomastia were evaluated at each visit. Results: 52 of 106 boys (49 developed gynaecomastia of which 10 (19 presented with intermittent gynaecomastia. Boys with physiological gynaecomastia reached peak height velocity at a significantly younger age than boys who......Context: Physiological gynaecomastia is common and affects a large proportion of otherwise healthy adolescent boys. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone, though this is rarely evident in analyses of serum. Objective: This study aimed to describe the frequency...... of physiological gynaecomastia, and to determine possible etiological factors (e.g. auxology and serum hormone levels) in a longitudinal set-up. Design, Settings and Participants: A prospective cohort study of 106 healthy Danish boys (5.8–16.4 years) participated in the longitudinal part of “the COPENHAGEN Puberty...

  1. Sustained attention performance during sleep deprivation associates with instability in behavior and physiologic measures at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lau, Pauline; Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Puvanendran, Kathiravelu; Gooley, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    To identify baseline behavioral and physiologic markers that associate with individual differences in sustained attention during sleep deprivation. In a retrospective study, ocular, electrocardiogram, and electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were compared in subjects who were characterized as resilient (n = 15) or vulnerable (n = 15) to the effects of total sleep deprivation on sustained attention. Chronobiology and Sleep Laboratory, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore. Healthy volunteers aged 22-32 years from the general population. Subjects were kept awake for at least 26 hours under constant environmental conditions. Every 2 hours, sustained attention was assessed using a 10-minute psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). During baseline sleep and recovery sleep, EEG slow wave activity was similar in resilient versus vulnerable subjects, suggesting that individual differences in vulnerability to sleep loss were not related to differences in homeostatic sleep regulation. Rather, irrespective of time elapsed since wake, subjects who were vulnerable to sleep deprivation exhibited slower and more variable PVT response times, lower and more variable heart rate, and higher and more variable EEG spectral power in the theta frequency band (6.0-7.5 Hz). Performance decrements in sustained attention during sleep deprivation associate with instability in behavioral and physiologic measures at baseline. Small individual differences in sustained attention that are present at baseline are amplified during prolonged wakefulness, thus contributing to large between-subjects differences in performance and sleepiness.

  2. Mathematical literacy in Plant Physiology undergraduates: results of interventions aimed at improving students' performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Francisca; Sanz, Amparo

    2013-09-01

    The importance of mathematical literacy in any scientific career is widely recognized. However, various studies report lack of numeracy and mathematical literacy in students from various countries. In the present work, we present a detailed study of the mathematical literacy of Spanish undergraduate students of Biology enrolled in a Plant Physiology course. We have performed individual analyses of results obtained during the period 2000-2011, for questions in the examinations requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. Additionally, we present the outcome of two interventions introduced with the aim of helping students improve their prospects for success in the course. Our results confirm previous research showing students' deficiencies in mathematical skills. However, the scores obtained for mathematical questions in the examinations are good predictors of the final grades attained in Plant Physiology, as there are strong correlations at the individual level between results for questions requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. The introduction of a laboratory session devoted to strengthening the application of students' previously acquired mathematical knowledge did not change significantly the results obtained for mathematical questions. Since mathematical abilities of students entering university have declined in recent years, this intervention may have helped to maintain students' performance to a level comparable to that of previous years. The outcome of self-assessment online tests indicates that although Mathematics anxiety is lower than during examinations, the poor results obtained for questions requiring mathematical skills are, at least in part, due to a lack of self-efficacy.

  3. Physiological, psychometric, and performance effects of the Christmas break in Australian football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Morgan, Will; Wallace, Jarryd; Bode, Matthew; Poulos, Nick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to quantify the physiological, psychometric, and performance effects of a 2-wk Christmas break in a professional Australian Football League club. A series of physiological (eg, heart-rate [HR] response to a 5-min submaximal run and skinfold thicknesses), psychometric (rating-of-perceived-exertion [RPE] responses and wellness variables), and performance (running activity during standardized handball games, isometric midthigh pull [IMTP] peak force, and countermovement jump [CMJ]) measures were conducted in the weeks before and after the break. There was a possible and small increase in the sum of 7 skinfolds, while body mass and fat-free mass remained possible and likely unchanged, respectively. Sleep and stress scores remained likely to almost certainly unchanged, but there were some small, possible to likely decreases in fatigue and soreness scores. HR and RPE responses to the 5-min submaximal run were likely slightly lower (ie, improved) after the break. High-intensity running and acceleration distance during a standard handball game were very likely slightly greater, while HR and RPE responses to the game were possibly to very likely unchanged. HR responses to a high-intensity training session remained very likely unchanged. There was also a likely small increase in IMTP peak force but likely to very likely no change in CMJ variables. The results show that players returned from a 2-wk break during preseason well recovered, with preserved to improved levels of strength and cardiorespiratory fitness, despite small increases in skinfold thickness.

  4. Flipped classroom model improves graduate student performance in cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tune, Johnathan D; Sturek, Michael; Basile, David P

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a traditional lecture-based curriculum versus a modified "flipped classroom" curriculum of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology delivered to first-year graduate students. Students in both courses were provided the same notes and recorded lectures. Students in the modified flipped classroom were required to watch the prerecorded lectures before class and then attend class, where they received a quiz or homework covering material in each lecture (valued at 25% of the final grade) followed by a question and answer/problem-solving period. In the traditional curriculum, attending lectures was optional and there were no quizzes. Evaluation of effectiveness and student performance was achieved by having students in both courses take the same multiple-choice exams. Within a comparable group of graduate students, participants in the flipped course scored significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and weighted cumulative sections by an average of >12 percentage points. Exam averages for students in the flipped course also tended to be higher on the renal section by ∼11 percentage points (P = 0.06). Based on our experience and responses obtained in blinded student surveys, we propose that the use of homework and in-class quizzes were critical motivating factors that likely contributed to the increase in student exam performance. Taken together, our findings support that the flipped classroom model is a highly effective means in which to disseminate key physiological concepts to graduate students.

  5. Acute physiological stress down-regulates mRNA expressions of growth-related genes in coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Nakano

    Full Text Available Growth and development in fish are regulated to a major extent by growth-related factors, such as liver-derived insulin-like growth factor (IGF -1 in response to pituitary-secreted growth hormone (GH binding to the GH receptor (GHR. Here, we report on the changes in the expressions of gh, ghr, and igf1 genes and the circulating levels of GH and IGF-1 proteins in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch in response to handling as an acute physiological stressor. Plasma GH levels were not significantly different between stressed fish and prestressed control. Plasma IGF-1 concentrations in stressed fish 1.5 h post-stress were the same as in control fish, but levels in stressed fish decreased significantly 16 h post-stress. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis showed that ghr mRNA levels in pituitary, liver, and muscle decreased gradually in response to the stressor. After exposure to stress, hepatic igf1 expression transiently increased, whereas levels decreased 16 h post-stress. On the other hand, the pituitary gh mRNA level did not change in response to the stressor. These observations indicate that expression of gh, ghr, and igf1 responded differently to stress. Our results show that acute physiological stress can mainly down-regulate the expressions of growth-related genes in coho salmon in vivo. This study also suggests that a relationship between the neuroendocrine stress response and growth-related factors exists in fish.

  6. Environmental effects of nanosilver: impact on castor seed germination, seedling growth, and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasur, Jyothsna; Rani, Pathipati Usha

    2013-12-01

    Increasing use of nanoparticles in daily products is of great concern today, especially when their positive and negative impact on environment is not known. Hence, in current research, we have studied the impact of silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) and silver nitrate (AgNO3) application on seed germination, root, and shoot length of castor bean, Ricinus communis L. plant. Silver nanoparticles had no significant effects on seedling growth even at higher concentration of 4,000 mg L(-1), while the silver in bulk form as AgNO3 applied on the castor bean seeds inhibited the seed germination. Silver uptake in seedlings of the castor seeds on treatment with both the forms of silver was confirmed through atomic absorption spectroscopy studies. The silver nanoparticle and silver nitrate application to castor seeds also caused an enhanced enzymatic activity of ROS enzymes and phenolic content in castor seedlings. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of individual phenols indicated enhanced content of parahydroxy benzoic acid. These kinds of studies are of great interest in order to unveil the movement and accumulation of nanoparticles in plant tissues for assessing future applications in the field or laboratory.

  7. Physiological Assessment and Behavioral Interaction of Wild and Hatchery Juvenile Salmonids : The Relationship of Fish Size and Growth to Smoltification in Spring Chinook Salmon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, Brian R.; Larsen, Donald A.; Lee-Pawlak, Beeda; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    1996-10-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the relative influence of size and growth rate on downstream migratory disposition and physiology in yearling spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawtscha) smolts. A group of juvenile chinook salmon was size graded into small and large categories with half the fish in each group reared at an elevated temperature, resulting in four distinct treatment groups: Large Warm (LW), Large Cool (LC), Small Warm (SW), and Small Cool (SC). Fish from warm-water treatment groups displayed significantly higher growth rates than cool-water groups. Fish were tagged and released into a natural creek where downstream movement was monitored. For each of the two releases, fish that migrated past a weir within the first 5 days postrelease had significantly higher spring growth rates than fish that did not migrate within that period. Significant differences in length for the same fish were only found in the second release. Also for the second release, fish from the warm water treatment groups were recovered in higher proportions than fish from cool water groups. The results indicate that increased growth rate in the spring has a positive relation to downstream migratory disposition. Furthermore, there is a relation between smolt size and migration; however, this relation is weaker than that found between growth rate and migration.

  8. Hatching system and time effects on broiler physiology and posthatch growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van de L.J.F.; Wagenberg, van A.V.; Debonne, M.; Decuypere, E.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2011-01-01

    A multilevel housing system for broilers was developed, named Patio (Vencomatic BV, Eersel, the Netherlands), in which the hatching and brooding phase are combined. In a Patio system, climate conditions differ from those provided in the hatchers currently in use. We compared the physiology of

  9. THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGICAL GROWTH ON ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hery Ferdinan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTechnology in the globalization era is difficult to be avoided in daily life. This study aims to estimate the impact of technological growth on economic performance in Indonesia using a Total Factor Productivity (TFP method. The results indicate that technological growth in Indonesia during 1981-2012 is 0.87 percent, contributes up to 30.48 percent to economic growth. The results of econometric analysis suggest that technological growth will increase not only economic growth but also the unemployment rate, implying that technological growth in Indonesia creates jobs destruction than jobs creation.Keywords: Technological growth, TFP, economic growth, unemployment rateJEL classification number: O11, O47AbstrakTeknologi di era globalisasi sulit untuk dihindarkan dalam kehidupan sehari-hari. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengestimasi dampak dari perkembangan teknologi pada kinerja ekonomi di Indonesia menggunakan metode Total Factor Productivity (TFP. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa perkembangan teknologi di Indonesia selama 1981-2012 adalah 0,87 persen, memberikan kontribusi hingga 30.48 persen terhadap pertumbuhan ekonomi. Hasil analisis ekonometrik menunjukkan bahwa perkembangan teknologi akan meningkatkan tidak hanya pertumbuhan ekonomi tetapi juga tingkat pengangguran, yang menyiratkan bahwa perkembangan teknologi di Indonesia menciptakan turunnya jumlah pekerjaan, bukannya menciptakan lapangan kerja.Keywords: Pertumbuhan teknologi, TFP, pertumbuhan ekonomi, tingkat pengangguranJEL classification number: O11, O47

  10. Morphology and physiology of the dimorphic fungus Mucor circinelloides (syn. M. racemosus) during anaerobic growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübbehüsen, Tina Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Mcintyre, Mhairi

    2003-01-01

    The dimorphic Mucor circinelloides requires an anaerobic atmosphere and the presence of 30% CO2 to grow as a multipolar budding yeast, otherwise hyphal growth predominates. Establishing other means to control the morphology would be a distinct advantage in the development of a fermentation process...... for this organism for the production of heterologous proteins. Thus, conditions suppressing polarised growth while at the same time abolishing the CO2 requirement were investigated in submerged cultivations. It was found that supplementing cultures with mixtures of ergosterol and Tween 80 resulted in yeast...... on supporting yeast growth by influencing the fluidity of the plasma membrane or affecting polarised growth are discussed....

  11. The Effect of Dietary Nitrate Supplementation on Physiology and Performance in Trained Cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Joseph A; Dulson, Deborah K; Laursen, Paul B; Kilding, Andrew E

    2017-05-01

    To determine the effect of dietary nitrate (NO 3 - ) supplementation on physiology and performance in well-trained cyclists after 6-8 d of NO 3 - supplementation. Eight competitive male cyclists (mean ± SD age 26 ± 8 y, body mass 76.7 ± 6.9 kg, VO 2peak 63 ± 4 mL · kg -1 · min -1 ) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study in which participants ingested 70 mL of beetroot juice containing ~4 mmol NO 3 - (NIT) or a NO 3 - -depleted placebo (PLA), each for 8 d. Replicating pretreatment measures, participants undertook an incremental ramp assessment to determine VO 2peak and first (VT 1 ) and second (VT 2 ) ventilatory thresholds on d 6 (NIT6 and PLA6), moderate-intensity cycling economy on d 7 (NIT7 and PLA7), and a 4-km time trial (TT) on d 8 (NIT8 and PLA8). Relative to PLA, 6 d of NIT supplementation produced unclear effects for VO 2peak (mean ± 95% confidence limit: 1.8% ± 5.5%) and VT 1 (3.7% ± 12.3%) and trivial effects for both VT 2 (-1.0% ± 3.0%) and exercise economy on d 7 (-1.0% ± 1.6%). However, effects for TT performance time (-0.7% ± 0.9%) and power (2.4% ± 2.5%) on d 8 were likely beneficial. Despite mostly unclear outcomes for standard physiological determinants of performance, 8 d of NO 3 - supplementation resulted in likely beneficial improvements to 4-km TT performance in well-trained male endurance cyclists.

  12. Lightweight physiologic sensor performance during pre-hospital care delivered by ambulance clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mort, Alasdair J; Fitzpatrick, David; Wilson, Philip M J; Mellish, Chris; Schneider, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of motion generated by ambulance patient management on the performance of two lightweight physiologic sensors. Two physiologic sensors were applied to pre-hospital patients. The first was the Contec Medical Systems CMS50FW finger pulse oximeter, monitoring heart rate (HR) and blood oxygen saturation (SpO2). The second was the RESpeck respiratory rate (RR) sensor, which was wireless-enabled with a Bluetooth(®) Low Energy protocol. Sensor data were recorded from 16 pre-hospital patients, who were monitored for 21.2 ± 9.8 min, on average. Some form of error was identified on almost every HR and SpO2 trace. However, the mean proportion of each trace exhibiting error was <10 % (range <1-50 % for individual patients). There appeared to be no overt impact of the gross motion associated with road ambulance transit on the incidence of HR or SpO2 error. The RESpeck RR sensor delivered an average of 4.2 (±2.2) validated breaths per minute, but did not produce any validated breaths during the gross motion of ambulance transit as its pre-defined motion threshold was exceeded. However, this was many more data points than could be achieved using traditional manual assessment of RR. Error was identified on a majority of pre-hospital physiologic signals, which emphasised the need to ensure consistent sensor attachment in this unstable and unpredictable environment, and in developing intelligent methods of screening out such error.

  13. Interactive effect of salinity and boron application on growth and physiological traits of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atif Riaz, Muhammad Saqib, Javaid Akhtar and Riaz Ahmad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a major problem of agriculture in Pakistan. Permanent solution of salinity problem is removal of salts by leaching and drainage whic is expensive. So research efforts should involve profitable utilization of these lands through biological approaches. Considering these observations, this study was designed with the objectives to explore changes in growth and physiological attributes of different sunflower genotypes under interactive effect of salinity and boron. Vigorous seeds of selected genotypes (two tolerant, two sensitive were sown in gravels. One week old seedlings were transplanted to ½ strength Hoagland’s nutrients solution. Three days after transplantation the requisite salinity (control and 100 mM NaCl and boron levels (0.05 mM B, 0.5 mM B and 1.0 mM B as H3BO3 were established in three installments. The arrangement of the experiment was split plot with three replications. The data regarding shoot and root fresh weights, relative water contents (RWC, membrane stability index (MSI, and leaf area (LA were recorded. The results revealed that salinity and boron adversely affected the growth and physiology of sunflower genotypes with a higher effect in the case of combined stress. This study also showed that the growth reduction was more in the salt susceptible genotypes (Hysun-33, Hysun-38 than in the salt tolerant genotypes (SF-187, S-278.

  14. Do physiological measures predict selected CrossFit® benchmark performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Scotty J; Neyedly, Tyler J; Horvey, Karla J; Benko, Chad R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose CrossFit® is a new but extremely popular method of exercise training and competition that involves constantly varied functional movements performed at high intensity. Despite the popularity of this training method, the physiological determinants of CrossFit performance have not yet been reported. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physiological and/or muscle strength measures could predict performance on three common CrossFit “Workouts of the Day” (WODs). Materials and methods Fourteen CrossFit Open or Regional athletes completed, on separate days, the WODs “Grace” (30 clean and jerks for time), “Fran” (three rounds of thrusters and pull-ups for 21, 15, and nine repetitions), and “Cindy” (20 minutes of rounds of five pull-ups, ten push-ups, and 15 bodyweight squats), as well as the “CrossFit Total” (1 repetition max [1RM] back squat, overhead press, and deadlift), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), and Wingate anaerobic power/capacity testing. Results Performance of Grace and Fran was related to whole-body strength (CrossFit Total) (r=−0.88 and −0.65, respectively) and anaerobic threshold (r=−0.61 and −0.53, respectively); however, whole-body strength was the only variable to survive the prediction regression for both of these WODs (R2=0.77 and 0.42, respectively). There were no significant associations or predictors for Cindy. Conclusion CrossFit benchmark WOD performance cannot be predicted by VO2max, Wingate power/capacity, or either respiratory compensation or anaerobic thresholds. Of the data measured, only whole-body strength can partially explain performance on Grace and Fran, although anaerobic threshold also exhibited association with performance. Along with their typical training, CrossFit athletes should likely ensure an adequate level of strength and aerobic endurance to optimize performance on at least some benchmark WODs. PMID:26261428

  15. Physiology of seed yield in soybean: Growth and dry matter production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field study was conducted to assess the growth parameters controlling the dry matter and seed yield of soybean. The result shows that growth rate was slow during vegetative phase in all genotypes. A relatively smaller portion of total dry mass (TDM) was produced before flower initiation and the bulk of it after anthesis.

  16. Effects of shoe cleat position on physiology and performance of competitive cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Carl D

    2009-12-01

    Aerobic economy is an important factor that affects the performance of competitive cyclists. It has been suggested that placing the foot more anteriorly on the bicycle pedals may improve economy over the traditional foot position by improving pedaling efficiency. The current study examines the effects of changing the anterior-posterior pedal foot position on the physiology and performance of well-trained cyclists. In a crossover study, 10 competitive cyclists completed two maximal incremental and two submaximal tests in either their preferred (control) or a forward (arch) foot position. Maximum oxygen consumption and peak power output were determined from the incremental tests for both foot positions. On two further occasions, cyclists also completed a two-part 60-min submaximal test that required them to maintain a constant power output (equivalent to 60% of their incremental peak power) for 30 min, during which respiratory and blood lactate samples were taken at predetermined intervals. Thereafter, subjects completed a 30-min self-paced maximal effort time trial. Relative to the control, the mean changes (+/-90% confidence limits) in the arch condition were as follows: maximum oxygen consumption, -0.5% (+/-2.0%); incremental peak power output, -0.8% (+/-1.3%); steady-state oxygen consumption at 60%, -2.4% (+/-1.1%); steady-state heart rate 60%, 0.4% (+/-1.7%); lactate concentration 60%, 8.7% (+/-14.4%); and mean time trial power, -1.5% (+/-2.9%). We conclude that there was no substantial physiological or performance advantage in this group using an arch-cleat shoe position in comparison with a cyclist's normal preferred condition.

  17. Effects of Transport at Weaning on the Behavior, Physiology and Performance of Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhairi A. Sutherland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Transport of pigs to separate production facilities at the time of weaning is a common practice, primarily performed to reduce vertical transfer of disease and enhance production and overall farm efficiency. During transport, pigs are exposed to numerous stressors in conjunction with the stress experienced as a result of weaning. In this review, the behavioral and physiological response of pigs experiencing weaning and transport simultaneously will be described, including the effects of space allowance, season and transport duration. Based on the scientific literature, the gaps in the knowledge regarding potential welfare issues are discussed. Changes in behavior and physiology suggest that weaned pigs may experience stress due to transport. Space allowance, season and duration are aspects of transport that can have a marked impact on these responses. To date, the literature regarding the effects of transport on weaned pigs has primarily focused on the short term stress response and little is known about the effects of concurrent weaning and transport on other aspects of pig welfare including morbidity and mortality rates. Greater understanding of the short and long term consequences of transport on weaned pig welfare particularly in relation to factors such as trip duration, provision of feed and water, and best handling practices would benefit the swine industry. Furthermore, the development of guidelines and recommendations to enhance the short and long term welfare of weaned pigs in relation to transport are needed.

  18. Potassium-modulated physiological performance of mango plants infected by Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaias Severino Cacique

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Mango wilt, caused by the fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata, is an important disease affecting mango production. In view of the beneficial effects of potassium (K in other profitable crops and the lack of information about the effect of macronutrients on mango wilt development, the present study aimed to evaluate how mango plants supplied with K respond physiologically when infected by C. fimbriata. Mango plants (» 3 years old from cultivar Ubá were grown in plastic pots containing 58 mg of K·dm−3 (original K level based on the chemical analysis of the substrate or in plastic pots with substrate amended with a solution of 0.5 M potassium chloride (KCl to achieve the rate of 240 mg K·dm−3. Disease symptoms were more pronounced in inoculated plants grown at the lower K level. Substantial declines in stomatal conductance, in line with decreases in the internal-to-ambient CO2 concentration ratio and the absence of detectable changes in the chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, suggest that the decrease in the net carbon assimilation rate is due, at least initially, to stomatal limitations. High concentrations of K and manganese were found in the stem tissues of inoculated plants and supplied with the highest K rate, most likely due to the involvement of these tissues in the local development of defense mechanisms. The results of this study suggest that the supply of K favored the physiological performance of mango plants and their resistance against C. fimbriata infection.

  19. Threshold Research on Highway Length under Typical Landscape Patterns Based on Drivers’ Physiological Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriately landscaped highway scenes may not only help improve road safety and comfort but also help protect ecological environment. Yet there is very little research data on highway length threshold with consideration of distinctive landscape patterns. Against this backdrop, the paper aims to quantitatively analyze highway landscape’s effect on driving behavior based on drivers’ physiological performance and quantify highway length thresholds under three typical landscape patterns, namely, “open,” “semiopen,” and “vertical” ones. The statistical analysis was based on data collected in a driving simulator and electrocardiograph. Specifically, vehicle-related data, ECG data, and supplemental subjective stress perception were collected. The study extracted two characteristic indices, lane deviation and LF/HF, and extrapolated the drivers’ U-shaped physiological response to landscape patterns. Models on highway length were built based on LF/HF’s variation trend with highway length. The results revealed that the theoretical highway length threshold tended to increase when the landscape pattern was switched to open, semiopen, and vertical ones. And the reliability and accuracy of the results were validated by questionnaires and field operational tests. Findings from this research will assist practitioners in taking active environmental countermeasures pertaining to different roadside landscape patterns.

  20. Physiological and health quality of angico-vermelho seeds on seedling initial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Maldonado Berloffa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of treatments to control fungi associated with the seeds of angico-vermelho, and its influence on the early development of seedlings. The seeds were collected in two different situations, already fallen on the ground or in still closed vegetables and attached to the plant.The analysis was performed on seeds with no treatment and seeds treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO 1% for one minute, sodium hypochlorite 2%for 10 minutes, fungicide Standak Top®, bio control with Trichoderma asperellum and immersion in hot water, in which the seeds were soaked for 10 minutes in water at 45°C and then immersed in water at 50°C with 15 minute forced circulation for.Besides evaluating seeds health, germination rate, germination speed index (GSI and the degree of seeds maturation in a growth chamber, we also evaluated in greenhouse variables related to the production of seedlings as emergency and the emergency speed index (ESI, height and mass of the seedlings. The experiments were conducted in factorial scheme 2x6 (collection of seeds x antifungal treatments. The fungal genera Aspergillus, Colletotrichum, Curvularia, Fusarium, Penicillium and Rhizopus were identified associated with the seeds. The seeds collected from vegetables still closed attached to the plant showed a higher percentage of germination and GSI. Germination was the only variable that showed a significant difference regarding the treatments. The use of fungicidal Standak Top® promoted lower fungal incidence, however it reduced the germination of the seeds when compared to the untreated seed. Yet the use of biological control proved to be effective for controlling, without showing difference of germination in comparison to the untreated seeds.

  1. Performance Aspects and Physiological Responses in Male Amateur Boxing Competitions: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Maamer; Chaabène, Helmi; Davis, Philip; Franchini, Emerson; Cheour, Foued; Chamari, Karim

    2017-04-01

    Slimani, M, Chaabène, H, Davis, P, Franchini, E, Cheour, F, and Chamari, K. Performance aspects and physiological responses in male amateur boxing competitions: a brief review. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1132-1141, 2017-Boxing is one of the most popular striking combat sports in the world. The aim of this review was to present data concerning performance analysis (time-motion and technical-tactical analysis) and physiological responses (i.e., blood lactate concentration [BLC], heart rate, and oxygen consumption) during novice and elite male simulated and official amateur boxing competitions in any age category. The present review shows that boxing competition is a high-intensity intermittent striking combat sport. Typically, the activity-to-rest ratio was higher in elite (18:1) than in novice (9:1) boxers and significant differences were observed between rounds (first round = 16:1, second round = 8:1, and third round = 6:1) in novice boxers. Thus, total stop-time and total stop-frequency increased over subsequent rounds in novice boxers. The technical-tactical aspects in elite and novice boxing bouts were different between rounds and dependent on the match outcome (i.e., winners vs. losers). Particularly, the current review highlights that triple-punch combinations, total combinations, block- and counter-punch combinations, total punches to the head, technical performance effectiveness, and defensive- and offensive-skills effectiveness may have contributed to win in novice and elite boxing competitions. Higher frequencies of technical movements were also observed in elite compared with novice boxers. From a physiological point of view, BLC increased significantly from postround 1 compared with postround 3 in novice boxing match. BLC was also higher in official than in simulated elite boxing matches in senior compared with junior boxers and in medium heavy-weight category compared with light- and medium-weight categories in junior boxing competition. A higher

  2. Rodent growth, behavior, and physiology resulting from flight on the Space Life Sciences-1 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, G.; Meylor, J.; Fast, T.; Hawes, N.; Zarow, G.

    1992-01-01

    A rodent-based spaceflight study is conducted to investigate physiological changes in rats vs humans and the effects of changes in the design of the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) and the Animal Enclosure Module (AEM). Rats were housed in the AEM and the RAHF, and controls were kept in identical flight hardware on earth subjected to the same flight-environmental profile. Biosamples and organ weights are taken to compare the rats before and after flight, and food/water intake are also compared. Weight gain, body weight, and food consumptions in the flight rats are significantly lower than corresponding values for the control subjects. Flight rats tend to have smaller postexperiment spleens and hearts, and flight rats consumed more water in the AEM than in the RAHF. The rodents' behavior is analogous to humans with respect to physiological and reconditioning effects, showing that the rat is a good model for basic research into the effects of spaceflight on humans.

  3. Comparative effects of partial rootzone drying and deficit irrigation on growth and physiology of tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Slađana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of partial rootzone drying (PRD, deficit irrigation (DI, and full irrigation (FI on tomato physiology were investigated. In PRD and DI plants, leaf water potential values and stomatal conductance were significantly lower, while xylem ABA concentration was greater compared to FI plants. Photosynthesis was similar for all treatments. Water use efficiency was improved by PRD and DI, which reduced fruit dry weight, but had no effect on dry weight of leaves and stems.

  4. In Silico Modeling of Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption: Predictive Performance of Three Physiologically Based Absorption Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Thörn, Helena; Tannergren, Christer

    2016-06-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) drug absorption is a complex process determined by formulation, physicochemical and biopharmaceutical factors, and GI physiology. Physiologically based in silico absorption models have emerged as a widely used and promising supplement to traditional in vitro assays and preclinical in vivo studies. However, there remains a lack of comparative studies between different models. The aim of this study was to explore the strengths and limitations of the in silico absorption models Simcyp 13.1, GastroPlus 8.0, and GI-Sim 4.1, with respect to their performance in predicting human intestinal drug absorption. This was achieved by adopting an a priori modeling approach and using well-defined input data for 12 drugs associated with incomplete GI absorption and related challenges in predicting the extent of absorption. This approach better mimics the real situation during formulation development where predictive in silico models would be beneficial. Plasma concentration-time profiles for 44 oral drug administrations were calculated by convolution of model-predicted absorption-time profiles and reported pharmacokinetic parameters. Model performance was evaluated by comparing the predicted plasma concentration-time profiles, Cmax, tmax, and exposure (AUC) with observations from clinical studies. The overall prediction accuracies for AUC, given as the absolute average fold error (AAFE) values, were 2.2, 1.6, and 1.3 for Simcyp, GastroPlus, and GI-Sim, respectively. The corresponding AAFE values for Cmax were 2.2, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively, and those for tmax were 1.7, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively. Simcyp was associated with underprediction of AUC and Cmax; the accuracy decreased with decreasing predicted fabs. A tendency for underprediction was also observed for GastroPlus, but there was no correlation with predicted fabs. There were no obvious trends for over- or underprediction for GI-Sim. The models performed similarly in capturing dependencies on dose and

  5. Speed endurance training is a powerful stimulus for physiological adaptations and performance improvements of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaia, F M; Bangsbo, J

    2010-10-01

    The present article reviews the physiological and performance effects of speed endurance training consisting of exercise bouts at near maximal intensities in already trained subjects. Despite a reduction in training volume, speed endurance training of endurance-trained athletes can maintain the oxidative capacity and improve intense short-duration/repeated high-intensity exercise performance lasting 30 s to 4 min, as it occurs in a number of sports. When combined with a basic volume of training including some aerobic high-intensity sessions, speed endurance training is also useful in enhancing performance during longer events, e.g. 40 K cycling and 10 K running. Athletes in team sports involving intense exercise actions and endurance aspects can also benefit from performing speed endurance training. These improvements don't appear to depend on changes in maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), muscle substrate levels, glycolytic and oxidative enzymes activity, and membrane transport proteins involved in pH regulation. Instead they appear to be related to a reduced energy expenditure during submaximal exercise and a higher expression of muscle Na(+) ,K(+) pump α-subunits, which via a higher Na(+) ,K(+) pump activity during exercise may delay fatigue development during intense exercise. In conclusion, athletes from disciplines involving periods of intense exercise can benefit from the inclusion of speed endurance sessions in their training programs. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Assessing the Role of Technology Adoption in China's Growth Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirz, Nadja

    China has experienced a period of tremendous economic growth in recent years. In an attempt to explain this development, several existing growth-accounting studies reveal that impressively high rates of productivity growth have been at the heart of China's performance. This study investigates...... to what extent these productivity increases can be explained by technology-adoption theory. In less developed countries, the key element behind technological progress is technology adoption, the process of copying technological knowledge invented throughout the world. To uncover a measure of China......'s technological advances, the paper constructs a hybrid of some prominent technology-adoption models and calibrates it to reasonable parameter values. The calibrated version of the model is then combined with Chinese economic data. For the period 1978-2005, the analysis finds that the Chinese performance can...

  7. Influence of boron on the morphological and physiological growth parameters of bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.A. de

    1982-01-01

    Effect of boron on Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Cacahuate was studied in nutrient solutions containing 0.000; 0.005; 0.050 and 0.500 ppm of the element. The deficiency of boron affected root growth, leaf development and plant growth. Lower values of net assimilation rate (NAR) indicated reduced photosynthetic activity in the case of boron deficiency. (M.A.C.) [pt

  8. Seventh workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings (abstracts); 1998 September 27-29; South Lake Tahoe, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.D. McCreary; J.G. Isebrands

    1999-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities in field performance of planted trees, seedling propagation, physiology, genetics, acorn germination, and natural regeneration for oaks are described in 17 abstracts.

  9. The effects of split marketing on the physiology, behavior, and performance of finishing swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggs, L V; Kattesh, H G; Morrow, J L; Stalder, K J; Dailey, J W; Roberts, M P; Schneider, J F; Saxton, A M

    2002-02-01

    One hundred twenty 8-wk-old barrows (20.3 +/- 2.0 kg BW) were used to examine the effect of split marketing on selected behavioral, physiological and performance parameters. Pigs were assigned by weight in a randomized complete block design to one of three treatments: SM (split-marketed), six pigs/pen (1.83 m2/pig); C (control), six pigs/pen (1.83 m2/pig); or MC (modified control), three pigs/pen (3.66 m2/pig). The heaviest half of SM animals were removed 1 wk prior to marketing penmates. Control and MC animals remained in their respective groups until marketing. Animals were videotaped during the first 72 h of the study (INITIAL), 72 h prior to (PRE), and following the removal (POST) of pigs in the SM treatment to quantify maintenance behaviors and to identify socially dominant, intermediate, and submissive pigs. A blood sample was collected from each animal upon completion of INITIAL, PRE, and POST time periods to determine neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio and plasma haptoglobin, cortisol, and corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) levels. Animals were weighed and feed disappearance was calculated biweekly. Tenth-rib backfat and area of the longissimus muscle at marketing were ultrasonically evaluated on all animals. Regardless of treatment, animals were more (P marketing. During the POST period, both MC and SM pigs had greater (P < 0.01) ADFI with poorer (P < 0.01) feed efficiency than C pigs. The ADG was not different among animals as a result of treatment. There were no treatment differences for any of the carcass measurements. Significant differences in performance between the treatment groups could not be attributed to any physiological or behavioral measures reported here.

  10. Intellectual Capital on the Financial Performance and Company Growth

    OpenAIRE

    gunawan, Barbara; Sari, Kharisma Iman

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of intellectual capital on thefinancial performance and company growth. Population of study is bankingcompanies listed in Indonesia Stock Exchange during the years of observation2007-2009. There are 63 financial statements of 21 companies which can besampled during the years of observation research. Result of analysis using ameasuring instrument SmartPLS show that intellectual capital has positive influnceon corporate financial performance, intellect...

  11. Growth Performance of Red Sokoto Bucks Fed Inclusion levels of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the growth performance of red Sokoto bucks fed two (2) inclusion levels of rawwater soaked and lime soaked Hibiscus sabdariffa seeds in rice offal based diets. A total of twenty one (21) red Sokoto bucks were randomly allotted into seven treatments with three (3) bucks per group while ...

  12. Effect of fibre and digestible energy levels on growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A seventy-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary fibre and digestible energy (DE) level on growth performance, apparent nutrient digestibility and caecal fermentation of growing rabbits. The experiment was laid out in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of 3 levels of fibre (low (249 – 258 g/kg NDF, 149 ...

  13. Growth performance, carcass and organ characteristics of growing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted at the Department of Animal Science teaching and research farm, Bayero University Kano, to evaluate the effect of feeding graded levels of Moringa oleifera leaf meal (MOLM) in diets on growth performance, carcass and organ characteristics of weaned rabbits. Twenty eight grower rabbits of ...

  14. Effects of exogenous tannase enzyme on growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of dietary addition of tannase to feed of chicks including grape pomace (GP) on growth performance, antioxidant status, immune response, blood parameters, gut morphology, intestinal microflora, liver function, and histopathological responses. The experimental diets were i) ...

  15. Growth Performance And Nutrient Utilization Of Clarias Gariepinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize is an expensive energy source for feedstuff in fish management especially during the offseason, hence the need to source and utilize other cheaper, and non–conventional energy sources. This study investigated the growth performance of Clarias Gariepinus fry fed processed sweet potato meal as an energy source ...

  16. Performance, organ growth and economics of finisher broiler fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 28-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary inclusion of neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf meal on the performance, organ growth and economics of finishing broilers. The harvested neem leaves were chopped and air dried under room temperature for ten days until they became crispy while retaining ...

  17. Effect of days in feedlot on growth performance and carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of days in feedlot on growth performance and carcass characteristics of Merino, South African Mutton Merino and Dorper lambs. T.S. Brand, E.J. van der Westhuizen, D.A. van der Merwe, L.C. Hoffman ...

  18. Growth performance and nutrient digestibility of broiler chickens fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and seventy (270), day old chicks were used in a completely randomized design experimental layout to test the growth performance and nutrient digestibility of broiler chickens fed single phase diets containing natuzyme™ treated groundnut shell at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 % inclusion levels. The treatments ...

  19. Growth performance and immunity status of starter broiler birds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding diets containing Neem Leaf Meal (NLM), Garlic Meal (GM) and their combinations (NLM + GM) on growth performance and serum parameters of starter broiler birds. A total of 180 day-old Cobb broiler chickens were divided into twelve groups of fifteen chicks with ...

  20. Growth Performance, Haematological Indices and Cost Benefits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lenovo pc

    Effect of replacing dietary maize with cassava peel meal (CPM) supplemented with Allzyme® SSF (SSF) on the growth performance, haematological indices and cost benefits of growing pigs was investigated. Chemical composition of CPM and diets used were determined using standard procedures. Twenty-four growing ...

  1. Feed utilization and growth performance of cockerels fed with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of soldier ant as dietary supplements on the growth performance of cockerels. Two hundred cockerels of Nera white strain (aged 6 weeks) were randomly assigned into 5 dietary treatments in a completely randomized design. Each treatment was replicated 5 times with 8 ...

  2. Effect of feeding frequency and feeding rate on growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish fed at higher feeding rates accumulated significantly more lipid within the body and had associated decreases in moisture, protein, and ash content, but carcass composition was unaffected by feeding frequency. Juvenile pompano show better growth performance when fed 10% BW/day 3 and 6 times a day.

  3. Early Growth and Reproductive Performances of Horro Cattle and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional survey, an assessment of recorded data and measurements of different traits were conducted to determine the reproductive and early growth performances of Horro cattle and their F1 Jersey crosses of the study area. The mean(SD) total farmland, cropland and grazing land holdings of individual ...

  4. Effects of probiotics on growth performance, blood parameters, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of probiotics on growth performance, blood parameters, and antibody stimulation in piglets. Z.C. Dlamini, R.L.S. Langa, O. A. Aiyegoro, A.I. Okoh. Abstract. The study investigated the effects of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus reuteri ZJ625, Lactobacillus reuteri VB4, Lactobacillus salivarius ZJ614, and Streptococcus ...

  5. Growth Performance of Fryer Rabbits Fed Diets Amended ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... weight gains of rabbits in the different treatment groups. There was also no significant difference(P>0.05) in the feed conversion ratio and feed efficiency of birds in the different groups. Key words: Growth performance, macerated bitter leaf meal. Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences Vol.2(1) 2004: 29-35 ...

  6. Growth performance, haematology and cost benefit of growing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance, haematology and cost benefit of growing rabbits reared on different feed access times and restriction durations. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... Growing rabbits on 24-h feed access time (control) recorded a higher (p<0.05) feed intake when compared with other treatments.

  7. Evaluation of Growth Performance of Tomato in Response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiment was conducted in 2013 and 2014 to evaluate growth performance of two tomato genotypes in response to biochar application and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) inoculation at the Teaching and Research Farm, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. The experiment was laid out in a split-split ...

  8. Evaluation of Growth Performance of Tomato in Response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sunusi

    ABSTRACT. Field experiment was conducted in 2013 and 2014 to evaluate growth performance of two tomato genotypes in response to biochar application and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) inoculation at the. Teaching and Research Farm, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. The experiment was laid out.

  9. Effect of Production System on Welfare Traits, Growth Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duck feather quality was greater and gait defects were reduced in NRS system compared with FRS and WRS systems. Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) was not affected by the production system. Growth performance was not significantly different between FRS and WRS systems. Average daily weight gain of FRS ducks was ...

  10. Feed intake, growth performance and nutrient digestibility in growing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to evaluate the growth performance, nutrient digestibility and nitrogen intake of growing red sokoto bucks fed graded levels of dried sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) peel meal (DSOPM). Twelve animals aged between 5 – 7 months with average body weight of 9.17 kg were assigned to four dietary ...

  11. Growth performance and economics of sheep production with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A twelve-week feeding trial was conducted using sixteen (16) growing Uda lambs to determine the growth performance of sheep fed varying levels of rice milling waste. Diets containing graded levels of rice milling waste replacing wheat offal at 15, 30 and 45% inclusion levels were formulated. Diet without rice milling waste ...

  12. Comparative growth performance of different Casuarina species and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in growth charactristics, coppicing ability and understory vegetation development was assessed in four Casuarina species (C. equisetifolia, C. junghuhniana, C. cunnighamiana and C. oligodon) grown in Lushoto in the West Usambara Mountains (WUM), Tanzania. The performance of the four species as well as of ...

  13. Effectiveness of probiotic feed ingredient on the growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of antibiotics in human or veterinary therapy is followed by the appearance of bacteria resistance to these antibiotics. This is a serious problem because of the direct impact on therapeutic possibilities. This study aimed at evaluating the efficiency of a probiotic feed ingredient (Starter) on the growth performance of ...

  14. Growth performance and nutrient quality of three Moringa oleifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance and nutrient quality of three Moringa oleifera accessions grown as potherbs under varied manure rates and watering intervals were investigated at the Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. The treatments included three accessions of Moringa (Awo-Anaekpa, Idere and Kano), ...

  15. Growth and reproductive performance of captive grass cutter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    135.0 g) and was significantly different (p<0.05) from other treatments. These suggest that M. oleifera leaf could be a potential and promising dietary supplementation that would affect growth, and reproductive performance of T. swinderianus in ...

  16. Effect of yoghurt waste on gut morphology and growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was carried out to determine the effect of yoghurt waste on intestinal morphology and growth performance of pigs weaned at 7 weeks of age. A total of 20 weaned pigs (15.6 ± 2kg, initial body weight {BW}) were randomly assigned in groups of four, to 5 experimental treatments in a randomized block design.

  17. Effects of glucose oxidase on the growth performance, serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of diets supplemented with glucose oxidase (GOD) on growth performance, serum parameters and faecal microflora of piglets. One hundred and twelve piglets (35 days old) were randomly assigned to two groups (four replicates per group, half male and half female, ...

  18. Acceptability, Growth Performance and Cost Analysis of Diets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acceptability, Growth Performance and Cost Analysis of Diets Enriched with Lipids from Varied Plants and Animal Sources Fed to Fingerlings of Clarias gariepinus (Teleostei, Clariidae) Burchell, 1822. ... effective cost per unit weight gain. Key words: Diet, fingerlings, Clarius gariepinus. Bio-Research Vol.1(2) 2003: 87-99 ...

  19. Assessment of growth performance of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of growth performance of Clarias gariepinus fingerlings from two culture media was conducted at the Federal College of Agriculture, Ishiagu Ebonyi State Nigeria fish farm between October 2013 and January, 2014. Five concrete tanks, each 11.31m2 and a stagnant earthen pond 36m2 were each stocked with ...

  20. Growth performance and economy of production of grower pigs fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meal-based diets. ... International Journal of Tropical Agriculture and Food Systems ... Twenty-four landrace x large white grower pigs were used to study the effect of maize-cob- meal-based diets on the growth performance and economy of ...

  1. Effect Of Feed Restriction On Growth Performance And Economy Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feed efficiency was improved by restriction followed with re-alimentation. A reduced feed cost (N)/Kg weight gain, highest revenueand least cost-benefit rato were obtained from reduced from birds on D3. Keywords: Broiler chicks, feed restriction, Growth performance, Economy of production. Animal Research International ...

  2. Effect of spent mushroom substrate on the growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nine week feeding study was conducted to determine the effect of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) as a replacement for wheat offal on the growth performance and economy of production of rabbits. The study was conducted at the rabbitary unit of the department of animal production, School of Agriculture, Lagos state ...

  3. Comparative study on the growth performance of the hybrid catfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance of the hybrid catfish Heteroclarias reared in concrete and earthen pond systems were investigated in a 92-day experiment. Experiment was conducted using four rectangular ponds (2 concrete and 2 earthen) each measuring 14 × 6 × 1.5 metres in duplicates. The ponds were uniformly limed, fertilized ...

  4. Effects of Prosopis laevigata pods on growth performance, ruminal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UASLP

    2016-10-27

    Oct 27, 2016 ... evaluate the effects of increasing dietary levels of Prosopis laevigata pods (PLP) in a 72 d growth performance trial ... Desert, Prosopis laevigata trees are well adapted and one hectare of rangeland (without irrigation) can produce 3.7 ..... Nutritional value of Mesquite beans (Prosopis glandulosa). In: Parker,.

  5. Nutrient influx, Water quality and growth performance of Nile tilapia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutrient influx, water quality and growth performance of Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus fed recycled food wastebased diets was studied in a closed recirculation system for 11 weeks, during which no water renewal was carried out in the system. Fish (mean weight 1.2 + 0.11 g) were fed with different levels of recycled ...

  6. Effects of various additives to enhance growth performance, blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of various additives to enhance growth performance, blood profiles, and reduce malodour emissions in growing pigs. W.G. Kwak, I.H. Park, W Yun, J.H. Lee, C.H. Lee, S.Y. Oh, H.J. Oh, Shudong Liu, Y.H. Kim, J.C. Park, G.S. Kim, J.H. Cho ...

  7. Growth Performance of Grain Amaranth under Different Nursery Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth performance of grain amaranth under different soil nursery media was studied in Owerri, South Eastern Nigeria. The experiment was a completely randomized design (CRD) experiment with five replications. The experiment was carried out at the teaching and research farm of the department of Agricultural ...

  8. The growth performance of exotic and indigenous tree species in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The saplings were monitored for survival rates one year after transplanting and growth performances by measuring root collar diameters and heights. There was no significant difference among the species in survival. The mean height increment of the exotics significantly surpassed indigenous tree species. E. grandis ...

  9. Study on Biodiesel plants growth performance and tolerance to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. In this research, we studied the growth performance and tolerance of three biodiesel plants namely; Jatropha curcas, Moringa oleifera and Ricinus communis to water stress. Research conducted on the three different soils from Kaita, Jibiya and Mai'adua in the semi-desert environments of Katsina State, Nigeria.

  10. and hyper-thyroidism on growth performance, organ weights and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRT

    2011-12-02

    Dec 2, 2011 ... weights and serum thyroid hormones of broilers, 120 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into four dietary treatments for six ... thyroid hormones and GH–IGF-I axis (Etherton et al.,. 1987). Thyroid hormones can ..... its associated hormones in regulation of metabolism and growth performance of.

  11. Effect of production system on welfare traits, growth performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Martina

    2015-06-06

    Jun 6, 2015 ... Therefore to meet the requirements for animal welfare and food safety, appropriate production systems must be developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three production systems on welfare traits, growth performance and meat quality of ducks. These welfare traits consisted of daily ...

  12. Effects of different housing systems on growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the last few decades, a rapid increase in poultry production is experienced due largely to improvements in the management systems. This study thereby investigated the effects of different housing systems on growth performance and carcass yield of exotic and locally-adapted breeds of turkey. A total of 192 unsexed ...

  13. Influence of Tannin in Selected Forages on the Growth Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56 day experiment was carried out to determine the effect of using forages of cassava, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala containing tannin on the growth performance and faecal egg count (FEC) of semi-intensively managed West African Dwarf (WAD) sheep. Sixteen WAD sheep with an average body weight ...

  14. Growth performance and feed utilization of Tilapia zillii (Gervais ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Accepted 22 May, 2009. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth performance, feed utilization and body composition of Tilapia zillii fed diets where poultry by-product meal replaced fish meal protein at 0, 50 and 100% ... fish diets because of its high protein quality and palata- bility. However, fish ...

  15. Growth performance and nutrient quality of three Moringa oleifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    APEH

    2015-06-12

    Jun 12, 2015 ... Growth performance and nutrient quality of three Moringa oleifera accessions grown as potherbs under varied manure ..... inorganic nutrition. Radiation Biology -Series Number 11, Academic. Press, New York, USA, 338p. Fuglie LJ (1999). The Miracle Tree –Moringa oleifera: Natural nutrition for the tropics.

  16. The Effect of Dietary Oils on Growth Performance of Broilers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    which depresses growth performance in poultry (Chamblee et al., 1992) and causes a decrease in the rate of ... experiment. As known, body weights of the male and female birds are pretty similar at the beginning of the hatch. However, there would be a great difference in the body weights between male and female chicks ...

  17. Effects of culture systems on growth and economic performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of culture system on growth and economics performance of Orechromis niloticus (Nile tilapia) in concrete tanks was investigated. Four outdoor concrete tanks measuring 2.5 x 2 m was used for the study for 24 weeks culture period. The culture systems included the use of algae only at the stocking rates of 4 ...

  18. Effect of chicken genotype on growth performance and feed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted to assess the effect of chicken genotype on the growth performance, feed intake and feed efficiency of the progenies resulting from pure, straight and reciprocal cross of Giriraja (Gr) and Alpha chickens. Data obtained on body weight, body length, breast girth, keel length, feed intake and feed ...

  19. Growth Performance and Nutrients Digestibility of Weanling Rabbits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dry matter, crude fibre, crude protein, ether extract and ash were inferior in the control (0% sesame meal) than the other treatment. Based on these results, growing rabbits could tolerate 12% sesame meal in their diets without adverse effects on their performance. Key words: Growth, nutrients digestibility, rabbits and ...

  20. Non-genetic factors affecting growth performance and carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science ... This study was based on 20 079 and 12 169 growth and 5 406 and 2 533 carcass data collected on performance tested pigs between 1990 and 2008 from Large White and Landrace breeds ... Herd of origin, year of testing and their interaction significantly affected all traits.

  1. Evaluation of growth performance and egg quality traits in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 14 week study was conducted at the teaching and research farm, Department of Animal Science A.B.U Zaria, using 240 two weeks old Japanese quails belonging to two strains (black strain n=120 and brown strain n=120). The aim was to evaluate the effect of strain on the growth performance and egg quality traits of the ...

  2. Growth and physiological responses of two phenotypically distinct accessions of centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack.) to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, JianJian; Ma, Jingjing; Guo, Hailin; Zong, Junqin; Chen, Jingbo; Wang, Yi; Li, Dandan; Li, Ling; Wang, Jingjing; Liu, Jianxiu

    2018-05-01

    Salinity is one of the major abiotic environmental stress factors affecting plant growth and development. Centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides [Munro)] Hack.) is an important warm-season turfgrass species with low turf maintenance requirements, but is sensitive to salinity stress. To explore salt tolerant germplasms in centipedegrass and better understand the growth and physiological responses of centipedegrass to salinity, we conducted anatomic observation and phytochemical quantification, examined growth parameters, and investigated photosynthetic machinery and antioxidant system in two phenotypically distinct centipedegrass accessions under NaCl salt stress. The morphophenotypical difference of the stems in the two accessions mainly depends on whether or not a thickened epidermal horny layer with purple colour was formed, which was caused by anthocyanin accumulation in the tissue. Successive salinity treatment was found to result in an inhibition of leaf growth, a marked decrease in photosynthesis, chlorophyll contents, and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm). Under the same treatment, purple-stem accession (E092) showed a lower degree of inhibition or decrease than green-stem one (E092-1). With the exception of malondialdehyde level, both proline content and antioxidant enzymes were upregulated to a greater extent in E092 following exposure to salinity condition. Meanwhile, significant enhancements of anthocyanin accumulation and total protein synthesis were detected in E092 after salt treatment, but not in E092-1. These results demonstrated that E092 favor better accumulation of anthocyanins under salinity condition, which contribute to salt tolerance by adjusting physiological functions and osmotic balance, and better maintenance of high turf quality. Hence, genetic phenotype can be utilized as a key indicator in E. ophiuroides breeding for salt-tolerance. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Physiologic performance test differences in female volleyball athletes by competition level and player position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Monique; Ransdell, Lynda B; Simonson, Shawn R; Gao, Yong

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine physiologic performance test differences by competition level (high school and Division-I collegiate athletes) and player position (hitter, setter, defensive specialist) in 4 volleyball-related tests. A secondary purpose was to establish whether a 150-yd shuttle could be used as a field test to assess anaerobic capacity. Female participants from 4 varsity high school volleyball teams (n = 27) and 2 Division-I collegiate volleyball teams (n = 26) were recruited for the study. Participants completed 4 performance-based field tests (vertical jump, agility T-test, and 150- and 300-yd shuttle runs) after completing a standardized dynamic warm-up. A 2-way multivariate analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustments (when appropriate) and effect sizes were used for the analyses. The most important findings of this study were that (a) college volleyball athletes were older, heavier, and taller than high school athletes; (b) high school athletes had performance deficiencies in vertical jump/lower-body power, agility, and anaerobic fitness; (c) lower-body power was the only statistically significant difference in the performance test measures by player position; and (d) the correlation between the 150- and 300-yd shuttle was moderate (r = 0.488). Female high school volleyball players may enhance their ability to play collegiate volleyball by improving their vertical jump, lower-body power, agility, and anaerobic fitness. Furthermore, all player positions should emphasize lower-body power conditioning. These physical test scores provide baseline performance scores that should help strength and conditioning coaches create programs that will address deficits in female volleyball player performance, especially as they transition from high school to college.

  4. Morphological, Physiological and Skating Performance Profiles of Male Age-Group Elite Ice Hockey Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allisse, Maxime; Sercia, Pierre; Comtois, Alain-Steve; Leone, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to describe the evolution of morphological, physiological and skating performance profiles of elite age-group ice hockey players based on repeated measures spread over one season. In addition, the results of fitness tests and training programs performed in off-ice conditions and their relationship with skating performance were analyzed. Eighteen high level age-group ice hockey players (13.1 ± 0.6 years) were assessed off and on-ice at the beginning and at the end of the hockey season. A third evaluation was also conducted at the beginning of the following hockey season. The players were taller, heavier, and showed bone breadths and muscle girths above the reference population of the same age. Muscular variables improved significantly during and between the two hockey seasons (p hockey season, but not during the off-season where some degradation was observed. Finally, weak observed variances (generally hockey players certainly deserves to be continued. PMID:28828080

  5. Effects of oral rehydration and external cooling on physiology, perception, and performance in hot, dry climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C X; Carney, K R; Schick, M K; Coburn, J W; Becker, A J; Judelson, D A

    2012-12-01

    Only limited research evaluates possible benefits of combined drinking and external cooling (by pouring cold water over the body) during exercise. Therefore, this study examined cold water drinking and external cooling on physiological, perceptual, and performance variables in hot, dry environments. Ten male runners completed four trials of walking 90 min at 30% VO(2max) followed by running a 5-km time trial in 33 ± 1 °C and 30 ± 4% relative humidity. Trials examined no intervention (CON), oral rehydration (OR), external cooling (EC), and oral rehydration plus external cooling (OR + EC). Investigators measured rectal temperature, skin temperatures, heart rate, thirst, thermal sensation, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). Oral rehydration (OR and OR + EC) significantly lowered heart rate (P External cooling (EC and OR + EC) significantly reduced chest and thigh temperature (P external cooling (CON and OR) during low-intensity exercise. Performance exhibited no differences (CON = 23.86 ± 4.57 min, OR = 22.74 ± 3.20 min, EC = 22.96 ± 3.11 min, OR + EC = 22.64 ± 3.73 min, P = 0.379). Independent of OR, pouring cold water on the body benefited skin temperature, thermal sensation, and RPE during low-intensity exercise in hot, dry conditions but failed to influence high-intensity performance. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Plant growth regulators and ascorbic acid effects on physiological quality of wheat seedlings obtained from deteriorated seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moori, S.; Eisv, H.R.

    2017-01-01

    This study attempted to examine the effect of seed priming using plant growth regulators and vitamin C on the physiological traits of non-aged and aged seeds of wheat and their obtained seedlings. Accelerated aging (AA) method (40 degree C, RH=100% for 72h) was used for aging seeds. The seeds were pre-treated by gibberellin (GA), salicylic acid (SA), brassinosteroid (BR), and ascorbic acid (AS). Some seed traits such as germination and electric conductivity (EC) and seedling traits such as malondialdehyde (MDA) content, activity of some antioxidant enzymes, soluble protein content (SP), soluble sugar (SS), and proline were measured seven days after germination. The results showed that accelerated aging of seeds reduces the germination percentage and speed, increases soluble sugar, and reduces soluble protein, activity of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the seedling. Pre-treatment of the aged seed by GA had the maximum positive impact on seed germination and seedling growth. Priming improved germination indices, quality of seedling, and seedling resistance against the oxidative stress caused by AA. It also improved cell membrane integrity and thus reduced seeds’ EC. Priming increased the activity of CAT, POD and SOD enzymes in both aged and non-aged seeds. When the deteriorated seeds were primed, proline and SS contents of the seedling increased significantly, but SP and MDA decreased. In general, pre-treatment of the non-aged and aged seeds by gibberellin improved the physiological quality of the seed and seedling. (author)

  7. Biochar amendment of fluvio-glacial temperate sandy subsoil: Effects on maize water uptake, growth and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Fauziatu; Arthur, Emmanuel; Plauborg, Finn

    2018-01-01

    Coarse sandy soils have poor water retention capacity, which may constrain crop growth during drought. We investigated the effect of biochar amendment to subsoil on crop physiological processes and maize yield, comparing irrigated and drought conditions. A two-year greenhouse experiment was condu......Coarse sandy soils have poor water retention capacity, which may constrain crop growth during drought. We investigated the effect of biochar amendment to subsoil on crop physiological processes and maize yield, comparing irrigated and drought conditions. A two-year greenhouse experiment...... was conducted with one-time application of straw biochar at concentrations of 0%, 1%, 2% and 3% (B0, B1, B2 and B3). Maize was planted twice in the same large pots one week and again 12 months after biochar application. Plants were fully irrigated until flowering; thereafter, half of them were subjected...... to drought. Our results indicate B2 and B3 increased soil water content at field capacity. Leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and transpiration were maintained in B2 and B3 during the drying cycle in year one and in all biochar levels in year two. In the first year, B3 induced...

  8. Combined effects of drought stress and npk foliar spray on growth, physiological processes and nutrient uptake in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabir, R.N.; Waraocj, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of supplemental foliar nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) spray, alone or in various combinations, on physiological processes and nutrients uptake in wheat under water deficit conditions. The study comprised of two phases; during the first phase, ten local wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes were evaluated for their response to PEG-6000 induced osmotic stress. One drought tolerant (Bhakkar-2002) and sensitive (Shafaq-2006) genotype selected from screening experiments were used in the second phase to determine the individual and combined effects of N, P and K foliar spray on physiological mechanisms in wheat under drought stress. The results revealed that limited water supply significantly reduced germination, growth and uptake of N, P and K. Supplemental foliar fertilisation of these macronutrients alone or in different combinations significantly improved the water relations, gas exchange characteristics and nutrient contents in both the genotypes. Bhakkar-2002 maintained higher turgor, net CO/sub 2/ assimilation rate (Pn), transpiration rate (E), stomatal conductance (gs) and accumulated more N, P and K in shoot than Shafaq-2006. The foliar spray of NPK in combination was effective in improving wheat growth under both well-watered and water-deficit conditions. (author)

  9. Acute Physiological and Thermoregulatory Responses to Extended Interval Training in Endurance Runners: Influence of Athletic Performance and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pinillos, Felipe; Soto-Hermoso, Víctor Manuel; Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel

    2015-12-22

    This study aimed to describe the acute impact of extended interval training (EIT) on physiological and thermoregulatory levels, as well as to determine the influence of athletic performance and age effect on the aforementioned response in endurance runners. Thirty-one experienced recreational male endurance runners voluntarily participated in this study. Subjects performed EIT on an outdoor running track, which consisted of 12 runs of 400 m. The rate of perceived exertion, physiological response through the peak and recovery heart rate, blood lactate, and thermoregulatory response through tympanic temperature, were controlled. A repeated measures analysis revealed significant differences throughout EIT in examined variables. Cluster analysis grouped according to the average performance in 400 m runs led to distinguish between athletes with a higher and lower sports level. Cluster analysis was also performed according to age, obtaining an older group and a younger group. The one-way analysis of variance between groups revealed no significant differences (p≥0.05) in the response to EIT. The results provide a detailed description of physiological and thermoregulatory responses to EIT in experienced endurance runners. This allows a better understanding of the impact of a common training stimulus on the physiological level inducing greater accuracy in the training prescription. Moreover, despite the differences in athletic performance or age, the acute physiological and thermoregulatory responses in endurance runners were similar, as long as EIT was performed at similar relative intensity.

  10. Growth performance of broilers in experimental Reovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar P. Awandkar

    Full Text Available Background: The avian reoviruses have emerged to induce various manifestations in chickens. They are associated with disease conditions including malabsorption syndrome, tenosynovitis etc. Reoviruses are an important cause of suboptimum performance in broilers, resulting in poor growth performance. Poultry industry in India is facing a catastrophe due to such infections which go unnoticed in field due to masking of the symptoms by secondary infections and commonly observed nutritional disorders. Aim: To investigate the effect of reovirus infection on overall performance of broiler birds. Material and Methods: The broiler birds were challenged with homologous strains of malabsorption syndrome and tenosynovitis syndrome of reovirus. The growth performance was recorded. Results and conclusion: The growth performance and immune response to NDV did not differ in the birds challenged with tenosynovitis syndrome strain of reo virus as compared to un challenged birds. However, poor live body weight, feed intake, FCR, PE and BPEI and better serum NDV titres were found in chicks challenged with malabsorption syndrome strain of reovirus as compared to the chicks from control group. [Vet World 2012; 5(11.000: 685-689

  11. The effect of two different interval-training programmes on physiological and performance indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindiani, Mahmood; Eliakim, Alon; Segev, Daria; Meckel, Yoav

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of an increasing-distance, interval-training programme and a decreasing-distance, interval-training programme, matched for total distance, on aerobic and anaerobic physiological indices. Forty physical education students were randomly assigned to either the increasing- or decreasing-distance, interval-training group (ITG and DTG), and completed two similar relevant sets of tests before and after six weeks of training. One training programme consisted of increasing-distance interval-training (100-200-300-400-500 m) and the other decreasing-distance interval training (500-400-300-200-100 m). While both training programmes led to a significant improvement in VO 2 max (ES = 0.83-1.25), the improvement in the DTG was significantly greater than in the ITG (14.5 ± 3.6 vs. 7.8 ± 3.2%, p training programmes led to a significant improvement in all anaerobic indices (ES = 0.83-1.63), the improvements in peak power (15.7 ± 7.8 vs. 8.9 ± 4.7), mean power (10.6 ± 5.4 vs. 6.8 ± 4.4), and fatigue index (18.2 ± 10.9 vs. 7.0 ± 14.2) were significantly greater in the DTG compared to the ITG (p training programmes on aerobic and anaerobic fitness, the DTG showed significant superiority over the ITG in improving aerobic and anaerobic performance capabilities. Coaches and athletes should therefore be aware that, in spite of identical total work, an interval-training programme might induce different physiological impacts if the order of intervals is not identical.

  12. Quantitative physiology of Lactococcus lactis at extreme low-growth rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the metabolic adaptation of Lactococcus lactis during the transition from a growing to a non-growing state using retentostat cultivation. Under retentostat cultivation, the specific growth rate decreased from 0.025 h-1 to 0.0001 h-1 in 42 days, while doubling time increased to

  13. Physiological traits and metabolites of cacao seedlings influenced by potassium in growth medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is of significant economic importance in several tropical countries but its yield potentials are low mainly because of poor soil fertility especially low levels of potassium (K). Cacao has a high demand for K to maintain healthy growth and production. Knowledge of K use in...

  14. The effect of excess copper on growth and physiology of important food crops: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrees, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Abbas, Farhat; Farid, Mujahid; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Irshad, Muhammad Kashif; Bharwana, Saima Aslam

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, copper (Cu) pollution in agricultural soils, due to arbitrary use of pesticides, fungicides, industrial effluent and wastewater irrigation, present a major concern for sustainable agrifood production especially in developing countries. The world's major food requirement is fulfilled through agricultural food crops. The Cu-induced losses in growth and yield of food crops probably exceeds from all other causes of food safety and security threats. Here, we review the adverse effects of Cu excess on growth and yield of essential food crops. Numerous studies reported the Cu-induced growth inhibition, oxidative damage and antioxidant response in agricultural food crops such as wheat, rice, maize, sunflower and cucumber. This article also describes the toxic levels of Cu in crops that decreased plant growth and yield due to alterations in mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, enzyme activities and decrease in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The response of various crops to elevated Cu concentrations varies depending upon nature of crop and cultivars used. This review could be helpful to understand the Cu toxicity and the mechanism of its tolerance in food crops. We recommend that Cu-tolerant crops should be grown on Cu-contaminated soils in order to ameliorate the toxic effects for sustainable farming systems and to meet the food demands of the intensively increasing population.

  15. Quantitative physiology and aroma formation of a dairy Lactococcus lactis at near-zero growth rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrigt, van Oscar; Abee, Tjakko; Lillevang, Søren K.; Smid, Eddy J.

    2018-01-01

    During food fermentation processes like cheese ripening, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) encounter long periods of nutrient limitation leading to slow growth. Particular LAB survive these periods while still contributing to flavour formation in the fermented product. In this study the dairy Lactococcus

  16. Quantification of SO2 effects on physiological processes, plant growth and crop production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropff, M.

    1989-01-01

    SO 2 may cause damage on crops and vegetation. This thesis aimes to explain the impact of SO 2 on plant growth and crop production on basis of a quantitative analysis of SO

  17. Growth and physiological response of tall oat grass to salinity stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to evaluate the responses of tall oat grass plants to increasing salinity, we measured plant growth, ion contents, photosynthetic gas exchange, lipid peroxidation, and proline accumulation in four salt concentrations. Two tall oatgrass genotypes, ZXY03P-367 and ZXY03P-443, were grown for 14 days in greenhouse ...

  18. Effect of Water Deficit Stress on the Physiology, Growth and Leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted in growth chambers to study the response of sorghum cultivars to water deficit stress. Seven sorghum cultivars were evaluated under three water deficit levels [control (-0.05 MPa), mild stress (-0.27 MPa), and severe stress (-0.96 MPa)] in a hydroponic culture in a completely randomised block ...

  19. Growth and physiological response of tall oat grass to salinity stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... In order to evaluate the responses of tall oat grass plants to increasing salinity, we measured plant growth, ion contents, photosynthetic ... population, the need to develop salt-tolerant crops is increasing. Thus, we need to ... (Rengel, 1992) and this can cause nutrient deficiencies. Growing plant in increasing ...

  20. Root growth and physiology of potted and field-grown trembling aspen exposed to tropospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.D. Coleman; R.E. Dickson; J.G. Isebrands; D.F. Karnosky

    1996-01-01

    We studied root growth and respiration of potted plants and field-grown aspen trees (Populus tremuloides Michx.) exposed to ambient or twice-ambient ozone. Root dry weight of potted plants decreased up to 45% after 12 weeks of ozone treatment, and root system respiration decreased by 27%. The ozone-induced decrease in root system respiration of...

  1. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 and transforming growth factor-beta1 mechanisms in acute valvular response to supra-physiologic hemodynamic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ling; Sucosky, Philippe

    2015-06-26

    To explore ex vivo the role of bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in acute valvular response to fluid shear stress (FSS) abnormalities. Porcine valve leaflets were subjected ex vivo to physiologic FSS, supra-physiologic FSS magnitude at normal frequency and supra-physiologic FSS frequency at normal magnitude for 48 h in a double-sided cone-and-plate bioreactor filled with standard culture medium. The role of BMP-4 and TGF-β1 in the valvular response was investigated by promoting or inhibiting the downstream action of those cytokines via culture medium supplementation with BMP-4 or the BMP antagonist noggin, and TGF-β1 or the TGF-β1 inhibitor SB-431542, respectively. Fresh porcine leaflets were used as controls. Each experimental group consisted of six leaflet samples. Immunostaining and immunoblotting were performed to assess endothelial activation in terms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expressions, paracrine signaling in terms of BMP-4 and TGF-β1 expressions and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in terms of cathepsin L, cathepsin S, metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expressions. Immunostained images were quantified by normalizing the intensities of positively stained regions by the number of cells in each image while immunoblots were quantified by densitometry. Regardless of the culture medium, physiologic FSS maintained valvular homeostasis. Tissue exposure to supra-physiologic FSS magnitude in standard medium stimulated paracrine signaling (TGF-β1: 467% ± 22% vs 100% ± 6% in fresh controls, BMP-4: 258% ± 22% vs 100% ± 4% in fresh controls; P 0.05). Supra-physiologic FSS frequency had no effect on endothelial activation and paracrine signaling regardless of the culture medium but TGF-β1 silencing attenuated FSS-induced ECM degradation via MMP-9 downregulation (MMP-9: 302% ± 182% vs 100% ± 42% in fresh controls; P > 0.05). Valvular tissue is sensitive

  2. Effect of Furfural on Saccharomyces carlsbergensis Growth, Physiology and Ethanol Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes da Silva, Teresa; Santo, Rui; Reis, Alberto; Passarinho, Paula C

    2017-06-01

    This work described the effect of furfural, a product resulting from the lignocellulosic material pretreatment, on Saccharomyces carlsbergensis growth and ethanol production. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate the yeast membrane potential, membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species production and lipid content. Above 0.3 g/L of furfural, a progressive decrease in the maximal specific growth rate was observed, reaching 53% of the value obtained in the absence of toxic when the cells were grown in the presence of 4 g/L of furfural. In general, the yeast biomass concentration and yield were less affected by the furfural presence than the specific growth rate, and a maximum reduction of 25% was observed for the assay at 4 g/L. The ethanol production was even less affected by the furfural presence than the yeast growth. At 4 g/L of furfural, the maximum ethanol concentration was reduced by only 10% relatively to the maximum ethanol concentration observed in the absence of toxic. At 5 g/L of furfural, the yeast cells were barely able to keep metabolic functions and produced a final ethanol concentration of 0.87 g/L although growth was undetectable. S. carlsbergensis membrane potential was affected by the furfural presence, concomitantly with the ethanol production. However, at 4 g/L, most of the yeast cells (90%) displayed the cytoplasmic membrane depolarized. The proportion of cells with increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) production levels increased for the experiments at 0-4 g/L. For the experiment at 4.5 g/L of furfural, ROS production was observed for only 11% of the yeast cells. The yeast lipid content was also severely affected by the furfural presence. Both polar and neutral lipids decreased in the presence of furfural, and this reduction was more notorious during the stationary phase.

  3. Azospirillum and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization enhance rice growth and physiological traits under well-watered and drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruíz-Sánchez, Michel; Armada, Elisabet; Muñoz, Yaumara; García de Salamone, Inés E; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruíz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Azcón, Rosario

    2011-07-01

    physiological and biochemical traits of rice plants were only clearly visible when the plants were mycorrhized. This microbial consortium was effective for rice plants as an acceptable and ecofriendly technology to improve plant performance and development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. EFFECT OF USING SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS (ANISE, CHAMOMILE AND GINGER) ON PRODUCTIVE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE OF JAPANESE QUAIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABU TALEB, A.M.; HAMODI, S.J.; EL AFIFI, SH.F.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of adding medicinal plants to Japanese quail diet on their performance and some metabolic functions. Four hundred, one day old, unsexed Japanese quails were used in this study. Quails were divided equally into four groups of 100 birds each according to medicinal plant additives. Group one was control (without additives, and the other groups contained 0.3% from anise (group 2), chamomile (group 3) and ginger (group 4). The end of the experiment was terminated when birds were 6 weeks old. Body weight, feed intake, some organs weight and some blood parameters were measured.The results indicated that addition of medicinal plants (anise, chamomile and ginger) improved growth rate, carcass and the relative weights of spleen, ovary and testis. Also, significant increases were observed in RBC, WBC, Hb, PCV, total protein and globulin. There was reduction in cholesterol in treated groups as compared to the control.The present results confirmed the beneficial effects of dietary medicinal plants (anise, chamomile and ginger) to improve the health condition as well as the productive and physiological characteristics of quails

  5. Coupling estimated effects of QTLs for physiological traits to a crop growth model: Predicting yield variation among recombinant inbred lines in barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.Y.; Chasalow, S.D.; Dourleijn, C.J.; Stam, P.; Kropff, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in the use of molecular markers to elucidate the inheritance of quantitative traits enable the integration of genetic information on physiological traits into crop growth models. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of a crop growth model with QTL-based estimates of

  6. Music in CrossFit®—Influence on Performance, Physiological, and Psychological Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Brupbacher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaining increasing popularity within the fitness sector, CrossFit® serves as an appealing and efficient high intensity training approach to develop strength and endurance on a functional level; and music is often utilized to produce ergogenic effects. The present randomized, controlled, crossover study aimed at investigating the effects of music vs. non-music on performance, physiological and psychological outcomes. Thirteen (age: 27.5, standard deviation (SD 6.2 years, healthy, moderately trained subjects performed four identical workouts over two weeks. The order of the four workouts (two with, and two without music, 20 min each was randomly assigned for each individual. Acute responses in work output, heart rate, blood lactate, rate of perceived exertion, perceived pain, and affective reaction were measured at the 5th, 10th, 15th, and 20th min during the training sessions. Training with music resulted in a significantly lower work output (460.3 repetitions, SD 98.1 vs. 497.8 repetitions, SD 103.7; p = 0.03. All other parameters did not differ between both music conditions. This is partly in line with previous findings that instead of providing ergogenic effects, applying music during CrossFit® may serve as a more distractive stimulus. Future studies should separate the influence of music on a more individual basis with larger sample sizes.

  7. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN HEART RATE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF PERFORMANCE IN TOP-LEVEL WATER POLO PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Galy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the heart rate (HR response of eight elite water polo players during the four 7-min quarters of the game and to check for relationships with the physiological parameters of performance ( ·VO2max, Th1vent, Th2vent. Each athlete performed a ·VO2max treadmill test and played a water polo game wearing a heart rate monitor. The game fatigue index was calculated as the ratio of the fourth-quarter HR to the first-quarter HR: HR4/HR1. The results showed a slight decrease in fourth-quarter HR compared with the first quarter, with the mean four-quarter HR equal to 79.9 ± 4.2% of HRmax. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed ·VO2max to be the main explanatory factor of game intensity, i.e. game HR expressed in %HRreserve (R=0.88, P<0.01. We observed that higher aerobic capacity resulted in higher game intensity. We also observed a decrease in the playing intensity in the fourth quarter compared with the first, likely due to very high game involvement. We concluded that high aerobic capacity seems necessary to ensure high game intensity in water polo. This suggests that coaches should encourage their athletes to reach a minimum level of ·VO2max and that HR monitoring could be of great interest in the control of water polo training sessions.

  8. Wearable carbon nanotube-based fabric sensors for monitoring human physiological performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2017-05-01

    A target application of wearable sensors is to detect human motion and to monitor physical activity for improving athletic performance and for delivering better physical therapy. In addition, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provides rich information that can be used to assess a subject’s physiological or psychological condition. This study aims to design a multifunctional, wearable, fabric-based sensing system. First, carbon nanotube (CNT)-based thin films were fabricated by spraying. Second, the thin films were integrated with stretchable fabrics to form the fabric sensors. Third, the strain and temperature sensing properties of sensors fabricated using different CNT concentrations were characterized. Furthermore, the sensors were demonstrated to detect human finger bending motions, so as to validate their practical strain sensing performance. Finally, to monitor human respiration, the fabric sensors were integrated with a chest band, which was directly worn by a human subject. Quantification of respiration rates were successfully achieved. Overall, the fabric sensors were characterized by advantages such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, lightweight, low-cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  9. Synergistic effects of dietary nano selenium and vitamin C on growth, feeding, and physiological parameters of mahseer fish (Tor putitora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kifayat Ullah Khan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study was conducted to determine the synergistic effects of dietary nano selenium (Nano Se and vitamin C on growth, feeding, and physiological parameters of juvenile mahseer, Tor putitora. L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (APP was used as a source of vitamin C. Four semi-purified experimental diets were prepared. A basal diet kept without the supplementation of any micronutrient and the other three diets were formulated such that three different levels of APP (100, 200, and 300 mg kg−1 were used in combination with a pre-determined dose of Nano Se (0.68 mg kg−1. The results showed that both the micronutrients positively synergized the effects of each other. APP at the rate of 300 mg kg−1 showed strong interaction with Nano Se. The APP300 + Nano Se0.68 mg kg−1 diet supplemented diet significantly decreased (P< 0.05 the feed conversion ratio (FCR while significantly increased (P< 0.05 the weight gain percentage (WG%, feed conversion efficiency (FCE%, specific growth rate (SGR, and serum growth hormone (GH concentration. Similarly, the physiological parameters such as red blood cells count (RBCs, hemoglobin level (Hb, hematocrit value (Hct, and serum lysozyme activity were also significantly increased in group of fish fed diet supplemented with APP100 mg kg−1 in combination with Nano Se0.68 mg kg−1 as compared to the control group. The present results clearly indicated the beneficent synergistic effects of Nano Se and APP in mahseer fish. Moreover, the current finding also supported our hypothesis that Nano Se and APP potentiate positively the effect of each other when both the micronutrients are supplemented together in the same fish feed.

  10. Growth temperature exerts differential physiological and transcriptional responses in laboratory and wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarra, Francisco J.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    exhibited higher fermentation rates. To elucidate mechanistic differences controlling the growth temperature response and underlying adaptive mechanisms between the strains, DNA microarrays and targeted metabolome analysis were used. We identified 1,007 temperature-dependent genes and 473 strain......-dependent genes. The transcriptional response was used to identify highly correlated gene expression subnetworks within yeast metabolism. We showed that temperature differences most strongly affect nitrogen metabolism and the heat shock response. A lack of stress response element-mediated gene induction, coupled...... environmental conditions and the organoleptic properties that they confer to wine. Here, we used a two-factor design to study the responses of a standard laboratory strain, CEN.PK113-7D, and an industrial wine yeast strain, EC1118, to growth temperatures of 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C in nitrogen...

  11. RESPONSE OF RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L.) UNDER ELEVATED TEMPERATURE AT EARLY GROWTH STAGE: PHYSIOLOGICAL MARKERS

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Kazim Ali; Abid Azhar; Saddia Galani

    2013-01-01

    A reliable and rapid assessment technique, for evaluation of cultivars having potential to combat harsh environmental conditions is imperative. This experiment was carried out to screen 8 local (Pakistan) accessions of rice at early growth stage (germination and seedling) at control and heat shock for different time periods (24, 48, 72 h). Heat stress indices, including promptness index (P.I.) and germination stress index (G.S.I.), were used to explore thermotolerance at germination stage. At...

  12. Characterization of the growth and auxin physiology of roots of the tomato mutant, diageotropica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muday, G. K.; Lomax, T. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Roots of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant (diageotropica (dgt) exhibit an altered phenotype. These roots are agravitropic and lack lateral roots. Relative to wild-type (VFN8) roots, dgt roots are less sensitive to growth inhibition by exogenously applied IAA and auxin transport inhibitors (phytotropins), and the roots exhibit a reduction in maximal growth inhibition in response to ethylene. However, IAA transport through roots, binding of the phytotropin, tritiated naphthylphthalamic acid ([3H]NPA), to root microsomal membranes, NPA-sensitive IAA uptake by root segments, and uptake of [3H]NPA into root segments are all similar in mutant and wild-type roots. We speculate that the reduced sensitivity of dgt root growth to auxin-transport inhibitors and ethylene is an indirect result of the reduction in sensitivity to auxin in this single gene, recessive mutant. We conclude that dgt roots, like dgt shoots, exhibit abnormalities indicating they have a defect associated with or affecting a primary site of auxin perception or action.

  13. Physiology of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana)regarding radiation near the Colombian Caribbean coast. II. Growth analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarma, A.; Rengifo, T.; Araméndiz-Tatis, H.

    2006-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni is a plant which produces a variety of high-potency, low-calorie sweetener in its leaf tissue. Its sweetening potential is considered to be 300 times greater than sucrose. Stevia sweeteners are used in food products in a number countries including Japan, Brazil and China and, more recently, in Colombia. The research was carried out from July 2002 to April 2003 in the Universidad de Córdoba' s Agricultural Sciences' fields in Montería, Colombia. The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of four levels of incident radiation on Stevia rebaudiana growth in the Sinu river valley' s climatic conditions. A completely random design used incident radiation levels (19%, 24%, 56% and 100%) and stevia genotypes (' Morita 1' and ' Morita 2') as factors. The most important results indicated that ' Morita 2' exposed to 100% incident radiation presented the highest absolute growth rate (AGR); this could possibly be attributed to this variety' s genetic advantage allowing it to carry out greater photosynthesis. Relative growth rate (RGR) was high in both genotypes at the beginning of the cycle (the first 60 days following transplant) for shady levels (19% and 24%); once this stage was finished, the high radiation produced greater increases RGR. ' Morita 2' , exposed to 100% incident radiation, presented the greatest net assimilation rate (NAR), suggesting greater efficiency in daily biomass production for each square centimeter of leaf surface per day. (author) [es

  14. Nutrient requirements and growth physiology of the photoheterotrophic Acidobacterium, Chloracidobacterium thermophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A Bryant

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermophilic, microaerophilic, anoxygenic and chlorophototrophic member of the phylum Acidobacteria, Chloracidobacterium thermophilum strain BT, was isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture derived from microbial mats associated with Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. C. thermophilum is strictly dependent on light and oxygen and grows optimally as a photoheterotroph at irradiance values between 20 to 50 µmol photons m-2 s-1. C. thermophilum is unable to synthesize branched-chain amino acids, L-lysine, and vitamin B12, which are required for growth. Although the organism lacks genes for autotrophic carbon fixation, bicarbonate is also required. Mixtures of other amino acids and 2-oxoglutarate stiumulate growth. As suggested from genomic sequence data, C. thermophilum requires a reduced sulfur source such as thioglycolate, cysteine, methionine, or thiosulfate. The organism can be grown in a defined medium at 51°C (Topt; range 44 to 58°C in the pH range 5.5 to 9.5 (pHopt = ~7.0. Using the defined growth medium and optimal conditions, it was possible to isolate new C. thermophilum strains directly from samples of hot spring mats Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The new isolates differ from the type strain with respect to pigment composition, morphology in liquid culture, and temperature adaptation.

  15. Physiological and developmental effects of O3 on cottonwood growth in urban and rural sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Jillian W; Jones, Clive G; Dawson, Todd E

    2006-12-01

    Previously we found that cloned cottonwood saplings (Populus deltoides) grew twice as large in New York, New York, USA, compared to surrounding rural environments and that soils, temperature, CO2, nutrient deposition, and microclimatic variables could not account for the greater urban plant biomass. Correlations between final season biomass and cumulative O3 exposures, combined with twofold growth reductions in an open-top chamber experiment provided strong evidence that higher cumulative O3 exposures in rural sites reduced growth in the country. Here, we assess the field gas exchange, growth and development, and allocation responses underlying the observed growth differences and compare them with isolated O3 responses documented in the open-top chamber experiment. Cottonwoods showed no visible foliar injury, reduced photosynthesis of recently expanded foliage, early leaf senescence, protective reduction in stomatal conductance, or compensatory allocation to shoot relative to root biomass for either the chamber or field experiment. Instead, O3-impacted chamber plants had significantly higher conductance and reduced photosynthesis of older foliage that led to reduced leaf area production and a twofold biomass reduction in the absence of visible injury. Rural-grown field plants showed the same pattern of significantly higher conductance in the absence of concomitant increases in photosynthesis that was indicative of a loss of stomatal control. Incremental changes in foliar production were also significantly inversely related to fluctuations in ambient O3 exposures. The similarity in biomass, gas exchange, phenological, and allocation responses between chamber and field experiments indicate that mechanisms accounting for reduced growth at rural sites were consistent with those in the open-top chamber O3 experiment. This study shows the limitation of visible symptoms as a sole diagnostic factor for documenting detrimental O3 impacts and points toward a new approach to

  16. Growth and physiological responses to surgical and gastric radio transmitter implantation techniques in subyearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Theresa L.; Hansel, H.C.; Shively, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the effects of surgical and gastric transmitter implantation techniques on the growth, general physiology and behavior of 230 subyearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, Walbaum) (100 mm-154 mm fork length). The transmitter weighed 1.3 g in air (0.9 g in water) and comprised, on average, 6% of the body weight of the fish (in air). Individuals were randomly assigned to an experimental group (control, surgical or gastric) and a sampling period (day 5 or day 21). Relative growth rate was expressed as% body weight gained/day. General condition was assessed by necropsy. Physiological response variables included hematocrit, leucocrit and plasma protein concentration. The mean relative growth rates of control, surgical and gastric fish were not significantly different at day 5. By day 21, the gastric group had a significantly lower relative growth rate (1.3%) as compared to the surgical group (1.8%) and the control group (1.9%) (P = 0.0001). Mean hematocrit values were significantly lower in the surgical (41.8%) and gastric (42.2%) groups as compared to controls (47.3%) at day 5 (P = 0.01), but all were within normal range for salmonids. No significant differences in hematocrit values were detected at day 21. Leucocrit values for all groups were ??? 1% in 99% of the fish. Both tagged groups had significantly lower mean plasma protein levels as compared to controls at day 5 (P = 0.001) and day 21 (P = 0.0001). At day 21 the gastric group (64.4 g 100 m1-1) had significantly lower mean plasma protein levels than the surgical group (68.8 g 100 ml-1) (P = 0.0001). Necropsies showed decreasing condition of gastrically tagged fish over time, and increasing condition of surgical fish. Paired releases of surgically and gastrically implanted yearling chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River in spring, 1996 revealed few significant differences in migration behavior through two reservoirs. We conclude that gastrically implanted fish show decreased growth and

  17. Effect of feeding frequencies on growth performance of Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigations were carried out on the growth performance of juvenile Clarias gariepinus using four different feeding frequencies. Two hundred and forty juveniles (8.6 +0.0 g) were stocked in eight aquaria tanks (120 x 60 x 80 cm) to a capacity of 120 litres and fed 1,2,3 and 4 times a day respectively for 70 days. Final body ...

  18. Evaluation of growth performance, carcass and organ weights of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of one hundred and thirty five broiler finisher birds were used in this study which lasted for 28 days. The birds were randomly assigned to three experimental treatments; T1 , T2 and T3 , containing 0.0, 15.0 and 30.0 g/L of ground Garcinia kola seeds, respectively. Growth performance of the broiler finisher birds ...

  19. Growth Performance Traits and Organ Weights in Rabbits Exposed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth Performance Traits and Organ Weights in Rabbits Exposed to Crude Oil Contaminated Diets. ... Il y avait une différence significative (P >0,05) dans la mortalité au fur et à mesure que les niveaux de pétrole brut augmentaient dans les régimes alimentaires. L\\'évaluation du poids des organes a montré une grande ...

  20. Evaluation of growth performance of Clarias gariepinus larvae fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A feeding trial, involving the use of two starter diets (artemia and aqualis) was carried out in the laboratory, to evaluate the growth performance of C. gariepinus larvae fed artemia and aqualis fish feeds. A total of 200 (48 hours old C. gariepinus larvae) of mean weight 4.8 ± 0.01mg and length 6.16 ± 0.03mm were reared for ...

  1. Growth performance, carcass response and cost benefit analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance at finisher phase revealed that average live weight was significantly (p<0.05) highest 2.17 kg/bird in birds fed 66.6 % CGM. Weekly weight gain was also significantly (p<0.05) highest 0.86kg/bird among birds placed on 66.6 % CGM. Feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio were also ...

  2. Growth performance, nutrient intake and digestibility of goats fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth performance, nutrient intake and digestibility of goats fed melon husk and palm oil slurry at 30% inclusion level. ... fed Diet 3 had lowest (P<0.05) average daily weight gain of 19.42g/day, with corresponding lowest (P<0.05) dry matter intake of 334.94g/day and poor feed conversion ratio of 17.24, respectively.

  3. Can Computer-Based Visual-Spatial Aids Lead to Increased Student Performance in Anatomy & Physiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Michael H.; Linzey, Alicia V.

    2005-01-01

    InterActive Physiology (IAP) is one of a new generation of anatomy and physiology learning aids with a broader range of sensory inputs than is possible from a static textbook or moderately dynamic lecture. This best-selling software has modules covering the muscular, respiratory, urinary, cardiovascular, and nervous systems plus a module on fluids…

  4. Seed priming with chitosan improves maize germination and seedling growth in relation to physiological changes under low temperature stress*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ya-jing; Hu, Jin; Wang, Xian-ju; Shao, Chen-xia

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature stress during germination and early seedling growth is an important constraint of global production of maize. The effects of seed priming with 0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75% (w/v) chitosan solutions at 15 °C on the growth and physiological changes were investigated using two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines, HuangC (chilling-tolerant) and Mo17 (chilling-sensitive). While seed priming with chitosan had no significant effect on germination percentage under low temperature stress, it enhanced germination index, reduced the mean germination time (MGT), and increased shoot height, root length, and shoot and root dry weights in both maize lines. The decline of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and relative permeability of the plasma membrane and the increase of the concentrations of soluble sugars and proline, peroxidase (POD) activity, and catalase (CAT) activity were detected both in the chilling-sensitive and chilling-tolerant maize seedlings after priming with the three concentrations of chitosan. HuangC was less sensitive to responding to different concentrations of chitosan. Priming with 0.50% chitosan for about 60~64 h seemed to have the best effects. Thus, it suggests that seed priming with chitosan may improve the speed of germination of maize seed and benefit for seedling growth under low temperature stress. PMID:19489108

  5. Seed priming with chitosan improves maize germination and seedling growth in relation to physiological changes under low temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ya-jing; Hu, Jin; Wang, Xian-ju; Shao, Chen-xia

    2009-06-01

    Low temperature stress during germination and early seedling growth is an important constraint of global production of maize. The effects of seed priming with 0.25%, 0.50%, and 0.75% (w/v) chitosan solutions at 15 degrees C on the growth and physiological changes were investigated using two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines, HuangC (chilling-tolerant) and Mo17 (chilling-sensitive). While seed priming with chitosan had no significant effect on germination percentage under low temperature stress, it enhanced germination index, reduced the mean germination time (MGT), and increased shoot height, root length, and shoot and root dry weights in both maize lines. The decline of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and relative permeability of the plasma membrane and the increase of the concentrations of soluble sugars and proline, peroxidase (POD) activity, and catalase (CAT) activity were detected both in the chilling-sensitive and chilling-tolerant maize seedlings after priming with the three concentrations of chitosan. HuangC was less sensitive to responding to different concentrations of chitosan. Priming with 0.50% chitosan for about 60 approximately 64 h seemed to have the best effects. Thus, it suggests that seed priming with chitosan may improve the speed of germination of maize seed and benefit for seedling growth under low temperature stress.

  6. Ninth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings (abstracts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.R. Weigel; J.W. Van Sambeek; C.H., eds. Michler

    2005-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities in field performance of oak plantings, seedling propagation, genetics, acorn germination, and natural regeneration of oaks are described in 26 abstracts.

  7. Tenth workshop on seedling physiology and growth problems in oak plantings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Roy Lockhart; Emile S. Gardiner; Daniel C. Dey

    2008-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities in field performance of oak plantings, seedling propagation, genetics, acorn germination, and natural regeneration of oaks are described in 15 abstracts.

  8. The Effects of Fertilization on the Growth and Physiological Characteristics of Ginkgo biloba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ginkgo biloba L. is one of the most extensively planted and productive commercial species in temperate areas around the world, but slow-growth is the most limiting factor for its utilization. Fertilization is one of the key technologies for high quality and high forest yield. To better understand the impacts of fertilization on Ginkgo productivity, the effects of fertilization treatments (single fertilizer and combined fertilizer on growth, nutrient content in Ginkgo leaves, and photosynthesis characteristics were studied in a 10-year-old Ginkgo plantation over two years. The single factor experiments suggested that DBH (diameter at breast height, H (height, NSL (length of new shoots, and V (trunk volume showed significant differences between the different levels of single nitrogen (N or phosphate (P fertilizer application. Orthogonal test results showed that the nine treatments all promoted the growth of Ginkgo, and the formula (N: 400 g·tree−1, P: 200 g·tree−1, potassium (K: 90 g·tree−1 was the most effective. Gs (stomatal conductance and Pn (net photosynthesis rate showed significant differences between the different amounts of single N or P fertilizer application, while single K fertilizer only affected Pn. Combined N, P, and K fertilizer had significant promoting effects on Ci (intercellular CO2 concentration, Gs and Pn. N and P contents in Ginkgo leaves showed significant differences between the different amounts of a single N fertilizer application. A single P fertilizer only improved foliar P contents in Ginkgo leaves. A single K fertilizer application improved N and K content in Ginkgo leaves. The effects of different N, P, and K fertilizer treatments on the nutrient content of Ginkgo leaves were different.

  9. Plant growth and physiology of vegetable plants as influenced by carbon dioxide environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tadashi

    1973-01-01

    In order to obtain basic knowledge on the increased giving of carbon dioxide to vegetables, the carbon dioxide environment in growing houses was analyzed, and the physiological and ecological properties of vegetables cultivated in carbon dioxide environment were elucidated. To improve the carbon dioxide environment, giving increased quantity of carbon dioxide, air flow, ventilation, and others were examined. The concentration of carbon dioxide began to decrease when the illumination intensity on growing layer reached 1 -- 1.5 lux, owing to the photo-synthetic activity of vegetables, and decreased rapidly at 3 -- 5 lux. The lowering of carbon dioxide concentration lowered the photo-synthesis of vegetables extremely, and the transfer of synthesized carbohydrate to roots was obstructed. The effect suffered in low carbon dioxide concentration left some aftereffect even after ventilation and the recovery of carbon dioxide concentration. But this aftereffect was not observed in case of cucumber. To improve carbon dioxide environment, the air flow or ventilation required for minimizing the concentration lowering was determined, but giving increased quantity of carbon dioxide was most effective. The interaction of carbon dioxide concentration and light was examined regarding the effect on photo-synthesis, and some knowledge of practical application was obtained. The effect of giving more carbon dioxide was more remarkable as the treatment was given to younger seedlings and in the period when the capacity of absorbing assimilation products was higher. (Kako, I.)

  10. Application of the Copenhagen Soccer Test in high-level women players - locomotor activities, physiological response and sprint performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Pettersen, Svein Arne; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the physiological response, sprint performance and technical ability in various phases of the Copenhagen Soccer Test for Women (CSTw) and investigated whether the locomotor activities of the CSTw were comparable to competitive match-play (CM). Physiological measurements and physical....../technical assessments were performed during CSTw for eleven Norwegian high-level women soccer players. The activity pattern during CSTw and CM was monitored using the ZXY tracking system. No differences were observed between CSTw and CM with regards to total distance covered (10093±94 and 9674±191m), high intensity...

  11. Physiological performance of sesame seeds under the water stress at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayana Silva de Medeiros

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. shows great economic potential because it can be explored by the national as well as the international market. It can be grown in the second season when it is subject to less favorable weather conditions such as drought during the sowing and emergence. Given this the objective was to evaluate the effect of water stress induced by polyethylene glycol solutions (PEG 6000 at different temperatures in order to asses the physiological quality of sesame seeds. In this work, were used PEG 6000 with different osmotic potentials (0.0 control and (-0.2, –0.4, –0.6, –0.8, –1.0 –1,2 and –1.4 MPa at temperatures of 25, 30 and 35 °C. For determine the effect of the treatments it was evaluated seed germination and vigor (first count and length of the primary root and shoot, in a completely randomized, with four replications. The sesame seeds are affected by water stress, with significant reductions in germination and vigor. A temperature of 30 °C favored the germination performance in less restrictive water potentials.

  12. Minor Immediate Effects of a Dog on Children’s Reading Performance and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Schretzmayer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Literacy is a key factor in occupational success and social integration. However, an increasing number of children lack appropriate reading skills. There is growing evidence that dogs have positive effects on reading performance. We investigated the short-term effects of dogs on reading performance in 36 third-graders and monitored physiological parameters [heart rate (HR, heart rate variability (HRV, and salivary cortisol] as well as behavioral variables. Each child took part in two test sessions at the presence of a tutor, in one of which a dog and its handler were present. To assess reading performance two reading tests were used: two subtests of the standardized “Ein Leseverständnistest für Erst- bis Sechstklässler”, where the children have to carry out time-limited reading tasks, to assess sentence and text comprehension, and repeated reading (RR, where the children have to read the same text twice, to assess reading speed and short-term improvement. Although the dog had no effect on reading performance scores, within the first test session the children improved from the first to the second run of RR when a dog was present but not without dog. The behavior of the children indicated a calming effect of the dog in the first test session with less nervous movements and the children being less talkative. We found no impact of the dog on HR and HRV. However, the excitement about the dog in combination with the unknown situation in the first test session was reflected in a higher difference in the mean HR difference between the two test sessions for the children, who in the first test session had a dog present, compared to the children, who had the dog in the second test session. In the second test session, the children were more aroused with a dog present than with no dog present, as indicated by the area under the curve increase (AUCi of salivary cortisol values. We conclude that the presence of a dog had a minor short-term positive

  13. Physiological epidermal growth factor concentrations activate high affinity receptors to elicit calcium oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Marquèze-Pouey

    Full Text Available Signaling mediated by the epidermal growth factor (EGF is crucial in tissue development, homeostasis and tumorigenesis. EGF is mitogenic at picomolar concentrations and is known to bind its receptor on high affinity binding sites depending of the oligomerization state of the receptor (monomer or dimer. In spite of these observations, the cellular response induced by EGF has been mainly characterized for nanomolar concentrations of the growth factor, and a clear definition of the cellular response to circulating (picomolar concentrations is still lacking. We investigated Ca2+ signaling, an early event in EGF responses, in response to picomolar doses in COS-7 cells where the monomer/dimer equilibrium is unaltered by the synthesis of exogenous EGFR. Using the fluo5F Ca2+ indicator, we found that picomolar concentrations of EGF induced in 50% of the cells a robust oscillatory Ca2+ signal quantitatively similar to the Ca2+ signal induced by nanomolar concentrations. However, responses to nanomolar and picomolar concentrations differed in their underlying mechanisms as the picomolar EGF response involved essentially plasma membrane Ca2+ channels that are not activated by internal Ca2+ store depletion, while the nanomolar EGF response involved internal Ca2+ release. Moreover, while the picomolar EGF response was modulated by charybdotoxin-sensitive K+ channels, the nanomolar response was insensitive to the blockade of these ion channels.

  14. Effects of air pollution from road transport on growth and physiology of six transplanted bryophyte species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignal, Keeley L.; Ashmore, Mike R.; Headley, Alistair D.

    2008-01-01

    Motor vehicles emit a cocktail of pollutants; however, little is known about the effects of these pollutants on bryophytes located in roadside habitats. Six bryophyte species were transplanted to either a woodland or a moorland site adjacent to a motorway, and were monitored over seven months from autumn through to spring. All species showed an increase in one or more of the following near the motorway: growth, membrane leakage, chlorophyll concentration, and nitrogen concentration. The strongest effects were observed in the first 50-100 m from the motorway: this was consistent with the nitrogen dioxide pollution profile, which decreased to background levels at a distance of 100-125 m. It is hypothesised that motor vehicle pollution was responsible for the effects observed, and that nitrogen oxides had a key influence. The observed effects may lead to changes in vegetation composition with significant implications for nature conservation and management of roadside sites. - Motor vehicle pollution has significant effects on the growth, membrane leakage, chlorophyll and nitrogen content of bryophytes

  15. Effects of air pollution from road transport on growth and physiology of six transplanted bryophyte species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bignal, Keeley L. [Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.bignal@sussex.ac.uk; Ashmore, Mike R. [Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ma512@york.ac.uk; Headley, Alistair D. [Department of Geography and Environmental Science, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: alistairheadley@aol.com

    2008-11-15

    Motor vehicles emit a cocktail of pollutants; however, little is known about the effects of these pollutants on bryophytes located in roadside habitats. Six bryophyte species were transplanted to either a woodland or a moorland site adjacent to a motorway, and were monitored over seven months from autumn through to spring. All species showed an increase in one or more of the following near the motorway: growth, membrane leakage, chlorophyll concentration, and nitrogen concentration. The strongest effects were observed in the first 50-100 m from the motorway: this was consistent with the nitrogen dioxide pollution profile, which decreased to background levels at a distance of 100-125 m. It is hypothesised that motor vehicle pollution was responsible for the effects observed, and that nitrogen oxides had a key influence. The observed effects may lead to changes in vegetation composition with significant implications for nature conservation and management of roadside sites. - Motor vehicle pollution has significant effects on the growth, membrane leakage, chlorophyll and nitrogen content of bryophytes.

  16. Performance of first-year health sciences students in a large, diverse, multidisciplinary, first-semester, physiology service module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins-Opitz, Susan B; Tufts, Mark

    2014-06-01

    Health Science students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal perform better in their professional modules compared with their physiology modules. The pass rates of physiology service modules have steadily declined over the years. While a system is in place to identify "at-risk" students, it is only activated after the first semester. As a result, it is only from the second semester of their first year studies onward that at-risk students can be formally assisted. The challenge is thus to devise an appropriate strategy to identify struggling students earlier in the semester. Using questionnaires, students were asked about attendance, financing of their studies, and relevance of physiology. After the first class test, failing students were invited to complete a second questionnaire. In addition, demographic data were also collected and analyzed. Correlation analyses were undertaken of performance indicators based on the demographical data collected. The 2011 class comprised mainly sport science students (57%). The pass rate of sport science students was lower than the pass rates of other students (42% vs. 70%, P physiology and recognized its relevance. Key issues identified were problems understanding concepts and terminology, poor study environment and skills, and lack of matriculation biology. The results of the first class test and final module marks correlated well. It is clear from this study that student performance in the first class test is a valuable tool to identify struggling students and that appropriate testing should be held as early as possible. Copyright © 2014 The American Physiological Society.

  17. Comparative physiology and fermentation performance of Saaz and Frohberg lager yeast strains and the parental species Saccharomyces eubayanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Brian R; Storgårds, Erna; Krogerus, Kristoffer; Vidgren, Virve

    2013-07-01

    Two distinct genetic groups (Saaz and Frohberg) exist within the hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus (S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus) taxon. However, physiological/technological differences that exist between the two groups are not known. Fermentative capability of the parental S. eubayanus has likewise never been studied. Here, 58 lager strains were screened to determine which hybrid group they belonged to, and selected strains were characterized to determine salient characteristics. In 15 °P all-malt wort fermentations at 22 °C, Frohberg strains showed greater growth and superior fermentation (80% apparent attenuation, 6.5% alcohol by volume in 3-4 days) compared to all other strains and maintained highest viability values (>93%). Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at the same temperature (33% apparent attenuation, 2.7% alcohol by volume at 6 days and viability reduced to 75%). Saaz strains and S. eubayanus were the least sensitive to cold (10 °C), though this did not translate to greater fermentation performance. Fermentation with S. eubayanus was poor at 10 °C but equal to or greater than that of the Saaz strains. Performance of Saaz yeast/S. eubayanus was limited by an inability to use wort maltotriose. [(14)C]-Maltotriose transport assays also showed negligible activity in these strains (≤0.5 µmol min(-1) g(-1) dry yeast). Beers from Saaz fermentations were characterized by two- to sixfold lower production of the flavour compounds methyl butanol, ethyl acetate and 3-methylbutyl acetate compared to Frohberg strains. Higher alcohol and ester production by S. eubayanus was similar to that of Frohberg strains. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Physiological, Nutritional and Performance Profiles of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreato, Leonardo V; Santos, Jonatas Fs; Esteves, João Vdc; Panissa, Valeria Lg; Julio, Ursula F; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-12-01

    This study analysed the physiological, nutritional and performance profiles of athletes practicing Brazilian jiu-jitsu. To this end, 15 athletes that practiced Brazilian jiu-jitsu (aged: 28 ± 5 years; 8 brown belts and 7 black belts; training experience: 11 ± 4 years) underwent anthropometric measurements (body composition and somatotype), dietary evaluation (24 h recall) and physical fitness tests (movement time, dynamometer handgrip, kimono grip strength, vertical jump and sit-and-reach tests). The athletes had 12.7 ± 4.8% of body fat, 59.2 ± 5.0% of muscle mass and their somatotype was dominated by the mesomorphic component (5.3 ± 2.0), followed by endomorphic (3.7 ± 1.5) and ectomorphic (1.4 ± 0.9) components. Nutritional assessment suggested a diet consisting of 54 ± 7% of carbohydrates, 19 ± 4% of protein and 27 ± 6% of lipids. Movement time on the handgrip tests was 0.42 ± 0.05 s, for handgrip strength, 53 ± 7 kgf was found for the dominant hand and 50 ± 9 kgf for the non-dominant hand. For the countermovement jump, the jiu-jitsu athletes reached 41 ± 5 cm. Athletes remained 30 ± 14 s in the maximum static suspension test gripping a kimono, and reached 27 ± 8 cm in the sit-and-reach test. Overall the sample presented average levels of body fat, elevated muscle mass and a predominantly mesomorphic somatotype. Diet was generally poor, with low carbohydrate intake, high protein intake and adequate lipid intake. Maximum isometric handgrip strength was consistent with observations of other athletes in this sport discipline. However, the performance in the maximum static suspension test gripping a kimono was lower than in other Brazilian jiu-jitsu athletes. Movement time was comparable and lower body muscle power was worse compared to athletes in similar sports. Additionally, flexibility was rated as poor.

  19. Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and interval training on physiological determinants of severe exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Micah; Boesch, Chris; Bolliger, Christine S; Norman, Barbara; Gustafsson, Thomas; Hoppeler, Hans; Vogt, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We aimed to manipulate physiological determinants of severe exercise performance. We hypothesized that (1) beta-alanine supplementation would increase intramuscular carnosine and buffering capacity and dampen acidosis during severe cycling, (2) that high-intensity interval training (HIT) would enhance aerobic energy contribution during severe cycling, and (3) that HIT preceded by beta-alanine supplementation would have greater benefits. Sixteen active men performed incremental cycling tests and 90-s severe (110 % peak power) cycling tests at three time points: before and after oral supplementation with either beta-alanine or placebo, and after an 11-days HIT block (9 sessions, 4 × 4 min), which followed supplementation. Carnosine was assessed via MR spectroscopy. Energy contribution during 90-s severe cycling was estimated from the O2 deficit. Biopsies from m. vastus lateralis were taken before and after the test. Beta-alanine increased leg muscle carnosine (32 ± 13 %, d = 3.1). Buffering capacity and incremental cycling were unaffected, but during 90-s severe cycling, beta-alanine increased aerobic energy contribution (1.4 ± 1.3 %, d = 0.5), concurrent with reduced O2 deficit (-5.0 ± 5.0 %, d = 0.6) and muscle lactate accumulation (-23 ± 30 %, d = 0.9), while having no effect on pH. Beta-alanine also enhanced motivation and perceived state during the HIT block. There were no between-group differences in adaptations to the training block, namely increased buffering capacity (+7.9 ± 11.9 %, p = 0.04, d = 0.6, n = 14) and glycogen storage (+30 ± 47 %, p = 0.04, d = 0.5, n = 16). Beta-alanine did not affect buffering considerably, but has beneficial effects on severe exercise metabolism as well as psychological parameters during intense training phases.

  20. Effects of Dietary Energy Levels on the Physiological Parameters and Reproductive Performance of Gestating Gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S S; Jung, S W; Jang, J C; Chung, W L; Jeong, J H; Kim, Y Y

    2016-07-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary energy levels on the physiological parameters and reproductive performance of gestating first parity sows. A total of 52 F1 gilts (Yorkshire×Landrace) were allocated to 4 dietary treatments using a completely randomized design. Each treatment contained diets with 3,100, 3,200, 3,300, or 3,400 kcal of metabolizable energy (ME)/kg, and the daily energy intake of the gestating gilts in each treatment were 6,200, 6,400, 6,600, and 6,800 kcal of ME, respectively. During gestation, the body weight (p = 0.04) and weight gain (p = 0.01) of gilts linearly increased with increasing dietary energy levels. Backfat thickness was not affected at d110 of gestation by dietary treatments, but increased linearly (p = 0.05) from breeding to d 110 of gestation. There were no significant differences on the litter size or litter birth weight. During lactation, the voluntary feed intake of sows tended to decrease when the dietary energy levels increased (p = 0.08). No difference was observed in backfat thickness of the sows within treatments; increasing energy levels linearly decreased the body weight of sows (pgilt should be between 6,678 and 7,932 kcal of ME/d. Similarly, our results suggested that 3,100 kcal of ME/kg is not enough to maintain the reproductive performance for gilts during gestation with 2 kg feed daily. Gilts in the treatment 3,400 kcal of ME/kg have a higher weaning number of piglets, but bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other treatments during lactation. But bodyweight and backfat loss were higher than other treatments during lactation. Consequently, an adequate energy requirement of gestating gilts is 6,400 kcal of ME/d.

  1. Physiological, Nutritional and Performance Profiles of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreato Leonardo V

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed the physiological, nutritional and performance profiles of athletes practicing Brazilian jiu-jitsu. To this end, 15 athletes that practiced Brazilian jiu-jitsu (aged: 28 ± 5 years; 8 brown belts and 7 black belts; training experience: 11 ± 4 years underwent anthropometric measurements (body composition and somatotype, dietary evaluation (24 h recall and physical fitness tests (movement time, dynamometer handgrip, kimono grip strength, vertical jump and sit-and-reach tests. The athletes had 12.7 ± 4.8% of body fat, 59.2 ± 5.0% of muscle mass and their somatotype was dominated by the mesomorphic component (5.3 ± 2.0, followed by endomorphic (3.7 ± 1.5 and ectomorphic (1.4 ± 0.9 components. Nutritional assessment suggested a diet consisting of 54 ± 7% of carbohydrates, 19 ± 4% of protein and 27 ± 6% of lipids. Movement time on the handgrip tests was 0.42 ± 0.05 s, for handgrip strength, 53 ± 7 kgf was found for the dominant hand and 50 ± 9 kgf for the non-dominant hand. For the countermovement jump, the jiu-jitsu athletes reached 41 ± 5 cm. Athletes remained 30 ± 14 s in the maximum static suspension test gripping a kimono, and reached 27 ± 8 cm in the sit-and-reach test. Overall the sample presented average levels of body fat, elevated muscle mass and a predominantly mesomorphic somatotype. Diet was generally poor, with low carbohydrate intake, high protein intake and adequate lipid intake. Maximum isometric handgrip strength was consistent with observations of other athletes in this sport discipline. However, the performance in the maximum static suspension test gripping a kimono was lower than in other Brazilian jiu-jitsu athletes. Movement time was comparable and lower body muscle power was worse compared to athletes in similar sports. Additionally, flexibility was rated as poor.

  2. Physiological, performance, and nutritional profile of the Brazilian Olympic Wushu (kung-fu) team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; Gualano, Bruno; Franchini, Emerson; Batista, Rafael Novaes; Polacow, Viviane Ozores; Lancha, Antonio Herbert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine physiological, nutritional, and performance profiles of elite Olympic Wushu (kung-fu) athletes. Ten men and four women elite athletes took part in the study. They completed the following tests: body composition, nutritional assessment, upper-body Wingate Test, vertical jump, lumbar isometric strength, and flexibility. Blood lactate was determined at rest and after the Wingate Test. Blood lactate was also determined during a training session (combat and Taolu training). We found low body fat (men: 9.5 +/- 6.3%; women: 18.0 +/- 4.8%), high flexibility (sit-and-reach-men: 45.5 +/- 6.1 cm; women: 44.0 +/- 6.3 cm), high leg power (vertical jump-men: 37.7 +/- 8.4 cm; women: 32.3 +/- 1.1 cm), high lumbar isometric strength (men: 159 +/- 13 cm; women: 94 +/- 6 cm), moderate arm mean and peak power (Wingate Test-men: 4.1 +/- 0.4 and 5.8 +/- 0.5 Wxkg, respectively; women: 2.5 +/- 0.3 and 3.4 +/- 0.3 W.kg, respectively), and elevated blood lactate after the Wingate Test (men: 10.8 +/- 2.0 mmolxL; women: 10.2 +/- 2.0 mmolxL) and during training (combat: 12.0 +/- 1.8 mmolxL; Taolu: 7.7 +/- 3.3 mmolxL). Men athletes consume a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, whereas women consume a moderate, high-carbohydrate diet. Energy consumption was markedly variable. In conclusion, Olympic Wushu seems to be a highly anaerobic-dependent combat sport. Low body fat, high flexibility, leg anaerobic power, isometric strength, and moderately high arm anaerobic power seem to be important for successful competitive performance.

  3. Growth and physiological responses of canola (Brassica napus) to three components of global climate change: temperature, carbon dioxide and drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaderi, M.M.; Kurepin, L.V.; Reid, D.M. [Univ. of Calgary, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    Elevated CO{sub 2} appears to be a significant factor in global warming, which will likely lead to drought conditions in many areas. Few studies have considered the interactive effects of higher CO{sub 2}, temperature and drought on plant growth and physiology. We grew canola (Brassica napus cv. 45H72) plants under lower (22/18 deg. C) and higher (28/24 deg. C) temperature regimes in controlled-environment chambers at ambient (370 {mu}mol mol-1) and elevated (740 {mu}mol mol-1) CO{sub 2} levels. One half of the plants were watered to field capacity and the other half at wilting point. In three separate experiments, we determined growth, various physiological parameters and content of abscisic acid (ABA), indole-3-acetic acid and ethylene. Drought-stressed plants grown under higher temperature at ambient CO{sub 2} had decreased stem height and diameter, leaf number and area, dry matter, leaf area ratio, shoot/root weight ratio, net CO{sub 2} assimilation and chlorophyll fluorescence. However, these plants had increased specific leaf weight, leaf weight ratio and chlorophyll concentration. Elevated CO{sub 2} generally had the opposite effect. and partially reversed the inhibitory effects of higher temperature and drought on leaf dry weight accumulation. This study showed that higher temperature and drought inhibit many processes but elevated CO{sub 2} partially mitigate some adverse effects. As expected, drought stress increased ABA but higher temperature inhibited the ability of plants to produce ABA in response to drought. (au)

  4. Impact of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles on the growth and physiological responses in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Venkidasamy; Venkatesh, Jelli; Park, Se Won

    2015-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were extensively used in various fields, particularly in medicine as an antimicrobial agent. The unavoidable and extensive usage of AgNPs in turn accumulates in the environment. Plants are the essential base of ecosystem and are ready to disturb by environmental pollutants. Therefore, in the present study, we have planned to evaluate the impact of biologically synthesized AgNPs on the essential food crop Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). The effects of AgNP-induced plant morphological and physiological changes were investigated in different concentrations (100, 250, and 500 mg/L). The results of morphological features showed that AgNPs at lower concentrations (100 mg/L) exhibit growth-stimulating activity, whereas at higher concentrations (250 and 500 mg/L), particularly, 500 mg/L exhibited growth-suppressing activities which are in terms of reduced root, shoot growth, and fresh biomass. The increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, malondialdehyde production, anthocyanin biosynthesis, and decreased chlorophyll content were also more obviously present at higher concentrations of AgNPs. The concentration-dependent DNA damage was observed in the AgNP-treated plants. The molecular responses of AgNPs indicate that most of the genes related to secondary metabolism (glucosinolates, anthocyanin) and antioxidant activities were induced at higher concentrations of AgNP treatment. The dose-dependent phytotoxicity effects of AgNPs were also observed. Taken together, the highest concentration of AgNPs (500 mg/L) could induce growth-suppressing activities via the induction of ROS generation and other molecular changes in B. rapa seedlings.

  5. Plasticity in relative growth rate after a reduction in nitrogen availability is related to root morphological and physiological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useche, Antonio; Shipley, Bill

    2010-10-01

    To maximize growth and fitness a plant must adjust its phenotype by an amount and speed that matches changes in nitrogen availability. To determine how plastic ontogenetic changes in root physiological and morphological traits interact and whether or not these responses are likely to maximize growth, ontogenetic changes in relative growth rate (RGR, proportional rate of change of plant dry mass), unit root rate (URR, rate of change of plant dry mass per unit root length or area), specific root length (SRL, root length per dry root mass), specific root area (SRA, root area per dry root mass), and other root traits before and after a decrease in nitrogen supply, were studied in ten herbaceous species. Plants of each species were grown in hydroponic culture under controlled conditions in a control treatment where the supply of nitrogen remained constant at 1 mm, and in a stress treatment where the nitrogen supply was abruptly reduced from 1 to 0·01 mm during the growth period. In the treatment series the number of bifurcations per root area and per root length, specific root area (SRA) and length (SRL), areal (URR(area)) and length-based (URR(mass)) unit root rate and RGR decreased, and root tissue density increased relative to the control. Species having greater plasticity in the percentage decrease in SRA at the end of the experiment also had smaller reductions in RGR; plasticity in SRA is therefore adaptive. In contrast, species which showed a greater reduction in URR(area) and in the number of bifurcations per root area and per root length, showed stronger reductions in RGR; plasticity in URR(area) and in the number of bifurcations per root area and per root length is therefore not adaptive. The plastic responses observed in SRA, SRL and in root tissue density constitute a set of plastic adjustments that would lead to resource conservation in response nutrient stress.

  6. Exponential growth combined with exponential decline explains lifetime performance evolution in individual and human species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Geoffroy; Len, Stéphane; Hellard, Philippe; Tafflet, Muriel; Guillaume, Marion; Vollmer, Jean-Claude; Gager, Bruno; Quinquis, Laurent; Marc, Andy; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2012-08-01

    The physiological parameters characterizing human capacities (the ability to move, reproduce or perform tasks) evolve with ageing: performance is limited at birth, increases to a maximum and then decreases back to zero at the day of death. Physical and intellectual skills follow such a pattern. Here, we investigate the development of sport and chess performances during the lifetime at two different scales: the individual athletes' careers and the world record by age class in 25 Olympic sports events and in grandmaster chess players. For all data sets, a biphasic development of growth and decline is described by a simple model that accounts for 91.7% of the variance at the individual level and 98.5% of the variance at the species one. The age of performance peak is computed at 26.1 years old for the events studied (26.0 years old for track and field, 21.0 years old for swimming and 31.4 years old for chess). The two processes (growth and decline) are exponential and start at age zero. Both were previously demonstrated to happen in other human and non-human biological functions that evolve with age. They occur at the individual and species levels with a similar pattern, suggesting a scale invariance property.

  7. Integrated healthcare networks' performance: a growth curve modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Thomas T H; Wang, Bill B L

    2003-05-01

    This study examines the effects of integration on the performance ratings of the top 100 integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) in the United States. A strategic-contingency theory is used to identify the relationship of IHNs' performance to their structural and operational characteristics and integration strategies. To create a database for the panel study, the top 100 IHNs selected by the SMG Marketing Group in 1998 were followed up in 1999 and 2000. The data were merged with the Dorenfest data on information system integration. A growth curve model was developed and validated by the Mplus statistical program. Factors influencing the top 100 IHNs' performance in 1998 and their subsequent rankings in the consecutive years were analyzed. IHNs' initial performance scores were positively influenced by network size, number of affiliated physicians and profit margin, and were negatively associated with average length of stay and technical efficiency. The continuing high performance, judged by maintaining higher performance scores, tended to be enhanced by the use of more managerial or executive decision-support systems. Future studies should include time-varying operational indicators to serve as predictors of network performance.

  8. Growth, Physiological, Biochemical, and Ionic Responses of Morus alba L. Seedlings to Various Salinity Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mulberry (Morus alba L., a moderately salt-tolerant tree species, is considered to be economically important. In this study, 1-year-old mulberry seedlings cultivated in soil under greenhouse conditions were treated with five concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl; 0%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, and 0.5% for 3 and 21 days. Plant growth parameters were not affected by 0.1% NaCl, but significant reductions were observed after treatment with 0.2%, 0.3%, and 0.5% NaCl. The malondialdehyde content and cell membrane stability of mulberry seedlings exposed to 0.1% NaCl did not change, indicating that mulberry is not significantly affected by low-salinity conditions. The Na contents of various organs did not increase significantly in response to 0.1% NaCl, but the K:Na, Mg:Na, and Ca:Na ratios of various organs were affected by NaCl. Marked changes in the levels of major compatible solutes (proline, soluble sugars, and soluble proteins occurred in both the leaves and roots of NaCl-treated seedlings relative to control seedlings. Under severe saline conditions (0.5% NaCl, the ability of mulberry to synthesize enzymatic antioxidants may be impaired.

  9. Academic Performance in Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes: A 2-Yr Study of Academic Motivation and Grade Expectation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic…

  10. Do Targeted Written Comments and the Rubric Method of Delivery Affect Performance on Future Human Physiology Laboratory Reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Zachary S.; Wilds, Gabriel P.; Mangum, Joshua E.; Hocker, Austin D.; Dawson, Sierra M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how students performed on weekly two-page laboratory reports based on whether the grading rubric was provided to the student electronically or in paper form and the inclusion of one- to two-sentence targeted comments. Subjects were registered for a 289-student, third-year human physiology class with laboratory and were randomized…

  11. Milk Production, Physiological Condition and Performance of Etawa Crossbreed Goats Feed by Ration Supplemented with Mangosteen Peel Flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzarnisa; Rachmadi, D.; Azhar, A.; Fakhrur Riza, R.; Hidayati, A.

    2018-02-01

    Study on the effect of the addition of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) peel flour on physiological condition and performance of Etawa crossbreed goats was done. This was to grant the use of mangosteen peel flour that rich of antioxidants and has variety good benefits for health as feed additive for cattle. This study used a Complete Randomized Block Design consisting of 4 treatment groups and 4 replications each. Subjects were 16 female Etawa crossbreed goats randomly designed into treatments group based on lactation periods. Subjects were feed with traditional rations (control, A), traditional rations and 2.5% mangosteen peel flour (B), tradition rations and 5% mangosteen peel flour (C), and traditional rations and 7,5 % mangosteen peel flour (D). Data on performance (milk production) and physiological condition (respiratory frequency, rectal temperature, and heart rate) obtained were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed that the addition of mangosteen peel flour as food additive in the rations resulted in variations in the milk production, physiological condition (rectal temperature, heart rate and respiration frequency) and performances (daily weigh gain, food consumption, ration conversion and breast volume) of Etawa crossbreed goats, but significant effect was only observed in the respiration frequency. The addition of 2.5% mangosteen peel flour in the ration caused the best, expected effects on milk production physiological condition and performance of Etawa crossbreed goats.

  12. Effects of thermal discomfort in an office on perceived air quality, SBS symptoms, physiological responses and human performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lan, Li; Wargocki, Pawel; Wyon, David Peter

    2011-01-01

    reduced at the higher temperature when they felt warm. No effects were observed on salivary biomarkers (alpha-amylase and cortisol). The present results imply that the negative effects on health and performance that occur when people feel thermally warm at raised temperatures are caused by physiological...

  13. Effects of Imagery Training on Cognitive Performance and Use of Physiological Measures as an Assessment Tool of Mental Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Christos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Albani, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of motor imagery training on cognitive performance was examined and the physiological mechanisms involved in the contribution of mental practice to motor learning were considered. The subject's mental effort during motor imagery was assessed by using psychophysiological measures and particularly eye blink activity as an…

  14. Performance and Physiology of Steers Grazing Toxic Tall Fescue as Influenced by Concentrate Feeding and Steroidal Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fescue toxicosis has a negative impact on animal performance and physiology, but concentrate feeding and ear implantation with steroid hormones could mitigate problems in grazing yearling cattle on toxic tall fescue. Sixty-four steers were grazed on endophyte-infected (E+) ‘KY-31’ tall fescue for 7...

  15. Performance and Physiology of Yearling Steers Grazing Toxic Tall Fescue as Influenced by Feeding Soybean Hulls and Steroidal Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    An endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) that infests tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) produces ergot alkaloids that adversely affect performance and physiology of cattle to inflict a malady collectively termed ‘fescue toxicosis’. A two-yr grazing experiment was conducted with yearling steers graz...

  16. The acute effects of graded physiological strain on soccer kicking performance: a randomized, controlled cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radman, Ivan; Wessner, Barbara; Bachl, Norbert; Ruzic, Lana; Hackl, Markus; Prpic, Tomislav; Markovic, Goran

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the acute effects of graded physiological strain on soccer kicking performance. Twenty-eight semi-professional soccer players completed both experimental and control procedure. The experimental protocol incorporated repeated shooting trials combined with a progressive discontinuous maximal shuttle-run intervention. The initial running velocity was 8 km/h and increasing for 1 km/h every 3 min until exhaustion. The control protocol comprised only eight subsequent shooting trials. The soccer-specific kicking accuracy (KA; average distance from the ball-entry point to the goal center), kicking velocity (KV), and kicking quality (KQ; kicking accuracy divided by the time elapsed from hitting the ball to the point of entry) were evaluated via reproducible and valid test over five individually determined exercise intensity zones. Compared with baseline or exercise at intensities below the second lactate threshold (LT2), physiological exertion above the LT2 (blood lactate > 4 mmol/L) resulted in meaningful decrease in KA (11-13%; p soccer kicking performance. The results suggest that high-intensity physiological exertion above the player's LT2 impairs soccer kicking performance. In contrast, light to moderate physiological stress appears to be neither harmful nor beneficial for kicking performance.

  17. Variation in antioxidant enzyme activities, growth and some physiological parameters of bitter melon (Momordica charantia) under salinity and chromium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Mahsa; Heidari, Mostafa; Ghorbani, Hadi

    2016-07-01

    In general, salinity and heavy metals interfere with several physiological processes and reduce plant growth. In order to evaluate of three levels of salinity (0, 4 and 8 ds m(-1)) and three concentration of chromium (0, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) soil) in bitter melon (Momordica charantia), a plot experiment was conducted in greenhouse at university of Shahrood, Iran. The results revealed that chromium treatment had no significant affect on fresh and dry weight, but salinity caused reduction of fresh and dry weight in growth parameter. Salinity and chromium enhanced antioxidant enzymes activities like catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and sodium content in leaves. However salinity and chromium treatments had no effect on potassium, phosphorus in leaves, soluble carbohydrate concentration in leaves and root, but decreased the carotenoid content in leaves. On increasing salinity from control to 8 ds m(-1) chlorophyll a, b and anthocyanin content decreased by 41.6%, 61.1% and 26.5% respectively but chromium treatments had no significant effect on these photosynthetic pigments.

  18. Variability in Growth, Physiological, and Biochemical Characteristics among Various Clones of Dalbergia sissoo in a Clonal Seed Orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and physiological variability among clones of Dalbergia sissoo growing in a CSO revealed maximum height and GBH in Gonda clones (C196 and C198 and minimum growth attributes in Rajasthan clones. All biochemical constituents except sugar were also maximum in Gonda clones. Maximum chl. a, total chl., and chlorofluorescence (CF were recorded in C235 and C123 while chl. b was maximum in C198. Among tested clones, sugar content was maximum in C60 (Chhachhrauli while C198 (Gonda revealed maximum protein content. Heritability estimates of 8 characters at 99% revealed strong genetic control of total chls., sugars, proteins, and chl. b; however, maximum genetic gains of 117% and 80% were recorded for sugar and protein content, respectively. Correlation matrix revealed a positive correlation between height and GBH and CF. Among biochemical constituents, chl. a, and chl. b, chl. b, and total chl. were correlated significantly at 0.1% level. Regarding contribution of different parameters to variability, height and GBH were the greatest contributors. Clustering of clones on the basis of all three parameters separated clones in one major and six minor clusters. Average distance from centroid was found to be 22.61 whereas the maximum distance from centroid was 50.75.

  19. Physiological, structural and molecular traits activated in strawberry plants after inoculation with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense REC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Molina, M F; Lovaisa, N C; Salazar, S M; Martínez-Zamora, M G; Díaz-Ricci, J C; Pedraza, R O

    2015-05-01

    The plant growth-promoting strain REC3 of Azospirillum brasilense, isolated from strawberry roots, prompts growth promotion and systemic protection against anthracnose disease in this crop. Hence, we hypothesised that A. brasilense REC3 can induce different physiological, structural and molecular responses in strawberry plants. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study these traits activated in Azospirillum-colonised strawberry plants, which have not been assessed until now. Healthy, in vitro micropropagated plants were root-inoculated with REC3 under hydroponic conditions; root and leaf tissues were sampled at different times, and oxidative burst, phenolic compound content, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, callose deposition, cell wall fortification and gene expression were evaluated. Azospirillum inoculation enhanced levels of soluble phenolic compounds after 12 h post-inoculation (hpi), while amounts of cell wall bound phenolics were similar in inoculated and control plants. Other early responses activated by REC3 (at 24 hpi) were a decline of lipid peroxidation and up-regulation of strawberry genes involved in defence (FaPR1), bacterial recognition (FaFLS2) and H₂O₂ depuration (FaCAT and FaAPXc). The last may explain the apparent absence of oxidative burst in leaves after bacterial inoculation. Also, REC3 inoculation induced delayed structural responses such as callose deposition and cell wall fortification (at 72 hpi). Results showed that A. brasilense REC3 is capable of exerting beneficial effects on strawberry plants, reinforcing their physiological and cellular characteristics, which in turns contribute to improve plant performance. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Growth Performance and Behaviour in Grouped Pigs Fed Fibrous Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Bakare, A. G.; Madzimure, J.; Ndou, S. P.; Chimonyo, M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of feeding fibrous diets on growth performance and occurrence of aggressive behaviours in growing pigs. Sixty healthy castrated pigs (initial body weight: 46.7±4.35 kg) were used. A basal diet was diluted with maize cobs to two levels (0 and 160 g/kg dry matter). Behavioural activities were observed using video cameras for three weeks, 8 h/d starting at 0800 h. Pigs subjected to control diet gained more weight compared to pigs receiving...

  1. Lepidopteran insect susceptibility to silver nanoparticles and measurement of changes in their growth, development and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasur, Jyothsna; Rani, Pathipati Usha

    2015-04-01

    Increased use of nanomaterials in various fields of science has lead for the need to study the impact of nanomaterial on the environment in general and on insect and plant life in particular. We studied the impact of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on growth and feeding responses of two lepidopteran pests of castor plant (Ricinus communis L.) namely Asian armyworm, Spodoptera litura F. and castor semilooper, Achaea janata L. Larvae were fed with PVP coated-AgNPs treated castor leaf at different concentrations and their activity was compared to that of silver nitrate (AgNO3) treated leaf diets. Larval and pupal body weights decreased along with the decrease in the concentrations of AgNPs and AgNO3 in both the test insects. Low amounts of silver were accumulated in the larval guts, but major portion of it was eliminated through the feces. Ultrastructural studies of insect gut cell using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) showed accumulation of silver nanoparticles in cell organelles. Changes in the antioxidative and detoxifying enzymes of the treated larva were estimated. The effect of treatments showed differences in the activities of detoxifying enzymes, carboxylesterases (CarE), glucosidases (Glu) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) in the larval gut. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase were also altered in the larval bodies due to the AgNPs treatments, suggesting that exposure of larvae to nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, which is countered by antioxidant enzymes. Induction of these enzymes may be an effective detoxification mechanism by which the herbivorous insect defends itself against nanoparticle treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of the length and timing of nighttime naps on task performance and physiological function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidemaro Takeyama

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the length and timing of nighttime naps on performance and physiological functions, an experimental study was carried out under simulated night shift schedules. METHODS: Six students were recruited for this study that was composed of 5 experiments. Each experiment involved 3 consecutive days with one night shift (22:00-8:00 followed by daytime sleep and night sleep. The experiments had 5 conditions in which the length and timing of naps were manipulated: 0:00-1:00 (E60, 0:00-2:00 (E120, 4:00-5:00 (L60, 4:00-6:00 (L120, and no nap (No-nap. During the night shifts, participants underwent performance tests. A questionnaire on subjective fatigue and a critical flicker fusion frequency test were administered after the performance tests. Heart rate variability and rectal temperature were recorded continuously during the experiments. Polysomnography was also recorded during the nap. RESULTS: Sleep latency was shorter and sleep efficiency was higher in the nap in L60 and L120 than that in E60 and E120. Slow wave sleep in the naps in E120 and L120 was longer than that in E60 and L60. The mean reaction time in L60 became longer after the nap, and faster in E60 and E120. Earlier naps serve to counteract the decrement in performance and physiological functions during night shifts. Performance was somewhat improved by taking a 2-hour nap later in the shift, but deteriorated after a one-hour nap. CONCLUSIONS: Naps in the latter half of the night shift were superior to earlier naps in terms of sleep quality. However performance declined after a 1-hour nap taken later in the night shift due to sleep inertia. This study suggests that appropriate timing of a short nap must be carefully considered, such as a 60-min nap during the night shift.OBJETIVO: Para investigar os efeitos da duração e horário de cochilos noturnos sobre o desempenho e as funções fisiológicas foi realizado um estudo experimental por meio do trabalho

  3. Performance of first-year health sciences students in a large, diverse, multidisciplinary, first-semester, physiology service module

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.; Tufts, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Health Science students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal perform better in their professional modules compared with their physiology modules. The pass rates of physiology service modules have steadily declined over the years. While a system is in place to identify “at-risk” students, it is only activated after the first semester. As a result, it is only from the second semester of their first year studies onward that at-risk students can be formally assisted. The challenge is thus to devise...

  4. Temperate heath plant response to dry conditions depends on growth strategy and less on physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Kristian Rost; Kongstad, J.; Schmidt, I. K.

    2012-01-01

    . In combination with dieback of aboveground biomass and reduction of stomatal conductance reduction during dry conditions, the grass continued to have high carbon uptake in the remaining leaves. The dwarf shrub endured the dry conditions by preserving shoot biomass and reducing stomatal conductance. Soil...... of these differences in response in dry versus rewetting conditions can be used to highlight the limitations coherent in different strategies adopted by, for example, evergreen shrubs and grasses. We investigated the leaf-level photosynthetic performance, leaf C, N and d13C along with vegetation cover and biomass...

  5. Physiological integration of parents and ramets of Agave deserti: Carbon relations during vegetative and sexually reproductive growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    Agave deserti is a semelparous perennial occurring in the northwestern Sonoran Desert that flowers after 50-55 years, but propagates primarily vegetatively by ramets. Shading ramets in the field to light compensation for two years did not decrease their relative growth rate compared with unshaded ramets. However, parents experienced a 30% decrease in total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) level, indicating that carbohydrates were translocated from parents to ramets. Parents were also shaded in the field for two years and about 10% of the growth of the shaded parents was attributed to TNC received from their attached, unshaded ramets indicating bidirectional translocation of carbohydrates between parents and ramets. The amount of carbon imported by a ramet from its parent, measured using 14 CO 2 techniques, was related to its photosynthetically active radiation environment, shaded ramets received 2.1 times more carbon than unshaded ramets, and was inversely related to the mass of the ramet, small ramets received up to 4.5 times more carbon than large ramets. The physiological integration of parents and ramets allows ramets to draw upon the reserves of the parent, thereby facilitating ramet growth and establishment in a resource-limited environment. Rosettes of Agave deserti must attain a minimum size (> 1,000 g dry mass) to initiate flowering, unless they are connected to a large flowering parent. Ramets that flower precociously can not complete formation of their inflorescence unless partially supported by carbon supplied by their attached parent. TNC reserves of the parent provided 70% of the carbon required to produce its own inflorescence, typically 4 m tall and 1.5 kg in dry mass, and CO 2 uptake by the leaves and the inflorescence provided the remaining 30%

  6. Calf Compression Sleeves Change Biomechanics but Not Performance and Physiological Responses in Trail Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Kerhervé

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine whether calf compression sleeves (CS affects physiological and biomechanical parameters, exercise performance, and perceived sensations of muscle fatigue, pain and soreness during prolonged (~2 h 30 min outdoor trail running.Methods: Fourteen healthy trained males took part in a randomized, cross-over study consisting in two identical 24-km trail running sessions (each including one bout of running at constant rate on moderately flat terrain, and one period of all-out running on hilly terrain wearing either degressive CS (23 ± 2 mmHg or control sleeves (CON, <4 mmHg. Running time, heart rate and muscle oxygenation of the medial gastrocnemius muscle (measured using portable near-infrared spectroscopy were monitored continuously. Muscle functional capabilities (power, stiffness were determined using 20 s of maximal hopping before and after both sessions. Running biomechanics (kinematics, vertical and leg stiffness were determined at 12 km·h−1 at the beginning, during, and at the end of both sessions. Exercise-induced Achilles tendon pain and delayed onset calf muscles soreness (DOMS were assessed using visual analog scales.Results: Muscle oxygenation increased significantly in CS compared to CON at baseline and immediately after exercise (p < 0.05, without any difference in deoxygenation kinetics during the run, and without any significant change in run times. Wearing CS was associated with (i higher aerial time and leg stiffness in running at constant rate, (ii with lower ground contact time, higher leg stiffness, and higher vertical stiffness in all-out running, and (iii with lower ground contact time in hopping. Significant DOMS were induced in both CS and CON (>6 on a 10-cm scale with no difference between conditions. However, Achilles tendon pain was significantly lower after the trial in CS than CON (p < 0.05.Discussion: Calf compression did not modify muscle oxygenation during ~2 h 30

  7. Physiological, physical and on-ice performance criteria for selection of elite ice hockey teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Roczniok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine physiological and physical determinants of ice-hockey performance in order to assess their impact on the result during a selection for ice hockey. A total of 42 ice hockey players took part in the selection camp. At the end of the camp 20 best players were selected by team of expert coaches to the ice hockey team and created group G1, while the second group (G2 consisted of not selected players (non-successful group Evaluation of goodness of fit of the model to the data was based on the Hosmer Lemeshow test Ice hockey players selected to the team were taller 181.95±4.02 cm, had lower % body fat 13.17±3.17%, a shorter time to peak power 2.47±0.35 s , higher relative peak power 21.34±2.41 W • kg-1 and higher relative total work 305.18±28.41 J • kg-1. The results of the aerobic capacity test showed significant differences only in case of two variables. Ice hockey players in the G1 had higher VO2max 4.07±0.31 l • min-1 values than players in the G2 as well as ice hockey players in G1 showed a higher level of relative VO2max 51.75±2.99 ml • min-1 • kg-1 than athletes in G2. Ice hockey players selected to the team (G1 performed better in the 30 m Forwards Sprint 4.28±0.31 s; 6x9 Turns 12.19±0.75 s; 6x9 stops 12.79±0.49 s and Endurance test (6x30 m stops 32.01±0.80 s than players in G2. The logistic regression model showed that the best predictors of success in the recruitment process of top level ice hockey players were time to peak power, relative peak power, VO2max and 30 m sprint forwards on ice. On the basis of the constructed predictive logistic regression model it will be possible to determine the probability of success of the athletes during following the selection processes to the team.

  8. Effects of meloxicam administration on physiological and performance responses of transported feeder cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnieri Filho, T A; Cooke, R F; Cappellozza, B I; Reis, M M; Marques, R S; Bohnert, D W

    2014-09-01

    This experiment evaluated the effects of meloxicam administration on physiological and performance responses of transported cattle during feedlot receiving. Eighty-four Angus × Hereford steers were ranked by BW on d -10 and assigned to 21 dry lot pens. From d -10 to 0, pens were fed alfalfa-grass hay ad libitum and 2.4 kg/steer daily (DM basis) of a corn-based concentrate. On d 0, pens were randomly assigned to 1) transport for 1,440 km in a livestock trailer and oral administration of meloxicam (1 mg/kg of BW) at loading (d 0), unloading (d 1), and daily from d 2 to 7 of feedlot receiving (MEL; n = 7); 2) the same transportation and treatment schedule of MEL but oral administration of lactose monohydrate (1 mg/kg of BW) instead of meloxicam (TRANS; n = 7); or 3) no transport and oral administration of lactose monohydrate (1 mg/kg of BW) concurrently with treatment administration to MEL and TRANS (CON; n = 7). Upon arrival (d 1), MEL and TRANS steers returned to their pens for a 21-d feedlot receiving with the same diet offered from d -10 to 0. Treatments were administered to steers via oral drench on d 0 and 1 or mixed daily with the concentrate from d 2 to 7. Full BW was recorded before (d -2, -1, and 0) treatment application and at the end of experiment (d 20, 21, and 22) for ADG calculation. Daily DMI was recorded from d 1 to 21. Blood samples were collected on d 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 21. During the initial 7 d of feedlot receiving, hay and total DMI were reduced (P ≤ 0.03) in TRANS vs. CON and MEL and similar between CON and MEL (P ≥ 0.26), whereas concentrate DMI did not differ (P = 0.16) among treatments. Mean ADG was reduced (P ≤ 0.03) in TRANS vs. MEL and CON but similar (P = 0.82) between MEL and CON. Moreover, TRANS had reduced G:F vs. CON (P = 0.01) and MEL (P = 0.05), whereas G:F was similar (P = 0.39) between CON and MEL. Serum NEFA concentrations were greater (P meloxicam administration to feeder steers modulated the haptoglobin and

  9. Physiological and genetic characterization of plant growth and gravitropism in LED light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitzer, Gerald F.

    1994-01-01

    Among the many problems of growing plants in completely controlled environments, such as those anticipated for the space station and the CELSS program, is the need to provide light that is both adequate for photosynthesis and of proper quality for normal growth and development. NASA scientists and engineers have recently become interested in the possibility of utilizing densely packed, solid state, light emitting diodes (LED's) as a source for this light. Unlike more conventional incandescent or electrical discharge lamps, these sources are highly monochromatic and lack energy in spectral regions thought to be important for normal plant development. In addition, a recent observation by NASA scientist has suggested that infra-red LED's, that are routinely used as photographic safelights for plants grown in darkness, may interact with the ability of plants to detect gravity. In order to establish how plants respond to light from these LED light sources we carried out a series of experiments with known pigment mutants of the model mustard plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, growing in either a gravity field or on a clinostat to simulate a micro-gravity environment. Results indicate that only red light from the 665 nm LED's disrupts the ability of normal wildtype seedlings to detect a gravity stimulus. There was no consistent effect found for the far-red (735 nm) LED's or either of the infrared (880 nm or 935 nm) LED sources but both showed some effect in one or more of the genotypes tested. Of these five members of the phytochrome multigene family in Arabidopsis, only the phytochrome B pigment mutant (hy3) lacked the ability to detect gravity under all conditions. There was no effect of either micro-gravity (clinostat) or the infra-red LED's on the light induced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Measurements of the pigment phytochrome in oats also showed no photoconversion by 15 min irradiations with the infra-red LED's. We conclude that phytochrome B is required for the

  10. Passive Recovery Promotes Superior Performance and Reduced Physiological Stress Across Different Phases of Short-Distance Repeated Sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Madueno, Maria C

    2016-09-01

    Scanlan, AT and Madueno, MC. Passive recovery promotes superior performance and reduced physiological stress across different phases of short-distance repeated sprints. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2540-2549, 2016-Limited research has examined the influence of recovery modalities on run-based repeated-sprint (RS) performance with no data available relative to the sprint phase. This study compared run-based RS performance across various sprint phases and underlying physiological responses between active and passive recoveries. Nine students (21.8 ± 3.6 years; 171.3 ± 6.4 cm; 72.8 ± 12.2 kg) completed 2 bouts (active and passive recoveries) of 10 × 20 m sprints interspersed with 30 s recoveries in a randomized crossover fashion. Sprint times and decrements were calculated for each split (0-5, 5-15, 15-20, and 0-20 m) across each sprint. Blood lactate concentration ([BLa]), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at various time-points. Passive recovery promoted improved performance times (p ≤ 0.005) and decrements (p ≤ 0.045) across all splits, and lower post-test [BLa] (p ≤ 0.005), HR (bout 3 onwards) (p ≤ 0.014), and RPE (bout 4 onwards) when compared with active recovery. Performance differences between recoveries were less pronounced across the 0-5 m split. Temporal analyses showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) increases in sprint times and decrements primarily with active recovery. The present data indicate that passive recovery promoted superior performance across run-based RS, with earlier performance deterioration and greater physiological load evident during active recovery. These findings can aid the manipulation of interbout activity across RS drills to promote physiological overload and adaptation during training. Further, coaches may develop tactical strategies to overcome the detrimental effects of active recovery and optimize sprint performance in athletes during game-play.

  11. Growth performance and behaviour in grouped pigs fed fibrous diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakare, A G; Madzimure, J; Ndou, S P; Chimonyo, M

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of feeding fibrous diets on growth performance and occurrence of aggressive behaviours in growing pigs. Sixty healthy castrated pigs (initial body weight: 46.7±4.35 kg) were used. A basal diet was diluted with maize cobs to two levels (0 and 160 g/kg dry matter). Behavioural activities were observed using video cameras for three weeks, 8 h/d starting at 0800 h. Pigs subjected to control diet gained more weight compared to pigs receiving fibrous diet in week 1 (0.47 vs 0.15 kg, respectively) and 2 (1.37 vs 1.04, respectively) (pdiet in the third week. Pigs on high fibrous spent more time eating, lying down, standing, walking and fighting (pdiet. Time spent eating increased as the weeks progressed whilst time spent lying down decreased. Time of day had an effect on time spent on different behavioural activities exhibited by all pigs on different treatment diet (pdiet had more skin lesions in all body regions compared to pigs on control diet (pdiet with maize cobs did not affect growth performance and also did not reduce aggressive behaviours. Aggressive behaviours emanated out of frustration when queuing on the feeder. The findings of this study suggest that maize cobs can be included at a level of 160 g/kg in diets of pigs. However, to reduce the level of aggression more feeding space should be provided.

  12. Physiological and biochemical characterization of the assai palm (Euterpe oleracea Mart. during seed germination and seedling growth under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco de Carvalho Gonçalves

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and biochemical aspects of assai palm during seed germination and early seedling growth were investigated. Seeds collected from plants growing in flooded and upland forests were used to determine the influence of normoxic (aerobic and anoxic (anaerobic conditions in germination and the initial and average time of development in the roots and shoots. After 75 days, seedlings germinated under normoxia were transferred to trays and submitted to flooding. Seed reserves (lipids, proteins, soluble sugars and starch were monitored for quiescent and germinated seeds maintained under normoxic and anoxic conditions, as well as after 5, 10 and 20 days of seedling growth. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH activity was quantified in roots and leaves of seedlings without or with flooding (partial and total. Seeds were not able to germinate under anoxia. Different strategies of storage mobilization of lipids, proteins, soluble sugars and starch were observed in seeds of each environment. ADH activity was induced by anoxia, with the highest level observed in the leaves. This study showed that, under normoxic conditions, the best developmental performance of assai palm seeds, from flooded or upland forest areas, during germination was associated with primary metabolites mobilization and seedling flooding tolerance with increased ADH activity. We conclude that the assai palm is well adapted to the anoxic conditions provoked by flooding.

  13. Human Performance: More Psychological and Physiological Sex Differences (A Selected Bibliography),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    34 Sissy Stuff": The Stigma of Anything Vaguely Feminine. 49. The Politics of Vulnerability, Warren Farrell. 51. The Inexpressive Male: A Tragedy of American...B., Yousef, M. K., & Nelson, J. D. Responses of men and women to two-hour walks in desert heat. Journal of Applied Physiology, 1973, 35, 231-235. 23...Physiology, 1977, 37, 83-92. 24. Falls, H. B., & Humphrey, L. D. Energy cost of running and walking in young women. Medicine and Science in Sports, 1976, 8, 9

  14. The role of anthropometric, growth and maturity index (AGaMI) influencing youth soccer relative performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisyri Husin Musawi Maliki, Ahmad; Razali Abdullah, Mohamad; Juahir, Hafizan; Muhamad, Wan Siti Amalina Wan; Afiqah Mohamad Nasir, Nur; Muazu Musa, Rabiu; Musliha Mat-Rasid, Siti; Adnan, Aleesha; Azura Kosni, Norlaila; Abdullah, Farhana; Ain Shahirah Abdullah, Nurul

    2018-04-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop Anthropometric, Growth and Maturity Index (AGaMI) in soccer and explore its differences to soccer player physical attributes, fitness, motivation and skills. A total 223 adolescent soccer athletes aged 12 to 18 years old were selected as respondent. AGaMI was develop based on anthropometric components (bicep, tricep, subscapular, suprailiac, calf circumference and muac) with growth and maturity component using tanner scale. Meanwhile, relative performance namely physical, fitness, motivation and skills attributes of soccer were measured as dependent variables. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) are used to achieve the objective in this study. AGaMI had categorized players into three different groups namely; high (5 players), moderate (88 players) and low (91 players). PCA revealed a moderate to very strong dominant range of 0.69 to 0.90 of factor loading on AGaMI. Further analysis assigned AGaMI groups as treated as independent variables (IV) and physical, fitness, motivation and skills attributes were treated as dependent variables (DV). Finally, ANOVA showed that flexibility, leg power, age, weight, height, sitting height, short and long pass are the most significant parameters statistically differentiate by the groups of AGaMI (p<0.05). As a summary, body fat mass, growth and maturity are an essential component differentiating the output of the soccer players relative performance. In future, information of the AGaMI model are useful to the coach and players for identifying the suitable biological and physiological demand reflects more comprehensive means of youth soccer relative performance. This study further highlights the importance of assessing AGaMI when identifying soccer relative performance.

  15. Malathion Administration: Effects on Physiological and Physical Performance in the Heat,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-09

    Institute of Environmental Medicine Natick, MA 01760 Send Proofs To: Ralph Francesconi Heat Research Division US Army Research Institute of Enviromental ...corcerning increased tail-skin heat loss after pesticide administration. However, this observation appears to be of no physiological importance since...alterations subsequent to pesticide exposure. Namba et al. (25) have noted that accidental or deliberate ingestion of pesticides can elicit circulatory

  16. Lectures Replaced by Prescribed Reading with Frequent Assessment: Enhanced Student Performance in Animal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevins, Peter F. D.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a study of the effects of partial replacement of lectures with a system of prescribed reading, supported by weekly objective testing in a second year animal physiology module. Formative tests with feedback within 24 hours were followed a week later with summative tests on the same material, utilising a proportion of the same…

  17. Effects of diet energy concentration and an exogenous carbohydrase on growth performance of weanling pigs fed diets containing canola meal produced from high protein or conventional canola seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Trine Friis; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives were to determine effects of diet NE and an exogenous carbohydrase on growth performance and physiological parameters of weanling pigs fed a corn-soybean meal (SBM) diet or diets containing high protein canola meal (CM-HP) or conventional canola meal (CM-CV). A total of 492 pigs...

  18. The effect of lichen-dominated biological soil crusts on growth and physiological characteristics of three plant species in a temperate desert of northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, W W; Serpe, M; Zhang, Y M

    2015-11-01

    Biocrusts (biological soil crusts) cover open spaces between vascular plants in most arid and semi-arid areas. Information on effects of biocrusts on seedling growth is controversial, and there is little information on their effects on plant growth and physiology. We examined impacts of biocrusts on growth and physiological characteristics of three habitat-typical plants, Erodium oxyrhynchum, Alyssum linifolium and Hyalea pulchella, growing in the Gurbantunggut Desert, northwest China. The influence of biocrusts on plant biomass, leaf area, leaf relative water content, photosynthesis, maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), chlorophyll, osmotic solutes (soluble sugars, protein, proline) and antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase) was investigated on sites with or without biocrust cover. Biomass, leaf area, leaf water content, photosynthesis, F(v)/F(m) and chlorophyll content in crusted soils were higher than in uncrusted soils during early growth and lower later in the growth period. Soluble sugars, proline and antioxidant enzyme activity were always higher in crusted than in uncrusted soils, while soluble protein content was always lower. These findings indicate that biocrusts have different effects on these three ephemeral species during growth in this desert, primarily via effects on soil moisture, and possibly on soil nutrients. The influence of biocrusts changes during plant development: in early plant growth, biocrusts had either positive or no effect on growth and physiological parameters. However, biocrusts tended to negatively influence plants during later growth. Our results provide insights to explain why previous studies have found different effects of biocrusts on vascular plant growth. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Elevated CO2, warmer temperatures and soil water deficit affect plant growth, physiology and water use of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes in temperature, atmospheric [CO2] and precipitation under the scenarios of projected climate change present a challenge to crop production, and may have significant impacts on the physiology, growth and yield of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). A glasshouse experiment explored the early growt...

  20. Hospitals with greater diversities of physiologically complex procedures do not achieve greater surgical growth in a market with stable numbers of such procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Epstein, Richard H; Lubarsky, David A

    2018-01-30

    Although having a large diversity of types of procedures has a substantial operational impact on the surgical suites of hospitals, the strategic importance is unknown. In the current study, we used longitudinal data for all hospitals and patient ages in the State of Florida to evaluate whether hospitals with greater diversity of types of physiologically complex major therapeutic procedures (PCMTP) also had greater rates of surgical growth. Observational cohort study. 1479 combinations of hospitals in the State of Florida and fiscal years, 2008-2015. The types of International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) procedures studied were PCMT, defined as: a) major therapeutic procedure; b) >7 American Society of Anesthesiologists base units; and c) performed during a hospitalization with a Diagnosis Related Group with a mean length of stay ≥4.0days. The number of procedures of each type of PCMTP commonly performed at each hospital was calculated by taking 1/Herfindahl index (i.e., sum of the squares of the proportions of all procedures of each type of PCMTP). Over the 8 successive years studied, there was no change in the number of PCMTP being performed (Kendall's τ b =-0.014±0.017 [standard error], P=0.44; N=1479 hospital×years). Busier and larger hospitals commonly performed more types of PCMTP, respectively categorized based on performed PCMTP (τ=0.606±0.017, Pmarket, the unique contributions of each large teaching hospital performing many different types of PCMTP needs to be considered relative to the combined capabilities of other hospitals in its region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparative study of students' performance in preclinical physiology assessed by multiple choice and short essay questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyebola, D D; Adewoye, O E; Iyaniwura, J O; Alada, A R; Fasanmade, A A; Raji, Y

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the performance of medical students in physiology when assessed by multiple choice questions (MCQs) and short essay questions (SEQs). The study also examined the influence of factors such as age, sex, O/level grades and JAMB scores on performance in the MCQs and SEQs. A structured questionnaire was administered to 264 medical students' four months before the Part I MBBS examination. Apart from personal data of each student, the questionnaire sought information on the JAMB scores and GCE O' Level grades of each student in English Language, Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics. The physiology syllabus was divided into five parts and the students were administered separate examinations (tests) on each part. Each test consisted of MCQs and SEQs. The performance in MCQs and SEQs were compared. Also, the effects of JAMB scores and GCE O/level grades on the performance in both the MCQs and SEQs were assessed. The results showed that the students performed better in all MCQ tests than in the SEQs. JAMB scores and O' level English Language grade had no significant effect on students' performance in MCQs and SEQs. However O' level grades in Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics had significant effects on performance in MCQs and SEQs. Inadequate knowledge of physiology and inability to present information in a logical sequence are believed to be major factors contributing to the poorer performance in the SEQs compared with MCQs. In view of the finding of significant association between performance in MCQs and SEQs and GCE O/level grades in science subjects and mathematics, it was recommended that both JAMB results and the GCE results in the four O/level subjects above may be considered when selecting candidates for admission into the medical schools.

  2. Effects of music tempo on performance, psychological, and physiological variables during 20 km cycling in well-trained cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have investigated the effects of music on trained athletes during high intensity endurance tasks. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of different music tempi on performance, psychological, and physiological responses of well-trained cyclists to time trial cycling. 10 male road cyclists (M age = 35 yr., SD = 7), with a minimum of three years racing experience, performed four 20-km time trials on a Computrainer Pro 3D indoor cycle trainer over a period of four weeks. The time-trials were spaced one week apart. The music conditions for each trial were randomised between fast-tempo (140 bpm), medium-tempo (120 bpm), slow-tempo (100 bpm), and no music. Performance (completion time, power output, average speed and cadence), physiological (heart rate, oxygen consumption, breathing frequency and respiratory exchange ratio), psychophysical (RPE), and psychological (mood states) data were collected for each trial. Results indicated no significant changes in performance, physiological, or psychophysical variables. Total mood disturbance and tension increased significantly in the fast-tempo trial when compared with medium and no-music conditions.

  3. The Impact of Heat Exposure and Sleep Restriction on Firefighters’ Work Performance and Physiology during Simulated Wildfire Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E. Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the effects of ambient heat on firefighters’ physical task performance, and physiological and perceptual responses when sleep restricted during simulated wildfire conditions. Thirty firefighters were randomly allocated to the sleep restricted (n = 17, SR; 19 °C, 4-h sleep opportunity or hot and sleep restricted (n = 13, HOT + SR; 33 °C, 4-h sleep opportunity condition. Firefighters performed two days of simulated, intermittent, self-paced work circuits comprising six firefighting tasks. Heart rate, and core temperature were measured continuously. After each task, firefighters reported their rating of perceived exertion and thermal sensation. Effort sensation was also reported after each work circuit. Fluids were consumed ad libitum. Urine volume and urine specific gravity were analysed. Sleep was monitored using polysomnography. There were no differences between the SR and HOT + SR groups in firefighters’ physiological responses, hydration status, ratings of perceived exertion, motivation, and four of the six firefighting tasks (charged hose advance, rake, hose rolling, static hose hold. Black out hose and lateral repositioning were adversely affected in the HOT + SR group. Working in hot conditions did not appear to consistently impair firefighters work performance, physiology, and perceptual responses. Future research should determine whether such findings remain true when individual tasks are performed over longer durations.

  4. Dynamics of seed germination, seedling growth and physiological responses of sweet corn under peg-induced water stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.; Zhang, X.; Li, G.; Suo, H.; Ashraf, U.; Mo, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Stress induced variations in seed germination of various crops has been well reported but germination potential of sweet corn seeds under osmotic stress with relation to time dynamics is still elusive. Present study explored the water absorption, germination potential and physiological indices and of sweet corn seeds exposed to five different levels of PEG-induced water stress i.e., 0, -0.3, -0.6, -0.9 and -1.2 M Pa water potential (Psi /sub w/) with respect to time dynamics. Results showed that enhanced water stress for prolonged time period (96 h) led to substantial reduction in water absorption and seed moisture contents, seed germination and vigor index as well as seedlings growth and fresh and dry biomass. Osmotic stress triggered antioxidant defense system like super-oxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) and accumulation of soluble sugars, proline and protein contents considerably. Initially, activities of SOD and CAT were higher but then reduced as stress persisted, however, POD showed a linear increase with respect to stress exposure time. Water stress also increased MDA contents up to 36 h then declined. Further, alpha-amylase activity and soluble protein showed significant correlations with maize seed germination. Overall, germination potential decreased with increase in osmotic stress in sweet corn seeds. (author)

  5. Effect of Different Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth and Physiology of Maize at Ambient and Low Temperature Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of four different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the growth and lipid peroxidation, soluble sugar, proline contents, and antioxidant enzymes activities of Zea mays L. was studied in pot culture subjected to two temperature regimes. Maize plants were grown in pots filled with a mixture of sandy and black soil for 5 weeks, and then half of the plants were exposed to low temperature for 1 week while the rest of the plants were grown under ambient temperature and severed as control. Different AMF resulted in different root colonization and low temperature significantly decreased AM colonization. Low temperature remarkably decreased plant height and total dry weight but increased root dry weight and root-shoot ratio. The AM plants had higher proline content compared with the non-AM plants. The maize plants inoculated with Glomus etunicatum and G. intraradices had higher malondialdehyde and soluble sugar contents under low temperature condition. The activities of catalase (CAT and peroxidase of AM inoculated maize were higher than those of non-AM ones. Low temperature noticeably decreased the activities of CAT. The results suggest that low temperature adversely affects maize physiology and AM symbiosis can improve maize seedlings tolerance to low temperature stress.

  6. Effect of silicon application on physiological characteristics and growth of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under drought stress condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karmollachaab

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of silicon application on some physiological characteristics and growth of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under late drought stress condition, an experiment was conducted at the Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Ramin, Khuzestan during year 2012. The experiment was conducted in the open environment as factorial randomized complete block design with three levels of drought stress (irrigation after 25, 50 and 75% depletion of available water content as the first factor and four levels of silicon (0, 10, 20 and 30 mg Si.kg-1 soil as the second factor with three replications. The results showed that drought stress imposed a negative significant effect on all traits. The drought stress led to increased electrolyte leakage and proline content, cuticular wax, leaf silicon concentration, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD and grain potassium were decreased. The severe drought stress has most effect on electrolyte leakage (up to 53%. The application of silicon except the shoot/root parameter, on all characters have been affected so that application of 30 mg Si.kg-1 soil led to decrease electrolyte leakage up to 22.5% and increased SOD activity, proline content, cuticular wax grain K and flag leaf Si concentration, 25, 12.8, 21, 17 and 30% compared to control, respectively. In general, the results showed a positive effect of silicon on wheat plant under stress conditions that were higher than no stress condition.

  7. INVESTMENT FUNDS’ PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolzan Carmen Maria

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine the performance of investment funds during the period 2006-2010, intending to comprise the portfolio performance’s dynamics before, during and after the present economic and financial crises climax. We categorize investment funds according to their investment strategy and geographical focus and distinguish a number of 11 classes. In order to analyze their returns’ dynamics, we create a fund performance index for each category using principal components method. The instability created in financial system in 2007 had a direct impact on institutional investors’ portfolios regardless of investment strategy, effects that have rapidly propagated on real economy. Analyzing index’s dynamics correlated with economic growth we conclude that financial and economic environment react in the same direction, but with a certain time delay, to instability factors. We also underline the major impact of boom and bust evolution of financial markets on real economy, cause of the current economic and financial crises.

  8. Improving growth performance in calves under hot weather conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emara, S.S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objectives of the present study were to evaluate the effect of some supplement such as dried live yeast DLY (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), DLY + vitamin E and / or dried whey milk (DWM) on blood constituents and thyroid activity in relation to some immune indices and growth performance of calves under hot weather conditions. The ambient temperature and relative humidity averaged 36.9±4 degree C and 43-58 % during day and 29±4 degree C and 60-68 % during night, respectively, which were equivalent to temperature humidity index of 86-89 during day and 78-80 during night . The present study included three experiments as follows. Experiment 1 : Six female bovine Baladi calves of 8-10 months old and 100 kg initial body weight (IBW) were used during two periods. In the first period, the calves were offered the basal diet for one month and considered as a control period. In the second period, the same calves were fed the same basal diet which supplemented with 15 g / calf/ day DLY for one month and considered as treated period. The obtained results indicated that supplementation of DLY reduced significantly the respiration rate (RR) and rectal temperature (RT) as well as serum lipids profile including total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL- cholesterol) very low density lipoprotein (VLDL-cholesterol) triglycerides and phospholipids.The second and third experiments were carried out for improving growth performance of heat-stressed bovine baladi calves by adding DLY and vitamine E (alpha-tocopherol) to their diet in experiment 2 and dried whey milk (DWM) in experiment 3.

  9. A review of human physiological and performance changes associated with desynchronosis of biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, C. M.; Deroshia, C. W.; Markley, C. L.; Holley, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    This review discusses the effects, in the aerospace environment, of alterations in approximately 24-h periodicities (circadian rhythms) upon physiological and psychological functions and possible therapies for desynchronosis induced by such alterations. The consequences of circadian rhythm alteration resulting from shift work, transmeridian flight, or altered day lengths are known as desynchronosis, dysrhythmia, dyschrony, jet lag, or jet syndrome. Considerable attention is focused on the ability to operate jet aircraft and manned space vehicles. The importance of environmental cues, such as light-dark cycles, which influence physiological and psychological rhythms is discussed. A section on mathematical models is presented to enable selection and verification of appropriate preventive and corrective measures and to better understand the problem of dysrhythmia.

  10. Physiological and Agronomic Performance of the Coffee Crop in the Context of Climate Change and Global Warming: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaMatta, Fábio M; Avila, Rodrigo T; Cardoso, Amanda A; Martins, Samuel C V; Ramalho, José C

    2018-03-15

    Coffee is one of the most important global crops and provides a livelihood to millions of people living in developing countries. Coffee species have been described as being highly sensitive to climate change, as largely deduced from modeling studies based on predictions of rising temperatures and changing rainfall patterns. Here, we discuss the physiological responses of the coffee tree in the context of present and ongoing climate changes, including drought, heat, and light stresses, and interactions between these factors. We also summarize recent insights on the physiological and agronomic performance of coffee at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations and highlight the key role of CO 2 in mitigating the harmful effects of heat stress. Evidence is shown suggesting that warming, per se, may be less harmful to coffee suitability than previously estimated, at least under the conditions of an adequate water supply. Finally, we discuss several mitigation strategies to improve crop performance in a changing world.

  11. Bacterial Growth Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Mette

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) mediates the translation of the code, transiently stored in the messenger RNA (mRNA), to the final protein. The entity of tRNA has for decades been assumed to be stable for hours in any circumstance, but my supervisor Michael A. Sørensen noticed during his work with charging l...

  12. Differences in Physical, Physiological and Motor Performance Traits between Volleyball and Basketball Athletes in a University in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obour, A; Moses, M O; Baffour-Awuah, B; Asamoah, B; Sarpong, P K; Osei, F; Akwa, L G; Appiah, E J

    2017-06-30

    Physical, physiological and motor performance traits play substantial role in both volleyball (VB) and basketball(BB) competitions. The differences in these traits among University athletes in Ghana have not been reported. Hence, thisstudy documents and compares the physical, physiological and motor performance traits of VB and BB university athletes.Purposive sampling technique involving thirty-five university athletes (24 males and 11 females) with mean age of 21.77 ±2.03years was used. Height, weightn, waist and hip circumferences, waist to hip ratio (WHR), body mass index (BMI), heartrate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), shoulder muscular endurance (SME), abdominal muscular endurance (AME), left and right Arm Strength, Leg Power, Reaction time, Agility and Speed traits were measured.Descriptive statistics was used while analysis of variable was by paired t-test and significance was at pathletes possess better SBP, SME and reactiontime. Gender influence was significant in height, WHR, HR, SBP, SME, AME, LAS, RAS, speed, reaction time, power andagility. Athletes in both games do not have similar physical, physiological and motor performance traits. Volley Ball playershad better abdominal muscular endurance, right-hand muscular strength, speed, power and agility while BB players hadbetter shoulder muscular endurance and reaction time traits. These differences in traits should inform volleyball andbasketball coaches in their selection.

  13. Effect of various probiotics on growth performance of Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Sirsat

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study the effect of various probiotics on the performance of Japanese Quails. One hundred Japanese quail chicks were weighed individually and they were uniformly distributed equally to four dietary treatments consisting 25 birds in each. The starter and finisher diets were containing ME 2800 and 2600 Kcal/kg and protein 25 and 23 % respectively. The group T0(Controll fed standard quail diet and T1,T2 and T3 were fed probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus sporogenes and Saccharomyces boulardii @ 0.05 % in diet. The study was conducted for six weeks in the same managemental condition. Weekly live body weight and feed consumption were recorded. The group supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in significantly higher growth rate and showed higher weight gain. The average feed efficiency and nitrogen retention were significantly higher in group supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cost of production /100gm of meat was found to be Rs.7.10, 6.84, 7.55 and 8.37 respectively in T0 to T3 groups. Thus, the study indicated that supplementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the diet of Japanese quails was effective in improving performance of the quails. [Vet World 2009; 2(8.000: 321-322

  14. Modeling growth performances, survival, and feed efficiency of four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evolution of growth rate with age was similar in the four groups, but significant differences of growth curve parameters were found among breeds and/or sexes. Estimated hatch weight was lower in C hens and higher in FT hens. Initial specific growth rates and asymptotic body weight were higher in males for all breeds.

  15. Effects of graded noise levels on behavior, physiology and production performance of intensively managed lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Casamassima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to assess the effects of graded noise levels on behavioral, immune and cortisol respons-  es, and on production performance of forty precocious Merino lambs. The experiment lasted 42 days and was preceded  by a two-week adjustment period. The animals were divided into 3 test groups and a control group of 10 each, which  were housed in 12 m2 sound-proof rooms. The lambs in the test groups were exposed to recordings of high-speed motor  vehicle traffic noise for 8 hours a day. The frequency range of the recordings was 100 to 6,300 Hz, while the loudness  levels were different in the three experimental rooms: group A = 95 dB, group B = 85 dB, and group C = 75 dB. During  the same 8 hours the control group was exposed to a background noise of 42-44 dB. For the rest of the day, the ambi-  ent noise level in the animal building was 35-40 dB. Behavioral traits of lambs were recorded at the end of the adjust-  ment period and then at 14d, 28d and 42d of the experiment. At the same intervals, the plasma levels of glucose, total  cholesterol, triglycerides, total proteins, albumins and cortisol were determined. Cell-mediated immune response to phy-  tohemagglutinin (PHA was determined at the beginning and at days 21 and 42 of the trial. Live weights of lambs were  measured at the beginning of the trial and then at two-week intervals during the trial. After slaughtering, the carcass  weights and the dressing percentage were determined. The experimental treatment determined a significant increase in  the walking time (P   42 of the trial in groups A and B. The lambs in the test groups exhibited a slower growth rate (P   mals of the control group, whereas a deterioration of feed efficiency was observed only in group A (P   no differences amongst the groups in terms of cell-mediated immunity and blood metabolites. Results suggest that expo-  sure to noise has a detrimental effect on some biological functions in

  16. Behavioral and physiological correlates of stress related to examination performance in college chemistry students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, M; Koone, T; Mewaldt, S; O'Connor, K

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to assess physiological and behavioral correlates of academic stress during a college course in organic chemistry in the USA. Participants (45 females, 46 males, mean age 19.88 years) were screened for their basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical activity using saliva samples collected at the beginning of the course and after each major test. Displacement activities (DAs) were observed during each test by videotaping students' behavior when they were taking the tests. These variables were then used as predictors of the students' achievement as measured by their grade point average (GPA) scores, American College Testing (ACT) scores, and their final grade in the class. Ninety-one students, enrolled in Organic Chemistry I at Marshall University during the summer of 2009, were recruited for this study. It was found that individual differences in the physiological stress responses are a factor in predicting the students' ability to pass a challenging class. A logistic model built on GPA, DAs during stress, and salivary hormone (cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone) concentrations was able to correctly classify almost 90% of the students passing the class. The same model was not nearly as successful in determining the possible factors behind failing the class, because the classification success was just 52%, a figure close to chance. We conclude that a clear set of characteristics related to the students' ability and resilience to psychological stress are necessary to succeed in a challenging class. The reason behind dropping or failing a class could be less defined. These data indicated that investigating the physiological and behavioral propensities associated with psychological stress can help us better understand an individual's coping responses to a long-term challenging situation.

  17. Performance, health and physiological responses of newly weaned feedlot cattle supplemented with feed-grade antibiotics or alternative feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, K A; Cooke, R F; Schubach, K M; Brandão, A P; Schumaher, T F; Prado, I N; Marques, R S; Bohnert, D W

    2018-03-26

    With increased regulations regarding the use of feed-grade antimicrobials in livestock systems, alternative strategies to enhance growth and immunity of feedlot cattle are warranted. Hence, this experiment compared performance, health and physiological responses of cattle supplemented with feed-grade antibiotics or alternative feed ingredients during the initial 60 days in the feedlot. Angus×Hereford calves (63 steers+42 heifers) originating from two cow-calf ranches were weaned on day -3, obtained from an auction yard on day -2 and road-transported (800 km; 12 h) to the feedlot. Upon arrival on day -1, shrunk BW was recorded. On day 0, calves were ranked by sex, source and shrunk BW, and allocated to one of 21 pens. Pens were assigned to receive (7 pens/treatment) a free-choice total mixed ration containing: (1) lasalocid (360 mg/calf daily of Bovatec; Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ, USA)+chlortetracycline (350 mg/calf of Aureomycin at cycles of 5-day inclusion and 2-day removal from diet; Zoetis) from days 0 to 32, and monensin only (360 mg/calf daily of Rumensin; Elanco Animal Health, Greenfield, IN, USA) from days 33 to 60 (PC), (2) sodium saccharin-based sweetener (Sucram at 0.04 g/kg of diet dry matter; Pancosma SA; Geneva, Switzerland)+plant extracts containing eugenol, cinnamaldehyde and capsicum (800 mg/calf daily of XTRACT Ruminants 7065; Pancosma SA) from days 0 to 32 and XTRACT only (800 mg/calf daily) from days 33 to 60 (EG) or (3) no supplemental ingredients (CON; days 0 to 60). Calves were assessed for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) signs and dry matter intake was recorded from each pen daily. Calves were vaccinated against BRD pathogens on days 0 and 22. Shrunk BW was recorded on day 61, and blood samples collected on days 0, 6, 11, 22, 33, 43 and 60. Calf ADG was greater (P=0.04) in PC v. EG and tended (P=0.09) to be greater in PC v. CON. Feed efficiency also tended (P=0.09) to be greater in PC v. CON, although main treatment effect for this response

  18. Divergence in physiological factors affecting swimming performance between anadromous and resident populations of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespel, A; Dupont-Prinet, A; Bernatchez, L; Claireaux, G; Tremblay, R; Audet, C

    2017-05-01

    In this study, an anadromous strain (L) and a freshwater-resident (R) strain of brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis as well as their reciprocal hybrids, were reared in a common environment and submitted to swimming tests combined with salinity challenges. The critical swimming speeds (U crit ) of the different crosses were measured in both fresh (FW) and salt water (SW) and the variations in several physiological traits (osmotic, energetic and metabolic capacities) that are predicted to influence swimming performance were documented. Anadromous and resident fish reached the same U crit in both FW and SW, with U crit being 14% lower in SW compared with FW. The strains, however, seemed to use different underlying strategies: the anadromous strain relied on its streamlined body shape and higher osmoregulatory capacity, while the resident strain had greater citrate synthase (FW) and lactate dehydrogenase (FW, SW) capacity and either greater initial stores or more efficient use of liver (FW, SW) and muscle (FW) glycogen during exercise. Compared with R ♀ L ♂ hybrids, L ♀ R ♂ hybrids had a 20% lower swimming speed, which was associated with a 24% smaller cardio-somatic index and higher physiological costs. Thus swimming performance depends on cross direction (i.e. which parental line was used as dam or sire). The study thus suggests that divergent physiological factors between anadromous and resident S. fontinalis may result in similar swimming capacities that are adapted to their respective lifestyles. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Iron Deficiency in Seagrasses and Macroalgae in the Red Sea Is Unrelated to Latitude and Physiological Performance

    KAUST Repository

    Anton, Andrea

    2018-03-06

    Iron can limit primary production in shallow marine systems, especially in tropical waters characterized by carbonated sediments, where iron is largely trapped in a non-available form. The Red Sea, an oligotrophic ecosystem characterized by a strong N-S latitudinal nutrient gradient, is a suitable setting to explore patterns in situ of iron limitation in macrophytes and their physiological performance under different iron regimes. We assessed the interactions between environmental gradients and physiological parameters of poorly-studied Red Sea macrophytes. Iron concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, blade thickness, and productivity of 17 species of macrophytes, including seven species of seagrasses and 10 species of macroalgae, were measured at 21 locations, spanning 10 latitude degrees, along the Saudi Arabian coast. Almost 90% of macrophyte species had iron concentrations below the levels indicative of iron sufficiency and more than 40% had critically low iron concentrations, suggesting that iron is a limiting factor of primary production throughout the Red Sea. We did not identify relationships between tissue iron concentration, chlorophyll a concentration and physiological performance of the 17 species of seagrass and macroalgae. There was also no latitudinal pattern in any of the parameters studied, indicating that the South to North oligotrophication of the Red Sea is not reflected in iron concentration, chlorophyll a concentration or productivity of Red Sea macrophytes.

  20. Iron Deficiency in Seagrasses and Macroalgae in the Red Sea Is Unrelated to Latitude and Physiological Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Anton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron can limit primary production in shallow marine systems, especially in tropical waters characterized by carbonated sediments, where iron is largely trapped in a non-available form. The Red Sea, an oligotrophic ecosystem characterized by a strong N-S latitudinal nutrient gradient, is a suitable setting to explore patterns in situ of iron limitation in macrophytes and their physiological performance under different iron regimes. We assessed the interactions between environmental gradients and physiological parameters of poorly-studied Red Sea macrophytes. Iron concentration, chlorophyll a concentration, blade thickness, and productivity of 17 species of macrophytes, including seven species of seagrasses and 10 species of macroalgae, were measured at 21 locations, spanning 10 latitude degrees, along the Saudi Arabian coast. Almost 90% of macrophyte species had iron concentrations below the levels indicative of iron sufficiency and more than 40% had critically low iron concentrations, suggesting that iron is a limiting factor of primary production throughout the Red Sea. We did not identify relationships between tissue iron concentration, chlorophyll a concentration and physiological performance of the 17 species of seagrass and macroalgae. There was also no latitudinal pattern in any of the parameters studied, indicating that the South to North oligotrophication of the Red Sea is not reflected in iron concentration, chlorophyll a concentration or productivity of Red Sea macrophytes.

  1. Growth Performance and Behaviour in Grouped Pigs Fed Fibrous Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Bakare

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of feeding fibrous diets on growth performance and occurrence of aggressive behaviours in growing pigs. Sixty healthy castrated pigs (initial body weight: 46.7±4.35 kg were used. A basal diet was diluted with maize cobs to two levels (0 and 160 g/kg dry matter. Behavioural activities were observed using video cameras for three weeks, 8 h/d starting at 0800 h. Pigs subjected to control diet gained more weight compared to pigs receiving fibrous diet in week 1 (0.47 vs 0.15 kg, respectively and 2 (1.37 vs 1.04, respectively (p<0.05. Average daily gain was not affected by treatment diet in the third week. Pigs on high fibrous spent more time eating, lying down, standing, walking and fighting (p<0.05 compared to pigs on control diet. Time spent eating increased as the weeks progressed whilst time spent lying down decreased. Time of day had an effect on time spent on different behavioural activities exhibited by all pigs on different treatment diet (p<0.05. Inactivity was greatest in 5th (1200 to 1300 h hour of the day for all the pigs on different dietary treatments. Skin lesions appeared the most on neck and shoulder region followed by chest, stomach and hind leg region, and finally head region (p<0.05. Pigs on high fibre diet had more skin lesions in all body regions compared to pigs on control diet (p<0.05. It can be concluded that the high fibrous diet with maize cobs did not affect growth performance and also did not reduce aggressive behaviours. Aggressive behaviours emanated out of frustration when queuing on the feeder. The findings of this study suggest that maize cobs can be included at a level of 160 g/kg in diets of pigs. However, to reduce the level of aggression more feeding space should be provided.

  2. Application of the Copenhagen Soccer Test in high-level women players - locomotor activities, physiological response and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Pettersen, Svein Arne; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Randers, Morten B; Brito, João; Mohr, Magni; Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the physiological response, sprint performance and technical ability in various phases of the Copenhagen Soccer Test for Women (CSTw) and investigated whether the locomotor activities of the CSTw were comparable to competitive match-play (CM). Physiological measurements and physical/technical assessments were performed during CSTw for eleven Norwegian high-level women soccer players. The activity pattern during CSTw and CM was monitored using the ZXY tracking system. No differences were observed between CSTw and CM with regards to total distance covered (10093±94 and 9674±191m), high intensity running (1278±67 and 1193±115m) or sprinting (422±55 and 372±46m) (p>.05). During CSTw, average HR was 85±2%HRmax with 35±2% playing time >90%HRmax. Blood lactate increased (p<.05) from 1.4±0.3mM at rest to an average of 4.7±0.5mM during CSTw, with no changes during the test. Blood glucose was 5.4±0.3mM at rest and remained unaltered during CSTw. Sprint performance (2×20m) decreased (p<.05) by 3% during CSTw (8.19±0.06-8.47±0.10s). In conclusion, the locomotor activities during CSTw were comparable to that of high-level competitive match-play. The physiological demands of the CSTw were high, with no changes in heart rate, blood lactate or technical performance during the test, but a lowered sprint performance towards the end of the test. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Physiologic performance of oats seeds treated with tiametoxamDesempenho fisiológico de sementes de aveia-preta tratadas com tiametoxam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Regina Lauxen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The bioactivator are complex organic substances that can alter the growth, capable of acting on the transcription of DNA into the plant, gene expression, cell membrane proteins, metabolic enzymes and mineral nutrition. The insecticide thiamethoxam has demonstrated positive effects as increased expression of vigor and biomass formation, the elevation of photosynthetic rate and the formation of deeper roots. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiologic performance of tiamethoxan on the oat. Were used oat seeds and product concentrations 0.0, 100, 200, 300, 400ml. to 100 kg of seeds. To evaluate the physiological quality of seeds were carried by germination test, first germination, cold test, seedling length, shtoot and root, tetrazolium test and emergency in the greenhouse. The product tiamethoxan stimulates physiologic performance of oat seeds. The use of the 300 ml of tiametoxam per 100kg, seeds shown to be more efficient to improve the physiological performance of seed oat. Os bioativadores são substâncias orgânicas complexas, modificadoras do crescimento, capazes de atuar na transcrição do DNA na planta, na expressão gênica, em proteínas da membrana celular e enzimas metabólicas e na nutrição mineral. O inseticida tiametoxam tem demonstrado efeitos positivos como o aumento da expressão do vigor e do acúmulo de fitomassa, a elevação da taxa fotossintética e a formação de raízes mais profundas. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência do tiametoxan no desempenho fisiológico de sementes de aveia-preta. Foram utilizadas, para tratamento das sementes de aveia-preta, concentrações do produto de 0,0, 100, 200, 300, 400 mL para 100 kg de sementes. Para avaliação da qualidade fisiológica das sementes foram conduzidos os testes de germinação, primeira contagem de germinação, de frio, comprimento de plântula, aéreo e radicular, tetrazólio e emergência de plântulas em casa de vegetação. O produto

  4. Physiological performance, secondary metabolite and expression profiling of genes associated with drought tolerance in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Singh, Ruchi; Mishra, Anand; Dhawan, Sunita S; Shirke, Pramod A; Gupta, Madan M; Sharma, Ashok

    2015-11-01

    Physiological, biochemical, and gene expression responses under drought stress were studied in Withania somnifera. Photosynthesis rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, relative water content, chlorophyll content, and quantum yield of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) decreased in response to drought stress. Comparative expression of genes involved in osmoregulation, detoxification, signal transduction, metabolism, and transcription factor was analyzed through quantitative RT-PCR. The genes encoding 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CS), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), serine threonine-protein kinase (STK), serine threonine protein phosphatase (PSP), aldehyde dehydrogenase (AD), leucoanthocyanidin dioxygenase/anthocyanin synthase (LD/AS), HSP, MYB, and WRKY have shown upregulation in response to drought stress condition in leaf tissues. Enhanced detoxification and osmoregulation along with increased withanolides production were also observed under drought stress. The results of this study will be helpful in developing stress-tolerant and high secondary metabolite yielding genotypes.

  5. Physical attributes, physiological characteristics, on-court performances and nutritional strategies of female and male basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Gal; Lidor, Ronnie

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews a series of studies (n = 51) examining physical attributes, physiological characteristics, on-court performances and nutritional strategies of female and male elite basketball players. These studies included relevant information on physical and physiological variables, such as height, weight, somatotype, relative size, aerobic profile, strength, anaerobic power, agility and speed. Six main findings emerged from our review: (i) differences in physical attributes exist among playing positions and skill levels (e.g. guards tend to be lighter, shorter and more mesomorphic than centres); (ii) maximum aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) values of female and male players are 44.0-54.0 and 50-60 mLO(2)/kg/min, respectively; (iii) male and female players of higher skill levels tend to have higher vertical jump values; (iv) the more skilled female and male players are faster and more agile than the less skilled players; (v) guards tend to perform more high-intensity movements during game play compared with forwards and centres; and (vi) a water deficit of 2% of bodyweight can lead to reduced physical and mental performance during an actual game. Five limitations associated with the testing protocols used in the studies are outlined, among them the lack of a longitudinal approach, lack of tests performed under physical exertion conditions, and lack of studies using a time-motion analysis. In addition, three practical recommendations for the basketball coach and the strength and conditioning coach are presented. It is concluded that the data emerging from these studies, combined with the knowledge already obtained from the studies on physical and physiological characteristics of elite basketball players, should be applied by basketball and strength and conditioning coaches when planning training programmes for elite basketball players.

  6. The effect of morphological characteristics on the physical and physiological performance of Turkish soccer referees and assistant referees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozdoğan Tuba Kızılet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical fitness and physiological status play an important role in the referees’ performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the body structure and morphological characteristics of Turkish Ssccer refereesand assistant referees and to determine the effect of these variables on physical performance. A sample of 158 male referees and 55 asisstant referees (mean age 31.8 ± 4.2 and 37.4 ± 3.3 yearswas evaluated. Physical assesment were conducted using the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 (YYIRTL1 and Repeated Sprint Ability (RSA for referees and Active Recovery Intermittent Endurance Test (ARIET and the RSA for assistant referees. We analyzed heart rate assesments. The measures used to assess morphological characteristics were age, weight, body mass index (BMI, body fat (BF, body mass, and fat free mass.The ANOVA test (Tukey testwas used to determine the result. Correlations between the referees’ fitness test performance and their morphological characteristics were examined using Pearson’s correlation (p<0.05. To result of this study, point to the existence of a strong correlation between morphological and physical and physiological characteristics. According to the literature, we found that greater BF and a higher BMI may negatively affect areferee’s running performance.

  7. Olive mill wastewater triggered changes in physiology and nutritional quality of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum mill) depending on growth substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounidou, G; Asfi, M; Sotirakis, N; Papadopoulou, P; Gaitis, F

    2008-10-30

    We have studied the changes in the physiology and nutritional quality of Lycopersicon esculentum exposed to olive mill wastewater (OMW) with regard to cultivation in sand and soil. Tomato plant performance decreased with increasing concentration of OMW to both substrates. Root was more sensitive to OMW than the upper parts of the plants, grown either in sand or in soil for 10 days and 3 months, respectively, probably due to the direct OMW toxicity on roots as compared to other parts. Significant restriction on uptake and translocation of nutrients (K, Na, Fe, Ca and Mg) under OMW application was found. The decrease in the photochemical efficiency of PSII photochemistry in the light adapted state and the big decrease in photochemical quenching, indicate that OMW resulted in diminished reoxidation of Q(A)(-) and started to inactivate the reaction centers of PSII. The OMW supply on soil and sand, resulted in leaf water stress and lesser water use efficiency. Plants treated with high OMW concentration, produced fewer but bigger tomatoes as compared to plants treated with lower OMW concentration. Generally, fruit yield and nutritional value was inhibited under OMW application.

  8. Effects of Pitch Area-Restrictions on Tactical Behavior, Physical, and Physiological Performances in Soccer Large-Sided Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Esteves, Pedro; Folgado, Hugo; Ric, Angel; Torrents, Carlota; Sampaio, Jaime

    2017-09-01

    Gonçalves, B, Esteves, P, Folgado, H, Ric, A, Torrents, C, and Sampaio, J. Effects of pitch area-restrictions on tactical behavior, physical and physiological performances in soccer large-sided games. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2398-2408, 2017-The aim of this study was to identify how pitch area-restrictions affect the tactical behavior, physical, and physiological performances of players during soccer large-sided games. A 10 vs. 9 large-sided game was performed under 3 experimental conditions: (a) restricted-spacing, the pitch was divided into specific areas where players were assigned and they should not leave it; (b) contiguous-spacing, the pitch was divided into specific areas where the players were only allowed to move to a neighboring one; (c) free-spacing, the players had no restrictions in space occupation. The positional data were used to compute players' spatial exploration index and also the distance, coefficient of variation, approximate entropy, and frequency of near-in-phase displacements synchronization of players' dyads formed by the outfield teammates. Players' physical and physiological performances were assessed by the distance covered at different speed categories, game pace, and heart rate. Most likely higher values were found in players' spatial exploration index under free-spacing conditions. The synchronization between dyads' displacements showed higher values for contiguous-spacing and free-spacing conditions. In contrast, for the jogging and running intensity zones, restricted-spacing demanded a moderate effect and most likely decrease compared with other scenarios (∼20-50% to jogging and ∼60-90% to running). Overall, the effects of limiting players' spatial exploration greatly impaired the coadaptation between teammates' positioning while decreasing the physical and physiological performances. These results allow for a better understanding of players' decision-making process according to specific task rules and can be relevant to

  9. Asset growth strategy and bank performance in Nigeria | Toby ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the nature of the relationship between asset growth rate and growth in such output variables as total cost, total income and net profit In the Nigerian banking industry. Based on the data of 25 quoted Nigerian banks, three linear regression models were estimated complemented by descriptive data ...

  10. A Multi-Disciplinary Examination of Psycho-Physiological Performance Among Youth and Junior Ball Sport Athletes: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Márton Pucsok

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The primary purpose of our review was to systematically review the evolution of psycho-physiological performance analysis. Our secondary aim was to investigate the role of specific, multi-disciplinary performance indicators to identify future talents in the sport of soccer, handball and basketball. Methods A review protocol was set up in order to avoid individual bias and ensure an efficient searching prodedure. This enabled a search strategy to define which literature was to be included or excluded from our research. Certain inclusion criteria were identified, before performing a search using three electronic databases (Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar and reference lists for English-language articles, published from the year 1980 till 2017. Results The comprehensive search yielded 82 documents to be relevant to our purpose of the study, according to our inclusion criteria criteria, 58 were fully-reviewed and referred to in our study. As we previously expected, the review of related literature resulted investigations involving mostly soccer and basketball players, studies conducted on handball players are significantly fewer. The majority of those studies examined physical performance characteristics via various field test. Conclusions We concluded that further analysis is necessary to identify relevant psycho-physiological performance indicators, in order to properly enhance sports performance in the younger athlete population and in general too. Vienna Test System protocols may offer a great potential to provide valuable information for athletes and their coaches to enhance athletic performance. Future research should focus on specifically identify Vienna Test System test protocols that may be linked to each particular sport.

  11. Interactive effect of salinity and boron application on growth and physiological traits of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Atif Riaz, Muhammad Saqib, Javaid Akhtar and Riaz Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major problem of agriculture in Pakistan. Permanent solution of salinity problem is removal of salts by leaching and drainage whic is expensive. So research efforts should involve profitable utilization of these lands through biological approaches. Considering these observations, this study was designed with the objectives to explore changes in growth and physiological attributes of different sunflower genotypes under interactive effect of salinity and boron. Vigorous seeds...

  12. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of antioxidants 'TIOFAN' and 'FANTOX 11-1' on physiological growth of broilers in conditions of intoxication with lead and cadmium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval, Yu.I.; Bokova, T.I.; Kandalintseva, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of research is to study the influence of antioxidants 'TIOFAN' and 'FANTOX 11-1' on physiological growth of broilers in conditions of intoxication with lead and cadmium salts. The growth and development of bird in conditions of intoxication with heavy metals and by using of antioxidants as detoxicant is studied. The biochemical blood values on application of antioxidants and without them in conditions of intoxication are determined. The most effective preparation raising of birds productivity and it's optimal concentration is established.

  14. Physiological Performance Related to Multiple Stresses such as those Experienced in Air Force Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    3. Horvath, S. M. Exercise in a cold environment. Exercise Sport Sci. Rev. 4. Horvath, S. M., and R. L. Jackson. Significance of PSO under stress ...7 AD-AI3 010 CALIFORNIA UNIV SANTA BARBARA NST OP ENVIRONMENTAL --ETC F/6 6/19-7PHY IOL GICAL PERFORMANCE RELATED TO MULTIPLE STRESSES SUCH AS...Performance Related to Multiple Interim Scientific Report Stresses Such as Those Experienced in Air Force - 1//81-12/31/81 Operations 6. PERFORMING ORG

  15. Effects of Soil Fertilizers on Growth Indices, Morpho-Physiological Traits and Potassium content of Baurley Tobacco Cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Tadayon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tobacco with scientific name of (Nicotiana tabacum L. belongs to Solanaceae family is one of the important industrial crops in the world that plays a critical role in economy of producing countries and its income from various products had a major share of the national income. Tobacco is an annual, short day length and self pollinated crop that its chromosomal number is 2n=48. The yield of plants depends upon several production factors. Among these proper, balanced nutrition plays a significant role. The main purpose of fertilization in tobacco plants not only the quantity but quality should be considered. Now tobacco farmers apply a large amount of fertilizer to improve yields, but these actions not only decrease tobacco leaf quality, but also cause fertilizer pollution. Organic and chemical fertilizers use has played a significant role in increase of crop yield. The use of compost and vermicompost in the soil, generally in order to maintain and increase aggregate stability and fertility of soils for farming and gardening in the past decade has been of particular importance. Increasing soil organic matter stocks and stability by addition of organic amendment offers a good way to substantially improve soil quality and therefore agricultural sustainability. The objective of this study was evaluate the effect of chemical and organic fertilizer on morpho-physiological and yield of tobacco in field conditions. Materials and Methods In order to study the effects of organic and chemical fertilizers on morpho-physiological traits of baurley tobacco cultivar, an experiment was counducted as based on a randomized complete block design with three replications during growing season of 2012-2013 at the research field of Shahrekord University located in 50º 49´ E longitude and 32º21´ N latitude.with sea level of 2116 meter. Treatments included chemical fertilizers based on the tobacco needs and soil test results, compost based on the tobacco

  16. Influence of rearing conditions on performance, behavioral, and physiological responses of pigs to preslaughter handling, carcass traits, and meat quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebret, B.; Meunier-Salaün, M.C.; Foury, A.; Mormède, P.; Dransfield, E.; Dourmad, J.Y.

    2006-01-01

    A total of 120 crossbred [synthetic line x (Large White x Landrace)] pigs (castrated males and females) were used to evaluate the influence of rearing conditions for growing-finishing pigs on growth performance, carcass, stress reactions at slaughter, and meat eating quality. At approximately 35 kg

  17. Effects of anticoccidial and antibiotic growth promoter programs on broiler performance and immune status

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of various coccidiosis control programs in combination with antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) on growth performance and host immune responses in broiler chickens. The coccidiosis programs that were investigated include in ovo coccidiosis vaccination (CVAC) with ...

  18. Chewing Gum: Cognitive Performance, Mood, Well-Being, and Associated Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has indicated that chewing gum can enhance attention, as well as promoting well-being and work performance. Four studies (two experiments and two intervention studies examined the robustness of and mechanisms for these effects. Study 1 investigated the acute effect of gum on mood in the absence of task performance. Study 2 examined the effect of rate and force of chewing on mood and attention performance. Study 3 assessed the effects of chewing gum during one working day on well-being and performance, as well as postwork mood and cognitive performance. In Study 4, performance and well-being were reported throughout the workday and at the end of the day, and heart rate and cortisol were measured. Under experimental conditions, gum was associated with higher alertness regardless of whether performance tasks were completed and altered sustained attention. Rate of chewing and subjective force of chewing did not alter mood but had some limited effects on attention. Chewing gum during the workday was associated with higher productivity and fewer cognitive problems, raised cortisol levels in the morning, and did not affect heart rate. The results emphasise that chewing gum can attenuate reductions in alertness, suggesting that chewing gum enhances worker performance.

  19. Psychological and physiological correlates of stress: Performance on a cooperative task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, R.; Lester, J.; Knapp, T.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of personality dimensions to performance was investigated. The personality measure used to select subjects, the Barratt impulsiveness scale, is hypothesized to be related to a style of behavior which should affect the trend of choices which various subjects will make. Personality dimensions were specifically examined during performance of a cooperative task, the Prisoner's Dilemma.

  20. The effect of feeding frequency on growth performance and body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to investigate the effects of different feeding frequencies on the growth, feed efficiency and specific growth rate (%) of juvenile of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, weight 16.44±0.22 g) rearing in cold sea water conditions (5.8 to 9.3°C; 17 to 18 ppt). Fish were fed on a commercial feed to the apparent ...

  1. Genetic Diversity and Physiological Performance of Portuguese Wild Beet (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from Three Contrasting Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Isa C; Pinheiro, Carla; Ribeiro, Carla M; Veloso, Maria M; Simoes-Costa, Maria C; Evaristo, Isabel; Paulo, Octávio S; Ricardo, Cândido P

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of stress resilient sugar beets (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is an important breeding goal since this cash crop is susceptible to drought and salinity. The genetic diversity in cultivated sugar beets is low and the beet wild relatives are useful genetic resources for tolerance traits. Three wild beet populations (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima) from contrasting environments, Vaiamonte (VMT, dry inland hill), Comporta (CMP, marsh) and Oeiras (OEI, coastland), and one commercial sugar beet (Isella variety, SB), are compared. At the genetic level, the use of six microsatellite allowed to detect a total of seventy six alleles. It was observed that CMP population has the highest value concerning the effective number of alleles and of expected heterozygosity. By contrast, sugar beet has the lowest values for all the parameters considered. Loci analysis with STRUCTURE allows defining three genetic clusters, the sea beet (OEI and CMP), the inland ruderal beet (VMT) and the sugar beet (SB). A screening test for progressive drought and salinity effects demonstrated that: all populations were able to recover from severe stress; drought impact was higher than that from salinity; the impact on biomass (total, shoot, root) was population specific. The distinct strategies were also visible at physiological level. We evaluated the physiological responses of the populations under drought and salt stress, namely at initial stress stages, late stress stages, and early stress recovery. Multivariate analysis showed that the physiological performance can be used to discriminate between genotypes, with a strong contribution of leaf temperature and leaf osmotic adjustment. However, the separation achieved and the groups formed are dependent on the stress type, stress intensity and duration. Each of the wild beet populations evaluated is very rich in genetic terms (allelic richness) and exhibited physiological plasticity, i.e., the capacity to physiologically adjust to

  2. Genetic diversity and physiological performance of Portuguese wild beet (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima from three contrasting habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Catarina Ribeiro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of stress resilient sugar beets (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris is an important breeding goal since this cash crop is susceptible to drought and salinity. The genetic diversity in cultivated sugar beets is low and the beet wild relatives are useful genetic resources for tolerance traits. Three wild beet populations (Beta vulgaris spp. maritima from contrasting environments, Vaiamonte (VMT, dry inland hill, Comporta (CMP, marsh and Oeiras (OEI, coastland, and one commercial sugar beet (Isella variety, SB, are compared. At the genetic level, the use of six microsatellite allowed to detect a total of seventy six alleles. It was observed that CMP population has the highest value concerning the effective number of alleles and of expected heterozygosity. By contrast, sugar beet has the lowest values for all the parameters considered. Loci analysis with STRUCTURE allows defining three genetic clusters, the sea beet (OEI and CMP, the inland ruderal beet (VMT and the sugar beet (SB. A screening test for progressive drought and salinity effects demonstrated that: all populations were able to recover from severe stress; drought impact was higher than that from salinity; the impact on biomass (total, shoot, root was population specific. The distinct strategies were also visible at physiological level. We evaluated the physiological responses of the populations under drought and salt stress, namely at initial stress stages, late stress stages and early stress recovery. Multivariate analysis showed that the physiological performance can be used to discriminate between genotypes, with a strong contribution of leaf temperature and leaf osmotic adjustment. However, the separation achieved and the groups formed are dependent on the stress type, stress intensity and duration. Each of the wild beet populations evaluated is very rich in genetic terms (allelic richness and exhibited physiological plasticity, i.e. the capacity to physiologically adjust

  3. Biomonitoring of physiological status and cognitive performance of underway submariners undergoing a novel watch-standing schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplessis, C. A.; Cullum, M. E.; Crepeau, L. J.

    2005-05-01

    Submarine watch-standers adhere to a 6 hour-on, 12 hour-off (6/12) watch-standing schedule, yoking them to an 18-hr day, engendering circadian desynchronization and chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, the chronic social crowding, shift work, and confinement of submarine life provide additional stressors known to correlate with elevated secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) and cortisol levels, reduced performance, immunologic dysfunction, malignancies, infections, gastrointestinal illness, coronary disease, anxiety, and depression. We evaluated an alternative, compressed, fixed work schedule designed to enhance circadian rhythm entrainment, sleep hygiene, performance, and health on 10 underway submariners, who followed the alternative and 6/12 schedules for approximately 2 weeks each. We measured subjects" sleep, cognitive performance, and salivary biomarker levels. Pilot analysis of the salivary data on one subject utilizing ELISA suggests elevated biomarker levels of stress. Average PM cortisol levels were 0.2 μg/L (normal range: nondetectable - 0.15 μg/L), and mean sIgA levels were 562 μg/ml (normal range: 100-500 μg/ml). Future research exploiting real-time salivary bioassays, via fluorescent polarimetry technology, identified by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) as a future Naval requirement, allows researchers to address correlations between stress-induced elaboration of salivary biomarkers with physiological and performance decrements, thereby fostering insight into the underway submariner"s psychoimmunological status. This may help identify strategies that enhance resilience to stressors. Specifically, empirically-based modeling can identify optimal watch-standing schedules and stress-mitigating procedures -- within the operational constraints of the submarine milieu and the mission --that foster improved circadian entrainment and reduced stress reactivity, enhancing physiological health, operational performance, safety, and job satisfaction.

  4. Multiple-Locus Heterozygosity and the Physiological Energetics of Growth in the Coot Clam, MULINIA LATERALIS, from a Natural Population

    OpenAIRE

    Garton, David W.; Koehn, Richard K.; Scott, Timothy M.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between individual energy budgets and multiple-locus heterozygosity at six polymorphic enzyme loci was examined in Mulinia lateralis. Energy budgets were determined by measuring growth rates, rates of oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion and clearance rates. Enzyme genotypes were determined using starch gel electrophoresis. Growth rate and net growth efficiency (the ratio of energy available for growth to total energy absorbed) increased with individual heterozygosity. The p...

  5. Academic performance in human anatomy and physiology classes: a 2-yr study of academic motivation and grade expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W; Allen, Deborah; Gatch, Delena Bell; Shankar, Padmini

    2016-03-01

    This project used a nonexperimental design with a convenience sample and studied the relationship between academic motivation, grade expectation, and academic performance in 1,210 students enrolled in undergraduate human anatomy and physiology (HAP) classes over a 2-yr period. A 42-item survey that included 28 items of the adapted academic motivation scale for HAP based on self-determination theory was administered in class during the first 3 wk of each semester. Students with higher grade point averages, who studied for longer hours and reported to be more motivated to succeed, did better academically in these classes. There was a significant relationship between students' scores on the adapted academic motivation scale and performance. Students were more extrinsically motivated to succeed in HAP courses than intrinsically motivated to succeed, and the analyses revealed that the most significant predictor of final grade was within the extrinsic scale (introjected and external types). Students' motivations remained stable throughout the course sequence. The data showed a significant relationship between HAP students' expected grade and their final grade in class. Finally, 65.5% of students overestimated their final grade, with 29% of students overestimating by two to four letter grades. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  6. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Kathleen M. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY),Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26°C and downshifted 30-26-30°C) and females (constant 30°C and upshifted 26-30-26°C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26°C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30°C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26°C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30°C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25°C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30°C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  7. Effects of egg incubation condition on the post-hatching growth and performance of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, K.M.

    1990-12-01

    The effect of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth and performance capacities of the common snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina was investigated in the laboratory. Turtle eggs were collected from four sites in New York State and randomly assigned to four incubation temperature treatments to produce males (constant 26[degree]C and downshifted 30-26-30[degree]C) and females (constant 30[degree]C and upshifted 26-30-26[degree]C) under constant and altered temperature regimes. The incubation conditions resulted in 92% males from the constant 26[degree]C group and 93% males from the downshifted group. 100% females resulted from both the constant 30[degree]C group and the upshifted group. Turtles hatching from eggs incubated constantly at 26[degree]C were significantly larger than hatchlings from eggs incubated at a constant 30[degree]C or downshifted. Hatchlings were raised in individual aquaria at 25[degree]C and fed earthworms and fish. After a 9-month growth period, turtles which had been incubated at a constant 30[degree]C gained significantly more mass than did turtles from eggs which had been downshifted or upshifted. There was no extended effect of incubation condition on Post-hatching performance and learning ability as measured by righting and feeding responses. Thus, the mass gain differences seen in this study suggest that physiological differences do result as the consequence of incubation condition. However, these physiological differences are not reflected in normal locomotive or feeding behavior.

  8. Plant growth promoting effect ofBacillus amyloliquefaciensH-2-5 on crop plants and influence on physiological changes in soybean under soil salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Kang, Sang-Mo; You, Young-Hyun; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Kim, Jong-Guk; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-07-01

    This study was aimed to identify plant growth-promoting bacterial isolates from soil samples and to investigate their ability to improve plant growth and salt tolerance by analysing phytohormones production and phosphate solubilisation. Among the four tested bacterial isolates (I-2-1, H-1-4, H-2-3, and H-2-5), H-2-5 was able to enhance the growth of Chinese cabbage, radish, tomato, and mustard plants. The isolated bacterium H-2-5 was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens H-2-5 based on 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. The secretion of gibberellins (GA 4 , GA 8 , GA 9 , GA 19 , and GA 20 ) from B. amyloliquefaciens H-2-5 and their phosphate solubilisation ability may contribute to enhance plant growth. In addition, the H-2-5-mediated mitigation of short term salt stress was tested on soybean plants that were affected by sodium chloride. Abscisic acid (ABA) produced by the H-2-5 bacterium suppressed the NaCl-induced stress effects in soybean by enhancing plant growth and GA 4 content, and by lowering the concentration of ABA, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and proline. These results suggest that GAs, ABA production, and the phosphate solubilisation capacity of B. amyloliquefaciens H-2-5 are important stimulators that promote plant growth through their interaction and also to improve plant growth by physiological changes in soybean at saline soil.

  9. The Path to Presence in Performance through Movement, Physiological Response, and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preeshl, Artemis; George, Gwen; Hicks, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Presence may occur when actors are alert and relaxed in performance. A positive mood is associated with physical activity, but little is known about how movement qualities affect mood and vital signs of actors. This study examined the effects of vibratory, pendular, abrupt, and sustained movement qualities on the Brief Mood Introspection Scale,…

  10. Effect of Curcumin Supplementation on Physiological Fatigue and Physical Performance in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin (CCM is a well-known phytocompound and food component found in the spice turmeric and has multifunctional bioactivities. However, few studies have examined its effects on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CCM supplementation on fatigue and ergogenic function following physical challenge in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups to receive vehicle or CCM (180 μg/mL by oral gavage at 0, 12.3, 24.6, or 61.5 mL/kg/day for four weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated after physical challenge by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of physical fatigue-associated biomarkers serum lactate, ammonia, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, and glucose and tissue damage markers such as aspartate transaminase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT, and creatine kinase (CK. CCM supplementation dose-dependently increased grip strength and endurance performance and significantly decreased lactate, ammonia, BUN, AST, ALT, and CK levels after physical challenge. Muscular glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise, was significantly increased. CCM supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. CCM supplementation may have a wide spectrum of bioactivities for promoting health, improving exercise performance and preventing fatigue.

  11. Effect of Curcumin Supplementation on Physiological Fatigue and Physical Performance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Tang, Deh-Wei; Lee, Zon-Min; Wei, Li; Chen, Fu-An; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CCM) is a well-known phytocompound and food component found in the spice turmeric and has multifunctional bioactivities. However, few studies have examined its effects on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CCM supplementation on fatigue and ergogenic function following physical challenge in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups to receive vehicle or CCM (180 μg/mL) by oral gavage at 0, 12.3, 24.6, or 61.5 mL/kg/day for four weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated after physical challenge by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of physical fatigue-associated biomarkers serum lactate, ammonia, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and glucose and tissue damage markers such as aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and creatine kinase (CK). CCM supplementation dose-dependently increased grip strength and endurance performance and significantly decreased lactate, ammonia, BUN, AST, ALT, and CK levels after physical challenge. Muscular glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise, was significantly increased. CCM supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. CCM supplementation may have a wide spectrum of bioactivities for promoting health, improving exercise performance and preventing fatigue. PMID:25647661

  12. Best practices in the lactating and weaned sow to optimize reproductive physiology and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soede, N.M.; Kemp, B.

    2015-01-01

    For optimal reproductive performance of the weaned sow, management needs to be optimised in the lactation period, in the interval from weaning to oestrus and during oestrus and insemination. Essentially, management should be focussed on optimizing follicle development during lactation and after

  13. Effects of caffeine chewing gum on race performance and physiology in male and female cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, Carl; Costa, Vitor; Guglielmo, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This investigation reports the effects of chewing caffeinated gum on race performance with trained cyclists. Twenty competitive cyclists completed two 30-km time trials that included a maximal effort 0.2-km sprint each 10-km. Caffeine (~3-4 mg · kg(-1)) or placebo was administered double-blind via chewing gum at the 10-km point following completion of the first sprint. Measures of power output, oxygen uptake, heart rate, lactate and perceived exertion were taken at set intervals during the time trial. Results indicated no substantial differences in any measured variables between caffeine and placebo conditions during the first 20-km of the time trial. Caffeine gum did however lead to substantial enhancements (mean ± 90% confidence limits (CLs)) in mean power during the final 10-km (3.8% ± 2.3%), and sprint power at 30-km (4.0% ± 3.6%). The increases in performance over the final 10-km were associated with small increases in heart rate and blood lactate (effect size of 0.24 and 0.28, respectively). There were large inter-individual variations in the response to caffeine, and apparent gender related differences in sprint performance. Chewing caffeine gum improves mean and sprint performance power in the final 10-km of a 30-km time trial in male and female cyclists most likely through an increase in nervous system activation.

  14. Cross-Modal Interactions in the Experience of Musical Performances: Physiological Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapados, Catherine; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate cross-modal interactions in the emotional experience of music listeners. Previous research showed that visual information present in a musical performance is rich in expressive content, and moderates the subjective emotional experience of a participant listening and/or observing musical stimuli [Vines,…

  15. Online Quizzes Promote Inconsistent Improvements on In-Class Test Performance in Introductory Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory A.; Bice, Matthew R.; Shaw, Brandon S.; Shaw, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Review quizzes can provide students with feedback and assist in the preparation for in-class tests, but students often do not voluntarily use self-testing resources. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if taking a mandatory online review quiz alters performance on subsequent in-class tests. During two semesters of a single-semester…

  16. Physiological and cell morphology adaptation of Bacillus subtilis at near-zero specific growth rates: a transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overkamp, Wout; Ercan, Onur; Herber, Martijn; van Maris, Antonius J A; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-02-01

    Nutrient scarcity is a common condition in nature, but the resulting extremely low growth rates (below 0.025 h(-1) ) are an unexplored research area in Bacillus subtilis. To understand microbial life in natural environments, studying the adaptation of B. subtilis to near-zero growth conditions is relevant. To this end, a chemostat modified for culturing an asporogenous B. subtilis sigF mutant strain at extremely low growth rates (also named a retentostat) was set up, and biomass accumulation, culture viability, metabolite production and cell morphology were analysed. During retentostat culturing, the specific growth rate decreased to a minimum of 0.00006 h(-1) , corresponding to a doubling time of 470 days. The energy distribution between growth and maintenance-related processes showed that a state of near-zero growth was reached. Remarkably, a filamentous cell morphology emerged, suggesting that cell separation is impaired under near-zero growth conditions. To evaluate the corresponding molecular adaptations to extremely low specific growth, transcriptome changes were analysed. These revealed that cellular responses to near-zero growth conditions share several similarities with those of cells during the stationary phase of batch growth. However, fundamental differences between these two non-growing states are apparent by their high viability and absence of stationary phase mutagenesis under near-zero growth conditions. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. CO2-induced seawater acidification affects physiological performance of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Riebesell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2/pH perturbation experiments were carried out under two different pCO2 levels (39.3 and 101.3 Pa to evaluate effects of CO2-induced ocean acidification on the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. After acclimation (>20 generations to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions (with corresponding pH values of 8.15 and 7.80, respectively, growth and photosynthetic carbon fixation rates of high CO2 grown cells were enhanced by 5% and 12%, respectively, and dark respiration stimulated by 34% compared to cells grown at ambient CO2. The half saturation constant (Km for carbon fixation (dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC increased by 20% under the low pH and high CO2 condition, reflecting a decreased affinity for HCO3– or/and CO2 and down-regulated carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM. In the high CO2 grown cells, the electron transport rate from photosystem II (PSII was photoinhibited to a greater extent at high levels of photosynthetically active radiation, while non-photochemical quenching was reduced compared to low CO2 grown cells. This was probably due to the down-regulation of CCM, which serves as a sink for excessive energy. The balance between these positive and negative effects on diatom productivity will be a key factor in determining the net effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on ocean primary production.

  18. heat-induced biological changes as heat tolerance indices related to growth performance in buffaloes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldes, M.Z.N.

    2004-01-01

    the main objective of this study was to predict new heat tolerance indices related to hot summer growth performance, depending on heat - induced changes in some physiological and biochemical parameters of young water buffalo calves. the present study was carried out on 8 egyptian male buffalo calves of 6 months old and 106.8 kg mean body weight (B W), and on the same animals of 12 months old and 179.5 kg mean B W. the animals were maintained in a climatic chamber of the egyptian atomic energy authority. the animals were maintained in metabolic cages inside a climatic chamber for 3 weeks under mild climate (20-24 c and 50-60% Rh, equivalent to 62-72 THI) for 6 hours daily as adjustment period,followed by 5 and 7 days in the 6- and 12-month old calves, respectively at the same climatic conditions as a control period.this was followed by 6 hours of acute heat exposure period (33-43 c and 40-60% Rh, equivalent to 85-93 Thi), then by chronic heat exposure period of the same climatic conditions for 5 and 7 days in the 6- and 12- month old calves, respectively.Rectal temperature (RT) and respiration rate (RR) were estimated daily, whereas BW was estimated at the beginning and the end of each exposure period

  19. The influence of muscle physiology and advanced technology on sports performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neptune, Richard R; McGowan, Craig P; Fiandt, John M

    2009-01-01

    Muscle mechanical output such as force and power are governed by highly nonlinear intrinsic muscle properties associated with different muscle fiber types and are influenced by training and age. Many of the interactions between these properties pose trade-offs such that an individual's anthropometrics and muscle morphology may allow an athlete to excel in one sport but not in others. Advanced modeling and simulation techniques are powerful tools to gain insight into performance limits, optimal equipment designs, and mechanisms that may lead to injury. Recent technological innovations have produced faster running tracks, bicycles, speed skates, and swimming pools. This review discusses the influence of intrinsic muscle properties in sports and how advanced technology can be used to extend the limits of human performance.

  20. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.