WorldWideScience

Sample records for group vi summary

  1. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  2. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. [comp.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  3. Beam dynamics group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peggs, S.

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved.

  4. Summary report: injection group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brown, B.

    1984-01-01

    The injector group attempted to define and address several problem areas related to the SSC injector as defined in the Reference Design Study (RDS). It also considered the topic of machine utilization, particularly the question of test beam requirements. Details of the work are given in individually contributed papers, but the general concerns and consensus of the group are presented within this note. The group recognized that the injector as outlined in the RDS was developed primarily for costing estimates. As such, it was not necessarily well optimized from the standpoint of insuring the required beam properties for the SSC. On the other hand, considering the extraordinary short time in which the RDS was prepared, it is an impressive document and a good basis from which to work. Because the documented SSC performance goals are ambitious, the group sought an injector solution which would more likely guarantee that SSC performance not be limited by its injectors. As will be seen, this leads to a somewhat different solution than that described in the RDS. Furthermore, it is the consensus of the group that the new, conservative approach represents only a modest cost increase of the overall project well worth the confidence gained and the risks avoided

  5. Storage ring group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Storage Ring Group set out to identify and pursue salient problems in accelerator physics for heavy ion fusion, divorced from any particular reference design concept. However, it became apparent that some basic parameter framework was required to correlate the different study topics. As the Workshop progressed, ring parameters were modified and updated. Consequently, the accompanying papers on individual topics will be found to refer to slightly varied parameters, according to the stage at which the different problems were tackled

  6. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  7. Environmental Survey in Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Summary report; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    An environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, has been carried out. This report presents the results from the analyses carried out on samples from a total of 316 stations at 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of the environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (Author)

  8. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  9. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  10. Radiation sources working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  11. Summary of Research 1997, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boger, Dan

    1999-01-01

    This report contains information of research projects in the interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control, and Communications Academic Group, Information Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic...

  12. Summary -- Experiments with Radioactive Beams Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wiescher, M. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    During the course of the workshop, a wide range of futuristic radioactive-beam experiments were discussed. These extended from the study of electroweak interactions in nuclei to materials science, nuclear astrophysics, and a host of nuclear physics investigations. Emphasis was placed on illustrating how these prototypical experiments could be done, discussing what types of detection systems would be needed, exploring the new problems which would be confronting the radioactive beam experimenter, and better defining the beam requirements. Contained herein is a summary of these discussions.

  13. Summary Report of Working Group: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.; Tochitsky, Sergei; Milchberg, Howard M.

    2004-01-01

    A summary is given on the work presented and discussed in the Laser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2004 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, including the Plasma Acceleration Subgroup (Group-Leader: Eric Esarey; Co-Group-Leader: Sergei Tochitsky) and the Plasma Guiding Subgroup (Group-Leader: Howard Milchberg; Co-Group-Leader: Carl Schroeder)

  14. The relationship of title VI requirements to Florida's transportation planning process : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in the 1960s, awareness of the disproportionate exposure of poor, migrant, and minority communities to environmental hazards founded the concept of environmental justice. With Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act as its basis, environmenta...

  15. Summary of the polarized beam working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienands, U.; Dyck, O. van.

    1989-05-01

    The polarized beam working group reviewed the AGS Bookster and TRIUMF KAON Factory facilities, heard an overview of the subject of siberian snakes, discussed internal polarized gas targets, and made recommendations for further study

  16. DIAGNOSTIC SUMMARY: WORKING GROUP T9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Marc C

    2002-09-23

    The diagnostics T9 group was charged with reviewing the diagnostic requirements of the proposed accelerators for the future. The list includes the e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, Muon Neutrino source, NLC, Proton Driver, Tesla, and the VLHC. While the machines vary widely on diagnostic requirements, there are many similarities that were discovered. The following sections will attempt to point out the similarities and requirements for R&D for these future accelerators. To answer the Charge to the group we organized joint sessions with most of the machine groups and several of the technical groups. In addition, due to their overwhelming importance, we held a special session on position monitor systems. For each of the joint machine group sessions we generated a table of required diagnostic systems, selected the highest priority items using a ranking based on need and RD effort, and pondered a RD path leading from the present state of the technology to a system satisfying the requirement. We used the joint technical group sessions to collect up to date RD plans and to assess the applicability of new ideas in a broad range of topics. As required by our Charge, we have also tried to include promising new ideas.

  17. Diagnostics summary: Working group T9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralph J. Pasquinelli; Marc C. Ross

    2002-12-09

    The diagnostics T9 group was charged with reviewing the diagnostic requirements of the proposed accelerators for the future. The list includes the e+e- colliders, Muon Neutrino source, NLC, Proton Driver, Tesla, and the VLHC. While the machines vary widely on diagnostic requirements, there are many similarities that were discovered. The following sections will attempt to point out the similarities and requirements for R and D for these future accelerators. To answer the Charge to the group they organized joint sessions with most of the machine groups and several of the technical groups. In addition, due to their overwhelming importance, they held a special session on position monitor systems. For each of the joint machine group sessions they generated a table of required diagnostic systems, selected the highest priority items using a ranking based on need and RD effort, and pondered a RD path leading from the present state of the technology to a system satisfying the requirement. They used the joint technical group sessions to collect up to date RD plans and to assess the applicability of new ideas in a broad range of topics. As required by their Charge, they have also tried to include promising new ideas.

  18. The classification of 2-compact groups (talk summary)

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Grodal, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    This is a summary of a talk given at the "Conference on Pure and Applied Topology", Isle of Skye, June 24, 2005. It contains an announcement and sketch of proof of the classification of 2-compact groups.

  19. Summary of experiments and data breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Experiments and Data Breakout Group addressed status of experiments directed towards, or relevant to, ADTT system development. Such experiments are the bridge between ideas and reality. They simultaneously cross cut all major technology and components of ADTT systems - accelerators, target/blanket, separations, and materials. At this Conference the large majority of papers dealing with experiments were on nuclear data and cross sections. No separate papers were presented on materials experiments although data were included in papers presented at the several sessions on materials. Beginning engineering experiments were also discussed which could address issues such as neutronics performance and code benchmarking, handling of special products through processes such as sparging of volatiles, determination of thermal hydraulics performance, and beginning safety performance. One recommendation from this group was the formation of a group to collate and prioritize data needs and to provide input to existing data centers.

  20. Summary of the separations breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Separations Breakout Group reviewed the wide spectrum of separations technologies available for application to ADTT systems. Separations processes play a key role in areas associated with preparation of feed materials for introduction into ADTT, removal of fission products and other transmutation byproducts that build into the fuel during operation, and in the preparation of wastes ({open_quotes}polishing{close_quotes}) for discharge from ADTT systems so as to meet appropriate waste disposal criteria. General separations technologies addressed by the group included aqueous, fluoride salt, and chloride salt approaches.

  1. Summary from working group on noninterceptive diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    The working group for noninterceptive diagnostics spent much of its time comparing diagnostic techniques from different fields and their possible application to high-power injectors. The group included backgrounds from electron beam diagnostics, fusion power diagnostics, cw ion source and transport design, and ion beam of diagnostics. The probability of success for adapting techniques from these different areas is quite difficult to judge, short of a detailed examination of each application. Unexpected flaws or unforeseen noise sources can eliminate an idea that would otherwise appear promising. The report presents several ideas that were discussed, with an indication of those ideas most likely to succeed if implemented

  2. Summary of the Physics Opportunities Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin; McDonald, K.T.

    1992-12-01

    The Physics Opportunities Working Group was convened with the rather general mandate to explore physic opportunities that may arise as new accelerator technologies and facilities come into play. Five topics were considered during the workshop: QED at critical field strength, novel positron sources, crystal accelerators, suppression of beamstrahlung, and muon colliders. Of particular interest was the sense that a high energy muon collider might be technically feasible and certainly deserves serious study

  3. Summary of the Physics Opportunities Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); McDonald, K.T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Joseph Henry Labs.

    1992-12-01

    The Physics Opportunities Working Group was convened with the rather general mandate to explore physic opportunities that may arise as new accelerator technologies and facilities come into play. Five topics were considered during the workshop: QED at critical field strength, novel positron sources, crystal accelerators, suppression of beamstrahlung, and muon colliders. Of particular interest was the sense that a high energy muon collider might be technically feasible and certainly deserves serious study.

  4. Summary of the materials breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F. [Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States); Sommer, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This breakout group discussed the following topics and reached a number of recommendations summarized in this report. The topics of discussion included (1) a comparison of expected materials response at spallation sources to experience with fission reactors; (2) synergistic effects from high-energy particle radiation, corrosion, and cyclic stresses; (3) estimates, based on experience with materials developed for fission and fusion reactors, for -materials testing needs; - facilities for materials development, both available and needed; - candidate materials; - time frame for material qualification; and - expected program costs.

  5. The Higgs Working Group Summary Report (2001)

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalli, D.; Jakobs, K.; Nikitenko, A.; Spira, M.; Wagner, C.E.M.; Yao, W.M.; Assamagan, K.A.; Azuelos, G.; Balatenychev, S.; Belanger, G.; Bisset, M.; Bocci, A.; Boudjema, F.; Buttar, C.; Carena, M.; Catani, S.; Cavasinni, V.; Coadou, Y.; Costanzo, D.; Cottrant, A.; Datta, A.K.; Deandrea, A.; de Florian, D.; Del Duca, V.; Di Girolamo, B.; Drollinger, V.; Figy, T.; Frank, M.; Godbole, R.M.; Grazzini, M.; Guchait, M.; Harper, R.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hobbs, J.; Hollik, W.; Hugonie, C.; Ilyin, V.I.; Kilgore, W.B.; Kinnunen, R.; Klute, M.; Lafaye, R.; Mambrini, Y.; Mazini, R.; Mazumdar, K.; Moortgat, F.; Moretti, S.; Negri, G.; Neukermans, L.; Oleari, C.; Pukhov, A.; Rainwater, D.; Richter-Was, E.; Roy, D.P.; Schmidt, C.R.; Semenov, A.; Thomas, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Weiglein, G.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2002-01-01

    Report of the Higgs working group for the Workshop `Physics at TeV Colliders', Les Houches, France, 21 May - 1 June 2001. It contains 7 separate sections: A. Theoretical Developments B. Higgs Searches at the Tevatron C. Experimental Observation of an invisible Higgs Boson at LHC D. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson using Vector Boson Fusion at the LHC E. Study of the MSSM channel A/H -> \\tau \\tau at the LHC F. Searching for Higgs Bosons in $t\\bar t H$ Production G. Studies of Charged Higgs Boson Signals for the Tevatron and the LHC

  6. Experimental area design working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackmore, E.W.; Louis, W.

    1989-05-01

    The charge to this working group on experimental areas concerned a number of topics related to optimum layout of the experimental areas, the design of secondary channels and spectrometers, the floor space required for experiments and the impact of remote handling requirements on site layout. Recommendations included: 1) Plan for a second proton beamline even if not installed initially; 2) Carry out a detailed engineering design of the components for the beamlines and target cell for a configuration in which two or more secondary channel front-ends are combined; 3) Keep the experimental area floor close to grade level to minimize the cost and simplify future extensions to the building as new beamlines or facilities are required; and 4) Plan to have the extraction region accessible from above for remote servicing

  7. Summary of the electron ID group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Lepton identification is extremely important for any B physics experiment attempting to measure CP violation. The reasons are obvious: (1) single lepton triggers operate on 44% of all b bar b pairs; (2) lepton triggers are the only triggers (outside of secondary vertex triggers) that are feasible for a variety of important B decay modes; for example, B 0 →D + D - , B 0 →J/ψK s , and B s →K s γ; and (3) events triggered with leptons are already tagged. The electron identification group focused its efforts on learning what state-of-the-art collider detectors are doing in electron identification. To this end they entertained several talks each from the CDF and D0 collaborations at Fermilab, as well as several talks from proposed SSC and LHC experiments. Each talk was followed by lively discussion. They also attempted to understand what the backgrounds to electron identifications will be at the new higher energy hadron colliders - the SSC and LHC - their prejudice being that only these machines will have the energy and luminosity needed to see CP violation in the B system. None of the approved experiments at the SSC or LHC is optimized for B physics. Hence they focused on dedicated forward collider and fixed target detectors

  8. Summary of the laser working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigio, I.J.; Kurnit, N.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1988-10-01

    The laser working group considered several options to deliver synchronized laser pulses of the required energy to the photocathode and laser triggered switches. These requirements actually decreased during the course of the workshop, and the values finally settled upon (<10 μJ in 100 fs at ∼250 nm for the photocathode and ∼20 mJ in 2 ps near either 250 nm or 1 μm for the switches) were considered to be well within the state of the art. Some development work may be required, however, to provide a system that has the desirable characteristics of stability, ease of use and low maintenance. The baseline concept, which is similar to a number of existing systems, utilizes doubled Nd:YAG-pumped dye oscillator/amplifiers to produce an upconverted picosecond pulse that can be amplified to tens of mJ in a KrF excimer laser. A fraction of the dye oscillator output is also compressed by means of a fiber-grating compressor and further amplified in a dye amplifier before being upconverted to produce the synchronized pulse for the photocathode. 9 refs., 1 fig

  9. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  10. Summary records of the meetings of INFCE Working Group 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These were 6 meetings of Working Group 6 that took place between 8 December 1977 and 7 September 1979. This document consists of the summaries of those meetings and it reports on the objectives of the Working Group, the participants, the guidelines for the study, and the outline of the final report

  11. Tunable thermoelectricity in monolayers of MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M

    2014-10-31

    We study the thermoelectric properties of monolayers of MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides under circularly polarized off-resonant light. Analytical expressions are derived for the Berry phase mediated magnetic moment, orbital magnetization, as well as thermal and Nernst conductivities. Tuning of the band gap by off-resonant light enhances the spin splitting in both the valence and conduction bands and, thus, leads to a dramatic improvement of the spin and valley thermoelectric properties.

  12. A first-principles study of group IV and VI atoms doped blue phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruimin; Chen, Zheng; Gou, Manman; Zhang, Yixin

    2018-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we have systematically investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of blue phosphorene doped by group IV and VI atoms, including C, Si, Ge, Sn, O, S, Se and Te. All the doped systems are energetically stable. Only C, Si, Ge and O-substituted systems show the characteristics of spin polarization and the magnetic moments are all 1.0 μB. Moreover, we found that C, Si, Ge and O doped systems are indirect bandgap semiconductors, while Sn, S, Se and Te doped systems present metallic property. These results show that blue phosphorene can be used prospectively in optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  13. Scientific conference on inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry devoted to centenary from birthday of academician V.I. Spitsyn. Program of conference and summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Program and summaries of reports of the Scientific conference on inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry devoted to the centenary from the birthday of academician V.I. Spitsyn are presented. The conference took place at the Chemical department of the Moscow State University named for M.V. Lomonosov 17 - 18 April, 2002. Part of the reports was devoted to the work of academician V.I. Spitsyn, his investigations into radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Scientific explorations in the fields of solid chemistry, inorganic and coordination chemistry, radiochemistry and chemical technology are discussed [ru

  14. BEIR VI report. Public summary: the health effects of exposure to indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    For centuries it has been known that some underground miners suffered from higher rates of lung cancer than the general population. In recent decades, a growing body of evidence has casually linked their lung cancers to exposure to high levels of radon and also to cigarette smoking. The connection between radon and lung cancer in miners has raised concern that radon in homes might be causing lung cancer in the general population, although the radon levels in most homes are much lower than in most mines. The National Research Council study, which has been carried out by the sixth Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR VI), has used the most recent information available to estimate the risks posed by exposure to radon in homes. The most direct way to assess the risks posed by radon in homes is to measure radon exposures among people who have lung cancer and compare them with exposures among people who have not developed lung cancer. Several such studies have been completed, and several are under way. The studies have not produced a definitive answer, primarily because the risk is likely to be very small at the low exposure encountered from most homes and because it is difficult to estimate radon exposures that people have received over their lifetimes. In addition, it is clear that far more lung cancers are caused by smoking that are caused by radon. The risk of lung cancer caused by smoking is much higher than the risk of lung cancer caused by indoor radon. Most of the radon-related deaths among smokers would not have occurred if the victims had not smoked. Furthermore, there is evidence for a synergistic interaction between smoking and radon. In other words, the number of cancers induced in ever-smokers by radon is greater than one would expect from the additive effects of smoking along and radon alone. Nevertheless, the estimated 15400 or 21800 deaths attributed to radon in combination with cigarette-smoking and radon alone in never

  15. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  16. Statistical thermodynamics and magnetic moments of Landau quantized group VI dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    2018-02-01

    This work is focused on the determination of the Helmholtz free energy and the magnetic moments of the ‘Dirac-like’ group VI dichalcogenides subject to Landau quantization. We employ a technique described by Wilson to relate the free energy to the Green’s function for the dichalcogenides in a high magnetic field, which was recently evaluated explicitly in terms of elementary functions. In the course of this analysis, the partition function is determined as a function of the magnetic field as well. The results exhibit the role of the quantizing magnetic field in the Helmholtz free energy at arbitrary temperature, and they are also employed to obtain the magnetic moments of the dichalcogenides. Explicit analytic formulas characteristic of de Haas–van Alphen oscillatory phenomenology are presented in the degenerate limit, and nondegenerate Landau quantization effects are also presented for the dichalcogenide magnetic moments.

  17. Summary report: working group 2 on 'Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the talks, papers and discussion sessions presented in the Working Group on Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts is given within the context of the progress towards a 1 GeV laser driven accelerator module. The topics covered within the Working Group were self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration, standard laser wakefield acceleration, plasma beat wave acceleration, laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels, plasma wakefield acceleration, plasma lenses and optical injection techniques for laser wakefield accelerators. An overview will be given of the present status of experimental and theoretical progress as well as an outlook towards the future physics and technological challenges for the development of an optimized accelerator module

  18. Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, H.N.

    1992-10-01

    This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8

  19. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    2017-06-01

    This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green's function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green's function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green's function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function). The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ (x ) -potential profile. This retarded Green's function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green's function for the system without the δ (x ) -potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green's function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  20. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman J. M. Horing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green’s function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green’s function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green’s function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function. The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ(x-potential profile. This retarded Green’s function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green’s function for the system without the δ(x-potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green’s function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  1. [Affinity of the elements in group VI of the periodic table to tumors and organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, A; Hisada, K; Ando, I

    1976-10-01

    In order to investigate the tumor affinity radioisotopes, chromium (51Cr), molybdenum (99Mo), tungsten (181W), selenium (75Se) and tellurium (127mTe)--the elements of group VI in the periodic table--were examined, using the rats which were subcutaneously transplanted with Yoshida sarcoma. Seven preprarations, sodium chromate (Na251CrO4), chromium chloride (51CrCl3), normal ammonium molybdate ((NH4)299MoO7), sodium tungstate (Na2181WO4), sodium selenate (Na275SeO4), sodium selenite (Na275SeO3) and tellurous acid (H2127mTeO3) were injected intravenously to each group of tumor bearing rats. These rats were sacrificed at various periods after injection of each preparation: 3 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours in all preparations. The radioactivities of the tumor, blood, muscle, liver, kidney and spleen were measured by a well-type scintillation counter, and retention values (in every tissue including the tumor) were calculated in percent of administered dose per g-tissue weight. All of seven preparations did not have any affinity for malignant tumor. Na251CrO4 and H2127mTeO3 had some affinity for the kidneys, and Na275SeO3 had some affinity for the liver. Na2181WO4 and (NH4)299MoO4 disappeared very rapidly from the blood and soft tissue, and about seventy-five percent of radioactivity was excreted in urine within first 3 hours.

  2. OPPS Provider Summary for 30 Selected APC Groups - CY2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A provider level summary of Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) average estimated submitted charges and average Medicare Payments for 30 selected Ambulatory...

  3. The Beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Azuelos et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated a number of aspects of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the running or planned TeV-scale colliders. For the most part, we have considered hadron colliders, as they will define particle physics at the energy frontier for the next ten years at least. The variety of models for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics has grown immensely. It is clear that only future experiments can provide the needed direction to clarify the correct theory. Thus, our focus has been on exploring the extent to which hadron colliders can discover and study BSM physics in various models. We have placed special emphasis on scenarios in which the new signal might be difficult to find or of a very unexpected nature. For example, in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY), we have considered: how to make fully precise predictions for the Higgs bosons as well as the superparticles of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) (parts III and IV); MSSM scenarios in which most or all SUSY particles have rather large masses (parts V and VI); the ability to sort out the many parameters of the MSSM using a variety of signals and study channels (part VII); whether the no-lose theorem for MSSM Higgs discovery can be extended to the next-to-minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which an additional singlet superfield is added to the minimal collection of superfields, potentially providing a natural explanation of the electroweak value of the parameter {micro} (part VIII); sorting out the effects of CP violation using Higgs plus squark associate production (part IX); the impact of lepton flavor violation of various kinds (part X); experimental possibilities for the gravitino and its sgoldstino partner (part XI); what the implications for SUSY would be if the NuTeV signal for di-muon events were interpreted as a sign of R-parity violation (part XII). Our other main focus was on the phenomenological implications of extra

  4. Static and dynamical properties of II-VI and III-V group binary solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, D S; Singh, D V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we extend to II-VI and III-V group binary solids of zinc blende (ZB) structure with conduction d-electrons the calculation of static and dynamical properties such as bulk modulus (B) and cohesive energy or total energy (E coh ) using the plasma oscillation theory of solids formalism already employed for ternary chalcopyrite semiconductors. The present method is not limited to tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors and ternary chalcopyrites, but can be used for all semiconducting compounds. We have applied an extended formula on ZB structured binary semiconductors and found better agreement with the experimental data as compared to the values evaluated by previous researchers. The bulk modulus and cohesive energy of ZB-type structure compounds exhibit a linear relationship when plotted on a log-log scale against the plasmon energy ℎω p (in eV), but fall on a straight line. The results for bulk modulus differ from experimental values by the following amounts: ZnS 0.36%, ZnSe 10%, ZnTe 0.62%, CdS 1.8%, CdSe 7.4% and CdTe 1.6%, AlP 2.6%, AlAs 5.3%, AlSb 4.0%, GaP 0%, AlAs 0%, AlS 4.4%, InP 0%, InAs 0% and InSb 2.1%; and the results for cohesive energy differ from experimental values by the following amounts: ZnS 0.16%, ZnSe 0.73%, ZnTe 0.6%, CdS 7.6%, CdSe 3.5%, CdTe 2.5%, AlP 2.0%, AlAs 3.0%, AlSb 11.1%, GaP 14.6%, AlAs 17.0%, AlSb 8.7%, InP 4.3%, InAs 5.5% and InSb 0.6%.

  5. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  6. International Working Group on Past Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  7. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  8. Thermally Driven Pure Spin and Valley Currents via the Anomalous Nernst Effect in Monolayer Group-VI Dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiao-Qin; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Su, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The spin and valley-dependent anomalous Nernst effects are analyzed for monolayer MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides. We find that pure spin and valley currents can be generated perpendicular to the applied thermal gradient in the plane of these two-dimensional materials. This effect provides...... a versatile platform for applications of spin caloritronics. A spin current purity factor is introduced to quantify this effect. When time reversal symmetry is violated, e.g., two-dimensional materials on an insulating magnetic substrate, a dip-peak feature appears for the total Nernst coefficient...

  9. Sorption studies of chromium(VI) onto new ion exchanger with tertiary amine, quaternary ammonium and ketone groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcik, Grzegorz [College of Chemistry, University of Maria Curie-Sklodowska, Department of Inorganic Chemistry Pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 2, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Neagu, Violeta, E-mail: vneagu@icmpp.ro [' Petru Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania); Bunia, Ion [' Petru Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Gr. Ghica Voda 41A, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2011-06-15

    A new acrylic anion exchanger with both tertiary and quaternary ammonium as well as ketone groups in the structural unit has been prepared by the nucleophilic substitution reaction of aminolyzed vinylacetate:acrylonitrile:divinylbenzene copolymer of porosity structure in the swelling state with 2-chloroacetone as a halogenated compound. The new compound exhibits better qualities of strong base exchange capacity than the weak base anion exchangers. The obtained acrylic anion exchanger was used to remove Cr(VI) from the aqueous solution. Batch adsorption studies have been carried out to determine the effect of contact time, concentration of hexavalent chromium in the solution and pH on the sorption capacity. The kinetic parameters were determined on the basis of the static results. The thermodynamic parameters of Cr(VI) sorption process on the anion exchanger were calculated based on the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Sorption was studied in the pH range of 1.5-7 and it was found that it depends on the solution acidity. At the pH values of 3.5 and 7 the anion exchanger exhibited large values of chromium sorption capacity. The speciation of chromium was investigated in the studied pH range by the Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS) method. Reduction of chromium(VI) to chromium(III) under acidic conditions was observed. The performed acrylic strong base anion exchanger is superior compared to the conventional one based on the styrene:divinylbenzene matrix due to its ability for reposition of the long spacer arm for providing exchange sites, hydrophilic character of matrix, and possible hydrogen bonds provided by carbonyl functional groups.

  10. Summary, Working Group 1: Electron guns and injector designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Bazarov, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    We summarize the proceedings of Working Group 1 of the 2005 Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Workshop. The subject of this working group, the electron gun and injector design, is arguably the most critical part of the ERL as it determines the ultimate performance of this type of accelerators. Working Group 1 dealt with a variety of subjects: The technology of DC, normal-conducting RF and superconducting RF guns; beam dynamics in the gun and injector; the cathode and laser package; modeling and computational issues; magnetized beams and polarization. A short overview of these issues covered in the Working Group is presented in this paper

  11. The Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-08-08

    Various theoretical aspects of physics beyond the Standard Model at hadron colliders are discussed. Our focus will be on those issues that most immediately impact the projects pursued as part of the BSM group at this meeting.

  12. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  13. Working Group 2 Summary:. Space Charge Effects in Bending Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Courtlandt L.; Emma, Paul J.

    2000-12-01

    Participants in Working Group 2 included: Y. Batygin, C. Bohn, B. Carlsten, J. Ellison, P. Emma, Z. Huang, A. Kabel, R. Kishek, R. Li, P. Musumeci, S. Nagaitsev, J. Qiang, M. Reiser, A. Ruggerio, R. Warnock, and M. Zeitlin.

  14. The Multispectral Imaging Science Working Group. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S. C. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Results of the deliberations of the six multispectral imaging science working groups (Botany, Geography, Geology, Hydrology, Imaging Science and Information Science) are summarized. Consideration was given to documenting the current state of knowledge in terrestrial remote sensing without the constraints of preconceived concepts such as possible band widths, number of bands, and radiometric or spatial resolutions of present or future systems. The findings of each working group included a discussion of desired capabilities and critical developmental issues.

  15. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 731 Summary: Group Prenatal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Individual prenatal care is intended to prevent poor perinatal outcomes and provide education to women throughout pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period through a series of one-on-one encounters between a woman and her obstetrician or other obstetric care provider. Concerns regarding increasing health care costs, health care provider availability, dissatisfaction with wait times, and the minimal opportunity for education and support associated with the individual care model have given rise to interest in alternative models of prenatal care. One alternative model, group prenatal care, may be beneficial or preferred for some practice settings and patient populations, although individual prenatal care remains standard practice. Group prenatal care models are designed to improve patient education and include opportunities for social support while maintaining the risk screening and physical assessment of individual prenatal care. Bringing patients with similar needs together for health care encounters increases the time available for the educational component of the encounter, improves efficiency, and reduces repetition. Evidence suggests patients have better prenatal knowledge, feel more ready for labor and delivery, are more satisfied with care in prenatal care groups, and initiate breastfeeding more often. There is no evidence that suggests that group prenatal care causes harm. Individual and group care models warrant additional study with a goal of demonstrating differences in outcomes and identifying populations that benefit most from specific care models.

  16. Summary of the target-blanket breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capiello, M.; Bell, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Barthold, W.

    1995-10-01

    This breakout group discussed a number of topics and issues pertaining to target and blanket concepts for accelerator-driven systems. This major component area is one marked by a broad spectrum of technical approaches. It is therefore less defined than other major component areas such as the accelerator and is at an earlier stage of technical needs and task specification. The working group did reach a number of general conclusions and recommendations that are summarized. The Conference and the Target/Blanket Breakout Group provided a first opportunity for people working on a variety of missions and concepts to get together and exchange information. A number of subcritical systems applicable for a spectrum of missions were proposed at the Conference and discussed in the Breakout Group. Missions included plutonium disposition, energy production, waste destruction, isotope production, and neutron scattering. The Target/Blanket Breakout Group also defined areas where parameters and data should be addressed as target/blanket design activities become more detailed and sophisticated.

  17. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan Lammel et al. email = crathbun@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large

  18. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  19. Summary report for the Microwave Source Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westenskow, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions of the Microwave Source Working Group during the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held October 13-19, 1996 in the Granlibakken Conference Center at Lake Tahoe, California. Progress on rf sources being developed for linear colliders is reviewed. Possible choices for high-power rf sources at 34 GHz and 94 GHz for future colliders are examined. 27 refs.

  20. Summary from working group on multiple beams and funneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    The working group on Multiple Beams and Funneling discussed various topics related to multiple beams and funneling, including (1) design considerations for multiple-beam accelerators; (2) scaling of current, emittance, and brightness for multiple-beam systems; (3) funneling lines using either discrete components or a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) funneling structure; and (4) alternatives to funneling

  1. E-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggli, P.; Southern California U.; Ng, J.S.T.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of ∼4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner

  2. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  3. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  4. 1994 Solid waste forecast summary: Waste characteristics and treatability groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero, O.J.; Williams, N.C.; Armacost, L.L.

    1994-10-01

    This document, prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), describes the characteristics of the low-level mixed solid waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed solid waste (TRU/TRUM) that will be received at Hanford's Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC). This waste will be generated over the next 30 years from operations, maintenance activities, deactivation activities, decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities, and environmental restoration (ER) activities. For the past 4 years, each onsite and offsite waste generator has provided an annual forecast of the waste volume that is scheduled to be shipped to Hanford's Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) over the next 30 years. The generator's forecast includes the waste volumes, waste classes, physical waste forms, hazardous constituents, and container types. Certain waste generators had a difficult time predicting their future waste volumes. Therefore, special studies and interviews were conducted to obtain these volumes. This document, based primarily on the 1993 forecasts, describes the physical waste forms and hazardous constituents for the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and the transuranic/transuranic mixed waste (TRU/TRUM) that will be shipped to Hanford's SWOC. In addition, it illustrates how mixed waste is categorized into nationally established treatability groups. Defining the waste characteristics and categorizing the waste into treatability groups allows management and treatment planners to plan for future waste management activities and evaluate alternative treatment strategies

  5. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 ; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 . Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout

  6. Summary for working group B on long-term stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 36 workshop participants attended at least one session of the Long-Term Stability working group. We avoided turning these sessions into a specialized seminar series by meeting in two subgroups, loosely labeled Analysis and Diffusion ampersand Tracking, so that working discussions among a reasonably small number of people were possible. Nonetheless, no attempt is made to categorize the 13 group B papers according to original subgroup. A similar workshop, the Workshop on Accelerator Orbit and Particle Tracking Problems, was held almost exactly 10 years ago at Brookhaven. It is interesting to see how many of the participants in the photograph of that workshop appear again in the photograph at the front of these proceedings. Fortunately, it is not correct to infer that little progress has been made in the last decade, nor that the average age of the participants has increased significantly. Rather, the recent photograph has many more, younger, faces than its predecessor. This attests to the ongoing interest and vigorous activity in an area of central importance to accelerator physics

  7. Study group meeting on steam generators for LMFBR's. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Meeting organised by IAEA international working group on fast reactors which considered that the subject of sodium heated steam generators was a topic which needed study by the experts of several disciplines. For example: people who design such steam generators, specialists in the field of sodium water reactions, experts in material and water chemistry and members of the utilities who would be the customers for such units. Besides the exchange of large amount of information, it was considered that further special studies were necessary for the following subjects: materials; maintenance and repair; operating procedures and control of steam generators. A separate study of sodium-water reactions was recommended considering the safety aspects related to large water leakage and economic advantage of possible detection and protection against small water leaks

  8. HIDE working groups: induction linac based system: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Faltens, A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    The induction linac does seem capable of delivering the required 1 megajoule of energy at peak powers of about 100 terawatts. The required components for the main accelerator exist in the laboratory. The ion source and preaccelerator technologies are not so well developed. The best injector for an induction linac is the high current gun which could deliver currents of tens of amperes into an induction accelerator at an energy of around 100 MeV. Such sources are under study. The alternative of a conventional low current ion source and rf accelerator (also used in other acceleration schemes such as synchrotrons or full energy accumulators) also seems usable for the induction linac, but as indicated in reports of other working groups is by no means easy. Considerable work needs to be done on component technology before any reliable cost estimates and economic optimizations can be made

  9. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, M.; Frixione, S.; Laenen, E.; De Roeck, A.; Tollefson, K.; Andersen, J.; Balazs, C.; Banfi, A.; Berge, S.; Bernreuther, W.; Binoth, T.; Brandenburg, A.; Buttar, C.; Cao, Q-H.; Corcella, G.; Cruz, A.; Dawson, I.; Del Duca, V.; De Roeck, A.; Drollinger, V.; Dudko, L.; Eynck, T.; Field, R.; Grazzini, M.; Guillet, J.P.; Heinrich, G.; Huston, J.; Kauer, N.; Kidonakis, N.; Kulesza, A.; Lassil-Perini, K.; Magnea, L.; Mahmoudi, F.; Maina, E.; Maltoni, F.; Nolten, M.; Moraes, A.; Moretti, S.; Mrenna, S.; Nadolsky, P.; Nagy, Z.; Olness, F.; Puljak, I.; Ross, D.A.; Sabio-Vera, A.; Salam, G.P.; Sherstnev, A.; Si, Z.G.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, P.; Thome, E.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.; Yuan, C.P.; Zanderighi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SMdynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  10. The QCD/SM Working Group: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, M.

    2004-01-01

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  11. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Matt; Frixione, S.; Laenen, E.; De Roeck, A.; Tollefson, K.; Andersen, J.; Balazs, C.; Banfi, A.; Bernreuther, W.; Binoth, T.; Brandenburg, A.; Buttar, C.; Cao, C-H.; Cruz, A.; Dawson, I.; DelDuca, V.; Drollinger, V.; Dudko, L.; Eynck, T.; Field, R.; Grazzini, M.; Guillet, J.P.; Heinrich, G.; Huston, J.; Kauer, N.; Kidonakis, N.; Kulesza, A.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Magnea, L.; Mahmoudi, F.; Maina, E.; Maltoni, F.; Nolten, M.; Moraes, A.; Moretti, S.; Mrenna, S.; Nagy, Z.; Olness, F.; Puljak, I.; Ross, D.A.; Sabio-Vera, A.; Salam, G.P.; Sherstnev, A.; Si, Z.G.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, P.; Thome, E.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.; Yuan, C.P.; Zanderighi,G.; Zanderighi, G.

    2004-04-09

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  12. Summary proceedings from the apnea-of-prematurity group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Neil N; Higgins, Rosemary; Kattwinkel, John; Martin, Richard J

    2006-03-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is found in >50% of premature infants and is almost universal in infants who are apnea in infants (breathing pauses that last for >20 seconds or for >10 seconds if associated with bradycardia or oxygen desaturation), but there is no consensus about the duration of apnea, the degree of change in oxygen saturation, or severity of bradycardia that should be considered pathologic. Although caregivers are able to respond successfully to apnea events with drugs (as well as physical and mechanical interventions) in the NICU, it remains unproven whether such interventions have any long-term effects. One of the most effective drugs, caffeine citrate, is currently labeled for short-term use only and within a limited gestational-age population. Clinicians often use off-label drugs that have been approved for gastroesophageal reflux disease, which is common in premature infants, with the belief that such treatments also have an impact on AOP, although this link has never been demonstrated. Key treatment issues include (1) lack of standardization for definition, diagnosis, and treatment of AOP, (2) unproven benefit of intervention, (3) lack of real-time data documenting AOP events, (4) unevaluated sustained treatment improvement at 7 days or later, (5) failure to address confounding conditions, (6) unsubstantiated AOP-gastroesophageal reflux disease relationship, and (7) undetermined role of AOP affecting long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. In addressing study-design issues, the pulmonary group identified (1) key questions about neonatal apnea, (2) methodologic requirements for study, (3) appropriate outcome measures, and (4) ethical considerations for future studies. This article describes a sample framework for the study of apnea in neonates and identifies future research needs. Plenary-session discussion points are also listed.

  13. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Giele et al.

    2004-01-12

    Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), and more generally the physics of the Standard Model (SM), enter in many ways in high energy processes at TeV Colliders, and especially in hadron colliders (the Tevatron at Fermilab and the forthcoming LHC at CERN), First of all, at hadron colliders, QCD controls the parton luminosity, which rules the production rates of any particle or system with large invariant mass and/or large transverse momentum. Accurate predictions for any signal of possible ''New Physics'' sought at hadron colliders, as well as the corresponding backgrounds, require an improvement in the control of uncertainties on the determination of PDF and of the propagation of these uncertainties in the predictions. Furthermore, to fully exploit these new types of PDF with uncertainties, uniform tools (computer interfaces, standardization of the PDF evolution codes used by the various groups fitting PDF's) need to be proposed and developed. The dynamics of colour also affects, both in normalization and shape, various observables of the signals of any possible ''New Physics'' sought at the TeV scale, such as, e.g. the production rate, or the distributions in transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. Last, but not least, QCD governs many backgrounds to the searches for this ''New Physics''. Large and important QCD corrections may come from extra hard parton emission (and the corresponding virtual corrections), involving multi-leg and/or multi-loop amplitudes. This requires complex higher order calculations, and new methods have to be designed to compute the required multi-legs and/or multi-loop corrections in a tractable form. In the case of semi-inclusive observables, logarithmically enhanced contributions coming from multiple soft and collinear gluon emission require sophisticated QCD resummation techniques. Resummation is a catch-all name for efforts to extend the predictive power of QCD by summing the large

  14. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

    2012-04-10

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005

  15. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.

    2012-01-01

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005

  16. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for New Hampshire based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of New Hampshire census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  17. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Alaska based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Alaska census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  18. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Massachusetts based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Massachusetts census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  19. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Maryland based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Maryland census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  20. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Washington based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Washington census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  1. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Maine based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Maine census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  2. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Delaware based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Delaware census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  3. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Texas based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Texas census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  4. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Michigan based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Michigan census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  5. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Connecticut based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Connecticut census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  6. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Louisiana based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Louisiana census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  7. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for New York based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of New York census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  8. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Rhode Island based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Rhode Island census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  9. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Ohio based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Ohio census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  10. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Illinois based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Illinois census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  11. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Virginia based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Virginia census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  12. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Pennsylvania based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Pennsylvania census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  13. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Alabama based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Alabama census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  14. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Wisconsin based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Wisconsin census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  15. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Indiana based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Indiana census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  16. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Mississippi based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Mississippi census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  17. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for New Jersey based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of New Jersey census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  18. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Georgia based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Georgia census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  19. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for South Carolina based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of South Carolina census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  20. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Hawaii based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Hawaii census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  1. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Oregon based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Oregon census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  2. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Coastal States based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of coastal states census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  3. Group IB Organometallic Chemistry XXXIV: Thermal behavior and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarylpropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1, 2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi{2}CU{4}Br{2} and Z-Vi{2}Cu{4}R{2} [Vi @? (2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4})C@?C(Me)-(C{6}H{4}Me-4), R @? 2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4} or 4-MeC{6}H{4}C@?C] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were

  4. Human genetic studies in areas of high natural radiation VI. Genetical load and ethnic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Maia, A.

    1974-01-01

    The load of mutations disclosed by inbreeding, according to the ethnic group of the parents, has been analyzed in our data. Besides the total of the population, a sample with no alien ancestrals has also been analyzed. Genetic load has been studied for absortions, still births, pos-natal mortality, total mortality, anomalies, total mortality + anomalies, and abnormalities in general [pt

  5. Critical experiments analyses by using 70 energy group library based on ENDF/B-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Yoshihisa; Matsumoto, Hideki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Energy Systems Engineering Center; Huria, H.C.; Ouisloumen, M.

    1998-03-01

    The newly developed 70-group library has been validated by comparing kinf from a continuous energy Monte-Carlo code MCNP and two dimensional spectrum calculation code PHOENIX-CP. The code employs Discrete Angular Flux Method based on Collision Probability. The library has been also validated against a large number of critical experiments and numerical benchmarks for assemblies with MOX and Gd fuels. (author)

  6. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The fourth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste Management and enriched fissile materials. The central theme of the workshop was ''Dealing with interests, values and knowledge in managing risk''within the Belgian context of local partnerships for the long term management of low-level, short-lived radioactive waste. The four-day workshop started with a half-day session in Brussels giving a general introduction on the Belgian context and the local partnership methodology. This was followed by community visits to three local partnerships, PaLoFF in Fleurus-Farciennes, MONA in Mol, and STOLA in Dessel. After the visits, the workshop continued with two full-day sessions in Brussels. One hundred and nineteen registered participants, representing 13 countries, attended the workshop or participated in the community visits. About two thirds were Belgian stakeholders; the remainder came from FSC member organisations. The participants included representatives of municipal governments, civil society organisations, government agencies, industrial companies, the media, and international organisations as well as private citizens, consultants and academics. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop and the community visits. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Executive Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's reflection aiming to place the main lessons of the workshop into an international perspective. (author)

  7. Booming Development of Group IV-VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie; Zhai, Tianyou

    2016-12-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth-abundant, low-cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review.

  8. Catalytic one-electron reduction of uranyl(VI) to Group 1 uranyl(V) complexes via Al(III) coordination

    OpenAIRE

    Zegke, Markus; Nichol, Gary S; Arnold, Polly L; Love, Jason B

    2015-01-01

    Reactions between the uranyl(vi) Pacman complex [(UO2)(py)(H2L)] of the Schiff-base polypyrrolic macrocycle L and Tebbe's reagent or DIBAL result in the first selective reductive functionalisation of the uranyl oxo by Al to form [(py)(R2AlOUO)(py)(H2L)] (R = Me or (i)Bu). The clean displacement of the oxo-coordinated Al(iii) by Group 1 cations has enabled the development of a one-pot, DIBAL-catalysed reduction of the U(vi) uranyl complexes to a series of new, mono-oxo alkali-metal-functionali...

  9. Booming Development of Group IV–VI Semiconductors: Fresh Blood of 2D Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing; Zhang, Qi; Gan, Lin; Li, Huiqiao; Xiong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of 2D layered materials (2DLMs), the 2D group IV metal chalcogenides (GIVMCs) have drawn much attention recently due to their earth‐abundant, low‐cost, and environmentally friendly characteristics, thus catering well to the sustainable electronics and optoelectronics applications. In this instructive review, the booming research advancements of 2D GIVMCs in the last few years have been presented. First, the unique crystal and electronic structures are introduced, suggesting novel physical properties. Then the various methods adopted for synthesis of 2D GIVMCs are summarized such as mechanical exfoliation, solvothermal method, and vapor deposition. Furthermore, the review focuses on the applications in field effect transistors and photodetectors based on 2D GIVMCs, and extends to flexible devices. Additionally, the 2D GIVMCs based ternary alloys and heterostructures have also been presented, as well as the applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Finally, the conclusion and outlook have also been presented in the end of the review. PMID:27981008

  10. Group ib organometallic chemistry. XXXIV. Thermal behaviour and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarypropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Koten, G. van; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1,2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi2CU4Br2 and Z-Vi2Cu4R2 [Vi = (2-Me2NC6H4)C=C(Me)-(C6H4Me-4), R = 2-Me2NC6H4 or 4-MeC6H4CC] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were formed on thermolysis of (Z-ViCu2OTf)η

  11. Translanguaging as a strategy for group work: Summary writing as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Translanguaging as a strategy for group work: Summary writing as a measure for reading comprehension among university students. ... This paper reports on a research study conducted to ascertain the effectiveness of using a translanguaging approach to assist students in understanding texts. Through discussion of the ...

  12. Lithium adsorption and migration in group IV-VI compounds and GeS/graphene heterostructures: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kuan-Rong; Fang, Lincan; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2018-04-18

    By means of first-principles calculations, the adsorption and transport properties of lithium (Li) in orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds MX (M = Ge, Sn; X = S, Se) and GeS/graphene heterostructures have been systematically investigated. Strong interactions and distinct charge transfer between Li and compounds MX are observed. The Li diffusion barriers along the zigzag direction are found to be much lower than that along the armchair direction in monolayer and bulk MX, showing distinct anisotropic diffusion features. In particular, monolayer GeS has a lowest barrier of 0.173 eV (zigzag) among them and it will transit from a semiconductor to a metallic state after Li intercalation, indicating fast Li and electron transport properties. As a comparison, the addition of graphene in a GeS/graphene heterostructure could enhance its binding with Li, decrease the Li diffusion barrier and inhibit the volume expansion dramatically, suggesting a potential performance improvement. Our study not only reveals the directional transport properties of Li in MX, but also improves the understanding of the role of graphene in the MX/graphene heterostructure, and shows great potential application in the field of electrode materials.

  13. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous media by hydrothermal cross-linking chitosan with phosphate group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-min Dong; Yan-fang Qiu; Lin Wang; Pan-feng Wang; Zhong-jun Lai; Wen-long Zhang; Ying Dai; Xiao-hong Cao; Zhi-bin Zhang; Yun-hai Liu; Zhang-gao Le; East China University of Technology, Jiangxi; East China University of Technology, Jiangxi

    2016-01-01

    For the selective adsorption of U(VI) from aqueous solutions, the hydrothermal cross-linking chitosan (HCC) and its phosphorylation production (HCC-TPP) were synthesized by hydrothermal reaction. The monolayer maximum capacity of HCC-TPP was improved from 200 mg g -1 of HCC to 409.2 mg g -1 at 298 K. Calculated thermodynamic parameters showed endothermic property of the adsorption process, while kinetic parameters indicated that the interaction followed pseudo-second kinetic model. Selective separation of U(VI) from effluent by HCC-TPP was achieved. (author)

  14. Group interventions for men who batter: a summary of program descriptions and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Daniel G

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the latest research on men's group interventions for men who batter their intimate partners. The major components of current programs are described, along with studies on treatment effectiveness. Evidence for the effectiveness of treatment combined with a coordinated community response is also presented. Several related topics are covered, in particular methods for enhancing treatment motivation and culturally competent practice.

  15. Adsorption of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions by glycidylmethacrylate-grafted-densified cellulose with quaternary ammonium groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anirudhan, T. S.; Nima, J.; Divya, P. L.

    2013-08-01

    This study successfully synthesized a new adsorbent by ethylation of glycidylmethacrylate grafted aminated titanium dioxide densified cellulose (Et-AMPGDC), to remove chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent was characterized by the FTIR, XRD, SEM and TG-DTG measurements. Batch adsorption technique using Et-AMPGDC was applied for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution and waste water. The contact time necessary to attain equilibrium and the optimum pH were found to be 1 h and 4.5, respectively. The kinetics of sorption of Cr(VI) ions was described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations and the adsorption process was reflected by Langmuir isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 123.60 mg/g. The electroplating industrial wastewater samples were treated with Et-AMPGDC to demonstrate its efficiency in removing Cr(VI) from wastewater. Almost complete removal was possible with 100 mg of the adsorbent from 50 mL of wastewater sample. Desorption efficiency was achieved by treatment with 0.1 M NaOH and five adsorption-desorption cycles were performed without significant decrease in adsorption capacity.

  16. Summary of Research 1995, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups (Command, Control & Communications Academic Group, Electronic Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic Group and Undersea Warfare Academic Group)

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Academic Groups

    1995-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. This report contains information of research projects in the four interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control & Communications Academic Group, Electronic Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic Group and Undersea Warfare Academic Group, which were carried out under funding of the Naval Postgraduate School Research...

  17. Summary of the activities of the ISAM Confidence Building Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinar, G.M.; Batandjieva, B.

    2002-01-01

    During the early stages of the ISAM project confidence building was a relatively new topic in the radioactive waste disposal literature, but it was beginning to receive some attention. Although almost all safety assessment activities are intended to provide a level of confidence in the results of the assessment, considering the activities from the viewpoint of how they contributed to the decision making of various 'audiences' was relatively new. The ISAM project included the Confidence Building Working Group (CBWG) to examine the topic of Confidence Building and this paper provides a summary of the working group findings. (author)

  18. Part 2 of the summary for the electronics, DAQ, and computing working group: Technological developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The attraction of hadron machines as B factories is the copious production of B particles. However, the interesting physics lies in specific rare final states. The challenge is selecting and recording the interesting ones. Part 1 of the summary for this working group, open-quote Comparison of Trigger and Data Acquisition Parameters for Future B Physics Experiments close-quote summarizes and compares the different proposals. In parallel with this activity, the working group also looked at a number of the technological developments being proposed to meet the trigger and DAQ requirements. The presentations covered a wide variety of topics, which are grouped into three categories: (1) front-end electronics, (2) level 0 fast triggers, and (3) trigger and vertex processors. The group did not discuss on-line farms or offine data storage and computing due to lack of time

  19. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE SNOWMASS 2001 WORKING GROUP : ELECTROWEAK SYMMETRY BREAKING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARENA, M.; GERDES, D.W.; HABER, H.E.; TURCOT, A.S.; ZERWAS, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this summary report of the 2001 Snowmass Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Working Group, the main candidates for theories of electroweak symmetry breaking are surveyed, and the criteria for distinguishing among the different approaches are discussed. The potential for observing electroweak symmetry breaking phenomena at the upgraded Tevatron and the LHC is described. We emphasize the importance of a high-luminosity e + e - linear collider for precision measurements to clarify the underlying electroweak symmetry breaking dynamics. Finally, we note the possible roles of the μ + μ - collider and VLHC for further elucidating the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking

  20. Working Group summary reports from the Advanced Photon Source reliability workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    A workshop was held at APS to address reliability goals for accelerator systems. Seventy-one individuals participated in the workshop, including 30 from other institutions. The goals of the workshop were to: (1) Give attendees an introduction to the basic concepts of reliability analysis. (2) Exchange information on operating experience at existing accelerator facilities and strategies for achieving reliability at facilities under design or in construction. (3) Discuss reliability goals for APS and the means of their achievement. This report contains the working group summary report an APS's following systems: RF Systems; Power Supplies; Magnet Systems; Interlock and Diagnostics; and Vacuum Systems

  1. Summary of the ECFA Linear Collider Working Group on Beamstrahlung and Photon-Photon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, P

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a concise summary of the developments achieved in the context of the ''Photons'' Working Group of the 1991 ECFA Workshop on Physics with Linear Colliders. After reviewing, in Section 2, the current knowledge on the beam-beam interaction and its main physics implications, they calculate in Section 3 effective photon and electron luminosity spectra. Section 4 discusses background issues associated with photon-photon processes. Finally, they briefly survey, in Section 5, recent updates on the principle issues and the physics potential of the so-called ''Compton Collider''.

  2. Removal of Chromium(VI from Aqueous Solutions Using Fe3O4 Magnetic Polymer Microspheres Functionalized with Amino Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic polymer microspheres (MPMs using glycidylmethacrylate (GMA as a functional monomer were synthesized in the presence of Fe3O4 nanoparticles via dispersion polymerization. After polymerization, the magnetic polymer microbeads were modified with ethylenediamine (EDA. The obtained ethylenediamine-functionalized magnetic microspheres (EDA-MPMs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. Then the EDA-MPMs were applied as adsorbents for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution. Langmuir equation was appropriate to describe the experimental data. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained from the Langmuir model were 236.9, 242.1 and 253.2 mg/g at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The Cr(VI adsorption equilibrium was established within 120 min and the adsorption kinetics was compatibly described by the pseudo-second order equation. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS° of the sorption process revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and was an endothermic process. The regeneration study demonstrated that the EDA-MPMs could be repeatedly utilized with no significant loss of adsorption efficiency.

  3. Closing plenary summary of working group 4 instrumentation and controls for ERL2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, D.; Obina, T.

    2011-10-16

    Working group 4 was charged with presentations and discussions on instrumentation and controls with regards to Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). There were 4 sessions spanning 3.5 hours in which 7 talks were delivered, the first being an invited plenary presentation. The time allotted for each talk was limited to 20-25 minutes in order to allow 5-10 minutes for discussion. Most of the talks were held in joint session with working group 5 (Unwanted Beam Loss). This format was effective for the purpose of this workshop. A final series of discussion sessions were also held with working group 5. Summary of the working group 4 activities, presented in the closing plenary session. We had a plenary presentation on operational performance, experience, and future plans at the existing ERL injector prototype at Cornell. This included instrumentation data, controls system configurations, as well as description of future needs. This was followed by four talks from KEK and RIKEN/SPring-8 that described electron beam instrumentation already in use or under development that can be applied to ERL facilities. The final talks described the ERLs under construction at KEK and BNL. The format of having joint sessions with working group 5 was beneficial as there were a significant number of common topics and concerns with regards to the causes of beam loss, instrumentation hardware, and techniques used to measure and analyze beam loss.

  4. Conceptions of perfectionism and interpersonal problems: evaluating groups using the structural summary method for circumplex data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaney, Robert B; Pincus, Aaron L; Uliaszek, Amanda A; Wang, Kenneth T

    2006-06-01

    This study examined two conceptions of perfectionism in relation to interpersonal problems. Two hundred and seventy-nine undergraduate participants completed the Almost Perfect Scale-Revised (APS-R) and the Dyadic Almost Perfect Scale (DAPS). The authors used empirically derived discriminant functions (APS-R) and cluster analysis (DAPS) to identify three groups for both measures: adaptive and maladaptive perfectionists and nonperfectionists. Analyses of group profiles were performed on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems Circumplex (IIP-C) scales using the structural summary method for circumplex data. APS-R and DAPS groups were compared on interpersonal problems endorsement and IIP-C profile characteristics. For both measures, results supported the hypotheses that maladaptive perfectionists would exhibit elevated profiles reflecting hostile-dominant and friendly-submissive interpersonal problems, whereas the adaptive perfectionists would exhibit low profile elevation indicative of interpersonal adjustment. Overall, results supported Slaney and colleagues' (2001) model of perfectionism and provided evidence for the validity of the APS-R and DAPS.

  5. Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs. Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, H.N. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8.

  6. Geometry VI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 8. Geometry VI - Space-the Final Frontier. Kapil H Paranjape. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 8 August 1996 pp 28-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/08/0028-0033 ...

  7. VI KA’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprogøe, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen handler om hvordan man kan bruge et spil til at udvikle og måle kompetencer. Artiklen diskuterer forskellige forståelser kompetencebegrebet og diskuterer hvordan Vi Ka'-spillet bidrager til at indfange den mere aktive forståelse af kompetence, som noget du gør i en bestemt kontekst....

  8. Methods for estimating the enthalpy of formation of inorganic compounds; thermochemical and crystallographic investigations of uranyl salts of group VI elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, N.P.

    1978-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is concerned with parameter methods for estimating the standard enthalpy of formation, ΔH 0 sub(f), of inorganic compounds. In this type of method the estimate is a function of parameters, assigned to cation and anion, respectively. The usefulness of a new estimation method is illustrated in the case of uranyl sulphide. In the second part of this thesis crystallographic and thermochemical properties of uranyl salts of group VI elements are described. Crystal structures are given for β-UO 2 SO 4 , UO 2 SeO 3 , and α-UO 2 SeO 4 . Thermochemical measurements have been restricted to the determination of ΔH 0 sub(f)(UO 2 SO 3 ) and ΔH 0 sub(f)(UO 2 TeO 3 ) by means of isoperibol solution calorimetry. (Auth.)

  9. Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) Provider Summary for the Top 100 Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A provider level summary of Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) discharges, average charges and average Medicare payments for the Top 100 Diagnosis-Related...

  10. Theory and analysis of nonlinear dynamics and stability in storage rings: A working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Audy, P.; Courant, E.D.

    1988-07-01

    A summary and commentary of the available theoretical and analytical tools and recent advances in the nonlinear dynamics, stability and aperture issues in storage rings are presented. 11 refs., 4 figs

  11. Production and testing of the VITAMIN-B6 fine-group and the BUGLE-93 broad-group neutron/photon cross-section libraries derived from ENDF/B-VI nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Greene, N.M.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    A new multigroup cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI data has been produced and tested for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The broad-group library is designated BUGLE-93. The processing methodology is consistent with ANSI/ANS 6.1.2, since the ENDF data were first processed into a fine-group, ''pseudo problem-independent'' format and then collapsed into the final broad-group format. The fine-group library is designated VITAMIN-B6. An extensive integral data testing effort was also performed. In general, results using the new data show significant improvements relative to earlier ENDF data

  12. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  13. Summary report for Group X6: Heat removal system and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, W

    2005-12-15

    This report is a summary of the activities of the X6 design support for the Heat Removal System (HRS) of MEGAPIE. It can be divided into two main parts: The first part is about the design and manufacturing of he cooling loop (the first 3 chapters), and the second part is dealing with the thermal hydraulic analysis of the overall HRS. This also reflects the change of the X6 activities from design to operation support. The activities of this group are more or less driven by the needs rather than a complete set of tasks given at the start of the project. The first part chronicles the system development. Some of the arguments are probably outdated but are kept in the original form to illustrate the evolution of concepts. The main objective is, of course, to design a heat removal system that can cool the liquid metal spallation target for a 1 MW proton beam i.e. 1.74 mA in 575 MeV). It is also reckoned that the liquid metal, BE (lead-bismuth-eutectic), must be kept liquid even when the proton beam was switched off. This requires either that the cooling system can be shut down or the operating temperature of the coolant be higher than the freezing point of LBE. As for safety concerns, the HRS system must not exert a pressure that exceeds the design pressure of the target beam window in case of a break at the target heat exchanger (THX); this limits the cover gas pressure to about 4 bar(a). These are the basic design principles that carry through the conceptual and engineering design of he system. The organic coolant Diphyl THT was then chosen, because of its wide range of operating temperature (i.e. from 0 to 340 degC) and high boiling point, and a proven record in industrial applications. (author)

  14. Summary report for Group X6: Heat removal system and system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, W.

    2005-12-01

    This report is a summary of the activities of the X6 design support for the Heat Removal System (HRS) of MEGAPIE. It can be divided into two main parts: The first part is about the design and manufacturing of he cooling loop (the first 3 chapters), and the second part is dealing with the thermal hydraulic analysis of the overall HRS. This also reflects the change of the X6 activities from design to operation support. The activities of this group are more or less driven by the needs rather than a complete set of tasks given at the start of the project. The first part chronicles the system development. Some of the arguments are probably outdated but are kept in the original form to illustrate the evolution of concepts. The main objective is, of course, to design a heat removal system that can cool the liquid metal spallation target for a 1 MW proton beam i.e. 1.74 mA in 575 MeV). It is also reckoned that the liquid metal, BE (lead-bismuth-eutectic), must be kept liquid even when the proton beam was switched off. This requires either that the cooling system can be shut down or the operating temperature of the coolant be higher than the freezing point of LBE. As for safety concerns, the HRS system must not exert a pressure that exceeds the design pressure of the target beam window in case of a break at the target heat exchanger (THX); this limits the cover gas pressure to about 4 bar(a). These are the basic design principles that carry through the conceptual and engineering design of he system. The organic coolant Diphyl THT was then chosen, because of its wide range of operating temperature (i.e. from 0 to 340 degC) and high boiling point, and a proven record in industrial applications. (author)

  15. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmatz Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine, severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14. Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity ®, clinical management was limited to supportive care and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Galsulfase is now widely available and is a specific therapy providing improved endurance with an acceptable safety profile. Prognosis is variable depending on the age of onset, rate of disease progression, age at initiation of ERT and on the quality of the medical care provided.

  17. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X9: Neutronic and nuclear assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanini, L

    2005-12-15

    The comprehensive work performed by the R+D task group X9 since the beginning of the MEGAPIE initiative is described in this summary report. The list of topics covered by this group is large and covers many of the essential aspects of an innovative system such as the MEGAPIE target. The X9 group worked on the neutronic and nuclear related aspects of the target design, as summarized in the following. The main tool in the neutronic design of a spallation neutron target is a reliable particle transport code, and nowadays the Monte Carlo technique is widely adopted in this field. There are several codes which are more or less extensively used in the nuclear physics community; at the beginning of the project a benchmark exercise was performed among several institutes using different Monte Carlo codes. The aim of the benchmark was to perform a code intercomparison by looking at the different predictions of several important quantities, as described later in the report. The benchmark results were first compiled in two separate reports. The results are critically discussed here. Based on the obtained results, and considering also other factors such as the code maintenance, the codes FLUKA and MCNPX were indicated as the most recommended ones to be used in the continuation of the X9 work. Proton and neutron fluxes in the MEGAPIE target were calculated. Detailed models of he MEGAPIE target and of the surrounding SINQ facility were developed, as well as of the present solid SINQ target. A comparison between the neutron flux with MEGAPIE and the SINQ solid target showed that the MEGAPIE target sill deliver 40% to 50% more thermal neutrons to the instruments served by SINQ as compared to the SINQ Mark 3 target. Calculations of the beam power deposition distributions are essential as input for the thermohydraulics CFD analysis of the lower target. Power deposition was calculated with FLUKA and MCNPX. The results from the two codes agree within 5%. Approximately 85% of the beam

  18. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X4: Fluid dynamics and structure mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. L.

    2006-03-01

    The document chronicles, and draws summary conclusions from, the activities of the X4 R+D Support Group from the start of the project on January 1, 2000 to the time of the Technical Review Meeting in Mol: 27-29 June, 2005. The objectives to be accomplished were set out in a Baseline document. These were: to define the lower target flow configuration, within the geometric constraints imposed by the physical boundary conditions (geometrical confinement, lead- bismuth eutectic (LBE) inventory, pump capacities, target heat exchanger (THX) power, etc.); to identify, and evaluate, optimum target window design to minimise thermal loads and pressure drops, and to avoid hot-spots and flow instabilities; to demonstrate reliable cooling of the lower target enclosure (LTE); to demonstrate the structural integrity of the lower section of the Iiquid-metal container LMC) and its internal components, and that of the LTE; to provide best-estimate safety margins on target coolability and structural integrity under operational flow conditions; to investigate, quantify, and make recommendations regarding, abnormal target operation including possible accident scenarios). The time-scale set for MEGAPIE was always such that much of the design work needed to be carried out at the same time as the R+D support. Often, the target design was changing faster than the time required to perform the detailed computer simulations. As a consequence, many of the simulations reported or referenced in this document do not refer to the very latest target design, and in many respects the results and conclusions must be regarded as generic in nature. Nonetheless, very valuable work has been carried out by the various organisations, and better understanding of the expected temperature distributions and stress levels in the operating MEGAPIE target has been gained, and direct feed-back to the design team on various aspects of the design details has taken place as a consequence of this work. As the design

  19. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X9: Neutronic and nuclear assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanini, L.

    2005-12-01

    The comprehensive work performed by the R+D task group X9 since the beginning of the MEGAPIE initiative is described in this summary report. The list of topics covered by this group is large and covers many of the essential aspects of an innovative system such as the MEGAPIE target. The X9 group worked on the neutronic and nuclear related aspects of the target design, as summarized in the following. The main tool in the neutronic design of a spallation neutron target is a reliable particle transport code, and nowadays the Monte Carlo technique is widely adopted in this field. There are several codes which are more or less extensively used in the nuclear physics community; at the beginning of the project a benchmark exercise was performed among several institutes using different Monte Carlo codes. The aim of the benchmark was to perform a code intercomparison by looking at the different predictions of several important quantities, as described later in the report. The benchmark results were first compiled in two separate reports. The results are critically discussed here. Based on the obtained results, and considering also other factors such as the code maintenance, the codes FLUKA and MCNPX were indicated as the most recommended ones to be used in the continuation of the X9 work. Proton and neutron fluxes in the MEGAPIE target were calculated. Detailed models of he MEGAPIE target and of the surrounding SINQ facility were developed, as well as of the present solid SINQ target. A comparison between the neutron flux with MEGAPIE and the SINQ solid target showed that the MEGAPIE target sill deliver 40% to 50% more thermal neutrons to the instruments served by SINQ as compared to the SINQ Mark 3 target. Calculations of the beam power deposition distributions are essential as input for the thermohydraulics CFD analysis of the lower target. Power deposition was calculated with FLUKA and MCNPX. The results from the two codes agree within 5%. Approximately 85% of the beam

  20. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X4: Fluid dynamics and structure mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B. L

    2006-03-15

    The document chronicles, and draws summary conclusions from, the activities of the X4 R+D Support Group from the start of the project on January 1, 2000 to the time of the Technical Review Meeting in Mol: 27-29 June, 2005. The objectives to be accomplished were set out in a Baseline document. These were: to define the lower target flow configuration, within the geometric constraints imposed by the physical boundary conditions (geometrical confinement, lead- bismuth eutectic (LBE) inventory, pump capacities, target heat exchanger (THX) power, etc.); to identify, and evaluate, optimum target window design to minimise thermal loads and pressure drops, and to avoid hot-spots and flow instabilities; to demonstrate reliable cooling of the lower target enclosure (LTE); to demonstrate the structural integrity of the lower section of the Iiquid-metal container LMC) and its internal components, and that of the LTE; to provide best-estimate safety margins on target coolability and structural integrity under operational flow conditions; to investigate, quantify, and make recommendations regarding, abnormal target operation including possible accident scenarios). The time-scale set for MEGAPIE was always such that much of the design work needed to be carried out at the same time as the R+D support. Often, the target design was changing faster than the time required to perform the detailed computer simulations. As a consequence, many of the simulations reported or referenced in this document do not refer to the very latest target design, and in many respects the results and conclusions must be regarded as generic in nature. Nonetheless, very valuable work has been carried out by the various organisations, and better understanding of the expected temperature distributions and stress levels in the operating MEGAPIE target has been gained, and direct feed-back to the design team on various aspects of the design details has taken place as a consequence of this work. As the design

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus in three ethnic groups. VI: Factors associated with fatigue within 5 years of criteria diagnosis. LUMINA Study Group. LUpus in MInority populations: NAture vs Nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonana-Nacach, A; Roseman, J M; McGwin, G; Friedman, A W; Baethge, B A; Reveille, J D; Alarcón, G S

    2000-01-01

    To determine the frequency, degree and associated features of fatigue among Hispanic (H), African American (AA) and Caucasian (C) patients with recent onset (NAture vs Nurture) cohort were studied. Fatigue [Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS)] was defined as present if FSS score > or = 3.0. Variables from functional, clinical, sociodemographic, health behaviors, behavioral and psychological and immunogenetics domains were ascertained at study entry. Associations were examined using regression models. Eighty-six percent (85.7%) of patients reported having fatigue (82.6% H; 85.5% AA; 88.7% C); median FSS score, 5.3. Factors from the psychological and clinical domains were primarily associated with FSS; immunogenetic (HLA Class II phenotypes) features were not. Increased fatigue was strongly associated with decreasing function, both physical and mental. Variables associated with significantly greater degree of fatigue at baseline in the multivariable stepwise model in order of decreasing additional partial R2 explained included: abnormal illness-related behaviors, older age, higher self-reported pain, greater degree of helplessness, greater disease activity, Caucasian race, and lacking health insurance (model R2 = 37%). Fatigue is one of the most prevalent clinical manifestations of SLE across all ethnic groups. The perception of fatigue severity in SLE may be multifactorial in origin, including psychosocial factors and disease activity. If these prove causal, knowledge of their contribution may suggest therapeutic and/or behavioral interventions, which could ameliorate this pervasive and often incapacitating symptom of SLE.

  2. A summary of the Nordic-group conference on safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, I.; Svenson, O.

    2005-04-01

    The report summarizes the Nordic-group conference on safety management, which took place in Lund, Sweden on October 28-29, 2004. The theme-group was originally created by researchers who had a common interest in cooperation, sharing their results, and discuss topics focusing on safety management and safety culture in nuclear power production, but also in other technologies involving risks. The research has, so far, basically been related to the areas of MTO, partly from a psychological perspective, but also from other perspectives. Today, the group consists primarily of members from Sweden, Finland and Norway. During the last three years the group has gathered twice a year. (au)

  3. Summary of Group Development and Testing for Single Shell Tank Closure at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, John, R.

    2005-04-28

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale and large scale experimental studies performed by Savannah River National Laboratory for CH2M HILL to develop grout design mixes for possible use in producing fill materials as a part of Tank Closure of the Single-Shell Tanks at Hanford. The grout development data provided in this report demonstrates that these design mixes will produce fill materials that are ready for use in Hanford single shell tank closure. The purpose of this report is to assess the ability of the proposed grout specifications to meet the current requirements for successful single shell tank closure which will include the contracting of services for construction and operation of a grout batch plant. The research and field experience gained by SRNL in the closure of Tanks 17F and 20F at the Savannah River Site was leveraged into the grout development efforts for Hanford. It is concluded that the three Hanford grout design mixes provide fill materials that meet the current requirements for successful placement. This conclusion is based on the completion of recommended testing using Hanford area materials by the operators of the grout batch plant. This report summarizes the regulatory drivers and the requirements for grout mixes as tank fill material. It is these requirements for both fresh and cured grout properties that drove the development of the grout formulations for the stabilization, structural and capping layers.

  4. North American Wood Waste Forum: Summary of Group Feedback, 2-3, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Falk

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the feedback and recommendations of the North American Wood Recovery Group. This report summarizes the barriers and opportunities in wood recovery, reuse, and recycling as identified by this group of stakeholders from the wood industry, waste industry, and relevant government agencies.

  5. Summary record of the second group meeting at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna 5 June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    It was noted that sub-group 2B had received answers to its questionnaire from seven Member States. Sub-group 1A/2A reported that it had decided to base its work on recently published NEA/OECD material, and that some answers to questionnaires had been received

  6. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  7. Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae VI: the conference summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, O.

    2014-04-01

    The Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae conference series, now in its sixth edition, aims to resolve the shaping mechanism of PN. Eighty percent of PN have non spherical shapes and during this conference the last nails in the coffin of single stars models for non spherical PN have been put. Binary theories abound but observational tests are lagging. The highlight of APN6 has been the arrival of ALMA which allowed us to measure magnetic fields on AGB stars systematically. AGB star halos, with their spiral patterns are now connected to PPN and PN halos. New models give us hope that binary parameters may be decoded from these images. In the post-AGB and pre-PN evolutionary phase the naked post-AGB stars present us with an increasingly curious puzzle as complexity is added to the phenomenologies of objects in transition between the AGB and the central star regimes. Binary central stars continue to be detected, including the first detection of longer period binaries, however a binary fraction is still at large. Hydro models of binary interactions still fail to give us results, if we make an exception for the wider types of binary interactions. More promise is shown by analytical considerations and models driven by simpler, 1D simulations such as those carried out with the code MESA. Large community efforts have given us more homogeneous datasets which will yield results for years to come. Examples are the ChanPlaN and HerPlaNe collaborations that have been working with the Chandra and Herschel space telescopes, respectively. Finally, the new kid in town is the intermediate-luminosity optical transient, a new class of events that may have contributed to forming several peculiar PN and pre-PN.

  8. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Land Cover Summaries by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of each block group that is classified as impervious, forest, green space, wetland, and agriculture. Impervious is...

  9. Limiting Debye temperature behavior following from cryogenic heat capacity data for group-IV, III-V, and II-VI materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paessler, R. [Technische Universitaet Chemnitz, Institut fuer Physik, 09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    We perform analyses of cryogenic heat capacity data sets, that are available from thermo-physical literature for group-IV materials (diamond, Si, Ge, and 3C-SiC), a variety of III-V materials (BN, BP, BAs, GaN, GaP, GaAs, GaSb, InP, InAs, InSb), and several II-VI materials (ZnO, ZnS, ZnSe, CdS, and CdTe). A prominent new result of the present study consists above all in a general high-precision formula, {theta}{sub D}(T)= {theta}{sub D}(0)(1+a{sub 2}T{sup 2}+a{sub 4}T{sup 4}){sup -1/3}, for the limiting behavior of the Debye temperature in the liquid helium-hydrogen region. The actual magnitudes of limiting Debye temperatures, {theta}{sub D}(0), in combination with the associated (throughout positive) curve shape coefficients, a{sub 2} and a{sub 4}, are given in unambiguous way in terms of the three lowest-order heat capacity coefficients involved by conventional Taylor series expansions for lattice heat capacities within the cryogenic range up to temperatures of order {theta}{sub D}(0){theta}{sub D}(0)/30. Among the variety of presently specified calorimetric {theta}{sub D}(0) values, particularly those obtained for a series of wide-bandgap materials may be of considerable interest. These are about 1110 K for 3C-SiC, 1860 for c-BN, 950 K for BP, 592 K for GaN, 429 or 392 K for isotopically modified samples {sup 64}Zn {sup 16}O and {sup 68}Zn {sup 18}O, respectively, 414 K for natural ZnO, 349 K for ZnS, 276 K for ZnSe, and 236 K for CdS. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. A Feasible Approach for an Early Manned Lunar Landing. Part I: Summary Report of Ad Hoc Task Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, William A.

    1961-01-01

    This report, in two parts, presents a program development plan for attempting a first manned lunar landing in 1967. The two parts consist of a Summary Report and a Detailed Report representing the coordinated output of the ad hoc task group assigned to the study. The study was started in response to the request for such a study by the Associate Administrator in his memorandum of May 2, 1961 establishing the Ad Hoc Task Group. The purpose of the study was to take a first cut at the tasks associated with the design, development and construction of the equipment and facilities as well as the development of the crews, and to show the time phasing of these tasks. Included are the space science, life science and advanced technology tasks whose data and results are needed for designing and developing the systems required in carrying out the mission.

  11. Technical Working Group on Career and Technical Education Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, September 22, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Judie

    2017-01-01

    On September 22, 2017, the National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) and the National Center for Education Research (NCER) at the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) convened a group of experts in policy, practice, and research related to Career and Technical Education (CTE). The goal of the meeting was to seek input from…

  12. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE INTERACTION REGION WORKING GROUP (T1) AT SNOWMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W

    2002-09-23

    The Interaction Region Working Group (T1) at Snowmass 2001 reviewed the issues, designs, and plans of existing and proposed colliders, including hadron colliders, e{sup -} hadron colliders, e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} linear colliders, e{sup +}e{sup -} circular colliders, and muon colliders. This document summarizes the IR issues, status, and R&D plans for each project.

  13. Group Adaptation and Individual Adjustment in Antarctica: A Summary of Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-13

    accidental and violent injuries are at the 0.10 level. To further evaluate the significantly reduced risk in the observed diagnostic categories, we examined...entertained. For instance, although not statistically significant, the lower rates of mental disorders and accidental injuries among the winter-over group...References Adler, R., MacRitchie, K, & Engel, G.L. (1971). Psychologic process and ischemic stroke (occlusive cerebrovascular disease): I. Observations

  14. Workshop to identify critical windows of exposure for children's health: neurobehavioral work group summary.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, J; Barone, S; LaMantia, A; Philen, R; Rice, D C; Spear, L; Susser, E

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the deliberations of a work group charged with addressing specific questions relevant to risk estimation in developmental neurotoxicology. We focused on eight questions. a) Does it make sense to think about discrete windows of vulnerability in the development of the nervous system? If it does, which time periods are of greatest importance? b) Are there cascades of developmental disorders in the nervous system? For example, are there critical points that determine the cou...

  15. Summary of the 200x200 GeV μ+-μ- collider working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.; Whittum, D.; Bombade, P.; Cline, D.; Jackson, G.; McIntyre, P.; Peters, G.; Sasaki, M.; Summers, D.; Yokoya, K.

    1996-01-01

    We report the discussions and some preliminary results from the sessions of the 200x200 GeV μ + -μ - Collider working group. The physics motivation for such a open-quote open-quote medium-energy close-quote close-quote collider is discussed. Possible parameters for such a system are described, and compared with higher-energy systems. Relatively-high luminosities (L∼10 33 cm -2 s -1 ) appear possible. Modifications of existing facilities to obtain medium-energy μ + -μ - collisions are discussed. Other discussion topics (μ-p colliders, low-energy μ sources, etc.) are summarized. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  16. The crystal chemistry of novel thorium and uranium compounds with oxo-anions from group VI of periodic table (S, Se, Te, Cr, Mo and W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bin

    2016-01-26

    This dissertation focus on the synthesis, phase studies and physicochemical properties of novel thorium and uranium compounds with the Group VI (S, Se, Te, Cr, Mo, W) of the Periodic Table. All the studied compounds are listed in Table 2.2 from the page 15. I subdivided all the newly synthesized compounds into several chapters according to their structural and topological differences. First, for thorium molybdates and tungstates, almost all of these compounds are based on corner-sharing of ThO{sub x} (x = 6, 8 and 9) and MoO{sub 4} or WO{sub x} (x = 4, 5, 6) polyhedra. Interestingly, all these compounds can be seen as derived from a pure thorium molybdate compound (ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8}) which was isolated from high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. Therefore, the polymorphs of this most basic ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8} compound is firstly introduced (see Chapter 3.1 from page 18). The thermodynamic, electronic and vibrational properties of all investigated ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8} polymorphs were studied using ab initio calculations. Then, two subfamilies of thorium molybdates, that is, rubidium thorium molybdate and cesium thorium molybdate and their thermal and vibrational behaviors were discussed in details in Chapter 4.1 from page 37 and Chapter 4.2 from page 50, respectively. Moreover, some new insights about the complexity of thorium tungstates were also discussed (Chapter 4.3 from page 59). Some novel thorium molybdate and chromate compounds synthesized from aqueous condition are discussed in Chapter 5 from page 71. In the Chapter 8.2.4, the stereochemistry for thorium and uranium compounds are introduced, especially thorium selinites and uranyl tellurites (see Chapter 6.1 from page 82), thorium tellurites (Chapter 6.2 from page 93), and uranyl tellurites (Chapter 6.3 from page 99 for sodium uranyl tellurium and Chapter 6.4 from page 110 for potassium uranyl tellurium, respectively). In the actinide tellurium systems, additional MoO{sub 3}/WO{sub 3} were also

  17. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienands, U.

    2012-01-01

    The facilities reported on are all in a fairly mature state of operation, as evidenced by the very detailed studies and correction schemes that all groups are working on. First- and higher-order aberrations are diagnosed and planned to be corrected. Very detailed beam measurements are done to get a global picture of the beam dynamics. More than other facilities the high-luminosity colliders are struggling with experimental background issues, mitigation of which is a permanent challenge. The working group dealt with a very wide rage of practical issues which limit performance of the machines and compared their techniques of operations and their performance. We anticipate this to be a first attempt. In a future workshop in this series, we propose to attempt more fundamental comparisons of each machine, including design parameters. For example, DAPHNE and KEKB employ a finite crossing angle. The minimum value of β* y attainable at KEKB seems to relate to this scheme. Effectiveness of compensation solenoids and turn-by-turn BPMs etc. should be examined in more detail. In the near future, CESR-C and VEPP-2000 will start their operation. We expect to hear important new experiences from these machines; in particular VEPP-2000 will be the first machine to have adopted round beams. At SLAC and KEK, next generation B Factories are being considered. It will be worthwhile to discuss the design issues of these machines based on the experiences of the existing factory machines.

  18. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Second Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: Opening of the meeting. 2. Appraisal of the IWGFB's activity for the period from the first annual meeting of the Group. 3. Comments on national programmes on fast breeder reactors. 4. Presentation of general findings and conclusions of national and regional meetings on fast reactor problems held in represented countries and international organisations last year. 5. Comments on the programmes of international meetings on fast reactors to be held in 1969. 6. Consideration of a schedule for meetings on fast reactors in 1970. 7. Suggestions for the topics and location of specialists' meetings in 1969-1970. 8. Suggestions for reviews and studies in the field of fast reactors. 9. The time and place of the third annual meeting of the IWGFR. 10. Closing of the meeting

  19. Summary of the 2016 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boule, Lisbeth A; Ju, Cynthia; Agudelo, Marisela; Parira, Tiyash; Cannon, Abigail; Davis, Booker; Eby, Jonathan; Cresci, Gail; Samuelson, Derrick R; Shukla, Pradeep; Alrefai, Waddah A; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Pandey, Subhash C; Schnabl, Bernd; Curtis, Brenda J; Wyatt, Todd A; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2018-02-01

    On November 18, 2016 the 21st annual Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting was held at the Center for Translational Research and Education at Loyola University Chicago's Health Sciences Campus in Maywood, IL. The 2016 meeting focused broadly on alcohol and inflammation, epigenetics, and the microbiome. The four plenary sessions of the meeting were Alcohol, Inflammation, and Immunity; Alcohol and Epigenetics; Alcohol, Transcriptional Regulation, and Epigenetics; and Alcohol, Intestinal Mucosa, and the Gut Microbiome. Presentations in all sessions of the meeting explored putative underlying causes for chronic diseases and mortality associated with alcohol consumption, shedding light on future work and potential therapeutic targets to alleviate the negative effects of alcohol misuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Les Houches 'Physics at Tev Colliders 2003' QCD/SM Working Group Summary Report

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, M.; Laenen, Eric; De Roeck, A.; Tollefson, K.; Andersen, J.R.; Balazs, C.; Banfi, A.; Berge, S.; Bernreuther, W.; Binoth, T.; Brandenburg, A.; Buttar, C.; Cao, Q.H.; Corcella, G.; Cruz, A.; Dawson, I.; Del Duca, V.; Drollinger, V.; Dudko, L.; Eynck, T.; Field, R.; Grazzini, M.; Guillet, J.P.; Heinrich, G.; Huston, J.; Kauer, N.; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Kulesza, A.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Magnea, Lorenzo; Mahmoudi, F.; Maina, E.; Maltoni, F.; Nolten, M.; Moraes, A.; Moretti, S.; Mrenna, S.; Nadolsky, Pavel M.; Nagy, Z.; Olness, F.; Puljak, I.; Ross, D.A.; Sabio Vera, Agustin; Salam, G.P.; Sherstnev, A.; Si, Z.G.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, Peter Z.; Thome, E.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Uwer, P.; Weinzierl, S.; Yuan, C.P.; Zanderighi, G.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained by the Working Group on Quantum Chromodynamics and the Standard Model for the Workshop `Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 26 May - 6 June 2003. After a Monte Guide description, the first contributions report on progress in describing multiple interactions, important for the LHC, and underlying events. An announcement of a Monte Carlo database, under construction, is then followed by a number of contributions improving parton shower descriptions. Subsequently, a large number of contributions address resummations in various forms, after which follow studies of QCD effects in pion pair, top quark pair and photon pair plus jet production. After a study of electroweak corrections to hadronic precision observables, the report ends by presenting recent progress in methods to compute finite order corrections at one-loop with many legs, and at two-loop.

  1. Current problems and future directions of transfusion-induced alloimmunization: summary of an NHLBI working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimring, James C; Welniak, Lis; Semple, John W; Ness, Paul M; Slichter, Sherrill J; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2011-02-01

    In April 2010, a working group sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was assembled to identify research strategies to improve our understanding of alloimmunization caused by the transfusion of allogeneic blood components and to evaluate potential approaches to both reduce its occurrence and manage its effects. Significant sequelae of alloimmunization were discussed and identified, including difficulties in maintaining chronic transfusion of red blood cells and platelets, hemolytic disease of the newborn, neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, and rejection of transplanted cells and tissues. The discussions resulted in a consensus that identified key areas of future research and developmental areas, including genetic and epigenetic recipient factors that regulate alloimmunization, biochemical specifics of transfused products that affect alloimmunization, and novel technologies for high-throughput genotyping to facilitate extensive and efficient antigen matching between donor and recipient. Additional areas of importance included analysis of unappreciated medical sequelae of alloimmunization, such as cellular immunity and its effect upon transplant and autoimmunity. In addition, support for research infrastructure was discussed, with an emphasis on encouraging collaboration and synergy of animal models biology and human clinical research. Finally, training future investigators was identified as an area of importance. In aggregate, this communication provides a synopsis of the opinions of the working group on the above issues and presents both a list of suggested priorities and the rationale for the topics of focus. The areas of research identified in this report represent potential fertile ground for the medical advancement of preventing and managing alloimmunization in its different forms and mitigating the clinical problems it presents to multiple patient populations. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The international network of nuclear structure and decay data (NSDD) evaluators aims at a complete and periodic nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of all nuclides, the continuous publication of these evaluations and their dissemination to the scientific community. The evaluated data resulting from this concerted international effort are introduced in the Evaluated Structure and Decay Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic meetings of this network are held in order to maintain the coordination of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD, to maintain and improve the standards and rules governing NSDS evaluation, and to review the development and common use of the computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. This document is a summary report of the twelfth Meeting on the Coordination of the NSDD Evaluators held between 14-18 October 1996 in Budapest, Hungary

  3. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Castiglione, Monica; Colleoni, Marco; Gruber, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods: From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). Conclusions: This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT.

  4. Guide to active vaccine safety surveillance: Report of CIOMS working group on vaccine safety - executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heininger, U; Holm, K; Caplanusi, I; Bailey, S R

    2017-07-13

    In 2013, the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS) created a Working Group on Vaccine Safety (WG) to address unmet needs in the area of vaccine pharmacovigilance. Generating reliable data about specific vaccine safety concerns is becoming a priority due to recent progress in the development and deployment of new vaccines of global importance, as well as novel vaccines targeting diseases specifically endemic to many resource-limited countries (RLCs), e.g. malaria, dengue. The WG created a Guide to Active Vaccine Safety Surveillance (AVSS) to assist national regulatory authorities and national immunization program officers in RLCs in determining the best course of action with regards to non-routine pharmacovigilance activities, when confronted with a launch of a new vaccine or a vaccine that is new to their country. Here we summarize the results of the WG, further detailed in the Guide, which for the first time provides a structured approach to identifying and analyzing specific vaccines safety knowledge gaps, while considering all available sources of information, in order to determine whether AVSS is an appropriate solution. If AVSS is confirmed as being the appropriate tool, the Guide provides additional essential information on AVSS, a detailed overview of common types of AVSS and practical implementation considerations. It also provides a framework for a well-constructed and informative AVSS when needed, thus aiming to ensure the best possible safety of immunization in this new landscape. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. to Cr (VI)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    been held responsible for the major influx of Cr to the biosphere, accounting for 40% of the total industrial use (Barnhart, 1997). Out of the different variable valance states of Chromium, Cr(VI) and. Cr(III) are most stable; Cr(VI) owing to filled and. Cr(III) due to half filled orbital stability. Cr(VI) is extremely labile in the biological ...

  6. Evidence summary: why is access to dental care for frail elderly people worse than for other groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caines, Beth

    2010-02-13

    In August 2009, members of the newly redeveloped Primary Care Dentistry Research Forum (http://www.dentistryresearch.org) took part in an online vote to identify questions in day-to-day practice that they felt most needed to be answered with conclusive research. The question which received the most votes formed the subject of a critical appraisal of the relevant literature. Each month a new round of voting will take place to decide which further questions will be reviewed. Dental practitioners and dental care professionals are encouraged to take part in the voting and submit their own questions to be included in the vote by joining the website.This paper details a summary of the findings of the first critical appraisal. In conclusion, the critical appraisal has identified that primary research is needed to look at the subject of access to dental care for frail elderly people. Similar barriers to accessing care for this group of people are still being reported today as they were 20 years ago.

  7. XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The collection contains materials of plenary, sectional and poster sessions, presented at the XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Theoretical questions and new experimental methods of chemistry of solutions, structure and dynamics of molecular and ion-molecular systems in solution and at the phase boundary; modern aspects of applied chemistry of solutions are discussed [ru

  8. The unperturbed oxo-sulfido functional group cis-Mo{sup VI}OS related to that in the xanthine oxidase family of molybdoenzymes: Synthesis, structural characterization, and reactivity aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapper, A.; Donahue, J.P.; Musgrave, K.B.; Willer, M.W.; Nordlander, E.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Holm, R.H.

    1999-09-06

    The oxo-sulfido functional group cis-Mo{sup VI}OS is essential to the activity of the xanthine oxidase family of enzymes but has proven elusive to synthesis in molecules containing no other four-electron ligands. A direct route to molecules containing this group has been achieved. The reaction system [MoO{sub 2}(OSiPh{sub 3}){sub 2}]/L in dichloromethane yields the complexes [Mo{sup VI}O{sub 2}(OSiPh{sub 3}){sub 2}L] (L = phen (1), Me{sub 4}phen (2), 4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2}bpy (3), 5,5{prime}-Me{sub 2}bpy (4), 2 py (5)) (74--96%), which are shown to have a distorted octahedral structure of crystallographically imposed C{sub 2} symmetry (1, 5) with cis oxo and trans silyloxy ligands. The related reaction system [MoO{sub 3}S]{sup 2{minus}}/2Ph{sub 3}SiCl/L in acetonitrile affords the complexes [Mo{sup VI}OS(OSiPh{sub 3}){sub 2}L] (L = phen (6), Me{sub 4}phen (7), 4,4{prime}-Me{sub 2}bpy (8), 5,5{prime}-Me{sub 2}bpy (9)) (36--69%). From the collective results of elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, {sup 1}H NMR, and X-ray structure determinations (6, 7), complexes 6--9 are shown to contain the cis-Mo {sup VI}OS group in molecules with the same overall stereochemistry as dioxo complexes 1--5. The crystal structures of 6 and 7 exhibit O/S disorder, which was modeled in refinements with 50% site occupancies. The Mo{double{underscore}bond}O (1.607(5) (6), 1.645(5) (7) {angstrom}) and Mo{double{underscore}bond}S (2.257(3) (6), 2.203(2) (7) {angstrom}) bond distances obtained in this way are somewhat shorter and longer, respectively, than expected. Distances obtained by molybdenum EXAFS analysis using the GNXAS protocol for 6--9 (Mo{double{underscore}bond}O 1.71--1.72 {angstrom}; Mo{double{underscore}bond}S 2.18--2.19 {angstrom}) are considered more satisfactory and are in good agreement with EXAFS values for xanthine oxidase. Molybdenum K-edge data for 1 and 6--9 are reported. Reaction of 7 with Ph{sub 3}P in dichloromethane results in sulfur abstraction and formation of

  9. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Gas-Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Identification and management of cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group (executive summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Fitchett, David H; Gilbert, Richard E; Gupta, Milan; Mancini, G B John; McFarlane, Philip A; Ross, Robert; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh; Anand, Sonia; Camelon, Kathryn; Chow, Chi-Ming; Cox, Jafna L; Després, Jean-Pierre; Genest, Jacques; Harris, Stewart B; Lau, David C W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Liu, Peter P; Lonn, Eva M; McPherson, Ruth; Poirier, Paul; Qaadri, Shafiq; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Rabkin, Simon W; Sharma, Arya M; Steele, Andrew W; Stone, James A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tobe, Sheldon; Ur, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    With the objectives of clarifying the concepts related to "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome" and "risk stratification" and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group presents an executive summary of a detailed analysis and position paper that offers a comprehensive and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The above concepts overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider ethnicity-related risk factors in order to appropriately evaluate all individuals in their diverse patient populations. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved Using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource-Constrained Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Davis, Thomas; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Ricca, Jim; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The Care Group approach, described in detail in a companion paper in this journal, uses volunteers to convey health promotion messages to their neighbors. This article summarizes the available evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, drawing on articles published in the peer-reviewed literature as well as data from unpublished but publicly available project evaluations and summary analyses of these evaluations. When implemented by strong international NGOs with adequate fundi...

  12. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-HR-1,100-KR-1, and 100-KR-2 Group 4 Waste Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-HR-1, 100-KR-1, and 100-KR-2 Group 4 waste sites will be the fourth set of Hanford 100 Area sites to undergo remediation. Like the sites in Groups 1, 2,and 3, the majority of Group 4 sties are considered high priority because of the contaminants present and their proximity to the Columbia River. the data quality objectives process,summarized in this document, is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approach for addressing data collecting and decision-making issues that are part of an environmental remediation project. The basic cleanup assumptions made in the Group 1, 2, and 3 designs are retained for the Group 4 design. As was the case with Group 3, the most significant difference between this DQO Summary Report and the Group 1 and 2 DQO Summary Reports is the data gaps that exist for specific Group 4 waste sites. These data gaps affect the approach to waste profiling and are the principal focus of the Group 4 DQO process

  13. and dioxouranium(vi)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    solvent. The iodo complex appears to be a 1:2, while the perchlorato complex is 1:4 electrolyte. The uranyl(VI) complexes ..... Thermal analysis data thorium (IV) complexes of HNAAPTS. Decomposition temp. (oC). Weight loss (%). Complex. Initial. Final. Decomposition product. Theor. Exp. ThCl4.2(HNAAPTS). 240. 350.

  14. and dioxouranium(vi)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    positive charge resulting from high oxidation state of central metal ion. Actinide ions generally present a high coordination number and the type of polyhedron obtainable is influenced by the nature of the coordinating ligands. Thorium(IV) and uranium(VI) with atomic radii of 1.65 and. 1.42 Å, respectively, and a high positive ...

  15. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  16. Terapia de reposição enzimática para as mucopolissacaridoses I, II e VI: recomendações de um grupo de especialistas brasileiros Enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses I, II and VI: recommendations from a group of Brazilian F experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giugliani

    2010-01-01

    developed and was approved for clinical use in MPS I, II and VI in the first decade of the 21st century. The authors of this paper are convinced that a better future for patients affected by mucopolysaccharidoses depends upon identifying, understanding and appropriately managing the multisystemic manifestations of these diseases. This includes the provision of support measures (which should be part of regular multidisciplinary care of these patients and of specific therapies. Although inhibition of synthesis of GAG and the recovery of enzyme activity with small molecules also may play a role in the management of MPS, the breakthrough is the currently available intravenous ERT. ERT radically changed the setting for treatment of mucopolysaccharidosis I, II and VI in the last decade., Benefits can even be extended soon to MPS IV A (ERT for this condition is already in clinical development, with prediction for treatment of MPS III A and the cognitive deficit in MPS II by administration of the enzyme directly into the central nervous system (CNS. A large number of Brazilian services, from all regions of the country, already have experience with ERT for MPS I, II and VI. This experience was gained not only by treating patients but also with the participation of some groups in clinical trials involving ERT for these conditions. Summing up the three types of MPS, more than 250 patients have already been treated with ERT in Brazil. The experience of professionals coupled to the data available in international literature, allowed us to elaborate this document, produced with the goal of bringing together and harmonize the information available for the treatment of these severe and progressive diseases, which, fortunately, are now treatable, a situation which bring new perspectives for Brazilian patients, affected by these conditions.

  17. Summary report of the IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear data for neutron multiplication in fusion-reactor first-wall and blanket materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1992-09-01

    The present Report contains the Summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Multiplication in Fusion-Reactor First-Wall and Blanket Materials, which was hosted by the Southwest Institute of Nuclear physics and Chemistry (SWINPC) at Chengdu, China and held from 19-21 November 1990. This AGM was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS), with the cooperation and assistance of local organizers at the SWINPC. The papers which the participants prepared for and presented at the meeting will be published as an INDC report. (author)

  18. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter-over-groups

  19. The removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution by almond green hull waste material: kinetic and equilibrium studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nasseh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of industrial effluents containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can be very harmful to living things. Therefore, prior to effluent discharge into the environment, hexavalent chromium should be removed from contaminated water and especially from wastewaters. In the present work, almond green hull powder (AGHP was investigated for the removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater. The effects of pH (2–10, adsorbent dose (2–24 g L−1, Cr(VI concentration (10–100 mg L−1, contact time (1–60 min, and temperature (5–50 °C were studied. All the experiments were performed in triplicate and average results were reported. The surface morphology, pore volume and size, pH of zero point charge (pHZPC and surface functional groups of AGHP were characterized. Isotherm and kinetic evaluations were also conducted in the present study. The results revealed that the adsorption of Cr(VI by AGHP was an adsorbate, adsorbent, and temperature dependent process that was favorable under acidic conditions. Furthermore, AGHP absorbed over 99% of chromium from the solutions containing 10–100 mg L−1 of Cr(VI based on the Freundlich model. In summary, hexavalent chromium was not found in almond kernel. Biosorption onto AGHP is an affordable and economical adsorption process for treating Cr(VI-laden industrial wastewater.

  20. Summary on the activity of AERs Working Group on core monitoring (flux reconstruction, in-core measurements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, I.

    2010-01-01

    Working Group C had a joint meeting with Group G in Balatonfuered, Hungary, 31 May-1 June, 2010. At the joint meeting 21 people from 10 AER member organisations of 4 countries - such as Russia, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary - participated. In the 2 days of the program 15 papers were presented, 10 from these connected to the topic of working group C. The title of papers and the list of participants are attached. At the meeting the following topics were discussed:1-Gd fuel introduction and experiences;2-Reactor physical measurement and evaluation problems; 3-Code development and testing;4-In-core surveillance system developments. (Author)

  1. Summary report on the French burnup credit working group. Knowledge regarding PWR UOX fuel. French Burnup Credit WG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The 'Burnup Credit' Working Group was established in 1997 to examine the various parameters, such as the irradiation conditions, the burnup profile and the nuclides (actinides and fission products), to be taken into consideration in the criticality studies that take credit from burnup. This report offers an overview of the work that has been completed or agreed under this framework. It presents the group findings on the following topics: - the axial distribution of nuclides or the axial burnup profile; - methods for validating the actual burnup and its axial distribution; - the calculation of nuclide concentrations after irradiation; - the calculation methods that will be used to determine the effective multiplication factor for systems containing used fuel assemblies. This document gathers together the work carried out by the French Burnup Credit Working Group; it is not a guide validating a particular method for taking burnup credit into account. All of the findings presented here may serve as a basis in industry for defining a method to take account of burnup credit in criticality studies; any industrial body effectively adopting such a method will also be responsible for defining it, based on its knowledge of the used fuel assemblies and the configuration to be addressed. This document forms a collection of the work completed by the Working Group up to 1 January 2007 but does not necessarily reflect ongoing work in the various institutes. (authors)

  2. Summary of the NICHD-BPCA Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Amidon, Gordon L.; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A.; Knipp, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community as an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) working group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric based classification system. Since there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability and potentially biorelevant solubilities at the different ages, the PBCS working group focused on identifying age specific issues that would need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. Objective To summarize the findings of the PBCS working group and provide insights into considerations required for the development of a pediatric based biopharmaceutics classification system. Methods Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development (NICHD)-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS working group considered several high level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS working group identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be addressed in order to develop a rigorous PBCS. Results It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it would need to be broken down into several different age groups that would account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal transit. Several critical knowledge gaps where identified including: 1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, in the liver and in the kidney; 2

  3. Les Houches Physics at TeV Colliders 2005 Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Grojean, C.; /Saclay, SPhT /CERN; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, G.; Baer, H.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, P.-A.; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, K.; Dobrescu, B.A.; Dudko, L.; El Kacimi, M.; /Saclay,

    2006-03-17

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  4. Proceedings of the spring meeting of the Working Group for Electronic Instrumentation, Berlin, March 21 - 23, 1994. Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, F.

    1994-07-01

    The SEI, working group for electronic instrumentation, is a platform for exchange of information and experience among electronics engineers from universities and research labs, particularly on subjects of interest in high-energy physics and nuclear electronics engineering. The abstracts of the 12 papers presented to the meeting cover aspects of current interest ranging from technology transfer to hardware description language to data processing to specific measuring and control instruments. (DG) [de

  5. Les Houches physics at TeV colliders 2005 beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, Benjamin C.; Skands, Peter Z.; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, Georges; Baer, H.; Balazs, Csaba; Belanger, G.; Benakli, Karim; Boudjema, Fawzi; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Carena, Marcela; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, Klaus; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Dudko, Lev V.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellwanger, Ulrich; Ferrag, S.; Finch, A.; Franke, F.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Gambino, Paolo; Ghodbane, Nabil; Godbole, R.M.; Goujdami, D.; Gris, Ph.; Guasch, Jaume Inglada; Guchait, M.; Hahn, Thomas; Heinemeyer, Sven; Hektor, A.; Hesselbach, Stefan; Hollik, W.; Hugonie, Cyril; Hurth, T.; Idarraga, J.; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Kalinowski, J.; Kneur, J.L.; Kraml, Sabine; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Lafaye, R.; Landsberg, Greg L.; Lari, T.; Lee, Jae Sik; Lykken, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Menon, Arjun; Miller, D.J.; Millet, T.; Milstene, Caroline; Montesano, S.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Moretti, Stefano; Morrissey, David Edgar; Muanza, S.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Muntel, M.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ohl, Thorsten; Penaranda, Siannah; Perelstein, M.; Perez, E.; Perries, S.; Peskin, Michael E.; Petzoldt, J.; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Plehn, Tilman; Polesello, G.; Pompos, A.; Porod, Werner; Przysiezniak, H.; Pukhov, A.; Raidal, Martti; Rainwater, David Landry; Raklev, Are R.; Rathsman, Johan; Reuter, Juergen; Richardson, Peter; Rindani, Saurabh D.; Rolbiecki, K.; Rzehak, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumann, S.; Semenov, A.; Serin, L.; Servant, Geraldine; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H.; Sherstnev, S.; Silvestrini, Luca; Singh, R.K.; Slavich, Pietro; Spira, Michael; Sopczak, A.; Sridhar, K.; Tompkins, Lauren Alexandra; Troncon, Clara; Tsuno, S.; Wagh, K.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Weiglein, Georg; Wienemann, P.; Zerwas, D.; Zhukov, V.; Gris, Ph

    2005-01-01

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop Physics at TeV Colliders, Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  6. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng

    2013-01-01

    We study the mergeability of data summaries. Informally speaking, mergeability requires that, given two summaries on two datasets, there is a way to merge the two summaries into a single summary on the two datasets combined together, while preserving the error and size guarantees. This property m...

  7. Practical application of non-whole animal alternatives: summary of IRAG workshop on eye irritation testing. Interagency Regulatory Alternatives Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradlaw, J; Gupta, K; Green, S; Hill, R; Wilcox, N

    1997-01-01

    In November 1993, the Interagency Regulatory Alternatives Group (IRAG) sponsored a workshop to examine the current scientific status of alternatives to the Draize eye irritation test by assessing the current practical application of methods used to predict in vivo eye irritation. Laboratories from around the world were invited to submit detailed in vitro and in vivo data in parallel according to a specific set of guidelines in a consistent format. In vitro scores were compared with individual tissue scores. Over 60 data sets from 41 laboratories were received for 29 different test methods. Methods were grouped into five categories: organotypic models, chorioallantoic membrane-based assays, cell function-based assays, cytotoxicity assays and other systems. Data submissions and correlation analyses have been used to demonstrate the application of guidelines in method evaluations. Findings are summarized and future directions are indicated. A significant outcome of the workshop was the co-operation demonstrated among representatives of industry, academia and government in sharing test data on more than 2000 chemicals, products and product formulations for evaluation by their peers. Information obtained from this workshop will add to the weight of scientific evidence and scientific consensus about in vitro test methods and will establish credibility for regulatory acceptance of non-whole animal alternatives for ocular irritation.

  8. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). Executive summary. [weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions so as to significantly reduce the cost for frost and freeze protection and crop losses. The design and implementation of the first phase of an economic experiment which will monitor citrus growers decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events was carried out. The economic experiment was designed to measure the change in annual protection costs and crop losses which are the direct result of improved temperature forecasts. To estimate the benefits that may result from improved temperature forecasting capability, control and test groups were established with effective separation being accomplished temporally. The control group, utilizing current forecasting capability, was observed during the 1976-77 frost season and the results are reported. A brief overview is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done.

  9. Vi tror, vi forstår hinanden, men det gør vi ikke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Mikkel Snorre Wilms

    2016-01-01

    Vores verdensbillede er baseret på en tro på, at vi forstår hinanden. Men meget tyder på, at denne tro snarere er en illusion. Derfor må vi indstille os på, at der skal en særlig indsats til, hvis vi skal kunne forstå vores omverden og menneskene i den......Vores verdensbillede er baseret på en tro på, at vi forstår hinanden. Men meget tyder på, at denne tro snarere er en illusion. Derfor må vi indstille os på, at der skal en særlig indsats til, hvis vi skal kunne forstå vores omverden og menneskene i den...

  10. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives

  12. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  13. Improved evaluations and integral data testing for FENDL. Summary report of the IAEA advisory group meeting held in Garching, Germany, 12 to 16 September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1994-12-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section, in co-operation with several national nuclear data centres and research groups, has created the first version of an internationally available Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL-1). The FENDL library has been selected to serve as a comprehensive source of processed and tested nuclear data tailored to the requirements of the Engineering and Development Activities (EDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project and other fusion-related development projects. Within the scope of the FENDL project, the International Atomic Energy Agency performs the task of coordinating the assembling, processing and testing of a comprehensive, fusion-relevant Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library with unrestricted international distribution. The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Improved Evaluations and Integral Data Testing for FENDL'', 12-16 September 1994 hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany. The report presents the current status of the FENDL activity and the future work plans in the form of conclusions and recommendations of the four Working Groups of the Advisory Group Meeting on (1) Basic Evaluations towards FENDL/E-2.0 for ITER Design, (2) Experimental and Calculational Benchmarks on Fusion Neutronics for FENDL Validation, (3) Production and Interfacing of FENDL Libraries to ITER Design, and, (4) Activation. (author)

  14. Cinética e equilíbrio de adsorção dos oxiânions Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI pelo sal de amônio quaternário de quitosana Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of oxyanions Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI by quaternary ammonium chitosan salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Spinelli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sal quaternário de quitosana foi sintetizado com cloreto de glicidil trimetil amônio. A modificação química foi caracterizada por espectrometria no IV, RMN de 13C e ¹H, e mmol/g de grupos quaternários presentes na matriz polimérica por condutimetria. A remoção de Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI, em meio aquoso, foi investigada em processo de batelada. A adsorção mostrou ser dependente do pH para o Cr (VI e Se (VI, com um pH ótimo de adsorção, entre 4,0 a 6,0. Para o Mo (VI a adsorção manteve-se quase constante no intervalo de pH entre 4,0 e 11,5. O modelo de isoterma de Langmuir descreveu melhor os dados de equilíbrio na faixa de concentração investigada. No presente estudo, um grama do sal quaternário de quitosana reticulado com glutaraldeído adsorveu 68,3 mg de Cr, 63,4 mg de Mo e 90,0 mg de Se. A velocidade de adsorção, no processo, segue a equação cinética de pseudo segunda-ordem, sendo que o equilíbrio para os três íons foi alcançado próximo aos 200 minutos. A análise dispersiva de raios-X para o Cr (VI mostrou que o principal mecanismo de adsorção é a troca iônica entre os íons Cl- da superfície do polímero pelos oxiânions. O trocador aniônico apresentou a seguinte ordem de seletividade: Cr (VI > Mo (VI > Se (VI.Quaternary chitosan salt was synthesized in the presence of glycidyl trimetyl ammonium chloride. The polymer was characterized by spectroscopic techniques: infrared, 13C and ¹H NMR, while the amount of quaternary ammonium groups was obtained by condutimetry. The removal of Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI from aqueous solutions was carried out in batch adsorption processes. The process seemed to be pH dependent for Cr (VI and Se (VI with an optimum pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.0; while for Mo (VI the adsorption remained almost constant within the range between 4.0 and 11.5. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data over the whole concentration investigated. In the experiment

  15. ViFiLite Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ViFiLite is a wireless infrastructure that utilizes the advantages of a V-band technology in supporting data gathering for structural health monitoring as well as...

  16. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Costa, Ana M. Rosa da; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Matos, Antonio Pedro; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  17. Skal vi have flere krondyr?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Christian

    2008-01-01

    Vi kunne have væsentligt flere krondyr i den danske natur end vi har i øjeblikket. Den primære årsag er jagt. Det viser en ny undersøgelse fra Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser ved Aarhus Universitet. Bestanden af krondyr er ganske vist steget meget siden 1970, men der er både plads og føde til mange...

  18. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-01-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF)

  19. The Vi conjugate typhoid vaccine is safe, elicits protective levels of IgG anti-Vi, and is compatible with routine infant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Vu Dinh; Lin, Feng-Ying C; Canh, Do Gia; Son, Nguyen Hong; Anh, Dang Duc; Mao, Nguyen Duc; Chu, Chiayung; Hunt, Steven W; Robbins, John B; Schneerson, Rachel; Szu, Shousun C

    2011-05-01

    Typhoid fever remains a serious problem in developing countries. Current vaccines are licensed for individuals who are 5 years old or older. A conjugate of the capsular polysaccharide (CP) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Vi) bound to recombinant exoprotein A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Vi-rEPA) enhanced Vi immunogenicity and protected 2- to 5-year-olds in Vietnam. In this study, Vi-rEPA was evaluated for use in infants. A total of 301 full-term Vietnamese infants received Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) vaccines alone or with Vi-rEPA or Haemophilus influenzae type b-tetanus toxoid conjugate (Hib-TT) at 2, 4, and 6 months and Vi-rEPA or Hib-TT alone at 12 months. Infants were visited 6, 24, and 48 h after each injection to monitor adverse reactions. Maternal, cord, and infant sera were assayed for IgG anti-Vi and for IgG antibodies to Hib CP and the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis toxins at 7, 12, and 13 months. No vaccine-related serious adverse reactions occurred. In the Vi-rEPA group, the IgG anti-Vi geometric mean (GM) increased from the cord level of 0.66 to 17.4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units (EU) at 7 months, declined to 4.76 EU at 12 months, and increased to 50.1 EU 1 month after the 4th dose (95% of infants had levels of ≥ 3.5 EU, the estimated protective level). Controls had no increase of the IgG anti-Vi GM. Infants with cord anti-Vi levels of anti-Vi levels than those with levels of ≥ 3.5 EU. Anti-diphtheria, -tetanus, and -pertussis toxin levels were similar in all groups. Vi-rEPA was safe, induced protective anti-Vi levels, and was compatible with EPI vaccines, and it can be used in infants. High cord IgG anti-Vi levels partially suppressed infant responses to Vi-rEPA.

  20. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Each session of the workshop consisted of a number of presentations followed by a panel discussion moderated by the session Chairs. A summary of each session and subsequent discussion that ensued are provided. Session 1: National approaches for long term interim storage facilities. Seven papers were presented during this session by representatives of research institutes in USA (EPRI) and in Norway (IFE), governmental authorities for the nuclear industry in Finland (STUK) and Slovak Republic (UJD), technical support organizations in Germany (GRS) and France (IRSN) and the public company in charge of waste management in Spain (ENRESA). The papers discussed the national policy, the regulatory framework and the current situation for storage of SF and HLW in various European countries (Germany, Spain, Finland, Norway and Slovak Republic). The main activities the EPRI is undertaking to establish the technical bases for extended (long-term) storage and the IRSN's definition of the safety principles and objectives for new storage facilities regarding long-term storage are also discussed. Session 2: Safety requirements, regulatory framework and implementation issues. Eleven papers were presented during this session by representatives from international groups (the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)), representatives of regulatory bodies from the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and Germany (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)), German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), operators from the United Kingdom (Sellafield Limited, UK) and France (EDF), vendors (AREVA), and representatives of TSOs in Germany (TUV and Oko-Institut). Session 3: Technical issues and operational experience, needs for R and D. This session was chaired by Karl Wasinger (AREVA, Germany) and Fumihisa Nagase (JAEA, Japan). Ten papers were presented during this session by representatives of research institutes of Japan (CRIEPI

  1. Radiosensitivity of Vi bacteriophage 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaremba, E.; Kwiatkowski, B.; Ciesielski, B.

    1989-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of Vi bacteriophages 3 under conditions of predominantly indirect radiation effects has been studied. The survival of the phages changed exponentially, with characteristic dose D 0 decreasing, during the first 120 minutes after irradiation due to postirradiation inactivation of the phages. Catalase reduced the toxic features of the irradiated medium. Inactivation of the phages caused by the presence of exogeneous H 2 O 2 in the medium had a similar character to inactivation caused by the medium preirradiated with adequate dose. It is concluded that hydrogen peroxide plays a critical role in postirradiation inactivation of Vi phages 3. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  2. Effect of flavin compounds on uranium(VI) reduction- kinetic study using electrochemical methods with UV-vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The reduction of uranium hexavalent (U(VI)) to tetravalent (U(IV)) is an important reaction because of the change in its mobility in the natural environment. Although the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) has acted as an electron shuttle for the U(VI) reduction in vivo system, which is called an electron mediator, only the rate constant for the electron transfer from FMN to U(VI) has been determined. This study examined the rate constant for the U(VI) reduction process by three flavin analogues (riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide) to elucidate their substituent group effect on the U(VI) reduction rate by electrochemical methods. The formation of the U(IV) was monitored by UV-vis spectrometry at 660 nm during the constant potential electrolysis of the U(VI) solution in the presence of the mediator. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that the three flavin analogues behaved as electron mediator to reduce U(VI). The logarithmic rate constant for the U(VI) reduction was related to the standard redox potential of the mediators. This linear relationship indicated that the redox-active group of the mediator and the substituent group of the mediator dominate capability of the U(VI) reduction and its rate, respectively. The apparent reduction potential of U(VI) increased about 0.2 V in the presence of the mediators, which strongly suggests that the biological electron mediator makes the U(VI) reduction possible even under more oxidative conditions. - Highlights: • The rate constant for the U(VI) reduction by flavin analogues was determined. • The flavins showed a mediator effect on the U(VI) reduction. • The logarithmic rate constants for the U(VI) reduction was proportional to redox potential of the mediator. • The presence of the mediator increased about 0.2 V apparent redox potential of U(VI) to U(IV).

  3. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  4. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  5. Protostars and Planets VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    star and planet formation. They are used by students to dive into new topics, and they are much valued by experienced researchers as a comprehensive overview of the field with all its interactions. We hope that you will enjoy reading (and learning from) this book as much as we do. The organization of the Protostars and Planets conference was carried out in close collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Center for Astronomy of the University Heidelberg, with generous support from the German Science Foundation. This volume is a product of effort and care by many people. First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the 250 contributing authors, as it is only due to their expertise and knowledge that such a comprehensive review compendium in all its depth and breadth is possible. The Protostars and Planets VI conference and this volume was a major undertaking, with support and contributions by many people and institutions. We like to thank the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee who selected the 38 teams and chapters out of more than 120 submitted proposals. Similarly, we are grateful to the reviewers, who provided valuable input and help to the chapter authors. The book would also not have been possible without the great support of Renée Dotson and other staff from USRA’s Lunar and Planetary Institute, who handled the detailed processing of all manuscripts and the production of the book, and of Allyson Carter and other staff from the University of Arizona Press. We are also grateful to Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his constant support during the long process, from the original concept to this final product. Finally, we would like to express a very special thank you to the entire conference local organizing committee, and in particular, Carmen Cuevas and Natali Jurina, for their great commitment to the project and for a very fruitful and enjoyable collaboration.

  6. VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaal / Leonhard Lapin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lapin, Leonhard, 1947-

    2005-01-01

    15.-17. IX Tallinnas Niguliste kirikus toimuval VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil esinevad inglise arhitektuurikriitik Peter Davey, šveitsi arhitekt Peter Zumthor, soome arhitekt Juha Leviskä, eesti arhitekt Vilen Künnapu, eesti kunstiajaloolane Juhan Maiste jt. Külastatakse KUMU, tutvutab autor Pekka Vapaavuori

  7. Vi har brug for skammere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Skammen er en væsentlig ingrediens i opdragelsen af børn, men det overser vi, for skam er et fyord i den pædagogiske verden. Interview med børnebogsforfatteren Lene Kaaberbøl om, hvorfor skam gør os menneskelige....

  8. (VI) oxide in acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media was studied. The reaction products were analysed using infra red (IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass (GC/MS) spectroscopy. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium were cyclohexanol, ...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1915.1026 Section 1915.1026 Labor... § 1915.1026 Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI... cement; or (4) Where the employer has objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1126 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1926.1126 Section 1926.1126 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms... objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or a specific process, operation, or...

  11. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chromium (VI). 1910.1026 Section 1910.1026 Labor... Chromium (VI). (a) Scope. (1) This standard applies to occupational exposures to chromium (VI) in all forms... objective data demonstrating that a material containing chromium or a specific process, operation, or...

  12. Spectroscopic Studies on Complex Formation of U(VI)-thiosalicylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wan Sik; Cho, Hye Ryun; Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The dynamic interaction between radionuclides and organic ligands is largely dependent on the composition of functional groups in a ligand chemical structure. Therefore, the structural mimics of natural ligands possessing specific functional groups, such as hydroxy, phenol, carboxyl, thiol and amine groups, have been studied to understand their influence on the migration of radionuclides including actinide species under geological groundwater conditions. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the fraction of hydrolyzed U(VI) species occurring in weak acidic solutions (pH {approx}4.5) is significantly influenced by the presence of salicylate (Sal) ligand due to the simultaneous participation of both phenol and carboxyl groups in the formation of U(VI)-complexes. Thiosalicylic acid (TSalH{sub 2}) is a good model compound for studying the effects of both carboxyl and thiol (-SH) groups. The fraction of di-anionic ligand form (TSal{sup 2-}) is higher at near neutral pH due to the lower pKa ({approx} 8) of the thiol group than the case of salicylic acid (pKa, {approx}13 for salicylic -OH), despite the structural similarity. In addition, the redox capability of the thiol group is expected to influence the reducible radiouclides and the chemical structures of natural ligands by creating cross-linkage (-S-S-) upon oxidation. The goal of the present study is to investigate aqueous U(VI)-TSal complexation equilibrium via laser-based spectroscopic techniques including time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In this preliminary work, we report the results of spectroscopic studies using conventional UVVis absorbance and fluorescence (FL) measurement methods. The photo-stability of U(VI)-TSal complex or ligand itself upon exposure to a series of laser pulses is estimated by monitoring the change in their absorption bands. Additionally, TSal FL-quenching effect by U(VI) ions is discussed in comparison with that of Sal FL-quenching

  13. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    2001-02-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 4-7 December 2000. The meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 7 Member States and 1 international organization concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  14. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    1999-03-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the thirteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998. The meeting was attended by 30 scientists from 10 Member States and 2 international organizations concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  15. Anesthetic Challenges in an Adult with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Jacqueline; Jansen, Nicholas

    2014-06-15

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of lysosomal storage diseases with many skeletal and airway features that pose a challenge to anesthetists. We present the anesthetic management of a woman with mucopolysaccharidosis type VI undergoing cervical spine surgery and review the perioperative issues that may arise with this disease.

  16. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U V species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U VI /U V oxo cluster [U(UO 2 ) 5 (μ 3 -O) 5 (PhCOO) 5 (Py) 7 ]. This cluster is only the second example of a U VI /U V cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U V center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U 12 IV U 4 V O 24 cluster {[K(Py) 2 ] 2 [K(Py)] 2 [U 16 O 24 (PhCOO) 24 (Py) 2 ]}.

  17. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Inst. de Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U{sup V} species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U{sup VI}/U{sup V} oxo cluster [U(UO{sub 2}){sub 5}(μ{sub 3}-O){sub 5}(PhCOO){sub 5}(Py){sub 7}]. This cluster is only the second example of a U{sup VI}/U{sup V} cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U{sup V} center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U{sub 12}{sup IV}U{sub 4}{sup V}O{sub 24} cluster {[K(Py)_2]_2[K(Py)]_2[U_1_6O_2_4(PhCOO)_2_4(Py)_2]}.

  18. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  19. Vi mangler endnu et panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Vi mangler højtuddannede værdiskabere, som transformerer gode idéer og teknologier til indtjening og velstand. Først i mødet med markedet afgøres fremtiden. Troels Lund Poulsen bør nedsætte et kommercialiseringspanel, der byder ind med løsninger, hvordan Danmark bliver et land ikke kun med gode i...

  20. Retention of U(VI) onto silica in presence of model organic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.T.H.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Drot, R.; Lagarde, G.; Simoni, E. [Groupe de Radiochimie, IPNO, Universite Paris 11, Orsay, 91406 (France); Lambert, J. [LCPME, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, Villers-les-Nancy, 54600 (France)

    2008-07-01

    It is well-known that the organic matter influences the retention of ions onto mineral surfaces. However, the major part of concerned studies implies humic substances and complex solids. Another approach for identifying the sorption mechanisms is possible by studying simpler solids than those present in natural medium. So, silica is chosen as mineral surface because of its abundance in soils and of the presence of Si-O groups in clayey minerals. Uranium (VI) is selected as cation. Simple organic molecules like acetic (one carboxylic group) and oxalic (two carboxylic functions) acids are considered as models of the natural organic matter for understanding their role in the retention of U(VI) onto powders and slides of silica. Binary (organics/silica, U(VI)/silica) and ternary systems (organics/silica/U(VI)) are studied by complementary approaches. Sorption edges as function of pH are obtained by liquid scintillation methods and capillary electrophoresis. Different spectroscopic techniques are used to deduce the interactions between the organic matter and U(VI) sorbed onto the silica whose: Time-Resolved Laser induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMA). The results of the effect of these model organic molecules onto the U(VI) retention showed a good agreement between the different techniques. Concerning the acetic acid, there are not differences in the sorption percentages of uranyl (see the figure). All these results indicate that the uranyl-acetate complexes stay in the aqueous solution rather than sorbing onto the silica. On the contrary, oxalic acid influences the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. The sorption percentage of U(VI) in the ternary system (oxalic acid/silica/U(VI)) is lower than the binary system (U(VI)/silica) (see the figure). So, the presence of oxalic acid decreases the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. (authors)

  1. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed ...

  2. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  3. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This column features summaries of research articles from 3 recent crisis management publications. The first, "School Shootings and Counselor Leadership: Four Lessons from the Field" summarized by Kristi Fenning, was conducted as the result of the increased demand for trained crisis personnel on school campuses. Survey participants were…

  4. Probing uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of amidoxime ligands using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adetayo M; Pasilis, Sofie P

    2013-10-15

    Extraction processes using poly(acrylamidoxime) resins are being developed to extract uranium from seawater. The main complexing agents in these resins are thought to be 2,6-dihydroxyiminopiperidine (DHIP) and N(1),N(5)-dihydroxypentanediimidamide (DHPD), which form strong complexes with uranyl(VI) at the pH of seawater. It is important to understand uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of these and similar amidoxime ligands to understand factors affecting uranyl(VI) adsorption to the poly(acrylamidoxime) resins. Experiments were carried out in positive ion mode on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The ligands investigated were DHIP, DHPD, and N(1),N(2)-dihydroxyethanediimidamide (DHED). DHED and DHPD differ only in the number of carbons separating the oxime groups. The effects on the mass spectra of changes in uranyl(VI):ligand ratio, pH, and ligand type were examined. DHIP binds uranyl(VI) more effectively than DHPD or DHED in the pH range investigated, forming ions derived from solution-phase species with uranyl(VI):DHIP stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:3. The 2:3 uranyl(VI):DHIP complex appears to be a previously undescribed solution species. Ions related to uranyl(VI):DHPD complexes were detected in very low abundance. DHED is a more effective complexing agent for uranyl(VI) than DHPD, forming ions having uranyl(VI):DHED stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 2:3. This study presents a first look at the solution chemistry of uranyl(VI)-amidoxime complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The appearance of previously undescribed solution species suggests that the uranyl-amidoxime system is a rich and relatively complex one, requiring a more in-depth investigation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  6. Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkham, M.

    1991-01-01

    This summary will begin with short remarks, trying to recall some of the spirit of the presentations of each of the speakers during the first day, with no attempt at detail or completeness, given the need for a 20:1 compression relative to the original talk. The author hopes these idiosyncratic recollections do not infuriate the speakers too much. Since the speakers on the second day presented such interlocking topics, he simply tries to present some sort of consensus report, to which he adds some comments of his own. The two talks preceding this Summary on the final day dealt with the prospects for applications; since he had no chance to attempt to prepare a proper report on these, he says only a few words about those presentations

  7. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  8. Ferrate(VI synthesis at boron-doped diamond anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čekerevac Milan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of iron compounds from alkaline 10 M KOH electrolytes on a boron doped diamond electrode is examined by cyclic voltammetry between the potentials of hydrogen evolution reaction and oxygen evolution reaction, due to ferrate(VI electrochemical synthesis. It is shown that the anodic current peak that appears in iron free electrolyte at a less positive potential than the potential of oxygen evolution probably coincides with oxidation of hydrogen in >CH2 groups and C-sp2 graphite impurities with formation of >C=O groups at C-sp3 diamond structure. Addition of Fe(III compounds to the electrolyte provoke formation of the anodic wave on cyclic voltammograms in the potential region which correlates with generation of ferrate(VI. It is concluded that the direct electrochemical synthesis of Fe(VI at the boron doped diamond anode is possible because of the less positive potential of ferrate(VIFeO2-4 formation in respect to the potential of oxygen evolution reaction. Presence of ferrate(VI in electrolyte, formed after anodic polarization of boron electrode in 10 M KOH electrolyte saturated with Fe(III at + 0.9 V against Hg|HgO electrode, has been proven by UV-VIS spectrometry.

  9. The Ability of Benzoic Acid to Reduce Cr(VI Heavy Metal Content in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anugrah Windy Mustikarini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (VI is an ionic heavy metal which has to be handled properly when dissolved in water due to its toxicity, corosive, carsinogenic activity.. According to the State Minister for Population and Environment’s regulation, the quality standards of waste water, which is allowed to be discharge on surface water contains Cr(VI is 0.05-1 mg/L. This research used benzoic acid which is a kind of organic acid to reduce Cr(VI content in water. Benzoic acid has an active carboxyl group which interact this metal. This paper, the elimination of Cr(VI using benzoic acid is undertaken through pH adjustment by regulating with phosphoric acid. The result showed the best condition to reducing Cr(VI content 41.99% when 400 ppm of benzoic acid and pH 7 was applied, respectively.

  10. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    . These can be grouped into the following categories: the assessment process, licensee actions, regulatory actions. Summaries from the three days of workshop discussions as well as information from the licensee and regulatory responses to two pre-workshop surveys are presented. Also included are highlights from the numerous invited presentations. The conclusions and findings from the extensive group and plenary discussions are summarised too. Supporting material, discussion group presentation slides, slides from the invited presenters, and information/responses to the licensee and regulatory surveys are included in the attached Appendices

  11. A simple Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system for rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidative degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yanan; Yang, Shaojie [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China); Zhou, Danna, E-mail: zdncug@163.com [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Feng [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of organic pollutants occur. • Oxysulfur radicals generated in Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system oxidize the organic pollutants. • Acidic pH facilitates the reactions from both directions of reduction and oxidation. • Degradation potential of aromatic amines depends on the substituted groups. • Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system is promising for “waste control by waste”. - Abstract: Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a heavy-metal contaminant, can be easily reduced to less toxic trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) by sulfite ions (S(IV)). However, S(IV) has not drawn as much attention as the ferrous ion has. We report herein a novel Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system containing sulfite ions that rapidly and simultaneously reduces Cr(VI) and oxidize organic pollutants in the presence of oxygen in aqueous solutions. This Cr(VI)–S(IV)-O{sub 2} system contains the initiator Cr(VI), the reductant S(IV), and the oxidant O{sub 2}, which produce oxysulfur radicals (mainly SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and SO{sub 5}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radicals (OH·). The Cr(VI)/S(IV) molar ratio, pH, and oxygen content play important roles in the entire reaction system. Acidic conditions (pH 3.0) facilitated degradation of organic compounds and reduction of Cr(VI) as well. In addition, experiments of rapid degradation of several kinds of organic pollutants such as azo dye (acid orange 7, AO7), aniline, phenol, bisphenol A etc were also conducted. Preliminary results show that the removal rates of the analogs of phenols or aromatic amines in this Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system have a relationship with the electronic parameters (Hammett constant, σ) of the substituted groups. Thus, the Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system, provides an excellent strategy of “waste control by waste” for removing multiple industrial contaminants.

  12. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  13. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This paper is an 'executive summary' of work undertaken to review proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high level radioactive wastes in an underground repository, appropriate to the U.K. context, with particular reference to: waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially-shielded block; stages of disposal; transportation within the repository; emplacement in vertical holes or horizontal tunnels; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; and costs. The paper contains a section on general conclusions and recommendations. (U.K.)

  14. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  15. Vi tror ikke noget, vi undersøger det

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gitte Riis; Winther Johannsen, Inger

    2017-01-01

    I diskussionerne om, hvad der kan betegnes som god viden i forhold til udvikling af pædagogisk ud-vikling og kvalitet, er yderpunkterne kridtet op. Begreber som ”evidensbaseret” og ”datainformeret” synes at udfordre det pædagogiske felts egen forståelse af faglighed og pædagogisk kvalitet. I proj...... tager afsæt i det konkrete projekt og samarbejdet med døgntilbuddene. Vi viser, at arbejdet med datainformeret metode på denne måde ikke er en udradering af pædagogisk faglighed knyttet til fagprofessionel dømmekraft – snarere tværtimod...

  16. Snowmass Cosmic Frontiers 6 (CF6) Working Group Summary --The Bright Side of the Cosmic Frontier: Cosmic Probes of Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beatty, J.J.; Olinto, A.; Sinnis, G.; Abeysekara, A.U.; Anchordoqui, L.A.; Aramaki, T.; Belz, J.; Buckley, J.H.; Byrum, K.; Cameron, R.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Clark, K.; Connolly, A.; Cowen, D.F.; DeYoung, T.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dumm, J.; Errando, M.; Farrar, G.; Ferrer, F.; Fortson, L.; Funk, S.; Grant, D.; Griffiths, S.; Gross, A.; Hailey, C.; Hogan, C.; Holder, J.; Humensky, B.; Kaaret, P.; Klein, S.R.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Krings, K.; Krizmanic, J.; Kusenko, A.; Linnemann, J.T.; MacGibbon, J.H.; Matthews, J.; McCann, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mukherjee, R.; Nitz, D.; Ong, R.A.; Orr, M.; Otte, N.; Paul, T.; Resconi, E.; Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; Sokolsky, P.; Stecker, F.; Stump, D.; Taboada, I.; Thomson, G.B.; Tollefson, K.; Ukwatta, T.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vassileiv, V.V.; Weiler, T.J.; Williams, D.A.; Weinstein, A.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2013-01-01

    Report of the CF6 Working Group at Snowmass 2013. Topics addressed include ultra-high energy cosmic rays, neutrinos, gamma rays, baryogenesis, and experiments probing the fundamental nature of spacetime.

  17. Tetrapotassium cis-dioxido-trans-bis(sulfato-kappa O)sulfato(kappa O-2,O ')molybdate(VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäffer, Susan Jeanne Cline; Berg, Rolf W.

    2008-01-01

    The title compound, K-4[(MoO2)-O-VI(SO4)(3)], was precipitated from a melt of molybdenum(VI) oxide and potassium sulfate in potassium disulfate. The compound contains monomeric [(MoO2)-O-VI(SO4)(3)](4-) anions, with the Mo-VI atom, both oxide ligands, and the S atom and both ligating O atoms...... of the bidentate sulfate group lying on a crystallographic mirror plane. One of the potassium cations is nine-coordinate, while the other is eight-coordinate....

  18. Når vi taler om 68

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Metz, Georg

    Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi......Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi...

  19. 76 FR 60593 - Title VI; Proposed Circular

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... recommends. In addition, we propose changing the format to make this Circular consistent with the style of... cross-referencing information related to Title VI that FTA and FHWA jointly assess and evaluate during... Title VI reporting requirements for each of these roles. We also propose cross-referencing information...

  20. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chulsung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2, illite (IMt-2, kaolinite (KGa-2, aluminum oxide (γ-Al2O3, titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase, and silica (SiO2. Based on their effects on Cr(VI reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i minerals catalyzing Cr(VI reduction – illite; (ii minerals with no effect – Al2O3; and (iii minerals inhibiting Cr(VI reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI. Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI, i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii, an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which

  1. Dissimilatory Reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) by Cellulomonas Isolates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, William Aaron; Apel, William Arnold; Peyton, B. M.; Petersen, J. N.; Sani, R.

    2002-10-01

    The reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) was studied using three recently isolated environmental Cellulomonas sp. (WS01, WS18, and ES5) and a known Cellulomonas strain (Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482) under anaerobic, non-growth conditions. In all cases, these cultures were observed to reduce Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI). In 100 h, with lactate as electron donor, the Cellulomonas isolates (500 mg/l total cell protein) reduced nitrilotriacetic acid chelated Fe(III) [Fe(III)-NTA] from 5 mM to less than 2.2 mM, Cr(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.001 mM, and U(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.12 mM. All Cellulomonas isolates also reduced Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) in the absence of lactate, while no metal reduction was observed in either the cell-free or heat-killed cell controls. This is the first report of Cellulomonas sp. reducing Fe(III) and U(VI). Further, this is the first report of Cellulomonas spp. coupling the oxidation of lactate, or other unknown electron donors in the absence of lactate, to the reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI).

  2. Dissimilatory reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) by Cellulomonas isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, R K; Peyton, B M; Smith, W A; Apel, W A; Petersen, J N

    2002-10-01

    The reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) was studied using three recently isolated environmental Cellulomonas sp. (WS01, WS18, and ES5) and a known Cellulomonas strain ( Cellulomonas flavigena ATCC 482) under anaerobic, non-growth conditions. In all cases, these cultures were observed to reduce Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI). In 100 h, with lactate as electron donor, the Cellulomonas isolates (500 mg/l total cell protein) reduced nitrilotriacetic acid chelated Fe(III) [Fe(III)-NTA] from 5 mM to less than 2.2 mM, Cr(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.001 mM, and U(VI) from 0.2 mM to less than 0.12 mM. All Cellulomonas isolates also reduced Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI) in the absence of lactate, while no metal reduction was observed in either the cell-free or heat-killed cell controls. This is the first report of Cellulomonas sp. reducing Fe(III) and U(VI). Further, this is the first report of Cellulomonas spp. coupling the oxidation of lactate, or other unknown electron donors in the absence of lactate, to the reduction of Cr(VI), Fe(III), and U(VI).

  3. Econophys-Kolkata VI Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Bikas; Chakraborti, Anirban; Ghosh, Asim

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the book is to present the ideas and research findings of active researchers such as physicists, economists, mathematicians and financial engineers working in the field of “Econophysics,” who have undertaken the task of modeling and analyzing systemic risk, network dynamics and other topics. Of primary interest in these studies is the aspect of systemic risk, which has long been identified as a potential scenario in which financial institutions trigger a dangerous contagion mechanism, spreading from the financial economy to the real economy. This type of risk, long confined to the monetary market, has spread considerably in the recent past, culminating in the subprime crisis of 2008. As such, understanding and controlling systemic risk has become an extremely important societal and economic challenge. The Econophys-Kolkata VI conference proceedings are dedicated to addressing a number of key issues involved. Several leading researchers in these fields report on their recent work and al...

  4. Natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in Europe: summary of the working group reports of the Euro-NOTES meeting 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meining, A; Feussner, H; Swain, P

    2011-01-01

    collaboration and indications, robotics and platforms, and matters related to training and education. This review summarizes consensus statements of the working groups to give an overview of what has been achieved so far and what might be relevant for research related to NOTES in the near future....... formed, consisting of participants with varying scientific and medical backgrounds. Each group was assigned to an important topic: the correct strategy for dealing with bacterial contamination and related complications, the question of the ideal entry point and secure closure, interdisciplinary...

  5. Data quality objectives summary report for the 100-BC-1, 100-BC-2, and 100-DR-1, and 100-DR-2 group 3 waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The 100-BC-1, 100-BC-2, 100-DR-1, and 100-DR-2 Group 3 waste sites contain 22 past-practice liquid waste disposal sites and process effluent piping associated with four plutonium-production nuclear reactors that operated from 1944 to 1967. The 100-BC-1, 100-BC-2, 100-DR-1, and 100-DR-2 Group 3 waste sites are the third set of Hanford 100 Area sites to undergo remediation to the extent practicable. Like the sites listed in Groups 1 and 2, the Group 3 sites are considered high-priority because of the contaminants present and their proximity to the Columbia River. Remediation of the 100-BC-1, 100-HR-1 and 100-DR-1 radioactive liquid waste sites is planned to occur in two phases: The first phase, which has been completed, was a demonstration project in the 100-B/C Area to test field techniques and acquire contamination data. The second phase is full-scale remediation of all the reactor areas, starting in the 10-B/C Area, using the field experience gained in the first phase and each subsequent reactor area remediation. This document provides the DQO in support of remediation sampling and analysis at selected sites in the 100-B/C and 100-D Areas

  6. Study for Agricultural Engineering Development in Brazil. Summary Report of Joint Study Group on Agricultural Engineering in Brazil (July 24-August 12, 1972).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    The joint study group was established to identify the most urgent research and training needs in agricultural engineering in Brazil and to recommend how best to meet those needs. Specific recommendations are given for a long-term program to establish quality programs in education and research in agricultural engineering in Brazil and means to gain…

  7. Approaches for the integration of human factors into the upgrading and refurbishment of control rooms - Summary and conclusions - Principal Working Group 1 on Operating Experience and Human Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    a broad range of interested parties, in relation to the upgrading and refurbishing of control rooms. The workshop attracted 16 contributions from 13 different countries and provided a range of insights and lessons based on design experience, practical experience, research and regulatory needs, and an opportunity for the exchange of experiences and approaches on a range of important topics. The workshop also sought to identify and prioritize areas meriting further consideration and research. The 34 participants shared their experiences and perceptions on a broad number of aspects including: - The identification of human factors issues from the utility, vendor, and regulatory perspectives. - Ensuring the inclusion and implementation of human factors issues within the upgrade or refurbishment process. - How this change process should be managed. - Feedback from practical experience and real concerns. - Meeting modern human factors requirements. This report presents a summary of the conclusions and recommendations from the workshop. five main points were considered by the participants in the workshop as important areas for future work or research: - There is a need to collate a 'lessons learnt' database relating to human factors and control room upgrades; - There is a need to co-ordinate the method/tool development and use in order to better support evaluations and comparisons; - there is a need to show how to establish a performance baseline before change in order to demonstrate that performance is at least as good, or better, that prior to the change; - It is important to support the use of a 'control room philosophy' prior to, during, and after the upgrade; - There is a need to have a better-shared understanding of the design process and how the different disciplines involved contribute to it

  8. On the 'Interim summary of requirements and criteria for nationwide scientific screening by the geological disposal technology working group.'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochiyama, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In order to make progress on the permanent geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the government of Japan revised, in May 2015, the basic plan to expand the site selection process, in which a set of site screening criteria was issued based on the existing geoscientific knowledge. These criteria were developed by the Geological Disposal Technology Working Group of the Nuclear Energy Subcommittee which was created by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). (author)

  9. Introduction and summary of the 13th meeting of the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals (SGOMSEC): alternative testing methodologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Stokes, W S; Marafante, E

    1998-01-01

    A workshop on alternative toxicological testing methodologies was convened by the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals (SGOMSEC) 26-31 January 1997 in Ispra, Italy, at the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the current status of alternative testing methodologies available to evaluate adverse human health and environmental effects of chemicals. Another objective of the workshop was to identify...

  10. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  11. Management summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A most pressing problem in many environmental assessments is determining the extent of contamination to the biosphere resulting from a given activity. This could result from the planned or accidental release of a contaminant to the environment and its subsequent transport through air, water, or the food chain. In either case, three critical questions need to be raised in the environmental assessment of the problem: Where are the contaminants; When will they arrive at a specific location; How much of the contaminant will be at the point of uptake. The location of the contaminant is important, since a contaminant isolated from man both now and in the future may represent little hazard, even in rather large quantities. Under other conditions, small amounts of contaminants arriving at critical locations over a short period may involve severe hazard. The problem of location is simplified by concentrating on those places where the contaminants will interface with the biosphere. Applications in evaluating the consequences of ground water contamination are discussed. Environmental consequences or impacts are most effectively and efficiently communicated by: Blending extensive technical results and reducing them to simple summary relationships, i.e., the arrival distributions; focusing on the arrival distributions as the central theme of communication efforts; and determining quantitative consequences or impacts to the biosphere through use of the arrival distributions. Appropriately applied, these principles can reduce a voluminous impact statement on subsurface pollution to a few pages that are directly useful to decision-makers and the public

  12. Theory summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    This is a summary of the advances in magnetic fusion energy theory research presented at the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference from 19 24 October, 1998 in Yokohama, Japan. Theory and simulation results from this conference provided encouraging evidence of significant progress in understanding the physics of thermonuclear plasmas. Indeed, the grand challenge for this field is to acquire the basic understanding that can readily enable the innovations which would make fusion energy practical. In this sense, research in fusion energy is increasingly able to be categorized as fitting well the 'Pasteur's Quadrant' paradigm, where the research strongly couples basic science ('Bohr's Quadrant') to technological impact ('Edison's Quadrant'). As supported by some of the work presented at this conference, this trend will be further enhanced by advanced simulations. Eventually, realistic three-dimensional modeling capabilities, when properly combined with rapid and complete data interpretation of results from both experiments and simulations, can contribute to a greatly enhanced cycle of understanding and innovation. Plasma science theory and simulation have provided reliable foundations for this improved modeling capability, and the exciting advances in high-performance computational resources have further accelerated progress. There were 68 papers presented at this conference in the area of magnetic fusion energy theory

  13. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  14. Learning the vi and Vim Editor

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold; Hannah, Elbert

    2008-01-01

    There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's. vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi. However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this

  15. Uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate chemically modified

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ordonez R, E., E-mail: nidgg@yahoo.com.m [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work deals with the uranium (Vi) speciation after sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}) surface, hydrated and in a surface modified with organic acids. Oxalic and citric acids were chosen to modify the ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7} surface because they have poly carboxylic groups and they mimic the organic matter in nature. Thus the interest of this work is to evaluate the uranium (Vi) sorption edge at different s ph values in natural and modified surfaces. The luminescence technique (fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively) was used for the quantification and speciation of uranyl sorbed at the zirconium diphosphate interface. The fluorescence experiment, showed that adsorption of uranyl on surface of zirconium diphosphate tends to 100%. The speciation shows that there are different complexes in surface which were formed between zirconium diphosphate and uranyl, since it is produced a displacement of wavelength in fluorescence spectra of each system. (Author)

  16. Summary of Recommendations of the GBIF Task Group on the Global Strategy and Action Plan for the Digitisation of Natural History Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter G. Berendsohn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Biodiversity Information Facility’s Task Group has formulated three basic recommendations to the GBIF Governing Board in order to increase the rate of the digitization of natural history collections and improve the usage of this information resource: (i GBIF must facilitate access to information about non-digitized collection resources by publicizing the research potential of collections through metadata and assessing the number of non-digitized specimens; (ii GBIF must work with collections to continue to increase the efficiency of specimen data capture and to enhance data quality by means of technical measures, by means of ensuring attribution and professional credit and influencing institutional priorities, and by engaging with funding agencies; (iii GBIF must continue to improve and promote the global infrastructure used to mobilize digitized collection data through technical measures, outreach activities and political measures.

  17. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group conference, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California, November 18-19, 1992; abstracts and summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Keith R.; Galloway, Devin L.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1995-01-01

    with this unprecedented increase in pumpage, substantial amounts of land subsidence were observed in several areas of the United States, most notably in Arizona, California, and Texas. Beginning in 1955, under the direction of Joseph Poland, the Geological Survey began the "Mechanics of Aquifers Project," which focused largely on the processes that resulted in land subsidence due to the withdrawal of ground water. This research team gained international renown as they advanced the scientific understanding of aquifer mechanics and land-subsidence theory. The results of field studies by members of this research group not only verified the validity of the application of Terzaghi's consolidation theory to compressible aquifers, but they also provided definitions, methods of quantification, and confirmation of the interrelation among hydraulic head declines, aquifer-system compaction, and land subsidence. In addition to conducting pioneering research, this group also formed a "center of expertise," providing a focal point within the Geological Survey for the dissemination of technology and scientific understanding in aquifer mechanics. However, when the "Mechanics of Aquifers Project" was phased out in 1984, the focal point for technology transfer no longer existed. Interest among various state and local agencies in land subsidence has persisted, and the Geological Survey has continued to participate in a broad spectrum of cooperative and Federally funded projects in aquifer mechanics and land subsidence. These projects are designed to identify and monitor areas with the potential for land subsidence, to conduct basic research in the processes that control land subsidence and the development of earth fissures, as well as to develop new quantitative tools to predict aquifer-system deformation. In 1989 an ad hoc "Aquifer Mechanics and Subsidence Interest Group" (referred to herein as the "Subsidence Interest Group") was formed

  18. Genetics Home Reference: mucopolysaccharidosis type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on PubMed Garrido E, Chabás A, Coll MJ, Blanco M, Domínguez C, Grinberg D, Vilageliu L, Cormand B. Identification of the molecular defects in Spanish and Argentinian mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux- ...

  19. Rheology of water ices V and VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical strength (??) of pure water ices V and VI under steady state deformation conditions. Constant displacement rate compressional tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at confining pressures from 400 250 K. Ices V and VI are thus Theologically distinct but by coincidence have approximately the same strength under the conditions chosen for these experiments. To avoid misidentification, these tests are therefore accompanied by careful observations of the occurrences and characteristics of phase changes. One sample each of ice V and VI was quenched at pressure to metastably retain the high-pressure phase and the acquired deformation microstructures; X ray diffraction analysis of these samples confirmed the phase identification. Surface replicas of the deformed and quenched samples suggest that ice V probably deforms largely by dislocation creep, while ice VI deforms by a more complicated process involving substantial grain size reduction through recrystallization.

  20. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

  1. Derfor elsker og hader vi positiv psykologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    Hvorfor er positiv psykologi så populært? Er positiv psykologi ved at blive en religion? Asterisk har mødt tre fremtrædende forskere, der forklarer, hvorfor vi elsker og hader positiv psykolog.......Hvorfor er positiv psykologi så populært? Er positiv psykologi ved at blive en religion? Asterisk har mødt tre fremtrædende forskere, der forklarer, hvorfor vi elsker og hader positiv psykolog....

  2. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    'burning' of the associated extremely long-life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. This additional important mission for the LMFBR is gaining worldwide interest. In the framework of disarmament of nuclear weapons and the utilization of the nuclear material for peaceful purposes a role for fast reactors can be also considered. Over the past 25 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in Fast Breeder Reactor Technology. At the present time the Working Group on Fast Reactors is the oldest and one of the most active groups in the Division of Nuclear Power. The present document contains information on the status of fast breeder reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1991, as reported at the 25th jubilee Annual Meeting of the IWGFR in Vienna, 27-30 April 1992. The publication is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFBR development in IAEA Member States and CEC

  3. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    systems. The scope of the workshop comprised reactor physics, fuel performance and fuel material technology, thermal-hydraulics, core behaviour and fuel cycle of advanced reactors with different types of fuels or fuel lattices. Reactor types considered were water-cooled, high-temperature gas-cooled and fast spectrum reactors as well as hybrid reactors with fast and thermal neutron spectra. The emphasis was on innovative concepts and issues related to the reactor and fuel. The workshop concluded with a wide-ranging panel discussion which considered some difficult questions from which it is hoped that some recommendations for future priorities can be derived. A record of the discussion is included at the end of this summary. (author)

  4. Individual and Group Extension Methods: Perspectives from Vi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) tools including semi-structured questionnaires were administrated to 90 randomly selected farmers who had received extension services from the project. In addition, twelve project extension workers were interviewed. Data were analysed using SPSS computer package and descriptive ...

  5. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis - Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Winnie Cw; Lam, Wynnie Mw; Ng, Bobby Kw; Tze-Ping, Lam; Lee, Kwong-Man; Guo, Xia; Cheng, Jack Cy; Burwell, R Geoffrey; Dangerfield, Peter H; Jaspan, Tim

    2008-06-27

    There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE) introduced the electronic focus group (EFG) as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves) and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth concept is regarded as

  6. Catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid under an irradiation of simulated solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jing; Lan, Yeqing

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid with simulated solar light was investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(II) could significantly accelerate Cr(VI) reduction and the reaction obeyed to pseudo zero-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI). The removal of Cr(VI) was related to the initial concentrations of Cu(II), citric acid, and the types of organic acids. The optimal removal of Cr(VI) was achieved at pH 4, and the rates of Cu(II) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids were in the order: tartaric acid (two α-OH groups, two -COOH groups)>citric acid (one α-OH group, three -COOH groups)>malic acid (one α-OH group, two -COOH groups)>lactic acid (one α-OH group, one -COOH group)≫succinic acid (two -COOH groups), suggesting that the number of α-OH was the key factor for the reaction, followed by the number of -COOH. The formation of Cu(II)-citric acid complex could generate Cu(I) and radicals through a pathway of metal-ligand-electron transfer, promoting the reduction of Cr(VI). This study is helpful to fully understanding the conversion of Cr(VI) in the existence of both organic acids and Cu(II) with solar light in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    (II-3) - Uncertainty analysis of the steady state benchmark. It should be recognized that the purpose of this benchmark is not only to compare currently available macroscopic approaches but above-all to encourage the development of novel next-generation approaches that focus on more microscopic processes. Thus, the benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitized computer graphic images are the microscopic data. The technical topics to be addressed at the workshop include: - Review of the benchmark activities after the 4. Workshop; - Presentation and discussion of summary of comparisons of final submitted results for Exercise 1 of Phase I (I-1); for Exercise 0 of Phase II (II-0); and for Exercise 1 of Phase II (II-1); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase I (I-2); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 3 of Phase I (I-3); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase II (II-2); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 4 of Phase I (I-4); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 3 of Phase II (II-3); - Preparing a special issue in a journal with participants' BFBT papers; - Defining a work plan and schedule outlining actions to advance the two phases of the benchmark activities

  8. The new geographic information system in ETVA VI.PE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xagoraris, Zafiris; Soulis, George

    2016-08-01

    ETVA VI.PE. S.A. is a member of the Piraeus Bank Group of Companies and its activities include designing, developing, exploiting and managing Industrial Areas throughout Greece. Inside ETVA VI.PE.'s thirty-one Industrial Parks there are currently 2,500 manufacturing companies established, with 40,000 employees and € 2.5 billion of invested funds. In each one of the industrial areas ETVA VI.PE guarantees the companies industrial lots of land (sites) with propitious building codes and complete infrastructure networks of water supply, sewerage, paved roads, power supply, communications, cleansing services, etc. The development of Geographical Information System for ETVA VI.PE.'s Industrial Parks started at the beginning of 1992 and consists of three subsystems: Cadastre, that manages the information for the land acquisition of Industrial Areas; Street Layout - Sites, that manages the sites sold to manufacturing companies; Networks, that manages the infrastructure networks (roads, water supply, sewerage etc). The mapping of each Industrial Park is made incorporating state-of-the-art photogrammetric, cartographic and surveying methods and techniques. Passing through the phases of initial design (hybrid GIS) and system upgrade (integrated Gis solution with spatial database), the system is currently operating on a new upgrade (integrated gIS solution with spatial database) that includes redesigning and merging the system's database schemas, along with the creation of central security policies, and the development of a new web GIS application for advanced data entry, highly customisable and standard reports, and dynamic interactive maps. The new GIS bring the company to advanced levels of productivity and introduce the new era for decision making and business management.

  9. Am(VI) Extraction Final Report: FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tillotson, Richard Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report summarizes activities related to hexavalent Am extraction for FY16, in completion of FCR&D Milestone M3FT-16IN030103027. Activities concentrated on three areas of research: 1) centrifugal contactor hot testing, 2) Am(VI) stability studies, and 3) alternative oxidant studies. A brief summary of each task follows. Hot Testing: A new engineering-scale oxidation and solvent extraction test bed was built at Idaho National Laboratory to allow for solvent extraction testing of minor actinide separation concepts. The test bed consists of an oxidation vessel, filtration apparatus, four, 3D printed, 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors, feed/product vessels, and sample ports. This system replaced the previous 3 stage, 5-cm contactor test bed that was used for the initial testing in FY14. In the FY16 hot test, a feed simulant was spiked with 243Am and 139Ce and treated with 60 g/L sodium bismuthate for two hours to oxidize the Am(III) to Am(VI). This solution was then pumped through a filter and into the four-stage centrifugal contactor setup. The organic phase solvent formulation was 1 M diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA)/dodecane. The test showed that Am(VI) was produced by bismuthate oxidation and the residual oxidant was successfully filtered without back pressure buildup. Sixty-four percent of Am was extracted in the contactors using DEHBA. Both Am and Ce were quantitatively stripped by 0.1 M H2O2. Successful demonstration of the utility of small, printable contactors suggests that hot testing of separations concepts can now be conducted more often, since it is cheaper, generates less waste, and entails much less radcon risk than previous testing. Am(VI) stability: A rigorous examination of reagents was conducted to determine if contaminants could interfere with Am oxidation and extraction. An series of DAm measurements showed that bismuthate particle size, water source, acid quality, and DAAP batch or pre-treatment had little effect on extraction efficiency

  10. Chromium sorption and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by grape stalks and yohimbe bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Núria; Escudero, Carlos; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2008-07-01

    In this work, two low cost sorbents, grape stalks and yohimbe bark wastes were used to remove Cr(VI) and Cr(III) from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were designed to obtain Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption data. The mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by the two vegetable wastes, has been investigated. Fourier transform infrared rays (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on solid phase were performed to determine the main functional groups that might be involved in metal uptake and to confirm the presence of Cr(III) on the sorbent, respectively. Results put into evidence that both sorbents are able to reduce Cr(VI) to its trivalent form.

  11. Biosorption of uranium(VI) by a mangrove endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. ZZF51 from the South China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.B.; Tan, N.; Wu, F.J.; Liu, H.J.; Sun, M.; She, Z.G.; Lin, Y.C.

    2012-01-01

    The uranium(VI) accumulation was studied in detail by using the biomass of mangrove endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. ZZF51 from the South China Sea. The uranium(VI) biosorption process onto the tested fungus powders was optimized at pH 4.0, adsorption time 60 min, and uranium(VI) initial concentration 50 mg L -1 with 61.89% of removal efficiency. According to Fourier transform infrared spectra for the tested fungus before and after loaded with uranium(VI), the results showed that both of hydroxyl and carboxyl groups acted as the important roles in the adsorption process. In addition, the experimental data were analyzed by using parameter and kinetic models, and it was obtained that the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided better correlation with the experimental data for adsorption of uranium(VI). (author)

  12. Executive summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Junge, A; Dvorak, J

    2014-01-01

    structure and improves its function. Blood pressure is markedly reduced with the mean arterial blood pressure being lowered by ~10 mmHg for hypertensive men and women training 2-3 times/week for 12-26 weeks. Triglycerides and cholesterol are lowered and body fat declines, especially in middle-aged men...... and women with type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, muscle mass and bone mineral density increases in a number of participant groups, including 65-75-year-old men. The functional capacity is elevated with increases in VO2 max of 10-15%, and 50-100% improvements in the capacity to perform intermittent work within...

  13. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopa, Luiz Claudio Barbosa

    2007-01-01

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U0 2 2+ , was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L -1 . In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g -1 . In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U0 2 2+ recovered with carbonate ion and 49.9% with oxalate ion

  14. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040±0.010 and 0.055±0.015 g g dry -1 , respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10 -4 mol l -1 Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment

  15. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko E-mail: ohnuki@sparclt.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O

    2004-07-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040{+-}0.010 and 0.055{+-}0.015 g g{sub dry}{sup -1}, respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10{sup -4} mol l{sup -1} Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment.

  16. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) organised a workshop to assess current understanding on the use of cementitious materials in radioactive waste disposal. The workshop was hosted by the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (Ondraf/Niras), in Brussels, Belgium on 17-19 November 2009. The workshop brought together a wide range of people involved in supporting safety case development and having an interest in cementitious materials: namely, cement and concrete experts, repository designers, scientists, safety assessors, disposal programme managers and regulators. The workshop was designed primarily to consider issues relevant to the post-closure safety of radioactive waste disposal, but also addressed some related operational issues, such as cementitious barrier emplacement. Where relevant, information on cementitious materials from analogous natural and anthropogenic systems was also considered. The workshop agenda is included as Appendix A. The workshop focused on: - The uses of different cementitious materials in various repository designs. - The evolution of cementitious materials over long time scales (1000s to 100000s of years). - The interaction of cementitious materials with surrounding components of the repository (e.g. waste, container, buffer, backfill, host rock). - The workshop comprised: - Plenary sessions in which the state-of-the-art on repository design and understanding the phenomenology of cementitious materials and their interactions were presented and discussed. - Dedicated working group sessions, which were used to discuss key safety assessment and safety case questions in more detail. For example: How strong is the scientific basis for incorporating the various aspects of the behaviour and interactions of cementitious materials in safety assessments and safety cases? How can the behaviour and interactions of cementitious materials best be incorporated within the

  17. Summary of southeastern group breakout sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Ford; Charles P. Nicholson

    1993-01-01

    The breakout sessions held by the southeastern representatives at the Partners In Flight meeting in Colorado were extremely well attended Most states were represented, as well as several federal agencies (including USFS, USFWS, TVA, EPA), and non-government organizations. Two sessions were held, one to discuss a strategy of management by...

  18. The Higgs Working Group: Summary Report 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, K.A.; Nikitenko, A.; Spira, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.; Alwall, Johan; Balazs, C.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U.; Biscarat, C.; Bisset, M.; Boos, E.; Bozzi, G.; Brein, O.; Campbell, John M.; Catani, S.; Ciccolini, M.; Cranmer, K.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dawson, S.; De Florian, D.; De Roeck, A.; Del Duca, V.; Dittmaier, S.; Djouadi, A.; Drollinger, V.; Dudko, L.; Duhrssen, M.; Ellwanger, U.; Escalier, M.; Fang, Y.Q.; Ferrag, S.; Forshaw, Jeffrey R.; Grazzini, M.; Guasch, J.; Guchait, M.; Gunion, J.F.; Hahn, T.; Harlander, R.; He, H.-J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Heyninck, J.; Hollik, W.; Hugonie, C.; Jackson, C.; Kauer, N.; Kersting, N.; Khoze, V.; Kidonakis, Nikolaos; Kinnunen, R.; Krämer, Michael; Kuang, Y.-P.; Laforge, B.; Lehti, S.; Lethuillier, M.; Li, J.; Logan, H.; Lowette, S.; Maltoni, F.; Mazini, R.; Mellado, B.; Moortgat, F.; Moretti, S.; Nagy, Z.; Nason, P.; Oleari, C.; Paganis, S.; Penaranda, S.; Plehn, T.; Quayle, W.; Rainwater, D.; Rathsman, J.; Ravat, O.; Reina, L.; Sabio Vera, Agustin; Sopczak, A.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Vanlaer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Weiglein, G.; Willenbrock, S.; Wu, Sau Lan; Yuan, C.P.; Wu, Sau Lan

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical progress in Higgs boson production and background processes is discussed with particular emphasis on QCD corrections at and beyond next-to-leading order as well as next-to-leading order electroweak corrections. The residual theoretical uncertainties of the investigated processes are estimated in detail. Moreover, recent investigations of the MSSM Higgs sector and other extensions of the SM Higgs sector are presented. The potential of the LHC and a high-energy linear e+e- collider for the measurement of Higgs couplings is analyzed.

  19. experimental biology group: summaries of scientific papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    typing for HL-A revealed that in addition to the four HL-A but perhaps under the genetic control of a ... found that histones interacted with a number of serum proteins. aggregation of histones at basic or neutral pH. In addition the. Mixing a solution of acid extracted total histone with serum histones which diffused into the gels ...

  20. Bacillus lichenformis γ-glutamyl exopolymer: Physicochemical characterization and U(VI) interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, L.M.; Neu, M.P.; Vanderberg, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Complexation by microbially produced exopolymers may significantly impact the environmental mobility and toxicity of metals. This study focused on the conformational structure of the bacterial exopolymer, γ-D-poly(glutamic acid) and its interactions with U(VI) examined using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Solution pH, polymer concentration, and ionic strength affected the conformation of the exopolymer, and U(VI) binding was monitored. At low pH, low concentration, or low ionic strength, this exopolymer exists in an α-helical conformation, while at high pH, concentration, or ionic strength the exopolymer exhibits a β-sheet structure. The change in exopolymer conformation is likely to influence the number and nature of exposed surface functional groups, sites most responsible for metal complexation. The authors found the polyglutamate capsule binds U(VI) in a binuclear, bidentate fashion; in contrast the glutamate monomer forms a mononuclear, bidentate complex with U(VI). The apparent polynuclear binding of U(VI) may induce β-sheet structure formation provided the U(VI) Concentration is sufficiently high

  1. New low cost sorbents for Cr(VI – batch and column experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šillerová H.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of agricultural byproducts and industrial biowaste materials has been shown to be an attractive technique for removing Cr(VI from contaminated waste waters. In this study, used brewers draff, peat moss, sawdust, grape stalks and husks were investigated as novel biosorbents for Cr(VI. The material was tested in two different modifications. The material was dried, cut and sieved and part of it was subjected to acid (2 M H2SO4 and alkali (0.5 M NaOH pre-treatments to remove starch, proteins and sugars. Fourier transform infrared rays analysis on solid phase (FTIR-ATR was used to determine the main functional groups that might control the metal uptake. Batch experiments were performed at different pH values (3, 4.5, 6 and at various initial concentration of Cr(VI (25–2012;250 mg L−1. Two equilibrium empirical models, Langmuir and Freundlich, were used to describe Cr(VI adsorption. In order to identify possible reduction processes, ion exchange separation on the AG1-X8 resin was used to separate the anionic Cr(VI and the reduced cationic Cr(III from the aqueous phase after biosorption. As expected, Cr(VI removal was pH-dependent and fitted well both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The ion exchange separation showed that Cr(VI reduction had occurred in the solution during biosorption. The efficiency of draff as a biosorbent was comparable (or even higher to highly organic materials (e.g., composted peat showing its potential application for Cr(VI decontamination.

  2. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This is a report on studies that value the environmental impacts resulting from generation and conservation of electric power. The purpose is to review the literature on the methodologies used to assign monetary costs to environmental externalities and to present the results of studies which have applied these methodologies. For those environmental damages for which the literature has not established a value, the report identifies the indicated ranges of adverse effects and provides a road map of issues that require research. The report is intended to assist utilities, government regulators, legislators, policy analysts and public interest groups in estimating the costs of the environmental impacts of electricity. It should be useful, as well, to assist in valuing the environmental impacts of pollutants from other industries, for setting environmental control standards, and in establishing pollution taxes or fees

  3. Singular Instantons and Painlevé VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz Manasliski, Richard

    2016-06-01

    We consider a two parameter family of instantons, which is studied in [Sadun L., Comm. Math. Phys. 163 (1994), 257-291], invariant under the irreducible action of SU_2 on S^4, but which are not globally defined. We will see that these instantons produce solutions to a one parameter family of Painlevé VI equations (P_VI}) and we will give an explicit expression of the map between instantons and solutions to P_{VI}. The solutions are algebraic only for that values of the parameters which correspond to the instantons that can be extended to all of S^4. This work is a generalization of [Muñiz Manasliski R., Contemp. Math., Vol. 434, Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2007, 215-222] and [Muñiz Manasliski R., J. Geom. Phys. 59 (2009), 1036-1047, arXiv:1602.07221], where instantons without singularities are studied.

  4. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Anna; Sakuma, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    SKI and KASAM (Sweden), NRC (USA), NWMO (Canada), and HSK (Switzerland), as well as representatives of NEA and its working parties the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) and the Regulators? Forum. Presentations, discussions, and lessons learned are summarised in this paper

  5. Methanol{2-methoxy-6-[(2-oxidopropyliminomethyl]phenolato}dioxidomolybdenum(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Stoeckli-Evans

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the structure of the title compound, [Mo(C11H13NO3O2(CH3OH], the MoVI ion is octahedrally coordinated by two oxide O atoms, the N atom and two deprotonated OH groups of the tridentate Schiff base ligand 2-methoxy-6-[(2-oxidopropyliminomethyl]phenolate and by a methanol O atom. In the crystal structure, two complexes are linked via O—H...O hydrogen bonds, yielding a centrosymmetric arrangement involving the methanol hydroxy group and one of the ligand O atoms coordinated to the MoVI ion.

  6. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-12-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The main aim of the document was to summarise 'best practice' in dealing with bleeding risk in AF patients when approaching antithrombotic therapy, by addressing the epidemiology and size of the problem, and review established bleeding risk factors. We also summarise definitions of bleeding in the published literature. Patient values and preferences balancing the risk of bleeding against thromboembolism as well as the prognostic implications of bleeding are reviewed. We also provide an overview of published bleeding risk stratification and bleeding risk schema. Brief discussion of special situations (e.g. periablation, peri-devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators [ICD] or pacemakers, presentation with acute coronary syndromes and/or requiring percutanous coronary interventions/stents and bridging therapy) is made, as well as a discussion of the prevention of bleeds and managing bleeding complications. Finally, this document puts forwards consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and assist in everyday clinical practice.

  7. Biomass energy systems program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Research programs in biomass which were funded by the US DOE during fiscal year 1978 are listed in this program summary. The conversion technologies and their applications have been grouped into program elements according to the time frame in which they are expected to enter the commercial market. (DMC)

  8. Papaya Seeds as A Low-Cost Sorbent for Removing Cr(VI) from The Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Atik; Marwoto, Putut; Karunia Z, Anita

    2016-08-01

    The presence of chromium (VI) contaminants and their toxicity in aqueous streams important environmental problems. Adsorption is one of the effective techniques that can be used for removing metal from wastewater. This research was initiated by preparing sorbent from papaya seeds and determining its functional group contents by using FT-IR. The adsorption process was carried out in a batch method. The study of adsorption aspects involved the pH, initial Cr (VI) concentration and contact time between Cr (VI) and sorbent. FT IR analysis results showed that the main functional groups are carbonyl, hydroxyl, and carboxylic. It was also found that the effective pH for Cr (VI) uptake is 2.0 and increasing contact time would increase the Cr (VI) uptake. In addition, the equilibrium was reached after 40 minutes interaction and the increase of initial chromium (VI) concentration would increase the sorbent uptake percentage. All these results indicated that papaya seed is a potential sorbent for removing Cr (VI) from aqueous solutions.

  9. Gamma gamma technology group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gamma gamma community are concerned that in the rush to prepare for the e+e− machine, allowance is not being made for a future upgrade of the photon linear collider. References. [1] ECFA/DESY Photon Collider Working Group: B Badelek et al, TESLA Technical. Design Report, Part VI, Chapter 1: Photon collider at ...

  10. Enhanced accumulation of U(VI) by Aspergillus oryzae mutant generated by dielectric barrier discharge air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wencheng Song; North China Electric Power University, Beijing; Xiangxue Wang; Soochow University, Suzhou; Wen Tao; Hongqing Wang; Tasawar Hayat; Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad; Xiangke Wang; Soochow University, Suzhou; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae was isolated from radionuclides' contaminated soils, and dielectric barrier discharge plasma was used to mutate A. oryzae to improve bioremediation capability of U(VI) pollution. The maximum accumulation capacities of U(VI) on mutated A.oryzae was 627.4 mg/g at T = 298 K and pH = 5.5, which was approximately twice than that of raw A.oryzae. XPS analysis indicated that U(VI) accumulation on mutated A. oryzae was largely attributable to nitrogen- and oxygen-containing functional groups on fungal mycelia. The mutated A. oryzae can be harnessed as bioremediation agents for radionuclides pollution. (author)

  11. Dioxouranium(VI) complexes with Schiff bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birardar, N.S.; Angadi, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    Complexes of uranyl chloride with five Schiff bases have been prepared. The dioxouranium(VI) forms 1 : 2 adducts with these Schiff bases. With the help of conductivity, analytical UV, IR and NMR data, it has been shown that these complexes have coordination number eight with hexagonal bipyramid structure. (author)

  12. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Hvem er vi? Hvem er de?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryger, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Kommentaren tager afsæt i initiativer i de pædagogiske faglige foreninger i Europa EERA) og i Norden (NERA) og argumenterer for at det er forpligtelse for os som nordiske og europæiske pædagogiske forskere at gå op imod de stadigt mere ekskluderende vi-konstruktioner, som er blevet formuleret i f...

  14. Vi har selv designet naturens love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Martin Mose

    2014-01-01

    ForskerZonenNaturlovene er universelt gyldige i de flestes øjne. De gælder altid, uanset hvad vi tænker. Men dette billede står ikke uimodsagt i videnskabsfilosofien, og der er meget, der tyder på, at det ikke er specielt empirisk korrekt...

  15. Energy balance of ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    ENDF/B-VI through Release 2 has been tested for neutron-photon energy balance using the Heater module of the NJOY nuclear data procesing system. The situation is much improved over ENDF/B-V, but there are still a number of maerials that show problems

  16. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors)

  17. Informal group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Nienstaedt; Dean W. Einspahr; J. Douglas Brodie

    1973-01-01

    Editor's note: The morning's presentations were discussed during the afternoon by three groups, each group discussing one of the morning's three topics. Summaries of the discussions, prepared by the discussion leaders, follow.

  18. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the β-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH 2 SO 4 of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author)

  19. Bioreduction of Cr (VI) by potent novel chromate resistant alkaliphilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation of Cr (VI) resistant alkaliphilic bacteria from sediment and water samples collected from Wadi Natrun hypersaline Soda lakes (located in northern Egypt), resulted in isolation of several alkaliphilic bacterial strains that can tolerate up to 2.94 g/l of Cr (VI) in alkaline medium. However, with increasing Cr (VI) ...

  20. 77 FR 64399 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Region VI AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession... its Field Offices (Region VI). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region VI. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D...

  1. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters; Reduction enzymatique de U(VI) dans des eaux souterraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W. [Center for Radioactive Waste Management, Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University, Albuquerque (United States); Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1999-03-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors) 12 refs.

  2. National COPD conference summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, A Sonia; Bailey, William; Hurd, Suzanne S

    2004-01-01

    The first National COPD Conference, sponsored by the US COPD Coalition was held in Arlington, Virginia on November 14-15, 2003. The theme for the conference was developed around the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Healthy People 2010 goals for COPD and included plenary speeches, roundtable discussions, abstracts, and workshops on spirometry, patient/physician education materials, and home monitoring/telemetry. The goal was to bring together a multidisciplinary group to identify important issues relating to COPD in the United States, specifically the barriers to a wider recognition of the disease, and to develop an orchestrated action plan. Over 500 scientists, clinicians, respiratory therapists, nurses, patients, government officials, and representatives from pharmaceutical companies participated. This summary provides the recommendations from the conference that will be used to develop an action plan for the US COPD Coalition. It includes actions proposed by plenary speakers, roundtable faculty and conference participants.

  3. Anti-S. typhi Vi IgG levels in children with and without typhoid vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriandayani Sriandayani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Typhoid fever is endemic to Indonesia, with an annual incidence of 13/10,000 people. Vaccination has been shown to be an effective method to prevent typhoid fever. Of several vaccine types, the polysaccharide Vi vaccine is the most commonly used typhoid vaccine in developing countries. Results of previous studies remain inconclusive on the necessity of revaccination every 3 years. Objective To compare the mean serum anrioody titers of anti-S. typhi Vi IgG and the proportion of children with protective antibody levels between children with and without typhoid Vi vaccination. Methods We conducted a cross-secrional study at Tuminring District, 11anado from June to September 2012. Data was analyzed using independent T-test and Fisher's test. Serum anti-S. typhi Vi IgG levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. Results Seventy-six subjects were divided into two groups: 38 children who had received the typhoid Vi vaccination more than 3 years prior to this study and 38 children who never had typhoid vaccinations as a control group. No statistically significant difference in age and gender was found between the two groups. The mean serum anti-Vi IgG level was 0.55 ug/mL (SD 0.58; 95%CI 0.36 to 0.74 in the vaccinated group, significantly higher than that of the control group [0.31 ug/mL (SD 0.12; 950/£1 0.17 to 0.44; P0.0381. The proportion of children with protective antiNi antioody level was higher in the vaccinated group (23.7% than in the control group  (10.5%, howevet; this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.128. Conclusion The mean serum anti-S. typhi Vi IgG antibody level in children who had been vaccinated more than 3 years prior to the study is higher than in children who had never received typhoid vaccinations. Nevertheless, the mean antibody titers are generally non-protective in ooth groups. Also, the proportion of children with protective antibody levels is not significantly

  4. Adsorption behavior of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal—polyethyleneimine composite for removal of Cr(VI) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao; Jin, Ru-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-kun, E-mail: xkouyang@zjou.edu.cn; Wang, Yang-Guang

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • A carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal-polyethyleneimine composite (CCN-PEI) was prepared. • The as-prepared CCN-PEI was characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS. • Results suggested that the reusable CCN-PEI could remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions with a high adsorption capacity. • The adsorption isotherm, thermodynamics, and kinetics of the adsorption process are also discussed. - Abstract: In this study, a composite adsorbent (CCN-PEI) composed of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals (CCN) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) was prepared through an amidation reaction between the carboxyl groups of the CCN and the amine groups of the PEI. The adsorption performance of the CCN-PEI was tested by removing Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The physicochemical properties of the CCN and the Cr(VI) ion-loaded CCN-PEI were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To investigate the adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) ions onto this newly developed CCN-PEI, we performed experiments under different adsorption conditions, by varying the contact time, solution pH, initial Cr(VI) ion concentration, and adsorption temperature. The prepared CCN-PEI exhibited an encouraging uptake capacity of 358.42 mg × g{sup −1}. The adsorption process was fast: within the first 100 min, Cr(VI) ion adsorption onto the CCN-PEI was about 65%, and the adsorption equilibrium was reached within 250 min. Kinetics experiments indicated that the adsorption process could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, our adsorption equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherms well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, such as the free energy change (ΔG = −2.93 kJ × mol{sup −1}), enthalpy change (ΔH = −5.69 kJ × mol{sup −1}), and entropy change (ΔS = −9.14 kJ × mol{sup −1}), indicate that the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions onto CCN

  5. High performance of phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide for the selective adsorption of U(VI) from acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Li, Jiaxing, E-mail: lijx@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (China); School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123, Suzhou (China); Wang, Xiangxue; Chen, Changlun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Wang, Xiangke [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (China); School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123, Suzhou (China); Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-11-15

    In this study, phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide (PGO) was prepared by grafting triethyl phosphite onto the surface of GO using Arbuzov reaction. The as-prepared PGO was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and Zeta potential. The application of the PGO to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was investigated with a maximum adsorption capacity of 251.7 mg/g at pH = 4.0 ± 0.1 and T = 303 K. The adsorption mechanism was also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, indicating a chemical adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface. Moreover, experimental results gave a better removal efficiency toward U(VI) on PGO surface than other heavy metal ions at acidic solution, indicating the selective extraction of U(VI) from environmental pollutants. - Highlights: • The successful grafting phosphonate to graphene oxide by the Arbuzov reaction. • Selective adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface over other heavy metal ions from acidic solution. • Electrostatic interactions of U(VI) with phosphonate and oxygen-containing functional groups on PGO surface. • Higher sorption capacity on PGO surface than GO surface for the U(VI) removal.

  6. Collagen VI-Related Myopathies: Navigating through the Molecular Maze, Myomatrix and Clinical Manifestations on a Journey toward Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a congenital onset of weakness and hypotonia, typically associated with dystrophic-appearing muscle biopsy findings. The spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with the congenital muscular dystrophy subgroup resulting from a deficiency of collagen VI in the extracellular matrix of muscle are collectively termed ‘collagen VI-related myopathies’ and include the early onset ...

  7. Thromboembolism and antithrombotic therapy for heart failure in sinus rhythm: an executive summary of a joint consensus document from the ESC Heart Failure Association and the ESC Working Group on Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Piotrponikowski, Piotr; Andreotti, Felicita; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Homma, Shunichi; Morais, Joao; Pullicino, Patrick; Rasmussen, Lars H; Marín, Francisco; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) with either reduced or preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction is common and remains an extremely serious disorder with a high mortality and morbidity. Many complications related to heart failure can be related to thrombosis. Epidemiological and pathophysiological data also link HF to an increased risk of thrombosis, leading to the clinical consequences of sudden death, stroke, systemic thromboembolism and/or venous thromboembolism. This executive summary of a joint consensus document of the Heart Failure Association (EHFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the ESC Working Group on Thrombosis reviews the published evidence, summarises 'best practice', and puts forward consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and assist management decisions in everyday clinical practice. In HF patients with atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation is clearly recommended, and the CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores should be used to determine the likely risk-benefit ratio (thromboembolism prevention versus risk of bleeding) of oral anticoagulation. In HF patients with reduced LV ejection fraction who are in sinus rhythm there is no evidence of an overall benefit of vitamin K antagonists (e.g. warfarin) on mortality, with risk of major bleeding. Whilst there is the potential for a reduction in ischaemic stroke, there is currently no compelling reason to routinely use warfarin for these patients. Risk factors associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events should be identified and decisions regarding use of anticoagulation individualised. Patient values and preferences are important determinants when balancing the risk of thromboembolism against bleeding risk. Novel oral anticoagulants that offer a different risk-benefit profile compared with warfarin may appear as an attractive therapeutic option, but this would need to be confirmed in clinical trials.

  8. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, T.; Bashmakov, I.; Bernstein, L.; Bogner, J.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Davidson, O.; Fisher, B.; Grubb, M.; Gupta, S.; Halsnaes, K.; Heij, B.; Kahn Ribeiro, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Levine, M.; Martino, D.; Masera Cerutti, O.; Metz, B.; Meyer, L.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Najam, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Holger Rogner, H.; Roy, J.; Sathaye, J.; Schock, R.; Shukla, P.; Sims, R.; Smith, P.; Swart, R.; Tirpak, D.; Urge-Vorsatz, D.; Dadi, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO 2 Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  9. Dobbins AFB, Georgia Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-25

    sources). r Dust and/or sand - Included are blowing dust, blowing sand, and dust. Continued on Reverse A-i i j+ 7 vi * . Blowing spray -This Item if...7 - -. - -.... .-- - -- . --- - ,~ I-I, * GLOB AL CLIMATOLOGY BPANCH SU FETAC PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY AT9 WFATHF< SERVICF/PAL 7-227 - CFNIS AFF CA

  10. Pneumothoraces in collagen VI-related dystrophy: a case series and recommendations for management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagen VI-related dystrophy (collagen VI-RD is a rare neuromuscular condition caused by mutations in the COL6A1, COL6A2 or COL6A3 genes. The phenotypic spectrum includes early-onset Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, adult-onset Bethlem myopathy and an intermediate phenotype. The disorder is characterised by distal hyperlaxity and progressive muscle weakness, joint contractures and respiratory insufficiency. Respiratory insufficiency is attributed to chest wall contractures, scoliosis, impaired diaphragmatic function and intercostal muscle weakness. To date, intrinsic parenchymal lung disease has not been implicated in the inevitable respiratory decline of these patients. This series focuses on pneumothorax, an important but previously under-recognised disease manifestation of collagen VI-RD. We describe two distinct clinical presentations within collagen VI-RD patients with pneumothorax. The first cohort consists of neonates and children with a single pneumothorax in the setting of large intrathoracic pressure changes. The second group is made up of adult patients with recurrent pneumothoraces, associated with chest computed tomography scan evidence of parenchymal lung disease. We describe treatment challenges in this unique population with respect to expectant observation, tube thoracostomy and open pleurodesis. Based on this experience, we offer recommendations for early identification of lung disease in collagen VI-RD and definitive intervention.

  11. Enhanced Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation in ice phase: Important role of dissolved organic matter from biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Xiaoling [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.edu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210046 (China); Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gress, Julia; Harris, Willie [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li, Yuncong [Soil and Water Science Department, Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031-3314 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Biochar-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) effectively reduced Cr(VI) and oxidized As(III). • Cr(VI) and As(III) could serve as a redox couple. • Cr(VI) and As(III) redox conversion was more effective in the ice phase than aqueous phase. • FTIR and ESR showed that biochar DOM served as both electron donor and acceptor. - Abstract: This study evaluated the impact of DOM from two biochars (sugar beet tailing and Brazilian pepper) on Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation in both ice and aqueous phases with a soil DOM as control. Increasing DOM concentration from 3 to 300 mg C L{sup −1} enhanced Cr(VI) reduction from 20% to 100% and As(III) oxidation from 6.2% to 25%; however, Cr(VI) reduction decreased from 80–86% to negligible while As(III) oxidation increased from negligible to 18–19% with increasing pH from 2 to 10. Electron spin resonance study suggested semiquinone radicals in DOM were involved in As(III) oxidation while Fourier transform infrared analysis suggested that carboxylic groups in DOM participated in both Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation. During Cr(VI) reduction, part of DOM (∼10%) was oxidized to CO{sub 2}. The enhanced conversion of Cr(VI) and As(III) in the ice phase was due to the freeze concentration effect with elevated concentrations of electron donors and electron acceptors in the grain boundary. Though DOM enhanced both Cr(VI) reduction and As(III)oxidation, Cr(VI) reduction coupled with As(III) oxidation occurred in absence of DOM. The role of DOM, Cr(VI) and/or As(III) in Cr and As transformation may provide new insights into their speciation and toxicity in cold regions.

  12. Tetrapotassium cis-dioxido-trans-bis(sulfato-κOsulfato(κ2O,O′molybdate(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf W. Berg

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, K4[MoVIO2(SO43], was precipitated from a melt of molybdenum(VI oxide and potassium sulfate in potassium disulfate. The compound contains monomeric [MoVIO2(SO43]4− anions, with the MoVI atom, both oxide ligands, and the S atom and both ligating O atoms of the bidentate sulfate group lying on a crystallographic mirror plane. One of the potassium cations is nine-coordinate, while the other is eight-coordinate.

  13. Effect of the gamma irradiation on the bio-sorption of Cr (Vi) by orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo L, V.; Barrera D, C. E.; Sanchez M, V.; Urena N, F.

    2009-01-01

    The orange peel (Citrus sp.) is a bioadsorbent that contains functional groups able to remove Cr (Vi). To study the effect of gamma irradiation in the sorption capacity, the Nn materials were irradiated with gamma rays using a Co 60 source to dose from 10 to 3500 KGy (Nlγ). The biomass irradiation with gamma rays was successful since it increased the hexavalent chromium removal obtaining a maximum removal percentage of 100%. Sorption isotherms were realized to determine the concentration effect of initial Cr (Vi), the ph effect of the solution and the relationship m/v. (Author)

  14. Bullying prevention in schools by targeting cognitions, emotions, and behavior: Evaluating the effectiveness of the REBE-ViSC program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Simona; Bora, Carmen; Sipos-Gug, Sebastian; Tocai, Ioana; Gradinger, Petra; Yanagida, Takuya; Strohmeier, Dagmar

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of a class-based antibullying prevention program on cognitions, emotions, and behaviors was investigated. The program consists of a cognitive-behavioral (Rational Emotive Behavioral Education; REBE) and a behavioral (Viennese Social Competence; ViSC) component. The REBE program is based on rational emotive behavioral theory and contains 9 student lessons. The ViSC program is based on social learning theory and comprises 10 student lessons. The order of the programs was experimentally manipulated. The REBE-ViSC program was implemented in 5 schools (14 classes), the ViSC-REBE program was implemented in 3 schools (9 classes), and 3 schools (11 classes) served as an untreated control group. Data were collected during 1 school year at pretest, midpoint, and posttest. Emotions (overt and internalizing anger), cognitions (learning and entitlement), and behaviors (bullying perpetration and bullying victimization) were measured with self-assessments. To examine the effectiveness of the REBE-ViSC/ViSC-REBE program, multilevel growth models were applied (time points at Level 1, individuals at Level 2, and classes at Level 3). The analyses revealed that the program effects differed depending on the order of the programs. The REBE-ViSC condition was more effective in changing negative emotions than the ViSC-REBE condition; both experimental conditions were effective in reducing dysfunctional cognitions, whereas no behavioral change was found in the 2 experimental groups when compared with the control group. To improve program effectiveness regarding behavioral changes, a multilevel whole-school approach including a teacher component is recommended. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI); Quitosama magnetica para remocao de uranio (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopa, Luiz Claudio Barbosa

    2007-07-01

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U0{sub 2}{sup 2+}, was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L{sup -1}. In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g{sup -1}. In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U0{sub 2}{sup 2+} recovered with carbonate ion and

  16. CPE OF URANIUM (VI USING IONIC LIQUID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANAA NAÏT-TAHAR

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud point extraction (CPE was used to extract uranium (VI from an aqueous solution in acetate media. The methodology used is based on the formation of uranyl-ionic liquid (I complexes and uranyl-D2EHPA soluble in a micellar phase of non-ionic surfactant (Triton X-100. The uranium (VI complexes are then extracted into the surfactant-rich phase at ambient temperature. The ionic liquid (IL used as a chelating agent was synthesized and characterized in this study. It is composed of N-butyl N’-triethoxy methyl imidazolium cation and diethylhexylphosphate (D2EHPA-H as anion. The effect of the IL on the extraction efficiency was studied in presence and in absence of IL’s cation in acetate medium.

  17. Hvad skal vi med Trump-satire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?......Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?...

  18. Annual report and summary financial statement 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1991-92 Annual Report for Scottish Hydro-Electric PLC is presented. It includes key financial statistics, the financial calendar, details of the Board of Directors, the Chairman's Statement, the Chief Executives' review of operations, operational statistics, a summary financial statement, a summary group profit and loss account, summary balance sheets, the Auditors' Report and a customer map. (UK)

  19. Prospek pengembangan industri perkulitan pada pelita VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Karyadi

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The leather industry is one of the strong competitive industry, as it comes from renewable natural resources. Therefore, the leather industry has good prospect to develop at the Pelita VI to be the industrial products export competitive. To develop leather industry and leather products should be given closed attention and well managed, especially concerning raw material supply, quality and leather waste treatment.

  20. Nanomaterials based on II-VI Semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Cozzarini, Luca

    2012-01-01

    2010/2011 This thesis describes: (i) synthesis and characterization of colloidal nanocrystals of II-VI semiconductor compounds; (II) development of two novel materials using such nanocrystals as “building blocks”: (IIa) a nanocrystals/polymer composite, to be used as phosphor in LED-based lighting devices; (IIb) an inorganic, nano-structured multiphase material, showing a promising geometry as an electronic intermediate band material. Different typologies of nanocrystals (single-phase...

  1. eBaViR, easy balance virtual rehabilitation system: a study with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, M; Gil-Gómez, José-Antonio; Alcañiz, M; Noé, E; Colomer, C

    2010-01-01

    eBaViR is a virtual rehabilitation system, which has been developed for balance rehabilitation for patients suffering from acquired brain injury. It is a game-based system that uses a low-cost interface, the Nintendo Wii Balance Board. The games have been specifically designed with the help of experts in the rehabilitation of balance disorders and can be adapted to patients according to their needs. We present an experimental study that has been carried out using the system. The aim of the study is to determine whether this setup could be applied as a Virtual Rehabilitation System for balance rehabilitation in Acquired Brain Injury. We randomly divided patients into two groups: a trial group and a control group. The trial group used eBaViR system during the rehabilitation sessions, and the control group followed traditional rehabilitation sessions. We obtained encouraging results.

  2. Multinary I-III-VI2 and I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductor Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regulacio, Michelle D; Han, Ming-Yong

    2016-03-15

    are the multinary chalcogenide semiconductors (MCSs), which include the ternary I-III-VI2 semiconductors (e.g., AgGaS2, CuInS2, and CuInSe2) and the quaternary I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductors (e.g., Cu2ZnGeS4, Cu2ZnSnS4, and Ag2ZnSnS4). These inorganic compounds consist of environmentally benign elemental components, exhibit excellent light-harvesting properties, and possess band gap energies that are well-suited for solar photon absorption. Moreover, the band structures of these materials can be conveniently modified through alloying to boost their ability to harvest visible photons. In this Account, we provide a summary of recent research on the use of ternary I-III-VI2 and quaternary I2-II-IV-VI4 semiconductor nanostructures for light-induced photocatalytic applications, with focus on hydrogen production and organic dye degradation. We include a review of the solution-based methods that have been employed to prepare multinary chalcogenide semiconductor nanostructures of varying compositions, sizes, shapes, and crystal structures, which are factors that are known to have significant influence on the photocatalytic activity of semiconductor photocatalysts. The enhancement of photocatalytic performance through creation of hybrid nanoscale architectures is also presented. Lastly, views on the current challenges and future directions are discussed in the concluding section.

  3. Indexing for summary queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Ke; Wang, Lu; Wei, Zhewei

    2014-01-01

    returned by reporting queries. In this article, we design indexing techniques that allow for extracting a statistical summary of all the records in the query. The summaries we support include frequent items, quantiles, and various sketches, all of which are of central importance in massive data analysis....... Our indexes require linear space and extract a summary with the optimal or near-optimal query cost. We illustrate the efficiency and usefulness of our designs through extensive experiments and a system demonstration....

  4. FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary is a summarized dataset describing all federally declared disasters, starting with the first disaster declaration in 1953,...

  5. Fe(III) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by low-molecular-weight organic acids with α-OH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jun; Mao, J.-D.; Gong Hui; Lan Yeqing

    2009-01-01

    The photochemical reduction of Cr(VI) by four low-molecular-weight organic acids (tartaric acid, citric acid, malic acid, and n-butyric acid) in the presence of either dissolved Fe(III) in dilute aqueous solution or adsorbed Fe(III) on clay mineral surfaces (kaolinite, montmorillonite and illite) was investigated using batch reactors at a pH range from 3.5 to 4.5 at 25 deg. C. The results indicate that Fe(III) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids with α-OH is extremely fast. During a reaction period when less than 80% initial Cr(VI) was consumed, the reaction can be described as pseudo-first-order with respect to Cr(VI) when organic acid in excess. By plotting ln[Cr(VI)] as a function of reaction time, rate constants of Cr(VI) reduction by organic acids are obtained. The rate constants involving the four acids are in the order: tartaric acid (with 2 carboxylic groups and 2 α-OH groups) > citric acid (with 3 carboxylic groups and 1 α-OH group) ∼ malic acid (with 2 carboxylic groups and 1 α-OH group) >> n-butyric acid (with 1 carboxylic group and no α-OH group). This order suggests that the number of α-OH but not the number of carboxylic groups is an important determinant of kinetics. With light, the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid is accelerated by clay minerals. The enhancement of Cr(VI) reduction is attributed to the catalysis of Fe(III) adsorbed on clay mineral surfaces. However, such an acceleration is markedly suppressed by introducing NaF into the reaction system since NaF forms a complex with Fe(III). It is concluded that the complex formation between Fe(III) and organic acid is a key step for the photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) in the presence of Fe(III) and organic acids with α-OH.

  6. The response to Typhi Vi vaccination is compromised in individuals with primary immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarage, Jeevani; Seneviratne, Suranjith L; Senaratne, Vijitha; Fernando, Amitha; Gunasekera, Kirthi; Gunasena, Bandu; Gurugama, Padmalal; Peiris, Sudath; Parker, Antony R; Harding, Stephen; de Silva, Nilhan Rajiva

    2017-06-01

    Measurement of an individuals ability to respond to polysaccharide antigens is a crucial test to determine adaptive immunity. Currently the response to Pneumovax ® is utilized but with the success of Prevnar ® , measurement of the response to Pneumovax may be challenging. The aim of the study was to assess the response to Typhi Vi vaccination in both children and adult control groups and patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID). In the control groups, >95% of the individuals had pre Typhi Vi vaccination concentrations 94% achieving ≥3 fold increase in concentration (FI). The response to Typhi Vi vaccination was significantly lower in both children ( p = 0.006) and adult ( p = 0.002) PID groups when compared to their control groups. 11% and 55% of the children and adult PID groups respectively did not obtain a response >3FI. There were no significant differences between the responses obtained in the children and adult PID groups. When all individuals with PID were separated into those with either hypogammaglobulinemia (HYPO) or common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), both groups had a significantly lower median FI than the control group (19, 95%CI 5-56 vs 59, 95%CI 7-237; p = 0.01 and 1, 95%CI 1-56 vs 32, 95%CI 5-136; p = 0.005). Further, a >3FI differentiated the antibody responses between both the CVID and HYPO groups and their control groups (AUC: 0.83, 95%CI: 0.65-1.00, p = 0.005 and 0.81, 95% CI: 0.65-0.97, p = 0.01). The data suggests that measurement of the response to Typhi Vi vaccination could represent a complementary assay for the assessment of the response to a polysaccharide vaccine.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and application of Lagerstroemia speciosa embedded magnetic nanoparticle for Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shalini; Agrawal, Shashi Bhushan; Mondal, Monoj Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Lagerstroemia speciosa bark (LB) embedded magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ salt solution with ammonia and LB for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution. The native LB, magnetic nanoparticle (MNP), L. speciosa embedded magnetic nanoparticle (MNPLB) and Cr(VI) adsorbed MNPLB particles were characterized by SEM-EDX, TEM, BET-surface area, FT-IR, XRD and TGA methods. TEM analysis confirmed nearly spherical shape of MNP with an average diameter of 8.76nm and the surface modification did not result in the phase change of MNP as established by XRD analysis, while led to the formation of secondary particles of MNPLB with diameter of 18.54nm. Characterization results revealed covalent binding between the hydroxyl group of MNP and carboxyl group of LB particles and further confirmed its physico-chemical nature favorable for Cr(VI) adsorption. The Cr(VI) adsorption on to MNPLB particle as an adsorbent was tested under different contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose, initial pH, temperature and agitation speed. The results of the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption were well described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters suggest spontaneous and endothermic nature of Cr(VI) adsorption onto MNPLB. The maximum adsorption capacity for MNPLB was calculated to be 434.78mg/g and these particles even after Cr(VI) adsorption were collected effortlessly from the aqueous solution by a magnet. The desorption of Cr(VI)-adsorbed MNPLB was found to be more than 93.72% with spent MNPLB depicting eleven successive adsorption-desorption cycles. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. An Overview on Production and Applications of Ferrate(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talaiekhozani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Coagulation, chemical oxidation and disinfection are essential processes in water and waste treatment. A chemical that can be applied for all the above mentioned purposes is ferrate(VI. Although there are many studies about ferrate(VI, no comprehensive review paper can be found about ferrate(VI from production to applications. The aim of this study was to review ferrate(VI production, measurement, stability and utilization in water and wastewater treatment. Evidence Acquisition In acidic conditions, the oxidation and reduction capacity of ferrate(VI is superior to all currently utilized oxidizers and disinfectants in water and wastewater treatment. New researches have provided the technology of using ferrate(VI for coagulation, chemical oxidation and disinfection of water and wastewater in a reactor simultaneously, which can reduce the size of water and wastewater treatment plants and increase the treatment efficiency. Results Despite the existence of these technologies, there is no full-scale application of ferrate(VI in the water and wastewater industry which it is due to difficulties associated with I, the lack of adequate researches that have demonstrated its capabilities and advantages over the existing water and wastewater treatment methods; ii, the instability of ferrate(VI depending on its method of preparation, and iii, the relatively low yield of ferrate(VI. Conclusions To solve the above mentioned difficulties, fundamental study most be carried out to discover the novel methods of ferrate(VI production, focusing on increasing the product stability and the production yield.

  9. ColVI myopathies: where do we stand, where do we go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allamand Valérie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collagen VI myopathies, caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen type VI (ColVI, represent a clinical continuum with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD and Bethlem myopathy (BM at each end of the spectrum, and less well-defined intermediate phenotypes in between. ColVI myopathies also share common features with other disorders associated with prominent muscle contractures, making differential diagnosis difficult. This group of disorders, under-recognized for a long time, has aroused much interest over the past decade, with important advances made in understanding its molecular pathogenesis. Indeed, numerous mutations have now been reported in the COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 genes, a large proportion of which are de novo and exert dominant-negative effects. Genotype-phenotype correlations have also started to emerge, which reflect the various pathogenic mechanisms at play in these disorders: dominant de novo exon splicing that enables the synthesis and secretion of mutant tetramers and homozygous nonsense mutations that lead to premature termination of translation and complete loss of function are associated with early-onset, severe phenotypes. In this review, we present the current state of diagnosis and research in the field of ColVI myopathies. The past decade has provided significant advances, with the identification of altered cellular functions in animal models of ColVI myopathies and in patient samples. In particular, mitochondrial dysfunction and a defect in the autophagic clearance system of skeletal muscle have recently been reported, thereby opening potential therapeutic avenues.

  10. Oxidation of indometacin by ferrate (VI): kinetics, degradation pathways, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junlei; Wang, Yahui; Liu, Guoguang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Fengliang; Ma, Jingshuai; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Haijin; Lv, Wenying

    2017-04-01

    The oxidation of indometacin (IDM) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) was investigated to determine the reaction kinetics, transformation products, and changes in toxicity. The reaction between IDM and Fe(VI) followed first-order kinetics with respect to each reactant. The apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) decreased from 9.35 to 6.52 M -1  s -1 , as the pH of the solution increased from 7.0 to 10.0. The pH dependence of k app might be well explained by considering the species-specific rate constants of the reactions of IDM with Fe(VI). Detailed product studies using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated that the oxidation products were primarily derived from the hydrolysis of amide linkages, the addition of hydroxyl groups, and electrophilic oxidation. The toxicity of the oxidation products was evaluated using the Microtox test, which indicated that transformation products exhibited less toxicity to the Vibrio fischeri bacteria. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis calculated by the ecological structure activity relationship (ECOSAR) revealed that all of the identified products exhibited lower acute and chronic toxicity than the parent pharmaceutical for fish, daphnid, and green algae. Furthermore, Fe(VI) was effective in the degradation IDM in water containing carbonate ions or fulvic acid (FA), and in lake water samples; however, higher Fe(VI) dosages would be required to completely remove IDM in lake water in contrast to deionized water.

  11. Sorption of Cr(VI) ions on two Lewatit-anion exchange resins and their quantitative determination using UV-visible spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, E; Cetin, S

    2009-04-15

    The sorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions with macroporous resins which contain quarternary amine groups (Lewatit MP 64 and Lewatit MP 500) was studied at varying Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose, pH, contact time and temperature. Batch shaking sorption experiments were carried out to evaluate the performance of Lewatit MP 64 and Lewatit MP 500 anion exchange resins in the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The concentration of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution was determined by UV-visible spectrophotometer. The ion exchange process, which is dependent on pH, showed maximum removal of Cr(VI) in the pH range 3-7 for an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 1x10(-3) M. The optimum pH for Cr(VI) adsorption was found as 5.0 for Lewatit MP 64 and 6.0 for Lewatit MP 500. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption at pH 5.0 is 0.40 and 0.41 mmol/g resin for Lewatit MP 64 and Lewatit MP 500 anion exchangers, respectively. The maximum chromium sorption occurred at approximately 60 min for Lewatit MP 64 and 75 min for Lewatit MP 500. The suitability of the Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models was also investigated for each chromium-sorbent system. The uptake of Cr(VI) by the anion exchange resins was reversible and so it has good potential for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Both ion exchangers had high bonding constants but Lewatit MP 500 showed stronger binding. The rise in the temperature caused a slight decrease in the value of the equilibrium constant (K(c)) for the sorption of Cr(VI) ion.

  12. NFSMI Research Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Mary Frances

    2014-01-01

    The NFSMI Research Summary is a continuing series of summaries reporting recently completed research and research-based resources funded by the National Food Service Management Institute. The following research studies are summarized in this article: (1) Succession Planning for Management Level Staff in School Nutrition Programs; (2)…

  13. Advanced Analysis Environments - Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panacek, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    This is a summary of the panel discussion on Advanced Analysis Environments. Rene Brun, Tony Johnson, and Lassi Tuura shared their insights about the trends and challenges in analysis environments. This paper contains the initial questions, a summary of the speakers' presentation, and the questions asked by the audience

  14. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Gonzalez, J.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Rodriguez, E.; Ramirez, S.L.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Cr(VI) bioadsorption and its possible reduction to Cr(III) by Agave lechuguilla biomass were studied. The experimental data obtained in batch experiments at different temperatures were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted well with the Freundlich model. The average model parameters calculated from Freundlich's isotherms (adsorption capacity K F = 4 . 10 -2 mol . g -1 and an average adsorption intensity value n = 13.07) showed that A. lechuguilla can be considered as an effective biomaterial for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG . , ΔH . , and ΔS . ) for Cr(VI) adsorption determined in the temperature range from (283 to 313) K suggest that a portion of Cr(VI) may be bound to functional groups on the surface of the adsorbent and then reduced to Cr(III). Additionally, the parameters of the Dubinin-Radushkevick equation indicated that the sorption of chromium species onto lechuguilla biomass mainly proceeds through binding surface functional groups

  15. Reduction and Removal of Chromium VI in Water by Powdered Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cr adsorption on wood-based powdered activated carbon (WPAC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The highest Cr(VI adsorption (40.04% was obtained under acidic conditions (pH 3, whereas Cr removal at pH 10 was only 0.34%. The mechanism of Cr(VI removal from aqueous solutions by WPAC was based on the reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III with the concomitant oxidation of C-H and C-OH to C-OH and C=O, respectively, on the surface of WPAC, followed by Cr(III adsorption. Raman spectroscopy revealed a change in the WPAC structure in terms of the D/G band intensity ratio after Cr(VI adsorption. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the oxygen/carbon ratio on the WPAC surface increased from 9.85% to 17.74%. This result was confirmed by XPS measurements, which showed that 78.8% of Cr adsorbed on the WPAC surface was in the trivalent state. The amount of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface increased due to the oxidation of graphitic carbons to C-OH and C=O groups.

  16. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, J. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Peralta-Videa, J.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Rodriguez, E. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Ramirez, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, J.L. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)]. E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu

    2005-04-15

    The temperature dependence of the Cr(VI) bioadsorption and its possible reduction to Cr(III) by Agave lechuguilla biomass were studied. The experimental data obtained in batch experiments at different temperatures were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted well with the Freundlich model. The average model parameters calculated from Freundlich's isotherms (adsorption capacity K{sub F} = 4 . 10{sup -2} mol . g{sup -1} and an average adsorption intensity value n = 13.07) showed that A. lechuguilla can be considered as an effective biomaterial for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution. Thermodynamic parameters ({delta}G{sup .}, {delta}H{sup .}, and {delta}S{sup .}) for Cr(VI) adsorption determined in the temperature range from (283 to 313) K suggest that a portion of Cr(VI) may be bound to functional groups on the surface of the adsorbent and then reduced to Cr(III). Additionally, the parameters of the Dubinin-Radushkevick equation indicated that the sorption of chromium species onto lechuguilla biomass mainly proceeds through binding surface functional groups.

  17. Aminopyridine modified Spirulina platensis biomass for chromium(VI) adsorption in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Akbulut, Aydin; Arica, M Yakup

    Chemical modification of Spirulina platensis biomass was realized by sequential treatment of algal surface with epichlorohydrin and aminopyridine. Adsorptive properties of Cr(VI) ions on native and aminopyridine modified algal biomass were investigated by varying pH, contact time, ionic strength, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and temperature. FTIR and analytical analysis indicated that carboxyl and amino groups were the major functional groups for Cr(VI) ions adsorption. The optimum adsorption was observed at pH 3.0 for native and modified algal biomasses. The adsorption capacity was found to be 79.6 and 158.7 mg g(-1), for native and modified algal biomasses, respectively. For continuous system studies, the experiments were conducted to study the effect of important design parameters such as flow rate and initial concentration of metal ions, and the maximum sorption capacity was observed at a flow rate of 50 mL h(-1), and Cr(VI) ions concentration 200 mg L(-1) with modified biomass. Experimental data fitted a pseudo-second-order equation. The regeneration performance was observed to be 89.6% and 94.3% for native and modified algal biomass, respectively.

  18. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Asha, Padmaja [National Centre for Aquatic Animal Health, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin (India); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Yitao [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau (China); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation.

  19. Adsorption and coadsorption mechanisms of Cr(VI) and organic contaminants on H3PO4 treated biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Chuanfang; Lv, Yizhong; Zhang, Weifang; Du, Yuguo; Hao, Zhengping; Zhang, Jing

    2017-11-01

    The study of simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic contaminants has practical applications due to the coexistence of complex pollutants in the wastewater or soil. In this work, biochar was prepared to study the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), naphthalene (NAP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the single or mixed systems. H 3 PO 4 -treated biochar presented a much higher adsorption capacity of the pollutants than the untreated biochar and also showed a high resistance to coexisting salts. The maximum adsorption capacities for Cr(VI) and BPA were 116.28 mg g -1 and 476.19 mg g -1 , respectively. Coadsorption experiments revealed that the presence of organic pollutants caused a limited decrease (∼10%) of removal efficiency of Cr(VI) and no further decrease was observed with higher concentrations of organic pollutants, while the presence of Cr(VI) had little impact on the removal of NAP. Infrared spectra and molecular simulation demonstrated that Cr(VI) was mainly adsorbed on the biochar via chemical complexation, while the organic pollutants through π-π interaction. Unexpectedly, the addition of Cr(VI) increased the removal efficiency of BPA, probably due to the increased H-bond interactions between BPA and the biochar through bridge bonds of oxygenic groups from CrO 4 2- . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. "LICENS ER NOGET VI GIVER TIL HINANDEN"

    OpenAIRE

    Svendsen, Nana Lysbo; Birksholm, Sarah Schlander; Rosendahl, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Nadja Loran

    2013-01-01

    This study consists of a rhetorical analysis of how the Danish Broadcasting Corporation argues for the compulsory license fee in their campaign video: ’Licens er noget vi giver til hinanden’. On the assumption that a visual product can argue on equal terms with the spoken language, the paper will look at the specific visual tools that are used in the argumentation and the portrayal of the concept of public service and the license fee. In extension to this the paper will examine if the vid...

  1. Voltammetry of Os(VI)-modified polysaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trefulka, Mojmír; Paleček, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 16 (2010), s. 1837-1845 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GPP301/10/P548; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651 Program:KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chemical modification of polysaccharides * electroactive labels * osmium(VI) complexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  2. Reduction U(VI) using jones reductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simbolon, S.

    1996-01-01

    Reduction of dissolved oxide uranium in sulfuric acid use of reductor Jones Zn (Hg) was carried out. The reduced uranium sulfate solution was analyzed its U(IV) by measuring its absorbance on 652 nm and compared to oxidation U(IV) solution with KMnO 4 solution. It was found that the comparison was in a good agreement. However, measuring of absorbance of U(VI) solution on 429 nm result of oxidation U(IV) with KMnO 4 solution was not change. (author)

  3. ViPTree: the viral proteomic tree server

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Yosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Kuronishi, Megumi; Uehara, Hideya; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Goto, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    ViPTree is a web server provided through GenomeNet to generate viral proteomic trees for classification of viruses based on genome-wide similarities. Users can upload viral genomes sequenced either by genomics or metagenomics. ViPTree generates proteomic trees for the uploaded genomes together with flexibly selected reference viral genomes. ViPTree also serves as a platform to visually investigate genomic alignments and automatically annotated gene functions for the uploaded viral genomes, th...

  4. Environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, May-Helen; Cochrane, Sabine; Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    There has been an environmental investigation in Region VI Halten Bank. This report presents the results of the chemical and biological assays performed on samples from a total of 316 stations in 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (AG)

  5. Vi lider af prætraumatisk stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Vi lider af prætraumatisk stress. Vi vil nemlig nå det hele og presser konstant nye aftaler ind i vores kalender. Det eneste, der hjælper, er at ’gøre intet’ – men kan man overhovedet det? Udgivelsesdato: 30.09.09......Vi lider af prætraumatisk stress. Vi vil nemlig nå det hele og presser konstant nye aftaler ind i vores kalender. Det eneste, der hjælper, er at ’gøre intet’ – men kan man overhovedet det? Udgivelsesdato: 30.09.09...

  6. Enzymatic U(VI) reduction by Desulfosporosinus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; Banfield, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Here we tested U(VI) reduction by a Desulfosporosinus species (sp.) isolate and type strain (DSM 765) in cell suspensions (pH 7) containing 1 mM U(VI) and lactate, under an atmosphere containing N 2 -CO 2 -H 2 (90: 5: 5). Although neither Desulfosporosinus species (spp.) reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions with 0.25% Na-bicarbonate or 0.85% NaCl, U(VI) was reduced in these solutions by a control strain, desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 642). However, both Desulfosporosinus strains reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions depleted in bicarbonate and NaCl. No U(VI) reduction was observed without lactate and H 2 electron donors or with heat-killed cells, indicating enzymatic U(VI) reduction. Uranium(VI) reduction by both strains was inhibited when 1 mM CuCl 2 was added to the cell suspensions. Because the Desulfosporosinus DSM 765 does not contain cytochrome c 3 used by Desulfovibrio spp. to reduce U(VI), Desulfosporosinus species reduce uranium via a different enzymatic pathway. (orig.)

  7. ENDF/B summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, R.

    1979-07-01

    This publication provides a localized source of descriptions for the evaluations contained in the ENDF/B Library. The summary documentation presented is intended to be a more detailed description than the (File 1) comments contained in the computer readable data files, but not so detailed as the formal reports describing each ENDF/B evaluation. The summary documentations were written by the CSEWB (Cross Section Evaluation Working Group) evaluators and compiled by NNDC (National Nuclear Data Center). This edition includes documentation for materials found on ENDF/B Version V tapes 501 to 516 (General Purpose File) excluding tape 504. ENDF/B-V also includes tapes containing partial evaluations for the Special Purpose Actinide (521, 522), Dosimetry (531), Activation (532), Gas Production (533), and Fission Product (541-546) files. The materials found on these tapes are documented elsewhere. Some of the evaluation descriptions in this report contain cross sections or energy level information

  8. ENDF/B summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsey, R. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    This publication provides a localized source of descriptions for the evaluations contained in the ENDF/B Library. The summary documentation presented is intended to be a more detailed description than the (File 1) comments contained in the computer readable data files, but not so detailed as the formal reports describing each ENDF/B evaluation. The summary documentations were written by the CSEWB (Cross Section Evaluation Working Group) evaluators and compiled by NNDC (National Nuclear Data Center). This edition includes documentation for materials found on ENDF/B Version V tapes 501 to 516 (General Purpose File) excluding tape 504. ENDF/B-V also includes tapes containing partial evaluations for the Special Purpose Actinide (521, 522), Dosimetry (531), Activation (532), Gas Production (533), and Fission Product (541-546) files. The materials found on these tapes are documented elsewhere. Some of the evaluation descriptions in this report contain cross sections or energy level information. (RWR)

  9. A Structure of a Collagen VI VWA Domain Displays N and C Termini at Opposite Sides of the Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ann-Kathrin A.; Mikolajek, Halina; Paulsson, Mats; Wagener, Raimund; Werner, Jörn M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Von Willebrand factor A (VWA) domains are versatile protein interaction domains with N and C termini in close proximity placing spatial constraints on overall protein structure. The 1.2 Å crystal structures of a collagen VI VWA domain and a disease-causing point mutant show C-terminal extensions that place the N and C termini at opposite ends. This allows a “beads-on-a-string” arrangement of multiple VWA domains as observed for ten N-terminal domains of the collagen VI α3 chain. The extension is linked to the core domain by a salt bridge and two hydrophobic patches. Comparison of the wild-type and a muscular dystrophy-associated mutant structure identifies a potential perturbation of a protein interaction interface and indeed, the secretion of mutant collagen VI tetramers is affected. Homology modeling is used to locate a number of disease-associated mutations and analyze their structural impact, which will allow mechanistic analysis of collagen-VI-associated muscular dystrophy phenotypes. PMID:24332716

  10. Immune responses to Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine in children 2 to 16 years old in Karachi, Pakistan, and Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, R Leon; Khan, M Imran; Soofi, Sajid B; Sur, Dipika; Kanungo, Suman; You, Young A; Habib, M Atif; Sahito, Shah Muhammad; Manna, Byomkesh; Dutta, Shanta; Acosta, Camilo J; Ali, Mohammad; Bhattacharya, Sujit K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Clemens, John D

    2014-05-01

    The geometric mean concentration (GMC) and the proportion maintaining a protective level (150 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) units [ELU]/ml) 2 years following a single dose of 25 μg of injectable Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine was measured against that of the control hepatitis A vaccine in children 2 to 16 years old in cluster randomized trials in Karachi and Kolkata. The GMC for the Vi group (1,428 ELU/ml) was statistically significantly different from the GMC of the control hepatitis A vaccine group (86 ELU/ml) after 6 weeks. A total of 117 children (95.1%) in the Vi group and 9 (7.5%) in the hepatitis A group showed a 4-fold rise in Vi IgG antibody concentrations at 6 weeks (P < 0.01). Protective antibody levels remained significantly different between the two groups at 2 years (38% in the Vi vaccine groups and 6% in the hepatitis A group [P < 0.01]). A very small proportion of younger children (2 to 5 years old) maintained protective Vi IgG antibody levels at 2 years, a result that was not statistically significantly different compared to that for the hepatitis A group (38.1% versus 10.5%). The GMCs of the Vi IgG antibody after 2 years were 133 ELU/ml for children 2 to <5 years old and 349 ELU/ml for children 5 to 16 years old. In conclusion, Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccine is immunogenic in children in settings of South Asia where typhoid is highly endemic. The antibody levels in children who received this vaccine remained higher than those in children who received the control vaccine but were significantly reduced at 2 years of follow-up.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM DICHROMATE Cr (VI ADMINISTRATION DURATION ON GLOBULAR RESISTANCE IN FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIŢIA STANA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The „in vivo” experiment has had as aim the study of different Cr(VI doses administration on globular resistance in female rats related to administration duration. Study was carried out on 56 female rats divided in 8 groups, 6 experimental and 2 control that received potassium dichromate in drinking water in doses of 25 ppm, 50 ppm and 75ppm Cr(VI, for 3 months, respectively, 6 months. Decrease of globular resistance (in terms of haemolysis degree in hypotonic solutions at increasing dose (up to 0.8% NaCl at 75 ppm dose in all experimental groups, in direct relation with the duration of administration was registered. Control groups were in physiological limits. The results of the present study revealed the affecting of erythrocyte membrane in function of administration duration and chromium intake level, because of oxidative lesions produced by it.

  12. Summary big data

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of Cukier the book: "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How we Live, Work, and Think" by Viktor Mayer-Schonberg and Kenneth. Summary of the ideas in Viktor Mayer-Schonberg's and Kenneth Cukier's book: " Big Data " explains that big data is where we use huge quantities of data to make better predictions based on the fact we identify patters in the data rather than trying to understand the underlying causes in more detail. This summary highlights that big data will be a source of new economic value and innovation in the future. Moreover, it shows that it will

  13. Biofuels: Project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  14. Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization behavior confirmation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Hajime; Nishimura, Kenji; Chikazawa, Takahiro; Teramae, Naoki

    2001-03-01

    Crystallization procedure is considered to have an advantage in recovering rather pure uranium from contaminated uranium solution and to be applicable for a new reprocessing process. It is considered necessary to collect data for Pu crystallization for design of the process with crystallization procedure. Last year the test for Pu(IV) nitrate crystallization was performed and it was confirmed that Pu crystallization is not observed under supposed crystallization condition if Pu valence is adjusted to 4. In this study, two type beaker tests were performed, 1. Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization test to confirm a behavior of Pu(VI) nitrate under crystallization condition. 2. U-Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization test to confirm a U-Pu(VI) co-crystallization phenomena. These tests were performed in AEA Technology Harwell Laboratory and the results were examined by Mitsubishi Materials Corporation. Test results were as follows. (1) Pu(VI) crystallization test. 1. Pu(VI) nitrate solution of 200,100 and 50 gPu/L with HNO 3 6M were cooled down up to -60degC to confirm Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization or freezing of the solution. 2. Crystal of H 2 O and HNO 3 · 3 H 2 O were observed but Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization was not observed. 3. We can estimate that Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization will not occurred in the reprocessing process with crystallization procedure. (2) U-Pu(VI) nitrate crystallization test. 1. U-Pu(VI) mixed nitrate solution is cooled to 10degC and 0degC. 2. U-Pu(VI) co-crystallization was confirmed by orange colored crystal in both cooling temperatures. 3. It is considered that Pu(VI) nitrate crystal is co-crystallized with uranyl nitrate crystal by the following reasons. chemical formula of both crystal are similar. crystal form is same and lattice parameters are very near. 4. U+Pu(VI) crystallization data is very near with uranyl nitrate crystallization data if Pu(VI) nitrate is considered to be crystallized in a same manner as uranyl nitrate. (author)

  15. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, J.A.

    A summary is presented of the topics covered during the period, from 1960 to 1978, of the contract. The general area of the research has been theoretical solid state physics. A list of publications produced during the contract is given

  16. Global Climate Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Hourly Summaries are simple indicators of observational normals which include climatic data summarizations and frequency distributions. These typically...

  17. MSIS State Summary Datamarts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page provides background needed to take advantage of the capabilities of the MSIS State Summary Datamart. This mart allows the user to develop high-level...

  18. Cancer Information Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer-reviewed, evidence-based summaries on topics including adult and pediatric cancer treatment, supportive and palliative care, screening, prevention, genetics, and complementary and alternative medicine. References to published literature are included.

  19. Annual Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Single-year summaries of observations at Weather Bureau and cooperative stations across the United States. Predominantly the single page Form 1066, which includes...

  20. Worldwide Airfield Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Worldwide Airfield Summary contains a selection of climatological data produced by the U.S. Air Force, Air Weather Service. The reports were compiled from dozens...

  1. An “on-off-on” fluorescent nanoprobe for recognition of chromium(VI) and ascorbic acid based on phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped carbon quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xiaojuan, E-mail: gxj1124@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Liu, Yang; Yang, Zhenhua; Shuang, Shaomin [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Zhang, Zeyu [Faculty of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China); Dong, Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2017-05-22

    Chromium (VI) [Cr(VI)] is a harsh environmental contaminates and has been proved to be highly toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Therefore, developing an inexpensive, good selective and highly sensitive nanoprobe for the detection of Cr(VI) is in urgent demand. Recently, the highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have been successfully utilized as efficient fluorescent nanoprobes for the detection of ions, pH and molecular substances. In this work, an “on-off” fluorescence phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped CQDs (PNCQDs) probe was developed for the determination of Cr(VI) based on inner filter effect (IFE). The proposed PNCQDs nanoprobe shows its distinct merits of simplicity, convenience, fast implementation, good selectivity and high sensitivity towards Cr(VI), allowing its potential application in the determination of Cr(VI) in environment and biosystem. In addition, the chelation effect of the functional groups in reductant and Cr(VI), and the easy-conversion of Cr(VI) to reduced states (i.e. Cr(III) and Cr(0)) by reductants makes the minimization of IFE with a concomitant recovery of PNCQDs fluorescence possible. Hence, the PNCQDs/Cr(VI) hybrid was used as an “off-on” fluorescence probe for sensing ascorbic acid (AA), which is a model reductant. For the detection of Cr(VI), the linear range and the limit of detection achieved were 1.5–30 μmol/L and 23 nmol/L, respectively. For the detection of AA, the linear range and the limit of detection obtained were 5.0–200 μmol/L and 1.35 μmol/L, respectively. The as-constructed “on-off-on” PNCQDs fluorescent nanoprobe was successfully applied for detecting Cr(VI) and AA in biosystem. Furthermore, the as-constructed fluorescent sensing system was successfully applied to the analyses of AA in fresh fruits and in commercial fruit juices with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • Fast synthesis of phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped CQDs (PNCQDs) by acid-base neutralization carbonization method.

  2. Summary of blog

    CERN Document Server

    Reader, Capitol

    2013-01-01

    This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Hugh Hewitt in his book "Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation that's Changing Your World". This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Hugh Hewitt's book.Hewitt argues that blogs have an important potential and he believes that it would be a dreadful mistake to avoid their power.

  3. Site environmental report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment

  4. The 1990-1991 project summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Tech's School of Textile & Fiber Engineering and School of Mechanical Engineering participated in four cooperative design efforts this year. One group designed a thermal shield for a lunar telescope. The second group designed a selenotextile habitat shielding structure. The third group designed a pneumatically assisted elbow joint for the NASA zero-prebreathe suit (ZPS). The final group designed an electromechanical system to power an astronaut's finger joints. Summaries of these projects are presented.

  5. Synthesis and immunological properties of Vi and di-O-acetyl pectin protein conjugates with adipic acid dihydrazide as the linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaczka, Z; Bystricky, S; Bryla, D A; Shiloach, J; Robbins, J B; Szu, S C

    1997-06-01

    The Vi capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella typhi, a licensed vaccine for typhoid fever in individuals > or = 5 years old, induces low and short-lived antibodies in children, and reinjection does not elicit booster responses at any age. Its immunogenicity was improved by binding Vi to proteins by using N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate (SPDP) as a linker. Similar findings were observed with the structurally related, di-O-acetyl derivative of pectin [poly-alpha(1-->4)-D-GalpA] designated OAcP. Protein conjugates of Vi and OAcP were synthesized by carbodiimide-mediated synthesis with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) as the linker. Hydrazide groups were introduced into proteins (bovine serum albumin or recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A) by treatment with ADH and 1-ethyl-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). The resultant adipic acid hydrazide derivatives (AH-proteins), containing 2.3 to 3.4% AH, had antigenic and physicochemical properties similar to those of the native proteins. The AH-proteins were bound to Vi and OAcP by treatment with EDC. The immunogenicity of Vi or OAcP, alone or as protein conjugates, was evaluated in young outbred mice and guinea pigs by subcutaneous injection of 2.5 and 5.0 microg, respectively, of polysaccharide, and antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All conjugates were significantly more immunogenic than Vi or OAcP alone and induced booster responses with 5- to 25-fold increases of antibodies. Vi conjugates were significantly more immunogenic than their OAcP analogs. A carboxymethyl derivative of yeast beta-glucan enhanced the anti-Vi response elicited by an OAcP conjugate but had no effect on the immunogenicity of Vi or of OAcP alone. Vi and OAcP conjugates synthesized by this scheme will be evaluated clinically.

  6. Oxidative stress-related lung dysfunction by chromium(VI): alleviation by Citrus aurantium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudani, Nejla; Rafrafi, Moez; Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Hakim, Ahmed; Troudi, Afef; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir; Ben Salah, Hichem; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2013-06-01

    Chromium(VI), a very strong oxidant, causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress in tissue systems. Our study investigated the potential ability of ethanolic Citrus aurantium L., family Rutaceae extract, used as a nutritional supplement, to alleviate lung oxidative damage induced by Cr(VI). A high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a mass spectrometer method was developed to separate and identify flavonoids in C. aurantium L. Six flavonoids were identified, as (1) poncirin, (2) naringin, (3) naringenin, (4) quercetin, (5) isosinensetin, and (6) tetramethyl-o-isoscutellarein. Adult Wistar rats, used in this study, were divided into six groups of six animals each: group I served as controls which received standard diet, group II received via drinking water K2Cr2O7 alone (700 ppm), groups III and IV were pretreated for 10 days with ethanol extract of C. aurantium L. at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively, and then K2Cr2O7 was administrated during 3 weeks, and groups V and VI received during 10 days only C. aurantium L. ethanol extract at doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg/day, respectively. Ethanol extract of C. aurantium L. was administered orally. Rats exposed to Cr(VI) showed in lung an increase in malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels and a decrease in sulflydryl content, glutathione, nonprotein thiol, and vitamins C and E levels. Decreases in enzyme activities such as in Na(+)K(+) ATPase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase were noted. Pretreatment with C. aurantium L. of chromium-treated rats ameliorated all biochemical parameters. Lung histological studies confirmed the biochemical parameters and the beneficial role of C. aurantium L.

  7. Cloning and expression of a Vi mimotope of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... A recombinant His-Vi protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was successfully constructed and cloned into ... mainly through consumption of food or water contami- nated with .... and healthy individuals (double arrows) followed by the detection using recombinant His-Vi protein as the primary antibody ...

  8. A CMOS rail-to-rail linear VI-converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, P.P.; Vervoort, P.P.; Wassenaar, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    A linear CMOS VI-converter operating in strong inversion with a common-mode input range from the negative to the positive supply rail is presented. The circuit consists of three linear VI-converters based on the difference of squares principle. Two of these perform the actual V to I conversion,

  9. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  10. Biosorption of chromium(VI) using immobilized Bacillius subtilis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, the batch removal of Cr (VI) from environment water bodies becomes necessary. Its removal from aqueous solution using immobilized Bacillus subtilis (IBBS), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IPBS), mixed biomass (IMBS) and Alginate alone (IABS) was carried out. The conditions of influence of initial Cr (VI) ...

  11. Adsorption kinetics for the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adsorption kinetics for the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions on the activated carbons prepared from agricultural wastes. ... The batch removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution using low-cost adsorbents such as cornelian cherry, apricot stone and almond shell under different experimental conditions was ...

  12. Extraction of uranium (VI) sulphate complexes by Adogen amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyamani, I.S.; Abd Elmessieh, E.N.

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of U(VI) between aqueous H 2 So 4 solutions and organic phases of adogen-368 has been described. The dependence of extraction on acidity, diluent type, metal and extractant concentrations was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism is discussed in the light of results obtained. The separation of U(VI) from rare earths is suggested. 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  14. Type VI Secretion Effectors: Methodologies and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wei Lien

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The type VI secretion system (T6SS is a nanomachine deployed by many Gram-negative bacteria as a weapon against eukaryotic hosts or prokaryotic competitors. It assembles into a bacteriophage tail-like structure that can transport effector proteins into the environment or target cells for competitive survival or pathogenesis. T6SS effectors have been identified by a variety of approaches, including knowledge/hypothesis-dependent and discovery-driven approaches. Here, we review and discuss the methods that have been used to identify T6SS effectors and the biological and biochemical functions of known effectors. On the basis of the nature and transport mechanisms of T6SS effectors, we further propose potential strategies that may be applicable to identify new T6SS effectors.

  15. Museo del oro: viñetas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Field

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available En enero de 2011 convocamos a un grupo internacional de académicos/activistas para discutir en Colombia las complejidades de la relación entre arqueología, excavaciones “ilícitas”, museos y comunidades indígenas desde una mirada comparativa. El taller de tres días tuvo lugar en Bogotá y Villa de Leyva. Uno de los eventos programados durante los dos días de la parte bogotana del taller fue una visita al Museo del Oro. En el restaurante del museo conversamos sobre lo que acabábamos de ver, sentir y pensar, y surgieron estas impresiones en las que el estupor convive con un fuerte deseo por decir algo. En Villa de Leyva nació la idea de que cada uno de nosotros transcribiera sus emociones en formato de viñeta.

  16. ASA conference on radiation and health, Coolfont VI: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The 1986 ASA Conference on Radiation and Health (Coolfont VI) continued the procedure established in 1981 of holding forenoon and evening sessions, leaving afternoons free for discussion and relaxation. One exception was made this year in that Michael and Marie Stoline were invited to discuss the Chernobyl Disaster on Monday afternoon. The program consisted of the following topics: a general overview of radiation and health problems; cytogenetics and radiation (human and animal studies and statistical analysis of dose-response curves); uranium and health effects, including continuing emphasis on radon, which has attracted considerable national interest lately; epidemiologic studies of workers at nuclear power plants and an uranium processing plant; the latest assessment of atomic bomb dosimetry. These Coolfont Conferences provide an excellent environment for an interchange of ideas and information in an assemblage of scientists from a variety of disciplines. Unfortunately there is one important factor which limits this interchange: language. In order to overcome the difficulty of statisticians understanding nuclear scientists and nuclear scientists understanding statisticians, I suggested one of two procedures: each group prepare a set of commonly used terms with definitions which would be understood by the other group(s); have an introductory session in which each group attempts to explain its language to the other group(s). This problem of communication is even more serious when scientists attempt to explain their research efforts to the general public. The Coolfont Conferences on Radiation and Health should be ideal forums for development of a language which could be understood by the general public as well as different scientific groups. This document contains the abstracts of 12 presented papers

  17. Hvad vi taler om, når vi taler om sømandskultur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Christopher

    Hvad vi taler om, når vi taler om sømandskultur   As the anthropologist uses the notion of culture to control his field experiences, those experiences will, in turn, come to control his notion of culture. He invents “a culture” for people, and they invent “culture” for him (Wagner 1981:11) I følge...... et skib, som eksisterer i opposition til bl.a. en moderne højteknologisk udvikling. Filmen er en kultfilm i sømandskredse, og således har den dannet ramme for events med flere hundrede deltagere i Svendborg. Den kan da ses som et punkt, hvorudfra forestillinger om sømandsidentitet, køn, klasse...

  18. Ferrrate(VI) and freeze-thaw treatment for oxidation of hormones and inactivation of fecal coliforms in sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, James; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the individual and combined effects of potassium ferrate(VI) additions and freeze-thaw conditioning for the treatment and dewatering of wastewater sludge in cold climates, with particular focus on the inactivation of fecal coliforms and oxidation of estrogens, androgens, and progestogens. The first phase of the study evaluated the effects of potassium ferrate(VI) pre-treatment followed by freeze-thaw at -20 °C using a low (0.5 g/L) and high (5.0 g/L) dose of potassium ferrate(VI). The results showed that pre-treatment of anaerobically digested sludge with 5 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI) reduced the concentration of fecal coliforms in the sludge cake to below 100 MPN/g DS. The second phase evaluated the ability of ferrate(VI) to oxidise selected hormones in sludge. Anaerobically digested sludge samples were spiked with 10 different hormones: estrone (E1), 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), equilin, mestranol, testosterone, norethindrone and norgestrel in two groups of low (3-75 ng/mL) and high (12-300 ng/L) concentration ranges of hormones. The samples were treated with either 0.5 or 1.0 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI), and hormone concentrations were measured again after treatment. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions as low as 1.0 g/L reduced the concentration of estrogens in sludge. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions of 0.5 and 1.0 g/L were less effective at reducing the concentrations of androgens and progestogens. Increasing ferrate(VI) dose would likely result in more substantial decreases in the concentrations of fecal coliforms and hormones. The results of this study indicate that the combined use of freeze-thaw and ferrate(VI) has the potential to provide a complete sludge treatment solution in cold regions.

  19. Spectrum and energy levels of Y VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, W.; Reader, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the five-times-ionized yttrium atom (Y VI), excited in a sliding-spark discharge, was studied in the 160--2500 A-circle range. About 900 Y VI lines were classified as transitions between 101 odd and 69 even energy levels.The energy-level system established includes almost all levels of the 4s 2 4p 4 , 4s4p 5 , 4s 2 4p 3 4d, 5d, 5s, 6s, and 5p configurations and a number of levels of the 7s, 4f, and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. The observed level system has been theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree--Fock calculations and least-squares parametric fits. Strong configuration mixings are found between the 4s4p 5 and 4s 2 4p 3 4d configurations, between the 4s 2 4p 3 5p and 4s4p 4 4d configurations, and between the 4s 2 4p 3 4f and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. From the optimized energy-level values, a system of Ritz-type wavelength standards with accuracies varying from 0.0003 to 0.003 A-circle in the range 179--500 A-circle has been determined. The ionization energy as determined from 4s 2 4p 3 ns levels (n = 5-7) is 737 110 +- 200 cm/sup -1/ (91.390 +- 0.025 eV)

  20. Investigation of uranium (VI) adsorption by polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi, S. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasiri, M., E-mail: mnasiri@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mesbahi, A. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khani, M.H. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran, 14395-836 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The adsorbent (polypyrrole) was synthesized by a chemical method using PEG, DBSNa and CTAB as the surfactant. • The solution pH was one of the most important parameters affecting the adsorption of uranium. • The CTAB provided higher removal percentage compared with the other surfactants. • The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm was 87.72 mg/g. • The pseudo second-order model fitted well with the adsorption kinetic of polypyrrole to uranium. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the adsorption of uranium (VI) ions on the polypyrrole adsorbent. Polypyrrole was synthesized by a chemical method using polyethylene glycol, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the surfactant and iron (III) chloride as an oxidant in the aqueous solution. The effect of various surfactants on the synthesized polymers and their performance as the uranium adsorbent were investigated. Adsorbent properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The effect of different parameters such as pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentrations, adsorbent dose, and the temperature was investigated in the batch system for uranium adsorption process. It has been illustrated that the adsorption equilibrium time is 7 min. The results showed that the Freundlich model had the best agreement and the maximum adsorption capacity of polypyrrole for uranium (VI) was determined 87.72 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the mentioned adsorption process was fast and the kinetic data were fitted to the Pseudo first and second order models. The adsorption kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0} and ΔS{sup 0} showed that the uranium adsorption process by polypyrrole was endothermic and spontaneous.

  1. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  2. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  3. Technology-derived storage solutions for stabilizing insulin in extreme weather conditions I: the ViViCap-1 device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Pesach, Gidi; Nagar, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Injectable life-saving drugs should not be exposed to temperatures 30°C/86°F. Frequently, weather conditions exceed these temperature thresholds in many countries. Insulin is to be kept at 4-8°C/~ 39-47°F until use and once opened, is supposed to be stable for up to 31 days at room temperature (exception: 42 days for insulin levemir). Extremely hot or cold external temperature can lead to insulin degradation in a very short time with loss of its glucose-lowering efficacy. Combined chemical and engineering solutions for heat protection are employed in ViViCap-1 for disposable insulin pens. The device works based on vacuum insulation and heat consumption by phase-change material. Laboratory studies with exposure of ViViCap-1 to hot outside conditions were performed to evaluate the device performance. ViViCap-1 keeps insulin at an internal temperature phase-change process and 'recharges' the device for further use. ViViCap-1 performed within its specifications. The small and convenient device maintains the efficacy and safety of using insulin even when carried under hot weather conditions.

  4. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of NpO 2+ and PuO 2 2+ by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO 2 O 2+ was rapidly reduced to form NpO 2 + organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO 2 2+ was predominantly reduced to Pu 4+ , resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO 2 2+ and PuO 2 P 2+ in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present

  5. CASL- The Common Algebraic Specification Language- Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne

    1997-01-01

    This Summary is the basis for the Design Proposal [LD97b] for CASL, the Common Algebraic Specification Language, prepared by the Language Design Task Group of CoFI, the Common Framework Initiative. It gives the abstract syntax, and informally describes its intended semantics. It is accompanied...... of this Summary shows just which bits of CASL are currently subject to reconsideration or revision, in view of the referees' comments and the recommendations made by the CoFI Semantics Task Group [Sem97c]. Changes that were made since the previous version are highlighted in the same way as this sentence. Points...

  6. Overview and summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The ITER Physics Basis presents and evaluates the physics rules and methodologies for plasma performance projections, which provide the basis for the design of a tokamak burning plasma device whose goal is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. This Chapter summarizes the physics basis for burning plasma projections, which is developed in detail by the ITER Physics Expert Groups in subsequent chapters. To set context, the design guidelines and requirements established in the report of ITER Special Working Group 1 are presented, as are the specifics of the tokamak design developed in the Final Design Report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities, which exemplifies burning tokamak plasma experiments. The behaviour of a tokamak plasma is determined by the interaction of many diverse physics processes, all of which bear on projections for both a burning plasma experiment and an eventual tokamak reactor. Key processes summarized here are energy and particle confinement and the H-mode power threshold; MHD stability, including pressure and density limits, neoclassical islands, error fields, disruptions, sawteeth, and ELMs; power and particle exhaust, involving divertor power dispersal, helium exhaust, fuelling and density control, H-mode edge transition region, erosion of plasma facing components, tritium retention; energetic particle physics; auxiliary power physics; and the physics of plasma diagnostics. Summaries of projection methodologies, together with estimates of their attendant uncertainties, are presented in each of these areas. Since each physics element has its own scaling properties, an integrated experimental demonstration of the balance between the combined processes which obtains in a reactor plasma is inaccessible to contemporary experimental facilities: it requires a reactor scale device. It is argued, moreover, that a burning plasma experiment can be sufficiently flexible to permit

  7. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  8. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50's structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG's charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure

  9. Effect of the gamma irradiation on the bio-sorption of Cr (Vi) by orange peel;Efecto de la irradiacion gamma en la biosorcion de Cr(VI) por cascara de naranja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo L, V.; Barrera D, C. E.; Sanchez M, V. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Urena N, F., E-mail: violelugol@yahoo.e [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The orange peel (Citrus sp.) is a bioadsorbent that contains functional groups able to remove Cr (Vi). To study the effect of gamma irradiation in the sorption capacity, the Nn materials were irradiated with gamma rays using a Co{sup 60} source to dose from 10 to 3500 KGy (Nlgamma). The biomass irradiation with gamma rays was successful since it increased the hexavalent chromium removal obtaining a maximum removal percentage of 100%. Sorption isotherms were realized to determine the concentration effect of initial Cr (Vi), the ph effect of the solution and the relationship m/v. (Author)

  10. Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesch, Benjamin; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the second iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi), a set theoretical visual analytics dashboard of big social data. In order to further demonstrate its usefulness in large-scale visual analytics tasks of individual and collective behavior of actors in social networks......, the current iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) in version II builds on recent advancements in visualizing set intersections. The development of the SoSeVi dashboard involved cutting-edge open source visual analytics libraries (D3.js) and creation of new visualizations such as of actor mobility...

  11. Research reactor utilization. Summary reports of three study group meetings: Irradiation techniques at research reactors, held in Istanbul 15-19 November 1965; Research reactor operation and maintenance problems, held in Caracas 6-10 December 1965; and Research reactor utilization in the Far East, held in Lucas Heights 28 February - 4 March 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The three sections of this book, which are summary reports of three Study Group meetings of the IAEA: Irradiation techniques at research reactors, Istanbul, 15-19 November 1965; Research reactor operation and maintenance problems, Caracas, 6-10 December 1965; and Research reactor utilization in the Far East, Lucas Heights, Australia, 28 February - 4 March 1966. These meetings were the latest in a series designed to promote efficient utilization of research reactors, to disseminate information on advances in techniques, to discuss common problems in reactor operations, and to outline some advanced areas of reactor-based research. (author)

  12. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers; Bilan 2007 des changements climatiques: l'attenuation des changements climatiques. Contribution du Groupe de travail 3 au quatrieme rapport d'evaluation du Groupe d'Experts Intergouvernemental sur l'Evolution du Climat (GIEC). Resume a l'attention des decideurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, T.; Bashmakov, I.; Bernstein, L.; Bogner, J.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Davidson, O.; Fisher, B.; Grubb, M.; Gupta, S.; Halsnaes, K.; Heij, B.; Kahn Ribeiro, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Levine, M.; Martino, D.; Masera Cerutti, O.; Metz, B.; Meyer, L.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Najam, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Holger Rogner, H.; Roy, J.; Sathaye, J.; Schock, R.; Shukla, P.; Sims, R.; Smith, P.; Swart, R.; Tirpak, D.; Urge-Vorsatz, D.; Dadi, Z

    2007-07-01

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO{sub 2} Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  13. Microwave assisted preparation of n-butylacrylate grafted chitosan and its application for Cr(VI) adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhana Krishna Kumar, A; Uday Kumar, Chinta; Rajesh, Vidya; Rajesh, N

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers such as chitosan possess excellent properties suited for varied applications. In this work, we describe a novel microwave assisted method for the preparation of n-butylacrylate grafted chitosan adsorbent and its utility for the adsorption of chromium(VI). A 3 min irradiation time was enough to prepare the adsorbent, and techniques such as FT-IR, powder XRD, SEM and EDS were used for comprehensive characterization. The adsorption was effective at pH 3.5 with 25 mL of 20 ppm Cr(VI) solution. Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin, Elovich and Redlich isotherms were studied in detail. The ΔG, ΔH and ΔS parameters were evaluated to understand the adsorption thermodynamics. The adsorption involves the interaction of Cr(VI) with the hydroxyl and amino groups in chitosan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Symposium summary and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1975-11-01

    The summary of the symposium on high energy physics experiments includes phenomena at low energies, the foundations of physics (considered to be mainly gravitation and quantum electrodynamics), standards of reference used for interpretation of experimental data, the new physics, particle proliferation, theoretical development, and a prognosis for the future

  15. Summary of cosmology workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Summary of cosmology workshop consistent with data. Concordant results are also obtained from the formation of large-scale structures in the universe by combining the exquisite measurements of the angular spectrum of CMB anisotropy with recent measurements of the power spectrum of density perturbation from large ...

  16. Summary of discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document provides summaries of the discussions occurred during the second international workshop on the indemnification of nuclear damage. It concerns the second accident scenario: a fire on board of a ship transporting enriched uranium hexafluoride along the Danube River. (A.L.B.)

  17. Summary of Session III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This is a summary of the talks presented in Session III ''Simulations of Electron-Cloud Build Up'' of the Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Simulations for Proton and Positron Beams ECLOUD-02, held at CERN, 15-18 April 2002

  18. Crisis Management Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Zhe, Elizabeth; Torem, Chris; Comeaux, Natashia; Dempsey, Allison

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a summary of recent crisis management publications. The first research report summarized, "Predictors of PTSD," was a study of predictor variables for responses to the World Trade Center attack. The second paper, "Effective Mental Health Response to Catastrophic Events," looked at effective responses following Hurricane…

  19. ICPAQGP 2001: Conference summary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 965–982. ICPAQGP 2001: Conference summary. REINHARD STOCK. University of Frankfurt, August-Euler-Str. 6, D-60486 Frankfurt, Germany ... New data from RHIC and direct photon production results from CERN .... in coupled modes featuring effective masses, our quarks are not really current quarks, the.

  20. Summary of Trends

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Summary of Trends. Optical Ethernet: Direct Ethernet connectivity to businesses through optical fiber. Automation of network infrastructure: Cross-connects for interconnections; Intelligence through software for OA&M. New “data-centric” protection mechanisms ...

  1. Geothermal energy. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Brief descriptions of geothermal projects funded through the Department of Energy during FY 1978 are presented. Each summary gives the project title, contractor name, contract number, funding level, dates, location, and name of the principal investigator, together with project highlights, which provide informaion such as objectives, strategies, and a brief project description. (MHR)

  2. Crisis Management: Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.; Dorman, Sally; Anderson, Luke; McNair, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three studies relevant to school crisis response. The first report, "A Framework for International Crisis Intervention" (Sally Dorman), is a review of how existing crisis intervention models (including the NASP PREPaRE model) have been adapted for international use. The second article, "Responding…

  3. summary writing skills development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we outline how translanguaging as a teaching and learning approach promises to develop literacy in both the students' African languages and English. The paper describes a summary skills development teaching approach and its accompanying activities which enable the students to move between isiZulu ...

  4. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Monterey FAA, Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-24

    page for each math . All years are also combined for this suay. E-2 -L CLi’ M 9 TOLC,.oY A’.C- -" SE-ViC"/rPSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY;.: .. -. o, SE _V ICL...8 5S J ~ I .?__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .- .- 23 /1 6-i773 _C_____? I, __manN.__Nes__ atp’ef/o P~~~m 6391 1 ,j CZ 4’L CLIl -*TOLC Y LRANJCP ,. CTE PSYCHROMETRIC

  5. Isolation and characterization of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M.; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2013-06-01

    The nature and extent of covalency in uranium bonding is still unclear compared with that of transition metals, and there is great interest in studying uranium-ligand multiple bonds. Although U=O and U=NR double bonds (where R is an alkyl group) are well-known analogues to transition-metal oxo and imido complexes, the uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond has long remained a synthetic target in actinide chemistry. Here, we report the preparation of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond. We highlight the importance of (1) ancillary ligand design, (2) employing mild redox reactions instead of harsh photochemical methods that decompose transiently formed uranium(VI) nitrides, (3) an electrostatically stabilizing sodium ion during nitride installation, (4) selecting the right sodium sequestering reagent, (5) inner versus outer sphere oxidation and (6) stability with respect to the uranium oxidation state. Computational analyses suggest covalent contributions to U≡N triple bonds that are surprisingly comparable to those of their group 6 transition-metal nitride counterparts.

  6. Synthesis and structures of molybdenum(V) and uranium(VI) complexes with piperidinium pentamethylenedithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.K.; Srivastava, M.N.; Nigam, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    Mixed piperidine-pentamethylenedithiocarbamate (pippmdtc) complexes of Mo(V) and U(VI) have been synthesized and characterized. With molybdenum two different complexes [MoO(OH) 2 (pmdtc)(pip)] (dark green) and [Mo 2 O 3 (OH) 3 (pmdtc) (H 2 O) 2 (pip)] (light green) are obtained. Molybdenum(V) complexes are six-coordinate octahedral, whilst the uranium(VI) complex is possibly eight coordinate as revealed by magnetic moment and IR and electronic spectral data. Coordination occurs through the two thiocarbamate sulphur atoms and nitrogen of the piperidine base via displacement of proton of the piperidinium group. The dimeric nature of the light green Mo(V) complex is supported by its electronic spectrum, subnormal magnetic moment (0.94 B.M.) and IR data. (author)

  7. Sorption of chromium(VI) and chromium(III) on aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that influence the sorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) on aluminium hydroxide were investigated. The sorption of chromates decreases as the pH of the suspension increases. The mechanism of CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption was interpreted in terms of reactions between chromates and -OH and/or Hsub(2)O groups at the hydroxide/liquid interface. It was shown that chromates are more tightly sorbed on aluminium hydroxide compared to other anions, e.g. chlorides. On the other hand, specifically absorbed anions, such as molybdates, compete strongly with chromates for the sorption sites. The sorption of chromium(III) increases with the pH of the suspension. Also, the sorption of chromium(III) is suppressed in the presence of citrate ions. The best conditions for the fixation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by aluminium hydroxide are presented. (author)

  8. Structural effect of N,N-dialkylamide in toluene on the extraction of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Guo-Xin; Han, Jing-Tian; Bao, Bo-Rong; Sun, Si-Xiu

    1998-01-01

    N,N-dialkylamides having ethyl (DEDOA), butyl (DBDOA) and octyl (DODOA) groups as the alkyl substituents were synthesized in order to investigate their selectivity and capability in the extraction from acidic nitrate media in nuclear reprocessing. The extraction distribution coefficients of U(VI) with the amides in toluene decrease in the order of DODOA > DBDOA > DEDOA. The structure of the extracted species was suggested from the dependence of the distribution ratio on the concentration of the extractant, with the aid of FT-IR spectra. The structural effect on the extraction capability of U(VI) was discussed in terms of the molecular modelling. The effects of temperature on the distribution ratios were also considered, and the extraction reaction enthalpy was calculated. (author)

  9. Group analysis of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Ovsiannikov, L V

    1982-01-01

    Group Analysis of Differential Equations provides a systematic exposition of the theory of Lie groups and Lie algebras and its application to creating algorithms for solving the problems of the group analysis of differential equations.This text is organized into eight chapters. Chapters I to III describe the one-parameter group with its tangential field of vectors. The nonstandard treatment of the Banach Lie groups is reviewed in Chapter IV, including a discussion of the complete theory of Lie group transformations. Chapters V and VI cover the construction of partial solution classes for the g

  10. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included.

  11. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included

  12. 2-(2'-pyridyl) benzimidazole complexes of dioxouranium (VI) and thorium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, K.C.; Mohanta, H.

    1978-01-01

    The bidentate ligand, 2-(2'-pyridyl) benzimidazole (PBH), forms a variety of complexes with dioxouranium(VI) and thorium(IV) of the type, U0 2 (PBH)sub(n)X 2 (n = l, X Cl, I, NO 3 , O.5SO 4 : n = 2, X = NCS), UO 2 (PBH) 3 (ClO 4 ) 2 , Th(PBH) 2 X 4 = Cl, NCS, NO 3 ) and Th(PBH) 4 (ClO 4 ) 4 . Microanalysis, electric conductivity in various non-aqueous media, electronic and IR (down to 200 cm -1 ) spectra, mass spectra and the TGA, DTA measurements on the complexes are reported. (author)

  13. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program

  14. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  15. Fusion plasma theory project summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at U.S. government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the U.S. Fusion Energy Program.

  16. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, El-Maraghy B.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO 4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  17. Vi tar pulsen på trærne

    OpenAIRE

    Børja, Isabella; Clarke, Nicholas; Dreslerová, J; Eldhuset, Toril Drabløs; Gebauer, Roman; Gryc, V; Krokene, Paal; Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Urban, J; Volařík, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Tørkestress hos gran ser ut til å bli et stadig større problem i mange europeiske land. På Skog og landskap har vi et EØS-samarbeidsprosjekt med tsjekkiske forskere fra Mendel-universitetet i Brno hvor vi i detalj undersøker hva som skjer i tørkestressede grantrær. Målet er å kartlegge vannførende mekanismer hos trær som er tørkestresset. Vi arbeider med 20 år gamle kloner av gran og simulerer tørke ved å bygge et tak under trekronene. Her bruker vi avansert instrumentering for å følge med på...

  18. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  19. Approaches to surface complexation modeling of Uranium(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.A.; Meece, D.E.; Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    surface functional groups available for adsorption in the surface coatings; 2) the electric field at the mineral-water interface; and 3) surface reactions of major ions in the aqueous phase, such as Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, SO42-, H4SiO4, and organic acids. In contrast, a semi-empirical surface complexation modeling approach can be used to describe the U(VI) experimental data more precisely as a function of aqueous chemical conditions. This approach is useful as a tool to describe the variation in U(VI) retardation as a function of chemical conditions in field-scale reactive transport simulations, and the approach can be used at other field sites. However, the semi-empirical approach is limited by the site-specific nature of the model parameters. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell

  1. Melanin-embedded materials effectively remove hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, An Manh; Le Na, Nguyen Thi; Thang, Pham Nhat; Diep, Trinh Ngoc; Thuy, Ly Bich; Thanh, Nguyen Lai; Thang, Nguyen Dinh

    2018-02-23

    Currently, it is recognized that water polluted with toxic heavy metal ions may cause serious effects on human health. Therefore, the development of new materials for effective removal of heavy metal ions from water is still a widely important area. Melanin is being considered as a potential material for removal of heavy metal from water. In this study, we synthesized two melanin-embedded beads from two different melanin powder sources and named IMB (Isolated Melanin Bead originated from squid ink sac) and CMB (Commercial Melanin Bead originated from sesame seeds). These beads were of globular shape and 2-3 mm in diameter. We investigated and compared the sorption abilities of these two bead materials toward hexavalent-chromium (Cr VI ) in water. The isotherm sorption curves were established using Langmuir and Freundlich models in the optimized conditions of pH, sorption time, solid/liquid ratio, and initial concentration of Cr VI . The FITR analysis was also carried out to show the differences in surface properties of these two beads. The optimized conditions for isotherm sorption of Cr VI on IMB/CMB were set at pH values of 2/2, sorption times of 90/300 min, and solid-liquid ratios of 10/20 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacities calculated based on the Langmuir model were 19.60 and 6.24 for IMB and CMB, respectively. However, the adsorption kinetic of Cr VI on the beads fitted the Freundlich model with R 2 values of 0.992 for IMB and 0.989 for CMB. The deduced Freundlich constant, 1/n, in the range of 0.2-0.8 indicated that these beads are good adsorption materials. In addition, structure analysis data revealed great differences in physical and chemical properties between IMB and CMB. Interestingly, FTIR analysis results showed strong signals of -OH (3295.35 cm - 1 ) and -C=O (1608.63 cm - 1 ) groups harboring on the IMB but not CMB. Moreover, loading of Cr VI on the IMB caused a shift of broad peaks from 3295.35 cm - 1 and 1608.63 cm - 1 to 3354

  2. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-01-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10 6 cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO 3 - ] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with

  3. Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI With a Novel Mutation in PYGL Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadisan, Barath; Ranganath, Prajnya

    2017-09-15

    Glycogen storage disease type VI (GSD-VI) presents with failure to thrive and also fibrosis in some cases, without cirrhosis. 2½-year-old girl presented with short stature, transaminase elevation and significant fibrosis, suggesting GSD-III. A pathogenic mutation in PYGL gene suggested GSD-VI. GSD-VI should be a differential diagnosis whenever GSD-III is suspected.

  4. Recovery of uranium (VI) from low level aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshrestha, Mukul

    1996-01-01

    Investigation was undertaken to evaluate the uranium (VI) removal and recovery potential of a naturally occurring, nonviable macrofungus, Ganoderma Lucidum from the simulated low level aqueous nuclear waste. These low level waste waters discharged from nuclear mine tailings and nuclear power reactors have a typical U(VI) concentration of 10-100 mg/L. It is possible to recover this uranium economically with the advent of biosorption as a viable technology. Extensive laboratory studies have revealed Ganoderma Lucidum to be a potential biosorbent with a specific uptake of 2.75 mg/g at an equilibrium U(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L at pH 4.5. To recover the sorbed U(VI), the studies indicated 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 to be an effective elutant. The kinetics of U(VI) desorption from loaded Ganoderma Lucidum with 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 as elutant, was found to be rapid with more than 75% recovery occurring in the first five minutes, the specific metal release rate being 0.102 mg/g/min. The equilibrium data fitted to a linearised Freundlich plot and exhibited a near 100% recovery of sorbed U(VI), clearly revealing a cost-effective method of recovery of precious uranium from low level wastewater. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  5. Lack of Collagen VI Promotes Wound-Induced Hair Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peiwen; Cescon, Matilde; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Collagen VI is an extracellular matrix molecule that is abundantly expressed in the skin. However, the role of collagen VI in hair follicle growth is unknown. Here, we show that collagen VI is strongly deposited in hair follicles, and is markedly upregulated by skin wounding. Lack of collagen VI in Col6a1(-/-) mice delays hair cycling and growth under physiological conditions, but promotes wound-induced hair regrowth without affecting skin regeneration. Conversely, addition of purified collagen VI rescues the abnormal wound-induced hair regrowth in Col6a1(-/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that the increased wound-induced hair regrowth of Col6a1(-/-) mice is triggered by activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and is abolished by inhibition of this pathway. These findings highlight the essential relationships between extracellular matrix (ECM) and hair follicle regeneration, and suggest that collagen VI could be a potential therapeutic target for hair loss and other skin-related diseases.

  6. Vi-da: vitiligo diagnostic assistance mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, G. A.; Nurhudatiana, A.; Bahana, R.

    2018-03-01

    Vitiligo is a skin disorder in which white patches of depigmentation appear on different parts of the body. Usually, patients come to hospitals or clinics to have their vitiligo conditions assessed. This can be very tiring to the patients, as vitiligo treatments usually take a relatively long period of time, which can range from months to years. To address this challenge, we present in this paper a prototype of an Android-based mobile application called Vi-DA, which stands for Vitiligo Diagnostic Assistance. Vi-DA consists of three subsystems, which are user sign-up subsystem, camera and image analysis subsystem, and progress report subsystem. The mobile application was developed in Java programming language and uses MySQL as the database system. Vi-DA adopts a vitiligo segmentation algorithm to segment input image into normal skin area, vitiligo skin area, and non-skin area. Results showed that Vi-DA gave comparable results to the previous system implemented in Matlab. User acceptance testing results also showed that all respondents agreed on the usefulness of the system and agreed to use Vi-DA again in the future. Vi-DA benefits both dermatologists and patients as not only a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool but also as a smart application that can be used for self-assessment at home.

  7. Summary of presentations and discussions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    In December 2007, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence discussed its theme entitled 'Link between research, development and demonstration (RD and D) and stakeholder confidence'. It was remarked that regulators need a technical demonstration to aid in evaluating the safety case. Local stakeholders appreciate the opportunity to visualise technological arrangements. In both cases, demonstration adds to confidence in the feasibility of solutions. Some believe there is an important role for analogues in communication with stakeholders, if handled with integrity. To explore and benchmark current practices, it was decided to hold a topical session at the 9. regular meeting of the FSC on 4 June 2008 regarding the use of analogues for confidence building. The session opened with an introductory presentation by the session rapporteur. This incorporated input provided for the purpose by FSC members in cooperation with their country's representative to the NEA RWMC 'Integration Group on the Safety Case'. Three speakers then presented the various uses of analogues by implementers, regulators and scientists to build their own confidence; a fourth speaker dealt with the experience of using natural analogues in public information. The presentations addressed the use of analogues in the field of geological disposal of high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate level (ILW-LL) radioactive waste. Then the FSC participants split into two working groups for discussion. The outcome of these discussions was reported in plenary on 6 June 2008 and it was agreed to publish proceedings of the session. The present summary, prepared by the session rapporteur with input from the NEA Secretariat, captures the main points heard in the course of the event. It combines data from the formal presentations and remarks made in discussion. The latter represent viewpoints expressed by a group whose primary focus is not natural analogues but rather stakeholder interests. The

  8. Vi har intet lært - hvornår lærer vi det?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2016-01-01

    WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en kerneakti......WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en...

  9. Mineral commodity summaries 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2015 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2014 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses.

  10. Summary and closing remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    A summary of the topics covered in papers presented at the 1995 Brookhaven joint conference on production, neutralization, and application of negative ion beams is given. The conference topics covered included plasma ion sources, plasma seeding of these sources for increased ion production, beam extraction and transport, computer simulation and design studies, and operation of existing and experimental ion source facilities. Application of the sources to accelerator, tokamak, and thin film deposition are discussed. (AIP) copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Blois V: Experimental summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation

  12. Blois V: Experimental summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrow, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    The author gives a summary talk of the best experimental data given at the Vth Blois Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering. He addresses the following eight areas in his talk: total and elastic cross sections; single diffractive excitation; electron-proton scattering; di-jets and rapidity gaps; areas of future study; spins and asymmetries; high-transverse momentum and masses at the Tevatron; and disoriented chiral condensates and cosmic radiation.

  13. Defective collagen VI ?6 chain expression in the skeletal muscle of patients with collagen VI-related myopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Tagliavini, F.; Pellegrini, C.; Sardone, F.; Squarzoni, S.; Paulsson, M.; Wagener, R.; Gualandi, F.; Trabanelli, C.; Ferlini, A.; Merlini, L.; Santi, S.; Maraldi, N.M.; Faldini, C.; Sabatelli, P.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen VI is a non-fibrillar collagen present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex polymer; the mainly expressed form is composed of ?1, ?2 and ?3 chains; mutations in genes encoding these chains cause myopathies known as Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), Bethlem myopathy (BM) and myosclerosis myopathy (MM). The collagen VI ?6 chain is a recently identified component of the ECM of the human skeletal muscle. Here we report that the ?6 chain was dramatically reduced in s...

  14. ULSGEN (Uplink Summary Generator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-F.; Schrock, M.; Reeve, T.; Nguyen, K.; Smith, B.

    2014-01-01

    Uplink is an important part of spacecraft operations. Ensuring the accuracy of uplink content is essential to mission success. Before commands are radiated to the spacecraft, the command and sequence must be reviewed and verified by various teams. In most cases, this process requires collecting the command data, reviewing the data during a command conference meeting, and providing physical signatures by designated members of various teams to signify approval of the data. If commands or sequences are disapproved for some reason, the whole process must be restarted. Recording data and decision history is important for traceability reasons. Given that many steps and people are involved in this process, an easily accessible software tool for managing the process is vital to reducing human error which could result in uplinking incorrect data to the spacecraft. An uplink summary generator called ULSGEN was developed to assist this uplink content approval process. ULSGEN generates a web-based summary of uplink file content and provides an online review process. Spacecraft operations personnel view this summary as a final check before actual radiation of the uplink data. .

  15. Advanced fusion concepts project summaries, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This report summarizes all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Applied Plasma Physics Division of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. Each project summary was written by the respective principal investigator using the format: title, principal investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. This report is organized into three sections: Section one contains five summaries describing work in the reversed-field pinch program being performed by a diversified group of contractors, these include a national laboratory, a private company, and several universities. Section two contains eight summaries of work from the compact toroid area which encompasses field-reversed configurations, spheromaks, and heating and formation experiments. Section three contains summaries from two other programs, a density Z-pinch experiment and high-beta Q machine experiment. The intent of this collection of project summaries is to help the contractors of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch understand their relationship with the rest of the branch's activities. It is also meant to provide background to those outside the program by showing the range of activities of interest of the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch

  16. Voltammetric study of chromium(VI)-ammonia/ammonium chloride solutions in the presence of dimethylglyoxime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, V.G.; Salikhdzhanova, R.M.F.

    1987-10-10

    The authors believed complexation to be possible in the system Cr(VI)-dimethylglyoxime (DMG, H/sub 2/D) by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) on a mercury electrode. The DMG can be used in chromium voltammetry and is promising for a number of reasons: The Cr(III) has an affinity for donor nitrogen atoms in the DMG molecule. Insertion of the H/sub 2/D into the inner sphere of the complex is expected to weaken the bond between the Cr(III) and the hydroxyl group, slow down formation of the insoluble hydroxide Cr(OH)/sub 3/, and lower the rate of the electrode reaction Cr(III) ..-->.. Cr(II). Molecules of H/sub 2/D adsorb on a mercury electrode. It is therefore possible to accelerate the electrode process by including adsorptive preconcentration of the chromium and thus lowering its detection limit. This paper reports the voltammetric behavior of the system Cr(VI)-DMG-NH/sub 4//sup +/ (proton donor) for the purpose of lowering the chromium detection limit.

  17. Organophosphinic, phosphonic acids and their binary mixtures as extractants for molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) from aqueous HCl media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, P.; Mishra, S.; Mohanty, I.; Chakravortty, V.

    1994-01-01

    Extraction studies of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) with organophosphoric, phosphinic acid and its thiosubstituted derivatives have been carried out from 0.1-1.0M HCl solutions. The extracted species are proposed to be UO 2 R 2 and MoO 2 CIR on the basis of slope analysis for uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI), respectively. The extraction efficiencies of PC-88A, Cyanex 272, Cyanex 301 and Cyanex 302 in the extraction of molybdenum(VI) and uranium(VI) are compared. Synergistic effects have been studied with binary mixtures of extractants. Separation of molybdenum(VI) from uranium(VI) is feasible by Cyanex 301 from 1M HCl, the separation factor logβ being 2.3. (author) 20 refs.; 5 figs.; 14 tabs

  18. Single-molecule studies of unconventional motor protein myosin VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HyeongJun

    Myosin VI is one of the myosin superfamily members that are actin-based molecular motors. It has received special attention due to its distinct features as compared to other myosins, such as its opposite directionality and a much larger step size than expected given the length of its "leg". This dissertation presents the author.s graduate work of several single-molecule studies on myosin VI. Special attention was paid to some of myosin VI.s tail domains that consist of proximal tail (PT), medial tail (MT), distal tail (DT) domains and cargo-binding domain (CBD). The functional form of myosin VI in cells is still under debate. Although full length myosin VI proteins in cytosolic extracts of cells were monomers from earlier studies, there are several reasons why it is now believed that myosin VI could exist as a dimer. If this is true and dimerization occurs, the next logical question would be which parts of myosin VI are dimerization regions? One model claimed that the CBD is the sole dimerization region. A competing model claimed that there must be another region that could be involved in dimerization, based on their observation that a construct without the CBD could still dimerize. Our single-molecule experiment with progressively truncated myosin VI constructs showed that the MT domain is a dimerization region, supporting the latter model. Additional single-molecule experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation done with our collaborators suggest that electrostatic salt bridges formed between positive and negative amino acid residues are mainly responsible for the MT domain dimerization. After resolving this, we are left with another important question which is how myosin VI can take such a large step. Recent crystal structure showed that one of the tail domains preceding the MT domain, called the PT domain, is a three-helix bundle. The most easily conceivable way might be an unfolding of the three-helix bundle upon dimerization, allowing the protein to

  19. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Huang, Liping, E-mail: lipinghuang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pan, Yuzhen [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Quan, Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li Puma, Gianluca, E-mail: g.lipuma@lboro.ac.uk [Environmental Nanocatalysis & Photoreaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup −}) and dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2−}) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  20. AAPS and US FDA Crystal City VI workshop on bioanalytical method validation for biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Steve; Ackermann, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Crystal City VI Workshop on Bioanalytical Method Validation of Biomarkers, Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel, Baltimore, MD, USA, 28-29 September 2015 The Crystal City VI workshop was organized by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in association with the US FDA to continue discussion on the bioanalysis of biomarkers. An outcome of the Crystal City V workshop, convened following release of the draft FDA Guidance for Industry on Bioanalytical Methods Validation in 2013 was the need to have further discussion on biomarker methods. Biomarkers ultimately became the sole focal point for Crystal City VI, a meeting attended by approximately 200 people and composed of industry scientists and regulators from around the world. The meeting format included several panel discussions to maximize the opportunity for dialogue among participants. Following an initial session on the general topic of biomarker assays and intended use, more focused sessions were held on chromatographic (LC-MS) and ligand-binding assays. In addition to participation by the drug development community, significant representation was present from clinical testing laboratories. The experience of this latter group, collectively identified as practitioners of CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments), helped shape the discussion and takeaways from the meeting. While the need to operate within the framework of the current BMV guidance was clearly acknowledged, a general understanding that biomarker methods validation cannot be adequately depicted by current PK-centric guidelines emerged as a consensus from the meeting. This report is not intended to constitute the official proceedings from Crystal City VI, which is expected to be published in early 2016.

  1. Skidding accidents : considerations on road surface and vehicle characteristics : summary of the present situation. Provisional recommendation concerning skidding resistance of road surfaces investigation programme. Interim report of the SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents"

    1970-01-01

    This is the first report of SWOV Working Group "Tyres, road surfaces and skidding accidents". Skidding is considered to be an important contributory factor in traffic accidents. Skidding can in principle be prevented in two ways, viz: (1) reduction of the minimum necessary friction, and (2)

  2. Molecular evolution of type VI intermediate filament proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Michel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tanabin, transitin and nestin are type VI intermediate filament (IF proteins that are developmentally regulated in frogs, birds and mammals, respectively. Tanabin is expressed in the growth cones of embryonic vertebrate neurons, whereas transitin and nestin are found in myogenic and neurogenic cells. Another type VI IF protein, synemin, is expressed in undifferentiated and mature muscle cells of birds and mammals. In addition to an IF-typical α-helical core domain, type VI IF proteins are characterized by a long C-terminal tail often containing distinct repeated motifs. The molecular evolution of type VI IF proteins remains poorly studied. Results To examine the evolutionary history of type VI IF proteins, sequence comparisons, BLAST searches, synteny studies and phylogenic analyses were performed. This study provides new evidence that tanabin, transitin and nestin are indeed orthologous type VI IF proteins. It demonstrates that tanabin, transitin and nestin genes share intron positions and sequence identities, have a similar chromosomal context and display closely related positions in phylogenic analyses. Despite this homology, fast evolution rates of their C-terminal extremity have caused the appearance of repeated motifs with distinct biological activities. In particular, our in silico and in vitro analyses of their tail domain have shown that (avian transitin, but not (mammalian nestin, contains a repeat domain displaying nucleotide hydrolysis activity. Conclusion These analyses of the evolutionary history of the IF proteins fit with a model in which type VI IFs form a branch distinct from NF proteins and are composed of two major proteins: synemin and nestin orthologs. Rapid evolution of the C-terminal extremity of nestin orthologs could be responsible for their divergent functions.

  3. Theoretical investigation of the II-VI and IV-VI families of diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNorton, Rhett D.

    This dissertation examines the electronic structure and magnetic properties of II-VI and IV-VI dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Properties that are investigated include the exchange energy, magnetic moment, density of states, sources of the magnetic coupling, and the effect that crystal disorder has on the aforementioned parameters. The computational methods employed are the Vienna ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP), and the Layered Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (LKKR) method. These two methods are based upon density functional theory. VASP relies on the construction of a pseudopotential and a plane wave expansion to model the charge density and wavefunction. LKKR uses multiple scattering theory to find the Green's function and electronic structure. The coherent potential approximation (CPA) can be readily incorporated into the LKKR approach, resulting in a first principle technique that can study a substitutionally disordered random alloy. We have studied how the double-exchange, super-exchange, and inter-band exchange are effected by the crystal symmetry of the host, the electronic structure of the transition metal, and geometry of the impurities d-shell. We observed in a few materials that a competition between exchange mechanism is possible. When the sign of the interactions are the same, the result is an unambiguous magnetic ground state. However, when the sign of the competing exchange mechanisms are opposite, the material is expected to have a weaker, often oscillating, magnetic coupling, as a result of magnetic frustration and sensitivity to transition metal spacing and orientation. We have also examined how the chemical interactions may be coupled to the magnetic interactions. This becomes important at high impurity concentrations when the transition metal impurity cannot participate effectively in crystal bonding. In these cases, the transition metal d-orbitals that reside in the gap, and are involved in the exchange, are forced to initiate bonding with

  4. Ground- and excited-state stability of the conformers of 3,5-dinitrocatechol and its complexes with W(VI) and V(V): combined theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delchev, V B; Gavazov, K B; Shterev, I G

    2014-12-01

    We performed a theoretical and experimental study of the (photo)stability of 3,5-dinitrocatechol (DNC) and its complexes with W(VI) and V(V). The investigation showed that irradiation of DNC is accompanied by a parallel proton migration from the hydroxy group to the neighboring NO2 group, which results in a large Stokes shift of the absorption and emission bands. It was found that W(VI) forms a more stable 1:2 complex than V(V). The complex is stable even under UV irradiation. The most stable W(VI)(DNC)2 conformer is comprised of two mutually perpendicular DNC molecules as ligands.

  5. IAEA advisory group meeting on technical aspects of atomic and molecular data processing and exchange (16. meeting of the A+M Data Centres and ALADDIN network). Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    2001-12-01

    The proceedings of the IAEA Advisory group meeting on technical aspects of atomic and molecular data processing and exchange (16. meeting of A+M Data centers and ALADDIN Network), held on September 10-11, 2001 in Vienna, Austria are briefly described. The meeting conclusions and recommendations on the priorities in A+M data compilation and evaluation, and on the technical aspects of data processing, exchange and distribution are also presented. (author)

  6. IAEA advisory group meeting on technical aspects of atomic and molecular data processing and exchange (15. meeting of the A+M data centres and ALADDIN network). Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    1999-12-01

    The proceedings of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on 'Technical Aspects of Atomic and Molecular Data Processing and Exchange' (15th Meeting of A+M Data Centres and ALADDIN Network), held on September 13-14, 1999 in Vienna, Austria are briefly described. The meeting conclusions and recommendations on the priorities in A+M data compilation and evaluation, and on the technical aspects of data processing, exchange, and distribution are also presented. (author)

  7. IAEA advisory group meeting on 'Technical Aspects of Atomic and Molecular Data Processing and Exchange' (14th meeting of the A + M data centres and ALADDIN network). Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, A.

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Technical Aspects of Atomic and Molecular Data Processing and Exchange (14th Meeting of A + M Data Centres and ALADDIN Network)'', held on July 21-22, 1997 in Vienna, Austria are briefly described. The meeting conclusions and recommendations on the priorities in A + M data compilation and evaluation, and on the technical aspects of data processing and exchange are also presented. The document includes 15 reports from various Data Centres

  8. 2010 Chemical Working Group Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Concha M.

    2010-01-01

    The Steering Group for the Interagency Advanced Power Group (IAPG) held their business meeting on November 30-December 1st in McLean, Virginia. Status reports were presented from each of the IAPG's Working Groups. These charts contain a brief summary of the IAPG Chemical Working Group's activities during 2010 and its plans for 2011.

  9. Improved performance of a biomaterial-based cation exchanger for the adsorption of uranium(VI) from water and nuclear industry wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anirudhan, T.S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum 695 581, Kerala (India)], E-mail: tsani@rediffmail.com; Radhakrishnan, P.G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum 695 581, Kerala (India)

    2009-03-15

    The amine-modified polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (poly(HEMA))-grafted biomaterial (tamarind fruit shell, TFS) carrying carboxyl functional groups at the chain end (PGTFS-COOH) was prepared and used as an adsorbent for the removal of uranium(VI) from water and nuclear industry wastewater. FTIR spectral analysis revealed that U(VI) ions and PGTFS-COOH formed a chelate complex. The adsorption process was relatively fast, requiring only 120 min to attain equilibrium. The adsorption kinetic data were best described by the pseudo-second-order equation. The equilibrium adsorption data were correlated with the Sips isotherm model. The maximum U(VI) ions uptake with PGTFS-COOH was estimated to be 100.79 mg/g. The complete removal of 10 mg/L U(VI) from simulated nuclear industry wastewater was achieved by 3.5 g/L PGTFS-COOH. The reusability of the adsorbent was demonstrated over 4 cycles using NaCl (1.0 M) + HCl (0.5 M) solution mixture to de-extract the U(VI). The results show that the PGTFS-COOH tested is very promising for the recovery of U(VI) from water and wastewater.

  10. Role of U(VI) adsorption in U(VI) Reduction by Geobacter species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovely, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    Previous work had suggested that Acholeplasma palmae has a higher capacity for uranium sorption than other bacteria studied. Sorption studies were performed with cells in suspension in various solutions containing uranium, and results were used to generate uranium-biosorption isotherms. Results from this study showed that the U(VI) sorption capacity of G. uraniireducens was relatively similar in simple solutions, such as sodium chloride or bicarbonate. However, this ability to sorb uranium significantly decreased in groundwater. This suggested that certain chemicals present in the groundwater were inhibiting the ability of cell components of Geobacter to adsorb uranium. It was hypothesized that uranium removal would also be diminished in the bicarbonate solution. However, this did not seem to be the case, as uranium was as easily removed in the bicarbonate solution as in the sodium chloride solution.

  11. Program summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The report provides summary information on all phases of nuclear regulation, and is intended as an information and decision-making tool for mid and upper level management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is divided functionally into ten sections: (1) nuclear power plants in the United States; (2) operating nuclear power plants; (3) reactors under construction; (4) operating license applications under NRC review; (5) construction permit applications and special projects under NRC review; (6) ACRS and ASLBP; (7) nuclear materials; (8) standards and regulations; (9) research projects; and (10) foreign reactors

  12. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Although EPA has the primary administrative role in implementing Title IV of the CAAA, the state public utility commissions and FERC are probably the most important agencies in determining the development and success of an allowance market. The policies and actions they adopt with regard to their jurisdictional utilities to implement the CAAA will profoundly influence the cost of compliance and the extent the market is used by utilities. Special summaries are provided on the topics of beneficial ownership of allowances, ratemaking treatment of allowances, managing uncertainty, and designing general regulatory guidelines. 1 ref

  13. [Adsorptive Stabilization of Soil Cr (VI) Using HDTMA Modified Montmorillonite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A series of organo-montomorillonites were prepared using Na-montomorillonite and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA). The organo-montomorillonites were then investigated for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. FT-IR, XRD, SEM and N2 -BET, CEC, Zeta potential measurement were conducted to understand the structural changes of montmorillonites as different amounts of HDTMAs were added as modifier. The characterization results indicated that the clay interlayer spacing distance increased from 1. 25 nm to 2. 13 nm, the clay surface roughness decreased, the clay surface area reduced from 38.91 m² · g⁻¹ to 0.42 m² · g⁻¹, the clay exchangeable cation amount reduced from 62 cmol · kg⁻¹ to 9.9 cmol · kg⁻¹ and the clay surface charge changed from -29.1 mV to 5.59 mV as the dosage of HDTMA in montmorillonite was increased. The TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) was used to evaluate the leachate toxicity of Cr(VI). The effects of the initial soil Cr(VI) concentration, montmorillonites dosage, reaction time and HDTMA modification amount were investigated, respectively. The results revealed that modification of montmorillonites would manifest an attenuated physical adsorptive effect and an enhanced electrostatic adsorptive effect on Cr(VI), suggesting electrostatic effect was the major force that resulted in improved Cr(VI) adsorption onto HDTMA modified montmorillonites.

  14. Above and beyond state-of-the-art approaches to investigate sequence data: summary of methods and results from the population-based association group at the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2016-02-03

    This paper summarizes the contributions from the Population-Based Association group at the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19. It provides an overview of the new statistical approaches tried out by group members in order to take best advantage of population-based sequence data.Although contributions were highly heterogeneous regarding the applied quality control criteria and the number of investigated variants, several technical issues were identified, leading to practical recommendations. Preliminary analyses revealed that Hurdle-negative binomial regression is a promising approach to investigate the distribution of allele counts instead of called genotypes from sequence data. Convergence problems, however, limited the use of this approach, creating a technical challenge shared by environment-stratified models used to investigate rare variant-environment interactions, as well as by rare variant haplotype analyses using well-established public software. Estimates of relatedness and population structure strongly depended on the allele frequency of selected variants for inference. Another practical recommendation was that dissenting probability values from standard and small-sample tests of a particular hypothesis may reflect a lack of validity of large-sample approximations. Novel statistical approaches that integrate evolutionary information showed some advantage to detect weak genetic signals, and Bayesian adjustment for confounding was able to efficiently estimate causal genetic effects. Haplotype association methods may constitute a valuable complement of collapsing approaches for sequence data. This paper reports on the experience of members of the Population-Based Association group with several novel, promising approaches to preprocessing and analyzing sequence data, and to following up identified association signals.

  15. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uygun, Murat; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Özçalışkan, Emir; Caka, Müşerref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO 3 solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m 2 /g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities

  16. Dependency Defence and Dependency Analysis Guidance. Volume 2: Appendix 3-8. How to analyse and protect against dependent failures. Summary report of the Nordic Working Group on Common Cause Failure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Hellstroem, Per; Makamo, Tuomas; Bento, Jean-Pierre; Knochenhauer, Michael; Poern, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    The safety systems in Nordic nuclear power plants are characterised by substantial redundancy and/or diversification in safety critical functions, as well as by physical separation of critical safety systems, including their support functions. Viewed together with the evident additional fact, that the single failure criterion has been systematically applied in the design of safety systems, this means that the plant risk profile as calculated in existing PSA:s is usually strongly dominated by failures caused by dependencies resulting in the loss of more than one system sub. The overall objective with the working group is to support safety by studying potential and real CCF events, process statistical data and report conclusions and recommendations that can improve the understanding of these events eventually resulting in increased safety. The result is intended for application in NPP operation, maintenance, inspection and risk assessments. The NAFCS project is part of the activities of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG), and is financed jointly by the Nordic utilities and authorities. The work is divided into one quantitative and one qualitative part with the following specific objectives: Qualitative objectives-The goal with the qualitative analysis is to compile experience data and generate insights in terms of relevant failure mechanisms and effective CCF protection measures. The results shall be presented as a guide with checklists and recommendations on how to identify current CCF protection standard and improvement possibilities regarding CCF defences decreasing the CCF vulnerability. Quantitative objectives-The goal with the quantitative analysis is to prepare a Nordic C-book where quantitative insights as Impact Vectors and CCF parameters for different redundancy levels are presented. Uncertainties in CCF data shall be reduced as much as possible. The high redundancy systems sensitivity to CCF events demand a well structured quantitative analysis in support of

  17. Intern Summary Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Topics covered include: Probe Station Antenna Range; LERCIP 2004 Summary; L.E.R.C.I.P. Internship Summary; Hubble Space Telescope Bi-Stem Thermal Shield Analyses; GRABER - the Duct Tape of Space and JIMO Heat Conducting Foam; CDF and PDF Comparison Between Humacao, Puerto Rico and Florida; Development of the On-board Aircraft Network; Development of the Planar Inlet Design and Analysis Process (PINDAP); An Overview of My 2004 Summer Internship [Non-destructive Evaluation]; My Summer Experience as an Administrative Officer Assistant [in the Safety and Assurance Directorate Office]; Programming an Experiment Control System; Reducing the Cation Exchange Capacity of Lithium Clay to Form Better Dispersed; Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites; Feasibility of EB Welded Hastelloy X and Combination of Refractory Metals; My Work in the NASA Glenn History Office and Records Management Office; Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio; [The Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center]; Drinking Water Database; Design of an EXB Probe; and Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen.

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2011 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2010 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011 contains new chapters on iron oxide pigments, wollastonite, and zeolites. The chapters on mica (natural), scrap and flake and mica (natural), sheet have been combined into a single chapter - mica (natural). Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. "Appendix C - Reserves and Resources" has been divided into "Part A - Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals" and "Part B - Sources of Reserves Data," including some information that was previously in this introduction. A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2011 are welcomed.

  19. Summary of main points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In conjunction with its 6. annual meeting, the WPDD in close co-operation with the FSC held a Topical session on 'Stakeholder Involvement in Decommissioning' on November 14, 2005. The session was attended by 36 participants totally representing 14 NEA member countries and 2 international organisations. Two keynote addresses were given at the Topical Session. The first one treated of what is needed for robust decisions and how to bring all stakeholders into the debate. In the second keynote address a summary was made on what have been said on stakeholder involvement in decommissioning during earlier meetings of the WPDD. The main part of the session was then devoted to views from different stakeholders regarding their role and their involvement. This part contained viewpoints from local communities (Kaevlinge in Sweden and Port Hope in Canada), authorities (Scottish Executive and CSNC) and operators (EDF from France and EWN from Germany). Case studies from the decommissioning of Dounrey in the UK and from Trojan and Main Yankee in the USA were presented in the end part of the Topical session followed by a summary and lessons learnt report by the Rapporteur. A detailed programme of the Topical session can be seen in Appendix 1

  20. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  1. Extraction kinetics of uranium (VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Chen, Dong-Hwang; Huang, Shius-Dong; Huang, Ching-Tsven; Shieh, Mu-Chang.

    1993-01-01

    The extraction kinetics of uranium(VI) from aqueous nitrate solution with polyether-based polyurethane foam was investigated in a batch reactor with automatic squeezing. The extraction curves of uranium(VI) concentration in solution vs. extraction time exhibited a rather rapid exponential decay within the first few minutes, followed by a slower exponential decay during the remaining period. This phenomenon can be attributed to the presence of two-phase structure, hard segment domains and soft segment matrix in the polyurethane foam. A two-stage rate model expressed by a superposition of two exponential curves was proposed, according to which the experimental data were fitted by an optimization method. The extraction rate of uranium (VI) was also found to increase with increasing temperature, nitrate concentration, and hydration of the cation of nitrate salt. (author)

  2. Reduction of Cr(VI) and survival in Cr-contaminated sites by Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Brodie, E. L.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Caulobacter spp. is known to be able to live in low-nutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal-contaminated sites. Recent studies have shown that Caulobacter crescentus can grow in chemically defined medium containing up to 1 mM uranium. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis and electron microscopic imaging of heavy metal stresses in Caulobacter crescentus also provided insight and evidence that the bacterium used an array of defensive mechanisms to deal with heavy metal stresses. In addition to up-regulated enzymes protecting against oxidative stress, DNA repair and down-regulated potential chromium transport, one of the major gene groups respond to chromium stress is "electron transport process and cytochrome oxidases", including cytochrome c oxidases, raising the possibility that the cells can employ the cytochromes to reduce chromium. Analysis of the microbial community at the chromium contaminated DOE site at Hanford, WA revealed the presence of Caulobacter spp. As an oligotroph, Caulobacter can play a significant role in chromium reduction in the environment where the nutrients are limited. This result was confirmed by both 16S rDNA based microarray (Phylochip) as well as by MDA-based clone library data. Based on these results we further investigated the capability of this organism to reduce Cr(VI) using the well known model strain Caulobacter crescentus CB15N. Preliminary cell suspension experiments were set up with glucose as the electron donor and Cr(VI) as the electron acceptor in phosphate based M2 salts buffer. After 22 hours almost 27% of Cr(VI) was reduced in the incubations containing active cells relative to the controls containing heat killed cells. Also, in another set of controls with no electron acceptor added, cells showed no increase in cell density during that time demonstrating that the reduction of Cr(VI) by cells of Caulobacter was due to biological activity. Future experiments will investigate the components

  3. Phosphate solubilization and chromium (VI) remediation potential of Klebsiella sp. strain CPSB4 isolated from the chromium contaminated agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin; Usmani, Zeba; Rani, Rupa; Chandra, Avantika

    2018-02-01

    In this study, an effort was made to identify an efficient phosphate solubilizing bacterial strain from chromium contaminated agricultural soils. Based on the formation of a solubilized halo around the colonies on Pikovskaya's agar amended with chromium (VI), 10 strains were initially screened out. Out of 10, strain CPSB4, which showed significantly high solubilization zone at different chromium concentrations, was selected for further study. The strain CPSB4 showed significant plant growth promotion traits with chromium (VI) stress under in-vitro conditions in broth. The plant growth promotion activities of the strain decreased regularly, but were not completely lost with the increase in concentration of chromium up to 200 mg L -1 . On subjected to FT-IR analysis, the presence of the functional group, indicating the organic acid aiding in phosphate solubilization was identified. At an optimal temperature of 30  ° C and pH 7.0, the strain showed around 93% chromium (VI) reduction under in-vitro conditions in broth study. In soil condition, the maximum chromium (VI) reduction obtained was 95% under in-vitro conditions. The strain CPSB4 was identified as Klebsiella sp. on the basis of morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This study shows that the diverse role of the bacterial strain CPSB4 would be useful in the chromium contaminated soil as a good bioremediation and plant growth promoting agent as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The voltammetric determination of trace U(VI) in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elwerfalli, J.; Page, J.A.; VanLoon, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Trace U(VI) in seawater has been determined by voltammeetry after preconcentration by adsorption of the U(VI)/BR-PADAP complex (Br-PADAP = 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol). The reagent and the metal complex are adsorbed at a Hg drop electrode polarized at -0.40 V vs. a Ag/AgCl reference from a seawater electrolyte containing 3 x 10 -7 M added Br-PADAP and buffered at pH 7.8 by the addition of triethanolamine/HC10 4 . The adsorption is at a mass transfer controlled rate. Voltammetry of the adsorbed electroactive material gave two peaks, one at -0.56 V for reduction and adsorbed Br-PADAP and one at -0.65 V for reduction of adsorbed U(VI)-PADAP complex. The height of the second peak was a sensitive measure of the concentration of U(VI) in the electrolyte. Analysis is carried out with preconcentration restricted to a low fractional electrode coverage with calibration by the method of standard additions. The method is subject to intereference from organic surfactants but not from common metal ions. Interferences were minimized by the use of short adsorption times in the preconcentration step. For a 60 s adsorption time, a scan rate of 0.050 V s -1 and peak current measurement, the sensitivity was 8.2 nA/(μg L -1 U(VI)). Values of 3.44 and 3.21 μg L -1 U(VI) were determined for NASS-1 and CASS seawater reference standards

  5. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. PMID:28534340

  6. An Improved VI-CFAR Detector Based on GOS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Likai; Li Sen; Hu Guangzhao

    2016-01-01

    In combination with the advantages of CA-CFAR, GO-CFAR and SO-CFAR algorithm, the VI-CFAR has strong adaptability both in homogeneous and non-homogeneous environment. However, if the interfering targets are present in both the halves of the reference sliding windows, the use of the window with the smallest mean is affected by them and therefore results in a performance degradation. In order to overcome the shortcoming, an improved VI-CFAR detector based on GOS (IVI-CFAR) is proposed in this p...

  7. Sådan skaber vi mønsterbrydere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Treårigt forskningsprojekt viser, at pædagoger og medhjælpere kan undersøtte alle børns trivsel og udvikling og dermed styrke udsatte børns ressourcer. det vil kjælpe med at bryde den sociale arv og forhindre, at vi reproducerer ulighed.......Treårigt forskningsprojekt viser, at pædagoger og medhjælpere kan undersøtte alle børns trivsel og udvikling og dermed styrke udsatte børns ressourcer. det vil kjælpe med at bryde den sociale arv og forhindre, at vi reproducerer ulighed....

  8. Sådan bekæmper vi skattely

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus Corlin; Mondrup Pedersen, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    I kampens hede er det belejligt at skyde skylden på Nordea og Mossack Fonseca, men skal vi skattely til livs, kræver det en mere omfattende reformation af det internationale skattesystem. Her er de tre største udfordringer......I kampens hede er det belejligt at skyde skylden på Nordea og Mossack Fonseca, men skal vi skattely til livs, kræver det en mere omfattende reformation af det internationale skattesystem. Her er de tre største udfordringer...

  9. Neutron cross section standards evaluations for ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.D.; Poenitz, W.P.; Hale, G.M.; Peelle, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron cross section standards are now being evaluated as the initial phase in the development of the new ENDF/B-VI file. These standards evaluations are following a somewhat different process compared with that used for earlier versions of ENDF. The primary effort is concentrated on a simultaneous evaluation using a generalized least squares program, R-matrix evaluations, and a procedure for combining the results of these evaluations. The ENDF/B-VI standards evaluation procedure is outlined, and preliminary simultaneous evaluation and R-matrix results are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs

  10. Structure and bonding in cubic IV-VI crystals. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enders, P.

    1983-01-01

    The inherent instability of the cubic structure of IV-VI compounds is considered. Alternatively to the work of Littlewood, the treatment bases on the LCAO method and relates to Harrison's approach as Littlewood's papers do to Phillips'-Van Vechten's one. First Harrison's polarity is calculated from Slater-Koster parameters due to Volkov and coworkers. It indicates predominantly covalent bonding character for the cubic IV-VI compounds. A comparison is given with Littlewood's treatment. The method of special points is used to calculate integral bonding properties. Chadi and Cohen's two point set is shown to be often equivalent to a ligand-field theoretical treatment. (author)

  11. Bioremediation of chromium by the yeast Pichia guilliermondii: toxicity and accumulation of Cr (III) and Cr (VI) and the influence of riboflavin on Cr tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksheminska, Helena; Jaglarz, Anita; Fedorovych, Daria; Babyak, Lyubov; Yanovych, Dmytro; Kaszycki, Pawel; Koloczek, Henryk

    2003-01-01

    A comparative study has been made on the sensitivity of the yeast Pichia guilliermondii to Cr (III) and Cr (VI) as well as on the Cr uptake potential at growth-inhibitory concentrations of chromium. The strains used in the study were either isolated from natural sources or obtained from a laboratory strain collection. The results show that most of the natural strains were more tolerant to chromium and were able to grow in the presence of 5 mM Cr (III) or 0.5 mM Cr (VI), that is at concentrations which substantially inhibited the growth of laboratory strains. The cellular Cr content after treatment was similar for both strain types and ranged from 1.2-4.0 mg/g d.w. and 0.4-0.9 mg/g d.w., for Cr (III) and Cr (VI) forms, respectively, however, in one case of a natural strain it reached the value of 10 mg Cr (III)/g dry mass. Natural-source strains were grouped into four groups based on the yeasts' differential response to Cr (III) and Cr (VI). Hexavalent Cr-resistant mutants of a P. giuilliermondii laboratory strain, which revealed markedly changed capabilities of chromium accumulation, were obtained by means of UV-induced mutagenesis. Cr (VI) treatment triggered oversynthesis of riboflavin and the addition of exogenous riboflavin increased P. guilliermondii resistance to both Cr (III) and Cr (VI). Electrophoretic protein profiles revealed the induction and/or suppression of several proteins in response to toxic Cr (VI) levels.

  12. Study on selective separation of uranium(VI) by new N,N-dialkyl carboxy-amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shinichi; Sugo, Yumi; Kimura, Takaumi; Yaita, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    -amides and group separation of Pu-Np linear alkyl type N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amide for FBR and LWR spent fuel treatment. Since the branched alkyl type N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides have the steric hindrance on the complexation with metal cations, branched alkyl type N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides can be used to separate An(VI) from An(IV). On the other hand, linear type N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides have potential for alternative extractant for tri-butyl phosphate(TBP) because linear type N,N-di-alkyl-amide can extract An(VI) and An(IV). In our previous research work, we have proposed N,N-di-(2- ethyl)hexyl-(2,2-dimethyl)-propanamide (D2EHDMPA) as a candidate extractant for uranium selective separation in FBR spent fuel treatments. However D2EHDMPA was able to separate uranium(VI) from plutonium(IV) and neptunium(VI), D2EHDMPA showed poor U(VI) loading capacity in organic phase. For the purpose of improvement of U(VI) loading capacity in organic phase, nineteenth kinds of New N,N-di-alkyl-amides: N,N-di-hexyl-(3,3-dimethyl)butanamide (DHDMBA), N,N-di-oxyl-(3,3-dimethyl)butanamide (DODMBA), N,N-di-hexyl-(2,2-dimethyl)propanamide (DHDMPA) N,N-di-octyl-(2,2-dimethyl)propanamide (DODMPA), N,N-di-octyl-(2-ethyl)butanamide (DO2EBA), N,N-di-hexyl-(2-ethyl)butanamide (DH2EBA), N-benzyl-N-R 1 -(2-ethyl)hexanamide (R 1 :- C 4 H 9 , -C 6 H 13 , -C 8 H 17 , N-cyclohexyl-N-R 1 -(2- ethyl)hexanamide (R 1 :-C 4 H 9 , -C 6 H 13 , -C 8 H 17 ), N-phenyl- N-R 1 -(2-ethyl)hexanamide (R 1 :-C 3 H 9 , -C 4 H 9 , -C 5 H 11 , - C 6 H 13 , -C 8 H 17 , N-(2-ethyl)hexyl-N-Phenyl-octanamide, N-Benzyl- N-Phenyl-(2-ethyl)hexanamide are synthesized. In this paper, our experimental results of new N,N-dialkyl carboxy-amides extraction property of U(VI)/Pu(IV), extraction of macro amount of U(VI), and gamma-ray radiolysis will be summarized. Solvent extraction of U(VI) and Pu (IV) by nineteenth kinds of new N,N-di-alkyl carboxy-amides, macro amount of U(VI) extraction and radiolysis of four compounds were carried

  13. Neutrino physics: Summary talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1989-04-01

    This paper is organized as follows: First, I describe the state of neutrino phenomenology. Emphasis is placed on sin 2 θ W , its present status and future prospects. In addition, some signatures of ''new physics'' are described. Then, kaon physics at Fermilab is briefly discussed. I concentrate on the interesting rare decay K L → π 0 e + e - which may be a clean probe direct CP violation. Neutrino mass, mixing, and electromagnetic moments are surveyed. There, I describe the present state and future direction of accelerator based experiments. Finally, I conclude with an outlook on the future. Throughout this summary, I have drawn from and incorporated ideas discussed by other speakers at this workshop. However, I have tried to combine their ideas with my own perspective on neutrino physics and where it is headed. 49 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  14. FAIR - Baseline technical report. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutbrod, H.H.; Augustin, I.; Eickhoff, H.; Gross, K.D.; Henning, W.F.; Kraemer, D.; Walter, G.

    2006-09-01

    This document presents the Executive Summary, the first of six volumes comprising the 2006 Baseline Technical Report (BTR) for the international FAIR project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research). The BTR provides the technical description, cost, schedule, and assessments of risk for the proposed new facility. The purpose of the BTR is to provide a reliable basis for the construction, commissioning and operation of FAIR. The BTR is one of the central documents requested by the FAIR International Steering Committee (ISC) and its working groups, in order to prepare the legal process and the decisions on the construction and operation of FAIR in an international framework. It provides the technical basis for legal contracts on contributions to be made by, so far, 13 countries within the international FAIR Consortium. The BTR begins with this extended Executive Summary as Volume 1, which is also intended for use as a stand-alone document. The Executive Summary provides brief summaries of the accelerator facilities, the scientific programs and experimental stations, civil construction and safety, and of the workproject structure, costs and schedule. (orig.)

  15. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, A.S.; Londergan, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this Workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves and Gyulassy; the fourth session Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and η physics are reviewed by the organizers of the Eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the Workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics

  16. Summary: Hadron dynamics sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, A.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Londergan, J.T. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Four sessions on Hadron Dynamics were organized at this Workshop. The first topic, QCD Exclusive Reactions and Color Transparency, featured talks by Ralston, Heppelman and Strikman; the second, QCD and Inclusive Reactions had talks by Garvey, Speth and Kisslinger. The third dynamics session, Medium Modification of Elementary Interactions had contributions from Kopeliovich, Alves and Gyulassy; the fourth session Pre-QCD Dynamics and Scattering, had talks by Harris, Myhrer and Brown. An additional joint Spectroscopy/Dynamics session featured talks by Zumbro, Johnson and McClelland. These contributions are reviewed briefly in this summary. Two additional joint sessions between Dynamics and {eta} physics are reviewed by the organizers of the Eta sessions. In such a brief review there is no way the authors can adequately summarize the details of the physics presented here. As a result, they concentrate only on brief impressionistic sketches of the physics topics discussed and their interrelations. They include no bibliography in this summary, but simply refer to the talks given in more detail in the Workshop proceedings. They focus on topics which were common to several presentations in these sessions. First, nuclear and particle descriptions of phenomena are now clearly converging, in both a qualitative and quantitative sense; they show several examples of this convergence. Second, an important issue in hadron dynamics is the extent to which elementary interactions are modified in nuclei at high energies and/or densities, and they illustrate some of these medium effects. Finally, they focus on those dynamical issues where hadron facilities can make an important, or even a unique, contribution to the knowledge of particle and nuclear physics.

  17. Quantifying Cr(VI) Production and Export from Serpentine Soil of the California Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Cynthia N; Fendorf, Scott; Webb, Samuel M; Maher, Kate

    2017-01-03

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is generated in serpentine soils and exported to surface and groundwaters at levels above health-based drinking water standards. Although Cr(VI) concentrations are elevated in serpentine soil pore water, few studies have reported field evidence documenting Cr(VI) production rates and fluxes that govern Cr(VI) transport from soil to water sources. We report Cr speciation (i) in four serpentine soil depth profiles derived from the California Coast Range serpentinite belt and (ii) in local surface waters. Within soils, we detected Cr(VI) in the same horizons where Cr(III)-minerals are colocated with biogenic Mn(III/IV)-oxides, suggesting Cr(VI) generation through oxidation by Mn-oxides. Water-extractable Cr(VI) concentrations increase with depth constituting a 7.8 to 12 kg/km 2 reservoir of Cr(VI) in soil. Here, Cr(VI) is produced at a rate of 0.3 to 4.8 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr and subsequently flushed from soil during water infiltration, exporting 0.01 to 3.9 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr at concentrations ranging from 25 to 172 μg/L. Although soil-derived Cr(VI) is leached from soil at concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L, due to reduction and dilution during transport to streams, Cr(VI) levels measured in local surface waters largely remain below California's drinking water limit.

  18. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  19. Isolation and characterization of Cr(VI)-reducing actinomycetes from estuarine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahara, Takeshi; Xu, Xudan; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Imada, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    Bioremediation technologies have strong potential use in the less costly and more environmentally friendly removal of highly toxic hexavalent-chromium (Cr(VI)) compared with physicochemical technologies. Several Cr(VI)-reducing bacteria have been isolated; however, there are few studies on Cr(VI)-resistant and Cr(VI)-reducing actinomycetes. In this study, Cr(VI)-reducing actinomycetes were screened from estuarine, marine, and terrestrial samples on the basis of Cr(VI)-resistant and Cr(VI)-reducing ability. Of the 80 Streptomyces-like strains isolated, 20 strains were found to be resistant to 50 mg/l of Cr(VI). In addition, two strains isolated from the estuarine sediment of Tokyo Bay were found to be resistant to a concentration of 150 mg/l of Cr(VI). Furthermore, one Cr(VI)-reducing strain was found to remove 60 mg/l of Cr(VI) within 1 week and was identified as Streptomyces thermocarboxydus based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The comparative evaluation with the type strain S. thermocarboxydus NBRC 16323 showed that our isolated strain had higher ability to grow at 27 °C and reduce Cr(VI) at a NaCl concentration of 6.0 % at 27 °C compared with the type strain NBRC 16323. These results indicate that our isolated strain have a potential ability to remove Cr(VI) from contaminated, highly saline sources without heating.

  20. The Adsorption of Cr(VI Using Chitosan-Alumina Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darjito Darjito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan as adsorbent has been used widely, however it was not effective yet for metal ions adsorption in industrial scale. In acidic condition, chitosan’s active site tends to decrease. This drawback can was solved by coating of chitosan active site on alumina. This paper discloses to overcome that limitation. The charateristic of the active side was analysed by FTIR spectrometry toward vibration N-H group at 1679.15 cm-1, C=O group of oxalate at 1703.30 cm-1, and Al-O group of alumina at 924.07 cm-1. The adsorption capacity of the developed adsorbent was tester to adsorb Cr(VI ions under various of pH value such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7. The contact time affect toward the adsorption was also reported in 20, 30, 40 50, 60, 70, and 80 minute. In addition, the concentration effects (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 ppm was also studied. Chromium (VI was measured using spectronic-20. Adsorption capacity was obtained at 66.90 mg/g under optimum conditions pH 2, and contact time 60 minute, respectively.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of Mo(VI)-Fe(III)-S(VI)-H2O system for separation of molybdenum and iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chao; Zeng, Li; Xiao, Liansheng; Zhang, Guiqing

    2017-11-01

    The separation of molybdenum and iron is one of key issues of the hydrometallurgical preparation of pure molybdenum chemical products. The thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams for distribution of species at different pH values and different concentrations of molybdenum, iron and sulfur with the systems of Mo(VI)-H2O, Fe(III)-S(VI)-H2O and Mo(VI)-Fe(III)-S(VI)-H2O at 298 K were established, separately. Thermodynamic analysis results revealed that both molybdenum and iron were transformed from their anions to cations with the decrease in pH values. The pHMf0.5 for the conversion of molybdenum anions to cations decreased from 0.92 to 0.20 with the increase in the molybdenum concentration from 0.05 mol/L to 1 mol/L (pHMf50 is defined as the pH value when target metal anions occupy 50% mole fraction of total). The total sulfur concentration has significant effect on the conversion of iron (III) species with the pH change. The separation of molybdenum (VI) and iron (III) from acidic solutions using a tertiary amine extractant N235 could be achieved by decreasing the total sulfur concentration and controlling the equilibrium pH in an optimum range. The verification test results showed that the operating window for the separation of Mo(VI) and Fe(III) from a solution containing 0.01 mol/L [Mo]T, 0.05 mol/L [Fe]T and 1.15 mol/L [S]T was in the pH range of 0.5-1.0, which was consistent with the thermodynamic analysis.

  2. Organic layer formation and sorption of U(vi) on acetamide diethylphosphonate-functionalized mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Eva C; Mason, Harris E; Shusterman, Jennifer A; Lukens, Wayne W

    2017-04-19

    Acetamide diethylphosphonate (AcPhos)-functionalized silica has been shown to have a high affinity for U(vi) in pH 2-3 nitric acid. Previous work with AcPhos-functionalized silica has focused on actinide and lanthanide extraction under various conditions, but has shown poor reproducibility in the functionalization process. For this work, four AcPhos-functionalized SBA-15 materials were synthesized and evaluated based on their U(vi) sorption capacity and their stability in nitric acid. Materials synthesized using pyridine as a basic catalyst were shown to form a greater fraction of polymeric structures at the silica surface, which correlated with higher structural integrity upon contact with acidic solutions. Single-pulse 31 P and 1 H NMR spectra of these materials show evidence of phosphonic acid groups, as well as hydrogen-bonding interactions either between ligands or with the silica surface. Additionally, these materials were found to have significantly higher U(vi) sorption capacities and K eq values than the materials synthesized without pyridine, most likely due to the ion-exchange properties of the phosphonic acid groups. The 31 P- 31 P DQ-DRENAR NMR technique was used to compare the average strength of dipolar coupling interactions between phosphorus atoms for the four materials. Because the strength of dipolar coupling interactions depends on the number and proximity of neighboring spins, this technique provides information about the average density of ligands on the surface. The conventional functionalization procedure yielded materials with the lowest average surface ligand density, while those using extended reaction times and the pyridine base catalyst yielded materials with higher surface ligand densities.

  3. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis – Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burwell R Geoffrey

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE introduced the electronic focus group (EFG as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs, and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth

  4. ACC/AHA Special Report: Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategies: A Summary of Systematic Reviews by the NHLBI Implementation Science Work Group: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wiley V; Pearson, Thomas A; Bennett, Glen C; Cushman, William C; Gaziano, Thomas A; Gorman, Paul N; Handler, Joel; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kushner, Robert F; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Stevens, Victor J; Wells, Barbara L; Castillo, Graciela; Heil, Susan K R; Stephens, Jennifer; Vann, Julie C Jacobson

    2017-02-28

    In 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened an Implementation Science Work Group to assess evidence-based strategies for effectively implementing clinical practice guidelines. This was part of a larger effort to update existing clinical practice guidelines on cholesterol, blood pressure, and overweight/obesity. Review evidence from the published implementation science literature and identify effective or promising strategies to enhance the adoption and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. This systematic review was conducted on 4 critical questions, each focusing on the adoption and effectiveness of 4 intervention strategies: (1) reminders, (2) educational outreach visits, (3) audit and feedback, and (4) provider incentives. A scoping review of the Rx for Change database of systematic reviews was used to identify promising guideline implementation interventions aimed at providers. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed a priori for each question, and the published literature was initially searched up to 2012, and then updated with a supplemental search to 2015. Two independent reviewers screened the returned citations to identify relevant reviews and rated the quality of each included review. Audit and feedback and educational outreach visits were generally effective in improving both process of care (15 of 21 reviews and 12 of 13 reviews, respectively) and clinical outcomes (7 of 12 reviews and 3 of 5 reviews, respectively). Provider incentives showed mixed effectiveness for improving both process of care (3 of 4 reviews) and clinical outcomes (3 reviews equally distributed between generally effective, mixed, and generally ineffective). Reminders showed mixed effectiveness for improving process of care outcomes (27 reviews with 11 mixed and 3 generally ineffective results) and were generally ineffective for clinical outcomes (18 reviews with 6 mixed and 9 generally ineffective results). Educational outreach visits (2 of 2

  5. Variation in human platelet glycoprotein VI content modulates glycoprotein VI-specific prothrombinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, K; Clemetson, K J; Deguchi, H; Kunicki, T J

    2001-11-01

    - Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is a platelet-specific receptor for collagen that figures prominently in signal transduction. An addition to binding to type I and III collagens, GPVI is also bound specifically by collagen-related peptide and convulxin (CVX), a snake venom protein. We developed a quantitative assay of platelet GPVI in which biotin-conjugated CVX binds selectively to GPVI in separated total platelet proteins by a ligand blot procedure. Using this approach, we have documented a 5-fold range in platelet GPVI content among 23 normal healthy subjects. In addition, we have determined that CVX-induced or collagen-related peptide-induced prothrombinase activity is directly proportional to the platelet content of GPVI. A statistically significant correlation was observed at 2 CVX concentrations: 14.7 ng/mL (R(2)=0.854 and P<0.001, n=11) and 22 ng/mL (R(2)=0.776 and P<0.001, n=12). In previous studies, we established a similar range of expression of the integrin collagen receptor alpha(2)beta(1) on platelets of normal subjects. Among 15 donors, there is a direct correlation between platelet alpha(2)beta(1) density and GPVI content (R(2)=0.475 and P=0.004). In view of the well-documented association of GPVI with platelet procoagulant activity, this study suggests that the variation in GPVI content is a potential risk factor that may predispose individuals to hemorrhagic or thromboembolic disorders.

  6. Some thiazine dyes as redox indicators in the estimations of U(VI), Mo(VI), V(V), Cr(VI) and Cu(II) with Fe(II) in strong phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Murty, N.; Satyanarayana, V.

    1977-01-01

    U(VI) and Mo(VI) in 11.5-12.5M, Cr(VI) in 8.5 10.3M and V(V) and V(IV) in 10.5 12.0M phosphoric acid medium can be estimated with Fe(II) visually using azure A, azure B, azure C, toluidine blue and new methylene blue. (author)

  7. Peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) ions containing tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Khan, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV) and their possible oxygen transfer reactions is presented. An attempt has also been made to study the size of the metal ions and the electronic effect derived from the tridentate Schiff bases on the v 1 (O-O) mode of the complexes in their IR spectra

  8. Study of Mo (VI Removal from Aqueous Solution: Application of Different Mathematical Models to Continuous Biosorption Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Kafshgari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (VI biosorption process was investigated by marine algae Cystoseria indica pretreated with 0.1 M CaCl2 solution in a packed bed column. The biosorbent was characterized by FTIR, BET and SEM analyses. The results showed that Mo (VI ions should be chelated with the hydroxyl, carboxyl and amine groups of the biomass. The effects of inlet metal concentration and flow rate on biosorption process were investigated and the experimental breakthrough curves were obtained. Results showed that the maximum biosorption capacity of Ca-pretreated C. indica for Mo (VI was found to be 18.32 mg/g at optimum flow rate of (1.4 mL/min. The controlled-rate step shifted from external to internal mass transfer limitations, as the flow rate increased. Also, it was observed that the breakthrough and exhaustion time decreased from 17.14 hr to 9.05 hr and from 0.006 h to 0.002 hr respectively, with the increase of flow rate from 0.7 to 2.1 ML/min. The increase in the initial concentration of Mo (VI solution from 30 to 95 ml min-1 increases the adsorption capacity from 18.32 to 30.19 mg/g and decreases the percentage of Mo (VI removal from 61 to 38%. Also, the treated volume was the greatest (1.42 L at the lowest inlet concentration. Column data obtained under different conditions were described using the Thomas, Yoon and Nelson, Yan and Belter models. The breakthrough curve predictions by Belter model were found to be very satisfactory.

  9. Phosphorus-modified poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene)-PAMAM chelating resin for the adsorption of uranium(VI) in aqueous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qiong; Liu, Yaochi; Wang, Chunzhi; Cheng, Jiashun

    2013-12-15

    Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) modified poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) absorbents carrying phosphorus functional groups (PS-PAMAM-PPA) were prepared and used as adsorbents for the adsorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution. Different generations of PAMAM were used for obtaining different chelating resins, PS-PPA, PS-1.0G PAMAM-PPA, PS-2.0G PAMAM-PPA, PS-3.0G PAMAM-PPA and PS-4.0G PAMAM-PPA. The synthesized resins were characterized by FTIR and XPS. The effects of many physio-chemical properties on metal ion adsorption to adsorbent phase, such as solution pH, kinetic studies, initial uranium concentration, temperature, were investigated using batch method. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity (99.89 mg/g) was observed at the pH 5.0 and 25°C with initial U(VI) concentration 100mg/L and adsorbent dose 1g/L. PS-1.0G PAMAM-PPA had the largest adsorption capacity for U(VI) compared with other prepared adsorbents. The adsorption kinetics of U(VI) onto PS-1.0G PAMAM-PPA followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation, indicating that the chemical adsorption was a rate-limiting step. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) stated that the adsorption of U(VI) onto PS-1.0G PAMAM-PPA were spontaneous, endothermic and feasible. The adsorption isotherms obeyed the Langmuir isotherm models. The desorption studies showed that PS-1.0G PAMAM-PPA could be used repeatedly and adsorption and desorption percentage did not have any noticeable loss after 27 cycles in a fixed bed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Developing Worksheet (LKS) Base on Process Skills in Curriculum 2013 at Elementary School Grade IV,V,VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhan, M.; Oktolita, N.; Kn, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Lacks of students' skills in the learning process is due to lacks of exercises in the form of LKS. In the curriculum of 2013, there is no LKS as a companion to improve the students' skills. In order to solve those problem, it is necessary to develop LKS based on process skills as a teaching material to improve students' process skills. The purpose of this study is to develop LKS Process Skills based elementary school grade IV, V, VI which is integrated by process skill. The development of LKS can be used to develop the thematic process skills of elementary school students grade IV, V, VI based on curriculum 2013. The expected long-term goal is to produce teaching materials LKS Process Skill based of Thematic learning that is able to develop the process skill of elementary school students grade IV, V, VI. This development research refers to the steps developed by Borg & Gall (1983). The development process is carried out through 10 stages: preliminary research and gathering information, planning, draft development, initial test (limited trial), first product revision, final trial (field trial), product operational revision, Desemination and implementation. The limited subject of the this research is the students of SDN in Dharmasraya grade IV, V, VI. The field trial subjects in the experimental class are the students of SDN Dharmasraya grade IV, V, VI who have implemented the curriculum 2013. The data are collected by using LKS validation sheets, process skill observation sheets, and Thematic learning test (pre-test And post-test). The result of LKS development on the validity score is 81.70 (very valid), on practical score is 83.94 (very practical), and on effectiveness score is 86.67 (very effective). In the trial step the use of LKS using One Group Pretest-Posttest Design research design. The purpose of this trial is to know the effectiveness level of LKS result of development for improving the process skill of students in grade IV, V, and VI of elementary

  11. Vi ved stadig alt for lidt om sexhandel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinskou, Marie Bruvik; Groes-Green, Christian; Skilbrei, May-Len

    2014-01-01

    I Danmark har vi generelt en tradition for at være tilbageholdende over for unødig kriminalisering. Den tradition er inden for de senere år blevet udfordret, og specifikt blusser diskussionen om kriminalisering op, når emnet vedrører sexarbejde. I Danmark diskuteres det, hvorvidt man, som i Norge...

  12. Finite difference simulation of biological chromium (VI) reduction in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-08

    May 8, 2013 ... wood preservation/processing, and alloy preparation have led ... al., 2009). The improper disposal of Cr(VI)-containing waste from these industries and its subsequent mobility in ground- water aquifers is a subject of paramount ...... TURICK CE, GRAVES C and APEL WA (1998) Bioremediation poten-.

  13. Evaluation of Cr (VI) remediation potential of Eichornia sp in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Evaluation of Cr (VI) removal by indigenous chromium resistant bacterial strains alone and in combination with Eichornia sp. Methods: Three chromium resistant bacterial strains S-4 Ochrobactrum grignonense, SF-5 Bacillus sp. and S-6 Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonenses were isolated from industrial effluent.

  14. A model to describe Cr(VI) kinetics biosorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the effect of pH control on kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalks has been studied. A set of experiments were performed at a constant pH 3+/-0.1 which was assured by means of a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). In a second set of experiments the initial pH was adjusted to pH 3 and then pH was allowed to freely evolve during the sorption process. Both sets of experiments were carried out at different temperatures within the range 5-50 degrees C. Constant temperature was assured by water recirculation from a thermostatic bath. Results demonstrated that pH has high influence on kinetics only at the lowest temperatures studied. A model based on a complex reaction sequence which takes into account Cr(VI) sorption, reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), sorption of the formed Cr(III) which includes the pH variation during the sorption process has been proposed to model Cr(VI) kinetics sorption onto grape stalk waste. Furthermore, the robustness of the model has been tested. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Individuals from Northern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Leanne; Bardai, Ghalib; Moffatt, Pierre; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Trejo, Pamela; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type VI is a recessively inherited form of OI that is caused by mutations in SERPINF1, the gene coding for pigment-epithelium derived factor (PEDF). Here, we report on two apparently unrelated children with OI type VI who had the same unusual homozygous variant in intron 6 of SERPINF1 (c.787-10C>G). This variant created a novel splice site that led to the in-frame addition of three amino acids to PEDF (p.Lys262_Ile263insLeuSerGln). Western blotting showed that skin fibroblasts with this mutation produced PEDF but failed to secrete it. Both children were treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, but the treatment of Individual 1 was switched to subcutaneous injections of denosumab (dose 1 mg per kg body weight, repeated every 3 months). An iliac bone sample obtained after 5 denosumab injections (and 3 months after the last injection) showed no change in the increased osteoid parameters that are typical of OI type VI, but the number of osteoclasts in trabecular bone was markedly increased. This suggests that the effect of denosumab on osteoclast suppression is of shorter duration in children with OI type VI than what has previously been reported on adults with osteoporosis.

  16. Paisaje del viñedo: patrimonio y recurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vicente Elías

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La propuesta de que el paisaje del viñedo sea el complemento a la visita a la bodega, siendo esta el eje del turismo del vino, es el objetivo de este trabajo. Repasando los conceptos variables de patrimonio, llegamos al paisaje del viñedo como recurso, formando parte del patrimonio natural. Pero este no se puede desvincular de los otros aspectos patrimoniales, por lo que la cultura tradicional es el soporte de la tipología de paisaje que queremos proponer y que va contrastar con los nuevos paisajes del viñedo que surgen de las recientes técnicas en los cultivos y de la actual vitivicultura, emparejada con una moderna “cultura del vino”. El análisis de las diversas normativas, que salvaguardan el paisaje y la comprobación del escaso valor legal del paisaje del viñedo, es otro puntal de este trabajo que trata de unir paisaje con cultura tradicional como recursos del Turismo del Vino, integrados en las Rutas del Vino.

  17. Revolutsioonilisest ja igavikulisest VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil / Ave Randviir

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Randviir, Ave, 1981-

    2005-01-01

    Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaali idee sünnist. 1990.a. toimus esimene triennaal nimega Põhja- ja Baltimaade Arhitektuuritriennaal. Niguliste kirikus toimunud VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalist. Korraldajaks Irina Raud. Tunnuslauseks "Feeling Architecture". Triennaali avanud ja lõpetanud Peter Davey ja teiste esinejate ettekannetest. Eestlastest esinesid Juhan Maiste ja Vilen Künnapu

  18. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion ... currently being done by oil drilling and exploration and production (E and P) waste .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited in Rozada et al. (2005), may be ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shin YS, Kilimann MW. Mutations in the liver glycogen phosphorylase gene (PYGL) underlying glycogenosis type VI. Am J Hum Genet. 1998 Apr;62(4):785-91. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Chang S, Rosenberg MJ, Morton ...

  20. Removal of Cr(VI) from groundwater by Fe(0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanjiao; Liu, Rui

    2017-11-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the treatment of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) by iron powder (Fe(0)) columns of simulated permeable reactive barriers with and without calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Two columns filled with Fe(0) were used as Cr(VI) removal equipment running at a flow velocity of 10 ml/min at room temperature. After 200 days running of the two columns, the results showed that Fe(0) was an effective material for Cr(VI) reduction with an average removal rate of above 84.6%. The performance of Column 2 with CaCO3 was better than Column 1 without CaCO3 in terms of average Cr(VI) removal rate. The presence of CaCO3 buffered the increasing pH caused by Fe(0) corrosion in Column 2 and enhanced the removal rate of Column 2. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of Fe(0) in the three stages of running of the two columns illustrated that the coat layer of Column 1 was a little thicker than that of Column 2. Energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) results showed that the surface of Fe(0) of Column 2 contained more chromium elements. Raman spectroscopy found that all iron oxide was generated on the Fe(0) surface of Column 1 and Column 2 and chromium class objects were only detected on Fe(0) surface in Column 2.