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Sample records for growth graphite irradiation

  1. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  2. Intercomparison of graphite irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, H; Perio, P; Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    While fast neutrons only are effective in damaging graphite, results of irradiations are more or less universally expressed in terms of thermal neutron fluxes. This paper attempts to correlate irradiations made in different reactors, i.e., in fluxes of different spectral compositions. Those attempts are based on comparison of 1) bulk length change and volume expansion, and 2) crystalline properties (e.g., lattice parameter C, magnetic susceptibility, stored energy, etc.). The methods used by various authors for determining the lattice constants of irradiated graphite are discussed. (author)

  3. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  4. Significance of primary irradiation creep in graphite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally primary irradiation creep is introduced into graphite analysis by applying the appropriate amount of creep strain to the model at the initial time-step. This is valid for graphite components that are subjected to high fast neutron flux...

  5. Neutron irradiations of polycrystalline graphites at 78 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochirol, L.; Bonjour, E.; Pluchery, M.

    1961-01-01

    As studies of resistivity restoration after irradiation by electrons have shown that no noticeable healing of created flaws occurs below 80 K, graphite samples are placed in a pool of boiling liquid nitrogen during irradiation and under a pressure slightly greater than normal pressure. Different values are measured: growth rate of a crystalline parameter, stored energy. The influence of irradiation temperature on damages created by a same dose is discussed [fr

  6. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  7. Characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated reactor graphite; Karakterizacija neozracenog i ozracenog reaktorskog grafita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report contains three parts: characterization of Yugoslav nuclear graphite development of methods and obtained results, characterization of un-irradiated and irradiated domestic nuclear graphite; calculation of electrical conductivity changes due to vacancies in the graphite crystal lattice.

  8. The behavior of interstitials in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model is developed to simulate the behavior of self-interstitials with particular attention to clustering. Owing to the layer structure of graphite, atomistic simulations can be performed using a large parallelepipedic supercell containing a few layers. In particular, interstitial clustering is studied here using a supercell that contains two basal planes only. Frenkel pairs are randomly produced. Interstitials are placed at sites between the crystal planes while vacancies are distributed in the two crystal planes. The size of the computational cell is 20000 atoms and periodic boundary conditions are used in two dimensions. Vacancies are assumed immobile whereas interstitials are given a certain mobility. Two point defect sinks are considered, direct recombination of Frenkel pairs and interstitial clusters. The clusters are assumed to be mobile up to a certain size where they are presumed to become loop nuclei. Clusters can shrink by emission of singly bonded interstitials or by recombination of a peripheral interstitial with a neighboring vacancy. The conditions under which interstitial clustering occurs are reported. It is shown that when clustering occurs the cluster size population gradually shifts towards the largest size cluster. The implications of the present results for irradiation growth and irradiation-induced amorphization are discussed

  9. Ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation in model graphites: Consequences for nuclear graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2017-10-01

    Due to its excellent moderator and reflector qualities, graphite was used in CO2-cooled nuclear reactors such as UNGG (Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz). Neutron irradiation of graphite resulted in the production of 14C which is a key issue radionuclide for the management of the irradiated graphite waste. In order to elucidate the impact of neutron irradiation on 14C behavior, we carried out a systematic investigation of irradiation and its synergistic effects with temperature in Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG) model graphite used to simulate the coke grains of nuclear graphite. We used 13C implantation in order to simulate 14C displaced from its original structural site through recoil. The collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic damage. However, a part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the graphite lattice through electronic excitation. The effects of the different irradiation regimes in synergy with temperature were simulated using ion irradiation by varying Sn(nuclear)/Se(electronic) stopping power. Thus, the samples were irradiated with different ions of different energies. The structure modifications were followed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Raman microspectrometry. The results show that temperature generally counteracts the disordering effects of irradiation but the achieved reordering level strongly depends on the initial structural state of the graphite matrix. Thus, extrapolating to reactor conditions, for an initially highly disordered structure, irradiation at reactor temperatures (200 - 500 °C) should induce almost no change of the initial structure. On the contrary, when the structure is initially less disordered, there should be a "zoning" of the reordering: In "cold" high flux irradiated zones where the ballistic damage is important, the structure should be poorly reordered; In "hot" low flux irradiated zones where the ballistic

  10. Formation of dislocation dipoles in irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwase, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    Recently, we have proposed a dislocation dipole accumulation model to explain the irradiation-induced amorphization of graphite. However, the structure of dislocation dipole in the hexagonal networks is still an open question at the atomic-level. In this paper, we propose a possible formation process of the dislocation dipole

  11. Property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Haag, G.

    1979-07-01

    Design data for irradiated graphite are usually presented as families of isothermal curves showing the change in physical property as a function of fast neutron fluence. In this report, procedures for combining isothermal curves to predict behavior under changing irradiation temperatures are compared with experimental data on irradiation-induced changes in dimensions, Young's modulus, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansivity. The suggested procedure fits the data quite well and is physically realistic

  12. The irradiation creep characteristics of graphite to high fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Cundy, M.; Kleist, G.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have massive blocks of graphite with thermal and neutron-flux gradients causing high internal stresses. Thermal stresses are transient; however, stresses generated by differential growth due to neutron damage continue to increase with time. Fortunately, graphite also experiences creep under irradiation allowing relaxation of stresses to nominally safe levels. Because of complexity of irradiation creep experiments, data demonstrating this phenomenon are generally limited to fairly low fluences compared to the overall fluences expected in most reactors. Notable exceptions have been experiments at 300/degree/C and 500/degree/C run at Petten under tension and compression creep stresses to fluences greater than 4 /times/ 10 26 (E > 50 keV) neutrons/m 2 . This study complements the previous results by extending the irradiation temperature to 900/degree/C. 2 refs., 3 figs

  13. Ion irradiated graphite exposed to fusion-relevant deuterium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deslandes, Alec; Guenette, Mathew C.; Corr, Cormac S.; Karatchevtseva, Inna; Thomsen, Lars; Ionescu, Mihail; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphite samples were irradiated with 5 MeV carbon ions to simulate the damage caused by collision cascades from neutron irradiation in a fusion environment. The ion irradiated graphite samples were then exposed to a deuterium plasma in the linear plasma device, MAGPIE, for a total ion fluence of ∼1 × 10 24 ions m −2 . Raman and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were used to characterize modifications to the graphitic structure. Ion irradiation was observed to decrease the graphitic content and induce disorder in the graphite. Subsequent plasma exposure decreased the graphitic content further. Structural and surface chemistry changes were observed to be greatest for the sample irradiated with the greatest fluence of MeV ions. D retention was measured using elastic recoil detection analysis and showed that ion irradiation increased the amount of retained deuterium in graphite by a factor of four

  14. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on specimens of nuclear graphites irradiated in capsule OG-2. About half the irradiation space was allocated to H-451 near-isotropic petroleum-coke-based graphite or its subsized prototype grade H-429. Most of these specimens had been previously irradiated. Virgin specimens of another near-isotropic graphite, grade TS-1240, were irradiated. Some previously irradiated specimens of needle-coke-based H-327 graphite and pitch-coke-based P 3 JHAN were also included

  15. Determining the future for irradiated graphite disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Wickham, A.J.; Hacker, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, proposals have been made for the long-term treatment of radioactive graphite waste which have ranged from sea dumping through incineration to land-based disposal, sometimes preceded by a variable period of 'safe storage' within the original reactor containment. Nuclear regulators are challenging the proposed length of 'safe storage' on the basis that essential knowledge may be lost. More recently, political constraints have further complicated the issue by eliminating disposal at sea and imposing a 'near-zero release' philosophy, while public opinion is opposed to land-based disposal and has induced a continual drive towards minimizing radioactivity release to the environment from disposal. This paper proposes that, despite various international agreements, it is time to review technically all options for disposal of irradiated graphite waste as a framework for the eventual decision-making process. It is recognized that the socio-economic and political pressures are high and therefore, given that all currently identified options satisfy the present safety limits, the need to minimize the objective risk is shown to be a minor need in comparison to the public's want of demonstrable control, responsiveness and ability to reverse/change the disposal options in the future. Further, it is shown that the eventual decision-making process for a post-dismantling option for graphite waste must optimize the beneficial attributes of subjective risk experienced by the general public. In addition, in advocating and preferred option to the general public, it is recommended that the industry should communicate at a level commensurate with the public understanding and initiate a process of facilitation which enables the public to arrive at their own solution and constituting a social exchange. Otherwise it is concluded that if the indecision over disposal options is allowed to continue then, by default, graphite will remain in long-term supervised storage. (author)

  16. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Wareing

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  17. Development of integrated waste management options for irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareing, Alan; Abrahamsen-Mills, Liam; Fowler, Linda; Jarvis, Richard; Banford, Anthony William [National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington (United Kingdom); Grave, Michael [Doosan Babcock, Gateshead (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Martin [National Nuclear Laboratory, Gloucestershire (United Kingdom); Norris, Simon [Radioactive Waste Management Limited, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-15

    The European Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project sought to develop best practices in the retrieval, treatment, and disposal of irradiated graphite including other irradiated carbonaceous waste such as structural material made of graphite, nongraphitized carbon bricks, and fuel coatings. Emphasis was given on legacy irradiated graphite, as this represents a significant inventory in respective national waste management programs. This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of graphite irradiated during its use, primarily as a moderator material, within nuclear reactors. It describes the potential techniques applicable to the retrieval, treatment, recycling/reuse, and disposal of these graphite wastes. Considering the lifecycle of nuclear graphite, from manufacture to final disposal, a number of waste management options have been developed. These options consider the techniques and technologies required to address each stage of the lifecycle, such as segregation, treatment, recycle, and ultimate disposal in a radioactive waste repository, providing a toolbox to aid operators and regulators to determine the most appropriate management strategy. It is noted that national waste management programs currently have, or are in the process of developing, respective approaches to irradiated graphite management. The output of the Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste project is intended to aid these considerations, rather than dictate them.

  18. An analysis of irradiation creep in nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; Hacker, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear graphite under load shows remarkably high creep ductility with neutron irradiation, well in excess of any strain experienced in un-irradiated graphite (and additional to any dimensional changes that would occur without stress). As this behaviour compensates, to some extent, some other irradiation effects such as thermal shutdown stresses, it is an important property. This paper briefly reviews the approach to irradiation creep in the UK, described by the UK Creep Law. It then offers an alternative analysis of irradiation creep applicable to most situations, including HTR systems, using AGR moderator graphite as an example, to high values of neutron fluence, applied stress and radiolytic weight loss. (authors)

  19. The irradiation induced creep of graphite under accelerated damage produced by boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocklehurst, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    The presence of boron enhances fast neutron irradiation damage in graphite by providing nucleation sites for interstitial loop formation. Doping with 11 B casues an increase in the irradiation induced macroscopic dimensional changes, which have been shown to result from an acceleration in the differential crystal growth rate for a given carbon atom displacement rate. Models of irradiation induced creep in graphite have centred around those in which creep is induced by internal stresses due to the anisotopic crystal growth, and those in which creep is activated by atomic displacements. A creep test on boron doped graphite has been performed in an attempt to establish which of these mechanisms is the determining factor. An isotropic nuclear graphite was doped to a 11 B concentration of 0.27 wt.%. The irradiation induced volume shrinkage rate at 750 0 C increased by a factor of 3 over that of the virgin graphite, in agreement with predictions from the earlier work, but the total creep strains were comparable in both doped and virgin samples. This observation supports the view that irradiation induced creep is dependent only on the carbon atom displacement rate and not on the internal stress level determined by the differential crystal growth rate. The implications of this result on the irradiation behaviour of graphite containing significant concentrations of boron are briefly discussed. (author)

  20. Removal of 14C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the chemical form of 14 C in irradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approximately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 14 C, with a half-life of 5730 years.

  1. Actinides in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plukienė, R., E-mail: rita@ar.fi.lt; Plukis, A.; Barkauskas, V.; Gudelis, A.; Gvozdaitė, R.; Duškesas, G.; Remeikis, V.

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Activation of actinides in the graphite of the RBMK-1500 reactor was analyzed. • Numerical modeling using SCALE 6.1 and MCNPX was used for actinide calculation. • Measurements of the irradiated graphite sample were used for model validation. • Results are important for further decommissioning process of the RBMK type reactors. - Abstract: The activation of graphite in the nuclear power plants is the problem of high importance related with later graphite reprocessing or disposal. The activation of actinide impurities in graphite due to their toxicity determines a particular long term risk to waste management. In this work the activation of actinides in the graphite constructions of the RBMK-1500 reactor is determined by nuclear spectrometry measurements of the irradiated graphite sample from the Ignalina NPP Unit I and by means of numerical modeling using two independent codes SCALE 6.1 (using TRITON-VI sequence) and MCNPX (v2.7 with CINDER). Both models take into account the 3D RBMK-1500 reactor core fragment with explicit graphite construction including a stack and a sleeve but with a different simplification level concerning surrounding graphite and construction of control roads. The verification of the model has been performed by comparing calculated and measured isotope ratios of actinides. Also good prediction capabilities of the actinide activation in the irradiated graphite have been found for both calculation approaches. The initial U impurity concentration in the graphite model has been adjusted taking into account the experimental results. The specific activities of actinides in the irradiated RBMK-1500 graphite constructions have been obtained and differences between numerical simulation results, different structural parts (sleeve and stack) as well as comparison with previous results (Ancius et al., 2005) have been discussed. The obtained results are important for further decommissioning process of the Ignalina NPP and other RBMK

  2. Temperature annealing of tracks induced by ion irradiation of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Yao, H.J.; Sun, Y.M.; Duan, J.L.; Hou, M.D.; Mo, D.; Wang, Z.G.; Jin, Y.F.; Abe, H.; Li, Z.C.; Sekimura, N.

    2006-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples were irradiated by Xe ions of initial kinetic energy of 3 MeV/u. The irradiations were performed at temperatures of 500 and 800 K. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images show that the tracks occasionally have elongated structures under high-temperature irradiation. The track creation yield at 800 K is by three orders of magnitude smaller compared to that obtained during room-temperature irradiation. STM and Raman spectra show that amorphization occurs in graphite samples irradiated at 500 K to higher fluences, but not at 800 K. The obtained experimental results clearly reveal that the irradiation under high temperature causes track annealing

  3. Examination of Experimental Data for Irradiation - Creep in Nuclear Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasheran, Amir Sassan

    The objective of this dissertation was to establish credibility and confidence levels of the observed behavior of nuclear graphite in neutron irradiation environment. Available experimental data associated with the OC-series irradiation -induced creep experiments performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were examined. Pre- and postirradiation measurement data were studied considering "linear" and "nonlinear" creep models. The nonlinear creep model considers the creep coefficient to vary with neutron fluence due to the densification of graphite with neutron irradiation. Within the range of neutron fluence involved (up to 0.53 times 10^{26} neutrons/m ^2, E > 50 KeV), both models were capable of explaining about 96% and 80% of the variation of the irradiation-induced creep strain with neutron fluence at temperatures of 600^circC and 900^circC, respectively. Temperature and reactor power data were analyzed to determine the best estimates for the actual irradiation temperatures. It was determined according to thermocouple readouts that the best estimate values for the irradiation temperatures were well within +/-10 ^circC of the design temperatures of 600^circC and 900 ^circC. The dependence of the secondary creep coefficients (for both linear and nonlinear models) on irradiation temperature was determined assuming that the variation of creep coefficient with temperature, in the temperature range studied, is reasonably linear. It was concluded that the variability in estimate of the creep coefficients is definitely not the results of temperature fluctuations in the experiment. The coefficients for the constitutive equation describing the overall growth of grade H-451 graphite were also studied. It was revealed that the modulus of elasticity and the shear modulus are not affected by creep and that the electrical resistivity is slightly (less than 5%) changed by creep. However, the coefficient of thermal expansion does change with creep. The consistency of

  4. Irradiation creep in reactor graphites for HTR applications. [Neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veringa, H J; Blackstone, R [Stichting Reactor Centrum Nederland, Petten

    1976-01-01

    A series of restrained shrinkage experiments on a number of graphites in the temperature range 400 to 1400/sup 0/C is described. A description is given of the experimental method and method of data evaluation. The results are compared with data from other sources. Analysis of data confirms that the creep coefficient, which is defined as the radiation induced creep strain per unit stress per unit neutron fluence, is inversely proportional to the pre-irradiation value of the Young's modulus of the material. The radiation creep coefficient increases with temperature in the range 400 to 1400/sup 0/C. It can be represented by the sum of two temperature dependent functions, one of which is inversely proportional to the neutron flux density, the other independent of the neutron flux density. When the data are analysed in this way it is found that the graphites investigated in the present work, although made from widely different starting materials and by different processes, show the same dependence of the irradiation creep coefficient on the temperature and the neutron flux density.

  5. Isotropic nuclear graphites; the effect of neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lore, J.; Buscaillon, A.; Mottet, P.; Micaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    Several isotropic graphites have been manufactured using different forming processes and fillers such as needle coke, regular coke, or pitch coke. Their properties are described in this paper. Specimens of these products have been irradiated in the fast reactor Rapsodie between 400 to 1400 0 C, at fluences up to 1,7.10 21 n.cm -2 PHI.FG. The results show an isotropic behavior under neutron irradiation, but the induced dimensional changes are higher than those of isotropic coke graphites although they are lower than those of conventional extruded graphites made with the same coke

  6. Variation of the properties of siliconized graphite during neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Y.S.; Chugunova, T.K.; Pikulik, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluate the radiation-induced property changes in siliconized graphite of the industrial grades SG-P and SG-M. The authors simultaneously tested the reference (control) specimens of graphite that are used as the base for obtaining the SG-M siliconized graphite by impregnating with silicon. The suggested scheme (model) atributes the dimensional changes of the siliconized graphite specimens to the effect of the quantitative ratio of the carbide phase and carbon under different conditions of irradiation. If silicon is insufficient for the formation of a dense skeleton, graphite plays a devisive role, and it may be assumed that at an irradiation temperature greater than 600 K, the material shrinks. The presence of isolated carbide inclusions also affects the physicomechanical properties (including the anitfriction properties)

  7. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an radioactive waste processing of graphite from graphite moderated nuclear reactors at its decommissioning is discussed. Methods of processing of irradiated graphite are presented. It can be concluded that advanced methods for graphite radioactive waste handling are available nowadays. Implementation of these methods will allow to enhance environmental safety of nuclear power that will benefit its progress in the future

  8. Effect of thermal annealing on property changes of neutron-irradiated non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1991-06-01

    Changes in dimension of non-graphitized carbon materials and nuclear graphite, and the bulk density, electrical resistivity, Young's modulus and thermal expansivity of nuclear graphite were studied after neutron irradiation at 1128-1483 K and the successive thermal annealing up to 2573 K. Carbon materials showed larger and anisotropic dimensional shrinkage than that of nuclear graphite after the irradiation. The irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage of carbon materials decreased during annealing at temperatures from 1773 to 2023 K, followed by a slight increase at higher temperatures. On the other hand, the irradiated nuclear graphite hardly showed the changes in length, density and thermal expansivity under the thermal annealing, but the electrical resistivity and Young's modulus showed a gradual decrease with annealing temperature. It has been clarified that there exists significant difference in the effect of thermal annealing on irradiation-induced dimensional shrinkage between graphitized nuclear graphite and non-graphitized carbon materials. (author)

  9. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, A., E-mail: aurelian.marcu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Avotina, L. [Institute of Chemical Physics, University of Latvia, Kronvalda 4, LV 1010 Riga (Latvia); Porosnicu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Marin, A. [Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry, 202 Splaiul Independentei 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Grigorescu, C.E.A. [National Institute R& D for Optoelectronics INOE 2000, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Ursescu, D. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Lungu, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics Atomistilor Str., 105 bis, 077125, Magurele (Romania); Demitri, N. [Hard X-ray Beamline and Structural Biology, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14 - km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34149 Basovizza TS Italy (Italy); Lungu, C.P. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp{sup 3}% increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp{sup 3}% is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp{sup 3} bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp{sup 3} percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  10. Spatially resolved nanostructural transformation in graphite under femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A.; Avotina, L.; Porosnicu, C.; Marin, A.; Grigorescu, C.E.A.; Ursescu, D.; Lungu, M.; Demitri, N.; Lungu, C.P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polycrystalline graphite was irradiated with a high power fs (IR) laser. • Presence of a diamond peak was detected by synchrotron XRD. • XPS and Raman showed in-depth sp 3 % increase at tens of nm below the surface. • sp 3 % is increasing with laser power density but it is independent of photon absorption rate. • Graphite crystallite size locally increase at tens of nanometers below the irradiated spots. - Abstract: A polycrystalline graphite target was irradiated using infrared (800 nm) femtosecond (120 fs) laser pulses of different energies. Increase of sp 3 bonds percentage and possible diamond crystal formation were investigated ‘in-depth’ and on the irradiated surfaces. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction pattern have shown the presence of a diamond peak in one of the irradiated zones while X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations have shown an increasing tendency of the sp 3 percent in the low power irradiated areas and similarly ‘in the depth’ of the higher power irradiated zones. Multiple wavelength Micro-Raman investigations have confirmed this trend along with an ‘in-depth’ (but not on the surface) increase of the crystallite size. Based on the wavelength dependent photon absorption into graphite, the observed effects are correlated with high density photon per atom and attributed to the melting and recrystallization processes taking place tens of nanometers below the target surface.

  11. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  12. A 2-D nucleation-growth model of spheroidal graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Jacques; Bourdie, Jacques; Castro-Román, Manuel Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of recent experimental investigations, in particular by transmission electron microscopy, suggests spheroidal graphite grows by 2-D nucleation of new graphite layers at the outer surface of the nodules. These layers spread over the surface along the prismatic direction of graphite which is the energetically preferred growth direction of graphite when the apparent growth direction of the nodules is along the basal direction of graphite. 2-D nucleation-growth models first developed for precipitation of pure substances are then adapted to graphite growth from the liquid in spheroidal graphite cast irons. Lateral extension of the new graphite layers is controlled by carbon diffusion in the liquid. This allows describing quantitatively previous experimental results giving strong support to this approach.

  13. Final report on graphite irradiation test OG-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.; Beavan, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of dimensional, thermal expansivity, thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and tensile strength measurements on graphite specimens irradiated in capsule OG-3 are presented. The graphite grades investigated included near-isotropic H-451 (three different preproduction lots), TS-1240, and SO818; needle coke H-327; and European coal tar pitch coke grades P 3 JHA 2 N, P 3 JHAN, and ASI2-500. Data were obtained in the temperature range 823 0 K to 1673 0 K. The peak fast neutron fluence in the experiment was 3 x 10 25 n/m 3 (E greater than 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/; the total accumulated fluence exceeded 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some H-451 specimens and 6 x 10 25 n/m 2 on some TS-1240 specimens. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes on H-451 graphite differed slightly from earlier predictions. For an irradiation temperature of about 1225 0 K, axial shrinkage rates at high fluences were somewhat higher than predicted, and the fluence at which radial expansion started (about 9 x 10 25 n/m 2 at 1275 0 K) was lower. TS-1240 graphite underwent smaller dimensional changes than H-451 graphite, while limited data on SO818 and ASI2-500 graphites showed similar behavior to H-451. P 3 JHAN and P 3 JHA 2 N graphites displayed anisotropic behavior with rapid axial shrinkage. Comparison of dimensional changes between specimens from three logs of H-451 and of TS-1240 graphites showed no significant log-to-log variations for H-451, and small but significant log-to-log variations for TS-1240. The thermal expansivity of the near-isotropic graphites irradiated at 865-1045 0 K first increased by 5 percent to 10 percent and then decreased. At higher irradiation temperatures the thermal expansivity decreased by up to 50 percent. Changes in thermal conductivity were consistent with previously established curves. Specimens which were successively irradiated at two different temperatures took on the saturation conductivity for the new temperature

  14. Project accent: graphite irradiated creep in a materials test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooking, M.

    2014-01-01

    Atkins manages a pioneering programme of irradiation experiments for EDF Energy. One of these projects is Project ACCENT, designed to obtain evidence of a beneficial physical property of the graphite, which may extend the life of the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The project team combines the in-house experience of EDF Energy with two supplier organisations (providing the material test reactors and testing facilities) and supporting consultancies (Atkins and an independent technical expert). This paper describes: - Brief summary of the Project; - Discussion of the challenges faced by the Project; and - Conclusion elaborating on the aims of the Project. These challenging experiments use bespoke technology and both un-irradiated (virgin) and irradiated AGR graphite. The results will help to better understand graphite irradiation-induced creep (or stress modified dimensional change) properties and therefore more accurately determine lifetime and safe operating envelopes of the AGRs. The first round of irradiation has been completed, with a second round about to commence. This is a key step to realising the full lifetime ambition for AGRs, demonstrating the relaxation of stresses within the graphite bricks. (authors)

  15. Irradiation creep performance of graphite relevant for pebble bed HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleist, G.; O'Connor, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation - induced creep in the core reflector component graphite of high temperature reactors is of primary importance to the core designer since it provides a mechanism for the relief of internal stresses arising from differential Wigner shrinkage and thermal expansion. The experimental determination of the extent of this creep for conditions relevant to the reactor is thus imperative

  16. Erosion of pyrolytic graphite and Ti-doped graphite due to high flux irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, Yusuke; Ohashi, Junpei; Ueda, Yoshio; Isobe, Michiro; Nishikawa, Masahiro

    1997-01-01

    The erosion of pyrolytic graphite and titanium doped graphite RG-Ti above 1,780 K was investigated by 5 keV Ar beam irradiation with the flux from 4x10 19 to 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . The total erosion yields were significantly reduced with the flux. This reduction would be attributed to the reduction of RES (radiation enhanced sublimation) yield, which was observed in the case of isotropic graphite with the flux dependence of RES yield of φ -0.26 (φ: flux) obtained in our previous work. The yield of pyrolytic graphite was roughly 30% higher than that of isotropic graphite below the flux of 10 20 m -2 ·s -1 whereas each yield approached to very close value at the highest flux of 1x10 21 m -2 ·s -1 . This result indicated that the effect of graphite structure on the RES yield, which was apparent in the low flux region, would disappear in the high flux region probably due to the disordering of crystal structure. In the case of irradiation to RG-Ti at 1,780 K, the surface undulations evolved with a mean height of about 3 μm at 1.2x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 , while at higher flux of 8.0x10 20 m -2 ·s -1 they were unrecognizable. These phenomena can be explained by the reduction of RES of graphite parts excluding TiC grains. (author)

  17. On the Thermal Conductivity Change of Matrix Graphite Materials after Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Kim, Eung-Seon; Sah, Injin; Park, Daegyu; Kim, Youngjun; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this work, the variations of the thermal conductivity of the A3-3 matrix graphite after neutron irradiation is discussed as well as of the IG-110 graphite for comparison. Neutron irradiation of the graphite specimens was carried out as a part of the first irradiation test of KAERI's coated particle fuel specimens by use of Hanaro research reactor. This work can be summarized as follows: 1) In the evaluation of the specific heat of the graphite materials, various literature data were used and the variations of the specific heat data of all the graphite specimens are observed well agreed, irrespectively of the difference in specimens (graphite and matrix graphite and irradiated and un-irradiated). 2) This implies that it should be reasonable that for both structural graphite and fuel matrix graphite, and even for the neuron-irradiated graphite, any of these specific heat data set be used in the calculation of the thermal conductivity. 3) For the irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity decreased on both directions. On the radial direction, the tendency of variation upon temperature is similar to that of unirradiated specimen, i.e., decreasing as the temperature increases. 4) In the German irradiation experiments with A3-27 matrix graphite specimens, the thermal conductivity of the un-irradiated specimen shows a decrease and that of irradiated specimen is nearly constant as the temperature increases. 5) The thermal conductivity of the irradiated IG-110 was considerably decreased compared with that of un-irradiated specimens The difference of the thermal conductivity of un-irradiated and irradiated IG-110 graphite specimens is much larger than that of un-irradiated and irradiated A3-3 matrix graphite specimens.

  18. The effect of compressive stress on the Young's modulus of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, T.; Usui, T.; Ero, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The Young's moduli of unirradiated and high temperature (800 to 1000 0 C) irradiated graphites for HTGR were measured by the ultrasonic method in the direction of applied compressive stress during and after stressing. The Young's moduli of all the tested graphites decreased with increasing compressive stress both during and after stressing. In order to investigate the reason for the decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress, the mercury pore diameter distributions of a part of the unirradiated and irradiated specimens were measured. The change in pore distribution is believed to be associated with structural changes produced by irradiation and compressive stressing. The residual strain, after removing the compressive stress, showed a good correlation with the decrease in Young's modulus caused by the compressive stress. The decrease in Young's modulus by applying compressive stress was considered to be due to the increase in the mobile dislocation density and the growth or formation of cracks. The results suggest, however, that the mechanism giving the larger contribution depends on the brand of graphite, and in anisotropic graphite it depends on the direction of applied stress and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  19. The utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture for irradiated graphite incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, G.; Perotin, J.P.; Charlot, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the interest of the utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture in the incineration of irradiated graphite. The aqueous phase comes in the form of a three-dimensional system that traps pressurized oxygen, the pulverulent solid being dispersed at the liquid/gas interfaces. These three-phasic formulations give the following advantages: reduction of the apparent viscosity of the mixture in comparison with a solid/liquid mixture at the same solid concentration; reduction of the solid/liquid interactions; self-pulverizability. thus promoting reduction of the flame length utilization of conventional burners; reduction of the flue gas flow rate; complete thermal destruction of graphite. (author)

  20. Studies on the graphite rupture under irradiation induced strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouquet, G.; Berthion, Y.; L'Homme, A.

    1980-01-01

    Following the RMG experiments (failure of graphite by mechanical effect, i.e. under very high temperature gradient) an experimental program called RWG (Failure of Graphite by WIGNER effect) was initiated in 75 at C.E.A. 3 experiments have been already performed in the OSIRIS reactor at Saclay: RWG 01, 02 and 03. A 4th one, RWG04, is scheduled for the end of 79, may be in collaboration with GERMANY. The aim of the RWG experiments is to induce internal stresses in graphite blocks by irradiation at high temperature which would lead or not to their failure so one could bracket, as tightly as possible, the critical value for failure onset in given experimental conditions

  1. Inert annealing of irradiated graphite by inductive heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botzem, W.; Woerner, J.

    2001-01-01

    Fission neutrons change physical properties of graphite being used in nuclear reactors as moderator and as structural material. The understanding of these effects on an atomic model is expressed by dislocations of carbon atoms within the graphite and the thereby stored energy is known as Wigner Energy. The dismantling of the Pile 1 core may necessitate the thermal treatment of the irradiated but otherwise undamaged graphite. This heat treatment - usually called annealing - initiates the release of stored Wigner Energy in a controlled manner. This energy could otherwise give rise to an increase in temperature under certain conditions during transport or preparation for final storage. In order to prevent such an effect it is intended to anneal the major part of Pile 1 graphite before it is packed into boxes suitable for final disposal. Different heating techniques have been assessed. Inductive heating in an inert atmosphere was selected for installation in the Pile 1 Waste Processing Facility built for the treatment and packaging of the dismantled Pile 1 waste. The graphite blocks will be heated up to 250 deg. C in the annealing ovens, which results in the release of significant amount of the stored energy. External heat sources in a final repository will never heat up the storage boxes to such a temperature. (author)

  2. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  3. IAEA international database on irradiated nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Clark, R.E.H.; Stephens, J.A.; Eto, M.; Haag, G.; Hacker, P.; Neighbour, G.B.; Janev, R.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2000-02-01

    This report describes an IAEA database containing data on the properties of irradiated nuclear graphites. Development and implementation of the graphite database followed initial discussions at an IAEA Specialists' Meeting held in September 1995. The design of the database is based upon developments at the University of Bath (United Kingdom), work which the UK Health and Safety Executive initially supported. The database content and data management policies were determined during two IAEA Consultants' Meetings of nuclear reactor graphite specialists held in 1998 and 1999. The graphite data are relevant to the construction and safety case developments required for new and existing HTR nuclear power plants, and to the development of safety cases for continued operation of existing plants. The database design provides a flexible structure for data archiving and retrieval and employs Microsoft Access 97. An instruction manual is provided within this document for new users, including installation instructions for the database on personal computers running Windows 95/NT 4.0 or higher versions. The data management policies and associated responsibilities are contained in the database Working Arrangement which is included as an Appendix to this report. (author)

  4. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  5. Irradiation growth in zirconium alloys: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidleris, V.

    1980-09-01

    The change in shape during irradiation without external stress, irradiation growth, was first discovered in uranium and later in graphite, zirconium and other core materials which exhibit anisotropic physical properties. The direction of maximum growth of metals invariably corresponds with the direction of minimum thermal expansion. In polycrystalline zirconium alloys growth is positive in the direction of maximum deformation during fabrication and in other directions it can be either positive or negative depending on the preferred orientation of grains (crystallographic texture). Growth increases gradually with temperature between 300 K and 620 K and rapidly with fluence up to about 1 x 10 25 n.m. -2 (Eμ1 MeV). At higher fluences the growth appears to saturate in annealed materials and reach a steady rate approximately proportional to dislocation density in cold-worked materials. Above 600 K both annealed and cold-worked materials have similar steady growth rates. Irradiation growth is caused by the segregation to different sinks of the vacancies and interstitials generated by irradiation, but the dominant types of sinks for each type of point defect and the mode of transport of the point defects to sinks cannot therefore be predicted theoretically. For the purpose of designing reactor core components empirical equations have been derived that can satisfactorily predict the steady state growth behaviour from texture and microstructure. (auth)

  6. Graphite irradiated by swift heavy ions under grazing incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, J; Müller, C; Neumann, R

    2002-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is irradiated with various heavy projectiles (Ne, Ni, Zn, Xe and U) in the MeV to GeV energy range under different oblique angles of incidence. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, the impact zones are imaged as hillocks protruding from the surface. The diameter of surface-grazing tracks varies between 3 nm (Ne) and 6 nm (U), which is about twice as large as under normal beam incidence. Exclusively for U and Xe projectiles, grazing tracks exhibit long comet-like tails consisting of successive little bumps indicating that the damage along the ion path is discontinuous even for highest electronic stopping powers.

  7. Study by internal friction of curing low temperature irradiation defects in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouby, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Micromechanical properties and anelastic effects of neutrons irradiated graphites at 300 and 77 0 K are investigated by internal friction analysis and elasticity modulus variations. Defects created by irradiation are studied and evolution versus dose and annealing is followed [fr

  8. The irradiation creep in reactor graphites for HTR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veringa, H.J.; Blackstone, R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of restrained shrinkage experiments on a number of graphites in the temperature range 400 to 1400 0 C is described. A description is given of the experimental method and method of data evaluation. The results are compared with data from other sources. Analysis of data confirms that the creep coefficient, which is defined as the radiation induced creep strain per unit stress per unit neutron fluence, is inversely proportional to the pre-irradiation value of the Young's modulus of the material. The radiation creep coefficient increases with temperature in the range 400 to 1400 0 C. It can be represented by the sum of two temperature dependent functions, one of which is inversely proportional to the neutron flux density, the other independent of the neutron flux density. When the data are analysed in this way it is found that the graphites investigated in the present work, although made from widely different starting materials and by different processes, show the same dependence of the irradiation creep coefficient on the temperature and the neutron flux density. (author)

  9. Changes in the physical and mechanical properties of graphite on irradiation in ditolylmethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilin, A.I.; Lebedev, I.G.; Sudakova, N.V.; Rizvanov, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from the irradiation and mechanical and structural testing of four grades of graphite - GMZ, VPG, MPG-6, and PG-50 - for use as moderator materials in organic cooled and graphite moderated reactors. Irradiation was carried out in the ARBUS-AST-1 reactor. Photomicrography was used to determine pore structure and ultimate strength in bending and compression was determined mechanically. Irradiation was found to increase the strength of GMZ, PMG-6, and PG-50 considerably, due to the healing of microdefects as a result of the pores filling with radiolysis products from the coolant, ditolylmethane. Conversely, VPG graphite, which has closed porosity, lost strength on irradiation

  10. Effect of various dopant elements on primary graphite growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, N; Theuwissen, K; Lacaze, J; Sertucha, J

    2012-01-01

    Five spheroidal graphite cast irons were investigated, a usual ferritic grade and four pearlitic alloys containing Cu and doped with Sb, Sn and Ti. These alloys were remelted in a graphite crucible, leading to volatilization of the magnesium added for spheroidization and to carbon saturation of the liquid. The alloys were then cooled down and maintained at a temperature above the eutectic temperature. During this step, primary graphite could develop showing various features depending on the doping elements added. The largest effects were that of Ti which greatly reduces graphite nucleation and growth, and that of Sb which leads to rounded agglomerates instead of lamellar graphite. The samples have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry to enlighten distribution of elements in primary graphite. SIMS analysis showed almost even distribution of elements, including Mg and Al (from the inoculant) in the ferritic grade, while uneven distribution was evident in all doped alloys. Investigations are going on to clarify if the uneven distribution is associated with structural defects in the graphite precipitates.

  11. Effects of the temperature and the irradiation on the behaviour of chlorine 37 in nuclear graphite: consequences on the mobility of chlorine 36 in irradiated graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the studies of the management of irradiated graphite wastes issued from the dismantling of the UNGG French reactors. This work focuses on the behavior of 36 Cl. This radionuclide is mainly issued through the neutron activation of 35 Cl by the reaction 35 Cl(n, γ) 36 Cl, pristine chlorine being an impurity of nuclear graphite, present at the level of some at.ppm. 36 Cl is a long lived radionuclide (about 300,000 years) and is highly soluble in water and mobile in concrete and clay. The solubilization of 36 Cl is controlled by the water accessibility into irradiated graphite pores as well as by factors related to 36 Cl itself such as its chemical speciation and its location within the irradiated graphite. Both speciation and chlorine location should strongly influence its behaviour and need to be taken into account for the choice of liable management options. However, data on radioactive chlorine features are difficult to assess in irradiated graphite and are mainly related to detection sensitivity problems. In this context, we simulated and evaluated the impact of the temperature, the irradiation and the radiolytic oxidation on the chlorine 36 behaviour. In order to simulate the presence of 36 Cl, we implanted 37 Cl into virgin nuclear graphite. Ion implantation has been widely used to study the lattice location, the diffusion and the release of fission and activation products in nuclear materials. Our results on the comparative effects of the temperature and the irradiation show that chlorine occurs in irradiated graphite on temperature and electronic and nuclear irradiation improve this effect. (author)

  12. Irradiation-induced creep in graphite: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    Data on irradiation-induced creep in graphite published since 1972 are reviewed. Sources include restrained shrinkage tests conducted at Petten, the Netherlands, tensile creep experiments with continuous strain registration at Petten and Grenoble, France, and controlled load tests with out-of-reactor strain measurement performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Petten, and in the United Kingdom. The data provide reasonable confirmation of the linear viscoelastic creep model with a recoverable transient strain component followed by a steady-state strain component, except that the steady-state creep coefficient must be treated as a function of neutron fluence and is higher for tensile loading than for compressive loading. The total transient creep strain is approximately equal to the preceding elastic strain. No temperature dependence of the transient creep parameters has been demonstrated. The initial steady-state creep coefficient is inversely proportional to the unirradiated Young modulus

  13. Derivation of a radionuclide inventory for irradiated graphite-chlorine-36 inventory determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.J.; Palmer, J.D.; Wood, P.

    2001-01-01

    The irradiation of materials in nuclear reactors results in neutron activation of component elements. Irradiated graphite wastes arise from their use in UK gas-cooled research and commercial reactor cores, and in fuel element components, where the graphite has acted as the neutron moderator. During irradiation the residual chlorine, which was used to purify the graphite during manufacture, is activated to chlorine-36. This isotope is long-lived and poorly retarded by geological barriers, and may therefore be a key radionuclide with respect to post-closure disposal facilities performance. United Kingdom Nirex Limited, currently responsible for the development of a disposal route for intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK, carried out a major research programme to support an overall assessment of the chlorine-36 activity of all wastes including graphite reactor components. The various UK gas cooled reactors reactors have used a range of graphite components made from diverse graphite types; this has necessitated a systematic programme to cover the wide range of graphite and production processes. The programme consisted of: precursor measurements - on the surface and/or bulk of representative samples of relevant materials, using specially developed methods; transfer studies - to quantify the potential for transfer of Cl-36 into and between waste streams during irradiation of graphite; theoretical assessments - to support the calculational methodology; actual measurements - to confirm the modelling. For graphite, a total of 458 measurements on samples from 57 batches were performed, to provide a detailed understanding of the composition of nuclear graphite. The work has resulted in the generation of probability density functions (PDF) for the mean chlorine concentration of three classes of graphite: fuel element graphite; Magnox moderator and reflector graphite and AGR reflector graphite; AGR moderator graphite. Transfer studies have shown that a significant

  14. Some physical methods for study of irradiation effects in graphite; Quelques procedes physiques pour etudier les effets de l'irradiation du graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, G; Lecomte, M; Mattmuller, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    A calibration method for a classical apparatus for differential thermal analysis is described in detail. This method achieves a relative precision of 5 per cent in the measurement of the internal energy release accompanying the annealing of irradiated graphites. Elastic constants of graphites are obtained from the frequencies of the longitudinal modes of vibration; procedures for excitation and detection of these vibrations at any temperature between -190 deg. C and +1500 deg. C are described. A procedure for obtaining easily measured deformations of graphites after relatively little irradiation with thermal neutrons is discussed. An application of this method to the study of the thermal annealing of elongation caused by displaced atoms is indicated. (author) [French] On decrit en detail une methode d'etalonnage pour un appareil classique d'analyse thermique differentielle. Cette methode permet de mesurer avec une precision relative de 5% la liberation d'energie interne qui accompagne le 'recuit' des graphites irradies. On deduit les constantes elastiques des graphites des frequences des vibrations longitudinales et on decrit les procedes pour exciter et detecter ces vibrations a toutes les temperatures comprises entre -190 deg. C et + 1500 deg. C. On discute un procede pour obtenir une des deformations de graphites facilement mesurables apres une irradiation relativement faible a l'aide de neutrons thermiques. Une application de cette methode a l'etude du 'recuit' thermique de l'elongation causee par les atomes deplaces est indiquee. (auteur)

  15. Studies on the behavior of graphite structures irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.; Ridealgh, F.

    1971-11-15

    Design data for the physical and mechanical property changes which occur in graphite structural and fuel body components irradiated in an HTR are largely obtained from small specimens tested in the laboratory and in materials test reactors. A brief data summary is given. This graphite physics data can be used to predict dimensional changes, internal stress generation and strength changes in the graphite materials of HTR fuel elements irradiated in the Dragon Reactor. In this paper, the results which have been obtained from post-irradiation examination of a number of fuel pins, are compared with prediction.

  16. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, J; Theuwissen, K; Laffont, L; Véron, M

    2016-01-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions. (paper)

  17. Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids in bainite during graphitization annealing of a medium carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.X.; Wei, B.Q.; Li, D.D.; He, K.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in bainite during graphitization annealing at 680 °C of Jominy-quenched bars of an Al-Si bearing medium carbon (0.4C wt%) steel has been studied and compared with that in martensite by using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the graphitization process in bainite is different from that in martensite in many aspects such as the initial carbon state, the behavior of cementite, the nucleation-growth feature and kinetics of formation of graphite spheroids during graphitization annealing, and the shape, size and distribution of these graphite spheroids. The fact that the graphitization in bainite can produce more homogeneous graphite spheroids with more spherical shape and finer size in a shorter annealing time without the help of preexisting coring particles implies that bainite should be a better starting structure than martensite for making graphitic steel. - Highlights: • This article presents a microstructural characterization of formation of graphite spheroids in bainite. • Nucleation and growth characteristics of graphite spheroids formed in bainite and martensite are compared. • Bainite should be a better starting structure for making graphitic steel as results show.

  18. Graphite Isotope Ratio Method Development Report: Irradiation Test Demonstration of Uranium as a Low Fluence Indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.D.; Gerlach, D.C.; Love, E.F.; McNeece, J.P.; Livingston, J.V.; Greenwood, L.R.; Petersen, S.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes an irradiation test designed to investigate the suitability of uranium as a graphite isotope ratio method (GIRM) low fluence indicator. GIRM is a demonstrated concept that gives a graphite-moderated reactor's lifetime production based on measuring changes in the isotopic ratio of elements known to exist in trace quantities within reactor-grade graphite. Appendix I of this report provides a tutorial on the GIRM concept

  19. Study on "1"4C content in post-irradiation graphite spheres of HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shouang; Pi Yue; Xie Feng; Li Hong; Cao Jianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Since the production mechanism of the "1"4C in spherical fuel elements was similar to that of fuel-free graphite spheres, in order to obtain the amount of "1"4C in fuel elements and graphite spheres of HTR-10, the production mechanism of the "1"4C in graphite spheres was studied. The production sources of the "1"4C in graphite spheres and fuel elements were summarized, the amount of "1"4C in the post-irradiation graphite spheres was calculated, the decomposition techniques of graphite spheres were compared, and experimental methods for decomposing the graphite spheres and preparing the "1"4C sample were proposed. The results can lay the foundation for further experimental research and provide theoretical calculations for comparison. (authors)

  20. Influence of irradiation on high-strength graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu.S.; Grebennik, V.N.; Kalyagina, I.P.

    1989-01-01

    To ensure efficiency of the graphite elements of the construction of the masonry of reactors, the graphite must possess high radiation stability, strength, and heat resistance. In this connection, the physical properties of graphites based on uncalcined petroleum coke with a binder - high-temperature hard coal pitch - the amount of which reaches 40% are considered in this paper

  1. The reaction of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphites with water vapor in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hisashi; Nomura, Shinzo; Kurosawa, Takeshi; Fujii, Kimio; Sasaki, Yasuichi

    1980-10-01

    Nuclear graphites more than 10 brands were oxidized with water vapor in helium and then some selected graphites were irradiated with fast neutron in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor to clarify the effect of radiation damage of graphite on their reaction behaviors. The reaction was carried out under a well defined condition in the temperature range 800 -- 1000 0 C at concentrations of water vapor 0.38 -- 1.30 volume percent in helium flow of total pressure of 1 atm. The chemical reactivity of graphite irradiated at 1000 +- 50 0 C increased linearly with neutron fluence until irradiation of 3.2 x 10 21 n/cm 2 . The activation energy for the reaction was found to decrease with neutron fluence for almost all the graphites, except for a few ones. The order of reaction increased from 0.5 for the unirradiated graphite to 1.0 for the graphite irradiated up to 6.0 x 10 20 n/cm 2 . Experiment was also performed to study a superposed effect between the influence of radiation damage of graphite and the catalytic action of barium on the reaction rate, as well as the effect of catalyser of barium. It was shown that these effects were not superposed upon each other, although barium had a strong catalytic action on the reaction. (author)

  2. Production of nanodiamonds by high-energy ion irradiation of graphite at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daulton, T.L.; Kirk, M.A.; Lewis, R.S.; Rehn, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    It has previously been shown that graphite can be transformed into diamond by MeV electron and ion irradiation at temperatures above approximately 600 deg. C. However, there exists geological evidence suggesting that carbonaceous materials can be transformed to diamond by irradiation at substantially lower temperatures. For example, submicron-size diamond aggregates have been found in uranium-rich, Precambrian carbonaceous deposits that never experienced high temperature or pressure. To test if diamonds can be formed at lower irradiation temperatures, sheets of fine-grain polycrystalline graphite were bombarded at 20 deg. C with 350±50 MeV Kr ions to fluences of 6x10 12 cm -2 using the Argonne tandem linear accelerator system (ATLAS). Ion-irradiated (and unirradiated control) graphite specimens were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove untransformed graphite and isolate diamonds that were produced; these acid residues were subsequently characterized by high-resolution and analytical electron microscopy. The acid residue of the ion-irradiated graphite was found to contain nanodiamonds, demonstrating that ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond. The diamond yield under our irradiation conditions is low, ∼0.01 diamonds/ion. An important observation that emerges from comparing the present result with previous observations of diamond formation during irradiation is that nanodiamonds form under a surprisingly wide range of irradiation conditions. This propensity may be related to the very small difference in the graphite and diamond free-energies coupled with surface-energy considerations that may alter the relative stability of diamond and graphite at nanometer sizes

  3. Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gilpin R.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Olson, Donald W.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Graphite is a form of pure carbon that normally occurs as black crystal flakes and masses. It has important properties, such as chemical inertness, thermal stability, high electrical conductivity, and lubricity (slipperiness) that make it suitable for many industrial applications, including electronics, lubricants, metallurgy, and steelmaking. For some of these uses, no suitable substitutes are available. Steelmaking and refractory applications in metallurgy use the largest amount of produced graphite; however, emerging technology uses in large-scale fuel cell, battery, and lightweight high-strength composite applications could substantially increase world demand for graphite.Graphite ores are classified as “amorphous” (microcrystalline), and “crystalline” (“flake” or “lump or chip”) based on the ore’s crystallinity, grain-size, and morphology. All graphite deposits mined today formed from metamorphism of carbonaceous sedimentary rocks, and the ore type is determined by the geologic setting. Thermally metamorphosed coal is the usual source of amorphous graphite. Disseminated crystalline flake graphite is mined from carbonaceous metamorphic rocks, and lump or chip graphite is mined from veins in high-grade metamorphic regions. Because graphite is chemically inert and nontoxic, the main environmental concerns associated with graphite mining are inhalation of fine-grained dusts, including silicate and sulfide mineral particles, and hydrocarbon vapors produced during the mining and processing of ore. Synthetic graphite is manufactured from hydrocarbon sources using high-temperature heat treatment, and it is more expensive to produce than natural graphite.Production of natural graphite is dominated by China, India, and Brazil, which export graphite worldwide. China provides approximately 67 percent of worldwide output of natural graphite, and, as the dominant exporter, has the ability to set world prices. China has significant graphite reserves, and

  4. Nuclear graphite based on coal tar pitch; behavior under neutron irradiation between 400 and 14000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottet, P.; Fillatre, A.; Schill, R.; Micaud, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two nuclear grades of coal tar pitch coke graphites have been developed and tested under neutron irradiation. The neutron irradiation induced dimensional changes between 400 and 1400 0 C, at fluences up to 1,2.10 22 n.cm -2 PHI.FG show a behavior comparable to anisotropic petroleum coke graphites. Less than 10% variation in thermal expansion, maximum decrease by a factor four in thermal conductivity, and large increase of the Young modulus have been observed

  5. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Nocera, P.; Zwaska, R.; Mokhov, N.

    2017-01-01

    In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140–180 MeV, to peak fluence of ~6.1×10"2"0 p/cm"2 and irradiation temperatures between 120–200 °C. The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a) comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b) understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young’s modulus. The proton fluence level of ~10"2"0 cm"-"2 where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite revealed for the first time the similarity in

  6. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, N.; Nocera, P.; Zhong, Z.; Zwaska, R.; Mokhov, N.; Misek, J.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Kotsina, Z.

    2017-07-01

    In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140-180 MeV, to peak fluence of ˜6.1 ×1020 p /cm2 and irradiation temperatures between 120 - 200 °C . The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a) comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b) understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young's modulus. The proton fluence level of ˜1020 cm-2 where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite revealed for the first time the similarity in

  7. Management of radioactive waste in nuclear power: handling of irradiated graphite from water-cooled graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfimov, S.S.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of decommissioning of water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors, a large amount of rad-waste in the form of graphite stack fragments is generated (on average 1500-2000 tons per reactor). That is why it is essentially important, although complex from the technical point of view, to develop advanced technologies based on up-to-date remotely-controlled systems for unmanned dismantling of the graphite stack containing highly-active long-lived radionuclides and for conditioning of irradiated graphite (IG) for the purposes of transportation and subsequent long term and ecologically safe storage either on NPP sites or in special-purpose geological repositories. The main characteristics critical for radiation and nuclear hazards of the graphite stack are as follows: the graphite stack is contaminated with nuclear fuel that has gotten there as a result of the accidents; the graphite mass is 992 tons, total activity -6?104 Ci (at the time of unit shutdown); the fuel mass in the reactor stack amounts to 100-140 kg, as estimated by IPPE and RDIPE, respectively; γ-radiation dose rate in the stack cells varies from 4 to 4300 R/h, with the prevailing values being in the range from 50 to 100 R/h. In this paper the traditional methods of rad-waste handling as bituminization technology, cementing technology are discussed. In terms of IG handling technology two lines were identified: long-term storage of conditioned IG and IG disposal by means of incineration. The specific cost of graphite immobilization in a radiation-resistant polymeric matrix amounts to -2600 USD per 1 t of graphite, whereas the specific cost of immobilization in slag-stone containers with an inorganic binder (cement) is -1400 USD per 1 t of graphite. On the other hand, volume of conditioned IG rad-waste subject for disposal, if obtained by means of the first technology, is 2-2.5 times less than the volume of rad-waste generated by means of the second technology. It can be concluded from the above that

  8. Determination of Cl-36 in Irradiated Reactor Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.-F.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T.; Hartmann, E.; Kramer, A.

    2016-01-01

    Two of the three research reactors at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the reactors DIORIT and PROTEUS, contained reactor graphite. Whereas the former research reactor DIORIT has been dismantled completely the PROTEUS is subject to a future decommissioning. In case of the DIORIT the reactor graphite was conditioned applying a procedure developed at PSI. In this case the 36 Cl content had to be determined after the conditioning. The result is reported in this paper. The radionuclide inventory including 36 Cl of the graphite used in PROTEUS was measured and the results are reported in here. It has been proven that the graphite from PROTEUS has a radionuclide inventory near the detection limits. All determined radionuclide activities are far below the Swiss exemptions limits. The graphite from PROTEUS therefore poses no radioactive waste. In contrast, the 36 Cl content of graphite from DIORIT is well above the exemption limits. (author)

  9. Modification of graphite structure by irradiation, revealed by thermal oxidation. Examination by electronic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouaud, Michel

    1969-01-01

    Based on the analysis of images obtained by electronic microscopy, this document reports the comparative study of the action of neutrons on three different graphites: a natural one (Ticonderoga) and two pyrolytic ones (Carbone-Lorraine and Raytheon). The approach is based on the modification of features of thermal oxidation of graphites by dry air after irradiation. Different corrosion features are identified. The author states that there seems to be a relationship between the number and shape of these features, and defects existing on the irradiated graphite before oxidation. For low doses, the feature aspect varies with depth at which oxidation occurs. For higher doses, the aspect remains the same [fr

  10. A reverse method for the determination of the radiological inventory of irradiated graphite at reactor scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicaise, Gregory [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Poncet, Bernard [EDF-DP2D, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-15

    Irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six gas-cooled nuclear reactors operated by Electricite De France (EDF). Determining the radionuclide content of this waste is an important legal commitment for both safety reasons and in order to determine the best suited management strategy. As evidenced by numerous studies nuclear graphite is a very pure material, however, it cannot be considered from an analytical viewpoint as a usual homogeneous material. Because of graphite high purity, radionuclide measurements in irradiated graphite exhibit very high discrepancies especially when corresponding to precursors at trace level. Therefore the assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements leads in most of cases to a gross over or under-estimation that can be detrimental to graphite waste management. A reverse method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess the radionuclide inventory as precisely as possible.

  11. Carbowaste: treatment and disposal of irradiated graphite and other carbonaceous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Lensa, W.; Rizzato, C.; Baginski, K.; Banford, A.W.; Bradbury, D.; Goodwin, J.; Grambow, B.; Grave, M.J.; Jones, A.N.; Laurent, G.; Pina, G.; Vulpius, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European Project on 'Treatment and Disposal of Irradiated Graphite and other Carbonaceous Waste (CARBOWASTE)' addressed the retrieval, characterization, treatment, reuse and disposal of irradiated graphite with the following main results: - I-graphite waste features significantly depend on the specific manufacture process, on the operational conditions in the nuclear reactor (neutron dose, atmosphere, temperature etc.) and on radiolytic oxidation leading to partial releases of activation products and precursors during operation. - The neutron activation process generates significant recoil energies breaking pre-existing chemical bonds resulting in dislocations of activation products and new chemical compounds. - Most activation products exist in different chemical forms and at different locations. - I-graphite can be partly purified by thermal and chemical treatment processes leaving more leach-resistant waste products. - Leach tests and preliminary performance analyses show that i-graphite can be safely disposed of in a wide range of disposal systems, after appropriate treatment and/or conditioning. (authors)

  12. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD on Graphite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Due to the superior electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT), synthesizing CNT on various substances for electronics devices and reinforced composites have been engaged in many efforts for applications. This presentation will illustrate CNT synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal CVD. On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles as catalysts for CNT growth are coated. The growth temperature ranges from 600 to 1000 C and the pressure ranges from 100 Torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than or equal to 900 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in the rough fiber surface without any CNT grown on it. When the growth temperature is relative low (650-800 C), CNT with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends are fabricated on the graphite surface. (Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis.) (By measuring the samples) Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), depending on growth concentrations, are found. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  13. Verification of thermal-irradiation stress analytical code VIENUS of graphite block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyoku, Tatsuo; Ishihara, Masahiro; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Shirai, Hiroshi; Minato, Kazuo.

    1992-02-01

    The core graphite components of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) show both the dimensional change (irradiation shrinkage) and creep behavior due to fast neutron irradiation under the temperature and the fast neutron irradiation conditions of the HTTR. Therefore, thermal/irradiation stress analytical code, VIENUS, which treats these graphite irradiation behavior, is to be employed in order to design the core components such as fuel block etc. of the HTTR. The VIENUS is a two dimensional finite element viscoelastic stress analytical code to take account of changes in mechanical properties, thermal strain, irradiation-induced dimensional change and creep in the fast neutron irradiation environment. Verification analyses were carried out in order to prove the validity of this code based on the irradiation tests of the 8th OGL-1 fuel assembly and the fuel element of the Peach Bottom reactor. This report describes the outline of the VIENUS code and its verification analyses. (author)

  14. Rate-dependent mode I interlaminar crack growth mechanisms in graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Carlsson, L. A.; Smiley, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the mode I fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites is examined over four decades of crosshead rates (0.25-250 mm/min). Straight-sided double-cantilever-beam specimens consisting of unidirectional laminates were tested at room temperature. For graphite/epoxy the load-deflection response was linear to fracture, and stable slow crack growth initiating at the highest load level was observed for all rates tested. In contrast, mode I crack growth in the graphite/PEEK material was often unstable and showed stick-slip behavior. Subcritical crack growth occurring prior to the onset of fracture was observed at intermediate displacement rates. A mechanism for the fracture behavior of the graphite/PEEK material (based on viscoelastic, plastic, and microcrack coalescence in the process zone) is proposed and related to the observed rate-dependent phenomena.

  15. Irradiated graphite studies prior to decommissioning of G1, G2 and G3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonal, J.P.; Vistoli, J.Ph.; Combes, C.

    2005-01-01

    G1 (46 MW th ), G2 (250 MW th ) and G3 (250 MW th ) are the first French plutonium production reactors owned by CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique). They started to be operated in 1956 (G1), 1959 (G2) and 1960 (G3); their final shutdown occurred in 1968, 1980 and 1984 respectively. Each reactor used about 1200 tons of graphite as moderator, moreover in G2 and G3, a 95 tons graphite wall is used to shield the rear side concrete from neutron irradiation. G1 is an air cooled reactor operated at a graphite temperature ranging from 30 C to 230 C; G2 and G3 are CO 2 cooled reactors and during operation the graphite temperature is higher (140 C to 400 C). These reactors are now partly decommissioned, but the graphite stacks are still inside the reactors. The graphite core radioactivity has decreased enough so that a full decommissioning stage may be considered. Conceming this decommissioning, the studies reported here are: (i) stored energy in graphite, (ii) graphite radioactivity measurements, (iii) leaching of radionuclide ( 14 C, 36 Cl, 63 Ni, 60 Co, 3 H) from graphite, (iv) chlorine diffusion through graphite. (authors)

  16. Processing of Irradiated Graphite to Meet Acceptance Criteria for Waste Disposal. Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is widely used in the nuclear industry and in research facilities and this has led to increasing amounts of irradiated graphite residing in temporary storage facilities pending disposal. This publication arises from a coordinated research project (CRP) on the processing of irradiated graphite to meet acceptance criteria for waste disposal. It presents the findings of the CRP, the general conclusions and recommendations. The topics covered include, graphite management issues, characterization of irradiated graphite, processing and treatment, immobilization and disposal. Included on the attached CD-ROM are formal reports from the participants

  17. Development of an apparatus for measuring the thermal conductivity of irradiated or non-irradiated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, M.; Micaud, G.

    1962-01-01

    An apparatus was developed for measuring the thermal conductivity coefficient K of irradiated or non-irradiated graphite. The measurement of K at around room temperature with an accuracy of about 6% is possible. The study specimen is placed in a vacuum between a hot and a cold source which create a temperature gradient ΔΘ/ Δx in the steady state. The amount of heat transferred, Q, is deduced from the electrical power dissipated at the hot source, after allowing for heat losses. The thermal conductivity coefficient is defined as: K = Q/S. Δx/ΔΘ, S being the cross section of the sample. Systematic studies have made it possible to determine the mean values of the thermal conductivity. (authors) [fr

  18. Irradiation test plan of oxidation-resistant graphite in WWR-K Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Sakaba, Nariaki; Osaki, Hirotaka; Kato, Hideki; Fujitsuka, Kunihiro; Muto, Takenori; Gizatulin, Shamil; Shaimerdenov, Asset; Dyussambayev, Daulet; Chakrov, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Graphite materials are used for the in-core components of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) which is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor. In the case of air ingress accident in HTGR, SiO_2 protective layer is formed on the surface of SiC layer in TRISO CFP and oxidation of SiC does not proceed and fission products are retained inside the fuel particle. A new safety concept for the HTGR, called Naturally Safe HTGR, has been recently proposed. To enhance the safety of Naturally Safe HTGR ultimately, it is expected that oxidation-resistant graphite is used for graphite components to prevent the TRISO CFPs and fuel compacts from failure. SiC coating is one of candidate methods for oxidation-resistant graphite. JAEA and four graphite companies launched R&Ds to develop the oxidation-resistant graphite and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) partner project with JAEA and INP was launched to investigate the irradiation effects on the oxidation-resistant graphite. To determine grades of the oxidation-resistant graphite which will be adopted as irradiation test, a preliminary oxidation test was carried out. This paper described the results of the preliminary oxidation test, the plan of out-of-pile test, irradiation test and post-irradiation test (PIE) of the oxidation-resistant graphite. The results of the preliminary oxidation test showed that the integrity of the oxidation resistant graphite was confirmed and that all of grades used in the preliminary test can be adopted as the irradiation test. Target irradiation temperature was determined to be 1473 (K) and neutron fluence was determined to be from 0.54 × 10"2"5through 1.4 × 10"2"5 (/m"2, E>0.18MeV). Weight change, oxidation rate, activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in out-of-pile test and weight change, irradiation effect on oxidation rate and activation energy, surface condition, etc. will be evaluated in PIE. (author)

  19. Tests for removal of Co-60 and Eu-154 from irradiated graphite in the TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsene, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The irradiated graphite in Romania is mainly generated in the thermal columns of TRIGA and WWER-S research reactors (about 9 tones). It was found that the radionuclide content of the graphite irradiated in the TRIGA research reactor is mainly due to C-14 (103 Bq/g), Eu-152 (600-700 Bq/g) and Co-60 (130-150 Bq/g) and low amounts of Eu-154 and Cs-137, depending on location in the thermal column and on irradiation history. In order to minimize the waste inventory and volume in view of their final disposal, in the present paper we show the results of experiments performed for developing and optimizing methods for the chemical decontamination of the irradiated graphite. These procedures are based on strong alkaline solutions for Eu-152 and strong acid solutions for Co-60. The influence of the process parameters on the decontamination factor is investigated. (authors)

  20. Temperature dependence of the thermal expansion of neutron-irradiated pyrolytic carbon and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Hideto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation and annealing on the temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion of pyrolytic carbon and graphite were investigated after irradiation at 930-1280 0 C to a maximum neutron fluence of 2.84 x 10 25 m -2 (E > 29 fJ). After irradiation, little change in the thermal expansion of pyrolytic graphite was observed. However, as-deposited pyrolytic carbon showed an increase in thermal expansion in the perpendicular direction, a decrease in the direction parallel to the deposition plane, and also an increase in the anisotropy of the thermal expansion. Annealing at 2000 0 C did not cause any effective changes for irradiated specimens of either as-deposited pyrolytic carbon or pyrolytic graphite. (author)

  1. A discussion of possible mechanisms affecting fission product transport in irradiated and unirradiated nuclear grade graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, M.J.

    1977-09-01

    137 Cs, 85 Sr, and sup(110m)Ag adsorption experiments were conducted on three graphite powders with differing amounts of specific basal and edge surface areas. No direct proportionality was found between the specific amounts of the isotopes adsorbed and either of the surface characteristics. There appears to be some correlation with the specific basal surface area despite the fact that each isotope behaves differently. Factors that might influence the adsorption behaviour of Cs and Ag during reactor irradiation and heat treatment of nuclear grade graphites are discussed. These include the form of Cs with the graphite surface. A model based on Cs adsorption at vacancy clusters is used to analyse adsorption experiments. A possible explanation for the behaviour of Ag through the migration of graphite impurities from the bulk of the graphite to the pore surface is also discussed. (author)

  2. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ?JOYO? fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor "JOYO" to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86 × 10 26 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597°C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens.

  3. Change in physical properties of high density isotropic graphites irradiated in the ''JOYO'' fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, T.; Kaito, T.; Onose, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597 C. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the dimensional changes, elastic modulus, and thermal conductivity of these materials. Dimensional change results indicate that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased by two to three times the unirradiated values. The large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependence on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, with a negligible change in specific heat. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (orig.)

  4. Exercise of Intercomparison on characterization of graphite irradiated: CW-RRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Lara, E.; Magro, E.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of inventory of irradiated graphite (i-graphite) of nuclear reactors is a critical parameter for the proper management of waste. For this reason it is of paramount importance have access to reliable analytical methodologies to provide accurate results through radiochemical procedures specifics. La reliability of the result depends on both its precision and the accuracy obtained. this requires specific tasks compared to other methods, such as the extent of an array reference or conducting intercomparison exercises between laboratories. (Author)

  5. Special graphites; Graphites speciaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [French] Ameliorer les proprietes du graphite nucleaire pour empilements et ouvrir de nouveaux domaines d'application au graphite constituent une part importante de l'effort entrepris en commun par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) et la compagnie PECHINEY. Des procedes nouveaux de fabrication de carbones et graphites speciaux ont ete mis au point: graphite forge, pyrocarbone, graphite de haute densite, agglomeration de poudres de graphite par craquage de gaz naturel, graphites impermeables. Les proprietes physiques de ces produits ainsi que leur reaction avec differents gaz oxydants sont decrites. Les premiers resultats d'irradiation sont aussi donnes. (auteurs)

  6. Source Term Analysis of the Irradiated Graphite in the Core of HTR-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuegang Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR has potential utilization due to its featured characteristics such as inherent safety and wide diversity of utilization. One distinct difference between HTGR and traditional pressurized water reactor (PWR is the large inventory of graphite in the core acting as reflector, moderator, or structure materials. Some radionuclides will be generated in graphite during the period of irradiation, which play significant roles in reactor safety, environmental release, waste disposal, and so forth. Based on the actual operation of the 10 MW pebble bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10 in Tsinghua University, China, an experimental study on source term analysis of the irradiated graphite has been done. An irradiated graphite sphere was randomly collected from the core of HTR-10 as sample in this study. This paper focuses on the analytical procedure and the establishment of the analytical methodology, including the sample collection, graphite sample preparation, and analytical parameters. The results reveal that the Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-152, and Eu-154 are the major γ contributors, while H-3 and C-14 are the dominating β emitting nuclides in postirradiation graphite material of HTR-10. The distribution profiles of the above four nuclides are also presented.

  7. Assessment of different mechanisms of C-14 production in irradiated graphite of RBMK-1500 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narkunas, Ernestas; Smaizys, Arturas; Poskas, Povilas; Kilda, Raimondas

    2010-01-01

    Two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) are under decommissioning now. The total mass of irradiated graphite in the cores of both units is more than 3600 tons. The main source of uncertainty in the numerical assessment of graphite activity is the uncertainty of the initial impurities content in graphite. Nitrogen is one of the most important impurities, having a large neutron capture cross-section. This impurity may become the dominant source of C-14 production. RBMK reactors graphite stacks operate in the cooling mixture of helium-nitrogen gases and this may additionally increase the quantity of the nitrogen impurity. In this paper the results of the numerical modelling of graphite activation for the INPP Unit I reactor are presented. In order to evaluate the C-14 activity dependence on the nitrogen impurity content, several cases with different nitrogen content were modelled taking into account initial nitrogen impurity quantities in the graphite matrix and possible nitrogen quantities entrapped in the graphite pores from cooling gases. (orig.)

  8. Development of an apparatus for measuring the thermal conductivity of irradiated or non-irradiated graphite; Realisation d'un appareil de mesure de la conductibilite thermique du graphite irradie ou non irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquet, M; Micaud, G

    1962-07-01

    An apparatus was developed for measuring the thermal conductivity coefficient K of irradiated or non-irradiated graphite. The measurement of K at around room temperature with an accuracy of about 6% is possible. The study specimen is placed in a vacuum between a hot and a cold source which create a temperature gradient {delta}{theta}/ {delta}x in the steady state. The amount of heat transferred, Q, is deduced from the electrical power dissipated at the hot source, after allowing for heat losses. The thermal conductivity coefficient is defined as: K = Q/S. {delta}x/{delta}{theta}, S being the cross section of the sample. Systematic studies have made it possible to determine the mean values of the thermal conductivity. (authors) [French] Un appareil de mesure du coefficient de conductibilite thermique K du graphite irradie ou non irradie a ete realise. Utilisant le principe du transfert de chaleur, il permet de mesurer K au voisinage de la temperature ambiante avec une precision de 6 pour cent environ. L'echantillon de graphite etudie est place sous vide entre une source chaude et une source froide qui creent en regime permanent un gradient de temperature {delta}{theta}/{delta}x La quantite de chaleur transferee Q est deduite de la puissance electrique dissipee dans la source chaude en deduisant les pertes thermiques. Le coefficient de conductibilite thermique est defini par: K = Q/S. {delta}x/{delta}{theta} S designant la section de l'echantillon. Des etudes systematiques ont permis de determiner pour differents graphites non irradies les valeurs moyennes des coefficients de conductibilite thermique. Ces etudes ont mis en evidence pour un type de graphite donne, l'influence de la densite apparente sur le coefficient de conductibilite thermique. A partir de mesures effectuees sur des echantillons de graphite irradies preleves par carottage dans les empilements des reacteurs a moderateur de graphite les variations du rapport K0/Ki en fonction de la dose et de la

  9. High-temperature irradiation effects on mechnical properties of HTGR graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Eto, Motokuni; Fujisaki, Katsuo

    1978-04-01

    The irradiation effects on stress-strain relation, Young's modulus, tensile strength, bending strength and compressive strength of HTGR graphites were studied in irradiation temperature ranges of 200 - 300 0 C and 800 - 1400 0 C and in neutron fluences up to 7.4 x 10 20 n/cm 2 and 3 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (> 0.18 MeV). Fracture criteria and strain energy to fracture of the unirradiated and the irradiated graphites were also examined. (1) Neutron fluence dependences are similar in Young's modulus, tensile strength and bending strength. (2) The change of compressive strength and of tensile and bending strengths with neutron fluence differ; the former varies with graphite kind. (3) At lower irradiation temperatures the bending fracture strain energy decreases with increasing neutron fluence and at higher irradiation temperatures it increases. (4) The fracture criteria of graphites deviates from the constant strain energy theory (α = 0.5) and the constant strain theory (α = 1), shifting from α asymptotically equals 0.5 to α asymptotically equals 1 with increasing irradiation temperature. (auth.)

  10. Differences in the irradiation effects of IG-110 and IG-430 nuclear graphites : effects of coke difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Kim, Gen Chan; Kim, Eung Seon; Hong, Jin Ki; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-01-01

    In the high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), graphite acts as a moderator and reflector as well as a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and shut down, and thermal and neutron shielding. During a reactor operation, many of the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of these graphite components are significantly modified as a function of the temperature, environment, and an irradiation. On the other hand, currently, all the nuclear graphites are being manufactured from two types of cokes, i.e., petroleum and coal-tar pitch coke, and it has been understood that the type of coke plays the most critical role determining the properties of a specific graphite grade. To investigate the effects of coke types on the irradiation response of a graphite, two graphites of different cokes were irradiated by 3 MeV C+ ions and the differences in the response of ion-irradiation were investigated

  11. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  12. Irradiation damage in graphite. The works of Professor B.T. Kelly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The irradiation damage produced in graphite by energetic neutrons (>100eV) has been extensively studied because of the use of graphite as a moderator in thermal nuclear reactors. In recent times, graphite has been adopted as the protective tiling of the inner wall of experimental fusion systems and property changes due to fusion neutrons have become important. The late Professor B.T. Kelly reviewed the work carried out on the irradiation behaviour of graphite since the 1940s. This work is particularly timely as the scale of research into the effects of fission neutrons has been greatly reduced and many of the active researchers have retired. In recent years, new programmes of work are being formulated for the use of graphite in both the field of high temperature reactor systems and fusion systems. It is therefore important that the knowledge gained by Professor Kelly and other workers is not lost but passed on to future generations of nuclear scientists and engineers. This paper reviews Professor Kelly's last work, it also draws on the experience gained during many long discussions with Brian during the years he worked closely with the present graphite team at AEA Technology. It is hoped to publish his work in full in the near future. (author). 13 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Swift heavy ions induced irradiation effects in monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, J.; Yao, H.J.; Zhang, S.X.; Zhai, P.F.; Duan, J.L.; Sun, Y.M.; Li, G.P.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were irradiated by swift heavy ions ( 209 Bi and 112 Sn) with the fluence between 10 11 and 10 14 ions/cm 2 . Both pristine and irradiated samples were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that D and D′ peaks appear after irradiation, which indicated the ion irradiation introduced damage both in the graphene and graphite lattice. Due to the special single atomic layer structure of graphene, the irradiation fluence threshold Φ th of the D band of graphene is significantly lower ( 11 ions/cm 2 ) than that (2.5 × 10 12 ions/cm 2 ) of HOPG. The larger defect density in graphene than in HOPG indicates that the monolayer graphene is much easier to be damaged than bulk graphite by swift heavy ions. Moreover, different defect types in graphene and HOPG were detected by the different values of I D /I D′ . For the irradiation with the same electronic energy loss, the velocity effect was found in HOPG. However, in this experiment, the velocity effect was not observed in graphene samples irradiated by swift heavy ions

  14. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140–180 MeV, to peak fluence of ∼6.1×10^{20}  p/cm^{2} and irradiation temperatures between 120–200 °C. The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young’s modulus. The proton fluence level of ∼10^{20}  cm^{−2} where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite

  15. High temperature graphite irradiation creep experiment in the Dragon Reactor. Dragon Project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzel, R.; Everett, M. R.; Graham, L. W.

    1971-05-15

    The irradiation induced creep of pressed Gilsocarbon graphite under constant tensile stress has been investigated in an experiment carried out in FE 317 of the OECD High Temperature Gass Cooled Reactor ''Dragon'' at Winfrith (England). The experiment covered a temperature range of 850 dec C to 1240 deg C and reached a maximum fast neutron dose of 1.19 x 1021 n cm-2 NDE (Nickel Dose DIDO Equivalent). Irradiation induced dimensional changes of a string of unrestrained graphite specimens are compared with the dimensional changes of three strings of restrained graphite specimens stressed to 40%, 58%, and 70% of the initial ultimate tensile strength of pressed Gilsocarbon graphite. Total creep strains ranging from 0.18% to 1.25% have been measured and a linear dependence of creep strain on applied stress was observed. Mechanical property measurements carried out before and after irradiation demonstrate that Gilsocarbon graphite can accommodate significant creep strains without failure or structural deterioration. Total creep strains are in excellent agreement with other data, however the results indicate a relatively large temperature dependent primary creep component which at 1200 deg C approaches a value which is three times larger than the normally assumed initial elastic strain. Secondary creep constants derived from the experiment show a temperature dependence and are in fair agreement with data reported elsewhere. A possible determination of the results is given.

  16. Rapid analysis method for the determination of 14C specific activity in irradiated graphite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidmantas Remeikis

    Full Text Available 14C is one of the limiting radionuclides used in the categorization of radioactive graphite waste; this categorization is crucial in selecting the appropriate graphite treatment/disposal method. We propose a rapid analysis method for 14C specific activity determination in small graphite samples in the 1-100 μg range. The method applies an oxidation procedure to the sample, which extracts 14C from the different carbonaceous matrices in a controlled manner. Because this method enables fast online measurement and 14C specific activity evaluation, it can be especially useful for characterizing 14C in irradiated graphite when dismantling graphite moderator and reflector parts, or when sorting radioactive graphite waste from decommissioned nuclear power plants. The proposed rapid method is based on graphite combustion and the subsequent measurement of both CO2 and 14C, using a commercial elemental analyser and the semiconductor detector, respectively. The method was verified using the liquid scintillation counting (LSC technique. The uncertainty of this rapid method is within the acceptable range for radioactive waste characterization purposes. The 14C specific activity determination procedure proposed in this study takes approximately ten minutes, comparing favorably to the more complicated and time consuming LSC method. This method can be potentially used to radiologically characterize radioactive waste or used in biomedical applications when dealing with the specific activity determination of 14C in the sample.

  17. Rapid analysis method for the determination of 14C specific activity in irradiated graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remeikis, Vidmantas; Lagzdina, Elena; Garbaras, Andrius; Gudelis, Arūnas; Garankin, Jevgenij; Plukienė, Rita; Juodis, Laurynas; Duškesas, Grigorijus; Lingis, Danielius; Abdulajev, Vladimir; Plukis, Artūras

    2018-01-01

    14C is one of the limiting radionuclides used in the categorization of radioactive graphite waste; this categorization is crucial in selecting the appropriate graphite treatment/disposal method. We propose a rapid analysis method for 14C specific activity determination in small graphite samples in the 1-100 μg range. The method applies an oxidation procedure to the sample, which extracts 14C from the different carbonaceous matrices in a controlled manner. Because this method enables fast online measurement and 14C specific activity evaluation, it can be especially useful for characterizing 14C in irradiated graphite when dismantling graphite moderator and reflector parts, or when sorting radioactive graphite waste from decommissioned nuclear power plants. The proposed rapid method is based on graphite combustion and the subsequent measurement of both CO2 and 14C, using a commercial elemental analyser and the semiconductor detector, respectively. The method was verified using the liquid scintillation counting (LSC) technique. The uncertainty of this rapid method is within the acceptable range for radioactive waste characterization purposes. The 14C specific activity determination procedure proposed in this study takes approximately ten minutes, comparing favorably to the more complicated and time consuming LSC method. This method can be potentially used to radiologically characterize radioactive waste or used in biomedical applications when dealing with the specific activity determination of 14C in the sample.

  18. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites due to neutron irradiation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    Several graphites and carbon/carbon composites (C/C's) have been irradiated with fission neutrons near 150 C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m K for a unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14% of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The significant recovery of thermal conductivity due to post-irradiation isochronal anneals is also presented. (orig.)

  19. Electron spin resonance in neutron-irradiated graphite. Dependence on temperature and effect of annealing; Resonance paramagnetique du graphite irradie aux neutrons. Variation en fonction de la temperature et experiences de recuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kester, T [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Laboratoire de resonance magnetique

    1967-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance signal from neutron irradiated graphite has been studied. The results lead to an interpretation of the nature of the paramagnetic centers created by irradiation. In annealing experiments on graphite samples, which had been irradiated at low temperature, two annealing peaks and one anti-annealing peak were found. Interpretations are proposed for these peaks. (author) [French] Le graphite irradie aux neutrons a ete etudie par resonance paramagnetique electronique en fonction de la temperature. La nature des centres paramagnetiques crees par irradiation est interpretee a l'aide des resultats. Des experiences de recuit sur des echantillons de graphite irradie a 77 deg. K ont permis de mettre en evidence deux pics de recuit et un pic d'anti-recuit, pour lesquels des interpretations sont proposees. (auteur)

  20. Nanoscale transformation of sp2 to sp3 of graphite by slow highly charged ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meguro, T.; Hida, A.; Koguchi, Y.; Miyamoto, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Takai, H.; Maeda, K.; Aoyagi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Nanoscale transformation of electronic states by highly charged ion (HCI) impact on graphite surfaces is described. The high potential energy of slow HCI, which induces multiple emission of electrons from the surface, provides a strong modification of the electronic states of the local area upon graphite surfaces. The HCI impact and the subsequent surface treatment either by electron injection from a scanning tunneling microscopy tip or by He-Cd laser irradiation induce a localized transition from sp 2 to sp 3 hybridization in graphite, resulting in the formation of nanoscale diamond-like structures (nanodiamond) at the impact region. From Raman spectroscopic measurements on sp 2 related peaks, it is found that the HCI irradiation creates vacancy complexes in contrast to ions having a lower charge state, which generate single vacancies. It is of interest that a single impact of HCI creates one nanodiamond structure, suggesting potential applications of HCI in nanoscale material processing

  1. Quality assurance for the IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Humbert, D.

    2006-06-01

    Consideration has been given to the process of Quality Assurance applied to data entered into current versions of the IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Originally conceived simply as a means of collecting and preserving data on irradiation experiments and reactor operation, the data are increasingly being utilised for the preparation of safety arguments and in the design of new graphites for forthcoming generations of graphite-moderated plant. Under these circumstances, regulatory agencies require assurances that the data are of appropriate accuracy and correctly transcribed, that obvious errors in the original documentation are either highlighted or corrected, etc., before they are prepared to accept analyses built upon these data. The processes employed in the data transcription are described in this document, and proposals are made for the categorisation of data and for error reporting by Database users. (author)

  2. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, R. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, Dalton Nuclear Institute, The University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Whitehaven, Cumbria, CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Jones, A.N., E-mail: Abbie.Jones@manchester.ac.uk [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, School of MACE, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite

  3. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A.N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated ‘D’peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of ‘G’ and ‘D’ in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure. - Highlights: • Irradiated graphite exhibits

  4. Development of a Scanning Microscale Fast Neutron Irradiation Platform for Examining the Correlation Between Local Neutron Damage and Graphite Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinhero, Patrick [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-10

    The fast particle radiation damage effect of graphite, a main material in current and future nuclear reactors, has significant influence on the utilization of this material in fission and fusion plants. Atoms on graphite crystals can be easily replaced or dislocated by fast protons and result in interstitials and vacancies. The currently accepted model indicates that after most of the interstitials recombine with vacancies, surviving interstitials form clusters and furthermore gather to create loops with each other between layers. Meanwhile, surviving vacancies and interstitials form dislocation loops on the layers. The growth of these inserted layers cause the dimensional increase, i.e. swelling, of graphite. Interstitial and vacancy dislocation loops have been reported and they can easily been observed by electron microscope. However, observation of the intermediate atom clusters becomes is paramount in helping prove this model. We utilize fast protons generated from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) cyclotron to irradiate highly- oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) as target for this research. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) of dosed targets with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has permit observation and analysis of clusters and dislocation loops to support the proposed theory. Another part of the research is to validate M.I. Heggie’s Ruck and Tuck model, which introduced graphite layers may fold under fast particle irradiation. Again, we employed microscopy to image irradiated specimens to determine how the extent of Ruck and Tuck by calculating the number of folds as a function of dose. Our most significant accomplishment is the invention of a novel class of high-intensity pure beta-emitters for long-term lightweight batteries. We have filed four invention disclosure records based on the research conducted in this project. These batteries are lightweight because they consist of carbon and tritium and can be

  5. Curling and closure of graphitic networks under electron-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugarte, D [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1992-10-22

    The discovery of buckminsterfullerene (C[sub 60]) and its production in macroscopic quantities has stimulated a great deal of research. More recently, attention has turned towards other curved graphitic networks, such as the giant fullerenes (C[sub n], n > 100) and carbon nanotubes. A general mechanism has been proposed in which the graphitic sheets bend in an attempt to eliminate the highly energetic dangling bonds present at the edge of the growing structure. Here, I report the response of carbon soot particles and tubular graphitic structures to intense electron-beam irradiation in a high-resolution electron microscope; such conditions resemble a high-temperature regime, permitting a degree of structural fluidity. With increased irradiation, there is a gradual reorganization of the initial material into quasi-spherical particles composed of concentric graphitic shells. This lends weight to the nucleation scheme proposed for fullerenes, and moreover, suggests that planar graphite may not be the most stable allotrope of carbon in systems of limited size. (Author).

  6. Characterization of fresh and irradiated domestic nuclear graphite; Karakterizacija neozracenog i ozracenog domaceg nuklearnog grafita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, S; Suznjevic, C; Bogdanovic, R; Gasic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report shows results of testing the quality of domestic impregnated graphite IGSP-05, and irradiated domestic graphite IGSP-01 as well as the new methos of characterization based on graphite oxidation by liquid agent. Systematic measurement of domestic impregnated graphite enabled conclusions related to its quality and further improvement. Domestic graphite is relatively well graphitized and its properties are approaching standard nuclear graphite, although it still shows some deficiencies. Important deficiencies are significant inhomogeneity and low density. The applied impregnation procedure did not improve significantly the quality of graphite, probably because the material which was impregnated had fine pores. To avoid this porosity it would be necessary to use material with higher granulation. Soot which was present in some blocks probably worsened the quality of graphite and caused dispersion of the obtained results. First tests of irradiated domestic graphite IGSP-01 showed that its behaviour does not differ from standard nuclear graphite in case of low doses. It is necessary to test its properties in case of higher neutron doses before drawing final conclusions. The new method of graphite oxidation by the N{sub 2}SO{sub 4} - Ag{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7} mixture which is highly sensitive on the existence of structural defects is based on detecting the oxidation rate of graphite by measuring the pressure of released CO{sub 2}. Application of the method for testing the domestic and American graphite showed that irradiation caused drastic changes of oxidation rates and similar behaviour of both graphite types. U ovom izvestaju su prikazani rezultati ispitivanja kvaliteta domaceg impregnisanog grafita IGSP-05, rezultati ispitivanja ozracenog domaceg grafita IGSP-01 i opisana je nova uvedena metoda karakterizacije zasnovana na oksidaciji grafita tecnim agensom. Sistematsko merenje osobina domaceg impregnisanog grafita je omogucilo donosenje zakljucaka o

  7. Irradiation damage in graphite due to fast neutrons in fission and fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    Gas cooled reactors have been in operation for the production of electricity for over forty years, encompassing a total of 56 units operated in seven countries. The predominant experience has been with carbon dioxide cooled reactors (52 units), with the majority operated in the United Kingdom. In addition, four prototype helium cooled power plants were operated in the United States and Germany. The United Kingdom has no plans for further construction of carbon dioxide units, and the last helium cooled unit was shutdown in 1990. However, there has been an increasing interest in modular helium cooled reactors during the 1990s as a possible future nuclear option. Graphite is a primary material for the construction of gas cooled reactor cores, serving as a low absorption neutron moderator and providing a high temperature, high strength structure. Commercial gas cooled reactor cores (both carbon dioxide cooled and helium cooled) utilise large quantities of graphite. The structural behaviour of graphite (strength, dimensional stability, susceptibility to cracking, etc.) is a complex function of the source material, manufacturing process, chemical environment, and temperature and irradiation history. A large body of data on graphite structural performance has accumulated from operation of commercial gas cooled reactors, beginning in the 1950s and continuing to the present. The IAEA is supporting a project to collect graphite data and archive it in a retrievable form as an International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties, with limited general access and more detailed access by participating Member States. Because of the large size of the database, the complexity of the phenomena and the number of variables involved, a general understanding of graphite behaviour is essential to the understanding and use of the data

  8. Irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of OGL-1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Minato, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Tobita, Tsutomu; Kikuchi, Teruo; Kurobane, Shiro; Adachi, Mamoru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1988-06-01

    Experimental data are summarized on irradiation-induced dimensional changes of fuel compacts and graphite sleeves of the first to ninth OGL-1 fuel assemblies. The range of fast-neutron fluence is up to 4 x 10 24 n/m 2 (E > 0.18 MeV); and that of irradiation temperature is 900 - 1400 deg C for fuel compacts and 800 - 1050 deg C for graphite sleeves. The dimensional change of the fuel compacts was shrinkage under these test conditions, and the shrinkage fraction increased almost linearly with fast-neutron fluence. The shrinkage fraction of the fuel compacts was larger by 20 % in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Influence of the irradiation temperature on the dimensional-change behavior of the fuel compacts was not observed clearly; presumably the influence was hidden by scatter of the data because of low level of the fast-neutron fluence and the resultant small dimensional changes. (author)

  9. Erosion of CFC, pyrolytic and boronated graphite under short pulsed laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraaij, G.J.; Bakker, J.; Stad, R.C.L. van der

    1992-07-01

    The effect of short pulsed laser irradiation of '0/3' ms and up to 10 MJ/m 2 on different types of carbon base materials is described. These materials are investigated as candidate protection materials for the Plasma Facing Components of NET/ITER. These materials are: carbon fibre composite graphite, pyrolytic graphite and boronated graphite. The volume of the laser induced craters was measured with an optical topographic scanner, and these data are evaluated with a simple model for the erosion. As a results, the enthalpy of ablation is estimated as 30±3 MJ/kg. A comparison is made with finite element numerical calculations, and the effect of lateral heat transfer is estimated using an analytical model. (author). 8 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Simulating Neutron Radiation Damage of Graphite by In-situ Electron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, Brindusa E; Freeman, H M; Brydson, R M D; Westwood, A V K; Scott, A J

    2014-01-01

    Radiation damage in nuclear grade graphite has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Changes in the structure on the atomic scale and chemical bonding, and the relationship between each were of particular interest. TEM was used to study damage in nuclear grade graphite on the atomic scale following 1.92×10 8 electrons nm −2 of electron beam exposure. During these experiments EELS spectra were also collected periodically to record changes in chemical bonding and structural disorder, by analysing the changes of the carbon K-edge. Image analysis software from the 'PyroMaN' research group provides further information, based on (002) fringe analysis. The software was applied to the micrographs of electron irradiated virgin 'Pile Grade A' (PGA) graphite to quantify the extent of damage from electron beam exposure

  11. Inhomogeneous microstructural growth by irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishan, K.; Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss the development of heterogeneous microstructure for uniform irradiation conditions. It is shown that microstructural inhomogeneities on a scale of 0.1 μm can develop purely from kinematic considerations because of the basic structure of the rate equations used...... to describe such evolution. Two aspects of the growth of such inhomogeneities are discussed. Firstly, it is shown that a local variation in the sink densities of the various microstructural defects will tend to enhance the inhomogeneity rather than remove it. Secondly, such inhomogeneities will lead to point...... defect fluxes that result in a spatial growth of the inhomogeneous region, which will be stopped only when the microstructural density around this region becomes large. The results have important implications in the formation of denuded zones and void formation in metals....

  12. Irradiation-induced defects in graphite and glassy carbon studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kajino, M.; Kuwahara, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kuramoto, E.; Takenaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG, isotropic fine-grained graphites, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 . HOPG showed a marked bimodal ACAR distribution along the c-axis. By irradiation of 1.0 X 10 19 fast neutrons/cm 2 remarkable narrowing in the ACAR curves and disappearance of the bimodal distribution were observed. Lifetime in HOPG increased from 225 psec to 289 psec (positron-lifetime in vacancies and their small clusters) by the irradiation. The irradiation on isotropic graphites and glassy carbons, however, gave slight narrowing in ACAR curves and decrease in lifetimes (360 psec → 300psec). This suggests irradiation-induced vacancy trapping in crystallites. In C 60 /C 70 powder two lifetime components were detected: τ 1 =177psec, τ 2 =403psec (I 2 =58%). The former is less than the bulk lifetime of HOPG, while the latter being very close to lifetimes in the isotropic graphites and glassy carbons. This and recent 2D-ACAR study of HOPG surface [15] strongly suggest free and defect surface states around ''soccer ball'' cages

  13. Special graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, P.

    1964-01-01

    A large fraction of the work undertaken jointly by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and the Pechiney Company has been the improvement of the properties of nuclear pile graphite and the opening up of new fields of graphite application. New processes for the manufacture of carbons and special graphites have been developed: forged graphite, pyro-carbons, high density graphite agglomeration of graphite powders by cracking of natural gas, impervious graphites. The physical properties of these products and their reaction with various oxidising gases are described. The first irradiation results are also given. (authors) [fr

  14. Negative pressure and spallation in graphite targets under nano- and picosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belikov, R S; Khishchenko, K V [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krasyuk, I K; Semenov, A Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I A [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rinecker, T; Schoenlein, A [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rosmej, O N [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Germany, 64291 Darmstadt, Planckstraße, 1 (Germany); Tomut, M [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, 64289 Darmstadt, Karolinenplatz, 5 (Germany)

    2015-05-31

    We present the results of experiments on the spallation phenomena in graphite targets under shock-wave nano- and picosecond irradiation, which have been performed on Kamerton-T (GPI, Moscow, Russia) and PHELIX (GSI, Darmstadt, Germany) laser facilities. In the range of the strain rates of 10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, the data on the dynamic mechanical strength of the material at rapure (spallation) have been for the first time obtained. With a maximal strain rate of 1.4 × 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}, the spall strength of 2.1 GPa is obtained, which constitutes 64% of the theoretical ultimate tensile strength of graphite. The effect of spallation is observed not only on the rear side of the target, but also on its irradiated (front) surface. With the use of optical and scanning electron microscopes, the morphology of the front and rear surfaces of the targets is studied. By means of Raman scattering of light, the graphite structure both on the target front surface under laser exposure and on its rear side in the spall zone is investigated. A comparison of the dynamic strength of graphite and synthetic diamond is performed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  15. Characterization of {sup 14}C in neutron irradiated NBG-25 nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBrier, Daniel, E-mail: labrdani@isu.edu; Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the highest concentration of {sup 14}C contamination present in reactor-irradiated graphite exists on the surfaces and within near-surface layers. Surface-sensitive analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS, SEM/EDS and Raman) were employed to determine the chemical nature of {sup 14}C on irradiated NBG-25 (nuclear grade) graphite surfaces. Several {sup 14}C precursor species are identified on the surfaces of irradiated NBG-25; the quantities of these species decrease at sub-surface depths, which further suggests that {sup 14}C formation is predominantly a surface-concentrated phenomenon. The elevated presence of several surface oxide complexes on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces are attributed directly to neutron irradiation. Larger numbers of oxide bonds were found on irradiated NBG-25 surfaces (when compared to unirradiated samples) in the form of interlattice (e.g. ether) and dangling (e.g. carboxylate and ketone) bonds; the quantities of these bond types also decrease with increasing sub-surface depths.

  16. Evaluation of thermal shock strengths for graphite materials using a laser irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Young Shin; Kim, Duck Hoi; Park, No Seok; Suh, Jeong; Kim, Jeng O.; Il Moon, Soon

    2004-01-01

    Thermal shock is a physical phenomenon that occurs during the exposure to rapidly high temperature and pressure changes or during quenching of a material. The rocket nozzle throat is exposed to combustion gas of high temperature. Therefore, it is important to select suitable materials having the appropriate thermal shock resistance and to evaluate these materials for rocket nozzle design. The material of this study is ATJ graphite, which is the candidate material for rocket nozzle throat. This study presents an experimental method to evaluate the thermal shock resistance and thermal shock fracture toughness of ATJ graphite using laser irradiation. In particular, thermal shock resistance tests are conducted with changes of specimen thickness, with laser source irradiated at the center of the specimen. Temperature distributions on the specimen surface are detected using type K and C thermocouples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used to observe the thermal cracks on specimen surface

  17. Low energy He+ irradiation effect on graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, E.; Nakamura, K.G.; Kitajima, M.; Kawabe, T.

    1992-01-01

    Study on the lattice disordering and the secondary electron emission under low energy (1-5keV) He + irradiation is reported. Real-time Raman measurements show that difference in the observed Raman spectra for different ion energies is due to the difference of the damage depth. The relation between the observed Raman spectrum and the depth profile of lattice damage is discussed. Energy dependence of the secondary electron emission coefficient are also described. (author)

  18. Analytical and numerical study of graphite IG110 parts in advanced reactor under high temperature and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinling, E-mail: Jinling_Gao@yeah.net; Yao, Wenjuan, E-mail: wj_yao@yeah.net; Ma, Yudong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An analytical model and a numerical procedure are developed to study the mechanical response of IG-110 graphite bricks in HTGR subjected to high temperature and irradiation. The calculation results show great accordance with each other. Rational suggestions on the calculation and design of the IG-110 graphite structure are proposed based on the sensitivity analyses including temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson’s ratio. - Highlights: • Analytical solution of stress and displacement of IG-110 graphite components in HTGR. • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Parameters analysis of mechanical response of graphite components during the whole life of the reflector. - Abstract: Structural design of nuclear power plant project is an important sub-discipline of civil engineering. Especially after appearance of the fourth generation advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor, structural mechanics in reactor technology becomes a popular subject in structural engineering. As basic ingredients of reflector in reactor, graphite bricks are subjected to high temperature and irradiation and the stress field of graphite structures determines integrity of reflector and makes a great difference to safety of whole structure. In this paper, based on assumptions of elasticity, side reflector is regarded approximately as a straight cylinder structure and primary creep strain is ignored. An analytical study on stress of IG110 graphite parts is present. Meanwhile, a finite element procedure for calculating stresses in the IG110 graphite structure exposed in the high temperature and irradiation is developed. Subsequently, numerical solution of stress in IG110 graphite structure is obtained. Analytical solution agrees well with numerical solution, which indicates that analytical derivation is accurate. Finally, influence of temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson

  19. Polymer surfaces graphitization by low-energy He{sup +} ions irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geworski, A.; Lazareva, I.; Gieb, K.; Koval, Y.; Müller, P. [Department of Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-08-14

    The electrical and optical properties of surfaces of polyimide and AZ5214e graphitized by low-energy (1 keV) He{sup +} irradiation at different polymer temperatures were investigated. The conductivity of the graphitized layers can be controlled with the irradiation temperature within a broad range and can reach values up to ∼1000 S/cm. We show that the electrical transport in low-conducting samples is governed by thermally activated hopping, while the samples with a high conductivity show a typical semimetallic behavior. The transition from thermally activated to semimetallic conductance governed by the irradiation temperature could also be observed in optical measurements. The semimetallic samples show an unusually high for graphitic materials carrier concentration, which results in a high extinction coefficient in the visible light range. By analyzing the temperature dependence of the conductance of the semimetallic samples, we conclude that the scattering of charge carriers is dominated by Coulomb interactions and can be described by a weak localization model. The transition from a three to two dimensional transport mechanism at low temperatures consistently explains the change in the temperature dependence of the conductance by cooling, observed in experiments.

  20. Study on structural recovery of graphite irradiated with swift heavy ions at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellemoine, F., E-mail: pellemoi@frib.msu.edu [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Avilov, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bender, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Ewing, R.C. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Fernandes, S. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Lang, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Li, W.X. [Dept. of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Mittig, W. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Schein, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Severin, D. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Tomut, M. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Laboratory of Magnetism and Superconductivity, National Institute for Materials Physics NIMP, Bucharest (Romania); Trautmann, C. [Dept. of Materials Research, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany); Dept. of Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-12-15

    Thin graphite foils bombarded with an intense high-energy (8.6 MeV/u) gold beam reaching fluences up to 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} lead to swelling and electrical resistivity changes. As shown earlier, these effects are diminished with increasing irradiation temperature. The work reported here extends the investigation of beam induced changes of these samples by structural analysis using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. A nearly complete recovery from swelling at irradiation temperatures above about 1500 °C is identified.

  1. Comparison of Material Behavior of Matrix Graphite for HTGR Fuel Elements upon Irradiation: A literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young-Woo; Yeo, Seunghwan; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The fuel elements for the HTGRs (i.e., spherical fuel element in pebble-bed type core design and fuel compact in prismatic core design) consists of coated fuel particles dispersed and bonded in a closely packed array within a carbonaceous matrix. This matrix is generally made by mixing fully graphitized natural and needle- or pitchcoke originated powders admixed with a binder material (pitch or phenolic resin), The resulting resinated graphite powder mixture, when compacted, may influence a number of material properties as well as its behavior under neutron irradiation during reactor operation. In the fabrication routes of these two different fuel element forms, different consolidation methods are employed; a quasi-isostatic pressing method is generally adopted to make pebbles while fuel compacts are fabricated by uni-axial pressing mode. The result showed that the hardness values obtained from the two directions showed an anisotropic behavior: The values obtained from the perpendicular section showed much higher micro hardness (176.6±10.5MPa in average) than from the parallel section ((125.6±MPa in average). This anisotropic behavior was concluded to be related to the microstructure of the matrix graphite. This may imply that the uni-axial pressing method to make compacts influence the microstructure of the matrix and hence the material properties of the matrix graphite.

  2. Leaching of 14C and 36Cl from irradiated French graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.; Morgan, W.C.

    1989-08-01

    The leach rates of 14 C and 36 Cl were measured on solid cylindrical samples prepared from irradiated graphite blocks supplied by the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Static leach tests were conducted in deionized water at 20 degree C for 13 weeks. The graphite samples were completely submerged in the water, and the entire volume of water was changed and analyzed at weekly intervals for the first three weeks and biweekly thereafter. Large differences in the leach rates of both 14 C and 36 Cl were observed between samples machined from the different blocks. In general, the leach rates were much higher than those measured in an earlier study with graphite obtained from a block removed from one of the Hanford reactors. The data from this study are compared with those from the previous study using the Hanford-reactor graphite. Implications of the data from both studies regarding possible rate-limiting mechanisms are discussed. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Processing of Irradiated Graphite to Meet Acceptance Criteria for Waste Disposal. Results of a Coordinated Research Project. Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    Graphite is widely used in the nuclear industry and in research facilities and this has led to increasing amounts of irradiated graphite residing in temporary storage facilities pending disposal. This publication arises from a coordinated research project (CRP) on the processing of irradiated graphite to meet acceptance criteria for waste disposal. It presents the findings of the CRP, the general conclusions and recommendations. The topics covered include, graphite management issues, characterization of irradiated graphite, processing and treatment, immobilization and disposal. Included on the attached CD-ROM are formal reports from the participants

  4. Simultaneous heating and compression of irradiated graphite during synchrotron microtomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodey, A. J.; Mileeva, Z.; Lowe, T.; Williamson-Brown, E.; Eastwood, D. S.; Simpson, C.; Titarenko, V.; Jones, A. N.; Rau, C.; Mummery, P. M.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear graphite is used as a neutron moderator in fission power stations. To investigate the microstructural changes that occur during such use, it has been studied for the first time by X-ray microtomography with in situ heating and compression. This experiment was the first to involve simultaneous heating and mechanical loading of radioactive samples at Diamond Light Source, and represented the first study of radioactive materials at the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2. Engineering methods and safety protocols were developed to ensure the safe containment of irradiated graphite as it was simultaneously compressed to 450N in a Deben 10kN Open-Frame Rig and heated to 300°C with dual focused infrared lamps. Central to safe containment was a double containment vessel which prevented escape of airborne particulates while enabling compression via a moveable ram and the transmission of infrared light to the sample. Temperature measurements were made in situ via thermocouple readout. During heating and compression, samples were simultaneously rotated and imaged with polychromatic X-rays. The resulting microtomograms are being studied via digital volume correlation to provide insights into how thermal expansion coefficients and microstructure are affected by irradiation history, load and heat. Such information will be key to improving the accuracy of graphite degradation models which inform safety margins at power stations.

  5. An Electron Microscopy Study of Graphite Growth in Nodular Cast Irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffont, L.; Jday, R.; Lacaze, J.

    2018-04-01

    Growth of graphite during solidification and high-temperature solid-state transformation has been investigated in samples cut out from a thin-wall casting which solidified partly in the stable (iron-graphite) and partly in the metastable (iron-cementite) systems. Transmission electron microscopy has been used to characterize graphite nodules in as-cast state and in samples having been fully graphitized at various temperatures in the austenite field. Nodules in the as-cast material show a twofold structure characterized by an inner zone where graphite is disoriented and an outer zone where it is well crystallized. In heat-treated samples, graphite nodules consist of well-crystallized sectors radiating from the nucleus. These observations suggest that the disoriented zone appears because of mechanical deformation when the liquid contracts during its solidification in the metastable system. During heat-treatment, the graphite in this zone recrystallizes. In turn, it can be concluded that nodular graphite growth mechanism is the same during solidification and solid-state transformation.

  6. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: consequences for the behavior of tritium in Gas Cooled Reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Guillou, Mael

    2014-01-01

    In France, 23 000 t of irradiated graphite that will be generated by the decommissioning of the first generation Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz (UNGG) nuclear reactors are waiting for a long term management solution. This work focuses on the behavior of tritium, which is one of the main contributors to the radiological inventory of graphite waste after reactor shutdown. In order to anticipate tritium release during dismantling or waste management, it is mandatory to collect data on its migration, location and inventory. Our study is based on the simulation of tritium by implantation of approximately 3 at. % of deuterium up to around 3 μm in a virgin nuclear graphite. This material was then annealed up to 300 h and 1300 C in inert atmosphere, UNGG coolant gas and humid gas, aiming to reproduce thermal conditions close to those encountered in reactor and during waste management operations. The deuterium profiles and spatial distribution were analyzed using the nuclear reaction 2 H( 3 He,p) 4 He. The main results evidence a thermal release of implanted deuterium occurring essentially through three regimes controlled by the detrapping of atomic deuterium located in superficial or interstitial sites. The extrapolation of our data to tritium suggests that its purely thermal release during reactor operations may have been lower than 30 % and would be located close to the graphite free surfaces. Consequently, most of the tritium inventory after reactor shutdown could be trapped deeply within the irradiated graphite structure. Decontamination of graphite waste should then require temperatures higher than 1300 C, and would be more efficient in dry inert gas than in humid gas. (author)

  7. Time of flight measurements of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphite under cyclic compressive load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodel, W., E-mail: william.bodel@hotmail.com [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Atkin, C. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Buxton (United Kingdom); Marsden, B.J. [Nuclear Graphite Research Group, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    The time-of-flight technique has been used to investigate the stiffness of nuclear graphite with respect to the grade and grain direction. A loading rig was developed to collect time-of-flight measurements during cycled compressive loading up to 80% of the material's compressive strength and subsequent unloading of specimens along the axis of the applied stress. The transmission velocity (related to Young's modulus), decreased with increasing applied stress; and depending on the graphite grade and orientation, the modulus then increased, decreased or remained constant upon unloading. These tests were repeated while observing the microstructure during the load/unload cycles. Initial decreases in transmission velocity with compressive load are attributed to microcrack formation within filler and binder phases. Three distinct types of behaviour occur on unloading, depending on the grade, irradiation, and loading direction. These different behaviours can be explained in terms of the material microstructure observed from the microscopy performed during loading.

  8. Status of IAEA international data base on irradiated graphite properties with respect to HTR engineering issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Haag, G.

    2002-01-01

    The International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties contains data on the physical, chemical, mechanical and other relevant properties of graphites. Its purpose is to provide a platform that makes these properties accessible to approved users in the fields of nuclear power, nuclear safety and other nuclear science and technology applications. The database is constructed using Microsoft Access 97 software and has a controlled distribution by CD ROM to approved users. This paper describes the organisation and management of the database through administrative arrangements approved by the IAEA. It also outlines the operation of the database. The paper concludes with some remarks upon and illustrations of the usefulness of the database for the design and operation of HTR. (authors)

  9. Graphite moderator annealing of the experimental reactor for irradiation (0.5 MW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Avila, Carlos Alberto de; Pires, Luis Fernando Goncalves

    1995-01-01

    This work describes an operational procedure for the annealing of the graphite moderator in the 0,5 MW Experimental Reactor for Irradiation. A theoretical methodology has been developed for calculating the temperature field during the annealing process. The equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation for the coolant as well as for the energy conservation in the moderator are solved numerically. The energy stored in the graphite and released in the annealing is accounted for by the use of a modified source term in the energy conservation equation for the moderator. A good agreement has been found for comparisons of the calculations with annealing data from the BEPO reactor. The major parameters affecting annealing have also been determined. (author). 8 refs, 11 figs

  10. Monovacancy paramagnetism in neutron-irradiated graphite probed by 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z T; Xu, C; Dmytriieva, D; Molatta, S; Wosnitza, J; Wang, Y T; Helm, M; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kühne, H

    2017-10-20

    We report on the magnetic properties of monovacancy defects in neutron-irradiated graphite, probed by 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The bulk paramagnetism of the defect moments is revealed by the temperature dependence of the NMR frequency shift and spectral linewidth, both of which follow a Curie behavior, in agreement with measurements of the macroscopic magnetization. Compared to pristine graphite, the fluctuating hyperfine fields generated by the defect moments lead to an enhancement of the 13 C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate [Formula: see text] by about two orders of magnitude. With an applied magnetic field of 7.1 T, the temperature dependence of [Formula: see text] below about 10 K can well be described by a thermally activated form, [Formula: see text], yielding a singular Zeeman energy of ([Formula: see text]) meV, in excellent agreement with the sole presence of polarized, non-interacting defect moments.

  11. Method to Assess the Radionuclide Inventory of Irradiated Graphite from Gas-Cooled Reactors - 13072

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncet, Bernard [EDF-CIDEN, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, F-69458 LYON cedex 06 (France)

    2013-07-01

    About 17,000 t of irradiated graphite waste will be produced from the decommissioning of the six French gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Determining the radionuclide (RN) content of this waste is of relevant importance for safety reasons and in order to determine the best way to manage them. For many reasons the impurity content that gave rise to the RNs in irradiated graphite by neutron activation during operation is not always well known and sometimes actually unknown. So, assessing the RN content by the use of traditional calculation activation, starting from assumed impurity content, leads to a false assessment. Moreover, radiochemical measurements exhibit very wide discrepancies especially on RN corresponding to precursor at the trace level such as natural chlorine corresponding to chlorine 36. This wide discrepancy is unavoidable and is due to very simple reasons. The level of impurity is very low because the uranium fuel used at that very moment was not enriched, so it was a necessity to have very pure nuclear grade graphite and the very low size of radiochemical sample is a simple technical constraint because device size used to get mineralization product for measurement purpose is limited. The assessment of a radionuclide inventory only based on few number of radiochemical measurements lead in most cases, to a gross over or under-estimation that is detrimental for graphite waste management. A method using an identification calculation-measurement process is proposed in order to assess a radiological inventory for disposal sizing purpose as precise as possible while guaranteeing its upper character. This method present a closer approach to the reality of the main phenomenon at the origin of RNs in a reactor, while also incorporating the secondary effects that can alter this result such as RN (or its precursor) release during reactor operation. (authors)

  12. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Property changes occur in materials subjected to irradiation. The bulk of experimental data and associated empirical models are for isothermal irradiation. The form that these isothermal models take is usually closed form expressions in terms...

  13. Accelerated irradiation growth of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Fidleris, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how sponge zirconium and Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, Zircaloy, or Excel alloys all exhibit accelerated irradiation growth compared with high-purity crystal-bar zirconium for irradiation temperatures between 550 to 710 K and fluences between 0.1 to 10 x 10 25 n · m -2 (E > 1 MeV). There is generally an incubation period or fluence before the onset of accelerated or breakaway growth, which is dependent on the particular material being irradiated, its metallurgical condition before irradiation, and the irradiation temperature. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that there is a correlation between accelerated irradiation growth and the appearance of c-component vacancy loops on basal planes. Measurements in some specimens indicate that a significant fraction of the strain can be directly attributed to the loops themselves. There is considerable evidence to show that their formation is dependent both on the specimen purity and on the irradiation temperature. Materials that have a high interstitial-solute content contain c-component loops and exhibit high growth rates even at low fluences ( 2 :5 n · m -2 , E > 1 MeV). For sponge zirconium and the Zircaloys, c-component loop formation and the associated acceleration of growth (breakaway) during irradiation occurs because the intrinsic interstitial solute (mainly, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen) in the zirconium matrix is supplemented by interstitial iron, chromium, and nickel from the radiation-induced dissolution of precipitates. (author)

  14. Synthesis of metal free ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride sheet for photocatalytic dye degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shakeelur; Momin, Bilal; Higgins M., W.; Annapure, Uday S.; Jha, Neetu

    2018-04-01

    In recent times, low cost and metal free photocatalyts driven under visible light have attracted a lot of interest. One such photo catalyst researched extensively is bulk graphitic carbon nitride sheets. But the low surface area and weak mobility of photo generated electrons limits its photocatalytic performance in the visible light spectrum. Here we present the facile synthesis of ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride using a cost effective melamine precursor and its application in highly efficient photocatalytic dye degradation of Rhodamine B molecules. Compared to bulk graphitic carbon nitride, the synthesized ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride shows an increase in surface area, a a decrease in optical band gap and effective photogenerated charge separation which facilitates the harvest of visible light irradiation. Due to these optimal properties of ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride, it shows excellent photocatalytic activity with photocatalytic degradation of about 95% rhodamine B molecules in 1 hour.

  15. Ion irradiation of {sup 37}Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of {sup 36}Cl in irradiated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Moncoffre, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Sainsot, P. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259 (France); Rouzaud, J.-N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), Paris, UMR CNRS-ENS 8538 (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as {sup 14}C, {sup 3}H or {sup 36}Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide’s location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of {sup 37}Cl, to simulate the presence of {sup 36}Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the {sup 36}Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted {sup 37}Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite.

  16. Growth of carbon nanotubes in arc plasma treated graphite disc: microstructural characterization and electrical conductivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, B. B.; Sahu, R. K.; Dash, T.; Pradhan, S.

    2018-03-01

    Circular graphite discs were treated in arc plasma by varying arcing time. Analysis of the plasma treated discs by field emission scanning electron microscope revealed globular grain morphologies on the surfaces, but when the same were observed at higher magnification and higher resolution under transmission electron microscope, growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes of around 2 nm diameter was clearly seen. In situ growth of carbon nanotube bundles/bunches consisting of around 0.7 nm tube diameter was marked in the case of 6 min treated disc surface. Both the untreated and the plasma treated graphite discs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectra of X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro Raman spectroscopy and BET surface area measurement. From Raman spectra, BET surface area and microstructure observed in transmission electron microscope, growth of several layers of graphene was identified. Four-point probe measurements for electrical resistivity/conductivity of the graphite discs treated under different plasma conditions showed significant increase in conductivity values over that of untreated graphite conductivity value and the best result, i.e., around eightfold increase in conductivity, was observed in the case of 6 min plasma treated sample exhibiting carbon nanotube bundles/bunches grown on disc surface. By comparing the microstructures of the untreated and plasma treated graphite discs, the electrical conductivity increase in graphite disc is attributed to carbon nanotubes (including bundles/bunches) growth on disc surface by plasma treatment.

  17. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 7th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting '7th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 March 2005 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  18. Summary report of consultants' meeting on IAEA international database on irradiated nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2007-06-01

    The '9th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' was held on 26-27 March 2007 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and make recommendations for actions for the next year. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  19. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 6th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2004-12-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting 6th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 September 2004 at Plas Tan-Y-Bwlch, Maentwrog, Gwynedd, UK. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  20. Fabrication of SnO2-Reduced Graphite Oxide Monolayer-Ordered Porous Film Gas Sensor with Tunable Sensitivity through Ultra-Violet Light Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shipu; Sun, Fengqiang; Yang, Shumin; Pan, Zizhao; Long, Jinfeng; Gu, Fenglong

    2015-01-01

    A new graphene-based composite structure, monolayer-ordered macroporous film composed of a layer of orderly arranged macropores, was reported. As an example, SnO2-reduced graphite oxide monolayer-ordered macroporous film was fabricated on a ceramic tube substrate under the irradiation of ultra-violet light (UV), by taking the latex microsphere two-dimensional colloid crystal as a template. Graphite oxide sheets dispersed in SnSO4 aqueous solution exhibited excellent affinity with template microspheres and were in situ incorporated into the pore walls during UV-induced growth of SnO2. The growing and the as-formed SnO2, just like other photocatalytic semiconductor, could be excited to produce electrons and holes under UV irradiation. Electrons reduced GO and holes adsorbed corresponding negative ions, which changed the properties of the composite film. This film was directly used as gas-sensor and was able to display high sensitivity in detecting ethanol gas. More interestingly, on the basis of SnO2-induced photochemical behaviours, this sensor demonstrated tunable sensitivity when UV irradiation time was controlled during the fabrication process and post in water, respectively. This study provides efficient ways of conducting the in situ fabrication of a semiconductor-reduced graphite oxide film device with uniform surface structure and controllable properties. PMID:25758292

  1. Effects of high temperature neutron irradiation on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, H.; Nomura, S.; Imai, H.; Oku, T.; Eto, M.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the dimensional change, coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE), thermal conductivity, corrosion rate, Young's modulus and strengths were studied for the candidate graphite material IG-110 of the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor(VHTR) after irradiation at 585 - 1273 deg C to neutron fluences of up to about 3 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the JMTR and JRR-2, and to about 7 x 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 29 fJ) in the HFR. The results were compared with the irradiation behaviors of other graphites. Dimensional shrinkage was observed in the whole irradiation temperature range, showing lower value than 2 %. The shrinkage rate showed the minimum in the irradiation temperature of around 850 deg C, followed by the increase for the samples irradiated at higher temperatures. The dimensional stability of the material was clarified to be almost the same with that of H451 graphite. The CTE, thermal resistivity and Young's modulus increased in the early stage of irradiation and then only the CTE decreased while the thermal resistivity and Young's modulus levelled off with further irradiation. The neutron fluence showing the maximum CTE shifted to the lower fluence with increasing irradiation temperature. The increases of both thermal resistivity and Young's modulus were remarkable for the samples irradiated at lower temperatures. Compressive and bending strengths measured at room temperature increased after irradiation as well. The corrosion rate with water-vapor of 0.65 % in helium at high temperatures decreased owing to irradiation and the reduction was independent of irradiation temperature and neutron fluence. The activation energy for the reaction was estimated to be the same before and after irradiation. (author)

  2. Post Irradiation Examination Results of the NT-02 Graphite Fins NUMI Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Sidorov, V. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab; Asner, D. M. [PNL, Richland; Casella, Casella,A.M [PNL, Richland; Edwards, D. J. [PNL, Richland; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L. [PNL, Richland; Senor, D. J. [PNL, Richland

    2017-02-10

    The NT-02 neutrino target in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab is a 95 cm long target made up of segmented graphite fins. It is the longest running NuMI target, which operated with a 120 GeV proton beam with maximum power of 340 kW, and saw an integrated total proton on target of 6.1 1020. Over the last half of its life, gradual degradation of neutrino yield was observed until the target was replaced. The probable causes for the target performance degradation are attributed to radiation damage, possibly including cracking caused by reduction in thermal shock resistance, as well as potential localized oxidation in the heated region of the target. Understanding the long-termstructural response of target materials exposed to proton irradiation is critical as future proton accelerator sources are becoming increasingly more powerful. As a result, an autopsy of the target was carried out to facilitate post-irradiation examination of selected graphite fins. Advanced microstructural imaging and surface elemental analysis techniques were used to characterize the condition of the fins in an effort to identify degradation mechanisms, and the relevant findings are presented in this paper.

  3. An evaluation on fatigue crack growth in a fine-grained isotropic graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hongtao; Sun Libin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Chenfeng [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Shi Li [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Haitao, E-mail: wanght@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The propagation of micro- and macro-fatigue cracks in IG-11 graphite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The curves of the fatigue crack growth rate versus the SIF range show three stages. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fatigue microcrack propagation is very sensitive to graphite's microstructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Graphite's microstructures have no significant impact on fatigue macrocrack growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fatigue fracture surface indicates the fracture mechanism of the IG-11 graphite. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in IG-11 graphite, and determine the crack growth rate in relation to the stress level. Experimental studies were performed at both micro and macro scales. For fatigue microcrack propagation, single-edge-notch specimens were chosen for testing and the fatigue crack growth was measured in situ with a scanning electron microscope. For fatigue macrocrack propagation, CT specimens were used and the fatigue crack growth was measured with a high-accuracy optic microscope. Combining the two groups of experimental results, the following conclusions are derived: (1) The heterogeneous microstructures of the graphite material have significant impact on the fatigue microcrack growth, while their influence on fatigue macrocrack growth is very limited. (2) The relationship between the fatigue crack growth rate and the crack-tip stress intensity factor range can be expressed in the form of Paris formulae, which contains three stages: an initial rising part with a small slope, an abrupt rise with a very large acceleration, and a short final part with a small slope. (3) The fatigue fracture surface of the graphite material contains considerable sliding of leaf-shape graphite flakes combined with small cotton-shape plastic deformations. These sliding traces are approximately aligned at 45 Degree-Sign , showing the

  4. An evaluation on fatigue crack growth in a fine-grained isotropic graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongtao; Sun Libin; Li Chenfeng; Shi Li; Wang Haitao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The propagation of micro- and macro-fatigue cracks in IG-11 graphite was studied. ► The curves of the fatigue crack growth rate versus the SIF range show three stages. ► The fatigue microcrack propagation is very sensitive to graphite's microstructures. ► Graphite's microstructures have no significant impact on fatigue macrocrack growth. ► The fatigue fracture surface indicates the fracture mechanism of the IG-11 graphite. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in IG-11 graphite, and determine the crack growth rate in relation to the stress level. Experimental studies were performed at both micro and macro scales. For fatigue microcrack propagation, single-edge-notch specimens were chosen for testing and the fatigue crack growth was measured in situ with a scanning electron microscope. For fatigue macrocrack propagation, CT specimens were used and the fatigue crack growth was measured with a high-accuracy optic microscope. Combining the two groups of experimental results, the following conclusions are derived: (1) The heterogeneous microstructures of the graphite material have significant impact on the fatigue microcrack growth, while their influence on fatigue macrocrack growth is very limited. (2) The relationship between the fatigue crack growth rate and the crack-tip stress intensity factor range can be expressed in the form of Paris formulae, which contains three stages: an initial rising part with a small slope, an abrupt rise with a very large acceleration, and a short final part with a small slope. (3) The fatigue fracture surface of the graphite material contains considerable sliding of leaf-shape graphite flakes combined with small cotton-shape plastic deformations. These sliding traces are approximately aligned at 45°, showing the main cause of the fatigue fracture is the shear stress. There are also a large amount of secondary cracks inside unit cells and on cell walls

  5. An investigation of the electron irradiation of graphite in a helium atmosphere using a modified electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, A.P.; Hutchison, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The behaviour of graphite particles immersed in helium gas and irradiated with an electron-beam has been investigated. Because this treatment was performed in a modified high resolution transmission electron microscope, the rapid morphological and microstructural changes that occurred could be directly observed. The results have implications for future controlled environment microscopy of carbonaceous materials and the characterisation of such microscopes. It is also shown that the processes can provide insight into ion-irradiation induced damage of graphite and the mechanism of fullerene generation. (Author)

  6. Modification of cell growth rate by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisao; Takemasa, Kazuhiko; Nishiguchi, Iku; Ka, Wei-Jei; Kutsuki, Shoji; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1993-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the proliferation kinetics of the monolayer cells has been studied. Two human cell lines with different doubling times (HeLa-P and RMUG) and two clones that have the same radiosensitivity but different doubling times (HeLa-R and HeLa-S) were irradiated with a daily dose of 2 Gy for 6 days. The number of the clonogenic cells/dish was calculated by multiplying the number of total cell/dish by the survival fraction. In the rapidly growing cells (HeLa-P, HeLa-R), the number of the clonogenic cells was not decreased by the first two fractionated irradiations, but decreased thereafter at a similar rate as by single-dose fractionation, whereas the clonogenic cell number decreased from the first fractionated irradiation in the slowly growing cells (RMUG, HeLa-S). When the proliferation of clonogenic cell number increased along with a similar growth rates that was seen in all other types of cells. Further, no correlation was seen between the growth rates of cells without irradiation and cells that received irradiation. This latter result suggests that the slow growth rate of non-irradiated cells may not be the predictive factor of the tumor cure and the interruption of radiotherapy may reduce the beneficial effect of this treatment even in slow growing tumors. (author)

  7. Technical specifications (replaces note T.62). Irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature, Note T. 76; Specification technique, (Annule et remplace la note T. 62), Irradiation de graphite a temperature ambiante, Note T. 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reseau, R A [Services des grandes piles experimentales, Section ' Physique et Experimentation, Saclay (France)

    1962-12-15

    The objective is to study the effects of fast neutron irradiation of different graphite samples. The irradiation conditions should be as follows: integral fast neutron flux should be higher than 10{sup 20} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, the reactor should operate at steady state for 15 days, the temperature od samples should not be higher than 100 deg C, preferably 80 deg C. Note T. 62 which is replaced by this Note is attached.

  8. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  9. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Lii-Rosales, Ann; Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Evans, James W.; Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison with the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. This island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.

  10. Adsorption of dysprosium on the graphite (0001) surface: Nucleation and growth at 300 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Lii-Rosales, Ann [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Evans, James W. [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Wallingford, Mark; Zhou, Yinghui [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Thiel, Patricia A., E-mail: pthiel@iastate.edu [The Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2016-12-07

    We have studied nucleation and growth of Dy islands on the basal plane of graphite at 300 K using scanning tunneling microscopy, density functional theory (DFT) in a form that includes van der Waals interactions, and analytic theory. The interaction of atomic Dy with graphite is strong, while the diffusion barrier is small. Experiment shows that at 300 K, the density of nucleated islands is close to the value predicted for homogeneous nucleation, using critical nucleus size of 1 and the DFT-derived diffusion barrier. Homogeneous nucleation is also supported by the monomodal shape of the island size distributions. Comparison with the published island density of Dy on graphene shows that the value is about two orders of magnitude smaller on graphite, which can be attributed to more effective charge screening in graphite. The base of each island is 3 atomic layers high and atomically ordered, forming a coincidence lattice with the graphite. Islands resist coalescence, probably due to multiple rotational orientations associated with the coincidence lattice. Upper levels grow as discernible single-atom layers. Analysis of the level populations reveals significant downward interlayer transport, which facilitates growth of the base. This island shape is metastable, since more compact three-dimensional islands form at elevated growth temperature.

  11. Distribution of 60Co and 54Mn in graphite material of irradiated HTGR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Kikuchi, Teruo; Kobayashi, Fumiaki; Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi

    1984-05-01

    Distribution of 60 Co and 54 Mn was measured in the graphite sleeves and blocks of the third and fourth HTGR fuel assemblies irradiated in the Oarai Gas Loop-1 (OGL-1), which is a high temperature inpile gas loop installed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Axial and circumferential profiles were obtained by gamma spectrometry, and radial profiles by lathe sectioning with gamma spectrometry. Distribution of 60 Co is in good agreement with that of thermal neutron flux, and the Co content in the graphite is estimated to be -- 1 x 10 -9 in weight fraction. Concentration of 54 Mn decreases toward the axial center in its axial profile, and radially is almost uniform inside and appreciably higher at free surfaces. An estimated Fe content of --10 -8 in wight fraction is smaller by two orders of magnitude than that from chemical analysis. Higher concentraion of 60 Co and 54 Mn at the free surfaces suggests the importance of transportation process of these nuclides in the coolant loop. (author)

  12. Cyclic fatigue of near-isotopic graphite: influence of stress cycle and neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.J.

    1977-11-01

    Near-isotropic graphites H-451 and PGX were tested in uniaxial cyclic fatigue, and fatigue life (S-N) curves were generated to a maximum of 10 5 cycles. The stress ratio, R (minimum stress during a cycle divided by maximum stress) ranged from -1 to +0.5. With R = - 1, the homologous stress limits (maximum applied fatigue stress divided by the tensile strength) for 50% specimen survival to 10 5 cycles averaged 0.63 in the axial direction and 0.74 in the radial direction. Corresponding homologous stress limits for 99% specimen survival (99/95 tolerance limits) were 0.48 and 0.53. Higher R-values resulted in longer fatigue lives and increased stress limits. H-451 graphite specimens irradiated with fast neutrons at 1173 to 1263 0 K at fluences of up to 10 26 n/m 2 (equivalent fission fluence) showed fatigue stress limits of about twice the unirradiated levels when the unirradiated tensile strength was used as the basis for normalization

  13. Monovacancy paramagnetism in neutron-irradiated graphite probed by 13C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi Tao; Xu, C; Dmytriieva, Daryna; Molatta, Sebastian; Wosnitza, J; Wang, Y T; Helm, Manfred; Zhou, Shengqiang; Kuehne, Hannes

    2017-09-18

    We report on the magnetic properties of monovacancy defects in neutron-irradiated graphite, probed by $^{13}$C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The bulk paramagnetism of the defect moments is revealed by the temperature dependence of the NMR frequency shift and spectral linewidth, both of which follow a Curie behavior, in agreement with measurements of the macroscopic magnetization. Compared to pristine graphite, the fluctuating hyperfine fields generated by the defect moments lead to an enhancement of the $^{13}$C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate $1/T_{1}$ by about two orders of magnitude. With an applied magnetic field of 7.1 T, the temperature dependence of $1/T_{1}$ below about 10 K can well be described by a thermally activated form, $1/T_{1}\\propto\\exp(-\\Delta/k_{B}T)$, yielding a singular Zeeman energy of ($0.41\\pm0.01$) meV, in excellent agreement with the sole presence of polarized, non-interacting defect moments. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Surface structure modification of single crystal graphite after slow, highly charged ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaher, I.; Akcöltekin, S.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Manil, B.; Dey, K. R.; Been, T.; Boduch, P.; Rothard, H.; Schleberger, M.; Lebius, H.

    2018-04-01

    Single crystal graphite was irradiated by slow, highly charged ions. The modification of the surface structure was studied by means of Low-Energy Electron Diffraction. The observed damage cross section increases with the potential energy, i.e. the charge state of the incident ion, at a constant kinetic energy. The potential energy is more efficient for the damage production than the kinetic energy by more than a factor of twenty. Comparison with earlier results hints to a strong link between early electron creation and later target atom rearrangement. With increasing ion fluence, the initially large-scale single crystal is first transformed into μ m-sized crystals, before complete amorphisation takes place.

  15. Models of bending strength for Gilsocarbon graphites irradiated in inert and oxidising environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eason, Ernest D.; Hall, Graham N.; Marsden, Barry J.; Heys, Graham B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the development and validation of an empirical model of fast neutron damage and radiolytic oxidation effects on bending strength for the moulded Gilsocarbon graphites used in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). The inert environment model is based on evidence of essentially constant strength as fast neutron dose increases in inert environment. The model of combined irradiation and oxidation calibrates that constant along with an exponential function representing the degree of radiolytic oxidation as measured by weight loss. The change in strength with exposure was found to vary from one AGR station to another. The model was calibrated to data on material trepanned from AGR moderator bricks after varying operating times

  16. The irradiation behaviour of boron carbide/graphite between 800 and 1,1000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattenbach, K.; Hilgendorff, W.; Weiler, K.; Zimmermann, H.U.

    1975-01-01

    64 samples of boron carbide/graphite, a material used as burnable poison in high temperature reactors, were irradiated at temperatures between 800 and 1,100 0 C up to a fluence of 1-2 x 10 20 nvt. The following post-investigations were extended to dimensional measurements to determime a possible swelling or shrinking of the pellet, corrosion tests in completely desalinated water at 300 0 C, preparation of metallographic microsections to check for crack formation, determination of the helium hold back power and the thus involved gas chromatic analysis, as well as burn-up determinations by determining the boron 10/boron 11 ratio and the lithium concentration. (orig./LN) [de

  17. Diamond growth on Fe-Cr-Al alloy by H2-plasma enhanced graphite etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. S.; Hirose, A.

    2007-01-01

    Without intermediate layer and surface pretreatment, adherent diamond films with high initial nucleation density have been deposited on Fe-15Cr-5Al (wt. %) alloy substrate. The deposition was performed using microwave hydrogen plasma enhanced graphite etching in a wide temperature range from 370 to 740 degree sign C. The high nucleation density and growth rate of diamond are primarily attributed to the unique precursors used (hydrogen plasma etched graphite) and the chemical nature of the substrate. The improvement in diamond adhesion to steel alloys is ascribed to the important role played by Al, mitigation of the catalytic function of iron by suppressing the preferential formation of loose graphite intermediate phase on steel surface

  18. Understanding the Growth Mechanism of GaN Epitaxial Layers on Mechanically Exfoliated Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianbao; Liu, Chenyang; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Bin; Dong, Hailiang; Jia, Wei; Jia, Zhigang; Yu, Chunyan; Gan, Lin; Xu, Bingshe; Jiang, Haiwei

    2018-04-27

    The growth mechanism of GaN epitaxial layers on mechanically exfoliated graphite is explained in detail based on classic nucleation theory. The number of defects on the graphite surface can be increased via O-plasma treatment, leading to increased nucleation density on the graphite surface. The addition of elemental Al can effectively improve the nucleation rate, which can promote the formation of dense nucleation layers and the lateral growth of GaN epitaxial layers. The surface morphologies of the nucleation layers, annealed layers and epitaxial layers were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, where the evolution of the surface morphology coincided with a 3D-to-2D growth mechanism. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of GaN. Fast Fourier transform diffraction patterns showed that cubic phase (zinc-blend structure) GaN grains were obtained using conventional GaN nucleation layers, while the hexagonal phase (wurtzite structure) GaN films were formed using AlGaN nucleation layers. Our work opens new avenues for using highly oriented pyrolytic graphite as a substrate to fabricate transferable optoelectronic devices.

  19. Behavior of LASL-made graphite, ZrC, and ZrC-containing coated particles in irradiation tests HT-28 and HT-29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiswig, R.D.; Wagner, P.; Hollabaugh, C.M.; White, R.W.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Davidson, K.V.; Schell, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    Three types of materials, extruded graphite, hot-pressed ZrC, and particles with ZrC coatings, were irradiated in ORNL High Fluence Isotope Reactor Irradiation tests HT-28 and HT-29. The ZrC seemed unaffected. The graphite changed in dimensions, x-ray diffraction parameters, and thermal conductivity. The four types of coated particles tested all resisted the irradiation well, except one set of particles with double-graded C-ZrC-C coats. Overall, the results were considered encouraging for use of ZrC and extruded graphite fuel matrices. 16 fig

  20. Ion irradiation used as surrogate of neutron irradiation in graphite: Consequences on 14C and 36Cl behavior and structural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Pipon, Y.; Bérerd, N.; Ammar, M. R.; Simon, P.; Deldicque, D.; Sainsot, P.

    2018-04-01

    Graphite has been widely used as neutron moderator, reflector or fuel matrix in different types of reactors such as gas cooled nuclear reactors (UNGG, Magnox, AGR), RBMK reactors or high temperature gas cooled reactors. Their operation produces a great quantity of irradiated graphite or other carbonaceous waste (around 250,000 tons worldwide) that requires a special management strategy. In the case of disposal, which is a current management strategy, two main radionuclides, 14C and 36Cl might be dose determining at the outlet. Particular attention is paid to 14C due to its long half-life (T∼5730 years) [1] and as major contributor to the radioactive dose. 14C has two main production routes, i) transmutation of nitrogen (14N(n,p)14C) where nitrogen is mainly adsorbed at the surfaces of the irradiated graphite; ii) activation of carbon from the matrix (13C(n,γ)14C). According to leaching tests, it was shown that even if the quantity of 14C released in the solution is low (less than 1% of the initial inventory), around 30% is in the organic form that would be mobile in repository conditions [2,3]. 36Cl is mainly produced through the activation of 35Cl (35Cl(n,γ)36Cl) which is an impurity in nuclear graphite. Its activity is low but it might be highly mobile in clay host rocks. Thus, in order to make informed decisions about the best management process and to anticipate potential radionuclide dissemination during dismantling and in the repository, it is necessary to collect information on 14C and 36Cl location and speciation in graphite, after reactor closure. The goal of the present paper is therefore to use ion irradiation to simulate neutron irradiation and to evaluate the irradiation effects on the behavior of 36Cl and 14C as well as on the induced graphite structure modifications. For that, to understand and model the underlying mechanisms, we used an indirect approach based on 13C or 37Cl implantation to simulate the respective presence of 14C or 36Cl. These

  1. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO{sub 2}-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, DRD/CM – 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, Parc de la Croix-Blanche, F-92298 Châtenay-Malabry cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Eléments Légers, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/NIMBE, UMR 3299 SIS2M – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO{sub 2}-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for “Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz”) to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D{sup +} ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO{sub 2}) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the

  2. Temperature and radiolytic corrosion effects on the chlorine behaviour in nuclear graphite: consequences for the disposable of irradiated graphite from UNGG reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudey, C.E.

    2010-10-01

    This work concerns the dismantling of the UNGG reactor which have produced around 23 000 t of graphite wastes that ave to be disposed of according to the French law of June 206. These wastes contain two long-lived radionuclides ( 14 C and 36 Cl) which are the main long term dose contributors. In order to get information about their inventory and their long term behaviour in case of water ingress into the repository, it is necessary to determine their location and speciation in the irradiated graphite after the reactor shutdown. This work concerns the study of 36 Cl. The main objective is to reproduce its behaviour during reactor operation. For that purpose, we have studied the effects of temperature and radiolytic corrosion independently. Our results show a rapid release of around 20% 36 Cl during the first hours of reactor operation whereas a much slower release occurs afterwards. We have put in evidence two types of chlorine corresponding to two different chemical forms (of different thermal stabilities) or to two locations (of different accessibilities). We have also shown that the radiolytic corrosion seems to enhance chlorine release, whatever the irradiation dose. Moreover, the major chemical form of chlorine is inorganic. (author)

  3. HTGR Fuels and Core Development Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending August 31, 1977. [Graphite and fuel irradiation; fission product release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The work reported includes studies of reactions between core materials and coolant impurities, basic fission product transport mechanisms, core graphite development and testing, the development and testing of recyclable fuel systems, and physics and fuel management studies. Materials studies include irradiation capsule tests of both fuel and graphite. Experimental procedures and results are discussed and data are presented.

  4. Strategy for Handling and Treatment of INPP RBMK-1500 Irradiated Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oryšaka, A.

    2016-01-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite-moderated channel-type power reactors at Ignalina NPP. After the final shutdown of the INPP, radioactive i-graphite dismantling, handling, conditioning, storage and disposal is an important part of the decommissioning activities. The core of the INPP unit 1 and 2 contains about 3600 tons of i-graphite. Formation of activation products strongly depends on the contents of impurities, operational mode and concentration of impurities in the graphite. The case study for INPP envisages the analysis of possibilities of graphite handling and treatment in the context of immediate decommissioning. (author)

  5. Thermal desorption spectroscopy of pyrolytic graphite cleavage faces after keV deuterium irradiation at 330-1000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Y.; Yamaki, T.; Tokiguchi, K.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements were made on D 2 and CD 4 from surface layers of pyrolytic graphite cleavage faces after 3 keV D + 3 irradiation to 1.5 x 10 18 D/cm 2 at irradiation temperatures from 330 to 1000 K. Thermal desorption of both D 2 and CD 4 was observed to rise simultaneously at around 700 K. The D 2 peak was found at T m = 900-1000 K, while the CD 4 peak appeared at a lower temperature, 800-840 K. The T m for the D 2 TDS increased, while that for the CD 4 decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. These results obviously indicate that the D 2 desorption is detrapping/recombination limited, while the CD 4 desorption is most likely to be diffusion limited. The amount of thermally desorbed D 2 after the D + irradiation was observed to monotonously decrease as the irradiation temperature was increased from 330 to 1000 K. These tendencies agreed with previous results for the irradiation temperature dependencies of both C1s chemical shift (XPS) and the interlayer spacing, d 002 (HRTEM), on the graphite basal face. (orig.)

  6. Direct growth of self-crystallized graphene and graphite nanoballs with Ni vapor-assisted growth: From controllable growth to material characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Wen-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ze; Yeh, Chao-Hui; He, Jr-Hau; Chiu, Po-Wen; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-01-01

    A directly self-crystallized graphene layer with transfer-free process on arbitrary insulator by Ni vapor-assisted growth at growth temperatures between 950 to 1100°C via conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was developed and demonstrated. Domain sizes of graphene were confirmed by Raman spectra from ~12 nm at growth temperature of 1000°C to ~32 nm at growth temperature of 1100°C, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the graphene is controllable, depending on deposition time and growth temperature. By increasing growth pressure, the growth of graphite nano-balls was preferred rather than graphene growth. The detailed formation mechanisms of graphene and graphite nanoballs were proposed and investigated in detail. Optical and electrical properties of graphene layer were measured. The direct growth of the carbon-based materials with free of the transfer process provides a promising application at nanoelectronics. PMID:24810224

  7. Direct growth of self-crystallized graphene and graphite nanoballs with Ni vapor-assisted growth: from controllable growth to material characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Wen-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ze; Yeh, Chao-Hui; He, Jr-Hau; Chiu, Po-Wen; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-05-09

    A directly self-crystallized graphene layer with transfer-free process on arbitrary insulator by Ni vapor-assisted growth at growth temperatures between 950 to 1100 °C via conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system was developed and demonstrated. Domain sizes of graphene were confirmed by Raman spectra from ~12 nm at growth temperature of 1000 °C to ~32 nm at growth temperature of 1100 °C, respectively. Furthermore, the thickness of the graphene is controllable, depending on deposition time and growth temperature. By increasing growth pressure, the growth of graphite nano-balls was preferred rather than graphene growth. The detailed formation mechanisms of graphene and graphite nanoballs were proposed and investigated in detail. Optical and electrical properties of graphene layer were measured. The direct growth of the carbon-based materials with free of the transfer process provides a promising application at nanoelectronics.

  8. Phonon scattering in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1976-04-01

    Effects on graphite thermal conductivities due to controlled alterations of the graphite structure by impurity addition, porosity, and neutron irradiation are shown to be consistent with the phonon-scattering formulation 1/l = Σ/sub i equals 1/sup/n/ 1/l/sub i/. Observed temperature effects on these doped and irradiated graphites are also explained by this mechanism

  9. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs

  10. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  11. Modeling of irradiated graphite {sup 14}C transfer through engineered barriers of a generic geological repository in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskas, Povilas; Grigaliuniene, Dalia, E-mail: Dalia.Grigaliuniene@lei.lt; Narkuniene, Asta; Kilda, Raimondas; Justinavicius, Darius

    2016-11-01

    There are two RBMK-1500 type graphite moderated reactors at the Ignalina nuclear power plant in Lithuania, and they are under decommissioning now. The graphite cannot be disposed of in a near surface repository, because of large amounts of {sup 14}C. Therefore, disposal of the graphite in a geological repository is a reasonable solution. This study presents evaluation of the {sup 14}C transfer by the groundwater pathway into the geosphere from the irradiated graphite in a generic geological repository in crystalline rocks and demonstration of the role of the different components of the engineered barrier system by performing local sensitivity analysis. The speciation of the released {sup 14}C into organic and inorganic compounds as well as the most recent information on {sup 14}C source term was taken into account. Two alternatives were considered in the analysis: disposal of graphite in containers with encapsulant and without it. It was evaluated that the maximal fractional flux of inorganic {sup 14}C into the geosphere can vary from 10{sup −} {sup 11} y{sup −} {sup 1} (for non-encapsulated graphite) to 10{sup −} {sup 12} y{sup −} {sup 1} (for encapsulated graphite) while of organic {sup 14}C it was about 10{sup −} {sup 3} y{sup −} {sup 1} of its inventory. Such difference demonstrates that investigations on the {sup 14}C inventory and chemical form in which it is released are especially important. The parameter with the highest influence on the maximal flux into the geosphere for inorganic {sup 14}C transfer was the sorption coefficient in the backfill and for organic {sup 14}C transfer – the backfill hydraulic conductivity. - Highlights: • Graphite moderated nuclear reactors are being decommissioned. • We studied interaction of disposed material with surrounding environment. • Specifically {sup 14}C transfer through engineered barriers of a geological repository. • Organic {sup 14}C flux to geosphere is considerably higher than inorganic

  12. Irradiation growth of Zircaloy (LWBR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williard, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    Irradiation growth of recrystallized annealed (RXA) Zircaloy is divided into four stages and a model is presented to account for each stage. Stage I is a short time, low-strain transient caused by the accumulation of point defects, small interstitial loops, and vacancy clusters. Stage II is a quasi-steady-state region of relatively low strain rate during which the loops grow and intrinsic dislocations climb. Stage III is a transient during which the strain rate increases due to the production and motion of irradiation-induced dislocation lines. Stage IV is a high-strain-rate, steady-state region during which nonrecoverable strain is caused predominantly by glide of the irradiationinduced dislocations. The proposed model is based on two new mechanisms: (1) direct production of an interstitial dislocation loop accompanied by a vacancy cluster in the primary damage event, and (2) production of dislocations due to the activation of Frank-Read sources by internal stresses caused by interaction of the loops with themselves and with intrinsic (cold work) dislocations. Nonconservative, recoverable strain is due to climb of all dislocations, whereas conservative, nonrecoverable strain is caused by glide of irradiation-induced and intrinsic dislocations under the action of the internal stress. The conservative strain follows a (1-3f) texture dependence

  13. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications

  14. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Summary report of consultants' meeting. 12. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2010-02-01

    The 12th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 12-13 November 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  15. Innovative approaches to the Management of Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Wastes: Addressing the Challenges through International Collaboration with Project 'GRAPA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Ojovan, M.; O'Sullivan, P.; )

    2017-01-01

    There exists more than 250.000 tonnes of irradiated (and therefore radioactive) nuclear graphite (i-graphite) in the world, primarily as a result of the development of graphite-moderated power-reactor systems, initially for defence and subsequently for commercial purposes. Only a very small number of such plants have been dismantled and, for most cases, the final destiny of the irradiated graphite remains unresolved. Future high-temperature reactor programmes, such as the Chinese HTR-PM development, will produce more graphite and carbonaceous wastes from both structural components and the fuel pebbles (which are approximately 96% carbonaceous), the latter producing a continuous stream of so-called 'operational waste'. The problem of dismantling irradiated graphite reactor stacks, possibly distorted through neutron damage and in some cases degraded further by radiation-chemical attack by gaseous coolants, and then finding the appropriate treatments and final destiny of the material, has exercised both the European Union and the International Atomic Energy Agency for more than 25 years, seeking to address the different issues and available disposal solutions in different IAEA Member States. An IAEA collaborative research programme on treatment options has recently been completed, and an active group of international specialists in this area has now been established as part of the IAEA International Decommissioning Network under the envelope of Project 'GRAPA' (Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches), which includes representatives from Belgium, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Lithuania, Rep. of Korea, Romania, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine and the Russian Federation with direct responsibilities for various parts of the decommissioning and graphite-disposal process in a variety of reactor designs. Interest has also been expressed by colleagues from Sweden and Japan. Work is in progress on a number of topic areas where weaknesses in the

  16. Theory of void swelling, irradiation creep and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.H.; Bullough, R.; Hayns, M.R.

    Recent progress in our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in swelling, creep and growth of materials subjected to irradiation is reviewed. The topics discussed are: the sink types and their strengths in the lossy continuum; swelling and void distribution analysis, including recent work on void nucleation; and, irradiation creep and growth of zirconium and zircaloy are taken as an example

  17. Brazing graphite to graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of graphite

  18. Buckle, ruck and tuck: A proposed new model for the response of graphite to neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggie, M.I., E-mail: m.i.heggie@sussex.ac.uk [Chemistry Subject Group, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); Suarez-Martinez, I. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Western Australia (Australia); Davidson, C.; Haffenden, G. [Chemistry Subject Group, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-30

    The default theory of radiation damage in graphite invokes Frenkel pair formation as the principal cause of physical property changes. We set out its inadequacies and present two new mechanisms that contribute to a better account for changes in dimension and stored energy. Damage depends on the substrate temperature, undergoing a change at approximately 250 deg. C. Below this temperature particle radiation imparts a permanent, nano-buckling to the layers. Above it, layers fold, forming what we describe as a ruck and tuck defect. We present first principles and molecular mechanics calculations of energies and structures to support these claims. Necessarily we extend the dislocation theory of layered materials. We cite good experimental evidence for these features from the literature on radiation damage in graphite.

  19. Studies of mechanical properties and irradiation damage nucleation of HTGR graphites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrower, P.A.

    1981-05-01

    Since the submission of the last report (COO-2712-6) work has concentrated on the examination of the effects of oxidation on the compressive strengths of graphites doped with iron, vanadium and calcium. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the relative effects of the impurities on the rates of oxidation in air, CO 2 and H 2 O and the resultant reduction in compressive strength

  20. Antibacterial activity of irradiated and non-irradiated chitosan and chitosan derivatives against Escherichia coli growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tg Ahbrizal Farizal Tg Ahmad; Norimah Yusof; Kamarudin Bahari; Kamaruddin Hashim

    2006-01-01

    Samples of chitosan and four chitosan derivatives [ionic chitosan, chitosan lactate, carboxymethyl chitosan (C) and carboxymethyl chitosan (L)] were studied for their antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli growth. Chitosan and chitosan derivatives were prepared at concentrations 20, 100, 1000, 10000 ppm and 250, 1000, 5000, 10000, 20000 ppm, respectively. Each of the samples was tested before and after irradiation with electron beam at 25 kGy. The turbidity of bacterial growth media was measured periodically at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 24 h after inoculation using the optical density method. The results indicated that non- irradiated chitosan inhibited E. coli growth at 20 and 100 ppm. Meanwhile, irradiated chitosan at 100 and 1000 ppm concentration inhibited E. coli growth. Both irradiated and non-irradiated ionic chitosan inhibited E. coli growth at all concentrations used. Chitosan lactate was found to inhibit E. coli at concentration as low as 5000 ppm for both irradiated and non-irradiated samples. E. coli growth was not inhibited by carboxymethyl chitosan (C) and carboxymethyl chitosan (L), before and after irradiation. The findings suggested that chitosan has greater antibacterial activity as compared to the chitosan derivative samples. (Author)

  1. Direct synthesis of graphitic mesoporous carbon from green phenolic resins exposed to subsequent UV and IR laser irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopronyi, Mihai; Sima, Felix; Vaulot, Cyril; Delmotte, Luc; Bahouka, Armel; Matei Ghimbeu, Camelia

    2016-01-01

    The design of mesoporous carbon materials with controlled textural and structural features by rapid, cost-effective and eco-friendly means is highly demanded for many fields of applications. We report herein on the fast and tailored synthesis of mesoporous carbon by UV and IR laser assisted irradiations of a solution consisting of green phenolic resins and surfactant agent. By tailoring the UV laser parameters such as energy, pulse repetition rate or exposure time carbon materials with different pore size, architecture and wall thickness were obtained. By increasing irradiation dose, the mesopore size diminishes in the favor of wall thickness while the morphology shifts from worm-like to an ordered hexagonal one. This was related to the intensification of phenolic resin cross-linking which induces the reduction of H-bonding with the template as highlighted by 13C and 1H NMR. In addition, mesoporous carbon with graphitic structure was obtained by IR laser irradiation at room temperature and in very short time periods compared to the classical long thermal treatment at very high temperatures. Therefore, the carbon texture and structure can be tuned only by playing with laser parameters, without extra chemicals, as usually required. PMID:28000781

  2. Irradiation creep due to SIPA-induced growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    An additional contribution to irradiation creep resulting from the stress-induced preferred adsorption (SIPA) effect is described - SIPA-induced growth (SIG). The mechanism of SIG is discussed and an expression for its contribution to irradiation creep developed. It is shown that SIG is very significant in comparison with SIPA. Enhancement of creep by swelling may also occur. (U.K.)

  3. Analysis of Wigner energy release process in graphite stack of shut-down uranium-graphite reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Bespala, E. V.; Pavliuk, A. O.; Kotlyarevskiy, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Data, which finding during thermal differential analysis of sampled irradiated graphite are presented. Results of computational modeling of Winger energy release process from irradiated graphite staking are demonstrated. It's shown, that spontaneous combustion of graphite possible only in adiabatic case.

  4. Production of an impermeable composite of irradiated graphite and glass by hot isostatic pressing as a long term leach resistant waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fachinger, Johannes; Muller, Walter [FNAG ZU Hanau, Hanau (Germany); Marsat, Eric [FNAG SAS Le Pont de Claix (France); Grosse, Karl-Heinz; Seemann, Richard [ALD Hanau (Germany); Scales, Charlie; Easton, Michael Mark [NNL, Workington (United Kingdom); Anthony Banford [NNL, Warrington (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Around 250,000 tons of irradiated graphite (i-graphite) exists worldwide and can be considered as a current waste or future waste stream. The largest national i-graphite inventory is located in UK (∼ 100,000 tons) with significant quantities also in Russia and France [5]. Most of the i-graphite remains in the cores of shutdown nuclear reactors including the MAGNOX type in UK and the UNGG in France. Whilst there are still operational power reactors with graphite cores, such as the Russian RBMKs and the AGRs in UK, all of them will reach their end of life during the next two decades. The most common reference waste management option of i-graphite is a wet or dry retrieval of the graphite blocks from the reactor core and the grouting of these blocks in a container without further conditioning. This produces large waste package volumes because the encapsulation capacity of the grout is limited and large cavities in the graphite blocks could reduce the packing densities. Packing densities from 0.5 to 1 tons per cubic meter have been assumed for grouting solutions. Furthermore the grout is permeable. This could over time allow the penetration of aqueous phases into the waste block and a potential dissolution and release of radionuclides. As a result particularly highly soluble radionuclides may not be retained by the grout. Vitrification could present an alternative, however a similar waste package volume increase may be expected since the encapsulation capacity of glass is potentially similar to or worse than that of grout. FNAG has developed a process for the production of a graphite-glass composite material called Impermeable Graphite Matrix (IGM) [3]. This process is also applicable to irradiated graphite which allows the manufacturing of an impermeable material without volume increase. Crushed i-graphite is mixed with 20 vol.% of glass and then pressed under vacuum at an elevated temperature in an axial hot vacuum press (HVP). The obtained product has zero or

  5. Production of an impermeable composite of irradiated graphite and glass by hot isostatic pressing as a long term leach resistant waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fachinger, Johannes; Muller, Walter; Marsat, Eric; Grosse, Karl-Heinz; Seemann, Richard; Scales, Charlie; Easton, Michael Mark; Anthony Banford

    2013-01-01

    Around 250,000 tons of irradiated graphite (i-graphite) exists worldwide and can be considered as a current waste or future waste stream. The largest national i-graphite inventory is located in UK (∼ 100,000 tons) with significant quantities also in Russia and France [5]. Most of the i-graphite remains in the cores of shutdown nuclear reactors including the MAGNOX type in UK and the UNGG in France. Whilst there are still operational power reactors with graphite cores, such as the Russian RBMKs and the AGRs in UK, all of them will reach their end of life during the next two decades. The most common reference waste management option of i-graphite is a wet or dry retrieval of the graphite blocks from the reactor core and the grouting of these blocks in a container without further conditioning. This produces large waste package volumes because the encapsulation capacity of the grout is limited and large cavities in the graphite blocks could reduce the packing densities. Packing densities from 0.5 to 1 tons per cubic meter have been assumed for grouting solutions. Furthermore the grout is permeable. This could over time allow the penetration of aqueous phases into the waste block and a potential dissolution and release of radionuclides. As a result particularly highly soluble radionuclides may not be retained by the grout. Vitrification could present an alternative, however a similar waste package volume increase may be expected since the encapsulation capacity of glass is potentially similar to or worse than that of grout. FNAG has developed a process for the production of a graphite-glass composite material called Impermeable Graphite Matrix (IGM) [3]. This process is also applicable to irradiated graphite which allows the manufacturing of an impermeable material without volume increase. Crushed i-graphite is mixed with 20 vol.% of glass and then pressed under vacuum at an elevated temperature in an axial hot vacuum press (HVP). The obtained product has zero or

  6. Toxicological characterization of chemicals produced from laser irradiation of graphite composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, J.

    1990-11-01

    One of the major potential hazards associated with laser machining of graphite composite materials is the toxic fumes and gases that are generated. When exposed to the intense energy of the laser beam, the organic polymer matrix of the composite material may decompose into various toxic by-products. To advance the understanding of the laser machining process from a health and safety viewpoint, this particular study consisted of the following steps: collect and analyze gaseous by-products generated during laser machining; collect particulates generated during laser machining and chemically extract them to determine the chemical species that may have absorbed or recondensed onto these particles; and review and evaluate the toxicity of the identified chemical species

  7. Fabrication of irradiation capsule for IASCC irradiation tests (1). Irradiation capsule for crack growth test (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Kawamata, Kazuo; Taguchi, Taketoshi; Kanazawa, Yoshiharu; Onuma, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Shuichi; Izumo, Hironobu; Ishida, Takuya; Saito, Takashi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ugachi, Hirokazu; Tsukada, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    It is known that Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) occurs when austenitic stainless steel components used for light water reactor (LWR) are irradiated for a long period. In order to evaluate the high aging of the nuclear power plant, the study of IASCC becomes the important problem. The specimens irradiated in the reactor were evaluated by post irradiation examination in the past study. For the appropriate evaluation of IASCC, it is necessary to test it under the simulated LWR conditions; temperature, water chemistry and irradiation conditions. In order to perform in-pile SCC test, saturated temperature capsule (SATCAP) was developed. There are crack growth test, crack propagation test and so on for in-pile SCC test. In this report, SATCAP for crack growth test is reported. (author)

  8. Crystal plasticity modeling of irradiation growth in Zircaloy-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Anirban; Tomé, Carlos N.; Golubov, Stanislav I.

    2017-08-01

    A physically based reaction-diffusion model is implemented in the visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) crystal plasticity framework to simulate irradiation growth in hcp Zr and its alloys. The reaction-diffusion model accounts for the defects produced by the cascade of displaced atoms, their diffusion to lattice sinks and the contribution to crystallographic strain at the level of single crystals. The VPSC framework accounts for intergranular interactions and irradiation creep, and calculates the strain in the polycrystalline ensemble. A novel scheme is proposed to model the simultaneous evolution of both, number density and radius, of irradiation-induced dislocation loops directly from experimental data of dislocation density evolution during irradiation. This framework is used to predict the irradiation growth behaviour of cold-worked Zircaloy-2 and trends compared to available experimental data. The role of internal stresses in inducing irradiation creep is discussed. Effects of grain size, texture and external stress on the coupled irradiation growth and creep behaviour are also studied and compared with available experimental data.

  9. Nuclear graphite ageing and turnaround

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Hall, G.N.; Smart, J.

    2001-01-01

    Graphite moderated reactors are being operated in many countries including, the UK, Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine and Japan. Many of these reactors will operate well into the next century. New designs of High Temperature Graphite Moderated Reactors (HTRS) are being built in China and Japan. The design life of these graphite-moderated reactors is governed by the ageing of the graphite core due to fast neutron damage, and also, in the case of carbon dioxide cooled reactors by the rate of oxidation of the graphite. Nuclear graphites are polycrystalline in nature and it is the irradiation-induced damage to the individual graphite crystals that determines the material property changes with age. The life of a graphite component in a nuclear reactor can be related to the graphite irradiation induced dimensional changes. Graphites typically shrink with age, until a point is reached where the shrinkage stops and the graphite starts to swell. This change from shrinkage to swelling is known as ''turnaround''. It is well known that pre-oxidising graphite specimens caused ''turnaround'' to be delayed, thus extending the life of the graphite, and hence the life of the reactor. However, there was no satisfactory explanation of this behaviour. This paper presents a numerical crystal based model of dimensional change in graphite, which explains the delay in ''turnaround'' in the pre-oxidised specimens irradiated in a fast neutron flux, in terms of crystal accommodation and orientation and change in compliance due to radiolytic oxidation. (author)

  10. Irradiation creep and growth of zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansiart, S.; Darchis, L.; Pelchat, J.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of temperature and fast neutron flux on irradiation creep and growth of stress relieved zircaloy-4 pressurized tubes has been derived from experimental irradiations in NaK, performed up to 2.5 10 25 n.m -2 in the temperature range [280, 350] 0 C. A significant influence of temperature on axial growth has been observed: at 280 0 C the elongation can no longer be expressed as a linear function of fluence as for the 350 0 C irradiation temperature; diametral growth, on the other hand, always appears negligible. Irradiation creep obviously depends on temperature too; the diametral strain (including thermal part) has been modelled as a sum of primary and secondary terms, the former being independent of fluence. For the tubing considered it is observed that the ranking of the different batches, with respect to diametral creep resistance, is the same before and under irradiation. Concerning axial creep strain the stress relieved material behaves as does an isotropic tube. This is not the case of recrystallized zircaloy-4 F, which shows a non negligible axial deformation, related to the diametral creep one, even though this diametral irradiation creep strain is strongly reduced comparatively to that of the stress relieved material. The comparison of the two materials growth rates is more complex since their dependence on temperature and flux differs

  11. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  12. Mechanisms of irradiation growth of alpha-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental observations in the last few years have shown that the range of irradiation growth behaviour of alpha-zirconium alloys is more varied, that a wider variety of sinks must be considered, and that there are more potential sources of anisotropy than was previously recognized. The important new experimental observations which influence our preception of the growth phenomenon in zirconium alloys include the growth of single crystals, accelerating growth in annealed material with the coincident appearance of vacancy loops on the basal planes, the occurrence of 'negative' growth, i.e., contractions along prism directions, the absence of a pronounced effect of grain size on the long term growth rate at low temperatures, and the presence of intergranular constraints prior to irradiation. With the greater complexity of behaviour now being observed, it is necessary to apply new theoretical concepts to assist in understanding growth, e.g., the potential role of anisotropic diffusion in segregation point defects to different sinks and 'growth' caused by the anisotropic relaxation of intergranular constrains. These can be combined with earlier ideas to predict a variety of growth behaviours, including 'negative growth'. Because the most important physical information required for theoretical treatments of growth, i.e, the characteristics of vacancies and self interstitial atoms, are still poorly understood, it is almost impossible to test rigorously any particular theoretical concept and a complete picture of growth has yet to emerge. (orig./MM)

  13. Cranial irradiation of young rats impairs later learning and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmier, J.B.; Carroll, M.E.; Patten, R.; Krivit, W.; Kim, T.H.

    1979-01-01

    Young rats (26 days) were exposed to ionizing radiation of the head of 0, 1200, 2400 or 3000 rads total in 200 rads/day doses. The subsequent growth of irradiated rats was permanently impaired: such impairment was positively related to amount of irradiation. Beginning in adolescence, rats were trained on a horizontal/vertical visual discrimination in a runway task and although all four groups mastered the discrimination, they differed in their patterns of acquisition. These results indicated long term effects and are associated with a cranial irradiation regimen similar to that given to children suffering acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). (author)

  14. Irradiation induced creep in graphite with respect to the flux effect and the high fluence behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    In accelerated irradiation creep tests, performed in the HFR Petten, in a fast neutron flux of about 2x10 4 cm -2 s -1 and at temperatures of 300 and 500 0 C, a fast neutron fluence in excess of 20x10 21 cm -2 (EDN) has been attained so far. As a supplement to this, an analogous creep test was conducted in a fast neutron flux lower by a factor of four which is more typical for the service conditions in a HTR, with a maximum fast fluence of only 4x10 21 cm -2 (EDN). This experiment was aimed at answering the question if, for equal fast fluence, enhanced irradiation creep and Wigner dimensional change would take place in a reduced fast neutron flux. This problem has more generally been addressed to as the ''flux effect'' or the ''equivalent temperature concept''. (orig./IHOE)

  15. Interpretation of measurements made by oscillations of irradiated fuels in natural uranium, graphite-gas piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laponche, Bernard; Luffin, Jean; Brunet, Max; Guerange, Jacques; Tonolli, Jacky

    1969-06-01

    When considering a pile operation, it is interesting to know the evolution of fuel quality with respect to irradiation, i.e. the variation of its fission rate and of its absorption rate. In order to experimentally obtain these features, a method is to introduce an irradiated cartridge into a critical reactor and to measure the induced effect on its reactivity and on the neutron density at the vicinity of the cartridge. An oscillation method presented in another document and based on a periodic introduction of fuel sample into a critical reactor allows, from the measurement of reactivity variation (global signal), and of the neutron density (local signal), effective macroscopic fission and absorption cross sections of this sample to be obtained. As previous studies revealed that the interpretation of the local signal was notably delicate, this information has been replaced by computed information, the fission rate, which is determined by means of the COREGRAF1 code. Thus, the remaining quantity to be obtained is the fuel absorption rate. The authors report studies performed on several sets of cartridges from different reactors, and with an irradiation range from about 700 to 4000 MWJ/T. In a first part, they describe the characteristics of the studied cartridges, their irradiation and measurement conditions, and the use of the evolution code. In a second part, they try to define the interpretation of oscillation-based measurements by using two methods, a first and fast one which gives an approximation of results, and a more elaborated second one which complies with measurement conditions. The last part presents and discusses the obtained results [fr

  16. Development of fracture toughness test method for nuclear grade graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. H.; Lee, J. S.; Cho, H. C.; Kim, D. J.; Lee, D. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Because of its high strength and stability at very high temperature, as well as very low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, graphite has been widely used as a structural material in Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR). Recently, many countries are developing the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) because of the potentials of hydrogen production, as well as its safety and viable economics. In VHTR, helium gas serves as the primary coolant. Graphite will be used as a reflector, moderator and core structural materials. The life time of graphite is determined from dimensional changes due to neutron irradiation, which closely relates to the changes of crystal structure. The changes of both lattice parameter and crystallite size can be easily measured by X-ray diffraction method. However, due to high cost and long time of neutron irradiation test, ion irradiation test is being performed instead in KAERI. Therefore, it is essential to develop the technique for measurement of ion irradiation damage of nuclear graphite. Fracture toughness of nuclear grade graphite is one of the key properties in the design and development of VHTR. It is important not only to evaluate the various properties of candidate graphite but also to assess the integrity of nuclear grade graphite during operation. Although fracture toughness tests on graphite have been performed in many laboratories, there have been wide variations in values of the calculated fracture toughness, due to the differences in the geometry of specimens and test conditions. Hence, standard test method for nuclear graphite is required to obtain the reliable fracture toughness values. Crack growth behavior of nuclear grade graphite shows rising R-curve which means the increase in crack growth resistance as the crack length increases. Crack bridging and microcracking have been proposed to be the dominant mechanisms of rising R-curve behavior. In this paper, the technique to measure the changes of crystallite size and

  17. Effect of microstructure on helium bubble growth in irradiated nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Thin nickel films were irradiated with 80 keV helium ions at varying doses and varying temperatures in order to obtain a variety of final microstructures. The growth of bubbles was examined during in-situ irradiations at 950 0 C where migration and coalescence events were observed for bubbles as large as 60 nm. Further direct observations of bubble growth were made during annealing of the irradiated specimens. For sample with no visible bubbles before annealing, the heating to 0.51 T/sub M/ produced bubbles that increased in diameter with annealing time to the power n. For bubbles in the grain interior, n ∼ 1, and on the grain boundaries, n ∼ 0.6. Since no migration and coalescence or ripening theories predict this behavior, a theory described by transient diffusion to spherical sinks was developed to discuss the behavior. This theory predicts that n = 1 for bubbles growing in the grain interior and n = 0.5 for bubbles on the grain boundary. In other annealing of irradiated samples containing large bubble populations, the growth of large bubbles and shrinking of small bubbles was observed at a temperature equal to 0.54 T/sub M/. The theory of Ostwald ripening properly described this type of bubble growth. Mass spectrometer measurements of He content in the irradiated specimens showed a greater He retention in the Ni films that contained a significant bubble population than those with no visible bubbles

  18. Comparison of 3 MeV C+ Ion-Irradiation Effects between The Nuclear Graphites made of Pitch and Petroleum Cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Se-Hwan, Chi; Gen-Chan, Kim; Jong-Hwa, Chang

    2006-01-01

    Currently, all the commercially available nuclear graphite grades are being made from two different cokes, i.e., petroleum coke or coal-tar pitch coke, and a coal-tar pitch binder. Of these, since the coke composes most of the graphite volume, i.e., > 70 %, it is understood that a physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical property as well as an irradiation-induced property change will be strongly dependent on the type of coke. To obtain first-hand information on the effects of the coke type, i.e., petroleum or pitch, on the irradiation sensitivity of graphite, specimens made of IG-110 of petroleum coke and IG-430 of pitch coke were irradiated up to ∼ 19 dpa by 3 MeV C + at room temperature, and the irradiation-induced changes in the hardness, Young's modulus, Raman spectrum, and oxidation properties were characterized. Results of the TEM show that the size and density of the Mrozowski cracks appeared to be far larger and higher in the IG-110 than the IG-430. Results of the hardness test revealed a slightly higher increase in the IG-430 than the IG-110 by around 10 dpa, and the Raman spectrum measurement showed a higher (FWHM) D /(FWHM) G value for IG-430 for 0.02 ∼ 0.25 dpa. Both the hardness and Raman measurement may imply a higher irradiation sensitivity of the IG-430 than the IG-110. Results of the Young's modulus measurements showed a large data scattering, which prevented us from estimating the differences between the grades. Oxidation experiments using a TG-DTA under a flow of dry air/He = 2.5 % (flow rate: 40 CC/min) at 750 and 1000 deg C show that the IG-110 of the petroleum coke exhibits a far higher oxidation rate than the IG-430. The discrepancy between the oxidation rate of the two grades increased with an increase in the oxidation temperature and the dose. Oxidized surface pore area was larger for IG-110. Judging from the results obtained from the present experimental conditions, the irradiation sensitivity appeared to be dependent on the degree

  19. Graphitic carbon nanospheres: A Raman spectroscopic investigation of thermal conductivity and morphological evolution by pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Radhe; Sahoo, Satyaprakash, E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu; Chitturi, Venkateswara Rao; Katiyar, Ram S., E-mail: satya504@gmail.com, E-mail: rkatiyar@hpcf.upr.edu [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936-8377 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Graphitic carbon nanospheres (GCNSs) were prepared by a unique acidic treatment of multi-walled nanotubes. Spherical morphology with a narrow size distribution was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. The room temperature Raman spectra showed a clear signature of D- and G-peaks at around 1350 and 1591 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements were performed to understand the phonon dynamics and first order temperature coefficients related to the D- and G-peaks. The temperature dependent Raman spectra in a range of 83–473 K were analysed, where the D-peak was observed to show a red-shift with increasing temperature. The relative intensity ratio of D- to G-peaks also showed a significant rise with increasing temperature. Such a temperature dependent behaviour can be attributed to lengthening of the C-C bond due to thermal expansion in material. The estimated value of the thermal conductivity of GCNSs ∼0.97 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} was calculated using Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the effect of pulsed laser treatment on the GCNSs was demonstrated by analyzing the Raman spectra of post irradiated samples.

  20. Experimental Plan for EDF Energy Creep Rabbit Graphite Irradiations- Rev. 2 (replaces Rev. 0 ORNL/TM/2013/49).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    The experimental results obtained here will assist in the development and validation of future models of irradiation induced creep of graphite by providing the following data: Inert creep stain data from low to lifetime AGR fluence Inert creep-property data (especially CTE) from low to lifetime AGR fluence Effect of oxidation on creep modulus (by indirect comparison with experiment 1 and direct comparison with experiment 3 NB. Experiment 1 and 3 are not covered here) Data to develop a mechanistic understanding, including oAppropriate creep modulus (including pinning and high dose effects on structure) oInvestigation of CTE-creep strain behavior under inert conditions oInformation on the effect of applied stress/creep strain on crystallite orientation (requires XRD) oEffect of creep strain on micro-porosity (requires tomography & microscopy) This document describes the experimental work planned to meet the requirements of project technical specification [1] and EDF Energy requests for additional Pre-IE work. The PIE work is described in detail in this revision (Section 8 and 9).

  1. Temperature and irradiation effects on the behaviour of 14C and its precursor 14N in nuclear graphite. Study of a decontamination process using steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silbermann, Gwennaelle

    2013-01-01

    The dismantling of UNGG reactors in France will generate about 23 000 tons of radioactive graphite wastes. To manage these wastes, the radiological inventory and data on radionuclides (RN) location and speciation should be determined. 14 C was identified as an important RN for disposal due to its high initial activity and the risk of release of a mobile organic fraction in environment, after water ingress into the disposal. Hence, the objective of this thesis, carried out in partnership with EDF is to implement experimental studies to simulate and evaluate the impact of temperature, irradiation and graphite radiolytic corrosion on the in reactor behavior of 14 C and its precursor, 14 N. The obtained data are then used to study the thermal decontamination of graphite in presence of water vapor. The experimental approach aims at simulating the presence of 14 C and 14 N by the respective ion implantation of 13 C and 14 N or 15 N in virgin graphite. This study shows that, in the temperature range reached during reactor operation, (100-500 C) and without radiolytic corrosion, 13 C is thermally stable whatever the initial graphite structure. Moreover, irradiation experiments were performed on heated graphite (500 C) put in contact with a gas representative of the radiolized coolant gas. They show the synergistic role played by the oxidative species and the graphite structure disorder on the enhancement of 13 C mobility resulting in the gasification of the graphite surface and/or the selective oxidation of 13 C more weakly bound than 12 C. Concerning the pristine nitrogen, we showed first that the surface concentration reaches several hundred ppm (≤500 ppm at) and decreases at deeper depths to about 160 ppm at.. Unlike implanted 13 C, implanted nitrogen migrates at 500 C when the graphite is highly disordered (about 8 dpa) while remaining stable for a lower disorder rate (0.14 dpa). Experiments also show the synergistic role by electronic excitations and temperature

  2. Growth of cells superinoculated onto irradiated and nonirradiated confluent monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, H.; Ueo, H.; Sugimachi, K.

    1990-01-01

    We prepared confluent monolayers of normal BALB/c 3T3 cells and compared differences in the growth of four types of cells superinoculated onto these nonirradiated and irradiated monolayers. The test cells were normal BALB/c 3T3 A31 cells, a squamous cell carcinoma from a human esophageal cancer (KSE-1), human fetal fibroblasts, and V-79 cells from Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts. Cell growth was checked by counting the cell number, determining [3H]thymidine incorporation and assessing colony formation. We found that on nonirradiated monolayers, colony formation of human fetal fibroblasts and normal BALB/c 3T3 cells was completely inhibited. On irradiated cells, test cells did exhibit some growth. KSE-1 cells, which had a low clonogenic efficiency on plastic surfaces, formed colonies on both irradiated and nonirradiated cells. On these monolayers, the clonogenic efficiency of V-79 cells was also higher than that on plastic surfaces. We conclude that the nonirradiated monolayer of BALB/c 3T3 cells completely inhibits the growth of superinoculated normal BALB/c 3T3 and human fetal fibroblasts, while on the other hand, they facilitate the growth of neoplastic KSE-1 and V-79 cells by providing a surface for cell adherence and growth, without affecting the presence of normal cells in co-cultures

  3. Loop Growth and Point-Defect Profiles during HVEM Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1979-01-01

    The point-defect profile in a thin foil is included in the model for the growth of dislocation loops during HVEM irradiation suggested by Kiritani, Yoshida, Takata, and Maehara, and the possible effect of divacancies is discussed. It is found that there is a fairly wide transition range between...

  4. Graphite selection for the PBMR reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature, direct cycle gas turbine, graphite moderated, helium cooled, pebble-bed reactor (PBMR) is being designed and constructed in South Africa. One of the major components in the PBMR is the graphite reflector, which must be designed to last thirty-five full power years. Fast neutron irradiation changes the dimensions and material properties of reactor graphite, thus for design purposes a suitable graphite database is required. Data on the effect of irradiation on nuclear graphites has been gathered for many years, at considerable financial cost, but unfortunately these graphites are no longer available due to rationalization of the graphite industry and loss of key graphite coke supplies. However, it is possible, using un-irradiated graphite materials properties and knowledge of the particular graphite microstructure, to determine the probable irradiation behaviour. Three types of nuclear graphites are currently being considered for the PBMR reflector: an isostatically moulded, fine grained, high strength graphite and two extruded medium grained graphites of moderately high strength. Although there is some irradiation data available for these graphites, the data does not cover the temperature and dose range required for the PBMR. The available graphites have been examined to determine their microstructure and some of the key material properties are presented. (authors)

  5. Improved growth response to GH treatment in irradiated children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannering, B.; Albertsson-Wikland, K.

    1989-01-01

    The growth response to two years of GH treatment was studied in fifteen children after radiotherapy for a cranial tumour. The growth response was compared to that of short children (-2 SD) and that of children with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of similar ages. All children were treated with hGH 0.1 IU/kg/day s.c.; which is a higher dose and frequency than previously reported for irradiated children. On this protocol the growth rate increased 5.0 +- 0.5 cm/y (mean +- SEM) the first year and 3.8 +- 0.7 cm/y the second year compared to the growth rate the year before GH-treatment. Although the net gain in growth was higher than previously reported, the first year growth response was significantly reduced (p less than 0.05) compared to that of GHD-children (7.6 +- 0.5 cm/y) but exceeded (p less than 0.05) that of short children (3.4 +- 0.3 cm/y). The median spontaneous 24 h-GH secretion was 209 mU/l in the short children, 52 mU/l in the irradiated children and 16 mU/l in the idiopathic GHD children. Thus the growth increment varied inversely to the spontaneous GH secretion observed in the three groups

  6. Growth in children following irradiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushhouse, S.; Ramsay, N.K.; Pescovitz, O.H.; Kim, T.; Robison, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    Longitudinal height data from 46 pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, including 18 with aplastic anemia (AA), 19 with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL), and 9 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), were analyzed to assess growth posttransplantation. Patients were prepared for BMT with high-dose cyclophosphamide followed by 7.5 Gy single-dose irradiation; AA patients received total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), and leukemia patients received total body irradiation (TBI). AA patients demonstrated reduced height posttransplant as reflected in a negative mean standard deviation score. The observed reduction was statistically significant only at 3 years following transplant. In contrast, leukemia patients showed a significant loss in relative height that was first visible at 1 year post-BMT and continued until at least 4 years post-BMT. Mean growth velocities in the leukemia patients were significantly below median for the 3 years following transplant. With a median follow-up of 4 years, antithymocyte globulin plus steroids in combination with methotrexate as graft vs. host prophylaxis was associated with less severe growth suppression than methotrexate alone, while there were no significant associations between growth during the first 2 years following transplant and prepubertal status at transplant (as defined by age), graft vs. host disease, thyroid or gonadal function, or previous therapies received by the leukemia patients. Children undergoing marrow transplantation, particularly those receiving TBI, are at significant risk of subsequent growth suppression

  7. Differential expression of growth factors in irradiated mouse testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauduit, Claire; Siah, Ahmed; Foch, Marie; Chapet, Olivier; Clippe, Sebastien; Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Benahmed, Mohamed

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: By using as an experimental model the male mouse gonad, which contains both radiosensitive (germ) and radioresistant (somatic) cells, we have studied the growth factor (and/or receptor) expression of transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβ RI), stem cell factor (SCF), c-kit, Fas-L, Fas, tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF R55), and leukemia inhibiting factor receptor (LIF-R) after local irradiation. Methods and Materials: Adult male mice were locally irradiated on the testes. Induction of apoptosis in the different testicular cell types following X-ray radiation was identified by the TdT-mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) approach. Growth factor expression was evidenced by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Results: Apoptosis, identified through the TUNEL approach, occurred in radiosensitive testicular (premeotic) germ cells with the following kinetics: the number of apoptotic cells increased after 24 h (p<0.001) and was maximal 48 h after a 2-Gy ionizing radiation (p<0.001). Apoptotic cells were no longer observed 72 h after a 2-Gy irradiation. The number of apoptotic cells increased with the dose of irradiation (1-4 Gy). In the seminiferous tubules, the growth factor expression in premeiotic radiosensitive germ cells was modulated by irradiation. Indeed Fas, c-kit, and LIF-R expression, which occurs in (radiosensitive) germ cells, decreased 24 h after a 2-Gy irradiation, and the maximal decrease was observed with a 4-Gy irradiation. The decrease in Stra8 expression occurred earlier, at 4 h after a 2-Gy irradiation. In addition, a significant (p<0.03) decrease in Stra8 mRNA levels was observed at the lowest dose used (0.5 Gy, 48 h). Moreover, concerning a growth factor receptor, such as TGFβ RI, which is expressed both in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, we observed a differential expression depending on the cell radiosensitivity after irradiation. Indeed, TGFβ RI expression was increased after irradiation in

  8. Comparison of 3 MeV C+ ion-irradiation effects between the nuclear graphites made of pitch and petroleum cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-01-01

    Three million electron volt C + irradiation effects on the microstructure (crystallinity, crystal size), mechanical properties (hardness, Young's modulus) and oxidation of IG-110 (petroleum coke) and IG-430 (pitch coke) nuclear graphites were compared based on the materials characteristics (degree of graphitization (DOG), density, porosity, type of coke, Mrozowski cracks) of the grades and the ion-irradiation conditions. The specimens were irradiated up to ∼19 dpa at room temperature. Differences in the as-received microstructure were examined by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The ion-induced changes in the microstructure, mechanical properties and oxidation characteristics were examined by the Raman spectroscopy, microhardness and Young's modulus measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of the as-received microstructure condition show that the DOG of the grades appeared the same at 0.837. The size of Mrozowski cracks appeared larger in the IG-110 of the higher open and total porosity than the IG-430. After an irradiation, the changes in the crystallinity and the crystallite size, both estimated by the Raman spectrum parameters, appeared large for the IG-430 and the IG-110, respectively. The hardness had increased after an irradiation, but, the hardness increasing behaviors were reversed at around 14 dpa. Thus, the IG-430 showed a higher increase before 14 dpa, but the IG-110 showed a higher increase after 14 dpa. No-clear differences in the increase of the Young's modulus were observed between the grades mainly due to a scattering in the measurements results. The IG-110 showed a higher oxidation rate than the IG-430 both before and after an irradiation. Besides the density and porosity, a possible contribution of the well-developed Mrozowski cracks in the IG-110 was noted for the observation. All the comparisons show that, even when the differences between the

  9. Comparison of 3 MeV C + ion-irradiation effects between the nuclear graphites made of pitch and petroleum cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Gen-Chan

    2008-10-01

    Three million electron volt C + irradiation effects on the microstructure (crystallinity, crystal size), mechanical properties (hardness, Young's modulus) and oxidation of IG-110 (petroleum coke) and IG-430 (pitch coke) nuclear graphites were compared based on the materials characteristics (degree of graphitization (DOG), density, porosity, type of coke, Mrozowski cracks) of the grades and the ion-irradiation conditions. The specimens were irradiated up to ˜19 dpa at room temperature. Differences in the as-received microstructure were examined by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The ion-induced changes in the microstructure, mechanical properties and oxidation characteristics were examined by the Raman spectroscopy, microhardness and Young's modulus measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of the as-received microstructure condition show that the DOG of the grades appeared the same at 0.837. The size of Mrozowski cracks appeared larger in the IG-110 of the higher open and total porosity than the IG-430. After an irradiation, the changes in the crystallinity and the crystallite size, both estimated by the Raman spectrum parameters, appeared large for the IG-430 and the IG-110, respectively. The hardness had increased after an irradiation, but, the hardness increasing behaviors were reversed at around 14 dpa. Thus, the IG-430 showed a higher increase before 14 dpa, but the IG-110 showed a higher increase after 14 dpa. No-clear differences in the increase of the Young's modulus were observed between the grades mainly due to a scattering in the measurements results. The IG-110 showed a higher oxidation rate than the IG-430 both before and after an irradiation. Besides the density and porosity, a possible contribution of the well-developed Mrozowski cracks in the IG-110 was noted for the observation. All the comparisons show that, even when the differences between the

  10. Growth mechanism and interface magnetic properties of Co nanostructures on graphite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, P.K.J.; de Jong, Machiel Pieter; Leonardus, L.; Siekman, Martin Herman; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard

    2011-01-01

    We investigated structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of Co adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Distribution and atomic sites of 3d transition-metal Co nanoislands and adatoms on HOPG were experimentally investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy with atomic

  11. Decolorizing of azo dye Reactive red 24 aqueous solution using exfoliated graphite and H2O2 under ultrasound irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei; Li, Ji-Tai; Sun, Han-Wen

    2008-07-01

    At its natural pH (6.95), the decolorization of Reactive red 24 in ultrasound, ultrasound/H2O2, exfoliated graphite, ultrasound/exfoliated graphite, exfoliated graphite/H2O2 and ultrasound/exfoliated graphite/H2O2 systems were compared. An enhancement was observed for the decolorization in ultrasound/exfoliated graphite/H2O2 system. The effect of solution pH, H2O2 and exfoliated graphite dosages, and temperature on the decolorization of Reactive red 24 was investigated. The sonochemical treatment in combination with exfoliated graphite/H2O2 showed a synergistic effect for the decolorization of Reactive red 24. The results indicated that under proper conditions, there was a possibility to remove Reactive red 24 very efficient from aqueous solution. The decolorization of other azo dyes (Reactive red 2, Methyl orange, Acid red 1, Acid red 73, Acid red 249, Acid orange 7, Acid blue 113, Acid brown 75, Acid green 20, Acid yellow 42, Acid mordant brown 33, Acid mordant yellow 10 and Direct green 1) was also investigated, at their natural pH.

  12. Nuclear graphite waste management. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of the seminar was to bring together the specialists dealing with various aspects of radioactive graphite waste management to exchange and review information on the decommissioning, characterisation, processing and disposal of irradiated graphite from reactor cores and other graphite waste associated with reactor operation. The seminar covered radioactive graphite characterisation, the effect of irradiation on graphite components, Wigner energy, radioactive graphite waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage and long term disposal options. Individual papers presented at the seminar were indexed separately

  13. Nucleation/Growth Mechanisms and Morphological Evolution of Porous MnO2 Coating Deposited on Graphite for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The nucleation and growth mechanisms of porous MnO2 coating deposited on graphite in MnSO4 solution were investigated in detail by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties of honeycomb-like MnO2 were evaluated by cycle voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge. Results indicated that MnO2 was synthesized by the following steps: Mn2+→ Mn3++ e-, Mn3++2H2O → MnOOH + 3H+, and MnOOH → MnO2 + H++ e-. The deposition of MnO2 was divided into four stages. A short incubation period (approximately 1.5 s was observed, prior to nucleation. The decreasing trend of the current slowed as time increased due to nucleation and MnO2 growth in the second stage. A huge number of nuclei were formed by instantaneous nucleation, and these nuclei grew and connected with one another at an exceedingly short time (0.5 s. In the third stage, the gaps in-between initial graphite flakes were filled with MnO2 until the morphology of the flakes gradually became similar to that of the MnO2-deposited layer. In the fourth stage, the graphite electrode was covered completely with a thick and dense layer of MnO2 deposits. All MnO2 electrodes at different deposition times obtained nearly the same specific capacitance of approximately 186 F/g, thus indicating that the specific capacitance of the electrodes is not related with deposition time.

  14. Evaluation of plasma disruption simulating short pulse laser irradiation experiments on boronated graphites and CFCs [carbon fibre composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stad, R.C.L. van der; Klippel, H.T.; Kraaij, G.J.

    1992-12-01

    New experimental and numerical results from disruption heat flux simulations in the millisecond range with laser beams are discussed. For a number of graphites, boronated graphites and carbon fibre composites, the effective enthalpy of ablation is determined as 30 ± 3 MJ/kg, using laser pulses of about -.3 ms. The numerical results predict the experimental results rather well. No effect of boron doping on the ablation enthalpy is found. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Growth studies on Lens culinaris after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, S.; Bokhari, F.S.; Shahnaz, F.

    1996-01-01

    A study on growth parameters was carried out on two varieties of Lens culinaris after gamma irradiation. Experiment was conducted at Botanical Garden, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan in 1993. The germination percentage, survival percentage, height, branch number, pods per plant and 100-seed weight decreased with the increasing dose of radiation. Comparing the two varieties, variety-86642 appeared more sensitive to radiation than variety-87528

  16. Two-peaked dose curves for irradiated pollen growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejchenko, S.V.; Grodzinskij, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of γ-radiation on growth activity of bicellular pollen of hybrid petunia has been investigated. Irradiation of pollen with doses of 5 to 70 Gy increases the pollen tube growth in an artificial culture medium. As the radiation dose increases the germination ability of pollen gradually decreases and the mean pollen tube length shortens, which is accompanied by the suppression of the generative cell division into spermia and inhibition of the unscheduled incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA. With radiation doses of 1200 to 1700 Gy some pollen tubes grow intensively. It is suggested that the phenomenon observed lays the basis for the gametic transformation

  17. Summary report of consultants meeting on IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 11. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2009-05-01

    The 11th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 25-26 March 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  18. Summary report of consultants' meeting - IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 8th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2006-05-01

    The '8th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' was held on 15-16 March 2006 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and make recommendations for actions for the next year. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  19. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  20. A sharp interface model for void growth in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrainer, Thomas; El-Azab, Anter

    2015-03-01

    A thermodynamic formalism for the interaction of point defects with free surfaces in single-component solids has been developed and applied to the problem of void growth by absorption of point defects in irradiated metals. This formalism consists of two parts, a detailed description of the dynamics of defects within the non-equilibrium thermodynamic frame, and the application of the second law of thermodynamics to provide closure relations for all kinetic equations. Enforcing the principle of non-negative entropy production showed that the description of the problem of void evolution under irradiation must include a relationship between the normal fluxes of defects into the void surface and the driving thermodynamic forces for the void surface motion; these thermodynamic forces are identified for both vacancies and interstitials and the relationships between these forces and the normal point defect fluxes are established using the concepts of transition state theory. The latter theory implies that the defect accommodation into the surface is a thermally activated process. Numerical examples are given to illustrate void growth dynamics in this new formalism and to investigate the effect of the surface energy barriers on void growth. Consequences for phase field models of void growth are discussed.

  1. Role of growth hormone in stunted head growth after cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, P E; Shalet, S M; Price, D A; Surtees, R A; Pearson, D

    1987-10-01

    The head sizes of 38 patients, growth hormone (GH) deficient following craniospinal (n = 26) or cranial irradiation (n = 12), have been assessed before (n = 38) and on completion of GH therapy (n = 15) or at the end of a similar period of observation without GH (n = 7). These results were compared to the change in head size seen in idiopathic GH deficiency following GH therapy (n = 14). Before GH therapy, the latter had small heads (mean occipitofrontal circumference SD score (SDS) -1), which were relatively large compared to the height deficit (height SDS (CA) -4.7), and they exhibited catch-up growth with GH (delta occipitofrontal circumference SDS + 0.7, final occipitofrontal circumference SDS -0.2). In contrast, over a similar period all patients, who previously had received cranial irradiation in the dosage range 2700-4750 centi-Geigy, irrespective of the radiation schedule or GH treatment, showed a decrease in occipitofrontal circumference SDS (mean delta -0.9), a significant difference to the expected head growth of normal children over a similar period (p less than 0.01). We have noted that restricted head growth occurs in the years following cranial irradiation and is unaffected by GH therapy. Earlier work has shown that cranial irradiation may impair intelligence. The exact relationship between intellectual impairment and stunted head growth remains to be determined.

  2. Structure and properties of combined coatings on C (graphite)/Al/Al2O3 base after Ti ion implantation with subsequent electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnjak, A.D.; Pogrebnjak, N.A.; Gritsenko, B.P.; Kylyshkanov, M.K.; Ruzimov, Sh.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The presented report deals with new results on deposition of combined coatings using Al metallization (by a plasma jet) and micro-arc (discharge) Al oxidation. After this, the coating was implanted by Ti ions with 5·10 I7 cm -2 dose (60 and 90 kV and about 200 μs duration). One series of samples with such coatings was irradiated using the accelerator Y-112 by an electron beam in melting regime (two regimes). Analysis of the structure and element composition was performed using SIMS, RBS, SEM with micro-analysis (WDS), XRD as well as measurements of microhardness, wear and adhesion. It had been demonstrated that the coating was able to sustain very high temperatures and oxidation medium. However, after electron beam irradiation temperature resistance decreased because the oxide coating was melted almost to the graphite surface. The work was funded by the Project of NANU 'Nanosystems, nanomaterials and nanotechnology'

  3. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; Joseph Lord; David Rohrbaugh; William Windes

    2012-10-01

    The NGNP Graphite R&D program is currently establishing the safe operating envelope of graphite core components for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design. The program is generating quantitative data necessary for predicting the behavior and operating performance of the new nuclear graphite grades. To determine the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic designs, the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment is underway. This experiment is examining the properties and behavior of nuclear grade graphite over a large spectrum of temperatures, neutron fluences and compressive loads. Each experiment consists of over 400 graphite specimens that are characterized prior to irradiation and following irradiation. Six experiments are planned with the first, AGC-1, currently being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and pre-irradiation characterization of the second, AGC-2, completed. This data package establishes the readiness of 512 specimens for assembly into the AGC-2 capsule.

  4. Growth and endocrine disorders secondary to cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rappaport, R; Brauner, R

    1989-06-01

    External cranial radiation for the treatment of malignant diseases has become a frequent cause of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). The timing of occurrence and the frequency of GHD were related to the hypothalamic-pituitary radiation dose. Frequency varied from 50% in leukemia (2400 cGy) to 75% in face and neck tumors or medulloblastoma (2500-4500 cGy) and up to 100% in optic glioma (greater than 4500 cGy). The significantly more severe growth deficit in patients with GHD given higher radiation doses suggests different levels of residual GH secretion according to radiation dosage. The minimum harmful radiation dose is probably close to 1800-2000 cGy. Our data show that stimulation tests remain a useful means of defining GHD and predicting growth. A fair agreement between GH secretion and growth was found in most cases, regardless of the radiation dose. The only exception was a group of leukemic children (2400 cGy) who achieved normal prepubertal growth despite a low GH response. The 24-h spontaneous plasma GH profiles and IGF-I measurements may add information if growth is retarded despite a normal GH response. We showed that growth retardation occurring after some schedules of total body irradiation was not due to GH deficiency but rather to radiation-induced skeletal lesions. Early or true precocious puberty, generally associated with GHD, was another cause of height loss. As the role of GH deficiency in the final height reduction was demonstrated in all groups of patients after cranial radiation, we suggest that hGH therapy should be considered in any child with proven GH deficiency and significant growth retardation after such radiation. 77 references.

  5. Influence of porewidening duration on the template assisted growth of graphitic carbon nitride nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchitra, S. M.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2018-01-01

    Porous anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes with a highly ordered pore arrangement are typically used as ideal templates for the synthesis of numerous nanostructured materials. Highly ordered templates gained significant attraction due to the fact that they are readily fabricated through self-organised simple anodization process. In this paper, the effect of different pore-widening treatments on the quality of the pores of the AAO templates prepared with different electrolytes were inspected. Results confirmed that, without altering the interpore distance different pore dimensions and diameters of the AAO templates can be easily achieved by chemical pore widening process at room temperature. Also, graphitic carbon nitride nanorods of different dimension have been fabricated from AAO template after porewidening process. These nanostructures are widely used in case of metal free visible light driven photo catalysis, photo degradation of organic pollutants, photo electric conversion and water splitting applications.

  6. Synthesis of carbon-13 labelled carbonaceous deposits and their evaluation for potential use as surrogates to better understand the behaviour of the carbon-14-containing deposit present in irradiated PGA graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, L., E-mail: liam.payne@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Walker, S.; Bond, G. [Centre for Materials Science, University of Central Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Eccles, H. [John Tyndall Institute for Nuclear Research, School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Heard, P.J.; Scott, T.B. [Interface Analysis Centre, HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Williams, S.J. [Radioactive Waste Management, B587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    The present work has used microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition to generate suitable isotopically labelled carbonaceous deposits on the surface of Pile Grade A graphite for use as surrogates for studying the behaviour of the deposits observed on irradiated graphite extracted from UK Magnox reactors. These deposits have been shown elsewhere to contain an enhanced concentration of {sup 14}C compared to the bulk graphite. A combination of Raman spectroscopy, ion beam milling with scanning electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to determine topography and internal morphology in the formed deposits. Direct comparison was made against deposits found on irradiated graphite samples trepanned from a Magnox reactor core and showed a good similarity in appearance. This work suggests that the microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition technique is of value in producing simulant carbon deposits, being of sufficiently representative morphology for use in non-radioactive surrogate studies of post-disposal behaviour of {sup 14}C-containing deposits on some irradiated Magnox reactor graphite.

  7. Microstructural evolutions of zirconium alloys under irradiation. Link with the irradiation growth phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonot, C.

    1995-01-01

    This study deals with the irradiation-induced growth and microstructural evolutions of Zircaloy-4 type materials (ZrSn 1.2-1.7 Fe 0.18-0.24 Cr 0.07-0.13 O 0.09-0.15 ), used as cladding and guide-tubes in PWR's fuel assemblies. The main objective was to obtain a better understanding of the growth acceleration which may occur at high doses for the recrystallized metallurgical state. The elongation values of stress-free tubes irradiated at 400 deg in experimental reactors give clear indication of accelerated growth after a critical dose. Microstructural investigations reveal some large basal plane dislocation loops with vacancy character, which is an unexpected defect configuration for an hexagonal material with a c/a ratio less than the ideal value. In addition, a significant redistribution of iron and chromium solute elements comes from the dissolution of the initial Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 phases. In a guide-tube irradiated to high dose at 320 deg in a power reactor, a large density of these c-component loops was also observed in coincidence with a large iron re-solution due to the progressive partial amorphization of Laves phases. By contrast, as long as a negligible amount of iron is available in the matrix (start of progressive amorphization at 350 deg or complete amorphization without any chemical change at 280 deg, only prism plane loops with interstitial and vacancy character are observed and the steady-state growth rate is low. A mechanism taking into account the Diffusional Anisotropy Difference of the radiation induced point defects seems to be the most suitable to explain the correlations between microstructural evolutions and growth rates. However it does not allow to predict the dose necessary for the formation of the basal plane loops responsible for the growth acceleration. Several factors (dose, temperature, metallurgical state) are required and the iron re-solution is likely to play a major role to stabilize such defects, by a decrease in stacking fault energy

  8. Graphite surveillance in N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    Graphite dimensional changes in N Reactor during its 24 yr operating history are reviewed. Test irradiation results, block measurements, stack profiles, top of reflector motion monitors, and visual observations of distortion are described. 18 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  9. Characterisation of Chlorine Behavior in French Graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondel, A.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Bererd, N.; Petit, L.; Laurent, G.; Lamouroux, C.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorine 36 is one of the main radionuclides of concern for French graphite waste disposal. In order to help the understanding of its leaching behaviour under disposal conditions, the respective impact of temperature, irradiation and gas radiolysis on chlorine release in reactor has been studied. Chlorine 36 has been simulated through chlorine 37 ion implantation in virgin nuclear graphite samples. Results show that part of chlorine is highly mobile in graphite in the range of French reactors operating temperatures in relation with graphite structural recovering. Ballistic damage generated by irradiation also promotes chlorine release whereas no clear impact of the coolant gas radiolysis was observed in the absence of graphite radiolytic corrosion. (author)

  10. Modeling to study the role of catalyst in the formation of graphitic shells during carbon nanofiber growth subjected to reactive plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Gupta, Neha; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2018-04-01

    An analytical model to study the role of a metal catalyst nanofilm in the nucleation, growth, and resulting structure of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) in low-temperature hydrogen diluted acetylene plasma has been developed. The model incorporates the nanostructuring of thin catalyst films, growth of CNF, restructuring of catalyst nanoparticles during growth, and its repercussion on the resulting structure (alignment of rolled graphene sheets around catalyst nanoparticles) by taking into account the plasma sheath formalization, kinetics of neutrals and positively charged species in the reactive plasma, flux of plasma species onto the catalyst front surface, and numerous surface reactions for carbon generation. In order to examine the influence of the catalyst film on the growth of CNFs, the numerical solutions of the model equations have been obtained for experimentally determined initial conditions and glow discharge plasma parameters. From the solutions obtained, we found that nanostructuring of thin films leads to the formation of small nanoparticles with high surface number density. The CNF nucleates over these small-sized nanoparticles grow faster and attain early saturation because of the quick poisoning of small-sized catalyst particles, and contain only a few graphitic shells. However, thick nanofilms result in shorter CNFs with large diameters composed of many graphitic shells. Moreover, we found that the inclination of graphitic shells also depends on the extent up to which the catalyst can reconstruct itself during the growth. The small nanoparticles show much greater elongation along the growth axis and also show a very small difference between their tip and base diameter during the growth due to which graphitic shells align at very small angles as compared to the larger nanoparticles. The present study is useful to synthesize the thin and more extended CNFs/CNTs having a smaller opening angle (inclination angle of graphene layers) as the opening angle has a

  11. Nuclear graphite for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The cores and reflectors in modern High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTRs) are constructed from graphite components. There are two main designs; the Pebble Bed design and the Prism design. In both of these designs the graphite not only acts as a moderator, but is also a major structural component that may provide channels for the fuel and coolant gas, channels for control and safety shut off devices and provide thermal and neutron shielding. In addition, graphite components may act as a heat sink or conduction path during reactor trips and transients. During reactor operation, many of the graphite component physical properties are significantly changed by irradiation. These changes lead to the generation of significant internal shrinkage stresses and thermal shut down stresses that could lead to component failure. In addition, if the graphite is irradiated to a very high irradiation dose, irradiation swelling can lead to a rapid reduction in modulus and strength, making the component friable.The irradiation behaviour of graphite is strongly dependent on its virgin microstructure, which is determined by the manufacturing route. Nevertheless, there are available, irradiation data on many obsolete graphites of known microstructures. There is also a well-developed physical understanding of the process of irradiation damage in graphite. This paper proposes a specification for graphite suitable for modern HTRs. (author)

  12. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersen’s 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to

  13. The impact of cranial irradiation on the growth of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.J.; Foster, M.B.; D'Ercole, A.J.; McMillan, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Heights, height velocities, weights, and weight velocities were measured serially in 21 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had survived three to five years in continuous complete remission. These patients were assigned randomly to treatment regimens that varied according to whether cranial irradiation was used. Patients receiving cranial irradiation had lower height velocities during therapy than normal subjects and patients not receiving cranial irradiation. Twenty-two other children with ALL, who were irradiated but not randomized, exhibited similar alterations in growth. These results indicate that cranial irradiation, and not leukemia or antileukemia chemotherapy, causes reduced growth

  14. Characterization of Mode 1 and Mode 2 delamination growth and thresholds in graphite/peek composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Murri, Gretchen B.

    1988-01-01

    Composite materials often fail by delamination. The onset and growth of delamination in AS4/PEEK, a tough thermoplastic matrix composite, was characterized for mode 1 and mode 2 loadings, using the Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) test specimens. Delamination growth per fatigue cycle, da/dN, was related to strain energy release rate, G, by means of a power law. However, the exponents of these power laws were too large for them to be adequately used as a life prediction tool. A small error in the estimated applied loads could lead to large errors in the delamination growth rates. Hence strain energy release rate thresholds, G sub th, below which no delamination would occur were also measured. Mode 1 and 2 threshold G values for no delamination growth were found by monitoring the number of cycles to delamination onset in the DCB and ENF specimens. The maximum applied G for which no delamination growth had occurred until at least 1,000,000 cycles was considered the threshold strain energy release rate. Comments are given on how testing effects, facial interference or delamination front damage, may invalidate the experimental determination of the constants in the expression.

  15. Irradiation-induced growth of zircaloy and its effects on the mechanical design of fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Pu

    1991-01-01

    Zircaloy growth could be induced due to irradiation. The ammount of growth is described as a function of texture, irradiation temperature, fast neutron fluence and the reduction of cold work, and it should be given great attention in the mechanical design of fuel assemblies

  16. The effects of irradiation and temperature on the growth of Zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendoush, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The growth strain was measured after irradiation for 16 Zircaloy-4 tubes of the recrystallised and stress relieved types. The operating temperature during irradiation ranged between 317 and 344 0 C. The average fast neutron fluence was 9.6x10 20 n/cm 2 . Experimental results indicated the dependence of the growth on the irradiation temperature. The stress relieved result was compared with data of the literature. (orig.)

  17. UV-B-irradiation effect on growth reactions of phytopathogenic fungus fusarium solani

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushcha, M.Yi.; Dyachenko, A.Yi.; Dmitryijev, O.P.

    2002-01-01

    The UV-B irradiation effect on spore germination and hyphae growth of phythopathogenic fungus Fusarium solani was studied. Spores irradiation by small doses of 0,1 - 1,0 kJ/m 2 results in growth stimulation of primary hyphae. Adaptive effect of UV-B small doses for fungi was shown. Preliminary irradiation in doses of 0,1 - 0,5 kJ/m 2 increased spore radioresistance and diminished the effect of the next damaging dose

  18. Analysis of the microbial growth in 60Co γ-irradiated foods by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Hayashi, Toshio; Hamasaki, Koji; Wirkner, Sandra; Constantinoiu, Elena; Takahashi, Katsutada

    2002-01-01

    Using a heat conduction calorimeter equipped with 24 sample units the heat evolutions from growing 60 Co γ-irradiated bioburden of black pepper seeds and frozen beef were detected in the form of growth thermograms. 60 Co γ-irradiation affected the growth pattern in which a dose-dependent reduction of the growth rate constant was observed together with the retardation in growth, indicating a combination of bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects. We successfully determined the minimal inactivation doses for the two food samples using the relationship between the irradiation dose and the retardation in growth t α , or the growth rate constant μ obtained from the growth thermograms. These results strongly suggested the possibility of calorimetry as measure of predictive microbiology in food irradiation. (author)

  19. Analysis of the microbial growth in 60Co gamma-irradiated foods by calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, M.; Hamasaki, K.; Wirkner, S.; Constantinoiu, E.; Takahashi, K.; Hayashi, T.

    2002-01-01

    Using a heat conduction calorimeter equipped with 24 sample units the heat evolutions from growing 60Co gamma-irradiated bioburden of black pepper seeds and frozen beef were detected in the form of growth thermograms. 60Co gamma-irradiation affected the growth pattern in which a dose-dependent reduction of the growth rate constant was observed together with the retardation in growth, indicating a combination of bactericidal and bacteriostatic effects. We successfully determined the minimal inactivation doses for the two food samples using the relationship between the irradiation dose and the retardation in growth talpha, or the growth rate constant mu obtained from the growth thermograms. These results strongly suggested the possibility of calorimetry as a measure of predictive microbiology in food irradiation

  20. Graphite selection for the FMIT test cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-06-01

    This document provides the basis for procuring a grade of graphite, at minimum cost, having minimum dimensional changes at low irradiation temperatures (nominal range 90 to 140 0 C). In light of those constraints, the author concludes that the most feasible approach is to attempt to reproduce a grade of graphite (TSGBF) which has exhibited a high degree of dimensional stability during low-temperature irradiations and on which irradiation-induced changes in other physical properties have been measured. The effects of differences in raw materials, especially coke morphology, and processing conditions, primarily graphitization temperture are briefly reviewed in terms of the practicality of producing a new grade of graphite with physical properties and irradiation-induced changes which would be very similar to those of TSGBF graphite. The production history and physical properties of TSGBF are also reviewed; no attempt is made, to project changes in dimensions or physical properties under the projected irradiation conditions

  1. Study of graphitic microstructure formation in diamond bulk by pulsed Bessel beam laser writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Sotillo, B.; Chiappini, A.; Ramponi, R.; Di Trapani, P.; Eaton, S. M.; Jedrkiewicz, O.

    2017-11-01

    The advantages of using Bessel beams for the generation of graphitic structures in diamond bulk are presented. We show that by irradiating the sample with a pulsed Bessel beam whose non-diffracting zone is of the same order of the sample thickness, it is possible to produce without any sample translation straight graphitic through-microstructures, whose size depends on the input pulse energy. The microstructure growth is investigated as a function of the number of irradiating pulses, and the femtosecond and picosecond regimes are contrasted.

  2. UV irradiation assisted growth of ZnO nanowires on optical fiber surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Bo; Shi, Tielin; Liao, Guanglan; Li, Xiaoping; Huang, Jie; Zhou, Temgyuan; Tang, Zirong, E-mail: zirong@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • A new fabrication process combined a hydrothermal process with UV irradiation from optical fiber is developed. • The growth of ZnO nanowires is efficient in the utilization of UV light. • A novel hybrid structure which integrates ZnO nanowires on optical fiber surface is synthesized. • The UV assisted growth of ZnO nanowires shows preferred orientation and better quality. • A mechanism of growing ZnO nanowires under UV irradiation is proposed. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel approach was developed for the enhanced growth of ZnO nanowires on optical fiber surface. The method combined a hydrothermal process with the efficient UV irradiation from the fiber core, and the effects of UV irradiation on the growth behavior of ZnO nanowires were investigated. The results show that UV irradiation had great effects on the preferred growth orientation and the quality of the ZnO nanowires. The crystallization velocity along the c-axis would increase rapidly with the increase of the irradiation power, while the growth process in the lateral direction was marginally affected by the irradiation. The structure of ZnO nanowires also shows less oxygen vacancy with UV irradiation of higher power. The developed approach is applicable for the efficient growth of nanowires on the fiber surface, and the ZnO nanowires/optical fiber hybrid structures have great potentials for a wide variety of applications such as optical fiber sensors and probes.

  3. AGC-2 Irradiation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled, very high temperature reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) designs.[ , ] Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the new NGNP reactor design. To support the design and licensing of NGNP core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade with a specific emphasis on data related to the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the NGNP candidate graphites. Based on experience with previous graphite core components, the phenomenon of irradiation induced creep within the graphite has been shown to be critical to the total useful lifetime of graphite components. Irradiation induced creep occurs under the simultaneous application of high temperatures, neutron irradiation, and applied stresses within the graphite components. Significant internal stresses within the graphite components can result from a second phenomenon—irradiation induced dimensional change. In this case, the graphite physically changes i.e., first shrinking and then expanding with increasing neutron dose. This disparity in material volume change can induce significant internal stresses within graphite components. Irradiation induced creep relaxes these large internal stresses, thus reducing the risk of crack formation and component failure. Obviously, higher irradiation creep levels tend to relieve more internal stress, thus allowing the

  4. Irradiation creep and growth behavior of Zircaloy-4 inner shell of HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jong-Ha; Cho, Yeong-Garp; Kim, Jong-In [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The inner shell of the reflector vessel of HANARO was made of Zircaloy-4 rolled plate. Zircaloy-4 rolled plate shows highly anisotropic behavior by fast neutron irradiation. This paper describes the analysis method for the irradiation induced creep and growth of the inner shell of HANARO. The anisotropic irradiation creep behavior was modeled as uniaxial strain-hardening power law modified by Hill's stress potential and the anisotropic irradiation growth was modeled by using volumetric swelling with anisotropic strain rate. In this study, the irradiation induced creep and growth behavior of the inner shell of the HANARO reflector vessel was re-evaluated. The rolling direction, the fast neutron flux, and the boundary conditions were applied with the same conditions as the actual inner shell. Analysis results show that deformation of the inner shell due to irradiation does not raise any problem for the lifetime of HANARO. (author)

  5. Study by electronic microscopy of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation (air, 620 C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodon de Villeroche, Suzanne

    1968-01-01

    The author reports the study of corrosion features of graphite after hot oxidation in the air at 620 C. It is based on observations made by electronic microscopy. This study comes after another one dedicated to oxidation features obtained by hot corrosion of natural graphite, and aims at comparing pyrolytic graphite before and after irradiation in an atomic pile, and at performing tests on a graphite processed with ozone. After a recall of generalities about natural graphite and of some issues related to hot corrosion of natural graphite, the author presents some characteristics and features of irradiated and non-irradiated pyrolytic graphite. He reports the study of the oxidation of samples of pyrolytic graphite: production of thin lamellae, production of glaze-carbon replicates, oxidation of irradiated and of non-irradiated graphite, healing of irradiation defects, and oxidation of ozone-processed natural graphite [fr

  6. Effect of gamma irradiated parenchyma on the growth of irradiated potato tuber buds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, J.; Garcia Collantes, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The development of buds greffed on irradiated potato parenchyma was studied. The irradiated parenchyma does not influence the sprouting capacity of buds, but it affects the way they develop. (Author) 9 refs

  7. An overview of microstructural and experimental factors that affect the irradiation growth behavior of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidleris, V.; Tucker, R.P.; Adamson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of factors affecting irradiation growth of zirconium alloys. Recent data obtained from irradiation programs in EBR-II, ATR, and NRU reactors are used to illustrate the effects of various microstructural and experimental factors on the growth of Zircaloy, zirconium, and zirconium-biobium alloys irradiated to fluences up to 2 X 10 26 nm -2 (E > 1 MeV) over the temperature range 330 to 720 K. Open literature results are also used to confirm or illustrate various effects. Important factors are texture, grain boundary parameters, residual stresses, original dislocation density, microstructure evolution, temperature during irradiation, solute effects, and fluence

  8. Gamma Irradiation on Growth and Development of Amorphophallus muelleri Blume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Santosa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Iles-iles (Amorphophallus muelleri Blume produces apomictic seeds lead to low genetic variation. In order to induce genetic variation, germinated seeds were exposed to Gamma irradiation (Co-60 at doses of 10 to 100 Gy. Seed irradiation was conducted at Center for the Application of Isotope and Irradiation Technology -National Nuclear Energy Agency (CAIRT, Indonesia. Morphology and yield of M1 generation were observed. Results showed that irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy close to LD50 with survival rate 56%. Gamma irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy delayed seeds germination.  Germination rates gradually increased and reached maximum at 4 weeks after planting (WAP for control plants, and 14 WAP of irradiated plants. At 16 WAP, germination rate of 10 Gy irradiated plants was 56% and 84% for those of control plants. Irradiation induced chimera as indicated by short petiole, variegated and abnornal shape of leaflets. Some irradiated plants entered dormancy at 8-10 weeks later than control ones. Prolong vegetative periode lead the plants to produce heavier corms. This study revealed the possibility to induce variation of A. muelleri by using gamma irradition. Keywords: Amorphophallus muelleri, gamma irradiation (Co-60, morphological variation, mutation breeding

  9. Management of UKAEA graphite liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    The UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) is responsible for managing its liabilities for redundant research reactors and other active facilities concerned with the development of the UK nuclear technology programme since 1947. These liabilities include irradiated graphite from a variety of different sources including low irradiation temperature reactor graphite (the Windscale Piles 1 and 2, British Energy Pile O and Graphite Low Energy Experimental Pile at Harwell and the Material Testing Reactors at Harwell and Dounreay), advanced gas-cooled reactor graphite (from the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) and graphite from fast reactor systems (neutron shield graphite from the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor and Dounreay Fast Reactor). The decommissioning and dismantling of these facilities will give rise to over 6,000 tonnes of graphite requiring disposal. The first graphite will be retrieved from the dismantling of Windscale Pile 1 and the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor during the next five years. UKAEA has undertaken extensive studies to consider the best practicable options for disposing of these graphite liabilities in a manner that is safe whilst minimising the associated costs and technical risks. These options include (but are not limited to), disposal as Low Level Waste, incineration, or encapsulation and disposal as Intermediate Level Waste. There are a number of technical issues associated with each of these proposed disposal options; these include Wigner energy, radionuclide inventory determination, encapsulation of graphite dust, galvanic coupling interactions enhancing the corrosion of mild steel and public acceptability. UKAEA is currently developing packaging concepts and designing packaging plants for processing these graphite wastes in consultation with other holders of graphite wastes throughout Europe. 'Letters of Comfort' have been sought from both the Low Level Waste and the Intermediate Level Waste disposal organisations to support the

  10. Sputtering characteristics of B4C-overlaid graphite for keV energy deuterium ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Y.; Yamaki, T.; Ando, T.; Jimbou, R.; Ogiwara, N.; Saidoh, M.; Teruyama, K.

    1992-01-01

    Two types of B 4 C-overlaid graphite (CFC), conversion and CVD B 4 C, together with bare CFC (PCC-2S) and/or HP B 4 C, were investigated with respect to erosion yields for 1 keV D + , D 2 /CD 4 TDS after 1 keV D + implantation, and thermal diffusivity/conductivity, in a temperature range from 300 to 1400 K. The erosion yields of both conversion and CVD B 4 C were found to be much lower than that of the bare CFC (PCC-2S), in both chemical sputtering (600-1100 K) and RES (1200-1400 K) temperature regions. The D 2 TDS peak of the conversion B 4 C was found to be located at nearly 200 K lower temperature than that of the bare CFC (PCC-2S), indicating much lower activation energy for detrapping/recombination of trapped D in the conversion B 4 C and in the CFC. The CD 4 TDS peak of the conversion B 4 C was found to be much weaker in intensity than that of the bare CFC (PCC-2S), in agreement with the present erosion yield results. Thermal diffusivities and conductivities of both the conversion B 4 C/PCC-2S and the CVD B 4 C, were measured to be nearly 1/10 of that of the bare CFC (PCC-2S), and to decrease with increasing temperatures. (orig.)

  11. Growth of Hexagonal Columnar Nanograin Structured SiC Thin Films on Silicon Substrates with Graphene–Graphitic Carbon Nanoflakes Templates from Solid Carbon Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanshun Zhao

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a new method for growing hexagonal columnar nanograin structured silicon carbide (SiC thin films on silicon substrates by using graphene–graphitic carbon nanoflakes (GGNs templates from solid carbon sources. The growth was carried out in a conventional low pressure chemical vapor deposition system (LPCVD. The GGNs are small plates with lateral sizes of around 100 nm and overlap each other, and are made up of nanosized multilayer graphene and graphitic carbon matrix (GCM. Long and straight SiC nanograins with hexagonal shapes, and with lateral sizes of around 200–400 nm are synthesized on the GGNs, which form compact SiC thin films.

  12. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires “matched pair” creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce “matched pairs” of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  13. Growth regulation in X-irradiated mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgjo, K.; Devik, F.

    1978-01-01

    Extracts of hairless mouse skin were tested for their content of epidermal G 1 inhibitor and G 2 inhibitor at daily intervals after X-irradiation with 4 500 or 2 250 rad. After either dose the skin extracts lacked G 1 inhibitory activity on days 5 and 6 respectively after irradiation. This coincided with the time when the epidermal mitotic rate again became normal and started a period of over-shoot. The time interval of 5 to 6 days corresponds to the turnover time of the differentiating cells in hairless mouse back epidermis. The findings indicate that the proliferating cells in epidermis can respond to changes in local chalone concentration, even after X-irradiation at the tested doses, and that the irradiated epidermal cell population still retains some important properties inherent in a cybernetically regulated system. The local G 2 -inhibitory activity also varied after irradiation, but these variations could not be directly related to the corresponding mitotic rates. (author)

  14. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation

  15. Non-covalent doping of graphitic carbon nitride with ultrathin graphene oxide and molybdenum disulfide nanosheets: an effective binary heterojunction photocatalyst under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S W; Yang, L W; Tian, Y; Wei, X L; Ding, J W; Zhong, J X; Chu, Paul K

    2014-10-01

    A proof of concept integrating binary p-n heterojunctions into a semiconductor hybrid photocatalyst is demonstrated by non-covalent doping of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with ultrathin GO and MoS2 nanosheets using a facile sonochemical method. In this unique ternary hybrid, the layered MoS2 and GO nanosheets with a large surface area enhance light absorption to generate more photoelectrons. On account of the coupling between MoS2 and GO with g-C3N4, the ternary hybrid possesses binary p-n heterojunctions at the g-C3N4/MoS2 and g-C3N4/GO interfaces. The space charge layers created by the p-n heterojunctions not only enhance photogeneration, but also promote charge separation and transfer of electron-hole pairs. In addition, the ultrathin MoS2 and GO with high mobility act as electron mediators to facilitate separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs at each p-n heterojunction. As a result, the ternary hybrid photocatalyst exhibits improved photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation compared to other reference materials. The results provide new insights into the large-scale production of semiconductor photocatalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In-pile IASCC growth tests of irradiated stainless steels in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Shigeki; Ise, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Junichi; Nishiyama, Yutaka [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Shibata, Akira; Ohmi, Masao [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has an in-pile irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test plan to evaluate in-situ effects of neutron/{gamma}-ray irradiation on crack growth of irradiated stainless steels under high-temperature water conditions for commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Crack growth rate and its electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) dependence are different between in-pile test and post irradiation examination (PIE), but these differences are not fully understood. The objectives of the present study are to understand the difference between in-pile and out-of-pile IASCC growth and to confirm the effectiveness of mitigation due to lowering ECP on in-pile crack growth rates. For in-pile crack growth tests, we have selected a large compact tension specimen such as 0.5T-CT because of validity of SCC growth test at a high stress intensity factor (K-value). For loading a 0.5T-CT specimen up to K - 30 MPa {radical}m, we have adopted a lever type loading unit for in-pile crack growth tests in the JMTR. In this report, an in-pile test plan for crack growth of irradiated SUS316L stainless steels under simulated BWR conditions in the JMTR and current status of development of in-pile crack growth test techniques are presented. (author)

  17. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  18. The influence of pollen γ-irradiation of the growth and development of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejchenko, S.V.; Grodzinskij, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of pollen gamma irradiation on induction of phenotypic mutation in F 1 hybrid petunia. Some dose regularities characterizing the rate of growth and development of daughter plants were revealed. It was shown that seed formation and embryogenesis depend directly on the degree of pollen gamma irradiation damage

  19. irradiation growth in annealed Zr2.5wt%Nb at 3530K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerson, A.; Murgatroyd, R.A.

    1978-10-01

    Zr 2.5wt%Nb growth specimens have been irradiated at 353 0 K to a fast neutron dose of approximately 4.0 x 10 25 n/m 2 . Specimens were taken from the longitudinal and transverse directions of a nominally annealed, seam-welded tube and irradiated in both the stress relieved and fully annealed conditions. Growth in these specimens is characterised by large positive and negative strains in the longitudinal and transverse directions respectively, with dimensional changes in weld material exhibiting intermediate growth behaviour. The results are compared with growth data on both annealed and cold worked Zircaloy-2 at 353 0 K and discussed in terms of the effect of texture, grain size, and cold work on irradiation growth. It is concluded that the continuation of growth to high doses in annealed Zr-2.5wt%Nb at 353 0 K results from interstitial induced dislocation climb with vacancies diffusing to grain boundaries. (author)

  20. Role of internal stresses in the transient of irradiation growth of zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tome, C.N.; Christodoulou, N.; Turner, P.A.; Miller, M.A.; Woo, C.H.; Root, J.; Holden, T.M.

    1995-07-01

    A 'self-consistent' polycrystalline model is used to simulate irradiation growth of Zircaloy-2 samples irradiated at about 330 K. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental measurements obtained from specimens irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho Falls. Three types of material are studied here: annealed, cold worked in tension and cold worked by rolling. In general, the growth rate attains a steady-state value after it goes through a transient that depends on the initial state of the material. The transient growth behaviour is explained in terms of the evolution of intergranular residual stresses that are present in the sample, and in terms of the dislocation structure. From this study, information regarding irradiation creep and growth mechanisms occurring at the single crystal level is obtained. (author). 28 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  1. SYMBIODINIUM ISOLATES FROM STONY CORAL: ISOLATION, GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS AND EFFECTS OF UV IRRADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symbiodinium spp. Isolates from Stony Coral: Isolation, Growth Characteristics and Effects of UV Irradiation (Abstract). J. Phycol. 37(3):42-43.Symbiodinium species were isolated from Montipora capitata, Acropora palmata and two field samples of Porites porites. Cultures ...

  2. A comparative study of post-irradiation growth kinetics of spheroids and monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dertinger, J.; Luecke-Huhle, C.

    1975-01-01

    Post-irradiation growth kinetics of γ-irradiated spheroid and monolayer cells in exponential growth phase was investigated by means of dose-response curves based on cell counts after specified time intervals following irradiation. A mathematical model of cell-growth after irradiation was fitted to these curves. The model parameters (related to division delay and growth of non-surviving cells) obtained from this analysis consistently indicated increasing resistance to sub-lethal damage of cells cultured as multicellular spheroids under conditions of increasing three-dimensional contact. In contrast, no indication of an increased radiation-resistance was found with cells cultured on a substratum under a variety of conditions. (author)

  3. Effect of whole-body irradiation on skeletal growth in rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneveld, P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    Late effects of single whole-body doses of 400 to 500 and 750 to 900 rads on skeletal growth in 32 rhesus monkeys were studied. Findings indicated growth inhibition strongly related to dose and age at irradiation. Doses of 750 to 900 rads before the age of 40 months resulted in significantly greater growth inhibition (11%) than doses given during or shortly after adolescence (p < 0.005). Doses of less than 750 rads were not significant. In view of the close similarity between monkeys and man, irradiation of children at doses greater than 750 rads may carry a strong risk of subsequent growth retardation

  4. Germanium Nanowires-in-Graphite Tubes via Self-Catalyzed Synergetic Confined Growth and Shell-Splitting Enhanced Li-Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Jin, Shuaixing; Yang, Guowei; Wang, Jing; Wang, Chengxin

    2015-04-28

    Despite the high theoretical capacity, pure Ge has various difficulties such as significant volume expansion and electron and Li(+) transfer problems, when applied as anode materials in lithium ion battery (LIB), for which the solution would finally rely on rational design like advanced structures and available hybrid. Here in this work, we report a one-step synthesis of Ge nanowires-in-graphite tubes (GNIGTs) with the liquid Ge/C synergetic confined growth method. The structure exhibits impressing LIB behavior in terms of both cyclic stability and rate performance. We found the semiclosed graphite shell with thickness of ∼50 layers experience an interesting splitting process that was driven by electrolyte diffusion, which occurs before the Ge-Li alloying plateau begins. Two types of different splitting mechanism addressed as "inside-out"/zipper effect and "outside-in" dominate this process, which are resulted from the SEI layer growing longitudinally along the Ge-graphite interface and the lateral diffusion of Li(+) across the shell, respectively. The former mechanism is the predominant way driving the initial shell to split, which behaves like a zipper with SEI layer as invisible puller. After repeated Li(+) insertion/exaction, the GNIGTs configuration is finally reconstructed by forming Ge nanowires-thin graphite strip hybrid, both of which are in close contact, resulting in enormous enchantment to the electrons/Li(+) transport. These features make the structures perform well as anode material in LIB. We believe both the progress in 1D assembly and the structure evolution of this Ge-C composite would contribute to the design of advanced LIB anode materials.

  5. The effect of some growth regulators on enzyme systems in irradiated barley grain using disinfestation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachman, S.

    1973-01-01

    Disinfestation doses of 20 to 100 krad may cause changes in the biological systems of barley grain and, therefore, may influence undesirably the technological quality of malted grain. The effect of some growth regulators on irradiated grain has been investigated. The experiments have been carried out on brewery barley var. Visa Breuns. Following growth-regulators were used: gibberellic acid (Polish preparation ''Gibrescol''), kinetin (6-furfurylo-aminopurin), CCC (2-chloroethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride), and betaine hydrochloride. By treating the irradiated barley with solutions of growth regulators it was possible to diminish the loss of enzyme activity. A ''regenerating'' effect of growth substances, mainly gibberellic acid and betain hydrochloride in 10 -4 M solutions, was observed. Amylolytic activity decreased immediately after irradiation but in samples treated with growth regulators it was higher than in those without regulators. The results may have a practical importance since gibberellic acid has just been introduced into the brewery industry. (F.J.)

  6. Effects of pre-irradiation on isogeneic and semi-isogeneic CFU growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buurman, W.A.; Bruggen, I. Van.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic resistance to a parental bone marrow transplant as demonstrated, when transplantation were performed early after irradiation, failed to occur if the interval between irradiation and transplantation was increased to 4 days. A similar radiation induced weakening of genetic resistance to a parental bone marrow graft in spleen and bone marrow would be demonstrated in mice, which has been irradiated with a sublethal dose at 7 days prior to the lethal irradiation and transplantation. The pre-irradiation of the recipient with a sublethal dose induced an enhancement of the growth in spleen and bone marrow of isogenic transplanted CFU. The pre-irradiation of a single tibia also resulted in a significant weakening of the resistance in the spleen. The experiments with partial body pre-irradiation suggested a local effect of the pre-irradiation, but it could be shown that the enhanced CFU growth is not caused by an enhanced seeding of CFU in pre-irradiation bone marrow. The role of microenvironment in the phenomenon of genetic resistance is discussed. (author)

  7. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-01-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth. - Highlights: ► Electron beam irradiation is effective against soil-borne pathogens. ► Application of irradiation at dose 1.5 kGy completely inhibited in vitro development of Phytophthora cinnamomi. ► Irradiation of horticultural substrata did not influence the growth of plants.

  8. A control technique of oxygen contamination by Ga beam irradiation in InN MOMBE growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isamoto, K.; Uesaka, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Hashimoto, A.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated about a control technique of oxygen contamination into the InN layers by simultaneous irradiation of Ga beam during RF-MOMBE growth using the combination of the TMIn and the RF-plasma nitrogen sources. Red shifts of the band gap energy and the improvement of the electrical properties have been achieved by the Ga beam irradiation. The suppression mechanism of the oxygen contamination has been discussed from the experimental results of the InN growth by the RF-MOMBE with the Ga beam irradiation. The present results strongly indicate that the simultaneous irradiation of the Ga beam would be useful to suppress the oxygen contamination into the InN layers during the growth. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. High flux irradiations of Li coatings on polycrystalline W and ATJ graphite with D, He, and He-seeded D plasmas at Magnum PSI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neff, A. L.; Allain, J. P.; F. Bedoya,; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning on PFCs (Plasma Facing Components) on a variety of substrate platforms (e.g. graphite, Mo, etc.) has resulted in improved plasma performance on multiple magnetic fusion devices. On graphite, this improvement occurs through the control of retention and recycling of hydrogen

  10. Graphite for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, W.; Leushacke, D.F.; Nickel, H.; Theymann, W.

    1976-01-01

    The different graphites necessary for HTRs are being developed, produced and tested within the Federal German ''Development Programme Nuclear Graphite''. Up to now, batches of the following graphite grades have been manufactured and fully characterized by the SIGRI Company to demonstrate reproducibility: pitch coke graphite AS2-500 for the hexagonal fuel elements and exchangeable reflector blocks; special pitch coke graphite ASI2-500 for reflector blocks of the pebble-bed reactor and as back-up material for the hexagonal fuel elements; graphite for core support columns. The material data obtained fulfill most of the requirements under present specifications. Production of large-size blocks for the permanent side reflector and the core support blocks is under way. The test programme covers all areas important for characterizing and judging HTR-graphites. In-pile testing comprises evaluation of the material for irradiation-induced changes of dimensions, mechanical and thermal properties - including behaviour under temperature cycling and creep behaviour - as well as irradiating fuel element segments and blocks. Testing out-of-pile includes: evaluation of corrosion rates and influence of corrosion on strength; strength measurements; including failure criteria. The test programme has been carried out extensively on the AS2-graphite, and the results obtained show that this graphite is suitable as HTGR fuel element graphite. (author)

  11. Effect of X-irradiation on the growth and some antioxidase activity in wheat seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qun; Gu Ruiqi

    1997-01-01

    Wheat seedlings of 48h after germination were irradiated with various dosage of X-rays. High dosage X-irradiation, 8 Gy and 14 Gy can inhibited the growth, decrease the freshness weight of wheat seedlings. The height and weight of wheat seedlings decreased with the development of X-irradiation of dosage. The concentration of protein and activity of some antioxidases include ascorbic acid peroxidase (ASA-POD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione transferase (GSH-Ts) were observed on 2nd and 4th day after irradiation. The concentration of protein in wheat seedlings decreases with the development of X-irradiation of dosage. The concentration of protein on 4th day was higher than that on 2nd day showed that the damage of wheat seedlings induced by X-irradiation was resumed during the culture process. X-irradiation can increase activity of ASA-POD, GSH-Px and GSH-Ts of wheat seedlings, and the increase rate of 14 Gy X-irradiation was higher than that of 8 Gy. The activity of ASA-POD and GSH-Px increased during the culture process and the activity of GSH-Ts decreased. That's show that wheat seedlings can increase the activity of antioxidases to resist the damage induced by high dosage X-irradiation. The results of low dosage X-irradiation, 2 Gy is similar as the control

  12. Methodology of characterization of radioactive graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Lara, E.; Magro, E.; Gascon, J. L.; Leganes, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the dismantling of Vandellos I, ENRESA has promoted the precise knowledge of the inventory of irradiated graphite (graphite-i) through establishing methodologies for radiological characterization of the vector of radionuclides of interest and their correlations as the primary means of characterization strategy to establish the safer management of this material in its life cycle. (Author)

  13. Voronoi-Tessellated Graphite Produced by Low-Temperature Catalytic Graphitization from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Leyi; Zhao, Xiuyun; Burke, Luke T; Bennett, J Craig; Dunlap, Richard A; Obrovac, Mark N

    2017-09-11

    A highly crystalline graphite powder was prepared from the low temperature (800-1000 °C) graphitization of renewable hard carbon precursors using a magnesium catalyst. The resulting graphite particles are composed of Voronoi-tessellated regions comprising irregular sheets; each Voronoi-tessellated region having a small "seed" particle located near their centroid on the surface. This suggests nucleated outward growth of graphitic carbon, which has not been previously observed. Each seed particle consists of a spheroidal graphite shell on the inside of which hexagonal graphite platelets are perpendicularly affixed. This results in a unique high surface area graphite with a high degree of graphitization that is made with renewable feedstocks at temperatures far below that conventionally used for artificial graphites. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth.

  15. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  16. Growth in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with and without prophylactic cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moell, C.; Garwicz, S.; Marky, L.; Melander, L.; Karlberg, J.

    1988-01-01

    Growth and weight gain were studied longitudinally over a period of four years in thirty-nine children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The children were divided into two groups according to treatment. Twenty-eight children were given prophylactic cranial irradiation and eleven children were treated without such irradiation. The duration of cytostatic treatment was three years in all cases. Average growth during the first two years was similar in the two groups, and the standard deviation scores (SDS) were below average. The rate of growth during the fourth year was significantly higher among those children who had not received cranial irradiation. After four years the average attained height had declined 0.5 SD for children treated with cranial irradiation and 0.2 SD for children without such treatment. Attained weight after four years had increased 0.4 SD more among those children who had not received irradiation. The results suggest that prophylactic cranial irradiation is responsible for the greater part of the prepubertal growth inhibition in these children. (authors)

  17. Effect of low level prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal growth in the Wistar rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five pregnant Wistar strain rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 Gy X-radiation on the 9th or 17th day of gestation to determined if prenatal X-irradiation would result in alterations in postnatal growth or growth rate. The mothers delivered their offspring, and the litters were reduced to a maximum of eight per litter on the second postnatal day. The 336 offspring were weighed weekly from day 3 until day 86, at which time they were killed, an autopsy was performed, and selected organs were removed and weighed. Postnatal growth rates did not differ significantly in irradiated offspring compared to sham irradiated animals. Irradiation on the 9th day, at any of the 3 dosage levels, did not result in significant differences in weekly weight. Weekly weight remained significantly lower due to irradiation on the 17th day of gestation. The gonadal weight ratio was significantly reduced in males irradiated on the 9th day. There were not other statistically significant changes in organ weight or organ/body weight ratios due to these levels of prenatal X-irradiation on the 9th or 17th day of pregnancy. These results indicate that low level prenatal X-irradiation, on the 17th day of rat gestation, causes prenatal growth retardation, evident at birth, which is not recuperable postnatally. Exposure to x-radiation at this time, however, does not affect the rate at which offspring grow during postnatal life. Offspring are smaller because they never fully recover from the original radiation-induced prenatal growth retardation

  18. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R.

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs

  19. Response to growth hormone treatment and final height after cranial or craniospinal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmont, V.; Brauner, R.; Fontoura, M.; Rappaport, R. (Hospital des Enfants Malades, Paris (France). Pediatric Endocrinology Unit and INSERM U30)

    1990-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD) induced by cranial irradiation has become a frequent indication of hGH substitutive therapy. This study analyses the growth response to hGH therapy and the factors involved in the decrease in growth velocity observed after cranial irradiation. One hundred children given cranial radiation for pathology distant from the hypothalamo-pituitary area were studied. Fifty-six of them received hGH therapy for GHD resulting in decreased growth velocity. The initial annual height gain in the cranial-irradiated group was comparable to that of patients treated for idiopathic GHD; additional spinal irradiation significantly reduced the growth response. Twenty-eight hGH-treated patients reached final heights which were compared to those of 2 untreated irradiated groups, one with GHD (n=27) and the other with normal GH secretion (n=17). The height SD score changes observed in hGH therapy were +0.3 in the cranial (n=10) and -1.2 SD in the craniospinal (n=18) groups. GH deficiency had contributed to a mean height loss of 1 SD and spinal irradiation to a loss of 1.4SD. The small effect of hGH therapy on final height is probably linked to the small bone age retardation at onset of hGH therapy and to the fact that irradiated children entered puberty at a younger age in terms of chronological age and bone age than the idiopathic GHD patients. These data suggest that the results of gGH therapy in irradiated children might be improved with higher and more fractionated hGH doses and, in some patients, by delaying puberty using luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogs.

  20. Hydrogen storage in carbon nanofibres for defence applications : the influence of growth parameters on graphitic quality and storage capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turpin, M.; Mellor, I. [Morgan Materials Technology Ltd., Worcestershire (United Kingdom); Shatwell, R.A.; Prentice, C. [QinetiQ Farnborough, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Browning, D.J. [QinetiQ Haslar, Gosport, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Lakeman, J.B. [Dstl Portsdown, Cosham, Hampshire (United Kingdom); Gerrard, M.L.; Mortimer, R.J. [Loughborough Univ. of Technology, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    The results of a study on hydrogen storage in carbon or graphite nanofibres (GNFs) were presented. Graphite nanofibres used in hydrogen storage treatment were synthesized at 600 degrees C by passing ethylene over a series of Fe:Ni:Cu catalysts. It was shown that while hydrogen storage can occur for up to 6.5 wt per cent, this number can vary depending on the method of preparation and heat treatment. Hydrogen storage requires an effective method, such as Raman spectroscopy, for characterising the product. Transmission Electron Microscopy also helped in the optimisation of the process to produce highly graphitic nanofibres. The main role of heat treatment is to remove carbon from the surface of the GNFs, allowing access to the graphene planes. Hydrogen storage experiments were conducted at 120 bar, using a bespoke apparatus with differential pressure. A detailed error analysis was performed on the uptake measurement system. The rate of penetration by hydrogen into a layer of carbon capping graphene planes is found to be negligible. It is concluded that hydrogen adsorption will not be observed unless the layer is removed. A maximum uptake of 4.2 wt per cent was achieved, increasing to more than 6.5 wt per cent following heat treatment at 1000 degrees C. 32 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  1. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dethloff, Christian; Gaganidze, Ermile; Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V.; Aktaa, Jarir

    2012-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different 10 B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  2. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in neutron irradiated boron doped RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dethloff, Christian, E-mail: christian.dethloff@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gaganidze, Ermile [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Svetukhin, Vyacheslav V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy Str. 42, 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Aktaa, Jarir [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are promising candidates for structural materials in future fusion technology. In addition to other irradiation defects, the transmuted helium is believed to strongly influence material hardening and embrittlement behavior. A phenomenological model based on kinetic rate equations is developed to describe homogeneous nucleation and growth of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated RAFM steels. The model is adapted to different {sup 10}B doped EUROFER97 based heats, which already had been studied in past irradiation experiments. Simulations yield bubble size distributions, whereby effects of helium generation rate, surface energy, helium sinks and helium density are investigated. Peak bubble diameters under different conditions are compared to preliminary microstructural results on irradiated specimens. Helium induced hardening was calculated by applying the Dispersed Barrier Hardening model to simulated cluster size distributions. Quantitative microstructural investigations of unirradiated and irradiated specimens will be used to support and verify the model.

  3. Biological effects of 60Co γ-irradiation on Laiwu ginger VM1 growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ming; Huang Jinli; Wei Yuxia; Guan Qiuzhu; Zhang Zhenxian

    2008-01-01

    Rhizome of Laiwu ginger were treated with γ-irradiation at the doses of 0, 20, 40 and 60 Gy. The results showed that 60 Co γ-irradiation inhibited the rhizome burgeoning, and decreased the survival rate of the seedlings, rate of leaf- expansion and the growth of plants (VM 1 ). The inhibition effects became stronger with the increase of the irradiation dose. Different bands were found through the analysis of POD, EST isozymes and RAPD of VM 1 plants, which showed that variation on molecular level occurred in VM 1 plants. LD 30-40 was appropriate for the irradiation of rhizomes of Laiwu ginger and the optimal irradiation dose was about 20- 30 Gy. (authors)

  4. Relation between the punctual defects dynamics and irradiation growth in Zr and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarce, A.; Monti, A.M.; Smetniansky-De Grande, N.

    1990-01-01

    The knowledge of the static properties punctual defects and their interaction with the drains present in the material, such as dislocations and grain borders, is of fundamental importance for the correct prediction of the reactor's components behaviour under irradiation. This work calculates the Zr alloys growth under irradiation and results are compared with the stretching values of the cooling channels measured at the Atucha I nuclear power plant. (Author) [es

  5. A graphite foam reinforced by graphite particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J.J.; Wang, X.Y.; Guo, L.F.; Wang, Y.M.; Wang, Y.P.; Yu, M.F.; Lau, K.T.T. [DongHua University, Shanghai (China). College of Material Science and Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Graphite foam was obtained after carbonization and graphitization of a pitch foam formed by the pyrolysis of coal tar based mesophase pitch mixed with graphite particles in a high pressure and temperature chamber. The graphite foam possessed high mechanical strength and exceptional thermal conductivity after adding the graphite particles. Experimental results showed that the thermal conductivity of modified graphite foam reached 110W/m K, and its compressive strength increased from 3.7 MPa to 12.5 MPa with the addition of 5 wt% graphite particles. Through the microscopic observation, it was also found that fewer micro-cracks were formed in the cell wall of the modified foam as compared with pure graphite foam. The graphitization degree of modified foam reached 84.9% and the ligament of graphite foam exhibited high alignment after carbonization at 1200{sup o}C for 3 h and graphitization at 3000{sup o}C for 10 min.

  6. Effect of gamma-irradiation to the embryos growth of kenaf and roselle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaka, Teruki; Okuyama, Naoki; Fujino, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Kenaf and roselle are widely cultivated in many countries and it has been used to produce several products or beverages. Also, these plants are recognized as an environmental friendly crop. The gamma-ray irradiation was commonly used to avoid the spoilage of several vegetables or to inhibit the emergence of larvae from seeds. Recently, radiation breeding was characterized for the creation of new varieties and the improvement of vegetative propagation. As of today, little studies have been reported regarding the radiation sensitivity of these plants. To gain a better understanding on the embryos growth of kenaf and roselle, gamma-ray irradiation was performed on these seeds using 60Co irradiator. A statistically significance was observed on germination and embryo growth at irradiated kenaf seeds between control groups. In case of roselle, there was not statistically significant difference in the germination of irradiated seeds between control groups at the same doses. Moreover, the several truncated DNA forms were detected at the irradiated seeds and their embryos in electrophoresis assay. Based on these results, inhibitory effect on germination and embryo growth were closely related to the DNA damages. The present study demonstrates that remarkable difference on the radiation tolerance of seed was found between kenaf and roselle. (author)

  7. The effect of gamma irradiation on the germination and growth of certain Nigerian agricultural crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokobia, C E; Anomohanran, O

    2005-01-01

    Gamma irradiation has been found to be very useful both for sterilisation in medicine and the preservation of food and cereals in nutrition and agriculture. This investigation was carried out to determine the effect of gamma irradiation on the subsequent germination and growth of irradiated seeds. Thirty seeds each of maize, okra and groundnut were irradiated to varying doses of 150, 300, 500, 700, 900, 1000 Gy using the 60 Co gamma cell irradiator facility at the Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. These, as well as the controls (unirradiated seeds), were planted on the same day in an already prepared area of farmland during the rainy season to ensure a constant moisture flow. The times of germination and subsequent growth were monitored. Results show that maize, okra and groundnut seeds needed for planting can be safely stored using gamma irradiation. However, the study reveals that the number of germinated seeds and the growth rate for the crops decrease with increase in the radiation dose the seeds were exposed to. Third-degree polynomial equations were derived which describe the percentage germination of the crops at various levels of exposure. A chart of percentage germination of seeds versus exposure dose is also presented as a quick guide to farmers, policy makers and agricultural institutions. (note)

  8. The effect of gamma irradiation on the germination and growth of certain Nigerian agricultural crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokobia, C E; Anomohanran, O [Department of Physics, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State (Nigeria)

    2005-06-01

    Gamma irradiation has been found to be very useful both for sterilisation in medicine and the preservation of food and cereals in nutrition and agriculture. This investigation was carried out to determine the effect of gamma irradiation on the subsequent germination and growth of irradiated seeds. Thirty seeds each of maize, okra and groundnut were irradiated to varying doses of 150, 300, 500, 700, 900, 1000 Gy using the {sup 60}Co gamma cell irradiator facility at the Centre for Energy Research and Development, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. These, as well as the controls (unirradiated seeds), were planted on the same day in an already prepared area of farmland during the rainy season to ensure a constant moisture flow. The times of germination and subsequent growth were monitored. Results show that maize, okra and groundnut seeds needed for planting can be safely stored using gamma irradiation. However, the study reveals that the number of germinated seeds and the growth rate for the crops decrease with increase in the radiation dose the seeds were exposed to. Third-degree polynomial equations were derived which describe the percentage germination of the crops at various levels of exposure. A chart of percentage germination of seeds versus exposure dose is also presented as a quick guide to farmers, policy makers and agricultural institutions. (note)

  9. The growth of human fibroblasts and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells on gamma-irradiated human amnion collagen substrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Harrell, R; Lamb, D J; Dresden, M H; Spira, M

    1989-10-15

    Human fibroblasts and A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells were cultured on gamma-irradiated human amnion collagen as well as on plastic dishes and non-irradiated collagen coated dishes. The morphology, attachment, growth and short-term cytotoxicity of these culture conditions have been determined. Both irradiated and non-irradiated amnion collagen enhanced the attachment and proliferation of fibroblasts as compared to the plastic dishes. No differences in these properties were observed for A431 cells cultured on irradiated collagen when compared with culture on non-irradiated collagen substrates. Cytotoxicity assays showed that irradiated and non-irradiated collagens were not cytotoxic for either fibroblasts or A431 cells. The results demonstrated that amnion collagen irradiated at doses of 0.25-2.0 Mrads is optimal for cell growth.

  10. Microstructural evolutions of zirconium alloys under irradiation. Link with the irradiation growth phenomenon; Evolutions microstructurales des alliages de zirconium sous irradiation. Liens avec le phenomene de croissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonot, C

    1995-07-18

    This study deals with the irradiation-induced growth and microstructural evolutions of Zircaloy-4 type materials (ZrSn{sub 1.2-1.7} Fe{sub 0.18-0.24} Cr{sub 0.07-0.13} O{sub 0.09-0.15}), used as cladding and guide-tubes in PWR`s fuel assemblies. The main objective was to obtain a better understanding of the growth acceleration which may occur at high doses for the recrystallized metallurgical state. The elongation values of stress-free tubes irradiated at 400 deg in experimental reactors give clear indication of accelerated growth after a critical dose. Microstructural investigations reveal some large basal plane dislocation loops with vacancy character, which is an unexpected defect configuration for an hexagonal material with a c/a ratio less than the ideal value. In addition, a significant redistribution of iron and chromium solute elements comes from the dissolution of the initial Zr(Fe,Cr){sub 2} phases. In a guide-tube irradiated to high dose at 320 deg in a power reactor, a large density of these c-component loops was also observed in coincidence with a large iron re-solution due to the progressive partial amorphization of Laves phases. By contrast, as long as a negligible amount of iron is available in the matrix (start of progressive) amorphization at 350 deg or complete amorphization without any chemical change at 280 deg, only prism plane loops with interstitial and vacancy character are observed and the steady-state growth rate is low. A mechanism taking into account the Diffusional Anisotropy Difference of the radiation induced point defects seems to be the most suitable to explain the correlations between microstructural evolutions and growth rates. However it does not allow to predict the dose necessary for the formation of the basal plane loops responsible for the growth acceleration. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Effect of irradiation on facial growth: a 7- to 25-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyuron, B.; Dagys, A.P.; Munro, I.R.; Ross, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    This retrospective study is a review of 41 patients who had received irradiation to the head and face during the growth period. Not only is growth of soft tissue and bone of the irradiated area noticeably affected, but other parts of the face can also be involved, especially if the dose is to the upper face and the cranial base. We were able to define a definite cutoff point for a harmful dose for growing facial bones, but the harmful dose for soft tissue could not be determined and may be as low as 400 rads

  12. Microbial biofilm growth on irradiated, spent nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.F.; Frank, S.M.; Roberto, F.F.; Pinhero, P.J.; Johnson, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 x 10 3 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments

  13. Experience with graphite in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pick, M.A.; Celentano, G.; Deksnis, E.; Dietz, K.J.; Shaw, R.; Sonnenberg, K.; Walravens, M.

    1987-01-01

    During the current operational period of JET more than 50% of the internal area of the machine is covered in graphite tiles. This includes the 15 m 2 of carbon tiles installed in the new toroidal limiter, the 40 poloidal belts of graphite tiles covering the U-joints and bellows as well as a two metre high ring (-- 20 m 2 ) or carbon tiles on the inner wall of the Torus. A ring of tiles in the equatorial plane (3 tiles high) consists of carbon-carbon fibre tiles. Test bed results indicated that the fine grained graphite tiles cracked at ∼ 1 kW/cm 2 for 2s of irradiation whereas the carbon-carbon fibre tiles were able to sustain a flux, limited by the irradiation facility, of 3.5 kW for 3s without any damage. The authors report on the generally positive experience they have had had with the installed graphite during the present and previous in-vessel configurations. This includes the physical integrity of the tiles under severe conditions such as high energy run-away electron beams, plasma disruptions and high heat fluxes. They report on the importance of the precise positioning of the inner wall and x-point tiles at the very high power fluxes of JET and the effect of deviations on both graphite and carbon-fibre tiles

  14. Growth and characterization of stoichiometric BCN films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannan, Md. Abdul, E-mail: amannan75@yahoo.co [Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Synchrotron Radiation Research Unit, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Noguchi, Hideyuki; Kida, Tetsuya; Nagano, Masamitsu [Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Hirao, Norie; Baba, Yuji [Synchrotron Radiation Research Unit, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-05-31

    Hexagonal boron carbonitride (h-BCN) hybrid films have been synthesized on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using tris-(dimethylamino)borane as a single-source molecular precursor. The films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopic measurements. XPS measurement showed that the B atoms were bonded to C and N atoms to form the sp{sup 2}-B-C-N atomic hybrid chemical environment. The atomic composition estimated from the XPS of the typical sample was found to be almost B{sub 1}C{sub 1}N{sub 1}. NEXAFS spectra of the B K-edge and the N K-edge had the peaks due to the {pi}* and {sigma}* resonances of sp{sup 2} hybrid orbitals implying the existence of the sp{sup 2} hybrid configurations of h-BCN around the B atoms. The G band at 1592 and D band at 1352 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectra also suggested the presence of the graphite-like sp{sup 2}-B-C-N atomic hybrid bonds. The films consisted of micrometer scale crystalline structure of around 10 {mu}m thick has been confirmed by the field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Host influence on irradiation bioefficacy : growth and development of Spodoptera litura (Fabricius)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, R.K.

    1995-01-01

    Survival and development of Spodoptera litura(F), a polyphagous pest was ascertained on a range of host plants, common and economic in the Indian context. Castor, cotton, green gram and okra constituted the preferred host group showing significantly better growth rate (GR) and growth index (GI) than the group of less preferred host plants that included groundnut, red gram, rose leaf and rose petal. Ontogenic growth profile vis-a-vis irradiation was studied with recording of GI at L3, pupa and adult levels in response to gamma dosages administered in L1 stage. Irradiation effect on the growth index was mainly due to reduction in survival, which was further pronounced owing to delay in development. On all the preferred host plants, adult-G1 was reduced by more than 50 per cent at 40 Gy gamma dose; whereas the same dose on less preferred host plants could prevent adult emergence on ground nut and red gram, and inhibited pupa formation on rose diet. The percentage mortality of larvae exhibiting delayed development was markedly more in the less preferred host group. Dose dependent reduction was observed in the larval growth rate of L3, L5 and L6 instars on all the host plants. 20 Gy exhibited almost same intensity of adverse impact in less preferred host group as was shown by 40 Gy in preferred hosts. 20 Gy dose reduced the pupal weight and conversion ratio of treated insects significantly. Age influence was evident on irradiation efficacy on all the diets. Insects treated in the later instar had less radiosusceptibility as compared to the young irradiated larvae. Irradiation had a negative correlation with survival and weight gain during the course of development that in turn bore a positive relation with the increase in radiation dosage. Food is an important governing factor in influencing the insects survival value and developmental behaviour and may modify its intrinsic sensitivity towards irradiation stress. (author). 21 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  16. Effects of proton beam irradiation on seed germination and growth of soybean ( Glycine max L. Merr.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Juhyun; Kim, Woon Ji; Kim, Sang Hun; Ha, Bo-Keun

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the morphological effects of proton beam irradiation on the seed germination, seedling survival, and plant growth of soybean. Seeds of three Korean elite cultivars (Kwangankong, Daepungkong, and Pungsannamulkong) were irradiated with a 57-MeV proton beam in the range of 50 - 400 Gy. The germination rates of all the varieties increased to > 95%; however, the survival rates were significantly reduced. At doses of > 300 Gy irradiation, the Daepungkong, Kwangankong, and Pungsannamulkong cultivars exhibited 39, 75, and 71% survival rates, respectively. In addition, plant height and the fresh weight of shoots and roots were significantly decreased by doses of > 100 Gy irradiation, as were the dry weights of the shoots and roots. However, SPAD values increased with increasing doses of irradiation. Abnormal plants with atypically branched stems, modified leaves, and chlorophyll mutations were observed. Based on the survival rate, plant growth inhibition, and mutation frequency, it appears that the optimum dosage of proton beam irradiation for soybean mutation breeding is between 250 and 300 Gy.

  17. Evaluation of neutron irradiation effect on SCC crack growth behaviour of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used as structural materials alloy in reactor pressure vessel internal components because of their high strength, ductility and fracture toughness. However, exposure due to neutron irradiation results in changes in microstructure, mechanical properties and microchemistry of the material. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) caused by the effect of neutron irradiation during long term operation in high temperature water environments in nuclear power plants is considered to take the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the critical fluence level has been reported to be about 5x10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) for Type 304 SS in BWR environment. JNES had been conducting IASCC project during from JFY 2000 to JFY 2008, and prepared an engineering database on IASCC. However, the data of crack growth rate (CGR) below the critical fluence level are not sufficient. Therefore, evaluation of neutron irradiation effect project (ENI) was initiated to obtain the CGR data below the critical fluence level, and prepare the SCC growth rate diagram for life time evaluation of core shroud. Test specimens have been irradiated in the OECD/Halden reactor, and the post irradiation experiments (PIE) have been conducting during from JFY 2011 to JFY 2013, finally the modified IASCC guide will be prepared in JFY 2013. (author)

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Gamma-Irradiated Chitosan on the Growth of Denitrifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Vilcáez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find an environmentally benign substitute to hazardous inhibitory agents, the inhibitory effect of -irradiated chitosans against a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria was experimentally evaluated. Unlike other studies using pure aerobic cultures, the observed effect was not a complete inhibition but a transient inhibition reflected by prolonged lag phases and reduced growth rates. Raw chitosan under acid conditions (pH 6.3 exerted the strongest inhibition followed by the 100 kGy and 500 kGy irradiated chitosans, respectively. Therefore, because the molecular weight of chitosan decreases with the degree of -irradiation, the inhibitory properties of chitosan due to its high molecular weight were more relevant than the inhibitory properties gained due to the modification of the surface charge and/or chemical structure by -irradiation. High dosage of -irradiated appeared to increase the growth of mixed denitrifying bacteria in acid pH media. However, in neutral pH media, high dosage of -irradiation appeared to enhance the inhibitory effect of chitosan.

  19. Dislocation climb and interstitial loop growth under cascade damage irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.; Semenov, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of intracascade clustering and recombination in radiation damage have been considered previously in semiquantitative calculations involving vacancy accumulation at voids, within the concept of production bias. To model void swelling and microstructural evolution quantitatively, similar effects on dislocation climb and interstitial loop growth have to be considered. In this regard, at elevated temperatures (such as in the peak-swelling temperature regime), the concentration of freely migrating vacancies is much higher than that of the interstitials, owing to the evaporation from the primary vacancy clusters (i.e. those produced by intracascade clustering). It is not immediately obvious how the dislocations can be net interstitials sinks, and hence that the observed nucleation and growth of the interstitial loops at elevated temperatures can be correctly predicted as in the conventional theory. To address these basic questions, a rate theory model is formulated in this paper, which describes the dislocation climb and loop growth in the presence of intracascade primary clusters. Within this model, conservation equations for the concentrations and average radii of the two kinds of primary cluster are derived, and the corresponding steady-state concentrations and average radii are calculated. From this, the dislocation climb velocity and interstitial loop growth rate are calculated. On the basis of the results of this calculation, some of the basic questions of production bias are discussed. (Author)

  20. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    , especially in the UK. It is intended that this report which contains the proceedings of the conference should contribute to progress in the management of radioactive graphite worldwide. The report contains a selection of the papers presented on various issues related to dismantling and treating irradiated graphite. In addition, the report contains summaries of the four topical discussions which were held during the conference

  1. The effect of irradiance on long-term skeletal growth and net photosynthesis in Galaxea fascicularis under four light conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, M.; Velthoven, van B.; Janse, M.; Osinga, R.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The relation between irradiance, skeletal growth and net photosynthesis was studied for the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis to provide experimental evidence for mediation of light-enhanced calcification through photosynthesis. The hypothesis was tested that skeletal growth and

  2. Effect of microwave irradiation on germination and seedling growth physiological characteristics of alfalfa seeds after storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liyu; Zhang Shuqing; Li Jianfeng; Shi Shangli; Huo Pinghui

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the effect of microwave irradiation on germination and growth physiological characteristics of seeds that stored for years, the irradiated alfalfa seeds that stored at room temperature for 2 years were used to conduct the germination and pot culture tests, and the germination rate, radical elongation, growth height, individual nodule, nitrogenase activity, chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters were measured. On the 15th day of germination, the germination rates of all the treatments are higher than that of the control, which decrease with the elongation of time. On the llst day of germination, the radical length of all the treatments is lower than that of the control. Growth height, individual nodule, fresh weight and dry weight for the 40 s irradiation treatment are higher than that of the control. Nitrogenase activity of all the treatments is lower than that of the control (P < O.05). The chlorophyll content reaches its maximum when being irradiated for 10 s, and the variation for F 0 and F v /F m of all treatments indicates that the light conversion efficiency of the leaves derived from the irradiated alfalfa seeds that stored for 2 a at room temperature is still relatively stressed. (authors)

  3. The growth of intra-granular bubbles in post-irradiation annealed UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations of low temperature irradiated UO 2 reveal large numbers of very small intra-granular bubbles, typically of around 1 nm diameter. During high temperature reactor transients these bubbles act as sinks for fission gas atoms and vacancies and can give rise to large volumetric swellings, sometimes of the order of 10%. Under irradiation conditions, the nucleation and growth of these bubbles is determined by a balance between irradiation-induced nucleation, diffusional growth and an irradiation induced re-solution mechanism. This conceptual picture is, however, incomplete because in the absence of irradiation the model predicts that the bubble population present from the pre-irradiation would act as the dominant sink for fission gas atoms resulting in large intra-granular swellings and little or no fission gas release. In practice, large fission gas releases are observed from post-irradiation annealed fuel. A recent series of experiments addressed the issue of fission gas release and swelling in post-irradiation annealed UO 2 originating from Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel which had been ramp tested in the Halden Test reactor. Specimens of fuel were subjected to transient heating at ramp rates of 0.5 deg. C/s and 20 deg. C/s to target temperatures between 1600 deg. C and 1900 deg. C. The release of fission gas was monitored during the tests. Subsequently, the fuel was subjected to post-irradiation examination involving detailed Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. Bubble-size distributions were obtained from seventeen specimens, which entailed the measurement of nearly 26,000 intra-granular bubbles. The analysis reveals that the bubble densities remain approximately invariant during the anneals and the bubble-size distributions exhibit long exponential tails in which the largest bubbles are present in concentrations of 10 4 or 10 5 lower than the concentrations of the average sized bubbles. Detailed modelling of the bubble

  4. Utilization of γ-irradiation technique on plant mutation breeding and plant growth regulation in Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Hirokatsu

    1997-01-01

    During about 30-years, we have developed γ-irradiation technique and breeding back pruning method for the study of mutation breeding of ornamental plants. As a result, we have made a wide variety of new mutant lines in chrysanthemum, narcissus, begonia rex, begonia iron cross, winter daphne, zelkova, sweet-scented oleander, abelia, kobus, and have obtained 7 plant patents. By the use of γ-irradiation to plant mutation breeding, we often observed that plants irradiated by low dose of γ-rays showed superior or inferior growth than the of non-irradiated plants. Now, we established the irradiation conditions of γ-rays for mutation breeding and growth of regulation in narcissus, tulip, Enkianthus perulatus Schneid., komatsuna, moyashi, african violet. In most cases, irradiation dose rate is suggested to be a more important factor to induce plant growth regulators than irradiation dose. (author)

  5. Irradiation control of pathogenic bacteria and their growth during storage time in cooled chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha Yiming; Wang Feng; Fan Bei; Liu Shuliang; Ju Hua

    2009-01-01

    The growth of pathogenic bacteria during storage time and their D 10 values by irradiation in cooled chicken were evaluated. The total numbers of colony, E.coli 10003, Campylobacter jejuni33560 and CY04 of the D 10 values were 1.434 kGy, 0.408 kGy, 0.175 kGy, 0.2 kGy respectively in cooled chicken. The results show that total bacteria count in vacuum packaged cooled chicken sample is 5.66 lg(CFU/g) and 4.90 lg (CFU/g) after 3 kGy and 5 kGy irradiation. And in storage at 0∼4 degree C the storage shelf-life of irradiated vacuum packaged cooled chicken could extend to 21 d and 28 d. It can be deduced that pathogenic bacteria can be controlled effectively by irradiation. (authors)

  6. Growth and instability of charged dislocation loops under irradiation in ceramic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Kinoshita, C; Klaptsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the physical mechanisms of the growth and stability of charged dislocation loops in ceramic materials with very strong different mass of atoms (stabilized cubic zirconia) under different energies and types of irradiation conditions: 100-1000 keV electrons, 100 keV He sup + and 300 keV O sup + ions. The anomalous formation of extended defect clusters (charged dislocation loops) has been observed by TEM under electron irradiation subsequent to ion irradiation. It is demonstrated that very strong strain field (contrast) near charged dislocation loops is formed. The dislocation loops grow up to a critical size and after then become unstable. The instability of the charged dislocation loop leads to the multiplication of dislocation loops and the formation of dislocation network near the charged dislocation loops. A theoretical model is suggested for the explanation of the growth and stability of the charged dislocation loop, taking the charge state of point defects. The calculated distribution...

  7. In-Pile Tests for IASCC Growth Behavior of Irradiated 316L Stainless Steel under Simulated BWR Condition in JMTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kasahara, Shigeki; Ise, Hideo; Kawaguchi, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Junichi; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has an in-pile irradiation test plan to evaluate in-situ effects of neutron/γ-ray irradiation on stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth of irradiated stainless steels using the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). SCC growth rate and its dependence on electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) are different between in-pile test and post irradiation examination (PIE). These differences are not fully understood because of a lack of in-pile data. This paper presents a systematic review on SCC growth data of irradiated stainless steels, an in-pile test plan for crack growth of irradiated SUS316L stainless steel under simulated BWR conditions in the JMTR, and the development of the in-pile test techniques.

  8. Model of cancer growth affected by irradiation. Effect of fluctuating intensity of the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of a biological model system which describes the growth of a cancer cell population in the presence of external irradiation is studied. The effect of randomly fluctuating source of radiation is analysed and its influence on cancer cell extinction is presented. The main stress is put on the biological significance of random fluctuations which seem to favour rejection of a tumor. (author)

  9. Growth and grazing responses of two chloroplast-retaining dinoflagellates: effect of irradiance and prey species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Hans Henrik; Hansen, P.J.; Larsen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of irradiance on growth and grazing responses of 2 phagotrophic dinoflagellates, Gymnodinium gracilentum Campbell 1973 and Amphidinium poecilochroum Larsen 1985, was studied. While G. gracilentum belongs to the plankton, A. poecilochroum is a benthic species that primarily feeds on prey...

  10. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Growth study of radio-mutant saccharomyce cerevisiae K 1,5 on irradiated molases media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siagian, E.G.; Lina, M.R.; Sisiana.

    1988-01-01

    The application of the radiopasteurization method for alcoholic fermentation of molases media have been studied which compared to heat pasteurization. The molases samples were obtained from sugar industry in Cirebon, Yogyakarta, and Lawang, used as a samples for gamma irradiation, doses of 3 kGy, 6 kGy and heat pasteurization 80 Celcius centigrade for 30 minutes, which compared to untreated molases. Innculum yeast was S. Cerevisiae K 1.5 which was resulted by irradiation mutation. The results showed that gamma irradiation dose of 3 kGy have pasteurization effect better than 6 kGy and heat pasteurization 80 Celcius centigrade, 30 minutes. Total cells count of microflora per gram samples (% survivors) on molasses media which has been heat pasteurized, decreased to be 70%, 10% for irradiated molasses 3 kGy; and 1% for molasses irradiated 6 kGy, but it did not have significant effect on the growth capacity of S. cerevisiae K 1.5 on that molasses media. Microflora isolated from molasses samples obtained from Cirebon, Yogyakarta, and Lawang, generally from Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus sp., Corynebacterium sp., and Rhizopus oligosporus, although was detected but not grows well on molasses media. The growth of S. cerevisiae K 1.5 on fermentation media suplemented with trace elements nitrogen and phosphor resulted difference on fermentation rate i.e.: in irradiated molasses 3 kGy and 6 kGy showed a higher rate, which compared to heat pasteurization and controle. In the environment condition study on molasses media shows the yeast S. cerevisiae K 1.5 have optimal growth at the pH 5.5, specific growth rate 0.3-0.5 per hour, the saturation constant 0.5 - 0.60 g/l, temperature 30 +/- 2 Celcius centigrade with sugar : nitrogen : phosphor ratio = 100 : 5 : 1. The nitrogen and phosphor sources are ammonium sulphate and sodium hidrogen phosphate respectively. (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  12. Effects of irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridium botulinum types A and B inoculated onto chicken skins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfulian, M.; Bartlett, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of 0.3-Mrad irradiation on growth and toxigenicity of Clostridum botulinum types A and B on chicken skins. Irradiation followed by aerobic or anaerobic incubation at 30 0 C extended the shelf life of skin samples and delayed growth and toxin production by C. botulinum. During 2 weeks of incubation at 10 0 C, the irradiated and nonirradiated C. botulinum spores failed to grow or produce toxin

  13. The nucleation and growth of uranium on the basal plane of graphite studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tench, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    For the first time, nanometer scale uranium clusters were created on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite by laser ablation under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The physical and chemical properties of these clusters were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as standard surface science techniques. Auger electron and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies found the uranium deposit to be free of contamination and showed that no carbide had formed with the underlying graphite. Clusters with sizes ranging from 42 Angstrom 2 to 630 Angstrom 2 were observed upon initial room temperature deposition. Surface diffusion of uranium was observed after annealing the substrate above 800 K, as evidenced by the decreased number density and the increased size of the clusters. Preferential depletion of clusters on terraces near step edges as a result of annealing was observed. The activation energy for diffusion deduced from these measurements was found to be 15 Kcal/mole. Novel formation of ordered uranium thin films was observed for coverages greater than two monolayers after annealing above 900 K. These ordered films displayed islands with hexagonally faceted edges rising in uniform step heights characteristic of the unit cell of the P-phase of uranium. In addition, atomic resolution STM images of these ordered films indicated the formation of the β-phase of uranium. The chemical properties of these surfaces were investigated and it was shown that these uranium films had a reduced oxidation rate in air as compared to bulk metal and that STM imaging in air induced a polarity-dependent enhancement of the oxidation rate

  14. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  15. Gamma-irradiation assisted seeded growth of Ag nanoparticles within PVA matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisa, Wael H.; Abdel-Moneam, Yasser K.; Shaaban, Yasser; Abdel-Fattah, Atef A.; Abou Zeid, Amira M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nucleation and growth must be two completely separated steps. → The amount of zerovalent nuclei can be controlled by varying the irradiation dose. → PVA act as physical barrier to inhibit aggregation or the growth of Ag nanoparticles. - Abstract: Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/Ag hybrid nanocomposites have been prepared from polymeric film of PVA and silver nitrate (AgNO 3 ). The silver nanoparticles were generated in PVA matrix by the reduction of silver ions with gamma-irradiation. UV-visible spectra showed a single peak at 422 nm, arising from the surface plasmon absorption of silver nanoparticles. The shifting of surface plasmon resonance peak after irradiation reveals that the gamma irradiation can be used as a size controlling agent for the preparation of silver nanoparticles embedded in PVA film. This result was in good agreement with the result obtained from TEM images. The TEM images showed the narrow size distribution of the obtained Ag nanoparticles with average particle size of 30 nm, which decreased to 17 nm with increasing irradiation dose. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that silver metal was present in face centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure. These results clearly indicate that monodispersed silver nanoparticles are embedded homogenously in PVA matrix.

  16. Methodology for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) growth and plant productivity stimulation, thought seeds irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Fernandez, Ramiro; Gonzalez Nunnez, Luis Manuel; Camejo Serrano, Yanelis; Licea Castro, Luis; Garcia Rodriguez, Blanca; Porras Leon, Elia; Perez Espinosa, Anabel

    2001-01-01

    Based in the obtained results by several authors and the experience accumulated by the group of Nuclear Techniques of the Agricultural Research Institute Jorge Dimitrov about the irradiation techniques; the methodology for tomato growth and productivity stimulation through the seeds irradiation was established. This methodology includes the preparation, irradiation and material selection to irradiate; as well as the sows of the material under field conditions. With her application the seedlings of good quality is guaranteed, what facilitates its transplant from the nursery to field conditions with 7 days in advance comparing to the control treatment, that contributes to the saving of material and human resources. Their fundamental contribution is given in the increment of the agricultural yield that reaches maximum values about 30% for some of the applied treatments. It is also recommended, the application of response- surface analysis among the plant yield (dependent variable) and the irradiation doses (independent variable) for determine the better stimulation doses in each one of the four varieties, as well as the time repeatability parameter of the growth and productivity were calculated, that which endorses the practical application of the proposed methodology

  17. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  18. Evaluation of staphylococcus aureus growth in unirradiated and irradiated cured meats using the Gompertz equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczawinski, J.; Szczawinska, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. Sodium nitrite, in concentration of 156 mg/kg, exerted little (from practical point of view) inhibitory effect on S. aureus in cured meat. Its addition caused lag time extension, increase of exponential growth rate, decrease of generation time and maximum population density of staphylococci in samples of cured meat stored at 20 C. 2. Growth curves of Staphylococcus aureus in unirradiated and irradiated (50 kGy) meats cured without sodium nitrite were similar. 3. Irradiation of meat cured with 156 mg/kg sodium nitrite with increasing doses of ionizing radiation (0, 10, 30, 50 kGy) progressively decreased growth rates and lag time and increased generation time and maximum population densities of Staphylococcus aureus in samples inoculated after radiation treatment and incubated at 20 C. (orig.)

  19. The optical properties and photocatalytic activity of CdS-ZnS-TiO{sub 2}/Graphite for isopropanol degradation under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmawati, Fitria, E-mail: fitria@mipa.uns.ac.id; Wulandari, Rini, E-mail: riniwulandari55@yahoo.com; Murni, Irvinna M., E-mail: irvinna-mutiara@yahoo.com; Mudjijono, E-mail: mbahparto@yahoo.com [Research Group of Solid State Chemistry & Catalysis, Chemistry Department, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A Kentingan, Surakarta, 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    This research prepared a photocatalyst tablet of CdS-ZnS-TiO{sub 2} on a graphite substrate. The synthesis was conducted through chemical bath deposition method. The graphite substrate used was a waste graphite rod from primary batteries. The aims of this research are studying the crystal structure, the optical properties and the photocatalytic activity of the prepared material. The photocatalytic activity was determined through isopropanol degradation. The result shows that the TiO{sub 2}/Graphite provide direct transition gap energy at 2.91 eV and an indirect transition gap energy at 3.21 eV. Deposition of CdS-ZnS changed the direct transition gap energy to 3.01 eV and the indirect transition gap energy to 3.22 eV. Isopropanol degradation with the prepared catalyst produced new peaks at 223-224 nm and 265-266 nm confirming the production of acetone. The degradation follows first order with rate constant of 2.4 × 10{sup −2} min{sup −1}.

  20. Effects of x-irradiation on growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzoga, K.F.; Dimitrievich, G.S.; Sutton, H.G.; Griem, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of x-irradiation doses ranging from 0-2000 rads on vascular smooth muscle cells were measured. Explant cultures were from the medial layers of aortas from New Zealand rabbits. X-irradiation was delivered to narrow mediastinal port using a 250 kV Maxitron at a rate of 80 rads/min. and a S-C distance of 60 cm. Explantation was done either immediately following radiation or five days later. Two parameters were used to determine post-irradiation growth potential of these cells: number of outgrowing cells per seeded explant and size and number of cells/culture. Results were expressed as fraction of control. Irradiation immediately before explantation reduced number of cells/ explant 10% for 250 rads and over 50% for 500 rads. Doses of 1000 rads and over resulted in reductions of over 70% in number of growing explants and culture size. When five days were allowed to elapse between x-irradiation and explantation the same parameters were not significantly affected for doses of 500 rads or less. Doses of 1000 rads resulted in a reduction in number of cells of 40% and 2000 rads of over 80%. These results suggest the presence of a population of vascular repair cells five days following irradiation treatment. The nature of these cells is discussed

  1. Fusarium growth on culture media made of tissue juice from irradiated and unirradiated potato tubers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taczanowski, M.

    1994-01-01

    Fusarium Sulphureum Schlecht is one of the tuber pathogens causing potato storage disease knowing as dry rot. Because irradiation can disturb the tissue defence mechanism against the pathogen, it was decided to carry out experiments on influence of the treatment on subsequent tuber tissue reaction to a maceration process. The maceration as a physical stress was a substitute for the pathogen activity. Tubers of two potato varieties were tested: Mila -a resistant variety to Fusarium and Atol - susceptible one. Tubers of both varieties were irradiated with a dose of 105 kGy. Unirradiated tubers were taken as a control. A day after irradiation the cortex tissue was macerated using an ordinary rasper and the resulted tissue pulp was strained through medical gauze to obtain crude juice. The juice was clarified by centrifugation and then added to dissolved PDA. The volume ratio of juice to PDA was 1:1. The prepared media were dispensed into Petri dishes. Small pieces of the Fusarium culture were put on the surface of the medium at the centre of each Petri dish. Subsequent growth of the fungus was assessed by measurement of culture diameters every 24 hours. Linear functions of the Fusarium growth were obtained for Mila control and Atol control. In the case of Mila, the Fusarium found more favourable conditions for its growth in the presence of juice from irradiated tubers than from the control ones. Making the same comparison for Atol, no difference was detected. (author)

  2. Effect of impurities on the growth of {113} interstitial clusters in silicon under electron irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, K.; Hamada, K.; Satoh, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2011-01-01

    The growth and shrinkage of interstitial clusters on {113} planes were investigated in electron irradiated Czochralski grown silicon (Cz-Si), floating-zone silicon (Fz-Si), and impurity-doped Fz-Si (HT-Fz-Si) using a high voltage electron microscope. In Fz-Si, {113} interstitial clusters were formed only near the beam incident surface after a long incubation period, and shrank on subsequent irradiation from the backside of the specimen. In Cz-Si and HT-Fz-Si, {113} interstitial clusters nucle...

  3. An evaluation of the effects of epidermal growth factor on irradiation lip mucosa damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan

    1994-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on lip mucosa damage by irradiation was explored in mice. EGF was administered in doses of 100 μg/kg/day using different schedules. Mucosal damage was assessed. The metaphase arrest method with vinblastine was used to evaluate the diurnal rhythm of mitosis. EGF in regimens employed did not protect the mouse lip epithelial cells from irradiation induced damage, but it has a demonstrable stimulatory effect on cell proliferation in lip mucosa which is dependent on the schedules of administration. The reasons and mechanisms are discussed

  4. Interfacing VPSC with finite element codes. Demonstration of irradiation growth simulation in a cladding tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-23

    This Milestone report shows good progress in interfacing VPSC with the FE codes ABAQUS and MOOSE, to perform component-level simulations of irradiation-induced deformation in Zirconium alloys. In this preliminary application, we have performed an irradiation growth simulation in the quarter geometry of a cladding tube. We have benchmarked VPSC-ABAQUS and VPSC-MOOSE predictions with VPSC-SA predictions to verify the accuracy of the VPSCFE interface. Predictions from the FE simulations are in general agreement with VPSC-SA simulations and also with experimental trends.

  5. The enhanced effects of antibiotics irradiated of extremely high frequency electromagnetic field on Escherichia coli growth properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgomyan, Heghine; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of extremely high frequency electromagnetic irradiation and antibiotics on Escherichia coli can create new opportunities for applications in different areas—medicine, agriculture, and food industry. Previously was shown that irradiated bacterial sensitivity against antibiotics was changed. In this work, it was presented the results that irradiation of antibiotics and then adding into growth medium was more effective compared with non-irradiated antibiotics bactericidal action. The selected antibiotics (tetracycline, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and ceftriaxone) were from different groups. Antibiotics irradiation was performed with low intensity 53 GHz frequency during 1 h. The E. coli growth properties—lag-phase duration and specific growth rate—were markedly changed. Enhanced bacterial sensitivity to irradiated antibiotics is similar to the effects of antibiotics of higher concentrations.

  6. A systematic study of acoustic emission from nuclear graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neighbour, G.B.; McEnaney, B.

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring has been identified as a possible method to determine internal stresses in nuclear graphites using the Kaiser effect, i.e., on stressing a graphite that has been subject to a prior stress, the onset of AE occurs at the previous peak stress. For three nuclear graphites (PGA, IM1-24 and VNEC), AE was monitored during both monotonic and cyclic loading to failure in tensile, compressive and flexural test modes. For unirradiated graphites, the Kaiser effect was not found in cyclic loading, but a Felicity effect was observed, i.e., the onset of AE occurred below the previously applied peak stress. The Felicity effect was attributed to time-dependent relaxation and recovery processes and was characterized using a new parameter, the Recovery ratio. It was shown that AE can be used to monitor creep strain and creep recovery in graphites at zero load. The AE-time responses from these experiments were fitted to equations similar to those used for creep strain-time at elevated temperatures. The number of AE counts from irradiated graphites were greater than those from unirradiated graphites, subject to similar stresses, due to increases in porosity caused by radiolytic oxidation. A Felicity effect was also observed on cyclic loading of irradiated graphites, but no evidence for a Kaiser effect was found for irradiated graphites loaded monotonically to failure. Thus internal stresses in irradiated graphites could not be measured using AE. This was attributed to relaxation and recovery processes that occur between removing the irradiated graphite from the reactor and AE testing. This work indicated that AE monitoring is not a suitable technique for measuring internal stresses in irradiated graphite. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  7. Growth rate of dislocation loop in Fe-Ni-Cr alloy under Kr+ ion and electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, T.; Allen, C.W.; Rehn, L.E.

    1991-10-01

    In order to examine the effect of irradiating particle species on the growth rate of radiation-induced dislocation loops, a solution-annealed Fe-25Ni-15Cr-0.02C alloy was irradiated at 723 K first by 1.5 MeV Kr + ions for 2520 sec, then by 1.5 MeV Kr + ions and 1.0 MeV electrons simultaneously for 780 sec, and finally by 1.0 MeV electrons for 780 sec with the HVEM-Tandem Facility in Argonne National Laboratory. The calculated damage rate by 1.5 MeV Kr + ions was 5.8 x 10 -4 dpa/s, and that by 1.0 MeV electrons was 1 x 10 -4 dpa/s. The growth rate of a dislocation loop located at the center of the specimen was 7 x 10 -3 nm/s for the Kr + ion irradiation, 4 x 10 -2 nm/s for the simultaneous Kr + and electron irradiation, and (2--3) x 10 -2 nm/s for the electron irradiation. This implies that the electron irradiation is about 19 times more effective in the growth of radiation-induced dislocation loops than the Kr + ion irradiation. The dislocation loop growth rate under the simultaneous Kr + and electron irradiation is higher than the sum of the growth rates under the individual Kr + and electron irradiations. 5 refs., 4 figs

  8. Process for purifying graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausius, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for purifying graphite comprising: comminuting graphite containing mineral matter to liberate at least a portion of the graphite particles from the mineral matter; mixing the comminuted graphite particles containing mineral matter with water and hydrocarbon oil to form a fluid slurry; separating a water phase containing mineral matter and a hydrocarbon oil phase containing grahite particles; and separating the graphite particles from the hydrocarbon oil to obtain graphite particles reduced in mineral matter. Depending upon the purity of the graphite desired, steps of the process can be repeated one or more times to provide a progressively purer graphite

  9. Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E. H. T.; Kalish, R.; Kulik, J.; Kauffmann, Y.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructured carbon films with oriented graphitic planes can be deposited by applying energetic carbon bombardment. The present work shows the possibility of structuring graphitic planes perpendicular to the substrate in following two distinct ways: (i) applying sufficiently large carbon energies for deposition at room temperature (E>10 keV), (ii) utilizing much lower energies for deposition at elevated substrate temperatures (T>200 deg. C). High resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to probe the graphitic planes. The alignment achieved at elevated temperatures does not depend on the deposition angle. The data provides insight into the mechanisms leading to the growth of oriented graphitic planes under different conditions.

  10. The growth of irradiated candida utilis in molasses media with and without nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andini, L.; Harsoyo; Siagian, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    The growth of irradiated candida utilis in molassea media with and without nitrogen. The experiment has been done to compare the growth of C.utilis on molasses media containing nitrogen and without nitrogen. The C.utilis irradiated with gamma rays from 60 Co (Gamma Cell 220) with different exposure i.e. 0,21, 43, 64, 85 and 106 Gy and then inoculated on 2% molasses medium with and without N, and incubated at 28 0 +- 2 0 C for 0 and 1 day. Parameters observed were the number of colony, the size of colony growth on 2% molasses medium with and without N. The results showed that the growth in media molasses with N was different from that without N. The incubation effect seemed to be a significant, while the effect of irradiation was not significant, which was probably due to the insufficient dose used for inducing stimulation. The interaction between the added Nand incubation was also significant. 13 refs

  11. Effects of combined action of temperature and irradiation on growth and crypt forming in fungi rhizopus nigricans and penicillium italicum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lezhneva, M.L.; Petrash, I.P.; Koval'skaya, L.P.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of incubation temperature on the vegetative growth and sporulation of non-irradiated and irradiated molds. The behavior of irradiated molds at various incubation temperatures was found to depend on their physiological condition. By combining irradiation with exposure to properly selected storage temperatures, the microbial damage to fruits may apparently be reduced, even in the case of fruits containing radioresistant fungi adapted to growth at low above-zero C temperatures. (E.T.)

  12. Microarray Cluster Analysis of Irradiated Growth Plate Zones Following Laser Microdissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damron, Timothy A.; Zhang Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Margulies, Bryan M.; Strauss, Judith A.; Farnum, Cornelia E.; Spadaro, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Genes and pathways involved in early growth plate chondrocyte recovery after fractionated irradiation were sought as potential targets for selective radiorecovery modulation. Materials and Methods: Three groups of six 5-week male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent fractionated irradiation to the right tibiae over 5 days, totaling 17.5 Gy, and then were killed at 7, 11, and 16 days after the first radiotherapy fraction. The growth plates were collected from the proximal tibiae bilaterally and subsequently underwent laser microdissection to separate reserve, perichondral, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones. Differential gene expression was analyzed between irradiated right and nonirradiated left tibia using RAE230 2.0 GeneChip microarray, compared between zones and time points and subjected to functional pathway cluster analysis with real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected results. Results: Each zone had a number of pathways showing enrichment after the pattern of hypothesized importance to growth plate recovery, yet few met the strictest criteria. The proliferative and hypertrophic zones showed both the greatest number of genes with a 10-fold right/left change at 7 days after initiation of irradiation and enrichment of the most functional pathways involved in bone, cartilage, matrix, or skeletal development. Six genes confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction to have early upregulation included insulin-like growth factor 2, procollagen type I alpha 2, matrix metallopeptidase 9, parathyroid hormone receptor 1, fibromodulin, and aggrecan 1. Conclusions: Nine overlapping pathways in the proliferative and hypertrophic zones (skeletal development, ossification, bone remodeling, cartilage development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part) may play key roles in early growth plate radiorecovery.

  13. Inhibition of microbial growth by spice extracts and their effect of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Meixu, G.

    1994-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of black pepper, rosemary and red pepper has been tested against 12 microorganisms. Alcoholic extracts of these spices were not exhibited strong activity against gram-negative bacteria in laboratory media. The growth of Bacillus subtilis and Clostridium botulinum type A was inhibited by 1% of black pepper, 0.5% rosemary and 0.03% red pepper. A little reduction of antimicrobial activity to B. subtilis was observed on extracts of gamma-irradiated black pepper or rosemary at 10 and 50 kGy. In the case of red pepper, irradiation of 10 or 50 kGy enhanced a little of antimicrobial activity to B. subtilis. Similar effect of irradiation was also observed on the inhibition of aflatoxin production by Aspergillus parasiticus in SL broth. (author)

  14. Interaction of neonatal irradiation and single-genes upon growth and behavior in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Postnatal growth and behavior following neonatal irradiation were studied in congenic strains of mice. Mice were genetically similar except for single-gene substitutions at either the steel or dominant spotting loci. Adult behavior was measured by locomotion and elimination in the open field and by spontaneous activity in exercise wheels. In general, neonatal irradiation caused a decrease in body weight, activity in exercise wheels, and elimination in the open field, but an increase in locomotion in the open field. Significant differences due to genotype and sex were observed for locomotion and body weight. Differential responses of the genotypes to neonatal irradiation were observed in body weight and in activity in exercise wheels. The genotypes, in order of increasing sensitivity, were +/+, Wsup(a)/+, and Slsup(gb)/+. (author)

  15. The Role of Gamma Irradiation on Growth and Some Metabolic Activities of Spirulina platensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, H.R.; El-Shaer, E.A.; Ismaiel, M.M.S.; Shabana, E.F.; Gabr, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina platensis cells were exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation 0.0; (control), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 Kilo Gray (kGy) using Co 60 as a gamma source at the Cyclotron Unit, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority. After which, the cells were cultivated on Zarrouk medium for 14 days (the exponential phase of growth). The optimum growth of Spirulina platensis was recorded at 2.0 kGy as compared to the control after the 14th day of incubation. All of the following analyses were done after 10 days of growth. The results of pigments analysis revealed that the chlorophyll a and carotenoid contents of Spirulina platensis were reached their maximum rate at a dose of 2.0 kGy, Which induces the same trend for phycobiliproteins fractions. The photosynthetic activity and total carbohydrate content of the irradiated Spirulina cells increased with elevating the doses of gamma irradiation and reached a maximum value at a dose of 2.0 kGy as compared to the control. The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) was increased up to irradiation dose of 2.0 kGy. whereas, the maximum activity of the phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (PEPCASE) was recorded at the irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy Spirulina platensis cells were exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation 0.0; (control), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 Kilo Gray (kGy) using Co 60 as a gamma source at the Cyclotron Unit, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority. After which, the cells were cultivated on Zarrouk medium for 14 days (the exponential phase of growth). The optimum growth of Spirulina platensis was recorded at 2.0 kGy as compared to the control after the 14th day of incubation. All of the following analyses were done after 10 days of growth. The results of pigments analysis revealed that the chlorophyll a and carotenoid contents of Spirulina platensis were reached their maximum rate at a dose of 2.0 kGy, Which induces the same

  16. Heat Transfer During Evaporation of Cesium From Graphite Surface in an Argon Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespala Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on discussion of problem of graphite radioactive waste formation and accumulation. It is shown that irradiated nuclear graphite being inalienable part of uranium-graphite reactor may contain fission and activation products. Much attention is given to the process of formation of radioactive cesium on the graphite element surface. It is described a process of plasma decontamination of irradiated graphite in inert argon atmosphere. Quasi-one mathematical model is offered, it describes heat transfer process in graphite-cesium-argon system. Article shows results of calculation of temperature field inside the unit cell. Authors determined the factors which influence on temperature change.

  17. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayasse, J.-B.

    1977-01-01

    The graphite elastic constants C 33 and C 44 , reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated [fr

  18. Effect of impurities on the growth of {113} interstitial clusters in silicon under electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, K.; Hamada, K.; Satoh, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2011-01-01

    The growth and shrinkage of interstitial clusters on {113} planes were investigated in electron irradiated Czochralski grown silicon (Cz-Si), floating-zone silicon (Fz-Si), and impurity-doped Fz-Si (HT-Fz-Si) using a high voltage electron microscope. In Fz-Si, {113} interstitial clusters were formed only near the beam incident surface after a long incubation period, and shrank on subsequent irradiation from the backside of the specimen. In Cz-Si and HT-Fz-Si, {113} interstitial clusters nucleated uniformly throughout the specimen without incubation, and began to shrink under prolonged irradiation at higher electron beam intensity. At lower beam intensity, however, the {113} interstitial cluster grew stably. These results demonstrate that the {113} interstitial cluster cannot grow without a continuous supply of impurities during electron irradiation. Detailed kinetics of {113} interstitial cluster growth and shrinkage in silicon, including the effects of impurities, are proposed. Then, experimental results are analyzed using rate equations based on these kinetics.

  19. Inactivation of the Escherichia coli chromosome during growth after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medic-Petranovic, M.; Trgovcevic, Z.; Novak, D.; Petranovic, D.

    1977-01-01

    Cells of the repair-proficient E.coli AB1157 strain and its lysogenic E.coli AB1157 (lambda c1857 ind) counterpart have been UV irradiated in an attempt to define when and why cells that are destined to die reach their biological end-point in the course of post-irradiation incubation. The thermo-inducibility of the lambdac1857 ind lysogens was first determined, since this reflects the functional integrity of the pro-viral part of the bacterial chromosome and that of the bacterial cytoplasm. The capacity (i.e. the ability of the irradiated cells to support growth of the unirradiated phage) was then determined, since this depends on the functional integrity of the bacterial cytoplasm. A progressive decrease in the ability of the lysogens to be heat-induced always preceded the decrease in capacity for the phage growth. The results strongly suggest that wild-type E.coli cells destined to die after exposure to moderate doses of UV-light reach their end point within 4 hours of post-irradiation incubation, probably as a result of the functional failure of the whole chromosome. (U.K.)

  20. Inactivation of the Escherichia coli chromosome during growth after ultraviolet irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medic-Petranovic, M; Trgovcevic, Z; Novak, D; Petranovic, D [Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1977-07-01

    Cells of the repair-proficient E.coli AB1157 strain and its lysogenic E.coli AB1157 (lambda c1857 ind) counterpart have been uv irradiated in an attempt to define when and why cells that are destined to die reach their biological end-point in the course of post-irradiation incubation. The thermo-inducibility of the lambdac1857 ind lysogens was first determined, since this reflects the functional integrity of the pro-viral part of the bacterial chromosome and that of the bacterial cytoplasm. The capacity (i.e. the ability of the irradiated cells to support growth of the unirradiated phage) was then determined, since this depends on the functional integrity of the bacterial cytoplasm. A progressive decrease in the ability of the lysogens to be heat-induced always preceded the decrease in capacity for the phage growth. The results strongly suggest that wild-type E.coli cells destined to die after exposure to moderate doses of uv-light reach their end point within 4 hours of post-irradiation incubation, probably as a result of the functional failure of the whole chromosome.

  1. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  2. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells

  3. Evaluation of neutron irradiation effect on SCC crack growth behaviour for austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used as structural components in reactor pressure vessel internals because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation results in changes in microstructure, mechanical properties and microchemistry of the steels. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) caused by the effect of neutron irradiation during long term plant operation in high temperature water environments is considered to take the form of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the critical fluence level has been reported to be about 5x10{sup 24}n/m{sup 2} (E>1MeV) in Type 304 stainless steel in BWR environment. JNES had been conducting IASCC project during the JFY (2000) - JFY (2008) period, and prepared an engineering database on IASCC. However, the data of Crack Growth Rate (CGR) below the critical fluence level are not sufficient. So, this project was initiated to obtain the CGR data below the critical fluence level. Test specimens have been irradiated in the Halden reactor, operating by the OECD Halden Reactor Project, and the post irradiation examination (PIE) will be conducted from JFY (2011) to JFY (2013), finally the modified IASCC guide will be prepared in JFY (2013). (author)

  4. A novel variant of growth hormone (GH) insufficiency following low dose cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowne, E.C.; Moore, C.; Wallace, W.H.B.; Ogilvy-Stuart, A.L.; Addison, G.M.; Morris-Jones, P.H.; Shalet, S.M. (Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom) Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of low dose (1800 cGy) prophylactic cranial irradiation on physiological growth hormone secretion. Forty-four children were studied, of whom 21 were long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and 23 were normal children. In the normal children, there was a significant increase in the median (range) area under the curve (AUC) of the GH profile between the prepubertal and pubertal groups. There was also a change in the spectral analysis through puberty. The dominant frequencies were spread widely in the prepubertal and post-pubertal groups but sharply focused in the pubertal group. In the cranially irradiated children there was no significant increase in AUC between the prepubertal and pubertal groups. The wide range of dominant frequencies persisted in the pubertal cranially irradiated group due to the presence of additional high frequency pulses. The impression of a disturbance of the periodicity of GH secretion in the cranially irradiated pubertal group was further supported by the finding that the autocorrelation function in this group alone was not significantly different from that which would arise from random data. A novel form of GH insufficiency has been observed after low dose irradiation in childhood in which an abnormality of periodicity and a quantitative reduction in GH secretion appears restricted to puberty. (author).

  5. Irradiation effects for the growth inhibition of weed seeds invaded from foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatani, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Weeds of foreign origin have been invaded through imported maize or dried grass which using for animal feeds, and causing serious damages to agricultural crops and farm animals in Japan. These weeds are spreading mainly through animal feeds to feces. For the purpose to decrease the damage from these weeds, we investigated the gamma-irradiation effect on 7 species of the weed seed to suppress the germination or elongation of stem and root. After the irradiation of the weed seeds, all species kept the ability of germination even at 4 kGy in petri dish cultivation, whereas decreased the germination ratio in some species. However, many species of weed decreased the ability on elongation of stem or root below l kGy irradiation. Furthermore, all of species lost the ability on the development of root hair and appearance of first leaf after germination of seeds below 1 kGy irradiation. From this study, necessary dose for growth inhibition was estimated to be 1 kGy which should be able to apply with combination treatment of the animal feeds for elimination of pathogenic bacteria such as salmonellae at 3 to 5 kGy irradiation. (author)

  6. Effects of 60Co γ-rays irradiation on germination and seedling growth of Hibiscus syriacus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiufen; Wu Fulan; Zhang Deshun; Meng Zhennong; Cao Jiyun

    2009-01-01

    The seeds of Hibiscus syria cus were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays at dose rate of 50 ∼ 500Gy/h for 0.5 and 1h, the seed germination rate and the seedling growth characters were surveyed. The results indicated that the seed germination was promoted when the absorbed dose was below 200Gy, and the seedling survival rate was increased when the dose was below 100Gy. The germination was inhibited, leaves and secondary roots were difficult to form, and the seedlings blasting occurred when the dose was over 200Gy. The dose rate affects the irradiation results. Absorbed dosed of 50 ∼ 100Gy were suggested for increasing seedling growth rate and 100 ∼ 200Gy were recommend for mutagenesis. (authors)

  7. Fission gas release and grain growth in THO2-UO2 fuel irradiated at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, I.; Waldman, L.A.; Giovengo, J.F.; Campbell, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on fission gas release and grain growth in ThO 2 -UO 2 fuels irradiated as part of the LWBR fuel element development program. These data for rods that experienced peak linear power outputs ranging from 15 to 22 KW/ft supplement fission gas release data previously reported for 51 rods containing ThO 2 and ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel irradiated at peak linear powers predominantly below 14 KW/ft. Fission gas release was relatively high (up to 15.0 percent) for the rods operated at high power in contrast to the relatively low fission gas release (0.1 to 5.2 percent) measured for the rods operated at lower power. Metallographic examination revealed extensive equiaxed grain growth in the fuel at the high power axial locations of the three rods

  8. In vitro growth, phytochemical content, and antioxidant activity of gamma irradiated Tacca (Tacca leontopetaloides) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betalini Widhi Hapsari; Andri Fadillah Martin; Tri Muji Ermayanti

    2016-01-01

    Tacca leontopetaloides (L.) Kuntze is tuberous plant belongs to family Taccaceae. Tacca plant has a potential as the source of natural antioxidant. Radiation with Gamma radiation done either by in vitro or ex vitro plants is often used to increase chemical content of plants including antioxidant. The purpose of this study was to determine growth and phytochemical content and as well as the antioxidant activity of gamma irradiated tacca plant. Phytochemical analysis was done to detect alkaloids, flavonoids, steroid, tannin and saponin compounds, meanwhile, antioxidant activity was carried by DPPH analysis. The results showed that gamma irradiated tacca plant had lower growth compared to the control. Phytochemical analysis showed that tacca plant contains an alkaloid, flavonoid, and steroid. The highest antioxidant activity was obtained from tacca clone number 30 Gy 3.1.3.1 with an IC_5_0 value of 50.85 μg/mL. (author)

  9. Effects of gamma ray irradiation on early growth of soybean (Glycine mac (L). Merrill)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilik Harsanti; Yulidar

    2015-01-01

    Increase my in domestic soybean production is one of the government's program to reduce dependence on imported soybeans and soybean efforts to achieve self-sufficiency in 2015. An experiment has been conducted to study the effects of gamma ray irradiation of of 60 Cobalt on early growth of soybean seed. Variety Denna 2 varieties have been irradiated by gamma rays with 0 Gy, 200 Gy, 300 Gy, 400 Gy doses, and then planted in green house on Ps Jumat PAIR-BATAN. Plant growth from each doses is proved to be varied. From germination viability on the third day, the highest percentage of seedling with leaves is on 100 Gy dose (73.75%), and 7, 14 and 21 day the lowest is on dose 400 Gy. (author)

  10. The effect of abnormal growth during irradiation and radiosensitivity of Gracilaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovskij, Yu.A.; Kulepanov, V.N.; Lesnikova, L.N.; Polishchuk, R.F.; Yadykin, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    γ-Irradiation of Gracilaria with doses of 0.25 to 7.5 kGy at a dose-rate of 8.36 Gy/min increased its linear dimensions and biomass during exposure. The effect was associated with the enhanced mitotic activity. The effect increased with radiation dose and depended on the stage of the life cycle and the rate of growth before irradiation. With postirradiation cultivation, 100 per cent death of exposed Gracilaria was registered at a dose of 7.5 kGy, partial death and destruction of thallus, at a dose of 5 kGy, and merely a stop of growth, at a dose of 2.5 kGy

  11. Graphite crystals grown within electromagnetically levitated metallic droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amini, Shaahin; Kalaantari, Haamun; Mojgani, Sasan; Abbaschian, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Various graphite morphologies were observed to grow within the electromagnetically levitated nickel–carbon melts, including primary flakes and spheres, curved surface graphite and eutectic flakes, as well as engulfed and entrapped particles. As the supersaturated metallic solutions were cooled within the electromagnetic (EM) levitation coil, the primary graphite flakes and spheres formed and accumulated near the periphery of the droplet due to EM circulation. The primary graphite islands, moreover, nucleated and grew on the droplet surface which eventually formed a macroscopic curved graphite crystal covering the entire liquid. Upon further cooling, the liquid surrounding the primary graphite went under a coupled eutectic reaction while the liquid in the center formed a divorced eutectic due to EM mixing. This brought about the formation of graphite fine flakes and agglomerated particles close to the surface and in the center of the droplet, respectively. The graphite morphologies, growth mechanisms, defects, irregularities and growth instabilities were interpreted with detailed optical and scanning electron microscopies.

  12. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response

  13. The Impact of Alkaliphilic Biofilm Formation on the Release and Retention of Carbon Isotopes from Nuclear Reactor Graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, S P; Payne, L; Walker, S; Scott, T; Heard, P; Eccles, H; Bond, G; Shah, P; Bills, P; Jackson, B R; Boxall, S A; Laws, A P; Charles, C; Williams, S J; Humphreys, P N

    2018-03-13

    14 C is an important consideration within safety assessments for proposed geological disposal facilities for radioactive wastes, since it is capable of re-entering the biosphere through the generation of 14 C bearing gases. The irradiation of graphite moderators in the UK gas-cooled nuclear power stations has led to the generation of a significant volume of 14 C-containing intermediate level wastes. Some of this 14 C is present as a carbonaceous deposit on channel wall surfaces. Within this study, the potential of biofilm growth upon irradiated and 13 C doped graphite at alkaline pH was investigated. Complex biofilms were established on both active and simulant samples. High throughput sequencing showed the biofilms to be dominated by Alcaligenes sp at pH 9.5 and Dietzia sp at pH 11.0. Surface characterisation revealed that the biofilms were limited to growth upon the graphite surface with no penetration of the deeper porosity. Biofilm formation resulted in the generation of a low porosity surface layer without the removal or modification of the surface deposits or the release of the associated 14 C/ 13 C. Our results indicated that biofilm formation upon irradiated graphite is likely to occur at the pH values studied, without any additional release of the associated 14 C.

  14. Effect of neutron irradiation on hatching rate of eggs and growth rate of chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yubin; Zhao Jide; Liu Shengdian; Xy Xiuwei

    1995-01-01

    It was proved through 3 years of experiments and productions that after the eggs of AA meat chickens being irradiated by 14 MeV fast neutron, the hatching rate and the survival rate as well the weight of commercial chickens increased greatly. In addition it is found that the optimum neutron fluence for hatching and growth rate is 6.2 x 10 5 n·cm -2

  15. The Behaviour of Various Graphites under Neutron Irradiation; Comportement de divers graphites sous l'effet de l'irradiation neutronique; ПОВЕДЕНИЕ РАЗЛИЧНЫХ ГРАФИТОВ ПОД ДЕЙСТВИЕМ НЕЙТРОННОГО ОБЛУЧЕНИЯ; Efectos de la irradiación neutrónica sobre diversos tipos de grafitos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzer, E.; Vohler, O. [Siemens-Planiawerke AG für Kohlefabrikate, Meitingen bei Augsburg, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1963-08-15

    The change of graphite properties under neutron irradiation, which is quite important for reactor designers, has been investigated closely for several years, and results have been reported in detail by several authors. The goal of these irradiation experiments was the quantitative determination of property changes as a function of irradiation dose and temperature. The concern of our own irradiation programme, which is sponsored by the Ministry of Atomic Affairs of the Federal Republic of Germany, was to study the behaviour of a wide range of reactor-grade graphites under controlled irradiation conditions. In the first part of the paper, radiation damage as a function of different types of artificial graphite is dealt with. The graphite types differed only by their degree of crystalline order, even though they were produced under the same graphitizing conditions. The differences are caused by the different graphitizabilities of the raw materials. The dependence oí the radiation damage on the graphite type seems to be of fundamental importance for the development of reactor-grade graphites with respect to various applications. Within one group the physical properties are changed in different ways for different graphite types. The differences of the unirradiated samples remain largely unchanged or are even more pronounced after irradiation. Mechanical properties, such as strength, Young's Modulus and thermal expansion, fall into this group. The well-known Wigner growth of various graphites under irradiation was studied systematically. Furthermore, such properties are reported which are levelled out to a final value under the same irradiation conditions even when the raw materials are different. This is true for the thermal and electrical conductivity, the magnetic susceptibility and to some extent for the lattice dimensions of the graphites. Finally, the effect of irradiation on the pore distribution of the various graphites is discussed. The second section ol the

  16. The effect of γ-ray irradiation on growth and flowering of narcissus plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Hua

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 60 Co γ-ray on growth and flowering of water-planted narcissus bulb was investigated in this paper. The results showed that 20-60 Gy irradiation could obviously reduce the increment of weight of narcissus plant and inhibited the elongation growth of narcissus's roots and leaves, harmed the vascular bundle cells in leaves. But, the roots' diameter, leaves' breadth and thickness were very little influenced. The life-span of single flower was prolonged, first bloom time was delayed and the chlorophyll content in leaves was increased by 20 and 40 Gy treatment, which could fit the commodity treatment of narcissus bulb. (authors)

  17. INTRACELLULAR COPPER ACCUMULATION ENHANCES THE GROWTH OF KINEOCOCCUS RADIOTOLERANS DURING CHRONIC IRRADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagwell, C; Charles Milliken, C

    2007-01-01

    The actinobacteria Kineococcus radiotolerans is highly resistant to ionizing radiation, desiccation, and oxidative stress; though the underlying biochemical mechanisms are unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore a possible linkage between the uptake of transition metals and extreme resistance to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress. The effects of 6 different divalent cationic metals on growth were examined in the absence of ionizing radiation. None of the metals tested were stimulatory, though cobalt was inhibitory to growth. In contrast, copper supplementation dramatically increased cell growth during chronic irradiation. K. radiotolerans exhibited specific uptake and intracellular accumulation of copper compared to only a weak response to both iron and manganese supplementation. Copper accumulation sensitized cells to hydrogen peroxide. Acute irradiation induced DNA damage was similar between the copper-loaded culture as the age-synchronized no copper control culture, though low molecular weight DNA was more persistent during post-irradiation recovery in the Cu-loaded culture. Still, the estimated times for genome restoration differed by only 1 hr between treatments. While we cannot discount the possibility that copper fulfills an unexpectedly important biochemical role in a radioactive environment; K. radiotolerans has a high capacity for intracellular copper sequestration, and presumably efficiently coordinated oxidative stress defenses and detoxification systems, which confers cross-protection from the damaging affects ionizing radiation

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor: an independent predictor of survival in astrocytic tumors given definitive irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Zhu; Shaeffer, James; Leslie, Susan; Kolm, Paul; El-Mahdi, Anas M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein was predictive of patient survival independently of other prognostic factors in astrocytic tumors. Methods and Materials: Epidermal growth factor receptor protein expression was investigated immunohistochemically in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of 55 glioblastoma multiforme, 14 anaplastic astrocytoma, and 2 astrocytomas given definitive irradiation. We evaluated the relationship of EGFR protein expression and tumor grade, histologic features, age at diagnosis, sex, patient survival, and recurrence-free survival. Results: The percentage of tumor cells which were EGFR positive related to reduced survival by Cox regression analysis in both univariate (p = 0.0424) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.0016). Epidermal growth factor receptor positivity was the only 1 of 11 clinical and histological variables associated with decreased recurrence-free survival by either univariate (p = 0.0353) or multivariate (p = 0.0182) analysis. Epidermal growth factor receptor protein expression was not related to patient age, sex, or histologic features. Conclusion: Epidermal growth factor receptor positivity was a significant and independent prognostic indicator for overall survival and recurrence-free survival for irradiated patients with astrocytic gliomas

  19. Damaging process of graphite - new model and its impact on degradation of materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Muto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The most widely accepted model for development of defect structure in neutron irradiated graphite has been such that following the first production of a pair of an interstitial and vacancy, di-interstitials and vacancies are formed and their subsequent growth would result in the production of an interstitial plane or loop in-between the basal planes and vacancy clusters, respectively, which could cause the loss of thermal conductivity and dimensional change. Recently we have claimed that the formation of vacancy clusters and growth of the interstitial planes are not necessarily a unique interpretation of the damaging process. Instead, the damaging process is described by orientational disordering within the basal planes, i.e. fragmentation into small crystallites and rotation of their crystalline axes, change of stacking order and elongation of the interplanar spacing. The orientational disordering within the basal planes proceeds coordinately over a few layers with their layered correlation maintained. This process accompanies changes in bonding nature producing 5 member- and 7 member-atomic rings as appeared in fullerenes. This is so to speak ''self-restoring or reconstruction'' to maintain resonance bonds as strict as possible without the formation of dangling bonds. This paper reviews irradiation effects in graphite such as increase of hydrogen retention, loss of thermal conductivity and dimensional change on the bases of our new model, taking account of the changes of the bonding nature in irradiated graphite. (orig.)

  20. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Ling; Shinohara, Eric T.; Kim, Dong; Tan Jiahuai; Osusky, Kate; Shyr, Yu; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 μmol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α and β. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR β antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM was significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival

  1. The effect of gamma irradiation on chitosan and its application as a plant growth promoter in Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Mohd Hafez Mohd; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Hasan, Abu Bakar; Fadilah, Nur Izzah Md; Hassan, Abdul Rahman

    2016-01-01

    This research project was conducted to study the effects of irradiation on chitosan and its potential application as a plant growth promoter. Chitosan in the form of flakes was irradiated with gamma rays at irradiation dosage of 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 200 kGy and 400 kGy. The effect of irradiation on chitosan in terms of intrinsic viscosity and average molecular weight was measured using Ubbelohde capillary viscometry technique and the results obtained showed irradiation at doses of up to 50 kGy had caused an extremely significant reduction of both parameters and this trend continued at higher irradiation doses, although the decrease were not significant. The effect of various concentrations of chitosan and irradiated chitosan on growth promotion of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra) was hydroponically grown and cultivated for 50 days. Statistical analysis showed addition of 10 ppm of irradiated chitosan of 200 kGy and 400 kGy, respectively, resulted in an extremely significant increase in the percentage weight gain of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra). Results obtained in this study showed the potential use of irradiated chitosan as a plant growth promoter for plants grown hydroponically.

  2. The effect of gamma irradiation on chitosan and its application as a plant growth promoter in Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa, Mohd Hafez Mohd; Hasan, Abu Bakar; Fadilah, Nur Izzah Md; Hassan, Abdul Rahman; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi

    2016-01-01

    This research project was conducted to study the effects of irradiation on chitosan and its potential application as a plant growth promoter. Chitosan in the form of flakes was irradiated with gamma rays at irradiation dosage of 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 200 kGy and 400 kGy. The effect of irradiation on chitosan in terms of intrinsic viscosity and average molecular weight was measured using Ubbelohde capillary viscometry technique and the results obtained showed irradiation at doses of up to 50 kGy had caused an extremely significant reduction of both parameters and this trend continued at higher irradiation doses, although the decrease were not significant. The effect of various concentrations of chitosan and irradiated chitosan on growth promotion of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra) was hydroponically grown and cultivated for 50 days. Statistical analysis showed addition of 10 ppm of irradiated chitosan of 200 kGy and 400 kGy, respectively, resulted in an extremely significant increase in the percentage weight gain of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra). Results obtained in this study showed the potential use of irradiated chitosan as a plant growth promoter for plants grown hydroponically

  3. The effect of gamma irradiation on chitosan and its application as a plant growth promoter in Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isa, Mohd Hafez Mohd, E-mail: m.hafez@usim.edu.my; Hasan, Abu Bakar; Fadilah, Nur Izzah Md; Hassan, Abdul Rahman [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia, Bandar Baru Nilai, 71800 Nilai, Negeri Sembilan (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This research project was conducted to study the effects of irradiation on chitosan and its potential application as a plant growth promoter. Chitosan in the form of flakes was irradiated with gamma rays at irradiation dosage of 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 200 kGy and 400 kGy. The effect of irradiation on chitosan in terms of intrinsic viscosity and average molecular weight was measured using Ubbelohde capillary viscometry technique and the results obtained showed irradiation at doses of up to 50 kGy had caused an extremely significant reduction of both parameters and this trend continued at higher irradiation doses, although the decrease were not significant. The effect of various concentrations of chitosan and irradiated chitosan on growth promotion of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra) was hydroponically grown and cultivated for 50 days. Statistical analysis showed addition of 10 ppm of irradiated chitosan of 200 kGy and 400 kGy, respectively, resulted in an extremely significant increase in the percentage weight gain of Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra). Results obtained in this study showed the potential use of irradiated chitosan as a plant growth promoter for plants grown hydroponically.

  4. EFFECT OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF SAGO PALM (Metroxylon sagu Rottb. CALLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imron Riyadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of gamma irradiation on plant materials may increase the genetic variation of the offspring with useful traits. The experiment was conducted to determine the effect of irradiation dosage of gamma ray on growth and development of sago palm (Metroxylon sagu calli. Friable calli of sago palm derived from suspension culture were used as a material source. The primary calli were initiated from apical meristematic tissues of sago palm suckers of Alitir variety from Merauke, Papua. The treatments used were dosage of gamma ray irradiation at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy. The treated calli were then subcultured on modified Murashige and Skoog (MMS solid medium containing 3% sucrose and 0.1% activated charcoal and added with 1 mg l-1 2,4-D and 0.1 mg l-1 kinetin. The results showed that at all irradiation dosages, calli biomass increased significantly. The highest proliferation of calli biomass of 5.33 folds from the initial culture after 4 weeks was achieved at gamma irradiation of 25 Gy, whereas the lowest proliferation of calli biomass of 3.4 folds was achieved at control. The best development of embryogenic calli was obtained at 10 Gy that produced 100% somatic embryos, whereas the lowest somatic embryo formation at 0% was obtained at 0 and 25 Gy after one subculture. High response of somatic embryo induction to gamma irradiation at 10 Gy may increase production of somatic embryos. These results can be used in in vitro breeding of sago palm via mutagenesis to create new elite varieties.

  5. Delayed Growth Suppression and Radioresistance Induced by Long-Term Continuous Gamma Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Furukawa, Chiharu; Chang, Young-Chae; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2017-08-01

    Biological response to ionizing radiation depends not only on the type of radiation and dose, but also on the duration and dose rate of treatment. For a given radiation dose, the biological response may differ based on duration and dose rate. We studied the properties of two human cell lines, M059K glioma and U2OS osteosarcoma, continuously exposed to γ rays for long time periods of more than five months. Growth inhibition in both cell lines was dependent on total dose when exposed to acute radiation over several minutes, whereas prolonged growth inhibition was dependent on dose rate after continuous irradiation over several months. The minimum dose rate for growth inhibition was 53.6 mGy/h. Cell cycle analysis showed G 1 phase accumulation in cell populations continuously exposed to γ rays, and G 2 phase accumulation in cells acutely exposed to high-dose-rate γ rays. Cells continuously exposed to γ rays continued to exhibit delayed growth suppression even after one month in an environment of background radiation, and maintained a high-level expression of c-Jun and its phosphorylation forms, as well as resistance to apoptosis induced by staurosporine and chemotherapeutic agents. These delayed effects were not observed in cells acutely exposed to 5 Gy of radiation. These results suggest that optimization of the irradiation schedule is crucial for risk estimation, protection and therapeutic utilization of ionizing radiation.

  6. Chemical atomization of graphite by H+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busharov, I.P.; Gorbatov, E.A.; Gusev, V.M.; Guseva, M.I.; Martynenko, Yu.V.

    A simple model of the mechanism of chemical atomization is given, on whose basis a decrease in chemical atomization is qualitatively predicted for high temperatures. Mass spectrometric investigations of the atomization products cited, which found CH 4 and CH 3 molecules during the irradiation of graphite and H + ions thereby confirmed the presence of chemical atomization. A relationship of S and temperature of graphite T during irradiation was obtained which showed a decrease in the coefficient of atomization of a high temperature. (U.S.)

  7. Graphite target for the spiral project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J.; Loiselet, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author)

  8. Impermeable Graphite: A New Development for Embedding Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fachinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Irradiated graphite has to be handled as radioactive waste after the operational period of the reactor. However, the waste management of irradiated graphite e.g. from the Spanish Vandellos reactor shows, that waste management of even low contaminated graphite could be expensive and requires special retrieval, treatment and disposal technologies for safe long term storage as low or medium radioactive waste. FNAG has developed an impermeable graphite matrix (IGM) as nuclear waste embedding material. This IGM provides a long term stable enclosure of radioactive waste and can reuse irradiated graphite as feedstock material. Therefore, no additional disposal volume is required if e.g. concrete waste packages were replaced by IGM waste packages. The variability of IGM as embedding has been summarized in the following paper usable for metal scraps, ion exchange resins or debris from buildings. Furthermore the main physical, chemical and structural properties are described. (author)

  9. Whiskers growth and self-healing in Ti-based metallic glasses during ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Hu, Zheng; Zhao, Ziqiang; Wei, Bingchen; Li, Yansen; Wei, Yuhang

    2018-04-01

    Ti-based metallic glasses were subjected to a 20 MeV Cl4+ ion radiation under liquid-nitrogen cooling. Their responses, as well as effects of the electronic excitation and nucleus-nucleus collision were evaluated. The collision cascade during irradiation typically changes the structure by increasing the liquid-like zone/cluster, or the content of the free volume. However, along the ion incident depth, the structure change is inhomogeneous. Numerous whiskers appear and aggregate on the side of the irradiation surface, which are several micrometers away from the edge. This corresponds with the maximum collision depth obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation, where nuclear loss plays a dominant role. Moreover, the liquid-like zone continually forms, which add to the whiskers growth and subsequent self-healing. Results suggest that the irradiation-induced local shear stress combines with the well-localized liquid-like zone results in the observed phenomena. This study demonstrates that metallic glasses have high morphological instability under ion irradiation, which assets can pave new paths for their further applications.

  10. Irradiation control of pathogenic bacteria and their growth during storage in short neckde clam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Hua; Wang Feng; Ha Yiming; Liu Shuliang

    2009-01-01

    The growth of pathogenic bacteria during storage and their D 10 values by irradiation in short necked clam were evaluated. The results showed that the D 10 values of the total bacteria count, E. coli, Vibrio parahaemolyticus in short necked clam at 0 degree C ∼ 4 degree C condition were 0.70, 0.56, 0.20kGy, respectively. The results showed that total bacteria count in vacuum packaged short necked clam sample was 4.46 log (CFU/g) after 3kGy 60 Co γ-irradiation and 28 days stored under 0 degree C ∼ 4 degree C, which could meet the requirement of related aquatic product standards, the E. coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus would not detected after 0.4kGy irradiation and 7 days storage at 0 degree C ∼ 4 degree C. Therefore, micro-organisms could be controled effectively by 3 kGy irradiation and its shelf-life could extend to 28 days. (authors)

  11. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under 60 Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10 2 cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10 6 cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H 2 O 2 . H 2 O 2 addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H 2 O 2

  12. Effects of irradiated Ergosan on the growth performance and mucus biological components of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhzadeh, Najmeh; Chehrara, Fatemeh; Heidarieh, Marzieh; Nofouzi, Katayoon; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Effects of irradiated and non-irradiated Ergosan extract (alginic acid) on rainbow trout growth performance and skin mucosal immunity were compared. Ergosan was irradiated at 30 kGy in a cobalt-60 irradiator. A total of 252 fish (128.03±9.4 g) were randomly divided into four equal groups, given the basal diet either unsupplemented with Ergosan (control group) or supplemented with crude Ergosan (5 g/kg), ethanol-extracted Ergosan (0.33 g/kg) or irradiated Ergosan (0.33 g/kg) according to this protocol: basal diet for 15 days, treatment diet for 15 days, basal diet for 10 days and treatment diet for 15 days. Highest growth performance was observed in fish fed irradiated Ergosan ( P <0.05). Dietary administration of different Ergosan types did not cause any changes in mucus protein level, but improved alkaline phosphatase level and hemagglutination titer compared with the control (basal diet without Ergosan) on day 55 of feeding trial ( P <0.05). Furthermore, the highest value of lysozyme activity was observed in gamma-irradiated Ergosan on day 55. In conclusion, gamma-irradiated Ergosan at 0.33 g/kg was found to improve growth performance and mucus biological components significantly in comparison with the control group (basal diet without Ergosan).

  13. Sensitivity of root-knot nematodes to gamma irradiation, salinity and plant growth regulator, cycocel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweelam, M E [Econ. Entomology Dept., Fac. Agric. Menoufia University Shebin El-Kom, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The experiment was carried out at the experimental station of the faculty of agriculture, Menoufia Univ. To determine the sensitivity of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne Javanica infecting tomato plants exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation 0,20,40,60,80 Gy, salinity levels 0. 1000, 2000, 4000 ppm and the plant growth regulator cycocel 0,200 ppm. Treated seeds were planted clay pots and salinity levels and cycocel concentrations were applied. Fresh weights and nematode populations were computed 3 months after application. Results indicated that 20 Gy, 1000 ppm salinity and cycocel gave the highest fresh weight of shoots and roots. The developmental stages and egg-laying females of nematode decreased by the increasing of irradiation dose and salinity levels. Root-knot galls decreased with 40 and 60 Gy, while significant increase was observed with 0 and 80 Gy, salinity levels decreased root galls. Cycocel decreased nematode population, egg-lying females and root-knot galls.

  14. Sensitivity of root-knot nematodes to gamma irradiation, salinity and plant growth regulator, cycocel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweelam, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The experiment was carried out at the experimental station of the faculty of agriculture, Menoufia Univ. To determine the sensitivity of root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne Javanica infecting tomato plants exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation 0,20,40,60,80 Gy, salinity levels 0. 1000, 2000, 4000 ppm and the plant growth regulator cycocel 0,200 ppm. Treated seeds were planted clay pots and salinity levels and cycocel concentrations were applied. Fresh weights and nematode populations were computed 3 months after application. Results indicated that 20 Gy, 1000 ppm salinity and cycocel gave the highest fresh weight of shoots and roots. The developmental stages and egg-laying females of nematode decreased by the increasing of irradiation dose and salinity levels. Root-knot galls decreased with 40 and 60 Gy, while significant increase was observed with 0 and 80 Gy, salinity levels decreased root galls. Cycocel decreased nematode population, egg-lying females and root-knot galls

  15. Evolution of growth hormone neurosecretory disturbance after cranial irradiation for childhood brain tumours: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoudeas, H.A.; Hindmarsh, P.C.; Brook, C.G.D.; Matthews, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    To determine the aetiopathology of post-irradiation growth hormone (GH) deficiency, we performed a mixed longitudinal analysis of 56 24 h serum GH concentration profiles and 45 paired insulin-induced hypoglycaemia tests (ITT) in 35 prepubertal children, aged 1.5-11.8 years, with brain tumours in the posterior foss (n = 25) or cerebral hemispheres (n 10). Assessments were made before (n = 16), 1 year (n = 25) and 2 to 5 years (n = 15) after a cranial irradiation (DXR) dose of at least 30 Gy. Fourier transforms, occupancy percentage, first-order derivatives (FOD) and mean concentrations were determined from the GH profiles taken after neurosurgery but before radiotherapy (n = 16) and in three treatment groups: Group 1: neurosurgery only without DXR 9n 9); Group 2: ≥ 30 Gy DXR only (n = 22); Group 3: ≥ 30 Gy DXR with additional chemotherapy (n = 9). Results were compared with those from 26 short normally growing (SN) children. (author)

  16. Effect of gamma-irradiated sludge on the growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L. var. GR-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, G.A.; Prakash, L.; Devasia, Preston; Modi, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of gamma-irradiated sludge on the growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L. var. GR-3) in pot cultures have been studied. Compared to plants grown only in soil, shoot length, root length, fresh weight, dry weight, total proteins, total soluble sugars, starch and chlorophyll content of plants grown in soil supplemented with unirradiated or gamma-irradiated sludge were found to be significantly increased. Irradiation of sludge significantly stimulated the linear growth of shoot and root systems as well as fresh and dry weights of plants, compared to those grown in soil containing unirradiated sludge. There was also an improvement in the grain yield (weight of seed) when plants were grown in soil supplemented with irradiated sludge. The results obtained suggest that the gamma-irradiated sewage sludge can be beneficially recycled for agricultural uses. (author)

  17. Effect of graphite reflector on activation of fusion breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young-Ouk; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon; Ahn, Mu-Young

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphite reflector concept has been applied in the design of the Korea HCCR TBM for ITER and this concept is also a candidate design option for Korea Demo. • In the graphite reflector, C-14, B-11 and Be-10 are produced after an irradiation. Impurities in both case of beryllium and graphite is dominant in the shutdown dose after an irradiation. • Based on the evaluation, the graphite reflector is a good alternative of the beryllium multiplier in the view of induced activity and shutdown dose. But C-14 produced in the graphite reflector should be considered carefully in the view of radwaste management. - Abstract: Korea has proposed a Helium-Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) breeding blanket concept relevant to fusion power plants. Here, graphite is used as a reflector material by reducing the amount of beryllium multiplier. In this paper, activity analysis was performed and the effect of graphite reflector in the view of activation was compared to the beryllium multiplier. As a result, it is expected that using the graphite reflector instead of the beryllium multiplier decreases total activity very effectively. But the graphite reflector produces C-14 about 17.2 times than the beryllium multiplier. Therefore, C-14 produced in the graphite reflector is expected as a significant nuclide in the view of radwaste management.

  18. Cell proliferation and death in the irradiated pituitary gland and its modification by growth stimulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yaping; Hendry, Jolyon H.; Morris, Ian D.; Davis, Julian R.E.; Beardwell, Colin G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to show whether the rate of expression of radiation injury in the rat pituitary gland could be accelerated by the use of growth stimulants. Methods and Materials: Rat pituitary glands were irradiated in situ with a range of single doses up to 20 Gy. The rats were then given subcutaneous slow-release implants containing 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) and sulpiride (S) to stimulate lactotroph proliferation. Two sequential cycles were used, each consisting of stimulation (3 weeks) and withdrawal (2 weeks). Measurements were made of gland weight; BrdU-labeled, giant, and apoptotic cells; lactotrophs; as well as pituitary prolactin content, in response to exogenous thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH). Results: The two cycles of stimulation/withdrawal resulted in marked changes in gland weight, BrdU-labeling index, and serum prolactin (PRL) levels in unirradiated rats. The proportion of immunopositive growth-hormone-producing (GH) cells increased after irradiation. Radiation inhibited the hypertrophic response to E 2 + S and also inhibited increases in BrdU-labeling index and serum PRL levels. Also, giant lactotrophs were observed in the irradiated pituitaries. However, they were not seen in the unirradiated rats or in the irradiated rats treated with E 2 + S. TRH promoted PRL secretion in the unirradiated rat. In contrast, TRH inhibited PRL secretion in the irradiated rat and in all treatment groups receiving E 2 + S. Apoptosis was induced by irradiation and was substantially increased in lactotrophs and in other cell types by withdrawal of the E 2 and S stimulus, although the highest observed incidence was only 7 per 10,000 cells. Conclusion: Both irradiation and E 2 + S treatment removed the hypothalamic control of PRL secretion, which reveals this important inhibitory action of TRH upon PRL secretion. This suggests that it is not suitable as a dynamic test of pituitary PRL reserves in such abnormal situations, where there may also be damage to

  19. Magnetic order in graphite: Experimental evidence, intrinsic and extrinsic difficulties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquinazi, P.; Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Spemann, D.; Rothermel, M.; Ohldag, H.; Garcia, N.; Setzer, A.; Butz, T.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss recently obtained data using different experimental methods including magnetoresistance measurements that indicate the existence of metal-free high-temperature magnetic order in graphite. Intrinsic as well as extrinsic difficulties to trigger magnetic order by irradiation of graphite are discussed in view of recently published theoretical work.

  20. Influence of Mixed Mode I-Mode II Loading on Fatigue Delamination Growth Characteristics of a Graphite Epoxy Tape Laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; Johnston, William M., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mode I-mode II interlaminar tests were conducted on IM7/8552 tape laminates using the mixed-mode bending test. Three mixed mode ratios, G(sub II)/G(sub T) = 0.2, 0.5, and 0.8, were considered. Tests were performed at all three mixed-mode ratios under quasi-static and cyclic loading conditions, where the former static tests were used to determine initial loading levels for the latter fatigue tests. Fatigue tests at each mixed-mode ratio were performed at four loading levels, Gmax, equal to 0.5G(sub c), 0.4G(sub c), 0.3G(sub c), and 0.2G(sub c), where G(sub c) is the interlaminar fracture toughness of the corresponding mixed-mode ratio at which a test was performed. All fatigue tests were performed using constant-amplitude load control and delamination growth was automatically documented using compliance solutions obtained from the corresponding quasi-static tests. Static fracture toughness data yielded a mixed-mode delamination criterion that exhibited monotonic increase in Gc with mixed-mode ratio, G(sub II)/G(sub T). Fatigue delamination onset parameters varied monotonically with G(sub II)/G(sub T), which was expected based on the fracture toughness data. Analysis of non-normalized data yielded a monotonic change in Paris law exponent with mode ratio. This was not the case when normalized data were analyzed. Fatigue data normalized by the static R-curve were most affected in specimens tested at G(sub II)/G(sub T)=0.2 (this process has little influence on the other data). In this case, the normalized data yielded a higher delamination growth rate compared to the raw data for a given loading level. Overall, fiber bridging appeared to be the dominant mechanism, affecting delamination growth rates in specimens tested at different load levels and differing mixed-mode ratios.

  1. The effects of 137Cs irradiation and MAP on the survival and growth of salmonella Spp in pork

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Meixu

    2000-01-01

    The effects of 137 Cs irradiation (0 to 2 kGy) and MAP combination treatment on the survival and growth of Salmonella Spp are studied in sterile pork in the absence of competing microflora. A central composite response-surface design is used to test the response of the pathogen to the treatments in a single experiment. Predictive equations are developed from the analyses of variances of the resulting data. The results show that the survival of Salmonella is significant decrease with the increasing of irradiation dose, but there are no evident effects on the survival of salmonella due to the MAP. Five kinds of MAP do not show the difference on the growth of Salmonella. 50% CO 2 treatment shows the irradiation protection of Salmonella compared with air. The results indicate that the treatment combined irradiation with MAP is not more effective for controlling the survival and growth of Salmonella Spp

  2. Effects of UV-B irradiation on growth, survival, pigmentation and nitrogen metabolism enzymes in Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R.P.; Hader, D.P. [Institut fuer Botanik und Pharmazeutische Biologie, Friedrich-Alexander Universitaet, Erlangen (Germany); Kumar, H.D.; Kumar, A. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    1995-12-31

    The effects of artificial UV-B irradiation on growth, survival, pigmentation, nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and total protein profile have been studied in a number of N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterial strains isolated from rice (paddy) fields in India. Different organisms show different effects in terms of growth and survival. Complete killing of Anabaena sp. and Nostoc carmium occurs after 120 min of UV-B exposure, whereas the same occurs only after 150 min of exposure in the case of Nostoc commune and Scytonema sp. Growth patterns of the cells treated with UV-B revealed that Nostoc commune and Scytonema sp. are comparatively more tolerant than Anabaena sp. and Nostoc carmium. Pigment content, particularly phycocyanin, was severely decreased following UV-B irradiation in all strains tested so far. In vivo NR activity was found to increase, while in vivo GS activity was decreased following exposure to UV-B for different durations in all test organisms; although complete inhibition of GS activity did not occur even after 120 min of UV-B exposure. (author). 37 refs, 6 figs.

  3. Effects of UV-B irradiation on growth, survival, pigmentation and nitrogen metabolism enzymes in Cyanobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, R.P.; Hader, D.P.; Kumar, H.D.; Kumar, A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of artificial UV-B irradiation on growth, survival, pigmentation, nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and total protein profile have been studied in a number of N 2 -fixing cyanobacterial strains isolated from rice (paddy) fields in India. Different organisms show different effects in terms of growth and survival. Complete killing of Anabaena sp. and Nostoc carmium occurs after 120 min of UV-B exposure, whereas the same occurs only after 150 min of exposure in the case of Nostoc commune and Scytonema sp. Growth patterns of the cells treated with UV-B revealed that Nostoc commune and Scytonema sp. are comparatively more tolerant than Anabaena sp. and Nostoc carmium. Pigment content, particularly phycocyanin, was severely decreased following UV-B irradiation in all strains tested so far. In vivo NR activity was found to increase, while in vivo GS activity was decreased following exposure to UV-B for different durations in all test organisms; although complete inhibition of GS activity did not occur even after 120 min of UV-B exposure. (author)

  4. Theoretical basis for graphite stress analysis in BERSAFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, P.G.

    1980-03-01

    The BERSAFE finite element computer program for structural analysis has been extended to deal with structures made from irradiated graphite. This report describes the material behaviour which has been modelled and gives the theoretical basis for the solution procedure. (author)

  5. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  6. Effect of Low Dose gamma-ray Irradiation on the Germination and Growth in Red Pepper (Capcicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Eun-Kyung; Kim Jae-Sung

    1998-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of low dose gamma-ray irradiation in red pepper. The germination percentage, plant, the number of flower, chlorophyll contents, leaf length and width were observed from plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with various low dose of gamma-ray. The germination percentage of irradiation group treatmented gamma-ray was much higher than that of the control. Specially the germination percentage after sowing red pepper seeds on paper towel was higher than 1,000 and 2,000 rad irradiation group. The height of plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with gamma-ray was increased in 100, 200 and 400 rad irradiation group compared to that of the control. The height of plant from 2,400 rad irradiation group, however, was shorter than that of the control. Nutrient contents of leaves of plants grown with red pepper seeds irradiated with various dose of gamma-ray were significantly increased in 800 and 1,200 rad irradiation group. Electric conductivity (EC) of the water used for seed germination was lower irradiation group than control group. Therefore, there was the possibility to increase the germination and plant growth with gamma-ray of adequate low dose

  7. Inhibition of IL-17A suppresses enhanced-tumor growth in low dose pre-irradiated tumor beds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation induces modification of the tumor microenvironment such as tumor surrounding region, which is relevant to treatment outcome after radiotherapy. In this study, the effects of pre-irradiated tumor beds on the growth of subsequently implanted tumors were investigated as well as underlying mechanism. The experimental model was set up by irradiating the right thighs of C3H/HeN mice with 5 Gy, followed by the implantation of HCa-I and MIH-2. Both implanted tumors in the pre-irradiated bed showed accelerated-growth compared to the control. Tumor-infiltrated lymphocyte (TIL levels were increased, as well as pro-tumor factors such as IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 in the pre-irradiated group. In particular, the role of pro-tumor cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A was investigated as a possible target mechanism because IL-6 and TGF-β are key factors in Th17 cells differentiation from naïve T cells. IL-17A expression was increased not only in tumors, but also in CD4+ T cells isolated from the tumor draining lymph nodes. The effect of IL-17A on tumor growth was confirmed by treating tumors with IL-17A antibody, which abolished the acceleration of tumor growth. These results indicate that the upregulation of IL-17A seems to be a key factor for enhancing tumor growth in pre-irradiated tumor beds.

  8. Growth and viability of Aedes albopictus cell line in vitro after cesium-137 gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of the cultured mosquito cell line Aedes albopictus (Skuse) was investigated. Population growth was followed by total cell counts and by viable cell counts on aliquots of cultures exposed to various doses of gamma radiation during exponential growth. Viable cell determinations were based on the cellular exclusion of the dye, alcian blue, in a procedure adapted to the insect cells in culture. Viability determinations in the irradiated exponential cultures indicated that initially there was some increase in the gestation, suggesting that gonadal steroids may have unusual effects on uterine physiology and biochemistry in this species. Consequently, studies were undertaken to elucidate some of the basic responses of hamster uteri to estradiol benzoate and progesterone under conditions of protein malnutrition, actinomycin D administration and corticosterone injection. Furthermore, the effects of gonadal steroids on uteri of pregnant ovariectomized hamsters were studied

  9. Growth of large microcones in steel under multipulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolgaev, S.I. [University of Barcelona, Department of Applied Physics and Optics, Barcelona (Spain); A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Wave Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Pradas, J.M.; Morenza, J.L.; Serra, P. [University of Barcelona, Department of Applied Physics and Optics, Barcelona (Spain); Shafeev, G.A. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Wave Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    We report the growth of conical microstructure arrays on a stainless steel substrate under multi-pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m, pulse duration of 300 ns, repetition rate of 5 kHz) at atmospheric air pressure. The average period of microcones is 70 {mu}m, and they protrude 50-60 {mu}m above the substrate. At an air pressure of 1 Pa, the well-defined conical shape is lost and the resulting microstructure shows a smaller period and height. At 10{sup -3} Pa, only small protrusions separated by about 5 {mu}m are observed. The different mechanisms involved in the growth of conical microstructures are discussed. (orig.)

  10. The effect of gamma and fast neutron irradiations on M1 seedling growth in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.; Mohammad, T.; Khan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Seeds of three varieties of soybean, i.e. Bragg, Hodgson and Lee-74, having a moisture content of 11-13% were irradiated with doses of gamma, 100,200,300,400 and 500 Gray and fast neutron, 5,10,20,25 and 30 Gray, to study the effect on M1 seedling growth. The parameters studied were germination, seedling height and epicotyl length. Growth inhibition was found to increase with increasing radiation doses and the effect on germination was observed only at higher doses. Among early assessable M1 parameters for radio-sensitivity, epicotyl length has proved to be most sensitive, and hence most useful. The Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values for the three varieties differed slightly for epicotyl length and the difference was more pronounced for seedling height. A dose range of 150-300 Gray of gamma rays and 10-15 Gray of fast neutron might prove useful for efficient induced mutation. (authors)

  11. Metastasis and growth of friend tumor cells in irradiated syngeneic hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matioli, G.

    1974-01-01

    Friend tumor cells (FTC) have been studied by growing them in lethally irradiated syngeneic mice. After establishing the FTC dilution factor (delta), extinction factor (Q), and the optimal time for colony counts, the FTC kinetic was analyzed by the recovery curve method. It was found that FTC growth is different from that experienced by normal or leukemic Friend stem cells when tested by the same in vivo assay. The most interesting differences were the high metastatic activity, the lack of differentiation, the deterministic growth, and the independence from the spleen microenvironment experienced by the FTC, in contrast with the normal and leukemic stem cells. In addition, the estimate of the critical size the FTC colony has to reach before releasing the first metastatic cells is presented. (U.S.)

  12. Irradiation effect on growth development and offsprings character of millet in the stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Guoyong; Li Xiuzhen; Liu Peili; Li Jinguo; Jiang Xingcun

    1996-01-01

    A significant influence on vegetative growth and character variation in offsprings of millet by irradiation in the stratosphere were investigated. The experimental results showed that germinating viability increased by 21.1%, plant height reduced 6.8 cm compared with control. The dynamics growth pattern of leaf length was a double-peak curve. The difference in length and width of leaves between control and treatment was shown as a sine-linear curve. Spike weight, spike length and flay leaf size were obviously higher than those of control. Various mutants with recessive traits in SP 2 were found. The strains with larger spike were stable in SP 3 . Significant variations in spike length, spike weight, protein content and fatty acid content were observed

  13. Increase of the density of commercial graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, H.; Meyerstein, D.

    1977-12-01

    The increase of the density of commercial graphite of the type ATJ by polymerization of an impregnated monomer, followed by pyrolysis, is described. The monomer which was either styrene or acrylonitrile, was irradiated by a 60 Co source and pyrolized in a standard vacuum system. The irradiation dose for the polymerization of the monomer was determined. Suggestions for the establishment of the optimum conditions are offered

  14. Effect of gamma radiation on graphite - PTFE dry lubrication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sachin; Tyagi, Mukti; Seshadri, Geetha; Tyagi, Ajay Kumar; Varshney, Lalit

    2017-12-01

    An effect of gamma radiation on lubrication behavior of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system has been studied using (TR-TW-30L) tribometer with thrust washer attachment in plane contact. Different compositions of graphite and PTFE were prepared and irradiated by gamma rays. Gamma radiation exposure significantly improves the tribological properties indicated by decrease in coefficient of friction and wear properties of graphite -PTFE dry lubrication system. SEM and XRD analysis confirm the physico-chemical modification of graphite-PTFE on gamma radiation exposure leading to a novel dry lubrication system with good slip and anti friction properties.

  15. An Investigation on Irradiation-induced Grid Width Growth in Advanced Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Young Ki; Jeon, Kyeong Lak; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Jae Ik; Hwang, Sun Tack; Kim, Man Su; Lee, Tae Hyoung; Yoo, Myeong Jong; Yoon, Yong Bae; Kim, Tae Wan

    2011-01-01

    The spacer grids for fuel assembly are fabricated from preformed Zircaloy or Inconel strips interlocked in an egg crate fashion and welded or brazed together. The spacer grid is the important component to maintain the fuel rod array by providing positive lateral restraint to the fuel rods but only frictional restraint to axial fuel rod motion. To improve economy and safety aspects, advanced nuclear fuels of PLUS7, 16ACE7 and 17ACE7 were developed. The former is for Optimized Power Reactor of 1000 MWe (OPR1000) and Advanced Power Reactor of 1400 MWe (APR1400) and the latter two are for 16x16 and 17x17 Westinghouse type reactors, respectively. The material for top and bottom spacer grids on these advanced fuels are Inconel and the mid grids are Zirlo patented by Westinghouse. For neutron economy, the fuel assemblies are arranged very closely and the gaps between assemblies are kept to around 1 mm based on the worst case. The Zirconium-based alloys grow during irradiation in reactor. The large growth may cause some difficulties in loading and unloading fuel assemblies during refueling outage in reactor. The severe growth may cause some problems that fuel assemblies may be stuck within the core shroud and a modification of loading pattern is required. In addition, the grid growth with grid spring relaxation may cause different rod vibration behavior and results in the different wear mechanism. The grid width growth on the advanced fuels were predicted by using the growth models before the irradiation in reactor and were examined using lead test assemblies (LTAs) after each cycle in Ulchin unit 3 and Kori units 2 and 3, respectively. To reconfirm irradiation performance results using LTAs, the additional examinations are being performed through the surveillance programs on the commercially supplied fuels in Yonggwang unit 5 and Kori units 2 and 4. It is investigated on this study whether the grid widths on the advanced fuels meet their criteria and the predicted models

  16. Effect of pre-sowing gamma irradiated lupin seeds on growth characters and yield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Selected seeds of lupin were exposed to Co 60 -source to achieve doses of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, or 320 Grey, beside the control treatment, irradiated and unirradiated seeds were sown and the raised plants were grown under field condition at Agric. Dept. of Soil and Water Res. A.E.A. Representative plant samples were taken at early growth stage 15-days-old seedling at flowering and at harvest. The gained results could be summarized as follows: Plant growth parameters: Plant height, particularly at early stages and at flowering and the produced dry matter were statistically affected by the treatments. Leaf pigment content was intensified by almost 14-28% over control treatment. Total carbohydrates and soluble protein in plant leaves were statistically influenced by the applied irradiation doses. Number of pods was materially affected by the treatments while no remarkable effect was noted as far as a number of seeds/plant and dry weight of seeds/plant were considered: consequently: seed index was not materially affected

  17. Isolation of fusarium species from some food and feed and prevention their growth by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, K.A.; Abouzeid, M.A.; Hassan, A.A.; Abd-Elrahman, D.G.; Hammad, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seventy samples of different cereal grains, garlic, onion and animal feed were collected from the Egyptian markets to isolate associated moulds. Fusarium, Aspergillus, Penicillium and Rhizopus were the most common fungal genera isolated from the different samples. The genus Fusarium was the most dominant among the fungal genera and all isolates were identified as F. verticillioides, F. solani, F. oxysporum, F. dimerum, F. tabacinum and F. xylaroides. Fusarium verticillioides and F. solani were the most dominant comprising 58% of the total isolates. All Fusarium isolates were proved to produce one or more of zearalenone, diacetoxyscirpenol and fusaric acids in liquid medium. Irradiation at a dose of 5 KGy reduced the Fusarium growth greatly relative to non-irradiated controls. On the basis of the radiation survival data, the radiation decimal reduction doses (D 10 values) for F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. verticillioides and F. dimerum were 1.44, 1.66, 1.73 and 1.00 KGy in corn, respectively. Application of radiation at a dose of 12.5 KGy made corn samples free from mould throughout all the storage period (12 weeks) and there was no fungal growth and no mycotoxins have been produced

  18. Effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on hair follicle growth cycle of Swiss albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S; Sahu, K; Verma, Y; Rao, K D; Dube, A; Gupta, P K

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a study carried out to investigate the effect of helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm) irradiation on the hair follicle growth cycle of testosterone-treated and untreated mice. Both histology and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used for the measurement of hair follicle length and the relative percentage of hair follicles in different growth phases. A positive correlation (R = 0.96) was observed for the lengths of hair follicles measured by both methods. Further, the ratios of the lengths of hair follicles in the anagen and catagen phases obtained by both methods were nearly the same. However, the length of the hair follicles measured by both methods differed by a factor of 1.6, with histology showing smaller lengths. He-Ne laser irradiation (at approximately 1 J/cm(2)) of the skin of both the control and the testosterone-treated mice was observed to lead to a significant increase (p alopecia. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Part III: Comparing observed growth of selected test organisms in food irradiation studies with growth predictions calculated by ComBase softwares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Andrassy, E.; Meszaros, L.; Beczner, J.; Polyak-Feher, K.; Gaal, O.; Lebovics, V.K.; Lugasi, A.

    2009-01-01

    As a result of intensive predictive microbiological modelling activities, several computer programs and softwares became available recently for facilitating microbiological risk assessment. Among these tools, the establishment of the ComBase, an international database and its predictive modelling softwares of the Pathogen Modelling Program (PMP) set up by the USDA Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmore, PA, and the Food Micromodel/Growth Predictor by the United Kingdom's Institute of Food Research, Norwich, are most important. The authors have used the PMP 6.1 software version of ComBase as a preliminary trial to compare observed growth of selected test organisms in relation to their food irradiation work during recent years within the FAO/IAEA Coordinated Food Irradiation Research Projects (D6.10.23 and D6.20.07) with the predicted growth on the basis of growth models available in ComBase for the same species as those of the authors' test organisms. The results of challenge tests with Listeria monocytogenes inoculum in untreated or irradiated experimental batches of semi-prepared breaded turkey meat steaks (cordon bleu), sliced tomato, sliced watermelon, sliced cantaloupe and sous vide processed mixed vegetables, as well as Staphylococcus aureus inoculum of a pasta product, tortellini, were compared with their respective growth models under relevant environmental conditions. This comparison showed good fits in the case of non-irradiated and high moisture food samples, but growth of radiation survivors lagged behind the predicted values. (author)

  20. Growth and artemisinin content of artemisia Annua L. As a result of gamma irradiation on shoot culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri Muji Ermayanti; Erwin Al Hafiizh; Andri Fadillah Martin; Arthur A Lelono; Wiguna Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Artemisinin is the main compound produced by Artemisia annua is used as antimalarial drug. Many research have been conducted in order to increase artemisinin content in A. annua so that it can be produced economically. In several plants, mutation can be induced by Gamma irradiation to increase their secondary metabolite production. The aim of this research was to investigate the growth and artemisinin content of A. annua after Gamma irradiation. Irradiation was conducted using in vitro shoot tips with 5-50 Gy. Survival rate, growth of shoot culture, ploidy level confirmation, acclimatization, growth of plants in the field and artemisinin content were recorded. The results showed that LD_5_0 of A. annua was 37 Gy, therefore, shoots only grew in the control environment in the laboratory, their growth in the field was inhibited. Irradiation with 50 Gy, shoots only grew for 8 weeks, and died afterwards. Irradiation dose affected on growth of plants in the field as well as their artemisinin content. (author)

  1. Characteristics of first loaded IG-110 graphite in HTTR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Shibata, Taiju; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Hanawa, Satoshi; Ishihara, Masahiro

    2006-10-01

    IG-110 graphite is a fine-grained isotropic and nuclear-grade graphite with excellent resistivity on both irradiation and corrosion and with high strength. The IG-110 graphite is used for the graphite components of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) such as fuel and control rod guide blocks and support posts. In order to design and fabricate the graphite components in the HTTR, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (the Japan Atomic Energy Agency at present) had established the graphite structural design code and design data on the basis of former research results. After the design code establishment, the IG-110 graphite components were fabricated and loaded in the HTTR core. This report summarized the characteristics of the first loaded IG-110 graphite as basic data for surveillance test, measuring material characteristics changed by neutron irradiation and oxidation. By comparing the design data, it was shown that the first loaded IG-110 graphite had excellent strength properties and enough safety margins to the stress limits in the design code. (author)

  2. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Graphite moderator lifecycle behaviour. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The meeting provided the forum for graphite specialists representing operating and research organizations worldwide to exchange information in the following areas: the status of graphite development; operation and safety procedures for existing and future graphite moderated reactors; graphite testing techniques; review of the experiences gained and data acquired on the influence of neutron irradiation and oxidizing conditions on key graphite properties; and to exchange information useful for decommissioning activities. The participants provided twenty-seven papers on behalf of their countries and respective technical organizations. An open discussion followed each of the presentations. A consistently reoccurring theme throughout the specialists meeting was the noticeable reduction in the number of graphite experts remaining the nuclear power industry. Graphite moderated power reactors have provided a significant contribution to the generation of electricity throughout the past forty years and will continue to be a prominent energy source for the future. Yet, many of the renowned experts in the field of nuclear graphites are nearing the end of their careers without apparent replacement. This, coupled with changes in the focus on nuclear power by some industrialized countries, has prompted the IAEA to initiate an evaluation on the feasibility and interest by Member States of establishing a central archive facility for the storage of data on irradiated graphites. Refs, figs, tabs.

  4. A TEM Study on the Microstructure of Fine Flaky Graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Horsewell, Andy

    In this investigation the microstructure of the graphite flakes in titanium alloyed cast iron is studied using electron microscopy techniques. Based on this information, growth models for the platelets in the fine graphite flakes in cast iron are considered. Detailed crystallographic analysis...... of the defects observed such as multiple twin boundaries and possible spiral growth configurations are required...

  5. Growth hormone and somatomedin effects on calcification following X-irradiation, glucocorticoid treatment or fasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearden, L.C.; Mosier, H.D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is thought to activate the liver to produce a peptide called somatomedin (SM) and this substance putatively stimulates linear growth in long bones by its action on cartilagenous epiphyseal plates. These actions include stimulating chondrocytes to synthesize the carbohydrate and protein components of proteoglycan and of collagen, enhancing the synthesis of ribo and desoxyribonucleic acids, and possibly to increase cell division. In GH deficiencies there is a narrowing of the epiphyseal growth plate and cartilage calcification is enhanced concurrent with proteoglycan and collagen alterations in the extracellular matrix. Calcium and phosphate ions accumulate in mitochondria followed by their release as the calcification zone is approached, and matrix vesicles, which possess the chemical machinery necessary to induce the format0344of apatite crystals within them, increase. Therefore, if GH and/or SM levels are altered, there should be corresponding alterations in growth or in cartilage calcification. In the present study we have investigated rats after head X-irradiation, fasting, and corticosteroid treatment, and all of these treatments reduce GH and SM. (Auth.)

  6. Mathematical modeling predicts enhanced growth of X-ray irradiated pigmented fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shuryak

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is known for its cytotoxic and mutagenic properties. However, recent evidence suggests that chronic sub-lethal irradiation stimulates the growth of melanin-pigmented (melanized fungi, supporting the hypothesis that interactions between melanin and ionizing photons generate energy useful for fungal growth, and/or regulate growth-promoting genes. There are no quantitative models of how fungal proliferation is affected by ionizing photon energy, dose rate, and presence versus absence of melanin on the same genetic background. Here we present such a model, which we test using experimental data on melanin-modulated radiation-induced proliferation enhancement in the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, exposed to two different peak energies (150 and 320 kVp over a wide range of X-ray dose rates. Our analysis demonstrates that radiation-induced proliferation enhancement in C. neoformans behaves as a binary "on/off" phenomenon, which is triggered by dose rates 5000 mGy/h. Proliferation enhancement of irradiated cells compared with unirradiated controls occurs at both X-ray peak energies, but its magnitude is modulated by X-ray peak energy and cell melanization. At dose rates <5000 mGy/h, both melanized and non-melanized cells exposed to 150 kVp X-rays, and non-melanized cells exposed to 320 kVp X-rays, all exhibit the same proliferation enhancement: on average, chronic irradiation stimulates each founder cell to produce 100 (95% CI: 83, 116 extra descendants over 48 hours. Interactions between melanin and 320 kVp X-rays result in a significant (2-tailed p-value = 4.8 × 10(-5 additional increase in the number of radiation-induced descendants per founder cell: by 55 (95% CI: 29, 81. These results show that both melanin-dependent and melanin-independent mechanisms are involved in radiation-induced fungal growth enhancement, and implicate direct and/or indirect interactions of melanin with high energy ionizing photons as an important pro

  7. The use of Citrus tissue culture for mutation breeding. Effects of plant growth substances and gamma irradiation on embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochba, J.; Spiegel-Roy, P.

    1976-01-01

    An embryogenic callus subcultured from unfertilized ovules of the 'Shamouti' orange (Citrus sinensis) was established and is used for mutation-breeding. The callus is habituated and lines of differing embryogenic potential were established. The effect of growth substances and of gamma-irradiation on embryogenesis were studied. Auxins and cytokinins inhibited embryogenesis while inhibitors of auxin synthesis and a cytokinin antagonist significantly stimulate embryogenesis in an embryogenic line. A non-embryogenic callus line did not respond to these treatments. Stimulation of embryogenesis was observed when callus but not when the medium was irradiated. Age of callus prior to subculture and irradiation intensities modify irradiation induced embryogenesis by changing optimal dose range and radiosensitivity of the callus. Addition of IAA to unirradiated medium resulted in increased embryogenesis and greatly stimulated plantlet development in certain combinations of irradiation dose and IAA concentration. (author)

  8. Physics experiments in graphite lattices (1962); Experiences sur les reseaux a graphite (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Cogne, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    A review is made of the various experimental methods used to determine the physics of graphite, natural uranium lattices: integral lattice experiments; both absolute and differential, effective cross section measurements, both by activation methods and by analysis of irradiated fuels, fine structure measurements. A number of experimental results are also given. (authors) [French] On decrit les differentes methodes experimentales utilisees pour determiner les parametres physiques de reseaux a uranium-graphite. Il s'agit d'experiences globales: mesures absolues et relatives de laplaciens, mesures de sections efficaces effectives par activation et par analyses de combustibles irradies, mesures de structures fines. Un certain nombre de resultats experimentaux sont communiques. (auteurs)

  9. On the separation of so-called non-volatile uranium fission products of uranium using the conversion of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhardt, W.

    1979-01-01

    The investigations are continued in the following work which arose from the concept of separating uranium fission products from uranium. This is achieved in that due to the lattice conversions occurring during the course of solid chemical reactions, fission products can easily pass from the uranium-contained solid to a second solid. The investigations carried out primarily concern the release behaviour of cerium and neodymium in the temperature region of 1200 to 1700 0 C. UO 2 + graphite, both in powder form, are selected as suitable reaction system having the preconditions needed for the lattice conversion for the release effect. The target aimed at from the practical aspect for the improved release of lanthanoids is achieved by an isobar test course - changing temperature from 1200 to 1500 0 C at constant pressure, with a cerium release of 75-80% and a neodynium release of 80-90% (maximum at 1400 0 C). The concepts on the mechanism of the fission product release are related to transport processes in crystal lattices, as well as chemical solid reactions and evaporation processes on the surface of UC 2 grains. (orig./RB) [de

  10. Irradiation combined with SU5416: Microvascular changes and growth delay in a human xenograft glioblastoma tumor line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuuring, Janneke; Bussink, Johan; Bernsen, Hans; Peeters, Wenny; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and the antiangiogenic compound SU5416 was tested and compared with irradiation alone in a human glioblastoma tumor line xenografted in nude mice. The aim of this study was to monitor microenvironmental changes and growth delay. Methods and materials: A human glioblastoma xenograft tumor line was implanted in nude mice. Irradiations consisted of 10 Gy or 20 Gy with and without SU5416. Several microenvironmental parameters (tumor cell hypoxia, tumor blood perfusion, vascular volume, and microvascular density) were analyzed after imunohistochemical staining. Tumor growth delay was monitored for up to 200 days after treatment. Results: SU5416, when combined with irradiation, has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation alone. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment showed a decreased vascular density during treatment with SU5416. In tumors regrowing after reaching only a partial remission, vascular characteristics normalized shortly after cessation of SU5416. However, in tumors regrowing after reaching a complete remission, permanent microenvironmental changes and an increase of tumor necrosis with a subsequent slower tumor regrowth was found. Conclusions: Permanent vascular changes were seen after combined treatment resulting in complete remission. Antiangiogenic treatment with SU5416 when combined with irradiation has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation or antiangiogenic treatment alone

  11. Growth of normal or irradiated vaginal epithelium in in vivo cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tileva, M.

    1975-01-01

    Growth of normal or irradiated vaginal epithelium was studied by the method of F.M.Lazarenko (1959). Pieces of vaginal mucosa from immature albino rats, normal or exposed to 1000 or 2000 R, were embedded in celloidin and implanted into the abdominal wall of female immature rats. Implants were recovered for histological examinations from day 1 to day 10 after surgery. At day 1 post implantation, vaginal epithelium was found to have dedifferentiated. Cells showed a high mitotic index (MI = 16.2%). Cell proliferation progressed further to attain a peak rate at 3 days (MI = 32.7%). At 5 days, newly formed structures began to differentiate, and concurrently manifested a gradual decrease in cell proliferative activity (at 10 days, MI = 15.6%). Following exposure to 1000 R, vaginal epithelium displayed a similar pattern of growth and differentiation, the only difference from non-irradiated epithelium being that there was a transient mitotic delay over the first 3 days; mitotic rates reached a peak at 5 days (MI = 47.0%), were still high at 7 days (MI = 31.3%), and fell to 19% at 10 days. With this longer proliferation period, newly formed structures appeared ''luxuriant''. After a dose of 2000 R, vaginal epithelium failed to show any signs of growth at all investigated time intervals. These data are in agreement with evidence obtained by K.M.Svetikova (1961) and L.I.Chekulaeva (1969, 1974) for a good restitutional ability of epithelia of epidermal origin following exposure to 1200 R X-rays. By Warren' rule (1944), i.e., that cells should be considered radiosensitive if severely damaged by less than 2500 R, vaginal epithelium cells may be designated as relatively susceptible to radiation. (author)

  12. Effect of single-dose x irradiation on the growth curves of a human malignant melanoma transplanted into nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spang-Thomsen, M.; Visfeldt, J.; Nielsen, A.

    1981-01-01

    A human malignant melanoma transplanted into nude mice was exposed to single-dose x irradiation. Experimental growth data described mathematically according to a transformed Gompertz function were used to determine the effect of irradiation on growth delay, growth rate, and tumor shrinkage. The radiation-induced changes in the histology of the tumors were also described. The results showed that irradiation induced a dose-dependent growth delay; this parameter was therefore found suitable for the assessment of relative therapeutic effect. The treatment also induced a dose-dependent reduction in growth rate during regrowth. As a result of this effect on growth rate, extrapolation of tumor shrinkage to the time of treatment became directly misleading as a measure of the effect of the treatment. From this it can be deduced that in therapeutic studies where treatment induces nonparallel posttherapeutic growth curves, growth delay for various tumors and therapies cannot be compared directly. The transformed Gompertz function proved to be extremely well suited for evaluating these conditions

  13. On the defect structure due to low energy ion bombardment of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, D.; Bu, H.; Boyd, K. J.; Todorov, S. S.; Al-Bayati, A. H.; Rabalais, J. W.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite surfaces cleaved perpendicular to the c axis have been irradiated with low doses of Ar + ions at 50 eV kinetic energy and perpendicular incidence. Scanning tunneling micrographs (STM) of these irradiated surfaces exhibited dome-like features as well as point defects. These dome-like features retain undisturbed graphite periodicity. This finding is attributed to the stopping of ions between the first and second graphite sheets. The possibility of doping semiconductors at extremely shallow depths is raised.

  14. Ferrocene-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride as an enhanced heterogeneous catalyst of Fenton reaction for degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Lin, Jyun-Ting

    2017-09-01

    To enhance degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB), a toxic xanthene dye, an iron-doped graphitic carbon nitride (CN) is prepared by establishing a covalent bond (-CN-) bridging ferrocene (Fc) and CN via a Schiff base reaction. The π-conjugation between the aromatic Fc and CN can be much enhanced by the covalent bond, thereby facilitating the bulk-to-surface charge transfer and separation as well as reversible photo-redox reactions during photocatalytic reactions. Thus, the resulting Fc-CN exhibits a much higher catalytic activity than CN to activate hydrogen peroxide (HP) for RhB degradation, because the photocatalytically generated electrons from CN can activate HP and effectively maintain the bivalence state of Fe in Fc, which also induces the activation of HP. The RhB degradation by the Fc-CN activated HP process (Fc-CN-HP) is validated to involve OH • by examining the effect of radical probe agent as well as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analysis. Fc-CN is also proven to activate HP for RhB degradation over multiple times without loss of catalytic activity. Through determining the degradation intermediates, RhB is indeed fully decomposed by Fc-CN-HP into much lower-molecular-weight organic compounds. These features indicate that Fc-functionalization can be an advantageous technique to enhance the catalytic activity of CN for activating HP. The results obtained in this study are essential to further design and utilize Fc-functionalized CN for Fenton-like reactions. The findings shown here, especially the degradation mechanism and pathway, are also quite important for treating xanthene dyes in wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Low Gamma Irradiation Doses on Growth and Productivity of Green Bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.M.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The field experiment was conducted within the two successive growing seasons of 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 to study the effect of low gamma irradiation doses (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 Gy) on growth and productivity of green bean cv. Bronco with 3 sowing dates 8, 18 and 28th of October in the first season and 30th of September, 10 and 20th of October in the second season. The results of laboratory determinations showed that gamma irradiation doses did not affect the germination percent but slightly affected germination rate and electrical conductivity. Concerning field experiment, data revealed that green bean plant vegetative growth, i.e., plant height, fresh and dry weight, leaf number and leaf area, at 45 days after planting (DAP) and shoot number at 30, 45 DAP recorded significantly the highest values at the first sowing date in both seasons. With respect of gamma irradiation doses, all the previously mentioned parameters of plant vegetative growth recorded the highest values with 40 Gy at 15, 30, and 45 DAP except number of leaves which recorded the highest value with 30 Gy at 15, 30 and 45 DAP. Concerning shoot number there was no significant difference among several doses at 30 DAP in the first season but in the second season it was 20 Gy and at 45 DAP compared with the control. Also the first sowing date in both seasons gave the highest pod length, fresh and dry weight, plant yield, number of pods per plant, marketable yield per plot and total yield per feddan. Whereas ,the second sowing date led to the lowest pod thickness. In addition, 20 Gy of gamma irradiation doses recorded the highest value of pod length .The 30 Gy dose showed the highest value of pod fresh and dry weight, plant yield and total yield per feddan. In addition ,the 20 and 30 Gy doses led to the highest pod number per plant and marketable yield, concerning pod thickness there was slight difference only in the second season between several doses. The second sowing date in the first season

  16. Association of malignancy with rapid growth in early lesions induced by irradiation of rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Epithelial lesions induced by irradiation of rat skin were studied to determine (a) the relationship of malignancy to dose, (b) the types of lesions and circumstances leading to overt malignancy, and (c) the growth rates of lesions progressing to malignancy versus those of lesions remaining benign. High doses of radiation were shown to be associated with the production of epidermal cancers, the maximum yield being obtained at 6,400 rads. Conversely, a peak yield of noncancerous lesions was obtained at 1,600 rads. This association between malignancy and high dose was consistent for cancers evolving from warts, cysts, and chronic ulcers. Although the proportion of warts among the induced lesions was much higher than that of the cysts or chronic ulcers (76, 14, and 10%, respectively), the likelihood of warts becoming cancerous was substantially lower (14, 23, and 21%). The combined data for all doses showed that the latency period of the epidermal cancers was significantly (P = 0.015) shorter than that of the benign tumors. Rapid growth rates were observed for warts, cysts, and chronic ulcers progressing to overt cancer, and these did not overlap at any point on the growth scale with rates for benign tumors. This finding suggested that the potential for malignant development had been established early in the carcinogenic process, very likely at induction

  17. Membranes replace irradiated blast cells as growth requirement for leukemic blast progenitors in suspension culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, N.; McCulloch, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The blast cells of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) may be considered as a renewal population, maintained by blast stem cells capable of both self-renewal and the generation of progeny with reduced or absent proliferative potential. This growth requires that two conditions be met: first, the cultures must contain growth factors in media conditioned either by phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated mononuclear leukocytes (PHA-LCM), or by cells of the continuous bladder carcinoma line HTB9 (HTB9-CM). Second, the cell density must be maintained at 10(6) blasts/ml; this may be achieved by adding irradiated cells to smaller numbers of intact blasts. The authors are concerned with the mechanism of the feeding function. They present evidence that (a) cell-cell contact is required. (b) Blasts are heterogeneous in respect to their capacity to support growth. (c) Fractions containing membranes from blast cells will substitute for intact cells in promoting the generation of new blast progenitors in culture. (d) This membrane function may be specific for AML blasts, since membranes from blasts of lymphoblastic leukemia or normal marrow cells were inactive

  18. Progress in radioactive graphite waste management. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    , especially in the UK. It is intended that this report which contains the proceedings of the conference should contribute to progress in the management of radioactive graphite worldwide. The report contains a selection of the papers presented on various issues related to dismantling and treating irradiated graphite. In addition, the report contains summaries of the four topical discussions which were held during the conference

  19. Expression of transforming growth factor beta 1-related signaling proteins in irradiated vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preidl, Raimund H.M.; Moebius, Patrick; Weber, Manuel; Neukam, Friedrich W.; Schlegel, Andreas; Wehrhan, Falk [University of Erlangen- Nuernberg, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); University of Erlangen- Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Amann, Kerstin [University of Erlangen- Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-12-09

    Microvascular free tissue transfer is a standard method in head and neck reconstructive surgery. However, previous radiotherapy of the operative region is associated with an increased incidence in postoperative flap-related complications and complete flap loss. As transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) 1 and galectin-3 are well known markers in the context of fibrosis and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein 1 (LOX-1) supports vascular atherosclerosis, the aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of TGF-β1 and related markers as well as LOX-1 in irradiated vessels. To evaluate the expression of galectin-3, Smad 2/3, TGF-β1, and LOX-1, 20 irradiated and 20 nonirradiated arterial vessels were used for immunohistochemical staining. We semiquantitatively assessed the ratio of stained cells/total number of cells (labeling index). Expression of galectin-3, Smad 2/3, and TGF-β1 was significantly increased in previously irradiated vessels compared with nonirradiated controls. Furthermore, LOX-1 was expressed significantly higher in irradiated compared with nonirradiated vessels. Fibrosis-related proteins like galectin-3, Smad 2/3, and TGF-β1 are upregulated after radiotherapy and support histopathological changes leading to vasculopathy of the irradiated vessels. Furthermore, postoperative complications in irradiated patients can be explained by increased endothelial dysfunction caused by LOX-1 in previously irradiated patients. Consequently, not only TGF-β1 but also galectin-3inhibitors may decrease complications after microsurgical tissue transfer. (orig.) [German] Der freie mikrovaskulaere Gewebetransfer gilt heute als fester Standard in der rekonstruktiven Kopf-Hals-Chirurgie. Es zeigte sich jedoch, dass im Falle einer stattgehabten Bestrahlung im Operationsgebiet mit einer erhoehten Rate an transplantatbezogenen Komplikationen gerechnet werden muss. Sowohl TGF-β1 als auch Galektin-3 sind bekannte Mediatoren in Bezug auf die Fibroseentstehung

  20. Effect of UV-C irradiation on growth, sporulation and pathogenicity of cochliobolus sativus isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawhar, M.; Arabi, M.I.E.

    1999-12-01

    More than 30 isolates of Cochliobolus sativus, the causal agent of common root rot disease; were collected from different regions of Syria. Seven of them were exposed to UV-C light for 40 or 60 h . at a dose rate of 2.52x10 -3 W/cm 2 . A significant increases in the mycelium growth and sporulation were detected (p<0.001). Within the studied range of UV wave length, these two parameters were increased upon increasing the period of exposure to UV-C light. The pathogenicity of four isolates was evaluated after 60 h. of UV irradiation. The response to UV irradiation varied among these isolates, and resulted in an increase in their virulence level (as assessed by evaluating disease severity on sub-crown internodes). Five barley genotypes possessing different levels of resistance to C. sativus were studied. Arabi Abiad was the most susceptible cultivar whereas, Taka 76 line was moderately susceptible. It is concluded that it is possible to implement the positive effect of low doses of UV-C in stimulating the sporulation of fungi, which are difficult to sporulate on artificial media. (author)

  1. Effects of ultraviolet-B irradiation on seedling growth in the Pinaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.H.; Teramura, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Ten conifer species were grown in an unshaded greenhouse at the University of Maryland under 3 levels of biologically effective ultraviolet-B radiation. Ultraviolet-B radiation was supplied by Westinghouse FS-40 sunlamps and effective daily doses were 0, 12.4, and 19.1 kJ m-2. During the irradiation period, seedling growth and the development of stress symptoms were monitored. After 22 weeks of irradiation, seedlings were harvested and morphological characteristics analyzed. Visual symptoms included needle discoloration and stunting in three of the ten species tested. Seedling height was significantly reduced by supplemental UV-B in Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine), Pinus resinosa (red pine), and Pinus taeda (loblolly pine). Biomass increased in Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce). Abies fraseri (Fraser fir), Pinus edulus (pinyon pine), and Pinus nigra (black pine) were unaffected by UV-B while biomass reductions exceeding 5% were observed in all other species tested. These deleterious effects occurred despite the presence of morphological characteristics which would tend to reduce UV-B effectiveness. Generally, the effects of supplemental UV-B dose were less for those species native to higher elevations, implying the presence of natural adaptations to UV-B

  2. Void formation and growth in copper-nickel alloys during irradiation in the high voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leffers, T.; Singh, B.N.; Barlow, P.

    1977-05-01

    The formation and growth of voids during irradiation in a high-voltage electron microscope were studied in copper and Cu-Ni alloys. For each composition, the range of irradiation temperatures from 250 deg C to 550 deg C was covered. The development of the irradiation-induced dislocation structure was also studied. At irradiation temperatures up to 450 deg C, the void swelling decreased rapidly with increasing Ni content and became practically zero for Cu-10%Ni. The decrease in swelling was produced mainly by decreased void growth (and not by decreased void number density). At 550 deg C the void swelling increased with increasing Ni content up to 5%, whereas for Cu-10%Ni the swelling became practically zero; again the changes in swelling with Ni content were mainly determined by changes in void growth. The reduction in void swelling and growth due to alloying is ascribed to vacancy or interstitial trapping at submicroscopic Ni precipitates, i.e. to the precipitates acting as recombination centres. The increase in void swelling and growth with increasing Ni content, on the other hand, is ascribed to dislocation climb sources that emit loops, and hence produce a fairly high dislocation density at a temperature where there are only few dislocations in pure copper or Cu-Ni with lower Ni content. (author)

  3. Microstructural basis and crack growth theories for post-irradiation ductility loss in Nimonic PE16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been carried out to investigate the degradation of postirradiation ductility at reactor temperatures in Nimonic PE16, a Fe-Cr-Ni-based precipitation-hardened superalloy. Fractographic and microstructural investigations show that the grain matrix is capable of deformation and does not limit the postirradiation tensile ductility. Grain-boundary helium bubbles formed during neutron irradiation seem to be crack nucleation sites under stress. Growth and coalescence of these microcracks under stress lead to intergranular fracture. A rigid-grain fracture model is shown to be able to correlate the observed microstructures with most features of the mechanical properties, except the strain rate dependence of the ductility. By incorporating the interactions between diffusion and plastic deformation, a plastic-grain fracture model has been developed which can explain all postirradiation tensile ductility data quantitatively. 13 references

  4. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackstone, R [Commission of the European Communities, Petten (Netherlands). Joint Nuclear Research Center

    1977-03-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted.

  5. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behavior compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted

  6. Radiation creep of graphite. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, R.

    1977-01-01

    Graphite, a class of materials with many unique and unusual properties, shows a remarkably high creep ductility under irradiation. As this behaviour compensates to some extent some of the more worrying radiation effects, such as dimensional changes and their strong temperature dependence, it is a property of large technological interest. There are various ways of observing and measuring in-pile creep of graphite, varying in degree of sophistication and in cost, in accuracy and in the type of data that is generated. This paper attempts to review briefly the various experimental methods, and the knowledge generated so far. An indication is given of the areas in which further knowledge is wanted. (Auth.)

  7. Characterization of graphite dust produced by pneumatic lift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ke [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Peng, Wei; Liu, Bing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Kang, Feiyu [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Thermal Management Engineering and Materials, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong (China); Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Weihua [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Center, The Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Suyuan, E-mail: suyuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Center for Combustion Energy, The Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering, Ministry of Educations, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Generation of graphite dust by pneumatic lift. • Determination of morphology and particle size distribution of graphite dust. • The size of graphite dust in this study is compared to AVR and THTR-300 results. • Graphite dust originates from both filler and binder of the matrix graphite. - Abstract: Graphite dust is an important safety concern of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR). The graphite dust could adsorb fission products, and the radioactive dust is transported by the coolant gas and deposited on the surface of the primary loop. The simulation of coagulation, aggregation, deposition, and resuspension behavior of graphite dust requires parameters such as particle size distribution and particle shape, but currently very limited data on graphite dust is available. The only data we have are from AVR and THTR-300, however, the AVR result is likely to be prejudiced by the oil ingress. In pebble-bed HTR, graphite dust is generally produced by mechanical abrasion, in particular, by the abrasion of graphite pebbles in the lifting pipe of the fuel handling system. Here we demonstrate the generation and characterization of graphite dust that were produced by pneumatic lift. This graphite dust could substitute the real dust in HTR for characterization. The dust, exhibiting a lamellar morphology, showed a number-weighted average particle size of 2.38 μm and a volume-weighted average size of 14.62 μm. These two sizes were larger than the AVR and THTR results. The discrepancy is possibly due to the irradiation effect and prejudice caused by the oil ingress accident. It is also confirmed by the Raman spectrum that both the filler particle and binder contribute to the dust generation.

  8. Barley growth and plant mineral content of plant grown from seeds irradiated by low doses of gamma irradiated and cultured on salt media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbaji, T.; Arabi, M.I.; Jawhar, M.

    2000-02-01

    Seeds of two barley White Arabi (WA) Pakistani PK30163 (PK) were irradiated with three doses 0,15 and 20 Gy of gamma irradiation. Then they were cultured on (Coic-Lesaint) nutrient media containing several concentrations of NaCl (0, 10, 50, and 100 mmol). The irradiation doses did not affect the shoot growth of plants, whereas the combination between 15 Gy and 50 and 100 mmol NaCl decreased significantly the root growth. Doses of 0 and 20 Gy and 10 mmol NaCl had a positive effect on WA variety wet weight. The 20 Gy and 10 and 50 mmol NaCl significantly reduced the wet weight of PK variety. Dry weight of WA variety was decreased, when the seeds were irradiated by 15 Gy and cultured on media containing 10 and 50 mmol NaCl. WA and PK content of Ca ++ increased when weeds were irradiated by 15 Gy (WA) and 20 Gy (PK) and grown on media containing 10 mmol NaCl. The content of Mg ++ and K ++ of 2 varieties were increased, when seeds were cultured on media containing 10 mmol NaCl. Positive relationship was noticed between Na + and Cl - contents and NaCl concentrations in the media. The NaCl concentrations correlated with the irradiation, negatively effected the total N % of the WA variety, whereas in the absence of irradiation, 10 and 50 mmol NaCl had a positive effect on the total N % of PK variety. Similar effects were produced for the last variety with the dose of 15 Gy and NaCl concentrations in the media. Concentration of 100 mmol NaCl positively affect PO4 -- of unirradiated WA variety, but PO -- of all plants of PK variety was increased with 10 and 50 mmol NaCl. The content of SO4 -- of 2 varieties was increased, when the seeds were exposed to the irradiation of 15 and 20 Gy and cultured on a media containing 10 and 50 mmol NaCl. The ratio of Na/Cl, was generally different from 1 and the Cl - content was higher than Na + content, in seedlings of both barley varieties. (author)

  9. Barley growth and plant mineral content of plant grown from seeds irradiated by low doses of gamma irradiated and cultured on salt media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charbaji, T; Arabi, M I; Jawhar, M [Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic). Dept. of Agriculture

    2000-02-01

    Seeds of two barley White Arabi (WA) Pakistani PK30163 (PK) were irradiated with three doses 0,15 and 20 Gy of gamma irradiation. Then they were cultured on (Coic-Lesaint) nutrient media containing several concentrations of NaCl (0, 10, 50, and 100 mmol). The irradiation doses did not affect the shoot growth of plants, whereas the combination between 15 Gy and 50 and 100 mmol NaCl decreased significantly the root growth. Doses of 0 and 20 Gy and 10 mmol NaCl had a positive effect on WA variety wet weight. The 20 Gy and 10 and 50 mmol NaCl significantly reduced the wet weight of PK variety. Dry weight of WA variety was decreased, when the seeds were irradiated by 15 Gy and cultured on media containing 10 and 50 mmol NaCl. WA and PK content of Ca{sup ++} increased when weeds were irradiated by 15 Gy (WA) and 20 Gy (PK) and grown on media containing 10 mmol NaCl. The content of Mg{sup ++} and K{sup ++} of 2 varieties were increased, when seeds were cultured on media containing 10 mmol NaCl. Positive relationship was noticed between Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} contents and NaCl concentrations in the media. The NaCl concentrations correlated with the irradiation, negatively effected the total N % of the WA variety, whereas in the absence of irradiation, 10 and 50 mmol NaCl had a positive effect on the total N % of PK variety. Similar effects were produced for the last variety with the dose of 15 Gy and NaCl concentrations in the media. Concentration of 100 mmol NaCl positively affect PO4{sup --} of unirradiated WA variety, but PO{sup --} of all plants of PK variety was increased with 10 and 50 mmol NaCl. The content of SO4{sup --} of 2 varieties was increased, when the seeds were exposed to the irradiation of 15 and 20 Gy and cultured on a media containing 10 and 50 mmol NaCl. The ratio of Na/Cl, was generally different from 1 and the Cl{sup -} content was higher than Na{sup +} content, in seedlings of both barley varieties. (author)

  10. The effect of 15 MeV electrons at different irradiation depth on the growth of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmerking, B.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of fast electrons at relative depth doses of 100% and 30% with energy doses of 100 to 400 rad and a dose rate of 200 rad/min on HeLa cells was analyzed. For the evaluation of the irradiation effect, the cell count of irradiated cultures compared with the cell count of not irradiated cultures 16 d after irradiation. The determination of the cell numbers and thus the determination of the counting multiplication rate of the cells was done by isolated cell nuclei with a counter tube and a counter chamber. Irradiation of the cells took place in the plateau phase of the growth curve. After irradiation with a relative depth dose of 100% as well as of 30%, a decrease of the cell number of the cultures can be observed on the 16th day. After irradiation with 200 rad in 100%-depth a survival rate of 72% is found and in 30% depth a survival rate of 60%. At 300 rad the values are 44% for 100% depth, and 30% for 30% depth. For 400 rad the survival rate is 11% at 100% depth and 5% at 30% depth. On the basis of the above-mentioned values the survival rate after irradiation with 30% relative depth dose at the energy doses 200, 300 and 400 rad is increasingly less in comparison with the irradiation with 100% relative depth dose. In the range of 200 to 400 the RBW of the 100% depth in comparison with the 30% depth is constant with a value of 0.88 +- 0.03. The determination of the cell count of a culture by counting isolated nuclei, which is a new method of assessing an irradiation effect is discussed. The significance of this new criterion is compared with the known method of colony counting. The results are compared with results of other works using method of colony counting, and are discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Adjusting irradiance to enhance growth and lipid production of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with monosodium glutamate wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liqun; Ji, Yan; Hu, Wenrong; Pei, Haiyan; Nie, Changliang; Ma, Guixia; Song, Mingming

    2016-09-01

    Light is one of the most important factors affecting microalgae growth and biochemical composition. The influence of illumination on Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with diluted monosodium glutamate wastewater (MSGW) was investigated. Six progressive illumination intensities (0, 30, 90, 150, 200 and 300μmol·m(-2)s(-1)), were used for C. vulgaris cultivation at 25°C. Under 150μmol·m(-2)s(-1), the corresponding specific light intensity of 750×10(-6)μmol·m(-2)s(-1) per cell, algae obtained the maximum biomass concentration (1.46g·L(-1)) on the 7th day, which was 3.5 times of that under 0μmol·m(-2)s(-1), and the greatest average specific growth rate (0.79 d(-1)) in the first 7days. The results showed the importance role of light in mixotrophic growth of C. vulgaris. High light intensities of 200 and 300μmol·m(-2)s(-1) would inhibit microalgae growth to a certain degree. The algal lipid content was the greatest (30.5%) at 150μmol·m(-2)s(-1) light intensity, which was 2.42 times as high as that cultured in dark. The protein content of C. vulgaris decreased at high light intensities of 200 and 300μmol·m(-2)s(-1). The effect of irradiance on carbohydrate content was inversely correlated with that on protein. The available light at an appropriate intensity, not higher than 200μmol·m(-2)s(-1), was feasible for economical cultivation of C. vulgaris in MSGW. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A graphite nanoeraser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ze; Bøggild, Peter; Yang, Jia-rui

    2011-01-01

    We present here a method for cleaning intermediate-size (up to 50 nm) contamination from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and graphene. Electron-beam-induced deposition of carbonaceous material on graphene and graphite surfaces inside a scanning electron microscope, which is difficult to remove...... by conventional techniques, can be removed by direct mechanical wiping using a graphite nanoeraser, thus drastically reducing the amount of contamination. We discuss potential applications of this cleaning procedure....

  13. In situ electron beam irradiated rapid growth of bismuth nanoparticles in bismuth-based glass dielectrics at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Shiv Prakash; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2011-01-01

    In this study, in situ control growth of bismuth nanoparticles (Bi 0 NPs) was demonstrated in bismuth-based glass dielectrics under an electron beam (EB) irradiation at room temperature. The effects of EB irradiation were investigated in situ using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The EB irradiation for 2–8 min enhanced the construction of bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 4–9 nm. The average particle size was found to increase with the irradiation time. Bismuth metal has a melting point of 271 °C and this low melting temperature makes easy the progress of energy induced structural changes during in situ TEM observations. This is a very useful technique in nano-patterning for integrated optics and other applications.

  14. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  15. Effect of low dose irradiation of 60Co γ-rays on seed germination, seedling growth and enzymes activity of Lactuca sativa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiuqing; Zhang Tie

    2012-01-01

    The seeds of Lactuca sativa were irradiated by different doses (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 Gy) of 60 Co γ-rays. The effects of low dose irradiation on seed germination, seedling growth and enzymes activity were investigated. The results indicated that low dose irradiation could promote germination rate, germinating viability, germination rate in the field, root length and height of seedling. The suitable dosage for low dose irradiation for Lactuca sativa was 30 Gy. POD activity after irradiation treatment in the range of 10 to 50 Gy and CAT activity after irradiation treatment in the range of 20 Gy to 40 Gy was lower than that of control. (authors)

  16. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  17. Stimulating action of continuous γ-irradiation with low dose-rates on the growth and development of Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.M.; Nikitina, A.N.; Yurov, S.S.; Primak, V.N.

    1976-01-01

    Continuous γ-irradiation (1.6 - 4.1 rad/hr) of Aspergillus niger cultured in a mineral medium has been shown to stimulate markedly the growth of the culture and the production of organic acids. Optimum conditions for the stimulating effect have been found

  18. Effects of UVB irradiation on keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and receptor (KGFR) expression in cultured human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.; Lee, H.S.T.; Kooshesh, F.; Fujisawa, H.; Sauder, D.N.; Kondo, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Div. of Dermatology, Toronto (Canada)

    1996-06-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and its receptor (KGFR) are thought to play important roles in normal keratinocyte growth and differentiation. Since UVB radiation is known to influence keratinocyte growth, we sought to determine whether UVB would alter the expression of KGF and KGFR. Using a reverse-transcription coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the present study examined the expression of KGF and KGFR mRNA in cultured normal human keratinocytes exposed to UVB irradiation. Total cellular RNA was extracted from cultured keratinocytes at various time points after irradiation, reverse transcribed and used for PCR amplification using primers specific for KGF and KGFR. Constitutive expression of KGFR mRNA, but not KGF mRNA, was detected in normal cultured human keratinocytes. After UVB irradiation at 300 J/m{sup 2}, the KGF mRNA remained undetectable while the KGFR mRNA level was significantly decreased. The down-regulation of KGFR mRNA expression was also confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a decreased positive signal of KGFR in human keratinocytes after UVB irradiation. Our results suggest a possible role for the KGF-KGFR signalling pathway in the skin after exposure to UVB, and that UVB-induced growth inhibition of keratinocytes in hyperproliferative skin disorders may be related to downregulation of KGFR. (au) 39 refs.

  19. The influence of enhanced UV-B irradiation on the growth and composition of plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tevini, M.; Iwanzik, W.

    1982-02-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare), corn (Zea mays), bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and radish (Raphanus Sativus) were irradiated under a lighting device for 5 to 10 days continuously at an increased UV-B fluence rate. These four species reacted differently to the elevated UV-radiation in their growth parameters, composition and leaf surface. Bean seedlings incurred the greatest damage, radish and barley seedlings less damage, and corn seedlings were hardly affected. The fresh weight, loaf area and chlorophyll, carstenoid and galactolipid contents were reduced in all species, whereas protein contents were increased throughout compared to controls. An approx. 50% increase in flavaroid content was noted in barley and radish seedlings. Studies on barley seedlings showed the effects on growth parameters and composition to be more market with increasing UV-B fluence rate. Fresh weights, chlorophyll and carotinoid contents were reduced proportionately, in contrast to flavaroid content which increased with increasing fluence rate to 180% of the control value. A bronze discolouration of the leaves appeared regularly at the highest fluence rate. (orig./AJ) [de

  20. Effects of gamma irradiation and refrigeration on Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth in orange juice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domarco, R.E.; Spoto, M.H.F.; Walder, J.M.M.; Blumer, L.; Matraia, C.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation and of low temperatures was studied on yeast growth in orange juice. Concentrated orange juice (65 deg Brix) was diluted to 10.5 deg Brix and inoculated with commercial biological yeasts. The were irradiated with doses of 0.0 (control), 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 kGy (cobalt-60), with a 2.83 kGy/h dose rate. all the samples were stored at 0 deg, 5 deg and 25 deg C for periods of 1; 7; 14; 21; 30; 60 and 90 days of storage. Combined treatment of 1 kGy and refrigeration at 0 deg C was effective for orange juice conservation for 90 days of storage at 5 deg C. At 25 deg C only the two highest radiation doses (5.0 and 7.5 kGy) were effective to control yeast growth in orange juice. (author)

  1. {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C behaviour in UNGG graphite during leaching experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, C.; Guy, C.; Comte, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - C.E.A., Laboratoire d' Analyses Radiochimiques et Chimiques (L.A.R.C.) 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    Graphite has been used as a moderator in Natural Uranium Graphite Gas reactors. Among the radionuclides, the long-lived activation product {sup 36}Cl and {sup 14}C, which are abundant in graphite after irradiation can be the main contributors to the dose during disposal. This paper deals with the first results obtained on irradiated graphite from French G2 reactor. Both leaching and diffusion experiments have been performed in order to understand and quantify the radionuclides behaviour. Chlorine leaching seems to be controlled by diffusion transport through graphite matrix. On the contrary {sup 14}C leaching is very low, probably because after irradiation, the remaining {sup 14}C was produced from {sup 13}C activation in the crystalline structure of graphite. (authors)

  2. Patterns of radial and shoot growth of five tree species in a gamma-irradiated northern Wisconsin forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavitkovski, J.; Buech, R.R.; Rudolph, T.D.; Bauer, E.O.

    1977-01-01

    Patterns of radial and shoot growth of Abies balsamea, Acer rubrum, A. saccharum, Betula papyrifera, and Populus tremuloides were observed before (1970) and during (1972) gamma-irradiation of forest communities in the Enterprise Radiation Forest. Measurements were made during the growing season along the radiation gradient, and year days (YD) of 10, 25, 50, 75, and 90 percent of total growth were obtained by interpolation. The experimental area was divided into an ''affected'' and a ''no-effect'' zone. The boundary of the affected zone coincided with radiation exposures that effectively reduced the 1972 radial growth of a given species in comparison to the preirradiation growth. In 1970 and in the no-effect zone in 1972, shoot growth of the four broadleaved species started and terminated earlier than the radial growth. In A. balsamea the radial growth started earlier and terminated later than the shoot growth. In all five species, duration of radial growth was significantly longer than that of shoot growth. Radial growth of A. rubrum, A. saccharum, and B. papyrifera started significantly earlier in 1972 than in 1970, but no difference between years was found in the early-starting A. balsamea and P. tremuloides. In contrast, shoot growth of all five species started earlier in 1970 than in 1972. It is suggested that temperature regimes during the early developmental stages were probably responsible for the difference. In the affected zone in 1972, the radiation depressed radial growth and changed its normal pattern in all five species

  3. Study of the mechanisms controlling the oxide growth under irradiation: characterization of irradiated zircaloy-4 and Zr-1 Nb-O oxide scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossis, Ph.; Thomazet, J.; Lefebvre, F.

    2002-01-01

    In PWRs, the Zr-1Nb-O alloy shows a marked enhancement in corrosion resistance in comparison with Zircaloy-4. The aim of this work is to analyze the reasons for these different behaviors and to determine the respective nature of the oxide growth controlling mechanisms under irradiation. Samples taken from Zircaloy-4 irradiated 1, 2, and 4 cycles and Zr-1Nb-O irradiated 1 and 3 cycles have been systematically characterized by optical microscopy, SEM coupled with image analysis, hydride distribution, and XRD. Specific TEM characterizations have been performed on the Zr-1Nb-O samples. A XPS analysis of a nonirradiated sample is also reported. It has been shown that under irradiation the slow oxidation kinetics of the Zr-1Nb-O alloy is associated with very regular metal-oxide interface and oxide layer. On the contrary, the accelerated oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 is associated with highly perturbed metal-oxide interface and oxide layer. On both irradiated alloys, cracks are observed to initiate preferentially above the delayed parts of the oxidation front. Hydrogen intake during water oxidation in PWR environment is found to be much lower on the Zr-1Nb-O alloy than on Zircaloy-4. More β-ZrO 2 is found on the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 than on Zr-1NbO after oxidation in PWR. Classical irradiation-induced microstructural evolution is observed in the Zr-1Nb-O metallic alloy after 3 cycles, i.e., a fine β-Nb precipitation. β-Nb precipitates are observed to undergo a delayed oxidation associated with a crystalline to amorphous transformation. After water oxidation in autoclave, a pronounced Nb segregation is detected on the oxide surface of a Zr-1Nb-O sample. These results suggest that the oxidation kinetics of Zircaloy-4 is controlled essentially by oxygen diffusion through the inner barrier layer, which is significantly accelerated under irradiation. The oxidation kinetics of Zr-1Nb-O is controlled by both oxygen diffusion through the inner barrier and by

  4. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappano, Peter J [Oak Ridge, TN; Rogers, Michael R [Clinton, TN

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  5. Role of post irradiation growth delay in chemical radioprotection by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangabhagirathi, R.; Rao, B.S.; Bhat, N.N.

    2004-01-01

    Post irradiation treatment with caffeine enhanced the survival of wild type diploid yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae X2180. The presence of caffeine during gamma irradiation also affected a similar enhancement in survival. These observations suggest that caffeine imparted significant protection against radiation. Effectiveness of caffeine, even when present only during the post irradiation period, suggests that it modulates the post irradiation recovery process in yeast cells. (author)

  6. Effects of low doses of short-term gamma irradiation on growth and development through two generations of Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, R.; Misset, M.T. [UMR-CNRS 6553 Ecobio, Equipe Evolution des Populations et des Especes, Universite de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu Bat. 14, Rennes Cedex F 35042 (France); Chenal, C. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie, Universite de Rennes 1, Centre Regional de Lutte contre le Cancer, Rennes Cedex F 35062 (France)

    2004-03-29

    The effects of short-term gamma radiation on pea plants were investigated by exposing 5-day-old seedlings with doses ranging from 0 to 60 Gy, and studying plant growth and development over two generations after irradiation. Doses higher than 6 Gy significantly inhibited the G1 plant growth and productivity, and no seedling survived irradiation with 40 Gy and above. These effects were transmitted and were even more severe in the next generation, G2. Irradiated G1 ({>=}10 Gy) and G2 ({>=}0.4 Gy) plants were significantly smaller than controls. The mean number of pods produced per plant was reduced by at least 20% at all doses in both G1 and G2. In parallel, the mean numbers of ovules and normally developed seeds per pod were significantly reduced after 10 Gy in G1 and after 0.4 Gy in G2, leading to a significant drop in seed production. This effect was correlated with a linear decrease in male fertility linked to abnormal meiosis (tetrads with micronuclei) as a function of doses from 0 to 10 Gy, in G1 and G2 plants. These long-term changes in plant development demonstrate a genomic instability induced by irradiation. However, there were neither quantitative nor qualitative changes in storage proteins in G1 seeds at any of the irradiation doses tested from 0 to 10 Gy.

  7. Effects of low doses of short-term gamma irradiation on growth and development through two generations of Pisum sativum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaka, R.; Misset, M.T.; Chenal, C.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of short-term gamma radiation on pea plants were investigated by exposing 5-day-old seedlings with doses ranging from 0 to 60 Gy, and studying plant growth and development over two generations after irradiation. Doses higher than 6 Gy significantly inhibited the G1 plant growth and productivity, and no seedling survived irradiation with 40 Gy and above. These effects were transmitted and were even more severe in the next generation, G2. Irradiated G1 (≥10 Gy) and G2 (≥0.4 Gy) plants were significantly smaller than controls. The mean number of pods produced per plant was reduced by at least 20% at all doses in both G1 and G2. In parallel, the mean numbers of ovules and normally developed seeds per pod were significantly reduced after 10 Gy in G1 and after 0.4 Gy in G2, leading to a significant drop in seed production. This effect was correlated with a linear decrease in male fertility linked to abnormal meiosis (tetrads with micronuclei) as a function of doses from 0 to 10 Gy, in G1 and G2 plants. These long-term changes in plant development demonstrate a genomic instability induced by irradiation. However, there were neither quantitative nor qualitative changes in storage proteins in G1 seeds at any of the irradiation doses tested from 0 to 10 Gy

  8. Growth of legionella and other heterotrophic bacteria in a circulating cooling water system exposed to ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusnetsov, J.M.; Miettinen, I.T.; Martikainen, P.J.; Keskitalo, P.J.; Ahonen, H.E.; Tulkki, A.I.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on the growth and occurrence of legionella and other heterotrophic bacteria in a circulating cooling water system was studied. Water of the reservoir was circulated once in 28 h through a side-stream open channel u.v. radiator consisting of two lamps. Viable counts of legionellas and heterotrophic bacteria in water immediately after the u.v. treatment were 0-12 and 0.7-1.2% of those in the reservoir, respectively. U.v. irradiation increased the concentration of easily assimilable organic carbon. In the u.v. irradiated water samples incubated in the laboratory the viable counts of heterotropic bacteria reached the counts in reservoir water within 5 d. The increase in viable counts was mainly due to reactivation of bacterial cells damaged by u.v. light, not because of bacterial multiplication. Despite u.v. irradiation the bacterial numbers in the reservoir water, including legionellas, did not decrease during the experimental period of 33 d. The main growth of bacteria in the reservoir occurred in biofilm and sediment, which were never exposed to u.v. irradiation. (Author)

  9. Damage growth in Si during self-ion irradiation: A study of ion effects over an extended energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, O.W.; El-Ghor, M.K.; White, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Damage nucleation/growth in single-crystal Si during ion irradiation is discussed. For MeV ions, the rate of growth as well as the damage morphology are shown to vary widely along the track of the ion. This is attributed to a change in the dominant, defect-related reactions as the ion penetrates the crystal. The nature of these reactions were elucidated by studying the interaction of MeV ions with different types of defects. The defects were introduced into the Si crystal prior to high-energy irradiation by self-ion implantation at a medium energy (100 keV). Varied damage morphologies were produced by implanting different ion fluences. Electron microscopy and ion-channeling measurements, in conjunction with annealing studies, were used to characterize the damage. Subtle changes in the predamage morphology are shown to result in markedly different responses to the high-energy irradiation, ranging from complete annealing of the damage to rapid growth. These divergent responses occur over a narrow range of dose (2--3 times 10 14 cm -2 ) of the medium-energy ions; this range also marks a transition in the growth behavior of the damage during the predamage implantation. A model is proposed which accounts for these observations and provides insight into ion-induced growth of amorphous layers in Si and the role of the amorphous/crystalline interface in this process. 15 refs, 9 figs

  10. The effect of total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation during childhood and adolescence on growth and endocrine function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiper, A.D.; Stanhope, R.; Lau, T.; Grant, D.B.; Blacklock, H.; Chessells, J.M.; Plowman, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen children with acute leukaemia and myeloproliferative disorders were investigated for growth and endocrine dysfunction. All had undergone bone marrow transplantation prepared with cyclophosphamide and single fraction total body irradiation (900-1000 cGy) between 1.5 and 3.8 (mean 2.2) years previously. The majority exhibited growth failure, of multiple aetiology. Ten patients, of whom eight had had previous prophylactic cranial irradiation, had evidence of growth hormone deficiency based on reduced growth hormone reponse to insulin induced hypoglycaemia. Three had evidence of hypothalamic damage. Gonadal failure was common. All four girls of adolescent age (10.6-14.1 years) had ovarian failure requiring sex steroid replacement. Of eight boys of adolescent age (12.3-18.3 years), two had testicular failure requiring sex steroid supplements. Both had had previous testicular irradiation. Five others had compensated gonadal failure; one had normal Leydig cell function. Abnormalities of the TSH response to TRH occurred in 10 patients but only three had overt hypothyroidism. Unlike growth hormone deficiency, gonadal and thyroid dysfunction showed no correlation with previous cranial radiotherapy. (author)

  11. The role of natural growth stimulators in regulation of regeneration processes in small intestinal epithelium after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziekiewicz, M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, basing on recently published data, the influence of growth factors on small intestine epithelium regeneration after irradiation is presented. Our knowledge of growth control in the small intestine mucosa may become an accepted mode of radio-, chemotherapy and the treatment of acute radiation sickness in the future. Results of recent studies suggest that there are different factors which can modulate the process of epithelium regeneration. Some of them such as gastrin, enteroglucagon, CCK, EGF, FGF, TGF and IL-11 are able to enhance this process. In addition, other factor-PGE-2 is responsible for not only stimulation of small intestine epithelium growth but radioprotection as well. (author)

  12. Efect of Gamma 60Co Irradiation on The Growth, Lipid Content and Fatty Acid Composition of Botryococcus sp. Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Ermavitalini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Botryococcus sp. is one of microalgae species that has a high lipid content as much as 75% of their dry weight. But, lipid production by microalgae is regulated by their environmental condition (pH, light, temperature, nutrition, etc. Mutagenesis induced by Gamma 60Co irradiation can be utilized to alter the Botryococcus sp. genetic to get microalgae mutant strain that can produce a higher lipid content than the wild strain. Botryococcus sp. was irradiated with different doses of gamma ray of 60Co  (0, 2, 4, 6, and 10 Gy,  and the effect  on the growth, lipid content, and fatty acid composition of microalgae were observed. Research design used is random complete (RAL with 95 %  confident level for quantitive analysis based on the biomass and lipid contents. More over fatty acid composition was analyzed by Gas Cromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. Results showed that Gamma irradiated gave an effect on growth and lipid content of Botryococcus sp. But between the control treatment (0 Gy with microalgae irradiated dose of 2 Gy, 4 Gy and 6 Gy were not significantly different. Whereas between the control with 10 Gy irradiated was significantly different. The highest biomassa and lipid content are found in 10 Gy irradiated microalgae with 0.833 gram biomass and 41% lipid content. Fatty acid profile of Botryococcus sp. control has 6 fatty acids while 10 Gy irradiated microalgae has 12 fatty acids, with the long-chain fatty acids increased, whereas short-chain fatty acids decreased.

  13. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electrochemical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment, ECT of graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones with respect to the treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A small quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes.

  14. Electrochemical treatment of graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlovilin, V.I.; Egorov, I.M.; Zhernovoj, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    In the course of investigating various modes of electroche-- mical treatment (ECT) it has been found that graphite anode treatment begins under the ''glow mode''. A behaviour of some marks of graphite with the purpose of ECT technique development in different electrolytes has been tested. Electrolytes have been chosen of three types: highly alkaline (pH 13-14), neutral (pH-Z) and highly acidic (pH 1-2). For the first time parallel to mechanical electroerosion treatment ECT graphite and carbon graphite materials previously considered chemically neutral is proposed. ECT of carbon graphite materials has a number of advantages as compared with electroerrosion and mechanical ones this is treatment rate and purity (ronghness) of the surface. A sMall quantity of sludge (6-8%) under ECT is in highly alkali electrolytes

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on growth and aflatoxin production by certain local aflatoxigenic isolates of aspergillus flavus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, A.A.I.; Atalla, M.A.; El-Shayeb, N.M.A.; Ahmed, A.A.; Zeinat, Kamel

    1998-01-01

    The radiation D 1 0 values of two aflatoxigenic isolates of aspergillus flavus (No. 1 and No. 184) were determined. The D 1 0 -value of A. flavus isolate No.1 was found to be 0.43 and 0.50 kGy in physiological saline soulution and smoked herrings, while the D 1 0 - value of A. SFlavus isolateNo. 184 was 0.53 and -0.62 KGy in saline solution and raisins, respectively. The irradiated (0.05, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.5 KGy) and non-irradiated spores of two fungi were separately inoculated into rice-corn steep liquor and incubated at 28 degree C for 12 days. The fungal mycelial dry weight, as a function of growth, decreased with increasing gamma irradiation doses. Irradiation doses used gratly reduced aflatoxins formation. Smoked herrings and raisins were inoculated with spores of A. flavus isolated No.1 and No.184, respectively, then irradiated at 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 KGy and stored for two months at room temperature. It was found that a gamma irradiation dose of 1.5 KGy greatly reduced the amount of aflatoxins produced, while 3.0 and 4.5 KGy completely prevented aflatoxin formation

  16. Hydrogen adsorption on and solubility in graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanashenko, S.L.; Wampler, W.R.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental data on adsorption and solubility of hydrogen isotopes in graphite over a wide range of temperatures and pressures are reviewed. Langmuir adsorption isotherms are proposed for the hydrogen-graphite interaction. The entropy and enthalpy of adsorption are estimated, allowing for effects of relaxation of dangling sp 2 bonds. Three kinds of traps are proposed: edge carbon atoms of interstitial loops with an adsorption enthalpy relative to H 2 gas of -4.4 eV/H 2 (unrelaxed, Trap 1), edge carbon atoms at grain surfaces with an adsorption enthalpy of -2.3 eV/H 2 (relaxed, Trap 2), and basal plane adsorption sites with an enthalpy of +2.43 eV/H 2 (Trap 3). The adsorption capacity of different types of graphite depends on the concentration of traps which depends on the crystalline microstructure of the material. The number of potential sites for the 'true solubility' (Trap 3) is assumed to be about one site per carbon atom in all types of graphite, but the endothermic character of this solubility leads to a negligible H inventory compared to the concentration of hydrogen in type 1 and type 2 traps for temperatures and gas pressures used in the experiments. Irradiation with neutrons or carbon atoms increases the concentration of type 1 and type 2 traps from about 20 and 200 appm respectively for unirradiated (POCO AXF-5Q) graphite to about 1500 and 5000 appm, respectively, at damage levels above 1 dpa. (orig.)

  17. Influence of Gamma-Irradiation on the Growth of Aspergillus spp. on Feeds for Ensuring Feed Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.S.; Woo, J.H.; Kim, J.T.; Park, N.H.; Kim, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. is widely spread in the world on feeds and foods. They have been known to produce aflatoxins, which are mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum gamma-irradiation dose for controling the growth of Aspergillus spp. to ensure safety of feeds. Four species fungal spore (10∨7 spore/mL) exposed to 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy of gamma radiation were inhibited in their growth and AFBâ‚ productivity by greater-than or equal to 5 kGy. Meantime, the growth of fungal inoculated on feeds was inhibited at greater-than or equal to 3 kGy. However, AFBâ‚ presented in aqueous solution was not be inactivated completely by less-than or equal to 10 kGy irradiation. These results indicate that Aspergillus spp. on feeds could be controlled by 5 kGy gamma-irradiation but detoxification of AFBâ‚ demands a higher dose of gamma-irradiation (greater-than or equal to 10 kGy)

  18. Influence of Gamma-Irradiation on the Growth of Aspergillus spp. on Feeds for Ensuring Feed Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, B.R.; Kim, K.Y.; Ryu, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. is widely spread in the world on feeds and foods. They have been known to produce aflatoxins, which are mutagenic and carcinogenic to humans. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum gamma-irradiation dose for controlling the growth of Aspergillus spp. to ensure safety of feeds. Four species fungal spore (10?7 spore/mL) exposed to 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy of gamma radiation were inhibited in their growth and AFB? productivity by greater-than or equal to 5 kGy. Meantime, the growth of fungal inoculated on feeds was inhibited at greater-than or equal to 3 kGy. However, AFB? presented in aqueous solution was not be inactivated completely by less-than or equal to 10 kGy irradiation. These results indicate that Aspergillus spp. on feeds could be controlled by 5 kGy gamma-irradiation but detoxification of AFB? demands a higher dose of gamma-irradiation (greater-than or equal to 10 kGy)

  19. Effect of irradiation, pruning and removal of in vitro formed roots on ex vitro growth in micro propagated grape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbaji, T.; Ayyoubi, Z.

    2003-01-01

    In vitro rootstock (Ru 140) and Helwani variety were cultured on DSD1 media, were irradiated at low doses of gamma irradiation before acclimatization. Ru 140 were exposed to 0-5 Gy, while Helwani was exposed to 0-7 Gy. Then, the plants were divided into three different groups: in the first group the plant roots were pruned, in the second the plant roots were completely removed and in the third group the plant roots were kept intact (control). The ex vitro plants were observed after 45 days of planting. Shoots growth, leaf number and dry weight of Ru 140 were significantly higher than those of the control when roots were pruned and 5 Gy was applied. Those parameters were negatively affected by root removal. Gamma irradiation had a positive effect on the control comparing to unirradiated plants. Root pruning had positive effects on shoot growth, leaf number and dry weight of Helwani variety, while root removal had a contrary effect on this variety. Gamma irradiation positively affected shoot growth and dry weight of control comparing to unirradiated plants, similar effect was observed on leaf number of control and pruned plant of Helwani. (author)

  20. Effect of Irradiation, Pruning and Removal of In Vitro Formed Roots on Ex Vitro Growth in Micropropagated Grape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charabaji, T.; Ayyoubi, Z.; Karajoly, I

    2007-01-01

    In vitro rootstock (Ru 140) and Helwani variety were cultured on DSD1 media, were irradiated at low doses of gamma irradiation before acclimatization. Ru 140 was exposed to 0-5 Gy, while Helwani was exposed to 0-7 Gy. Then, the plants were divided into three different procedures, 1)- the plant roots were pruned, 2)- the plant roots were completely removed, 3)- the plant roots were kept intact (control). The ex vitro plants were observed after 45 days of planting. Shoots growth, leaf number and dry weight of Ru 140 were significantly higher than those of the control when roots were pruned and 5 Gy was applied. Those parameters were negatively affected by root removal. Gamma irradiation had a positive effect on the control comparing to unirradiated plants. Root pruning had positive effects on shoot growth, leaf number and dry weight of Helwani variety, while root removal had a contrary effect on this variety. Gamma irradiation positively affected shoot growth and dry weight of control comparing to unirradiated plants, similar effect was observed on leaf number of control and pruned plant of Helwani.

  1. Stoichiometry of photosystem I, photosystem II, and phycobilisomes in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum as a function of growth irradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mustardy, L.; Gantt, E. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (USA)); Dennenberg, R.J.; Jursinic, P.A. (Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Cells of the red alga Porphyridium cruentum (ATCC 50161) exposed to increasing growth irradiance exhibited up to a three-fold reduction in photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) and phycobilisomes but little change in the relative numbers of these components. Batch cultures of P. cruentum were grown under four photon flux densities of continuous white light; 6 (low light LL), 35 (medium light, ML), 180 (high light, HL), and 280 (very high light, VHL) microeinsteins per square meter per second and sampled in the exponential phase of growth. Ratios of PSII to PSI ranged between 0.43 and 0.54. About three PSII centers per phycobilisome were found, regardless of growth irradiance. The phycoerythrin content of phycobilisomes decreased by about 25% for HL and VHL compared to LL and ML cultures. The unit sizes of PSI (chlorophyll/P{sub 700}) and PSII (chlorophyll/Q{sub A}) decreased by about 20% with increase in photon flux density from 6 to 280 microeinsteins per square meter per second. A threefold reduction in cell content of chlorophyll at the higher photon flux densities was accompanied by a twofold reduction in {beta}-carotene, and a drastic reduction in thylakoid membrane area. Cell content of zeaxanthin, the major carotenoid in P. cruentum, did not vary with growth irradiance, suggesting a role other than light-harvesting. HL cultures had a growth rate twice that of ML, eight times that of LL, and slightly greater than that of VHL cultures. Cell volume increased threefold from LL to VHL, but volume of the single chloroplast did not change. From this study it is evident that a relatively fixed stoichiometry of PSI, PSII, and phycobilisomes is maintained in the photosynthetic apparatus of this red alga over a wide range of growth irradiance.

  2. Graphite behaviour in relation to the fuel element design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Manzel, R. [OECD High Temperature Reactor Project Dragon, Winfrith (United Kingdom); Blackstone, R. [Reactor Centrum, Petten (Netherlands); Delle, W. [Kernforschungsanlage, Juelich (Germany); Lungagnani, V. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands); Krefeld, R. [Joint Nuclear Research Centre, Euratom, Petten (Netherlands)

    1969-09-01

    The first designs of H.T.R. power reactors will probably use a Gilsocarbon based graphite for both the moderator/carrier blocks and for the fuel tubes. The initial physical properties and changes of dimensions, thermal expansion coefficient, Young*s modulus, and thermal conductivity on irradiation of Gilsocarbon graphites to typical reactor dwell-time fast neutron doses of 4 * 1021 cm -2 Ni dose Dido equivalent are given and values for the irradiation creep constant are presented. The influence of these property changes and those of chemical corrosion are considered briefly in relation to the present fuel element designs. The selection of an eventual less costly replacement graphite for Gilsocarbon graphite is discussed in terms of materials properties.

  3. The effect of gamma irradiation on the growth and flowering of stem chrysanthemum (chrysanthemum morifolium ramat.) cv. pink fiji

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ita Dwimahyani

    2007-01-01

    Rooted shoot cuttings have been irradiated by gamma rays with 0, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Gy doses, and then planted in green house on Gadog, Ciawi. Plant growth from each doses proved to be varied, both in height and flowering process. Plants with dose 15 Gy and higher had shown late flowering time and dwarfing. The optimal dose for chrysanthemum cv. Pink Fiji irradiation is suggested to be 10-15 Gy. The highest mutation frequency shown on flower color is yellow, followed by orange, white, dark pink and light pink. (author)

  4. Effect of gamma-irradiation and refrigerated storage on mold growth and keeping quality of strawberry (Fragaria sp) cv 'Confitura'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, P.R.; Meena, R.S.; Dar, M.A.; Wani, A.M.; Mir, M.A.; Shafi, F.

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation of fresh matured strawberries at 0.5-2.0 kGy and storage under ambient and refrigerated conditions was tested for delaying the mold appearance and extension of storage life. Radiation dose of 2.0 kGy was effective in extending the storage life of fresh strawberries by 2 days under ambient conditions. Samples irradiated at 1.5 and 2.0 kGy followed by refrigerated storage delayed the mold growth significantly (p≤0.05) and extended the storage life by 8 days. (author)

  5. Effect of irradiation ad incubation of palm oil empty fruit bunch medium on the Growth of rice mushroom (volvariella volvaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmawi; Suwadji, E.

    1998-01-01

    Study on the effect of irradiation and time incubation of composted palm oil empty fruit bunch (EFB) were conducted in growth chamber in the plastic bag as growth medium. Treatments were consisted of sterilization of composted EFB growth medium by autoclave heating were conducted at 2.0 kg/cm 2 for 40 minutes and gamma irradiation at the dose of 0, 15, 30, and 45kGy. After sterilization, EFB medium were inoculated using mushroom seed of V. volvaceae. The time of incubation of EFB medium after inoculation was 2 and 4 weeks before mushroom harvesting. Growth chamber was maintained at 28-35 0 C room temperature and humidity > 80%. Parameters of the experiment were determined on mushroom analysis i.e. fat, protein, and content and weight of mushroom. analysis od EFB medium after incubation were determined i.e. total fiber and percentage of rendement. Results of the experiment showed that dose of 45 kGy effected on mushroom fat content 0.52% which was decreasing regards to the delay of incubation period. Irradiation treatment did not effect EFB fat content compared to non irradiated EFB (0.82%). Irradiation treatment and one.variety produced number of plaincreasing on mushroom protein content. Mushroom starch content was obtained on the dose of 15 kGy and 4 weeks of incubation period 3.09 and 3.13% respectively. The dose of 45 kGy and autoclave heating were decreasing total fiber of EFB medium 29.29 and 28.02% respectively. The dose of 45 kGy on EFB medium with 2 weeks of incubation period produced weight of mushroom 30.92 and 27.73 g/bag respectively. (author)

  6. Asymptomatic Intracorneal Graphite Deposits following Graphite Pencil Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Philip, Swetha Sara; John, Deepa; John, Sheeja Susan

    2012-01-01

    Reports of graphite pencil lead injuries to the eye are rare. Although graphite is considered to remain inert in the eye, it has been known to cause severe inflammation and damage to ocular structures. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with intracorneal graphite foreign bodies following a graphite pencil injury.

  7. Nonequilibrium statistical theory of bubble nucleation and growth under neutron and proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.; Sommer, W.F.; Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in metals under particle irradiation is described by a non-equilibrium statistics method. This method gives a set of equations for the evolution of bubbles and an approximate solution for a distribution function of bubble size as a function of fluence and temperature. The distribution function gives the number of bubbles of radius r at time t, N(r,t)dr, as a function of size, r/r 0 (r 0 is the radius of a bubble nucleus). It is found that N(r,t)dr increases with fluence. Also, the peak value of N(r,t)dt shifts to higher r/r 0 with increasing fluence. Nucleation depends mainly on helium concentration and defect cluster concentration while bubble growth is controlled mainly by the vacancy concentration and a fluctuation coefficient. If suitable material parameters are chosen, a reasonable distribution function for bubble size is obtained. The helium diffusion coefficient is found to be less than that for vacancies by five orders of magnitude. The fraction of helium remaining in matrix is less than 10 -2 ; the majority of the helium is associated with the bubbles

  8. Graphite development for gas-cooled reactors in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) graphite activities in the USA which currently include the following research and development tasks: coke examination; effects of irradiation; variability of physical properties (mechanical, thermal-physical, and fracture); fatigue behavior, oxidation behavior; NDE techniques; structural design criteria; and carbon-carbon composite control rod clad materials. These tasks support nuclear grade graphite manufacturing technology including nondestructive examination of billets and components. Moreover, data shall be furnished to support design and licensing of graphite components for the MHTGR

  9. Development and engineering plan for graphite spent fuels conditioning program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendixsen, C.L.; Fillmore, D.L.; Kirkham, R.J.; Lord, D.L.; Phillips, M.B.; Pinto, A.P.; Staiger, M.D.

    1993-09-01

    Irradiated (or spent) graphite fuel stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) includes Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor and Peach Bottom reactor spent fuels. Conditioning and disposal of spent graphite fuels presently includes three broad alternatives: (1) direct disposal with minimum fuel packaging or conditioning, (2) mechanical disassembly of spent fuel into high-level waste and low-level waste portions to minimize geologic repository requirements, and (3) waste-volume reduction via burning of bulk graphite and other spent fuel chemical processing of the spent fuel. A multi-year program for the engineering development and demonstration of conditioning processes is described. Program costs, schedules, and facility requirements are estimated

  10. Ag-catalyzed InAs nanowires grown on transferable graphite flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Holdt, Jakob; Kanne, Thomas; Sestoft, Joachim E.

    2016-01-01

    on exfoliated graphite flakes by molecular beam epitaxy. Ag catalyzes the InAs nanowire growth selectively on the graphite flakes and not on the underlying InAs substrates. This allows for easy transfer of the flexible graphite flakes with as-grown nanowire ensembles to arbitrary substrates by a micro...

  11. Assessment of management modes for graphite from reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, I.F.; Smith, G.M.; Saunders, L.J.; Kaye, C.J.; Martin, T.J.; Clarke, G.H.; Wakerley, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    A technological and radiological assessment has been made of the management options for irradiated graphite wastes from the decommissioning of Magnox and advanced gas-cooled reactors. Detailed radionuclide inventories have been estimated, the main contribution being from activation of the graphite and its stable impurities. Three different packaging methods for graphite have been described; each could be used for either sea or land disposal, is logistically feasible and could be achieved at reasonable cost. Leaching tests have been carried out on small samples of irradiated graphite under a variety of conditions including those of the deep ocean bed; the different conditions had little effect on the observed leach rates of radiologically significant radionuclides. Radiological assessments were made of four generic options for disposal of packaged graphite: on the deep ocean bed, in deep geologic repositories at two different types of site, and by shallow land burial. Incineration of graphite was also considered, though this option presents logistical problems. With appropriate precautions during the lifetime of the Cobalt-60 content of the graphite, any of the options considered could give acceptably low doses to individuals, and all would merit further investigation in site-specific contexts

  12. Growth and quality of soybean sprouts (Glycine max L. Merrill) as affected by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Juan; Li, Xihong; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Weili; Jiang, Yuqian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, soybean seeds and sprouts (Glycine max L. Merrill) were exposed to radiation doses up to 3.0 kGy. The irradiated and non-irradiated seeds were germinated, and then germination rate, sprouts length, vitamin C content, antioxidants and visual and olfactory quality were determined after irradiation. Results indicated that there was no significant difference in the germination rate and sprouts length between the control and 0.3 kGy treated soybeans, however, the reductions in sprouts length of the 1.0 kGy and 3.0 kGy treated samples were quite significant with reductions of 20.4% and 58.8%, respectively. Irradiated sprouts had similar visual and olfactory quality as the non-irradiated one. Therefore, irradiation of seeds alone would have limited value in terms of commercial use due to reduced germination and length of sprouts. However, irradiation of sprouts at doses up to 3.0 kGy was feasible to enhance microbial safety of sprouts. - Highlights: ► Investigated the germination rate and the sprouts length after irradiation. ► Indicated the effect of irradiation on the antioxidants of the soybean sprouts. ► Evaluated the visual and olfactory quality of irradiated samples.

  13. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sejal; Srambikkal, Nishad; Yadav, Hansa D.; Shetake, Neena; Balla, Murali M. S.; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Pritha; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-01-01

    Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE) in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells) tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander) WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated) when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2) and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper insight about

  14. Molecular Understanding of Growth Inhibitory Effect from Irradiated to Bystander Tumor Cells in Mouse Fibrosarcoma Tumor Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejal Desai

    Full Text Available Even though bystander effects pertaining to radiation risk assessment has been extensively studied, the molecular players of radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE in the context of cancer radiotherapy are poorly known. In this regard, the present study is aimed to investigate the effect of irradiated tumor cells on the bystander counterparts in mouse fibrosarcoma (WEHI 164 cells tumor model. Mice co-implanted with WEHI 164 cells γ-irradiated with a lethal dose of 15 Gy and unirradiated (bystander WEHI 164 cells showed inhibited tumor growth, which was measured in terms of tumor volume and Luc+WEHI 164 cells based bioluminescence in vivo imaging. Histopathological analysis and other assays revealed decreased mitotic index, increased apoptosis and senescence in these tumor tissues. In addition, poor angiogenesis was observed in these tumor tissues, which was further confirmed by fluorescence imaging of tumor vascularisation and CD31 expression by immuno-histochemistry. Interestingly, the growth inhibitory bystander effect was exerted more prominently by soluble factors obtained from the irradiated tumor cells than the cellular fraction. Cytokine profiling of the supernatants obtained from the irradiated tumor cells showed increased levels of VEGF, Rantes, PDGF, GMCSF and IL-2 and decreased levels of IL-6 and SCF. Comparative proteomic analysis of the supernatants from the irradiated tumor cells showed differential expression of total 24 protein spots (21 up- and 3 down-regulated when compared with the supernatant from the unirradiated control cells. The proteins which showed substantially higher level in the supernatant from the irradiated cells included diphosphate kinase B, heat shock cognate, annexin A1, angiopoietin-2, actin (cytoplasmic 1/2 and stress induced phosphoprotein 1. However, the levels of proteins like annexin A2, protein S100 A4 and cofilin was found to be lower in this supernatant. In conclusion, our results provided deeper

  15. Recent developments in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Overall, the HTGR graphite situation is in excellent shape. In both of the critical requirements, fuel blocks and support structures, adequate graphites are at hand and improved grades are sufficiently far along in truncation. In the aerospace field, GraphNOL N3M permits vehicle performance with confidence in trajectories unobtainable with any other existing material. For fusion energy applications, no other graphite can simultaneously withstand both extreme thermal shock and neutron damage. Hence, the material promises to create new markets as well as to offer a better candidate material for existing applications

  16. Graphite for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eatherly, W.P.; Clausing, R.E.; Strehlow, R.A.; Kennedy, C.R.; Mioduszewski, P.K.

    1987-03-01

    Graphite is in widespread and beneficial use in present fusion energy devices. This report reflects the view of graphite materials scientists on using graphite in fusion devices. Graphite properties are discussed with emphasis on application to fusion reactors. This report is intended to be introductory and descriptive and is not intended to serve as a definitive information source

  17. Microbial growth and sensory quality of dried potato slices irradiated by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Song, Hyeon-Jeong; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation was applied to secure the microbial safety of dried purple sweet potato. After purple sweet potato slices had been dehydrated with 20% (w/w) maltodextrin solution, the samples were irradiated at doses 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 kGy and then stored at 20 o C for 60 days. Microbiological data indicated that the populations of total aerobic bacteria and of yeast and molds significantly decreased with increase in irradiation dosage. Specifically, microbial load was reduced by about three log cycles at 6 kGy compared to those of the control. Based on the color measurement of the potato slices, electron beam irradiation treatment did not affect the color quality. Sensory evaluation results also showed that electron beam irradiation did not affect overall sensory scores during storage. These results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be useful for improving microbial safety without impairing the quality of the potato slices during storage.

  18. [Growth and metabolite production of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. (Chroococcales) in function to irradiance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Loaiza, Néstor; Guevara, Miguel; Lodeiros, César; Morales, Ever

    2008-06-01

    Changes in salinity, temperature and irradiance during wet and dry seasons have induced metabolic versatility in cyanobacteria from saline environments. Cyanobacteria from these environments have biotechnological potential for the production of metabolites with pharmaceutical and industrial interest. We studied the growth, dry mass and metabolite production of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. MOF-03 in function of irradiance (78, 156 and 234 micromol q m(-2) s(-1)). All batch cultures were maintained by triplicate in constant aeration, 12:12 h photoperiod, 30 +/- 2 degrees C and 35% per hundred. Maximum values of protein, carbohydrates and lipids, of 530.19 +/- 11.16, 408.94 +/- 4.27 and 56.20 +/- 1.17 microg ml(-1), respectively, were achieved at 78 micromol q m(-2) s(-1). Pigments, analyzed by HPLC, showed maximum values at 78 micromol q m(-2) s(-1) for chlorophyll a with 7.72 +/- 0.16 microg ml(-1), and at 234 micromol q m(-2) s(-1) for beta-carotene and zeaxanthin with 0.70 +/- 0.01 and 0.67 +/- 0.05 microg ml(-1). Chlorophyll a:beta-carotene ratio decreased from 17.15 to 6.91 at 78 and 234 micromol q m(-2) s(-'1); whereas beta-carotene:zeaxanthin ratio showed no changes between 78 and 156 micromol q m(-2) s(-1), around 1.21, and decreased at 234 micromol q m(-2) s(-1), to 1.04. Also, this cyanobacterium produced the greatest cell density and dry mass at 156 micromol q m(-2) s(-1), with 406.13 +/- 21.74 x l0(6) cell ml(-1) and 1.49 +/- 0.11 mg ml(-1), respectively. Exopolysaccharide production was stable between 156 y 234 micromol q m(-2) s(-1), around 110 microg ml(-1). This Synechococcus strain shows a great potential for the production of enriched biomass with high commercial value metabolites.

  19. Effect of irradiation, pruning and removal of in vitro formed roots on ex vitro growth in micropropagated grape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbaji, T.; Ayyoubi, Z.

    2002-06-01

    In vitro rootstock (Ru 140) and Helwani variety were cultured on DSD1 media, were irradiated at low doses of gamma irradiation before acclimatization. Ru 140 were exposed to 0-5 Gy, while Helwani was exposed to 0-7 Gy. Then, the plants were divided into three different groups: in the first group the plant roots were pruned, in the second the plant roots were completely removed and in the third group the plant roots were kept intact (control). The ex vitro plants were observed after 45 days of planting. Shoots groeth, leaf number and dry weight of Ru 140 were significantly higher than those of the control when roots were pruned and 5 Gy was applied. Those parameters were negatively affected by root removal. Gamma irradiation had a positive effect on the control comparing to unirradiated plants. Root pruning had positive effects on shoot growth, leaf number and dry weight of helwani veriety, while root removal had a contrary effect on this variety. Gamma irradiation positively affected shoot growth and dry weight of control comparing to unirradiated plants, similar effect was observed on leaf number of control and pruned plant of Helwani. (author)

  20. Effect of sucrose concentration and gamma irradiation on growth and essential oil composition of spearmint plant through tissue culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sharnouby, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    In vitro culture of spearmint plant (Mentha spicata L) using different sucrose concentrations and different gamma irradiation treatments was investigated. The shoot tips of spearmint plant were cultured on MS medium without hormones and supplemented with different concentrations of sucrose (10, 20, 30 and 40 g/l) then exposed to different gamma irradiation treatments (2,4,6 and 8 Krad) to determine their effects on growth and chemical composition in different sub-culturing media . The data showed that culturing shoots of Mentha spicata on MS medium containing 10 g/l sucrose produced the highest values of callus than other treatments and the maximum number of shoots was produced on MS medium supplemented with 20 g/l sucrose. Irradiation of spearmint shoots at 8 Krad when cultured on MS medium containing 30 or 40 g/l sucrose caused minimum number of shoots, whereas the longest shoots were produced with MS medium containing 20 g/l sucrose after irradiation at 60 Gy gamma dose. Treating shoots of Mentha spicata by gamma irradiation at 8 Krad and culturing on MS medium containing 30 g/l sucrose produced all sub-cultures in shortest length of shoots. Moreover, adding 40 g/l of sucrose in MS medium gave the highest number of leaves than other treatments. Exposing shoots of spearmint plant to gamma irradiation at 8 Krad decreased the number of leaves when culturing on MS medium containing 10 or 30 g/l sucrose. Furthermore, the selected samples showed many differences on spearmint oil composition and proline content regarding sucrose levels and gamma irradiation doses

  1. Effect of daily low dose gamma irradiation on growth and differentiation of human myeloid leukaemic bone marrow in diffusion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, J S [Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, Department of Radiation and Sidney Farber Cancer Institute; Chang, J M; King, V; Fulmer, S; Balzuno, S; Moloney, W C [Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA

    1981-01-01

    Bone marrow from each of 8 untreated patients with myeloproliferative disorders was grown in diffusion chambers in 760 rad total body irradiated rats. Rats were exposed to 11.5, 57.5, or 108.5 rad daily for 14-21 and cell growth compared to that detected in unirradiated chambers. Cells from acute myelogenous leukaemia patients exposed to 11.5 rad per d grew for 11-21 d and there was no consistent stimulation of differentiation of immature granulocytic cells to mature granulocytes that was attributable to irradiation. Cells from a chronic myeloid leukaemia patient in chronic phase or blast crisis, and a polycythaemia vera patient with myeloid metaplasia showed signigicant morphologic differentiation from immature to mature granulocytes in control chambers with no additional effect of daily irradiation. Marrow specimens from 2 AML patients exposed to each of 3 daily dose fractions over 14 d revealed a dose-dependent decrease in immature granulocytes with no persistent increase in mature granulocytes. In both irradiated and control chambers, macrophages increased over 21 d. Thus, cells from patients with myeloprofilerative disorders may not necessarily differentiate to mature granulocytes following in vivo exposure to ionizing irradiation.

  2. Changes of cell growth and magnetosome biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 after ultraviolet-B irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhao eWang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ultraviolet radiation on microorganisms are of great interest in field of microbiology and planetary sciences. In the present study, we used Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 as a model organism to examine the influence of ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation on cell growth and magnetite biomineralization of magnetotactic bacteria. Live AMB-1 cells were exposed to UV-B radiation for 60 s, 300 s and 900 s, which correspond to radiation doses of 120 J/m2, 600 J/m2 and 1800 J/m2, respectively. After irradiation, the amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and reactive oxygen species of the cells were increased, and cell growth was stunted up to ~170 h, depending on the UV-B radiation doses. The UV-B irradiated cells also produced on average more magnetite crystals with larger grain sizes and longer chains, which results in changes of their magnetic properties.

  3. Effect of γ-irradiation on the thermomechanical and morphological properties of chitosan obtained from prawn shell: Evaluation of potential for irradiated chitosan as plant growth stimulator for Malabar spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Mohammed Mizanur; Kabir, Shahriar; Rashid, Taslim Ur; Nesa, Bodrun; Nasrin, Romana; Haque, Papia; Khan, Mubarak A.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we have synthesized chitosan from waste prawn shell via γ-irradiation of chitin and subsequent alkaline treatment. The detailed experimental studies demonstrated that nonirradiated chitin deacetylated by 40% NaOH solution showed 72% degree of deacetylation (DD), however 50 kGy irradiated chitin, deacetylated by 20% NaOH demonstrated 81.5% DD. Chitosan in solid state as obtained from γ-irradiation of chitin was further irradiated by different doses (2–100 kGy) of gamma irradiation and the effects of irradiation on the molecular weight, thermo-mechanical by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and antimicrobial properties were evaluated with respect to nonirradiated chitosan sample. Gamma irradiation of chitosan with a dose of 100 kGy caused a decrease in average molecular weight from 1.9×10 5 to 6.5×10 4 Da and thus increased its solubility in water. Nonirradiated and γ-irradiated chitosan at concentration 1% (w/w) in water were prepared and used to evaluate of its potentiality for growth stimulation of Malabar spinach. The chitosan solution was sprayed on the specimen plants and neighboring soil where germinations were taken place and various plant growth parameters such as plant height, number of leaves, leaf areas, dry and wet weight of the plants and roots were investigated. The details study revealed that application of 30 kGy irradiated chitosan yielded 60% higher growth of the Malabar spinach than that obtained from nonirradiated chitosan. The data are consistent with preliminary results from field experiments and unambiguously confirms that a minor amount of chitosan has a profound effect on the growth and development of Malabar spinach. - Highlight: ► A new approach for chitosan synthesis by γ-irradiation of chitin was described. ► Effect of irradiation on the various properties of chitosan was investigated. ►