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Sample records for group vi summary

  1. Working Group VI Summary Report: New Ideas Employing High-Power Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemans, W.P.

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this working group were to provide the ''Future Light Source Community'' information on: Electron-Laser interaction based sources; Plasma based radiation sources and accelerators; and Present and future high-power laser technology. A summary of presentations, discussions and opinions is presented next. At the end of this report, a few references are given. The list is very far from being complete but is meant as a start for further exploring the various topics discussed in this working group. Based on presentations and discussions during the workshop, a summarizing table of the performance of three different types of laser systems has been made. The emphasis is on listing performance parameters of solid state, FEL and gas based lasers, relevant to the development of a future fourth generation light source. Two types of solid state lasers capable of producing peak power in the multi-terawatt range are described: Nd:glass and Ti:sapphire lasers [1]. The main development for these lasers is towards higher average power levels: from the 10 W to the > 100 W level. An infrared FEL has recently produced 1 kW average power but with peak power on the order of 0.1 GW [2]. A terawatt class, short pulse CO 2 based gas laser is under development at the Advanced Test Facility at BNL [3

  2. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given

  3. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

  4. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.F.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe 56 . The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ''tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ''tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use

  5. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  6. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. [comp.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  7. Summary of group discussions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    A key aspect of the workshop was the interaction and exchange of ideas and information among the 40 participants. To facilitate this activity the workshop participants were divided into five discussions groups. These groups reviewed selected subjects and reported back to the main body with summaries of their considerations. Over the 3 days the 5 discussion groups were requested to focus on the following subjects: the characteristics and capabilities of 'good' organisations; how to ensure sufficient resources; how to ensure competence within the organisation; how to demonstrate organisational suitability; the regulatory oversight processes - including their strengths and weaknesses. A list of the related questions that were provided to the discussion groups can be found in Appendix 3. Also included in Appendix 3 are copies of the slides the groups prepared that summarised their considerations

  8. Working Group 7 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

    2012-06-10

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  9. Beam dynamics group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities of the beam dynamics working group of the LHC Collective Effects Workshop that was held in Montreux in 1994. It reviews the presentations that were made to the group, the discussions that ensued, and the consensuses that evolved

  10. Summary report: injection group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brown, B.

    1984-01-01

    The injector group attempted to define and address several problem areas related to the SSC injector as defined in the Reference Design Study (RDS). It also considered the topic of machine utilization, particularly the question of test beam requirements. Details of the work are given in individually contributed papers, but the general concerns and consensus of the group are presented within this note. The group recognized that the injector as outlined in the RDS was developed primarily for costing estimates. As such, it was not necessarily well optimized from the standpoint of insuring the required beam properties for the SSC. On the other hand, considering the extraordinary short time in which the RDS was prepared, it is an impressive document and a good basis from which to work. Because the documented SSC performance goals are ambitious, the group sought an injector solution which would more likely guarantee that SSC performance not be limited by its injectors. As will be seen, this leads to a somewhat different solution than that described in the RDS. Furthermore, it is the consensus of the group that the new, conservative approach represents only a modest cost increase of the overall project well worth the confidence gained and the risks avoided

  11. Storage ring group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Storage Ring Group set out to identify and pursue salient problems in accelerator physics for heavy ion fusion, divorced from any particular reference design concept. However, it became apparent that some basic parameter framework was required to correlate the different study topics. As the Workshop progressed, ring parameters were modified and updated. Consequently, the accompanying papers on individual topics will be found to refer to slightly varied parameters, according to the stage at which the different problems were tackled

  12. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  13. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  14. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  15. Environmental Survey in Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Summary report; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    An environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, has been carried out. This report presents the results from the analyses carried out on samples from a total of 316 stations at 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of the environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (Author)

  16. Accelerator technology working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A summary is presented of workshop deliberations on basic scaling, the economic viability of laser drive power for HEP accelerators, the availability of electron beam injectors for near-term experiments, and a few very general remarks on technology issues

  17. Radiation sources working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, components technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigation, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  18. Summary muon detection working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, N.R.

    1993-01-01

    The areas of concentration of the Muon Working Group reflected its composition: about half of the group was interested primarily is extending the capability of existing general purpose colliders (CDF, D0). Smaller numbers of people were interested in B physics with general purpose colliders at the SSC and LHC, with SSC fixed target experiments, and with dedicated forward colliders. Good muon tagging, and possibly also muon triggering, is essential for studying CP violation in B i →J/ψX, J/ψ→μ + μ - ; as a flavor tag, with the semimuonic decay B→μ + X or bar B→μ - X tagging the flavor of the partner; for studying the physics of the semimuonic B decays themselves; and for looking for really rare decays like B→μ + μ -

  19. Nonaccelerator physics working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, D.S.; Beier, E.W.; Cherry, M.L.; Marciano, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Nonaccelerator Physics Working Group set itself the task of predicting the contributions of nonaccelerator experiments to particle physics during the 1990s, in order to assess the needs for new experimental facilities. The main topics studied by the subgroups were: (1) the possibility of doing particle physics experiments with high energy cosmic rays from astrophysical sources; (2) the prospects for experiments which seek to measure the masses of neutrinos and the mixing of neutrino flavors; (3) an examination of the implications for proton decay of recent theoretical developments in grand unified and string theories. Other topics included a survey of magnetic monopole searches, an assessment of future prospects for double-beta-decay and nucleon-decay experiments, and a review of recent progress on neutrino and dark-matter detectors based on quasiparticles in superconductors and phonons in crystals

  20. Summary of exotic collider concepts group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1995-01-01

    We present a summary of the discussions in the Exotic Collider Concepts Group. Most of the discussions were centered around the status and open problems for muon-muon and gamma-gamma colliders. In addition the group discussed some general problems and new results of accelerator physics. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  1. Summaries of discussion groups and closeout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Beam Instrumentation Workshop registrants selected the following topics for group discussions: Commercial technology and beam instrumentation, 4th generation light source instrumentation, feedback systems, beam loss monitors, calibration methods, high resolution and highly stable BPM methods, challenges in beam profiling. Summaries of these discussion sessions are listed in the article that follows

  2. Volcanism/tectonics working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, L.A.; Young, S.R.

    1995-01-01

    This article is a summary of the proceedings of a group discussion which took place at the Workshop on the Role of Natural Analogs in Geologic Disposal of High-Level Nuclear Waste in San Antonio, Texas on July 22-25, 1991. The working group concentrated on the subject of the impacts of earthquakes, fault rupture, and volcanic eruption on the underground repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The tectonics and seismic history of the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is discussed and geologic analogs to that site are described

  3. Summary of the accelerator working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Noble, R.J.

    1998-03-01

    We present a summary of the main topics discussed in the Accelerator Working Group during the ''Workshop on the Physics at the First Muon Collider''. The discussions centered on critical design issues for a high-intensity, medium-energy proton synchrotron that would replace the present Fermilab 8 GeV Booster early in the next century. Such a machine is intended both to serve the hadron program with an order of magnitude increase in average proton current and to be compatible as a source for a future muon collider. Particular issues discussed at length include rf system design, control of longitudinal space-charge effects, bunching of proton beams and beam instabilities

  4. Dealing with uncertainty together. Summary of Annex VI (1996-1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kram, T.

    1999-10-01

    In Annex VI, the work of the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme (ETSAP) increasingly reached out to the international community. Especially in connection with the preparation for the Conferences of Parties under the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), the analytic tools and databases developed by ETSAP proved their worth in national analyses of greenhouse gas emission restrictions, multinational comparisons of such responses, and evaluations of the benefits of international co-operation. Anticipating the urgent need for this kind of capability, the ETSAP community improved the well-established MARKAL energy systems model and extended it in new directions. These included linking national models, expanding system boundaries in time and place, joining MARKAL with economic models, adding material flows, and developing approaches to treating uncertainty. In various forms, the MARKAL progeny now provide fully integrated energy/economy/environment models. These enable the simultaneous assessment of multiple, linked issues such as energy security, atmospheric acidification and climate change. Almost alone among the models being used to evaluate greenhouse gas emission reductions, the MARKAL models are based explicitly on the specific technologies that must produce the reductions. The basis for this achievement is the international network of systems analysts that has been built up under the aegis of the International Energy Agency (IEA) during the past two decades. During Annex VI, the Republic of Korea and Turkey joined the active members of the IEA Implementing Agreement: Australia, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United States and the Commission of the European Union. The group meets semiannually, usually in joint workshops with other groups doing related work, to report progress, provide peer review, and build on each other's accomplishments. Participants co-operate in model development

  5. Summary of Research 1997, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boger, Dan

    1999-01-01

    This report contains information of research projects in the interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control, and Communications Academic Group, Information Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic...

  6. Really large hadron collider working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.; Limon, P.; Syphers, M.

    1996-01-01

    A summary is presented of preliminary studies of three 100 TeV center-of-mass hadron colliders made with magnets of different field strengths, 1.8T, 9.5T and 12.6T. Descriptions of the machines, and some of the major and most challenging subsystems, are presented, along with parameter lists and the major issues for future study

  7. Summary -- Experiments with Radioactive Beams Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wiescher, M. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States)

    1992-12-31

    During the course of the workshop, a wide range of futuristic radioactive-beam experiments were discussed. These extended from the study of electroweak interactions in nuclei to materials science, nuclear astrophysics, and a host of nuclear physics investigations. Emphasis was placed on illustrating how these prototypical experiments could be done, discussing what types of detection systems would be needed, exploring the new problems which would be confronting the radioactive beam experimenter, and better defining the beam requirements. Contained herein is a summary of these discussions.

  8. Summary Report of Working Group: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.; Tochitsky, Sergei; Milchberg, Howard M.

    2004-01-01

    A summary is given on the work presented and discussed in the Laser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2004 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, including the Plasma Acceleration Subgroup (Group-Leader: Eric Esarey; Co-Group-Leader: Sergei Tochitsky) and the Plasma Guiding Subgroup (Group-Leader: Howard Milchberg; Co-Group-Leader: Carl Schroeder)

  9. Summary of the Linear Collider Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the Linear Collider Working Group was on a next generation linear collider. Topics discussed are: parameters; damping rings; bunch compression and pre-acceleration; linac; final focus; and multibunch effects. 8 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Summary of the polarized beam working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienands, U.; Dyck, O. van.

    1989-05-01

    The polarized beam working group reviewed the AGS Bookster and TRIUMF KAON Factory facilities, heard an overview of the subject of siberian snakes, discussed internal polarized gas targets, and made recommendations for further study

  11. Summary of the TeV33 working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, P.P.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Colestock, P.

    1996-10-01

    This summary of the TeV33 working group at Snowmass reports on work in the areas of Tevatron store parameters, the beam-beam interaction, Main Injector intensity (slip stacking), antiproton production, and electron cooling

  12. Summary of experiments and data breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Experiments and Data Breakout Group addressed status of experiments directed towards, or relevant to, ADTT system development. Such experiments are the bridge between ideas and reality. They simultaneously cross cut all major technology and components of ADTT systems - accelerators, target/blanket, separations, and materials. At this Conference the large majority of papers dealing with experiments were on nuclear data and cross sections. No separate papers were presented on materials experiments although data were included in papers presented at the several sessions on materials. Beginning engineering experiments were also discussed which could address issues such as neutronics performance and code benchmarking, handling of special products through processes such as sparging of volatiles, determination of thermal hydraulics performance, and beginning safety performance. One recommendation from this group was the formation of a group to collate and prioritize data needs and to provide input to existing data centers.

  13. Summary from working group on noninterceptive diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    The working group for noninterceptive diagnostics spent much of its time comparing diagnostic techniques from different fields and their possible application to high-power injectors. The group included backgrounds from electron beam diagnostics, fusion power diagnostics, cw ion source and transport design, and ion beam of diagnostics. The probability of success for adapting techniques from these different areas is quite difficult to judge, short of a detailed examination of each application. Unexpected flaws or unforeseen noise sources can eliminate an idea that would otherwise appear promising. The report presents several ideas that were discussed, with an indication of those ideas most likely to succeed if implemented

  14. Summary of the separations breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Separations Breakout Group reviewed the wide spectrum of separations technologies available for application to ADTT systems. Separations processes play a key role in areas associated with preparation of feed materials for introduction into ADTT, removal of fission products and other transmutation byproducts that build into the fuel during operation, and in the preparation of wastes ({open_quotes}polishing{close_quotes}) for discharge from ADTT systems so as to meet appropriate waste disposal criteria. General separations technologies addressed by the group included aqueous, fluoride salt, and chloride salt approaches.

  15. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Michael V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  16. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  17. Summary of the Physics Opportunities Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin; McDonald, K.T.

    1992-12-01

    The Physics Opportunities Working Group was convened with the rather general mandate to explore physic opportunities that may arise as new accelerator technologies and facilities come into play. Five topics were considered during the workshop: QED at critical field strength, novel positron sources, crystal accelerators, suppression of beamstrahlung, and muon colliders. Of particular interest was the sense that a high energy muon collider might be technically feasible and certainly deserves serious study

  18. Summary Report of Working Group 2: Computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoltz, P. H.; Tsung, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    The working group on computation addressed three physics areas: (i) plasma-based accelerators (laser-driven and beam-driven), (ii) high gradient structure-based accelerators, and (iii) electron beam sources and transport [1]. Highlights of the talks in these areas included new models of breakdown on the microscopic scale, new three-dimensional multipacting calculations with both finite difference and finite element codes, and detailed comparisons of new electron gun models with standard models such as PARMELA. The group also addressed two areas of advances in computation: (i) new algorithms, including simulation in a Lorentz-boosted frame that can reduce computation time orders of magnitude, and (ii) new hardware architectures, like graphics processing units and Cell processors that promise dramatic increases in computing power. Highlights of the talks in these areas included results from the first large-scale parallel finite element particle-in-cell code (PIC), many order-of-magnitude speedup of, and details of porting the VPIC code to the Roadrunner supercomputer. The working group featured two plenary talks, one by Brian Albright of Los Alamos National Laboratory on the performance of the VPIC code on the Roadrunner supercomputer, and one by David Bruhwiler of Tech-X Corporation on recent advances in computation for advanced accelerators. Highlights of the talk by Albright included the first one trillion particle simulations, a sustained performance of 0.3 petaflops, and an eight times speedup of science calculations, including back-scatter in laser-plasma interaction. Highlights of the talk by Bruhwiler included simulations of 10 GeV accelerator laser wakefield stages including external injection, new developments in electromagnetic simulations of electron guns using finite difference and finite element approaches.

  19. Summary of the materials breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F. [Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (United States); Sommer, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This breakout group discussed the following topics and reached a number of recommendations summarized in this report. The topics of discussion included (1) a comparison of expected materials response at spallation sources to experience with fission reactors; (2) synergistic effects from high-energy particle radiation, corrosion, and cyclic stresses; (3) estimates, based on experience with materials developed for fission and fusion reactors, for -materials testing needs; - facilities for materials development, both available and needed; - candidate materials; - time frame for material qualification; and - expected program costs.

  20. Euro VI technologies and costs for Heavy Duty vehicles: the expert panels summary of stakeholders responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gense, N.L.J.; Riemersma, I.J.; Such, C.l; Ntziachristos, L.

    2006-01-01

    This report is the result of the work carried out under on the Europeans Commission’s call for tender regarding “Technical support for the Commission DG Environment on the development of Euro 5 standards for light-duty vehicles and Euro VI standards for heavy-duty vehicles” (Reference:

  1. Beam-beam interaction working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    The limit in hadron colliders is understood phenomenologically. The beam-beam interaction produces nonlinear resonances and makes the transverse tunes amplitude dependent. Tune spreads result from the latter, and as long as these tune spreads do not overlap low order resonances, the lifetime and performance is acceptable. Experience is that tenth and sometimes twelfth order resonances must be avoided, and the hadron collider limit corresponds roughly to the space available between resonances of that and lower order when operating near the coupling resonance. The beam-beam interaction in e + e - colliders is not understood well. This affects the performance of existing colliders and could lead to surprises in new ones. For example. a substantial amount of operator tuning is usually required to reach the performance limit given above, and this tuning has to be repeated after each major shutdown. The usual interpretation is that colliding beam performance is sensitive to small lattice errors, and these are being reduced during tuning. It is natural to ask what these errors are, how can a lattice be characterized to minimize tuning time, and what aspects of a lattice should receive particular attention when a new collider is being designed. The answers to this type of question are not known, and developing ideas for calculations, simulations and experiments that could illuminate the details of the beam-beam interaction was the primary working group activity

  2. Summary of the electron ID group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    Lepton identification is extremely important for any B physics experiment attempting to measure CP violation. The reasons are obvious: (1) single lepton triggers operate on 44% of all b bar b pairs; (2) lepton triggers are the only triggers (outside of secondary vertex triggers) that are feasible for a variety of important B decay modes; for example, B 0 →D + D - , B 0 →J/ψK s , and B s →K s γ; and (3) events triggered with leptons are already tagged. The electron identification group focused its efforts on learning what state-of-the-art collider detectors are doing in electron identification. To this end they entertained several talks each from the CDF and D0 collaborations at Fermilab, as well as several talks from proposed SSC and LHC experiments. Each talk was followed by lively discussion. They also attempted to understand what the backgrounds to electron identifications will be at the new higher energy hadron colliders - the SSC and LHC - their prejudice being that only these machines will have the energy and luminosity needed to see CP violation in the B system. None of the approved experiments at the SSC or LHC is optimized for B physics. Hence they focused on dedicated forward collider and fixed target detectors

  3. Summary of the laser working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigio, I.J.; Kurnit, N.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1988-10-01

    The laser working group considered several options to deliver synchronized laser pulses of the required energy to the photocathode and laser triggered switches. These requirements actually decreased during the course of the workshop, and the values finally settled upon (<10 μJ in 100 fs at ∼250 nm for the photocathode and ∼20 mJ in 2 ps near either 250 nm or 1 μm for the switches) were considered to be well within the state of the art. Some development work may be required, however, to provide a system that has the desirable characteristics of stability, ease of use and low maintenance. The baseline concept, which is similar to a number of existing systems, utilizes doubled Nd:YAG-pumped dye oscillator/amplifiers to produce an upconverted picosecond pulse that can be amplified to tens of mJ in a KrF excimer laser. A fraction of the dye oscillator output is also compressed by means of a fiber-grating compressor and further amplified in a dye amplifier before being upconverted to produce the synchronized pulse for the photocathode. 9 refs., 1 fig

  4. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

    2005-08-01

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  5. THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAWSON, S.

    2005-01-01

    This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e + e - collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg → H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan β and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e + e - collider

  6. Tunable thermoelectricity in monolayers of MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M

    2014-10-31

    We study the thermoelectric properties of monolayers of MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides under circularly polarized off-resonant light. Analytical expressions are derived for the Berry phase mediated magnetic moment, orbital magnetization, as well as thermal and Nernst conductivities. Tuning of the band gap by off-resonant light enhances the spin splitting in both the valence and conduction bands and, thus, leads to a dramatic improvement of the spin and valley thermoelectric properties.

  7. Synthesis of graphite intercalation compound of group VI metals and uranium hexafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Toshihiro; Hagiwara, Rika; Ema, Keiko; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1993-01-01

    Systematic investigations were made on the synthesis of graphite intercalation compounds of group VI transition metals (W and Mo) and uranium hexafluorides. The reactions were performed by interacting liquid or gaseous metal hexafluorides with or without elemental fluorine at ambient temperature. The degree of intercalation of these metal fluorides depends on the formation enthalpy of fluorometallate anion from the original metal hexafluoride, as has been found for other intercalation reactions of metal fluorides. (author)

  8. Tunable thermoelectricity in monolayers of MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties of monolayers of MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides under circularly polarized off-resonant light. Analytical expressions are derived for the Berry phase mediated magnetic moment, orbital magnetization, as well as thermal and Nernst conductivities. Tuning of the band gap by off-resonant light enhances the spin splitting in both the valence and conduction bands and, thus, leads to a dramatic improvement of the spin and valley thermoelectric properties.

  9. Summary records of the meetings of INFCE Working Group 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These were 6 meetings of Working Group 6 that took place between 8 December 1977 and 7 September 1979. This document consists of the summaries of those meetings and it reports on the objectives of the Working Group, the participants, the guidelines for the study, and the outline of the final report

  10. A first-principles study of group IV and VI atoms doped blue phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ruimin; Chen, Zheng; Gou, Manman; Zhang, Yixin

    2018-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we have systematically investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of blue phosphorene doped by group IV and VI atoms, including C, Si, Ge, Sn, O, S, Se and Te. All the doped systems are energetically stable. Only C, Si, Ge and O-substituted systems show the characteristics of spin polarization and the magnetic moments are all 1.0 μB. Moreover, we found that C, Si, Ge and O doped systems are indirect bandgap semiconductors, while Sn, S, Se and Te doped systems present metallic property. These results show that blue phosphorene can be used prospectively in optoelectronic and spintronic devices.

  11. Fast Photo-detection in Phototransistors based on Group III-VI Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prasanna; Ghosh, Sujoy; Wasala, Milinda; Lei, Sidong; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel; Talapatra, Saikat

    Response time of a photo detector is one of the crucial aspect of photo-detection. Recently it has been shown that direct band gap of few layered group III-VI materials helps in increased absorption of light thereby enhancing the photo responsive properties of these materials. Ternary system of Copper Indium Selenide has been extensively used in optoelectronics industry and it is expected that 2D layered structure of Copper Indium Selenide will be a key component of future optoelectronics devices based on 2D materials. Here we report fast photo detection in few layers of Copper Indium Selenide (CuIn7Se11) phototransistor. Few-layers of CuIn7Se11 flakes were exfoliated from crystals grown using chemical vapor transport technique. Our photo response characterization indicates responsivity of 104 mA/W with external quantum efficiency exceeding 103. We have found response time of few μs which is one of the fastest response among photodetectors based on 2D materials. We also found specific detectivity of 1012 Jones which is an order higher than conventional photodetectors. A comparison between response times of various layered group III-VI materials will be presented and discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office through a MURI Grant # W911NF-11-1-0362.

  12. Scientific conference on inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry devoted to centenary from birthday of academician V.I. Spitsyn. Program of conference and summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Program and summaries of reports of the Scientific conference on inorganic chemistry and radiochemistry devoted to the centenary from the birthday of academician V.I. Spitsyn are presented. The conference took place at the Chemical department of the Moscow State University named for M.V. Lomonosov 17 - 18 April, 2002. Part of the reports was devoted to the work of academician V.I. Spitsyn, his investigations into radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Scientific explorations in the fields of solid chemistry, inorganic and coordination chemistry, radiochemistry and chemical technology are discussed [ru

  13. Working Group 2 summary: Space charge effects in bending systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.L.; Emma, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    At the start of the Workshop, the authors asked the Working Group 2 participants to concentrate on three basic goals: (1) survey the status of how comprehensively the physics concerning space-charge effects in bends is understood and how complete is the available ensemble of analytic and computational tools; (2) guided by data from experiments and operational experience, identify sources of, and cures for, beam degradation; and (3) review space-charge physics in rings and the limitations it introduces. As the Workshop unfolded, the third goal naturally folded into the other two goals, and these goals, they believe, were fulfilled in that the Working Group was able to compile an end product consisting of a set of recommendations for potentially fruitful future work. This summary constitutes an overview of the deliberations of the Working Group, and it is their hope that the summary clarifies the motivation for the recommended work listed at the end. The summary is organized according to the two aforementioned goals, and the prime topics of discussion appear as subsections under these goals

  14. BEIR VI report. Public summary: the health effects of exposure to indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    For centuries it has been known that some underground miners suffered from higher rates of lung cancer than the general population. In recent decades, a growing body of evidence has casually linked their lung cancers to exposure to high levels of radon and also to cigarette smoking. The connection between radon and lung cancer in miners has raised concern that radon in homes might be causing lung cancer in the general population, although the radon levels in most homes are much lower than in most mines. The National Research Council study, which has been carried out by the sixth Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR VI), has used the most recent information available to estimate the risks posed by exposure to radon in homes. The most direct way to assess the risks posed by radon in homes is to measure radon exposures among people who have lung cancer and compare them with exposures among people who have not developed lung cancer. Several such studies have been completed, and several are under way. The studies have not produced a definitive answer, primarily because the risk is likely to be very small at the low exposure encountered from most homes and because it is difficult to estimate radon exposures that people have received over their lifetimes. In addition, it is clear that far more lung cancers are caused by smoking that are caused by radon. The risk of lung cancer caused by smoking is much higher than the risk of lung cancer caused by indoor radon. Most of the radon-related deaths among smokers would not have occurred if the victims had not smoked. Furthermore, there is evidence for a synergistic interaction between smoking and radon. In other words, the number of cancers induced in ever-smokers by radon is greater than one would expect from the additive effects of smoking along and radon alone. Nevertheless, the estimated 15400 or 21800 deaths attributed to radon in combination with cigarette-smoking and radon alone in never

  15. Summary report: working group 2 on 'Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    1998-01-01

    A summary of the talks, papers and discussion sessions presented in the Working Group on Plasma Based Acceleration Concepts is given within the context of the progress towards a 1 GeV laser driven accelerator module. The topics covered within the Working Group were self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration, standard laser wakefield acceleration, plasma beat wave acceleration, laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels, plasma wakefield acceleration, plasma lenses and optical injection techniques for laser wakefield accelerators. An overview will be given of the present status of experimental and theoretical progress as well as an outlook towards the future physics and technological challenges for the development of an optimized accelerator module

  16. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in the Laser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespread observation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement between measured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration of laser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laser wakefield structure; new methods for measuring <100 fs electron bunches; and new methods for 'machining' laser-plasma accelerator structures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmap for laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection and guiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics; petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasma accelerators

  17. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    2017-06-01

    This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green's function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green's function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green's function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function). The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ (x ) -potential profile. This retarded Green's function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green's function for the system without the δ (x ) -potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green's function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  18. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman J. M. Horing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green’s function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green’s function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green’s function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function. The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ(x-potential profile. This retarded Green’s function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green’s function for the system without the δ(x-potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green’s function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  19. Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friesen, H.N.

    1992-10-01

    This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8

  20. [Affinity of the elements in group VI of the periodic table to tumors and organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, A; Hisada, K; Ando, I

    1976-10-01

    In order to investigate the tumor affinity radioisotopes, chromium (51Cr), molybdenum (99Mo), tungsten (181W), selenium (75Se) and tellurium (127mTe)--the elements of group VI in the periodic table--were examined, using the rats which were subcutaneously transplanted with Yoshida sarcoma. Seven preprarations, sodium chromate (Na251CrO4), chromium chloride (51CrCl3), normal ammonium molybdate ((NH4)299MoO7), sodium tungstate (Na2181WO4), sodium selenate (Na275SeO4), sodium selenite (Na275SeO3) and tellurous acid (H2127mTeO3) were injected intravenously to each group of tumor bearing rats. These rats were sacrificed at various periods after injection of each preparation: 3 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours in all preparations. The radioactivities of the tumor, blood, muscle, liver, kidney and spleen were measured by a well-type scintillation counter, and retention values (in every tissue including the tumor) were calculated in percent of administered dose per g-tissue weight. All of seven preparations did not have any affinity for malignant tumor. Na251CrO4 and H2127mTeO3 had some affinity for the kidneys, and Na275SeO3 had some affinity for the liver. Na2181WO4 and (NH4)299MoO4 disappeared very rapidly from the blood and soft tissue, and about seventy-five percent of radioactivity was excreted in urine within first 3 hours.

  1. Single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI semiconductors: Structural stability, electronic structures, optical properties, and photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-He; Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, single-layer group III monochalcogenides have attracted both theoretical and experimental interest at their potential applications in photonic devices, electronic devices, and solar energy conversion. Excited by this, we theoretically design two kinds of highly stable single-layer group IV-V (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P) and group V-IV-III-VI (IV =Si ,Ge , and Sn; V =N and P; III =Al ,Ga , and In; VI =O and S) compounds with the same structures with single-layer group III monochalcogenides via first-principles simulations. By using accurate hybrid functional and quasiparticle methods, we show the single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI are indirect bandgap semiconductors with their bandgaps and band edge positions conforming to the criteria of photocatalysts for water splitting. By applying a biaxial strain on single-layer group IV-V, single-layer group IV nitrides show a potential on mechanical sensors due to their bandgaps showing an almost linear response for strain. Furthermore, our calculations show that both single-layer group IV-V and group V-IV-III-VI have absorption from the visible light region to far-ultraviolet region, especially for single-layer SiN-AlO and SnN-InO, which have strong absorption in the visible light region, resulting in excellent potential for solar energy conversion and visible light photocatalytic water splitting. Our research provides valuable insight for finding more potential functional two-dimensional semiconductors applied in optoelectronics, solar energy conversion, and photocatalytic water splitting.

  2. OPPS Provider Summary for 30 Selected APC Groups - CY2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A provider level summary of Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) average estimated submitted charges and average Medicare Payments for 30 selected Ambulatory...

  3. The Beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Azuelos et al.

    2004-03-18

    In this working group we have investigated a number of aspects of searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) at the running or planned TeV-scale colliders. For the most part, we have considered hadron colliders, as they will define particle physics at the energy frontier for the next ten years at least. The variety of models for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) physics has grown immensely. It is clear that only future experiments can provide the needed direction to clarify the correct theory. Thus, our focus has been on exploring the extent to which hadron colliders can discover and study BSM physics in various models. We have placed special emphasis on scenarios in which the new signal might be difficult to find or of a very unexpected nature. For example, in the context of supersymmetry (SUSY), we have considered: how to make fully precise predictions for the Higgs bosons as well as the superparticles of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) (parts III and IV); MSSM scenarios in which most or all SUSY particles have rather large masses (parts V and VI); the ability to sort out the many parameters of the MSSM using a variety of signals and study channels (part VII); whether the no-lose theorem for MSSM Higgs discovery can be extended to the next-to-minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) in which an additional singlet superfield is added to the minimal collection of superfields, potentially providing a natural explanation of the electroweak value of the parameter {micro} (part VIII); sorting out the effects of CP violation using Higgs plus squark associate production (part IX); the impact of lepton flavor violation of various kinds (part X); experimental possibilities for the gravitino and its sgoldstino partner (part XI); what the implications for SUSY would be if the NuTeV signal for di-muon events were interpreted as a sign of R-parity violation (part XII). Our other main focus was on the phenomenological implications of extra

  4. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  5. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  6. International Working Group on Past Reactors Thirteenth Annual Meeting. Summary Report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria from 9 to 11 April 1980. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programme in the field of LMFBRs and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  7. Summary, Working Group 1: Electron guns and injector designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Bazarov, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    We summarize the proceedings of Working Group 1 of the 2005 Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) Workshop. The subject of this working group, the electron gun and injector design, is arguably the most critical part of the ERL as it determines the ultimate performance of this type of accelerators. Working Group 1 dealt with a variety of subjects: The technology of DC, normal-conducting RF and superconducting RF guns; beam dynamics in the gun and injector; the cathode and laser package; modeling and computational issues; magnetized beams and polarization. A short overview of these issues covered in the Working Group is presented in this paper

  8. The Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2002-08-08

    Various theoretical aspects of physics beyond the Standard Model at hadron colliders are discussed. Our focus will be on those issues that most immediately impact the projects pursued as part of the BSM group at this meeting.

  9. Summary of the BDS and MDI CLIC08 Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Ahmed, I; Ambatu, PK; Angal-Kalinin, D; Barlow, R; Baud, J P; Bolzon, B; Braun, H; Burkhardt, H; Burt, GC; Corsini, R; Dalena, B; Dexter, AC; Dolgashev, V; Elsener, K; Fernandez Hernando, JL; Gaillard, G; Geffroy, N; Jackson, F; Jeremie, A; Jones, RM; McIntosh, P; Moffeit, K; Peltier, F; Resta-López, J; Rumolo, G; Schulte, D; Seryi, A; Toader, A; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes the presentations held within the Beam Delivery System and Machine Detector Interface working group of the CLIC08 workshop. The written contributions have been provided by the presenters on a voluntary basis.

  10. Summary Report: NMSBA CY 2016 - AEgis Technologies Group Inc. #12458.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellum, John Curtis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Field, Ella Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AEgis requires large area partial mirror optics consisting of partially reflecting optical coatings on large dimension substrates for high energy laser (HEL) applications. The partial mirrors should transmit nearly the same small fraction of HEL radiation incident from a wide range of angles of incidence (AOIs), and the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the coatings should be high enough for them to be able to withstand direct exposure to near infrared CW HEL radiation at multi-kilowatt/cm2 power levels. The transmitted fraction of incident HEL radiation should reach an array of detectors at power levels high enough for reliable detection but low enough to not damage the detectors. The reflected fraction of incident HEL radiation should scatter into a divergent pattern so as to be eye safe at a distance of ~ 200 m from the mirror in the case of 100 kilowatt incident laser power. The detector array together with the partial mirror optic and possible additional optics that provide divergent scattering of reflected HEL radiation constitute what AEgis refers to as a target board. The target board use environment may vary from benign, indoor laboratory conditions to harsh, outdoor conditions in tests on the ground as well as in air. Under this NMSBA project, Sandia agreed to apply its extensive expertise and capability in the design and production of high LIDT coatings on large dimension optics for high power pulsed laser radiation to advise and assist AEgis in the design and development of high LIDT coatings for the partial mirror optic. Sandia and AEgis met several times to discuss the partial mirror and target board requirements, and Sandia was guided in its work by these discussions as well as by the partial mirror and target board requirement summaries of Tables 1 and 2, respectively, that were provided by AEgis.

  11. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 731 Summary: Group Prenatal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Individual prenatal care is intended to prevent poor perinatal outcomes and provide education to women throughout pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period through a series of one-on-one encounters between a woman and her obstetrician or other obstetric care provider. Concerns regarding increasing health care costs, health care provider availability, dissatisfaction with wait times, and the minimal opportunity for education and support associated with the individual care model have given rise to interest in alternative models of prenatal care. One alternative model, group prenatal care, may be beneficial or preferred for some practice settings and patient populations, although individual prenatal care remains standard practice. Group prenatal care models are designed to improve patient education and include opportunities for social support while maintaining the risk screening and physical assessment of individual prenatal care. Bringing patients with similar needs together for health care encounters increases the time available for the educational component of the encounter, improves efficiency, and reduces repetition. Evidence suggests patients have better prenatal knowledge, feel more ready for labor and delivery, are more satisfied with care in prenatal care groups, and initiate breastfeeding more often. There is no evidence that suggests that group prenatal care causes harm. Individual and group care models warrant additional study with a goal of demonstrating differences in outcomes and identifying populations that benefit most from specific care models.

  12. Summary of the target-blanket breakout group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capiello, M.; Bell, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Barthold, W.

    1995-10-01

    This breakout group discussed a number of topics and issues pertaining to target and blanket concepts for accelerator-driven systems. This major component area is one marked by a broad spectrum of technical approaches. It is therefore less defined than other major component areas such as the accelerator and is at an earlier stage of technical needs and task specification. The working group did reach a number of general conclusions and recommendations that are summarized. The Conference and the Target/Blanket Breakout Group provided a first opportunity for people working on a variety of missions and concepts to get together and exchange information. A number of subcritical systems applicable for a spectrum of missions were proposed at the Conference and discussed in the Breakout Group. Missions included plutonium disposition, energy production, waste destruction, isotope production, and neutron scattering. The Target/Blanket Breakout Group also defined areas where parameters and data should be addressed as target/blanket design activities become more detailed and sophisticated.

  13. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan Lammel et al. email = crathbun@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large

  14. Summary of Working Group 7 on 'Exotic acceleration schemes'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.

    2001-01-01

    Exotic concepts of advanced acceleration technologies have been explored by Group 7 under the leadership of T. Tajima and T. Smith (who could not attend) at the AAC. Explored concepts are: (1) proton (ion) acceleration by laser, (2) additional ion acceleration methods, (3) crystal x-rays and acceleration, (4) vacuum acceleration, (5) active medium acceleration, and (6) some advanced methods in laser wakefield. The first subject of laser photon acceleration was discussed jointly with Group 1 and in the end the participants came to an agreement on the mechanism of proton acceleration by laser irradiation

  15. Summary report for the Microwave Source Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westenskow, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions of the Microwave Source Working Group during the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held October 13-19, 1996 in the Granlibakken Conference Center at Lake Tahoe, California. Progress on rf sources being developed for linear colliders is reviewed. Possible choices for high-power rf sources at 34 GHz and 94 GHz for future colliders are examined. 27 refs

  16. Summary report for the Microwave Source Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westenskow, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions of the Microwave Source Working Group during the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held October 13-19, 1996 in the Granlibakken Conference Center at Lake Tahoe, California. Progress on rf sources being developed for linear colliders is reviewed. Possible choices for high-power rf sources at 34 GHz and 94 GHz for future colliders are examined. 27 refs.

  17. Interaction of uranium(VI) towards glutathione. An example to study different functional groups in one molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.; Geipel, G.; Viehweger, K.; Bernhard, G.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione, the most abundant thiol compound of the cell, has a great binding potential towards heavy metal ions. Hence it might influence the distribution of actinides on a cellular level. The unknown strength of the interaction of uranium(VI) with glutathione at physiologically relevant pH is subject of this paper and was studied with UV-vis spectroscopy and time-resolved laserinduced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The complex stability constant of UO 2 H 2 GS + , logβ 121 0 , was calculated to be 39.09±0.15 and 39.04±0.02 in case of UV-vis spectroscopy and TRLFS respectively. Therefore the average formation constant for UO 2 2+ +H 2 GS - = UO 2 H 2 GS + can be assigned to be log K 0 11 = 19.83±0.15. Furthermore it was demonstrated that derivatization of the ligand associated with an enhancement of the ligand's spectroscopic properties can be used for the determination of complex stability constants and to assess the coordination chemistry in more detail. Using UV-vis spectroscopy, the stability constant of the complex between UO 2 2+ and glutathione pyruvate S-conjugate, a well absorbing ligand in contrast to glutathione, was calculated to be > 39.24±0.08. Furthermore the interaction of UO 2 2+ with glutathione derivatized with the fluorescent label monobromobimane was examined with femtosecond laser fluorescence spectroscopy. Thereby the stability constant of the 1: 1 complex was determined to be > 39.35±0.02. Although the thiol group of glutathione was blocked a strong coordination was found. Thus a significant involvement of the thiol group in the coordination of U(VI) can be excluded. (orig.)

  18. Summary of conclusions of the vacuum photodiode working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the design of a 30 MV gun. In considering the design of the vacuum photodiode switched to drive the accelerating field in the gun, we have paid attention to the work of the groups on high-voltage pulsing and on the design of the laser. We have found that we can trade off reduced laser power at the cost of a higher charging voltage for our one stage accelerator. We have presented the various parameter sets to the two groups and attempted to measure their enthusiasm for each set, and we have chosen the set that seems to provide an equal level of difficulty on both sides. 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. E-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggli, P.; Southern California U.; Ng, J.S.T.; SLAC

    2005-01-01

    The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of ∼4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner

  20. Summary of the working group on FEL theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1984-01-01

    The working group on FEL theory dedicated most of its discussions to topics relevant to the high gain regime in a free electron laser. In addition the area of interest was mainly restricted to FELs for the production of XUV radiation (<1000 A). A list of the topics that were felt to be relevant is: (1) characterization of the FEL high gain regime; (2) the amplified spontaneous emission mode of operation (ASE); (3) superradiance in FELs; (4) diffraction effects for high gain FELs; (5) noise and start-up; (6) coherence properties of the radiation for the ASE and superradiant FELS. 9 references.

  1. Summary of the working group on FEL theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1984-01-01

    The working group on FEL theory dedicated most of its discussions to topics relevant to the high gain regime in a free electron laser. In addition the area of interest was mainly restricted to FELs for the production of XUV radiation (<1000 A). A list of the topics that were felt to be relevant is: (1) characterization of the FEL high gain regime; (2) the amplified spontaneous emission mode of operation (ASE); (3) superradiance in FELs; (4) diffraction effects for high gain FELs; (5) noise and start-up; (6) coherence properties of the radiation for the ASE and superradiant FELS. 9 references

  2. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  3. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  4. Summary for working group B on long-term stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    A total of 36 workshop participants attended at least one session of the Long-Term Stability working group. We avoided turning these sessions into a specialized seminar series by meeting in two subgroups, loosely labeled Analysis and Diffusion ampersand Tracking, so that working discussions among a reasonably small number of people were possible. Nonetheless, no attempt is made to categorize the 13 group B papers according to original subgroup. A similar workshop, the Workshop on Accelerator Orbit and Particle Tracking Problems, was held almost exactly 10 years ago at Brookhaven. It is interesting to see how many of the participants in the photograph of that workshop appear again in the photograph at the front of these proceedings. Fortunately, it is not correct to infer that little progress has been made in the last decade, nor that the average age of the participants has increased significantly. Rather, the recent photograph has many more, younger, faces than its predecessor. This attests to the ongoing interest and vigorous activity in an area of central importance to accelerator physics

  5. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 ; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10 31 cm -2 sec -1 . Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout

  6. Study group meeting on steam generators for LMFBR's. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-07-01

    The Meeting organised by IAEA international working group on fast reactors which considered that the subject of sodium heated steam generators was a topic which needed study by the experts of several disciplines. For example: people who design such steam generators, specialists in the field of sodium water reactions, experts in material and water chemistry and members of the utilities who would be the customers for such units. Besides the exchange of large amount of information, it was considered that further special studies were necessary for the following subjects: materials; maintenance and repair; operating procedures and control of steam generators. A separate study of sodium-water reactions was recommended considering the safety aspects related to large water leakage and economic advantage of possible detection and protection against small water leaks.

  7. Study group meeting on steam generators for LMFBR's. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Meeting organised by IAEA international working group on fast reactors which considered that the subject of sodium heated steam generators was a topic which needed study by the experts of several disciplines. For example: people who design such steam generators, specialists in the field of sodium water reactions, experts in material and water chemistry and members of the utilities who would be the customers for such units. Besides the exchange of large amount of information, it was considered that further special studies were necessary for the following subjects: materials; maintenance and repair; operating procedures and control of steam generators. A separate study of sodium-water reactions was recommended considering the safety aspects related to large water leakage and economic advantage of possible detection and protection against small water leaks

  8. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Delaware based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Delaware census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  9. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Coastal States based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of coastal states census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  10. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Mississippi based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Mississippi census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  11. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Louisiana based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Louisiana census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  12. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Alabama based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Alabama census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  13. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Washington based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Washington census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  14. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Hawaii based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Hawaii census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  15. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Wisconsin based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Wisconsin census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  16. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Rhode Island based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Rhode Island census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  17. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Georgia based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Georgia census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  18. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Michigan based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Michigan census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  19. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Virginia based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Virginia census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  20. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Maryland based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Maryland census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  1. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Maine based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Maine census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  2. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Alaska based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Alaska census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  3. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for New Hampshire based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of New Hampshire census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  4. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Illinois based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Illinois census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  5. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Ohio based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Ohio census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  6. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Pennsylvania based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Pennsylvania census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  7. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Connecticut based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Connecticut census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  8. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for New Jersey based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of New Jersey census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  9. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for New York based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of New York census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  10. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Massachusetts based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Massachusetts census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  11. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Texas based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Texas census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  12. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Indiana based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Indiana census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  13. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for South Carolina based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of South Carolina census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  14. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Oregon based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Oregon census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  15. The QCD/SM Working Group: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, M.

    2004-01-01

    Among the many physics processes at TeV hadron colliders, we look most eagerly for those that display signs of the Higgs boson or of new physics. We do so however amid an abundance of processes that proceed via Standard Model (SM) and in particular Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) interactions, and that are interesting in their own right. Good knowledge of these processes is required to help us distinguish the new from the known. Their theoretical and experimental study teaches us at the same time more about QCD/SM dynamics, and thereby enables us to further improve such distinctions. This is important because it is becoming increasingly clear that the success of finding and exploring Higgs boson physics or other New Physics at the Tevatron and LHC will depend significantly on precise understanding of QCD/SM effects for many observables. To improve predictions and deepen the study of QCD/SM signals and backgrounds was therefore the ambition for our QCD/SM working group at this Les Houches workshop. Members of the working group made significant progress towards this on a number of fronts. A variety of tools were further developed, from methods to perform higher order perturbative calculations or various types of resummation, to improvements in the modeling of underlying events and parton showers. Furthermore, various precise studies of important specific processes were conducted. A significant part of the activities in Les Houches revolved around Monte Carlo simulation of collision events. A number of contributions in this report reflect the progress made in this area. At present a large number of Monte Carlo programs exist, each written with a different purpose and employing different techniques. Discussions in Les Houches revealed the need for an accessible primer on Monte Carlo programs, featuring a listing of various codes, each with a short description, but also providing a low-level explanation of the underlying methods. This primer has now been compiled and a

  16. Free electron laser and coherent radiation. Working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gover, A.; Csonka, P.; Deacon, D.

    1984-01-01

    The planned development of a new storage ring at SSRL gives hope for the exciting possibility that an x-ray laser may become available in a users facility. Such a device would certainly be a unique and revolutionary tool for scientific research and industrial applications, which may take advantage of the spatial and temporal coherence, high power and high brightness of this device in a wavelength regime where no alternative coherent radiation sources exist. The feasibility of implementing such a device in the new ring should be examined carefully by the ring designers. If conclusions are positive, the ring design should take into account the special requirements which are set by the x-ray laser design parameters. Our working group made the first step in this examination process. Most of the emphasis was put on the consideration of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XR FEL). FEL technology has developed in the last few years and was recently demonstrated to operate successfully in the visible wavelength regime in the ACO storage ring in Orsay

  17. Group IB Organometallic Chemistry XXXIV: Thermal behavior and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarylpropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1, 2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi{2}CU{4}Br{2} and Z-Vi{2}Cu{4}R{2} [Vi @? (2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4})C@?C(Me)-(C{6}H{4}Me-4), R @? 2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4} or 4-MeC{6}H{4}C@?C] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were

  18. Human genetic studies in areas of high natural radiation VI. Genetical load and ethnic group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire-Maia, A [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas de Botucatu (Brazil). Departamento de Genetica

    1974-01-01

    The load of mutations disclosed by inbreeding, according to the ethnic group of the parents, has been analyzed in our data. Besides the total of the population, a sample with no alien ancestrals has also been analyzed. Genetic load has been studied for absortions, still births, pos-natal mortality, total mortality, anomalies, total mortality + anomalies, and abnormalities in general.

  19. Human genetic studies in areas of high natural radiation VI. Genetical load and ethnic group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Maia, A.

    1974-01-01

    The load of mutations disclosed by inbreeding, according to the ethnic group of the parents, has been analyzed in our data. Besides the total of the population, a sample with no alien ancestrals has also been analyzed. Genetic load has been studied for absortions, still births, pos-natal mortality, total mortality, anomalies, total mortality + anomalies, and abnormalities in general [pt

  20. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giele, W.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), and more generally the physics of the Standard Model (SM), enter in many ways in high energy processes at TeV Colliders, and especially in hadron colliders (the Tevatron at Fermilab and the forthcoming LHC at CERN), First of all, at hadron colliders, QCD controls the parton luminosity, which rules the production rates of any particle or system with large invariant mass and/or large transverse momentum. Accurate predictions for any signal of possible ''New Physics'' sought at hadron colliders, as well as the corresponding backgrounds, require an improvement in the control of uncertainties on the determination of PDF and of the propagation of these uncertainties in the predictions. Furthermore, to fully exploit these new types of PDF with uncertainties, uniform tools (computer interfaces, standardization of the PDF evolution codes used by the various groups fitting PDF's) need to be proposed and developed. The dynamics of colour also affects, both in normalization and shape, various observables of the signals of any possible ''New Physics'' sought at the TeV scale, such as, e.g. the production rate, or the distributions in transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. Last, but not least, QCD governs many backgrounds to the searches for this ''New Physics''. Large and important QCD corrections may come from extra hard parton emission (and the corresponding virtual corrections), involving multi-leg and/or multi-loop amplitudes. This requires complex higher order calculations, and new methods have to be designed to compute the required multi-legs and/or multi-loop corrections in a tractable form. In the case of semi-inclusive observables, logarithmically enhanced contributions coming from multiple soft and collinear gluon emission require sophisticated QCD resummation techniques. Resummation is a catch-all name for efforts to extend the predictive power of QCD by summing the large logarithmic corrections to all orders in perturbation theory. In

  1. The QCD/SM working group: Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Giele et al.

    2004-01-12

    Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), and more generally the physics of the Standard Model (SM), enter in many ways in high energy processes at TeV Colliders, and especially in hadron colliders (the Tevatron at Fermilab and the forthcoming LHC at CERN), First of all, at hadron colliders, QCD controls the parton luminosity, which rules the production rates of any particle or system with large invariant mass and/or large transverse momentum. Accurate predictions for any signal of possible ''New Physics'' sought at hadron colliders, as well as the corresponding backgrounds, require an improvement in the control of uncertainties on the determination of PDF and of the propagation of these uncertainties in the predictions. Furthermore, to fully exploit these new types of PDF with uncertainties, uniform tools (computer interfaces, standardization of the PDF evolution codes used by the various groups fitting PDF's) need to be proposed and developed. The dynamics of colour also affects, both in normalization and shape, various observables of the signals of any possible ''New Physics'' sought at the TeV scale, such as, e.g. the production rate, or the distributions in transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. Last, but not least, QCD governs many backgrounds to the searches for this ''New Physics''. Large and important QCD corrections may come from extra hard parton emission (and the corresponding virtual corrections), involving multi-leg and/or multi-loop amplitudes. This requires complex higher order calculations, and new methods have to be designed to compute the required multi-legs and/or multi-loop corrections in a tractable form. In the case of semi-inclusive observables, logarithmically enhanced contributions coming from multiple soft and collinear gluon emission require sophisticated QCD resummation techniques. Resummation is a catch-all name for efforts to extend the predictive power of QCD by summing the large

  2. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.

    2012-01-01

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005

  3. The SM and NLO Multileg Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J.R.; Archibald, J.; Badger, S.; Ball, R.D.; Bevilacqua, G.; Bierenbaum, I.; Binoth, T.; Boudjema, F.; Boughezal, R.; Bredenstein, A.; Britto, R.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, J.; Carminati, L.; Chachamis, G.; Ciulli, V.; Cullen, G.; Czakon, M.; Del Debbio, L.; Denner, A.; Dissertori, G.; /Edinburgh U. /Zurich, ETH /Michigan State U. /CAFPE, Granada /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /DESY, Zeuthen /Democritos Nucl. Res. Ctr. /Valencia U., IFIC /Annecy, LAPTH /Zurich U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Saclay, SPhT /University Coll. London /Fermilab /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /PSI, Villigen /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /RWTH Aachen U.

    2012-04-10

    After years of waiting, and after six Les Houches workshops, the era of LHC running is finally upon us, albeit at a lower initial center-of-mass energy than originally planned. Thus, there has been a great sense of anticipation from both the experimental and theoretical communities. The last two years, in particular, have seen great productivity in the area of multi-parton calculations at leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and this productivity is reflected in the proceedings of the NLM group. Both religions, Feynmanians and Unitarians, as well as agnostic experimenters, were well-represented in both the discussions at Les Houches, and in the contributions to the write-up. Next-to-leading order (NLO) is the first order at which the normalization, and in some cases the shape, of perturbative cross sections can be considered reliable. This can be especially true when probing extreme kinematic regions, as for example with boosted Higgs searches considered in several of the contributions to this writeup. A full understanding for both standard model and beyond the standard model physics at the LHC requires the development of fast, reliable programs for the calculation of multi-parton final states at NLO. There have been many advances in the development of NLO techniques, standardization and automation for such processes and this is reflected in the contributions to the first section of this writeup. Many calculations have previously been performed with the aid of semi-numerical techniques. Such techniques, although retaining the desired accuracy, lead to codes which are slow to run. Advances in the calculation of compact analytic expressions for Higgs + 2 jets have resulted in the development of much faster codes, which extend the phenomenology that can be conducted, as well as making the code available to the public for the first time. A prioritized list of NLO cross sections was assembled at Les Houches in 2005

  4. Critical experiments analyses by using 70 energy group library based on ENDF/B-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Yoshihisa; Matsumoto, Hideki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Energy Systems Engineering Center; Huria, H.C.; Ouisloumen, M.

    1998-03-01

    The newly developed 70-group library has been validated by comparing kinf from a continuous energy Monte-Carlo code MCNP and two dimensional spectrum calculation code PHOENIX-CP. The code employs Discrete Angular Flux Method based on Collision Probability. The library has been also validated against a large number of critical experiments and numerical benchmarks for assemblies with MOX and Gd fuels. (author)

  5. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional group IV-VI compounds: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-05-01

    New classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport is a fundamental physical parameter. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of the 2D orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds of GeS, GeSe, SnS and SnSe by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite their similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as phonon group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity (κ), etc. Especially, the κ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer GeS shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer SnS and SnSe show almost isotropy in phonon transport. The origin of the diverse anisotropy is fully studied and the underlying mechanism is discussed in details. With limited size, the κ could be effectively lowered, and the anisotropy could be effectively modulated by nanostructuring, which would extend the applications to nanoscale thermoelectrics and thermal management. Our study offers fundamental understanding of the anisotropic phonon transport properties of 2D materials, and would be of significance for further study, modulation and applications in emerging technologies.

  6. Infrared spectroscopic studies of uranyl(VI) species adsorbed from aqueous [UO2(CO3)3]4- solutions on to a polymer bearing amidoxime groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko; Seno, Manabu; Itagaki, Takaharu

    1987-01-01

    Infrared spectra of uranyl(VI) species adsorbed from aqeuous [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- solutions on to a polymer having amidoxime groups were examined in order to obtain information on the adsorption mechanism. The subtraction spectra in a region of 500-1 500 cm -1 exhibit only a distinct band at 886 cm -1 ascribed to the v 3 mode of the O=U=O moiety and no band assigned to carbonato ligands, suggesting the existence of a carbonato-free uranyl(VI) complex; this is consistent with the adsorption equilibrium reported previously. (author)

  7. Group ib organometallic chemistry. XXXIV. Thermal behaviour and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarypropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Koten, G. van; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1,2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi2CU4Br2 and Z-Vi2Cu4R2 [Vi = (2-Me2NC6H4)C=C(Me)-(C6H4Me-4), R = 2-Me2NC6H4 or 4-MeC6H4CC] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were formed on thermolysis of (Z-ViCu2OTf)η

  8. Lithium adsorption and migration in group IV-VI compounds and GeS/graphene heterostructures: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Kuan-Rong; Fang, Lincan; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2018-04-18

    By means of first-principles calculations, the adsorption and transport properties of lithium (Li) in orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds MX (M = Ge, Sn; X = S, Se) and GeS/graphene heterostructures have been systematically investigated. Strong interactions and distinct charge transfer between Li and compounds MX are observed. The Li diffusion barriers along the zigzag direction are found to be much lower than that along the armchair direction in monolayer and bulk MX, showing distinct anisotropic diffusion features. In particular, monolayer GeS has a lowest barrier of 0.173 eV (zigzag) among them and it will transit from a semiconductor to a metallic state after Li intercalation, indicating fast Li and electron transport properties. As a comparison, the addition of graphene in a GeS/graphene heterostructure could enhance its binding with Li, decrease the Li diffusion barrier and inhibit the volume expansion dramatically, suggesting a potential performance improvement. Our study not only reveals the directional transport properties of Li in MX, but also improves the understanding of the role of graphene in the MX/graphene heterostructure, and shows great potential application in the field of electrode materials.

  9. Adopting Thai Diagnosis Related Group for Vietnam Universal Health Coverage: A Case of Ba Vi District Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Le Tuan, M.D., Ph.D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This studyaimedtoclassifyallhospitaldischargescoveredbyhealthinsurancesystem intodiagnosis relatedgroup (DRG to guideproviderpayment reforms of universalhealth coverage roadmap in Vietnam. Methods: Data from Ba Vi hospital from January to December 2012 were grouped into DRGs by Viet-DRG grouperversion1.0developedbasedon Thai-DRG version5methodologies. ThePearsoncorrelation(r wasused to assess the performance of Viet-DRG grouper as against Thai-DRG grouper. A 5-step trimming of individual inpatientdata to achieve thehighest correlations was performed. Results: Dataof12,220inpatientcases wereanalyzedbybothgroupers,84.4% of totalcases wereclassifiedinto 89 DRGs. Thefive mostcommon DRGs werevaginaldelivery withoutcomplicatingdiagnosis (14500; Respira- tory infection/inflammation, no complication and comorbidity (04520; Otitis media and URI, no complication andcomorbidity(03530; Viral illnessexceptdengue,child,nocomplicationandcomorbidity(18610; Bronchitis and asthma, no complication and comorbidity (04590. The performance of Viet-DRG grouper v1.0 compared with Thai-DRG grouper v5.0for 89 DRGs intermsof relative weights as of 0.4 andlength of stay as of 0.5. Conclusion: Validity of thefirst Viet-DRG was at moderate level compared to Thai-DRG due to the limitation ofdata availability andqualityat thehospital.

  10. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group C Summary on Applications to FELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2003-01-01

    This is the summary of the activities in working group C, ''Application to FELs,'' which was based in the Bithia room at the Joint ICFA Advanced Accelerator and Beam Dynamics Workshop on July 1-6, 2002 in Chia Laguna, Sardinia, Italy. Working group C was small in relation to the other working groups at that workshop. Attendees include Enrica Chiadroni, University of Rome ape with an identical pulse length. ''La Sapienza'', Luca Giannessi, ENEA, Steve Lidia, LBNL, Vladimir Litvinenko, Duke University, Patrick Muggli, UCLA, Alex Murokh, UCLA, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn, SLAC, Sven Reiche, UCLA, Jamie Rosenzweig, UCLA, Claudio Pellegrini, UCLA, Susan Smith, Daresbury Laboratory, Matthew Thompson, UCLA, Alexander Varfolomeev, Russian Research Center, plus a small number of occasional visitors. The working group addressed a total of nine topics. Each topic was introduced by a presentation, which initiated a discussion of the topic during and after the presentation. The speaker of the introductory presentation facilitated the discussion. There were six topics that were treated in stand-alone sessions of working group C. In addition, there were two joint sessions, one with working group B, which included one topic, and one with working group C, which included two topics. The presentations that were given in the joint sessions are summarized in the working group summary reports for groups B and D, respectively. This summary will only discuss the topics that were addressed in the stand-alone sessions, including Start-To-End Simulations, SASE Experiment, PERSEO, ''Optics Free'' FEL Oscillators, and VISA II

  11. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The fourth workshop of the OECD/NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) was hosted by ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste Management and enriched fissile materials. The central theme of the workshop was ''Dealing with interests, values and knowledge in managing risk''within the Belgian context of local partnerships for the long term management of low-level, short-lived radioactive waste. The four-day workshop started with a half-day session in Brussels giving a general introduction on the Belgian context and the local partnership methodology. This was followed by community visits to three local partnerships, PaLoFF in Fleurus-Farciennes, MONA in Mol, and STOLA in Dessel. After the visits, the workshop continued with two full-day sessions in Brussels. One hundred and nineteen registered participants, representing 13 countries, attended the workshop or participated in the community visits. About two thirds were Belgian stakeholders; the remainder came from FSC member organisations. The participants included representatives of municipal governments, civil society organisations, government agencies, industrial companies, the media, and international organisations as well as private citizens, consultants and academics. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop and the community visits. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Executive Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's reflection aiming to place the main lessons of the workshop into an international perspective. (author)

  12. Advances and bottlenecks in modelling the greenhouse climate: summary of a group discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seginer, I.; Bakker, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a summary of a group discussion at the symposium 'Models in protected cultivation' held in Wageningen, August 1997. The discussion focused on the reasons for the relatively limited acceptance and application of greenhouse climate models, especially in commercial practice. The

  13. Translanguaging as a strategy for group work: Summary writing as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Translanguaging as a strategy for group work: Summary writing as a measure for reading comprehension among university students. ... This paper reports on a research study conducted to ascertain the effectiveness of using a translanguaging approach to assist students in understanding texts. Through discussion of the ...

  14. Chromium VI and stomach cancer: a meta-analysis of the current epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Roberta; Beaumont, James J; Petersen, Scott J; Alexeeff, George V; Steinmaus, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Chromium VI (hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI)) is an established cause of lung cancer, but its association with gastrointestinal cancer is less clear. The goal of this study was to examine whether the current human epidemiological research on occupationally inhaled Cr(VI) supports the hypothesis that Cr(VI) is associated with human stomach cancer. Following a thorough literature search and review of individual studies, we used meta-analysis to summarise the current epidemiological literature on inhaled Cr(VI) and stomach cancer, explore major sources of heterogeneity, and assess other elements of causal inference. We identified 56 cohort and case-control studies and 74 individual relative risk (RR) estimates on stomach cancer and Cr(VI) exposure or work in an occupation associated with high Cr(VI) exposure including chromium production, chrome plating, leather work and work with Portland cement. The summary RR for all studies combined was 1.27 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.38). In analyses limited to only those studies identifying increased risks of lung cancer, the summary RR for stomach cancer was higher (RR=1.41, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.69). Overall, these results suggest that Cr(VI) is a stomach carcinogen in humans, which is consistent with the tumour results reported in rodent studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Beam and Radiation Generation, Monitoring, and Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Church, Mike; Kim, Kiyong

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  16. Impact of the uranium (VI) speciation in mineralised urines on its extraction by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups used in chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadi, S; Bouvier-Capely, C; Ritt, A; Peroux, A; Fevrier, L; Rebiere, F; Agarande, M; Cote, G

    2015-11-01

    Actinides determination in urine samples is part of the analyses performed to monitor internal contamination in case of an accident or a terrorist attack involving nuclear matter. Mineralisation is the first step of any of these analyses. It aims at reducing the sample volume and at destroying all organic compounds present. The mineralisation protocol is usually based on a wet ashing step, followed by actinides co-precipitation and a furnace ashing step, before redissolution and the quantification of the actinides by the appropriate techniques. Amongst the existing methods to perform the actinides co-precipitation, alkali-earth (typically calcium) precipitation is widely used. In the present work, the extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) from the redissolution solutions (called "mineralised urines") on calix[6]arene columns bearing hydroxamic groups was investigated as such an extraction is a necessary step before their determination by ICP-MS or alpha spectrometry. Difficulties were encountered in the transfer of uranium(VI) from raw to mineralised urines, with yield of transfer ranging between 0% and 85%, compared to about 90% for Pu and Am, depending on the starting raw urines. To understand the origin of such a difficulty, the speciation of uranium (VI) in mineralised urines was investigated by computer simulation using the MEDUSA software and the associated HYDRA database, compiled with recently published data. These calculations showed that the presence of phosphates in the "mineralised urines" leads to the formation of strong uranyl-phosphate complexes (such as UO2HPO4) which compete with the uranium (VI) extraction by the calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups. The extraction constant of uranium (VI) by calix[6]arene bearing hydroxamic groups was determined in a 0.04 mol L(-1) sodium nitrate solution (logK=4.86±0.03) and implemented in an extraction model taking into account the speciation in the aqueous phase. This model allowed to

  17. IAEA advisory group meeting on: Critical assessment of tritium retention in fusion reactor materials. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janev, R.K.; Federici, G.; Roth, J.

    1999-07-01

    The proceedings, conclusions and recommendations of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on 'Critical Assessment of Tritium Retention in Fusion Reactor Materials', held on June 7-8, 1999 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, are briefly described. The report contains a summary of the presentations of meeting participants, a review of the data status (availability and needs) for the fusion most relevant bulk and mixed materials, and recommendations to the IAEA regarding its future activity in this data area. (author)

  18. Summary of the activities of the ISAM Confidence Building Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinar, G.M.; Batandjieva, B.

    2002-01-01

    During the early stages of the ISAM project confidence building was a relatively new topic in the radioactive waste disposal literature, but it was beginning to receive some attention. Although almost all safety assessment activities are intended to provide a level of confidence in the results of the assessment, considering the activities from the viewpoint of how they contributed to the decision making of various 'audiences' was relatively new. The ISAM project included the Confidence Building Working Group (CBWG) to examine the topic of Confidence Building and this paper provides a summary of the working group findings. (author)

  19. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Eight Annual Meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary Report. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-07-01

    The Eighth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Past Reactors was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 15 to 18 April 1975. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMPBR’s and other presentations at the Meeting. The Summary Report (Part III) contains the discussions on the review of the national programmes

  20. Viñales Taxonomic Characterization and trophic groups of two communities of birds associated to semideciduos forests and vegetation of Pine-oak of the paths «Marvels of Viñales» and «Valley Ancón» in Viñales National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cué Rivero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work was carried out in the months of February to April 2009 in the semideciduos forest «Marvels of Viñales» and the formation pine-encino of the «Valley Ancón» of the Viñales National Park and it pursued as main objective to characterize the taxonomic composition and tropic groups tof two communities of birds associated to semideciduos forest and pine oak vegetation from both -. The method of circular parcels of fixed radio was used in 30 points of counts separated to 150 m one of another. There were detected a total of 44 species of birds (in the semideciduo and 42 in pine-oak contained in 9 orders and 18 families. They registered 23 trophic groups with prevalence of Insectivorous. The communities of birds of the formation of semideciduo forest of the path «Marvels of Viñales» and of the forest of pine oak of «Valley Ancón» presented differences in its taxonomic composition The communities of birds of both vegetable formations showed differences as for their trophiccomposition but so much in one as in other majority of birds consumers of insects and grains was observed.

  1. Part 2 of the summary for the electronics, DAQ, and computing working group: Technological developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The attraction of hadron machines as B factories is the copious production of B particles. However, the interesting physics lies in specific rare final states. The challenge is selecting and recording the interesting ones. Part 1 of the summary for this working group, open-quote Comparison of Trigger and Data Acquisition Parameters for Future B Physics Experiments close-quote summarizes and compares the different proposals. In parallel with this activity, the working group also looked at a number of the technological developments being proposed to meet the trigger and DAQ requirements. The presentations covered a wide variety of topics, which are grouped into three categories: (1) front-end electronics, (2) level 0 fast triggers, and (3) trigger and vertex processors. The group did not discuss on-line farms or offine data storage and computing due to lack of time

  2. Working Group summary reports from the Advanced Photon Source reliability workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    A workshop was held at APS to address reliability goals for accelerator systems. Seventy-one individuals participated in the workshop, including 30 from other institutions. The goals of the workshop were to: (1) Give attendees an introduction to the basic concepts of reliability analysis. (2) Exchange information on operating experience at existing accelerator facilities and strategies for achieving reliability at facilities under design or in construction. (3) Discuss reliability goals for APS and the means of their achievement. This report contains the working group summary report an APS's following systems: RF Systems; Power Supplies; Magnet Systems; Interlock and Diagnostics; and Vacuum Systems

  3. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF THE SNOWMASS 2001 WORKING GROUP : ELECTROWEAK SYMMETRY BREAKING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CARENA, M.; GERDES, D.W.; HABER, H.E.; TURCOT, A.S.; ZERWAS, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this summary report of the 2001 Snowmass Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Working Group, the main candidates for theories of electroweak symmetry breaking are surveyed, and the criteria for distinguishing among the different approaches are discussed. The potential for observing electroweak symmetry breaking phenomena at the upgraded Tevatron and the LHC is described. We emphasize the importance of a high-luminosity e + e - linear collider for precision measurements to clarify the underlying electroweak symmetry breaking dynamics. Finally, we note the possible roles of the μ + μ - collider and VLHC for further elucidating the physics of electroweak symmetry breaking

  4. Removal of Chromium(VI from Aqueous Solutions Using Fe3O4 Magnetic Polymer Microspheres Functionalized with Amino Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic polymer microspheres (MPMs using glycidylmethacrylate (GMA as a functional monomer were synthesized in the presence of Fe3O4 nanoparticles via dispersion polymerization. After polymerization, the magnetic polymer microbeads were modified with ethylenediamine (EDA. The obtained ethylenediamine-functionalized magnetic microspheres (EDA-MPMs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy. Then the EDA-MPMs were applied as adsorbents for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution. Langmuir equation was appropriate to describe the experimental data. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained from the Langmuir model were 236.9, 242.1 and 253.2 mg/g at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The Cr(VI adsorption equilibrium was established within 120 min and the adsorption kinetics was compatibly described by the pseudo-second order equation. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS° of the sorption process revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and was an endothermic process. The regeneration study demonstrated that the EDA-MPMs could be repeatedly utilized with no significant loss of adsorption efficiency.

  5. Closing plenary summary of working group 4 instrumentation and controls for ERL2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, D.; Obina, T.

    2011-10-16

    Working group 4 was charged with presentations and discussions on instrumentation and controls with regards to Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). There were 4 sessions spanning 3.5 hours in which 7 talks were delivered, the first being an invited plenary presentation. The time allotted for each talk was limited to 20-25 minutes in order to allow 5-10 minutes for discussion. Most of the talks were held in joint session with working group 5 (Unwanted Beam Loss). This format was effective for the purpose of this workshop. A final series of discussion sessions were also held with working group 5. Summary of the working group 4 activities, presented in the closing plenary session. We had a plenary presentation on operational performance, experience, and future plans at the existing ERL injector prototype at Cornell. This included instrumentation data, controls system configurations, as well as description of future needs. This was followed by four talks from KEK and RIKEN/SPring-8 that described electron beam instrumentation already in use or under development that can be applied to ERL facilities. The final talks described the ERLs under construction at KEK and BNL. The format of having joint sessions with working group 5 was beneficial as there were a significant number of common topics and concerns with regards to the causes of beam loss, instrumentation hardware, and techniques used to measure and analyze beam loss.

  6. Geology summary of Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    During FY 1994, three multiport wells were installed in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. The wells were instrumented with Westbay multiport systems. The purpose of the wells is (1) to characterize different flow systems and (2) to monitor for contaminants. The geology of the individual boreholes (WAG 5-12, WAG 5-13, WAG 5-14) is documented in Bechtel National, Inc., (BNI) et al. (1994). The Bechtel report does not explicitly show geologic relationships between these boreholes or integrate this information into the geology of WAG 5. The purpose of this report is to document and present a summary of the distribution of geologic formations in WAG 5. This information is presented in several ways: (1) stratigraphic correlation diagrams based on the natural gamma ray log, (2) geologic cross sections, and (3) a geologic map. This work provides a reference frame for interpreting flow, water, and contaminant chemistry data from multiport wells

  7. SUMMARY OF GENERAL WORKING GROUP A+B+D: CODES BENCHMARKING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI, J.; SHAPOSHNIKOVA, E.; ZIMMERMANN, F.; HOFMANN, I.

    2006-05-29

    Computer simulation is an indispensable tool in assisting the design, construction, and operation of accelerators. In particular, computer simulation complements analytical theories and experimental observations in understanding beam dynamics in accelerators. The ultimate function of computer simulation is to study mechanisms that limit the performance of frontier accelerators. There are four goals for the benchmarking of computer simulation codes, namely debugging, validation, comparison and verification: (1) Debugging--codes should calculate what they are supposed to calculate; (2) Validation--results generated by the codes should agree with established analytical results for specific cases; (3) Comparison--results from two sets of codes should agree with each other if the models used are the same; and (4) Verification--results from the codes should agree with experimental measurements. This is the summary of the joint session among working groups A, B, and D of the HI32006 Workshop on computer codes benchmarking.

  8. Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs. Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesen, H.N. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8.

  9. Mixed Methods in Education Research. IES Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, May 29, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This meeting summary is organized into two major sections. The first section captures the individual contribution of meeting participants, including both Institute of Education Sciences (IES) staff and the invited technical working group members. The second section captures themes that arose during the group discussions, which were organized…

  10. Summary report of working group I CO{sub 2} capture, fixation/utilization, and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    The topics of our working group were divided into four key areas: CO{sub 2} Capture, Utilization/Fixation, Ocean Disposal, and Land Disposal. Fourteen presentations were made as follows: CO{sub 2} Capture: Toshikatsu Hakuta (Japan) and Rod Judkins, Bruce St. John, and Alan Wolsky (US). Utilization/Fixation: Hironori Arakawa, Yasuo Asada, and Takashi lbusuki (Japan) and Ed Lipinsky (US). Ocean Disposal: Yuji Shindo (Japan) and Eric Adams, Gerard Nihous, and Wheeler North (US). Land Disposal: Shoichi Tanaka (Japan) and Roger Bailey (US/Canada). Co-chairs for this working group were Toshikatsu Hakuta (Japan) and Howard Herzog (US). This document contains only a summary outline of research needs in the area of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. It should be used in conjunction with other assessments made in this area. For the U.S., a DOE report entitled A Research Needs Assessment for the Capture, Utilization and Disposal of Carbon Dioxide from Fossil Fuel-Fired Power Plants will be forthcoming in 1993.

  11. Methods for estimating the enthalpy of formation of inorganic compounds; thermochemical and crystallographic investigations of uranyl salts of group VI elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandenburg, N.P.

    1978-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is concerned with parameter methods for estimating the standard enthalpy of formation, ΔH 0 sub(f), of inorganic compounds. In this type of method the estimate is a function of parameters, assigned to cation and anion, respectively. The usefulness of a new estimation method is illustrated in the case of uranyl sulphide. In the second part of this thesis crystallographic and thermochemical properties of uranyl salts of group VI elements are described. Crystal structures are given for β-UO 2 SO 4 , UO 2 SeO 3 , and α-UO 2 SeO 4 . Thermochemical measurements have been restricted to the determination of ΔH 0 sub(f)(UO 2 SO 3 ) and ΔH 0 sub(f)(UO 2 TeO 3 ) by means of isoperibol solution calorimetry. (Auth.)

  12. Summary Record of the 15th Meeting of the Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRISK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The main mission of the working group on risk assessment (WGRISK) is to advance the understanding and utilisation of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) in ensuring the continued safety of nuclear installations in member countries. While PSA methodology has matured greatly over the years, further work is required. WGRISK has been active in several of these areas, including: human reliability; software reliability; low power and shutdown risk. In order to maintain a current perspective, the working group collaborates and assists other working groups within the CSNI, such as operating experience and organisational factors as well as keeping close co-ordination with other international organisations. Over the past twenty years, the NEA PWG5 and now WGRISK have looked at the technology and methods used for identifying contributors to risk and assessing their importance. Work during much of this period was concentrated on Level-1 PSA methodology. In recent years the focus has shifted into more specific PSA methodologies and risk-informed applications. This document summarizes the content of the 15. Meeting of WGRISK: - presentation of the new WGRISK Bureau, - Approval of the 14. WGRISK Meeting Summary Record [NEA/SEN/SIN/WGRISK (2013)1], - Use and Development of PSA in NEA Member Countries and by other International Organisations, - Report by the WGRISK Secretariat on the current WGRISK programme of work, actions taken by CSNI and CNRA and other recent developments in OECD/NEA, - Development of BPGs on failure mode taxonomy for reliability assessment of digital I and C systems for PSA [Task 2010-3], - Update Use of OECD Data Project Products in PSA [Task 2011-1], - Status report on the common WGHOF/WGRISK HRA Task, - Outcome on the International Workshop on PSA of Natural External Hazards Including Earthquakes, April 2014 [Task 2012-1], - Status report on the International Workshop on Fire PRA [Task 2012-2], - PSA insights relating to the loss of electrical sources

  13. Production and testing of the VITAMIN-B6 fine-group and the BUGLE-93 broad-group neutron/photon cross-section libraries derived from ENDF/B-VI nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; White, J.E.; Wright, R.Q.; Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Greene, N.M.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    A new multigroup cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI data has been produced and tested for light water reactor shielding and reactor pressure vessel dosimetry applications. The broad-group library is designated BUGLE-93. The processing methodology is consistent with ANSI/ANS 6.1.2, since the ENDF data were first processed into a fine-group, ''pseudo problem-independent'' format and then collapsed into the final broad-group format. The fine-group library is designated VITAMIN-B6. An extensive integral data testing effort was also performed. In general, results using the new data show significant improvements relative to earlier ENDF data

  14. IAEA advisory group meeting on completion of FENDL-1 and start of FENDL-2. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashchenko, A.B.

    1996-03-01

    The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Completion of FENDL-1 and Start of FENDL-2'', held in Del Mar, California, USA, from 5 to 9 December 1995. The meeting was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section with the cooperation and assistance of local organizers from TSI Research and the ITER Joint Central Team at San Diego. The FENDL library is a comprehensive collection of high-quality nuclear data, selected from the various existing national data libraries, covering the necessary nuclear input data for all physics and engineering aspects of the material development, design, operation and safety of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in its current Engineering Design Activities (EDA) phase and other fusion-related development projects. Summarized are results of the comprehensive integral data tests of FENDL-1 working libraries against available benchmark experiments performed in the framework of an international coordinated effort. Included are meeting conclusions and recommendations adopted for selection of evaluations for FENDL-2 together with a list of actions and time schedule. Attached are a detailed meeting agenda and a list of attendees. (author). Tabs

  15. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmatz Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine, severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14. Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity ®, clinical management was limited to supportive care and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Galsulfase is now widely available and is a specific therapy providing improved endurance with an acceptable safety profile. Prognosis is variable depending on the age of onset, rate of disease progression, age at initiation of ERT and on the quality of the medical care provided.

  17. Theory and analysis of nonlinear dynamics and stability in storage rings: A working group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Audy, P.; Courant, E.D.

    1988-07-01

    A summary and commentary of the available theoretical and analytical tools and recent advances in the nonlinear dynamics, stability and aperture issues in storage rings are presented. 11 refs., 4 figs

  18. Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) Provider Summary for the Top 100 Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A provider level summary of Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) discharges, average charges and average Medicare payments for the Top 100 Diagnosis-Related...

  19. European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy. Summaries of contributions, eleventh annual conference, Paris-Orsay, July 10-13, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    Summaries are presented of talks given at the eleventh conference of the European group for atomic spectroscopy. Topics covered include: lifetimes; collisions; line shape; hyperfine structure; isotope shifts; saturation spectroscopy; Hanle effect; Rydberg levels; quantum beats; helium and helium-like atoms; metrology; and molecules. (GHT)

  20. Summary report for Group X6: Heat removal system and system analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, W

    2005-12-15

    This report is a summary of the activities of the X6 design support for the Heat Removal System (HRS) of MEGAPIE. It can be divided into two main parts: The first part is about the design and manufacturing of he cooling loop (the first 3 chapters), and the second part is dealing with the thermal hydraulic analysis of the overall HRS. This also reflects the change of the X6 activities from design to operation support. The activities of this group are more or less driven by the needs rather than a complete set of tasks given at the start of the project. The first part chronicles the system development. Some of the arguments are probably outdated but are kept in the original form to illustrate the evolution of concepts. The main objective is, of course, to design a heat removal system that can cool the liquid metal spallation target for a 1 MW proton beam i.e. 1.74 mA in 575 MeV). It is also reckoned that the liquid metal, BE (lead-bismuth-eutectic), must be kept liquid even when the proton beam was switched off. This requires either that the cooling system can be shut down or the operating temperature of the coolant be higher than the freezing point of LBE. As for safety concerns, the HRS system must not exert a pressure that exceeds the design pressure of the target beam window in case of a break at the target heat exchanger (THX); this limits the cover gas pressure to about 4 bar(a). These are the basic design principles that carry through the conceptual and engineering design of he system. The organic coolant Diphyl THT was then chosen, because of its wide range of operating temperature (i.e. from 0 to 340 degC) and high boiling point, and a proven record in industrial applications. (author)

  1. Summary report for Group X6: Heat removal system and system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, W.

    2005-12-01

    This report is a summary of the activities of the X6 design support for the Heat Removal System (HRS) of MEGAPIE. It can be divided into two main parts: The first part is about the design and manufacturing of he cooling loop (the first 3 chapters), and the second part is dealing with the thermal hydraulic analysis of the overall HRS. This also reflects the change of the X6 activities from design to operation support. The activities of this group are more or less driven by the needs rather than a complete set of tasks given at the start of the project. The first part chronicles the system development. Some of the arguments are probably outdated but are kept in the original form to illustrate the evolution of concepts. The main objective is, of course, to design a heat removal system that can cool the liquid metal spallation target for a 1 MW proton beam i.e. 1.74 mA in 575 MeV). It is also reckoned that the liquid metal, BE (lead-bismuth-eutectic), must be kept liquid even when the proton beam was switched off. This requires either that the cooling system can be shut down or the operating temperature of the coolant be higher than the freezing point of LBE. As for safety concerns, the HRS system must not exert a pressure that exceeds the design pressure of the target beam window in case of a break at the target heat exchanger (THX); this limits the cover gas pressure to about 4 bar(a). These are the basic design principles that carry through the conceptual and engineering design of he system. The organic coolant Diphyl THT was then chosen, because of its wide range of operating temperature (i.e. from 0 to 340 degC) and high boiling point, and a proven record in industrial applications. (author)

  2. Separation method for ions of elements of the III., IV., VI. and VIII. groups of periodical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marhol, M.

    1973-01-01

    The method is presented of separating the ions of the elements of the periodic system groups III, IV, and VIII by ion exchangers. The ions are complex-bonded to a new type of ion exchanger consisting of the polycondensates of phenol with aldehydes or ketones and containing an atom of phosphorus, arsenic or antimony with an atom of sulphur or oxygen in a complex bond. The polymers of compounds containing a double bond, e.g., of butadiene, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene, polypropylene, and the compounds of styrene with fural may also be used for this purpose. The method is demonstrated on a case of uranium and heavy metal concentration and the separation thereof from waste waters. (L.K.)

  3. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X9: Neutronic and nuclear assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanini, L.

    2005-12-01

    The comprehensive work performed by the R+D task group X9 since the beginning of the MEGAPIE initiative is described in this summary report. The list of topics covered by this group is large and covers many of the essential aspects of an innovative system such as the MEGAPIE target. The X9 group worked on the neutronic and nuclear related aspects of the target design, as summarized in the following. The main tool in the neutronic design of a spallation neutron target is a reliable particle transport code, and nowadays the Monte Carlo technique is widely adopted in this field. There are several codes which are more or less extensively used in the nuclear physics community; at the beginning of the project a benchmark exercise was performed among several institutes using different Monte Carlo codes. The aim of the benchmark was to perform a code intercomparison by looking at the different predictions of several important quantities, as described later in the report. The benchmark results were first compiled in two separate reports. The results are critically discussed here. Based on the obtained results, and considering also other factors such as the code maintenance, the codes FLUKA and MCNPX were indicated as the most recommended ones to be used in the continuation of the X9 work. Proton and neutron fluxes in the MEGAPIE target were calculated. Detailed models of he MEGAPIE target and of the surrounding SINQ facility were developed, as well as of the present solid SINQ target. A comparison between the neutron flux with MEGAPIE and the SINQ solid target showed that the MEGAPIE target sill deliver 40% to 50% more thermal neutrons to the instruments served by SINQ as compared to the SINQ Mark 3 target. Calculations of the beam power deposition distributions are essential as input for the thermohydraulics CFD analysis of the lower target. Power deposition was calculated with FLUKA and MCNPX. The results from the two codes agree within 5%. Approximately 85% of the beam

  4. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X4: Fluid dynamics and structure mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. L.

    2006-03-01

    The document chronicles, and draws summary conclusions from, the activities of the X4 R+D Support Group from the start of the project on January 1, 2000 to the time of the Technical Review Meeting in Mol: 27-29 June, 2005. The objectives to be accomplished were set out in a Baseline document. These were: to define the lower target flow configuration, within the geometric constraints imposed by the physical boundary conditions (geometrical confinement, lead- bismuth eutectic (LBE) inventory, pump capacities, target heat exchanger (THX) power, etc.); to identify, and evaluate, optimum target window design to minimise thermal loads and pressure drops, and to avoid hot-spots and flow instabilities; to demonstrate reliable cooling of the lower target enclosure (LTE); to demonstrate the structural integrity of the lower section of the Iiquid-metal container LMC) and its internal components, and that of the LTE; to provide best-estimate safety margins on target coolability and structural integrity under operational flow conditions; to investigate, quantify, and make recommendations regarding, abnormal target operation including possible accident scenarios). The time-scale set for MEGAPIE was always such that much of the design work needed to be carried out at the same time as the R+D support. Often, the target design was changing faster than the time required to perform the detailed computer simulations. As a consequence, many of the simulations reported or referenced in this document do not refer to the very latest target design, and in many respects the results and conclusions must be regarded as generic in nature. Nonetheless, very valuable work has been carried out by the various organisations, and better understanding of the expected temperature distributions and stress levels in the operating MEGAPIE target has been gained, and direct feed-back to the design team on various aspects of the design details has taken place as a consequence of this work. As the design

  5. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X9: Neutronic and nuclear assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanini, L

    2005-12-15

    The comprehensive work performed by the R+D task group X9 since the beginning of the MEGAPIE initiative is described in this summary report. The list of topics covered by this group is large and covers many of the essential aspects of an innovative system such as the MEGAPIE target. The X9 group worked on the neutronic and nuclear related aspects of the target design, as summarized in the following. The main tool in the neutronic design of a spallation neutron target is a reliable particle transport code, and nowadays the Monte Carlo technique is widely adopted in this field. There are several codes which are more or less extensively used in the nuclear physics community; at the beginning of the project a benchmark exercise was performed among several institutes using different Monte Carlo codes. The aim of the benchmark was to perform a code intercomparison by looking at the different predictions of several important quantities, as described later in the report. The benchmark results were first compiled in two separate reports. The results are critically discussed here. Based on the obtained results, and considering also other factors such as the code maintenance, the codes FLUKA and MCNPX were indicated as the most recommended ones to be used in the continuation of the X9 work. Proton and neutron fluxes in the MEGAPIE target were calculated. Detailed models of he MEGAPIE target and of the surrounding SINQ facility were developed, as well as of the present solid SINQ target. A comparison between the neutron flux with MEGAPIE and the SINQ solid target showed that the MEGAPIE target sill deliver 40% to 50% more thermal neutrons to the instruments served by SINQ as compared to the SINQ Mark 3 target. Calculations of the beam power deposition distributions are essential as input for the thermohydraulics CFD analysis of the lower target. Power deposition was calculated with FLUKA and MCNPX. The results from the two codes agree within 5%. Approximately 85% of the beam

  6. Summary report for MEGAPIE R+D Task Group X4: Fluid dynamics and structure mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B. L

    2006-03-15

    The document chronicles, and draws summary conclusions from, the activities of the X4 R+D Support Group from the start of the project on January 1, 2000 to the time of the Technical Review Meeting in Mol: 27-29 June, 2005. The objectives to be accomplished were set out in a Baseline document. These were: to define the lower target flow configuration, within the geometric constraints imposed by the physical boundary conditions (geometrical confinement, lead- bismuth eutectic (LBE) inventory, pump capacities, target heat exchanger (THX) power, etc.); to identify, and evaluate, optimum target window design to minimise thermal loads and pressure drops, and to avoid hot-spots and flow instabilities; to demonstrate reliable cooling of the lower target enclosure (LTE); to demonstrate the structural integrity of the lower section of the Iiquid-metal container LMC) and its internal components, and that of the LTE; to provide best-estimate safety margins on target coolability and structural integrity under operational flow conditions; to investigate, quantify, and make recommendations regarding, abnormal target operation including possible accident scenarios). The time-scale set for MEGAPIE was always such that much of the design work needed to be carried out at the same time as the R+D support. Often, the target design was changing faster than the time required to perform the detailed computer simulations. As a consequence, many of the simulations reported or referenced in this document do not refer to the very latest target design, and in many respects the results and conclusions must be regarded as generic in nature. Nonetheless, very valuable work has been carried out by the various organisations, and better understanding of the expected temperature distributions and stress levels in the operating MEGAPIE target has been gained, and direct feed-back to the design team on various aspects of the design details has taken place as a consequence of this work. As the design

  7. Systemic lupus erythematosus in three ethnic groups. VI: Factors associated with fatigue within 5 years of criteria diagnosis. LUMINA Study Group. LUpus in MInority populations: NAture vs Nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonana-Nacach, A; Roseman, J M; McGwin, G; Friedman, A W; Baethge, B A; Reveille, J D; Alarcón, G S

    2000-01-01

    To determine the frequency, degree and associated features of fatigue among Hispanic (H), African American (AA) and Caucasian (C) patients with recent onset (NAture vs Nurture) cohort were studied. Fatigue [Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS)] was defined as present if FSS score > or = 3.0. Variables from functional, clinical, sociodemographic, health behaviors, behavioral and psychological and immunogenetics domains were ascertained at study entry. Associations were examined using regression models. Eighty-six percent (85.7%) of patients reported having fatigue (82.6% H; 85.5% AA; 88.7% C); median FSS score, 5.3. Factors from the psychological and clinical domains were primarily associated with FSS; immunogenetic (HLA Class II phenotypes) features were not. Increased fatigue was strongly associated with decreasing function, both physical and mental. Variables associated with significantly greater degree of fatigue at baseline in the multivariable stepwise model in order of decreasing additional partial R2 explained included: abnormal illness-related behaviors, older age, higher self-reported pain, greater degree of helplessness, greater disease activity, Caucasian race, and lacking health insurance (model R2 = 37%). Fatigue is one of the most prevalent clinical manifestations of SLE across all ethnic groups. The perception of fatigue severity in SLE may be multifactorial in origin, including psychosocial factors and disease activity. If these prove causal, knowledge of their contribution may suggest therapeutic and/or behavioral interventions, which could ameliorate this pervasive and often incapacitating symptom of SLE.

  8. Summary of Working Group I - beam-beam instability with crossing angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.

    1995-06-01

    This report is a summary report from a panel addressing the problem of beam-beam instability in colliding beams at finite crossing angles. This problem arises in the process of increasing luminosity in large circular particle factories. The primary means of increasing luminosity comes down to increasing the number of bunches in each beam, while decreasing the spacing between bunches. This situation favors finite crossing angle collision schemes. However such schemes allow synchro-betatron coupling, as transverse and longitudinal energies are mixed. The authors summarize their discussions on this problem, and the present state of experience with such schemes

  9. Summary of the snowmass working group on machine-detector interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Cooper, J.; Goderre, G.; Holt, J.

    1993-01-01

    From the detector point of view, what experimenters need is an outline of the EXPECTED machine parameters tempered with some indication of the POSSIBLE machine parameters. Given guidance from accelerator physicists on the machine, experimenters may get the germ of an idea of how to exploit a particular machine property. Similarly, given some indication of what is important to the experimenters, accelerator physicists may have ideas of how to modify the machine appropriately. The authors discuss a list of machine parameters from the perspective of experimentalists. These include: luminosity; number of bunches/bunch spacing; beam energy; luminosity lifetime; β * /longitudinal emittance; transverse emittance. They also include a summary of tevatron performance - past, present, and projected

  10. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  11. Summary Report of Working Group 7: Muon Colliders and Advanced Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermilab; Berg, J.Scott [Brookhaven

    2012-07-01

    The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

  12. A summary of the Nordic-group conference on safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, I.; Svenson, O.

    2005-04-01

    The report summarizes the Nordic-group conference on safety management, which took place in Lund, Sweden on October 28-29, 2004. The theme-group was originally created by researchers who had a common interest in cooperation, sharing their results, and discuss topics focusing on safety management and safety culture in nuclear power production, but also in other technologies involving risks. The research has, so far, basically been related to the areas of MTO, partly from a psychological perspective, but also from other perspectives. Today, the group consists primarily of members from Sweden, Finland and Norway. During the last three years the group has gathered twice a year. (au)

  13. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; VIth nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial nerve. This nerve is also called the abducens nerve. ...

  14. Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae VI: the conference summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, O.

    2014-04-01

    The Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae conference series, now in its sixth edition, aims to resolve the shaping mechanism of PN. Eighty percent of PN have non spherical shapes and during this conference the last nails in the coffin of single stars models for non spherical PN have been put. Binary theories abound but observational tests are lagging. The highlight of APN6 has been the arrival of ALMA which allowed us to measure magnetic fields on AGB stars systematically. AGB star halos, with their spiral patterns are now connected to PPN and PN halos. New models give us hope that binary parameters may be decoded from these images. In the post-AGB and pre-PN evolutionary phase the naked post-AGB stars present us with an increasingly curious puzzle as complexity is added to the phenomenologies of objects in transition between the AGB and the central star regimes. Binary central stars continue to be detected, including the first detection of longer period binaries, however a binary fraction is still at large. Hydro models of binary interactions still fail to give us results, if we make an exception for the wider types of binary interactions. More promise is shown by analytical considerations and models driven by simpler, 1D simulations such as those carried out with the code MESA. Large community efforts have given us more homogeneous datasets which will yield results for years to come. Examples are the ChanPlaN and HerPlaNe collaborations that have been working with the Chandra and Herschel space telescopes, respectively. Finally, the new kid in town is the intermediate-luminosity optical transient, a new class of events that may have contributed to forming several peculiar PN and pre-PN.

  15. Summary of Group Development and Testing for Single Shell Tank Closure at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbour, John R.

    2005-01-01

    This report is a summary of the bench-scale and large scale experimental studies performed by Savannah River National Laboratory for CH2M HILL to develop grout design mixes for possible use in producing fill materials as a part of Tank Closure of the Single-Shell Tanks at Hanford. The grout development data provided in this report demonstrates that these design mixes will produce fill materials that are ready for use in Hanford single shell tank closure. The purpose of this report is to assess the ability of the proposed grout specifications to meet the current requirements for successful single shell tank closure which will include the contracting of services for construction and operation of a grout batch plant. The research and field experience gained by SRNL in the closure of Tanks 17F and 20F at the Savannah River Site was leveraged into the grout development efforts for Hanford. It is concluded that the three Hanford grout design mixes provide fill materials that meet the current requirements for successful placement. This conclusion is based on the completion of recommended testing using Hanford area materials by the operators of the grout batch plant. This report summarizes the regulatory drivers and the requirements for grout mixes as tank fill material. It is these requirements for both fresh and cured grout properties that drove the development of the grout formulations for the stabilization, structural and capping layers

  16. Presenting quality data to vulnerable groups: charts, summaries or behavioral economic nudges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbel, Brian; Gillespie, Colleen; Raven, Maria C

    2014-07-01

    Despite the increased focus on health care consumers' active choice, not enough is known about how to best facilitate the choice process. We sought to assess methods of improving this process for vulnerable consumers in the United States by testing alternatives that emphasize insights from behavioral economics, or 'nudges'. We performed a hypothetical choice experiment where subjects were randomized to one of five experimental conditions and asked to choose a health center (location where they would receive all their care). The conditions presented the same information about health centers in different ways, including graphically as a chart, via written summary and using behavioral economics, 'nudging' consumers toward particular choices. We hypothesized that these 'nudges' might help simplify the choice process. Our primary outcomes focused on the health center chosen and whether consumers were willing to accept 'nudges'. We found that consumer choice was influenced by the method of presentation and the majority of consumers accepted the health center they were 'nudged' towards. Consumers were accepting of choices grounded in insights from behavioral economics and further consideration should be given to their role in patient choice. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Summary record of the second group meeting at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna 5 June 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    It was noted that sub-group 2B had received answers to its questionnaire from seven Member States. Sub-group 1A/2A reported that it had decided to base its work on recently published NEA/OECD material, and that some answers to questionnaires had been received

  18. North American Wood Waste Forum: Summary of Group Feedback, 2-3, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Falk

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the feedback and recommendations of the North American Wood Recovery Group. This report summarizes the barriers and opportunities in wood recovery, reuse, and recycling as identified by this group of stakeholders from the wood industry, waste industry, and relevant government agencies.

  19. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Land Cover Summaries by Block Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset describes the percentage of each block group that is classified as impervious, forest, green space, wetland, and agriculture. Impervious is...

  20. Validation of DRAGON code in connection with WIMS-AECL/RFSP code system based on ENDF/B-VI library and two group model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, In Seob; Suk, Ho Chun; Kim, Soon Young; Jo, Chang Keun

    2002-06-01

    The major objective of this research is to validate the incremental cross section property of DRAGON code in connection with WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP code system with ENDF/B-VI library and full 2G calculation model. The direct comparison between the incremental cross section results calculated by DRAGON with ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-V and MULTICELL with ENDF/B-V indicate that there are not much differences between the incremental cross sections of DRAGON with ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI, but there exists large discrepancies between the results of DRAGON and those of MULTICELL. In the analysis of the difference between calculated and measured reactivity worths of various types of control devices during Phase-B Post-Simulation of Wolsong Units 2, 3 and 4, WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP analysis well agrees with those of previous WIMS-AECL /MULTICELL/RFSP analysis within very small differences. From those results, we can conclude that DRAGON code can be used as a general purpose incremental cross section generation tool for not only the natural uranium fuel but also slightly enriched fuel such as RU or SEU, to cover the shortcomings of natural uranium based MULTICELL code

  1. Summary of Working Group 3: Machine Design and R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmori, C.; Kirk, H.; Haseroth, H.

    2006-01-01

    Various topics on machine studies and component R and D for Neutrino Factory subsystems were discussed in Working Group 3 (WG3) at the NuFact05 Workshop. In this working group, 29 talks and 2 posters were presented. We also had special focus sessions for lively discussions on several important issues; targets, cooling, proton driver, FFAGs and acceleration, and a World Wide Design study. Joint Sessions were held with WG1 and WG4 on machine requirements

  2. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part I) contains the Minutes of the Meeting

  3. Descriptive summary of the Grande Ronde Basalt type section, Columbia River Basalt Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, V.E.; Price, S.M.; Reidel, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    The Grande Ronde Basalt type section, located in extreme southeastern Washington, was measured, sampled, and characterized. The section is 800 meters thick and is comprised of 35 Grande Ronde Basalt flows. These flows are divisible into 3 magnetostratiographic units termed, in ascending order, the R 1 , the N 1 , and the R 2 . The R 1 unit is represented by 13 reversely polarized flows; the N 1 unit, by 13 normally polarized flows; and the R 2 , by 9 reversely polarized flows. Chemically, the Grande Ronde Basalt flows are divided into 2 major groups, termed A and B. The compositions of the lower 9 flows, members of Group A, are similar to either the high-Mg Grande Ronde chemical type, the high-Ti Grande Ronde chemical type, or the Pomona chemical type. The compositions of the upper 25 flows, members of Group B, are predominantly similar to the low-Mg Grande Ronde chemical type. Petrographically, the Grande Ronde Basalt flows are generally fine grained and aphyric, and have a intergranular or intersertal micro-texture. Major mineral phases include plagioclase (An/sub 40-60/) and augite; minor mineral phases include pigeonite, orthopyroxene, ilmenite, titanomagnetite, and olivine. Group A flows generally contain more olivine and less pigeonite than do Group B flows. 6 figures, 6 tables

  4. The crystal chemistry of novel thorium and uranium compounds with oxo-anions from group VI of periodic table (S, Se, Te, Cr, Mo and W)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bin

    2016-01-26

    This dissertation focus on the synthesis, phase studies and physicochemical properties of novel thorium and uranium compounds with the Group VI (S, Se, Te, Cr, Mo, W) of the Periodic Table. All the studied compounds are listed in Table 2.2 from the page 15. I subdivided all the newly synthesized compounds into several chapters according to their structural and topological differences. First, for thorium molybdates and tungstates, almost all of these compounds are based on corner-sharing of ThO{sub x} (x = 6, 8 and 9) and MoO{sub 4} or WO{sub x} (x = 4, 5, 6) polyhedra. Interestingly, all these compounds can be seen as derived from a pure thorium molybdate compound (ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8}) which was isolated from high-temperature solid-state synthesis method. Therefore, the polymorphs of this most basic ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8} compound is firstly introduced (see Chapter 3.1 from page 18). The thermodynamic, electronic and vibrational properties of all investigated ThMo{sub 2}O{sub 8} polymorphs were studied using ab initio calculations. Then, two subfamilies of thorium molybdates, that is, rubidium thorium molybdate and cesium thorium molybdate and their thermal and vibrational behaviors were discussed in details in Chapter 4.1 from page 37 and Chapter 4.2 from page 50, respectively. Moreover, some new insights about the complexity of thorium tungstates were also discussed (Chapter 4.3 from page 59). Some novel thorium molybdate and chromate compounds synthesized from aqueous condition are discussed in Chapter 5 from page 71. In the Chapter 8.2.4, the stereochemistry for thorium and uranium compounds are introduced, especially thorium selinites and uranyl tellurites (see Chapter 6.1 from page 82), thorium tellurites (Chapter 6.2 from page 93), and uranyl tellurites (Chapter 6.3 from page 99 for sodium uranyl tellurium and Chapter 6.4 from page 110 for potassium uranyl tellurium, respectively). In the actinide tellurium systems, additional MoO{sub 3}/WO{sub 3} were also

  5. Fifteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Group Meeting, in Obninsk, USSR, Vienna from 30 March to 2 April 1982. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

  6. Technical Working Group on Career and Technical Education Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, September 22, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Judie

    2017-01-01

    On September 22, 2017, the National Center for Special Education Research (NCSER) and the National Center for Education Research (NCER) at the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) convened a group of experts in policy, practice, and research related to Career and Technical Education (CTE). The goal of the meeting was to seek input from…

  7. Sixteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-10-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Meeting Group, in Vienna from 12-15 April 1983. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors.

  8. Fifteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-09-01

    The Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Group Meeting, in Obninsk, USSR, Vienna from 30 March to 2 April 1982. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors.

  9. Sixteenth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous Annual Meeting Group, in Vienna from 12-15 April 1983. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

  10. Summary Report of Working Group 5: Electron Beam Driven Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, Mark J.; Conde, Manoel E.

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam driven plasma accelerators have seen rapid progress over the last decade. Recent efforts have built on this success by constructing a concept for a plasma wakefield accelerator based linear collider. The needs for any future collider to deliver both energy and luminosity have substantial implications for interpreting current experiments and setting priorities for the future. This working group reviewed current experiments and ideas in the context of the demands of a future collider. The many discussions and presentations are summarized here.

  11. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-01-01

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner

  12. Summary report of working group 5: Beam sources, monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Manoel; Zgadzaj, Rafal

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the topics presented in Working Group 5 at the 17th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, which was held from 31 July to 5 August 2016 at the Gaylord Hotel and Conference Center, National Harbor, MD, USA. The presentations included a variety of topics covering cathode and RF gun design, new user facilities, beam phase space manipulation, and a range of novel diagnostic techniques.

  13. Summary of the working group on high current transport and final focus lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garren, A.A.

    1978-09-01

    The group reviewed recent work, and then addressed itself to relating the current understanding of relevant beam transport effects to the four reference concepts. In addition there was discussion on plans for future experimental and theoretical work. Discussions covered the following topics: (1) Transverse instabilities on intense beams through periodic focusing systems, (2) evaluation and correction of chromatic aberrations in the final beam transport lines, (3) evaluation and correction of geometric aberrations due to quadrupole fringe fields, and (4) ion focusing by electrons

  14. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE INTERACTION REGION WORKING GROUP (T1) AT SNOWMASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W

    2002-09-23

    The Interaction Region Working Group (T1) at Snowmass 2001 reviewed the issues, designs, and plans of existing and proposed colliders, including hadron colliders, e{sup -} hadron colliders, e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} linear colliders, e{sup +}e{sup -} circular colliders, and muon colliders. This document summarizes the IR issues, status, and R&D plans for each project.

  15. Twelfth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-05-01

    The Twelfth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous AGM,in Vienna from 27 to 30 March 1979. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors.

  16. Twelfth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    The Twelfth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendation of the previous AGM,in Vienna from 27 to 30 March 1979. The meeting was attended by the Member States of the group: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the USA, as well as by representatives from CEC, IAEA and OECD and observer from the USSR. This document includes: review of the IWGFR Activities for the period since the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Group; preliminary programme of international conference on breeder reactors as a world energy resource and the breeder fuel cycle; list of meetings on atomic energy which may be of interest to the IWGFR Members; IWGFR criteria for supporting some of the international conferences; list of proposed topics for the IWGFR Specialists' Meetings; list of topics for review articles on LMFBR recommended for publication by the IAEA; list of meetings sponsored by the IWGFR; a list of members of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors

  17. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Per; Cole, Bernard F.; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Castiglione, Monica; Colleoni, Marco; Gruber, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods: From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). Conclusions: This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT.

  18. Timing of Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy After Breast-Conserving Surgery for Node-Positive Breast Cancer: Long-Term Results From International Breast Cancer Study Group Trials VI and VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Per, E-mail: per.karlsson@oncology.gu.se [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Cole, Bernard F. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont (United States); Price, Karen N. [International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gelber, Richard D. [International Breast Cancer Study Group Statistical Center, Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Harvard T. F. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Coates, Alan S. [International Breast Cancer Study Group and University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Goldhirsch, Aron [Senior Consultant Breast Cancer, European Institute of Oncology and International Breast Cancer Study Group, Milan (Italy); Castiglione, Monica [International Breast Cancer Study Group, Bern (Switzerland); Colleoni, Marco [Division of Medical Senology, European Institute of Oncology and International Breast Cancer Study Group, Milan (Italy); Gruber, Günther [Institute of Radiotherapy, Klinik Hirslanden, Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To update the previous report from 2 randomized clinical trials, now with a median follow-up of 16 years, to analyze the effect of radiation therapy timing on local failure and disease-free survival. Patients and Methods: From July 1986 to April 1993, International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VI randomly assigned 1475 pre-/perimenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive 3 or 6 cycles of initial chemotherapy (CT). International Breast Cancer Study Group trial VII randomly assigned 1212 postmenopausal women with node-positive breast cancer to receive tamoxifen for 5 years, or tamoxifen for 5 years with 3 early cycles of initial CT. For patients who received breast-conserving surgery (BCS), radiation therapy (RT) was delayed until initial CT was completed; 4 or 7 months after BCS for trial VI and 2 or 4 months for trial VII. We compared RT timing groups among 433 patients on trial VI and 285 patients on trial VII who received BCS plus RT. Endpoints were local failure, regional/distant failure, and disease-free survival (DFS). Results: Among pre-/perimenopausal patients there were no significant differences in disease-related outcomes. The 15-year DFS was 48.2% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT and 44.9% in the group allocated 6 months initial CT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.45). Among postmenopausal patients, the 15-year DFS was 46.1% in the no-initial-CT group and 43.3% in the group allocated 3 months initial CT (HR 1.11; 95% CI 0.82-1.51). Corresponding HRs for local failures were 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.46) in trial VI and 1.51 (95% CI 0.77-2.97) in trial VII. For regional/distant failures, the respective HRs were 1.15 (95% CI 0.80-1.63) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.69-1.68). Conclusions: This study confirms that, after more than 15 years of follow-up, it is reasonable to delay radiation therapy until after the completion of standard CT.

  19. Summary of the 200x200 GeV μ+-μ- collider working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.; Whittum, D.; Bombade, P.; Cline, D.; Jackson, G.; McIntyre, P.; Peters, G.; Sasaki, M.; Summers, D.; Yokoya, K.

    1996-01-01

    We report the discussions and some preliminary results from the sessions of the 200x200 GeV μ + -μ - Collider working group. The physics motivation for such a open-quote open-quote medium-energy close-quote close-quote collider is discussed. Possible parameters for such a system are described, and compared with higher-energy systems. Relatively-high luminosities (L∼10 33 cm -2 s -1 ) appear possible. Modifications of existing facilities to obtain medium-energy μ + -μ - collisions are discussed. Other discussion topics (μ-p colliders, low-energy μ sources, etc.) are summarized. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Summary of the Optics, IR, Injection, Operations, Reliability and Instrumentation Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienands, U.

    2012-01-01

    The facilities reported on are all in a fairly mature state of operation, as evidenced by the very detailed studies and correction schemes that all groups are working on. First- and higher-order aberrations are diagnosed and planned to be corrected. Very detailed beam measurements are done to get a global picture of the beam dynamics. More than other facilities the high-luminosity colliders are struggling with experimental background issues, mitigation of which is a permanent challenge. The working group dealt with a very wide rage of practical issues which limit performance of the machines and compared their techniques of operations and their performance. We anticipate this to be a first attempt. In a future workshop in this series, we propose to attempt more fundamental comparisons of each machine, including design parameters. For example, DAPHNE and KEKB employ a finite crossing angle. The minimum value of β* y attainable at KEKB seems to relate to this scheme. Effectiveness of compensation solenoids and turn-by-turn BPMs etc. should be examined in more detail. In the near future, CESR-C and VEPP-2000 will start their operation. We expect to hear important new experiences from these machines; in particular VEPP-2000 will be the first machine to have adopted round beams. At SLAC and KEK, next generation B Factories are being considered. It will be worthwhile to discuss the design issues of these machines based on the experiences of the existing factory machines.

  1. Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Past Reactors. Summary Report. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    The Fourteenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA-IWGFR was held in accordance with the recommendations of the previous Annual Group Meeting, at the Vienna International Centre, Vienna from 31 March to 3 April 1981. All Member States of the group were represented at the meeting: France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The meeting was also attended by representatives from the Commission of European Communities, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Atomic Energy Agency and observers from Switzerland. The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: 1. Review of IWGFR activities; 2. Consideration of future method of operation of the IWGFR; 3. Consideration of Conferences on Fast Reactors; 4. Consideration of the major recommendations of some of the IWGFR specialists' meetings for which the support of the IWGFR is requested; 5. Consideration of a schedule for specialists' meetings in 1981-1982; 6. Presentations and discussions on national programmes on fast breeder reactors.; 7. Recommendation of the IWGFR regarding a request of Switzerland concerning participation in the IWGFR; 8. The date and place of the Fifteenth Annual Meeting of the IWGFR

  2. Summary of the 2017 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsebus, Holly J; Curtis, Brenda J; Molina, Patricia E; Afshar, Majid; Boule, Lisbeth A; Morris, Niya; Keshavarzian, Ali; Kolls, Jay K; Yeligar, Samantha M; Price, Michael E; Wyatt, Todd A; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2018-06-01

    On June 24, 2017, the 22nd annual Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting was held as a satellite conference during the annual Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) Scientific Meeting in Denver, Colorado. The 2017 meeting focused broadly on mechanisms that link alcohol to tissue injury and inflammation, and how this research can be translated to improve human health. Two plenary sessions composed the meeting, which first explored the association between alcohol and trauma/tissue injury, and finished with a discussion of alcohol and mucosal inflammation. The presentations encompassed diverse areas of alcohol research, from effects on the brain, to airway and pulmonary systems, to gut barrier disruption. The discussions also thoughtfully highlighted how current laboratory and clinical research can be used to prevent or treat alcohol-related morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Summary of the 2016 Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boule, Lisbeth A; Ju, Cynthia; Agudelo, Marisela; Parira, Tiyash; Cannon, Abigail; Davis, Booker; Eby, Jonathan; Cresci, Gail; Samuelson, Derrick R; Shukla, Pradeep; Alrefai, Waddah A; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Pandey, Subhash C; Schnabl, Bernd; Curtis, Brenda J; Wyatt, Todd A; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2018-02-01

    On November 18, 2016 the 21st annual Alcohol and Immunology Research Interest Group (AIRIG) meeting was held at the Center for Translational Research and Education at Loyola University Chicago's Health Sciences Campus in Maywood, IL. The 2016 meeting focused broadly on alcohol and inflammation, epigenetics, and the microbiome. The four plenary sessions of the meeting were Alcohol, Inflammation, and Immunity; Alcohol and Epigenetics; Alcohol, Transcriptional Regulation, and Epigenetics; and Alcohol, Intestinal Mucosa, and the Gut Microbiome. Presentations in all sessions of the meeting explored putative underlying causes for chronic diseases and mortality associated with alcohol consumption, shedding light on future work and potential therapeutic targets to alleviate the negative effects of alcohol misuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997.

  5. Summary of the IEA workshop/working group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    An International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Group on Ferritic/Martensitic Steels for Fusion Applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, the European Union, the United States, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, United Kingdom, 24-25 October 1996. At the meeting preliminary data generated on the large heats of steel purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. The second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The next meeting will be held in conjunction with the International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-8) in Sendai, Japan, 23-31 October 1997

  6. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Second Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: Opening of the meeting. 2. Appraisal of the IWGFB's activity for the period from the first annual meeting of the Group. 3. Comments on national programmes on fast breeder reactors. 4. Presentation of general findings and conclusions of national and regional meetings on fast reactor problems held in represented countries and international organisations last year. 5. Comments on the programmes of international meetings on fast reactors to be held in 1969. 6. Consideration of a schedule for meetings on fast reactors in 1970. 7. Suggestions for the topics and location of specialists' meetings in 1969-1970. 8. Suggestions for reviews and studies in the field of fast reactors. 9. The time and place of the third annual meeting of the IWGFR. 10. Closing of the meeting

  7. Long term needs for nuclear data development. Summary report of the advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Herman, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Advisory Group Meeting on Long Term Needs for Nuclear Data Development, was held from 28 November - 1 December 2000 at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. The goal of this meeting was to develop a vision of the work needed over the next decades (2000-2020) on the measurement, calculation and evaluation of improved nuclear data for emerging applications. Of particular interest were data improvement activities that could be coordinated by the IAEA. The following areas of nuclear data applications were selected for discussion during the Meeting: Medical Applications; Ion Beam Analysis and Related Techniques; Nuclear Astrophysics; Nuclear Safeguards and Related Applications; Critical Reactors, including Closed Fuel Cycles; Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors; ADS Target Design and High-Energy Radiation Shielding. (author)

  8. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The international network of nuclear structure and decay data (NSDD) evaluators aims at a complete and periodic nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of all nuclides, the continuous publication of these evaluations and their dissemination to the scientific community. The evaluated data resulting from this concerted international effort are introduced in the Evaluated Structure and Decay Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic meetings of this network are held in order to maintain the coordination of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD, to maintain and improve the standards and rules governing NSDS evaluation, and to review the development and common use of the computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. This document is a summary report of the twelfth Meeting on the Coordination of the NSDD Evaluators held between 14-18 October 1996 in Budapest, Hungary

  9. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Sixth Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: 1. Review of IWGFR Activities - 1a. Approval of the minutes of the Fifth IWGFR Meeting. 1b. Report by Scientific Secretary regarding the activities of the Group. 2. Comments on National Programmes on Fast Breeder Reactors. 3. International Coordination of the Schedule for Major Fast Reactor Meetings and other major international meetings having a predominant fast reactor interest. 4. Consideration of Conferences on Fast Reactors. 4a. IAEA Symposium on Fuel and Fuel Elements for Fast Reactors, Brussels, Belgium 2-6 July 1973. 4b. International Symposium on Physics of Fast Reactors, Tokyo, Japan, 16 to 23 October 1973. 4c. International Conference on Fast Reactor Power Stations, London, UK, 11 to 14 March 1974 . 4d. Suggestions of the IWGFR members on other conferences. 5. Consideration of a Schedule for Specialists' Meetings in 1973-74. 6. Other Business - 6a. First-aid in Sodium Burns. 6b. Principles of Good Practice for Safe Operation of Sodium Circuits. 6c. Bibliography on Fast Reactors. 7. The Date and Place of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the IWGFR

  10. FY 1977 Annual report on Sunshine Project results. Research and development of photovoltaic power generation systems. (Research and development of solar cells of II-VI group compound semiconductor); 1977 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. II-VI zoku kagobutsu handotai taiyo denchi no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-03-31

    This project is aimed at establishment of techniques for pollution-free production of II-VI group compound semiconductor type solar cells. The research items are (1) measures against aging, (2) methods for production of II-VI group compound semiconductors and for forming their joints, and (3) method for assembling solar cell devices.For the item (1), the aging tests are conducted for sintered film type CdS/CdTe solar cells. The C electrode is found to be less aged than the others. The aging tests for the CdS/Cu{sub 2}S cells indicate that it takes 10 years or longer for the performance to be halved under commercial conditions. For the item (2), the sintered film type CdS/CdTe solar cells can be produced by a mass-producible process of screen printing and belt furnace. This production method is promising for producing the solar cells at low cost. For the item (3), it is found that series resistance of the solar cell devices increases as the assembly area increases, resulting in decreased conversion efficiency. The divided structure of the CdTe layer is desired to avoid the above problem. Dividing each unit device increases intrinsic conversion efficiency, but decreases effective power generation area ratio. It is therefore necessary to improve printing precision. (NEDO)

  11. Scenario group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    A scenario is given for ISABELLE which provides a plausible sequence of events from FY 1980 to 1990. No doubt reality will be quite different. The scenario is based on the construction schedule of the 1976 proposal. Assembly and testing of the accelerator will occur until the end of FY 1983, and the next six years will provide pp interactions for the initial high energy physics research. By 1990 any temporary conditions associated with start-up of ISABELLE should be a thing of the past and all experimental capabilities fully utilized

  12. Scenario group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, A.

    1976-01-01

    The scenario is given which provides a plausible sequence of events for ISABELLE from FY 1980 to 1990. No doubt reality will be quite different. The scenario is based on the construction schedule of the 1976 proposal. Assembly and testing of the accelerator will occur until the end of FY 1983, and the next six years will provide pp interactions for the initial high energy physics research. By 1990 any temporary conditions associated with start-up of ISABELLE should be a thing of the past and all experimental capabilities fully utilized

  13. Tracking the release of IPCC AR5 on Twitter: Users, comments, and sources following the release of the Working Group I Summary for Policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Todd P

    2017-10-01

    Using the immediate release of the Working Group 1 Summary for Policymakers of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report as a case study, this article seeks to describe what type of actors were most active during the summary release, the substance of the most propagated tweets during the summary release, and the media sources that attracted the most attention during the summary release. The results from the study suggest that non-elite actors, such as individual bloggers and concerned citizens, accounted for the majority of the most propagated tweets in the sample. This study also finds that the majority of the most propagated tweets in the sample focused on public understanding of the report. Finally, while mainstream media sources were the most frequently discussed media sources, a number of new media and science news and information sources compete for audience attention.

  14. Real-time RT-PCR high-resolution melting curve analysis and multiplex RT-PCR to detect and differentiate grapevine leafroll-associated associated virus 3 variant groups I, II, III and VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Rachelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 is the main contributing agent of leafroll disease worldwide. Four of the six GLRaV-3 variant groups known have been found in South Africa, but their individual contribution to leafroll disease is unknown. In order to study the pathogenesis of leafroll disease, a sensitive and accurate diagnostic assay is required that can detect different variant groups of GLRaV-3. Methods In this study, a one-step real-time RT-PCR, followed by high-resolution melting (HRM curve analysis for the simultaneous detection and identification of GLRaV-3 variants of groups I, II, III and VI, was developed. A melting point confidence interval for each variant group was calculated to include at least 90% of all melting points observed. A multiplex RT-PCR protocol was developed to these four variant groups in order to assess the efficacy of the real-time RT-PCR HRM assay. Results A universal primer set for GLRaV-3 targeting the heat shock protein 70 homologue (Hsp70h gene of GLRaV-3 was designed that is able to detect GLRaV-3 variant groups I, II, III and VI and differentiate between them with high-resolution melting curve analysis. The real-time RT-PCR HRM and the multiplex RT-PCR were optimized using 121 GLRaV-3 positive samples. Due to a considerable variation in melting profile observed within each GLRaV-3 group, a confidence interval of above 90% was calculated for each variant group, based on the range and distribution of melting points. The intervals of groups I and II could not be distinguished and a 95% joint confidence interval was calculated for simultaneous detection of group I and II variants. An additional primer pair targeting GLRaV-3 ORF1a was developed that can be used in a subsequent real-time RT-PCR HRM to differentiate between variants of groups I and II. Additionally, the multiplex RT-PCR successfully validated 94.64% of the infections detected with the real-time RT-PCR HRM

  15. A summary of activities of the US/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.; Tverskaya, Galina; Orlov, Oleg I.; Ilyin, Eugene A.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-01

    The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanism—the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to understand its place in the universe. While nations can and do solve problems independently, it takes nations, working together, to accomplish great things. The formation of the JWG provided an opportunity for the opening of a series of productive relationships between the superpowers, the US and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); and served as a justification for continued relationship for medical assistance in spaceflight, and to showcase Earth benefits from space medicine research. This relationship has been played out on an international scale with the construction and operation of the International Space Station. The fundamental reason for this successful endeavor is a direct result of the spirit and perseverance of the men and women who have worked diligently side-by-side to promote science and move our understanding of space forward. This manuscript provides a historical perspective of the JWG; how it came about; its evolution; what it accomplished; and what impact it has had and continues to have in the 21st century with regard to human spaceflight and space life sciences research. It captures the spirit of this group, which has been in continuous existence for over 40 years, and provides a never before reported summary of its activities.

  16. XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The collection contains materials of plenary, sectional and poster sessions, presented at the XI International conference Problems of solvation and complex formation in solutions, and VI Conference of young scientists Theoretical and experimental chemistry of liquid-phase systems (Krestovsky readings). Theoretical questions and new experimental methods of chemistry of solutions, structure and dynamics of molecular and ion-molecular systems in solution and at the phase boundary; modern aspects of applied chemistry of solutions are discussed [ru

  17. Eighth meeting of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors Vienna, 30 January - 1 February 1989. Summary report. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Eighth Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria, from 30 January - 1 February, 1989. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes in the field of Gas-Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Identification and management of cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group (executive summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Fitchett, David H; Gilbert, Richard E; Gupta, Milan; Mancini, G B John; McFarlane, Philip A; Ross, Robert; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh; Anand, Sonia; Camelon, Kathryn; Chow, Chi-Ming; Cox, Jafna L; Després, Jean-Pierre; Genest, Jacques; Harris, Stewart B; Lau, David C W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Liu, Peter P; Lonn, Eva M; McPherson, Ruth; Poirier, Paul; Qaadri, Shafiq; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Rabkin, Simon W; Sharma, Arya M; Steele, Andrew W; Stone, James A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tobe, Sheldon; Ur, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    With the objectives of clarifying the concepts related to "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome" and "risk stratification" and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group presents an executive summary of a detailed analysis and position paper that offers a comprehensive and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The above concepts overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider ethnicity-related risk factors in order to appropriately evaluate all individuals in their diverse patient populations. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vi, de civiliserede

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyemann, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?......Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?...

  20. Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved Using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource-Constrained Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Davis, Thomas; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Ricca, Jim; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The Care Group approach, described in detail in a companion paper in this journal, uses volunteers to convey health promotion messages to their neighbors. This article summarizes the available evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, drawing on articles published in the peer-reviewed literature as well as data from unpublished but publicly available project evaluations and summary analyses of these evaluations. When implemented by strong international NGOs with adequate fundi...

  1. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report for the 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-HR-1,100-KR-1, and 100-KR-2 Group 4 Waste Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The 100-FR-1, 100-FR-2, 100-HR-1, 100-KR-1, and 100-KR-2 Group 4 waste sites will be the fourth set of Hanford 100 Area sites to undergo remediation. Like the sites in Groups 1, 2,and 3, the majority of Group 4 sties are considered high priority because of the contaminants present and their proximity to the Columbia River. the data quality objectives process,summarized in this document, is a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency approach for addressing data collecting and decision-making issues that are part of an environmental remediation project. The basic cleanup assumptions made in the Group 1, 2, and 3 designs are retained for the Group 4 design. As was the case with Group 3, the most significant difference between this DQO Summary Report and the Group 1 and 2 DQO Summary Reports is the data gaps that exist for specific Group 4 waste sites. These data gaps affect the approach to waste profiling and are the principal focus of the Group 4 DQO process

  2. Terapia de reposição enzimática para as mucopolissacaridoses I, II e VI: recomendações de um grupo de especialistas brasileiros Enzyme replacement therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses I, II and VI: recommendations from a group of Brazilian F experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giugliani

    2010-01-01

    developed and was approved for clinical use in MPS I, II and VI in the first decade of the 21st century. The authors of this paper are convinced that a better future for patients affected by mucopolysaccharidoses depends upon identifying, understanding and appropriately managing the multisystemic manifestations of these diseases. This includes the provision of support measures (which should be part of regular multidisciplinary care of these patients and of specific therapies. Although inhibition of synthesis of GAG and the recovery of enzyme activity with small molecules also may play a role in the management of MPS, the breakthrough is the currently available intravenous ERT. ERT radically changed the setting for treatment of mucopolysaccharidosis I, II and VI in the last decade., Benefits can even be extended soon to MPS IV A (ERT for this condition is already in clinical development, with prediction for treatment of MPS III A and the cognitive deficit in MPS II by administration of the enzyme directly into the central nervous system (CNS. A large number of Brazilian services, from all regions of the country, already have experience with ERT for MPS I, II and VI. This experience was gained not only by treating patients but also with the participation of some groups in clinical trials involving ERT for these conditions. Summing up the three types of MPS, more than 250 patients have already been treated with ERT in Brazil. The experience of professionals coupled to the data available in international literature, allowed us to elaborate this document, produced with the goal of bringing together and harmonize the information available for the treatment of these severe and progressive diseases, which, fortunately, are now treatable, a situation which bring new perspectives for Brazilian patients, affected by these conditions.

  3. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  4. Summary report of the IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear data for neutron multiplication in fusion-reactor first-wall and blanket materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pashchenko, A.B.

    1992-09-01

    The present Report contains the Summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on Nuclear Data for Neutron Multiplication in Fusion-Reactor First-Wall and Blanket Materials, which was hosted by the Southwest Institute of Nuclear physics and Chemistry (SWINPC) at Chengdu, China and held from 19-21 November 1990. This AGM was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS), with the cooperation and assistance of local organizers at the SWINPC. The papers which the participants prepared for and presented at the meeting will be published as an INDC report. (author)

  5. The removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution by almond green hull waste material: kinetic and equilibrium studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Nasseh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of industrial effluents containing hexavalent chromium into the environment can be very harmful to living things. Therefore, prior to effluent discharge into the environment, hexavalent chromium should be removed from contaminated water and especially from wastewaters. In the present work, almond green hull powder (AGHP was investigated for the removal of hexavalent chromium from wastewater. The effects of pH (2–10, adsorbent dose (2–24 g L−1, Cr(VI concentration (10–100 mg L−1, contact time (1–60 min, and temperature (5–50 °C were studied. All the experiments were performed in triplicate and average results were reported. The surface morphology, pore volume and size, pH of zero point charge (pHZPC and surface functional groups of AGHP were characterized. Isotherm and kinetic evaluations were also conducted in the present study. The results revealed that the adsorption of Cr(VI by AGHP was an adsorbate, adsorbent, and temperature dependent process that was favorable under acidic conditions. Furthermore, AGHP absorbed over 99% of chromium from the solutions containing 10–100 mg L−1 of Cr(VI based on the Freundlich model. In summary, hexavalent chromium was not found in almond kernel. Biosorption onto AGHP is an affordable and economical adsorption process for treating Cr(VI-laden industrial wastewater.

  6. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter-over-groups

  7. Summary on the activity of AERs Working Group on core monitoring (flux reconstruction, in-core measurements)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, I.

    2010-01-01

    Working Group C had a joint meeting with Group G in Balatonfuered, Hungary, 31 May-1 June, 2010. At the joint meeting 21 people from 10 AER member organisations of 4 countries - such as Russia, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary - participated. In the 2 days of the program 15 papers were presented, 10 from these connected to the topic of working group C. The title of papers and the list of participants are attached. At the meeting the following topics were discussed:1-Gd fuel introduction and experiences;2-Reactor physical measurement and evaluation problems; 3-Code development and testing;4-In-core surveillance system developments. (Author)

  8. Summary of geologic review group meetings, March 17--18, 1977 and May 26--27, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, J.C.; Crawford, J.H.; Davis, S.N.; Donath, F.A.; Gloyna, E.F.; Krauskopf, K.B.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of these meetings, the Geologic Review Group made suggestions and recommendations on radioactive waste repository sites, covering priorities for needed data on rock types, retrievable storage, use of Nevada Test Site, non-salt rock types, etc

  9. Testing of ENDF/B-VI data for shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    1995-01-01

    Version VI of the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data File (END/B-VI) was released for open distribution in 1990 after an extensive multiyear, multilaboratory evaluation effort coordinated by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). More than 75 of the 320 evaluations contained in the library are new for Version VI, including many relatively important nuclides and many with substantial changes to the cross-section data. Also, several important changes were made to the basic data formats for Version VI to permit better representation of the data and to allow additional types of data. Although these format changes yielded improved evaluations, they hindered processing of the data for use in applications codes and delayed the timely integral testing of the data. It has been only during the past year that significant integral testing of END/B-VI data has been achieved. The results and conclusions from some of these efforts are summarized in the following paragraphs

  10. Summary of the NICHD-BPCA Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Amidon, Gordon L.; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A.; Knipp, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community as an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) working group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric based classification system. Since there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability and potentially biorelevant solubilities at the different ages, the PBCS working group focused on identifying age specific issues that would need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. Objective To summarize the findings of the PBCS working group and provide insights into considerations required for the development of a pediatric based biopharmaceutics classification system. Methods Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development (NICHD)-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative (PFI) workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS working group considered several high level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS working group identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be addressed in order to develop a rigorous PBCS. Results It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it would need to be broken down into several different age groups that would account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal transit. Several critical knowledge gaps where identified including: 1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, in the liver and in the kidney; 2

  11. Les Houches physics at TeV colliders 2005 beyond the standard model working group: Summary report

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, Benjamin C.; Skands, Peter Z.; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, Georges; Baer, H.; Balazs, Csaba; Belanger, G.; Benakli, Karim; Boudjema, Fawzi; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, Giacomo; Carena, Marcela; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, Klaus; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Dudko, Lev V.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellwanger, Ulrich; Ferrag, S.; Finch, A.; Franke, F.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Gambino, Paolo; Ghodbane, Nabil; Godbole, R.M.; Goujdami, D.; Gris, Ph.; Guasch, Jaume Inglada; Guchait, M.; Hahn, Thomas; Heinemeyer, Sven; Hektor, A.; Hesselbach, Stefan; Hollik, W.; Hugonie, Cyril; Hurth, T.; Idarraga, J.; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Kalinowski, J.; Kneur, J.L.; Kraml, Sabine; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Lafaye, R.; Landsberg, Greg L.; Lari, T.; Lee, Jae Sik; Lykken, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mangano, Michelangelo L.; Menon, Arjun; Miller, D.J.; Millet, T.; Milstene, Caroline; Montesano, S.; Moortgat, F.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Moretti, Stefano; Morrissey, David Edgar; Muanza, S.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Muntel, M.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ohl, Thorsten; Penaranda, Siannah; Perelstein, M.; Perez, E.; Perries, S.; Peskin, Michael E.; Petzoldt, J.; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Plehn, Tilman; Polesello, G.; Pompos, A.; Porod, Werner; Przysiezniak, H.; Pukhov, A.; Raidal, Martti; Rainwater, David Landry; Raklev, Are R.; Rathsman, Johan; Reuter, Juergen; Richardson, Peter; Rindani, Saurabh D.; Rolbiecki, K.; Rzehak, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumann, S.; Semenov, A.; Serin, L.; Servant, Geraldine; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H.; Sherstnev, S.; Silvestrini, Luca; Singh, R.K.; Slavich, Pietro; Spira, Michael; Sopczak, A.; Sridhar, K.; Tompkins, Lauren Alexandra; Troncon, Clara; Tsuno, S.; Wagh, K.; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Weiglein, Georg; Wienemann, P.; Zerwas, D.; Zhukov, V.; Gris, Ph

    2005-01-01

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop Physics at TeV Colliders, Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  12. Summary of the NICHD-BPCA Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Amidon, Gordon L.; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A.; Knipp, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community as an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) working group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric based clas...

  13. Les Houches Physics at TeV Colliders 2005 Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Grojean, C.; /Saclay, SPhT /CERN; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, G.; Baer, H.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, P.-A.; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, K.; Dobrescu, B.A.; Dudko, L.; El Kacimi, M.; /Saclay,

    2006-03-17

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  14. Proceedings of the spring meeting of the Working Group for Electronic Instrumentation, Berlin, March 21 - 23, 1994. Summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, F.

    1994-07-01

    The SEI, working group for electronic instrumentation, is a platform for exchange of information and experience among electronics engineers from universities and research labs, particularly on subjects of interest in high-energy physics and nuclear electronics engineering. The abstracts of the 12 papers presented to the meeting cover aspects of current interest ranging from technology transfer to hardware description language to data processing to specific measuring and control instruments. (DG) [de

  15. Mergeable summaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Graham, Graham; Huang, Zengfeng

    2013-01-01

    We study the mergeability of data summaries. Informally speaking, mergeability requires that, given two summaries on two datasets, there is a way to merge the two summaries into a single summary on the two datasets combined together, while preserving the error and size guarantees. This property m...

  16. Improved evaluations and integral data testing for FENDL. Summary report of the IAEA advisory group meeting held in Garching, Germany, 12 to 16 September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1994-12-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section, in co-operation with several national nuclear data centres and research groups, has created the first version of an internationally available Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (FENDL-1). The FENDL library has been selected to serve as a comprehensive source of processed and tested nuclear data tailored to the requirements of the Engineering and Development Activities (EDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project and other fusion-related development projects. Within the scope of the FENDL project, the International Atomic Energy Agency performs the task of coordinating the assembling, processing and testing of a comprehensive, fusion-relevant Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library with unrestricted international distribution. The present report contains the summary of the IAEA Advisory Group Meeting on ''Improved Evaluations and Integral Data Testing for FENDL'', 12-16 September 1994 hosted by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany. The report presents the current status of the FENDL activity and the future work plans in the form of conclusions and recommendations of the four Working Groups of the Advisory Group Meeting on (1) Basic Evaluations towards FENDL/E-2.0 for ITER Design, (2) Experimental and Calculational Benchmarks on Fusion Neutronics for FENDL Validation, (3) Production and Interfacing of FENDL Libraries to ITER Design, and, (4) Activation. (author)

  17. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives

  18. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs.

  20. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  1. Commissioning specialist diabetes services for adults with diabetes: summary of a Diabetes UK Task and Finish group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, N; Turner, B; Vora, J

    2011-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes, the drive to develop community services for diabetes and the Quality and Outcomes Framework for diabetes have led to improvements in the management of diabetes in primary care settings, with services traditionally provided only in specialist care now provided for many patients with diabetes by non-specialists. Consequently, there is a need to redefine roles, responsibilities and components of a specialist diabetes service to provide for the needs of patients in the National Health Service (NHS) today. The delivery of diabetes care is complex and touches on almost every aspect of the health service. It is the responsibility of those working within commissioning and specialist provider roles to work together with people with diabetes to develop, organize and deliver a full range of integrated diabetes care services. The local delivery model agreed within the local diabetes network, comprising specialist teams, primary care teams, commissioners and people with diabetes, should determine how the diabetes specialist services are organizsed. It should identify the roles and responsibilities of provider organizations to ensure that the right person provides the right care, at the right time, and in the right place. We summarize a report entitled 'Commissioning Diabetes Specialist Services for Adults with Diabetes', which has been produced, as a 'Task and Finish' group activity within Diabetes UK, to assist managers, commissioners and healthcare professionals to provide advice on the structure, roles and components of specialist diabetes services for adults. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  2. Utilization of wireless pH monitoring technologies: a summary of the proceedings from the esophageal diagnostic working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J E; Pandolfino, J E; Vela, M F; Kahrilas, P J; Lacy, B E; Ganz, R; Dengler, W; Oelschlager, B K; Peters, J; DeVault, K R; Fass, R; Gyawali, C P; Conklin, J; DeMeester, T

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be difficult to diagnose - symptoms alone are often not enough, and thus, objective testing is often required. GERD is a manifestation of pathologic levels of reflux into the esophagus of acidic, nonacidic, and/or bilious gastric content. However, in our current evidence-based knowledge approach, we only have reasonable outcome data in regards to acid reflux, as this particular type of refluxate predictably causes symptoms and mucosal damage, which improves with medical or surgical therapy. While there are data suggesting that nonacid reflux may be responsible for ongoing symptoms despite acid suppression in some patients, outcome data about this issue are limited. Therefore, this working group believes that it is essential to confirm the presence of acid reflux in patients with 'refractory' GERD symptoms or extraesophageal symptoms thought to be caused by gastroesophageal reflux before an escalation of antireflux therapy is considered. If patients do not have pathologic acid reflux off antisecretory therapy, they are unlikely to have clinically significant nonacid or bile reflux. Patients who do not have pathologic acid gastroesophageal reflux parameters on ambulatory pH monitoring then: (i) could attempt to discontinue antisecretory medications like proton pump inhibitors and H2-receptor antagonists (which are expensive and which carry risks - i.e. C. diff, etc.); (ii) may undergo further evaluation for other causes of their esophageal symptoms (e.g. functional heartburn or chest pain, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, achalasia, other esophageal motor disorders); and (iii) can be referred to an ear, nose, and throat/pulmonary/allergy physician for assessment of non-GERD causes of their extraesophageal symptoms. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  3. Review of medical discharge summaries and medical documentation in a metropolitan hospital: impact on diagnostic-related groups and Weighted Inlier Equivalent Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, N; Perera, P; Roberts, A; Nagappan, R

    2013-07-01

    Accurate and comprehensive clinical documentation is crucial for effective ongoing patient care, follow up and to optimise case mix-based funding. Each Diagnostic Related Group (DRG) is assigned a 'weight', leading to Weighted Inlier Equivalent Separation (WIES), a system many public and private hospitals in Australia subscribe to. To identify the top DRG in a general medical inpatient service, the completeness of medical discharge documentation, commonly missed comorbidities and system-related issues and subsequent impact on DRG and WIES allocation. One hundred and fifty completed discharge summaries were randomly selected from the top 10 medical DRG in our health service. From a detailed review of the clinical documentation, principal diagnoses, associated comorbidities and complications, where appropriate, the DRG and WIES were modified. Seventy-two (48%) of the 150 reviewed admissions resulted in a revision of DRG and WIES equivalent to an increase of AUD 142,000. Respiratory-based DRG generated the largest revision of DRG and WIES, while 'Cellulitis' DRG had the largest relative change. Twenty-seven per cent of summaries reviewed necessitated a change in coding with no subsequent change in DRG allocation or WIES. Acute renal failure, anaemia and electrolyte disturbances were the most commonly underrepresented entities in clinical discharge documentation. Seven patients had their WIES downgraded. Comprehensive documentation of principal diagnosis/diagnoses, comorbidities and their complications is imperative to optimal DRG and WIES allocation. Regular meetings between clinical and coding staff improve the quality and timeliness of medical documentation, ensure adequate communication with general practitioners and lead to appropriate funding. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Cinética e equilíbrio de adsorção dos oxiânions Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI pelo sal de amônio quaternário de quitosana Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of oxyanions Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI by quaternary ammonium chitosan salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Spinelli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sal quaternário de quitosana foi sintetizado com cloreto de glicidil trimetil amônio. A modificação química foi caracterizada por espectrometria no IV, RMN de 13C e ¹H, e mmol/g de grupos quaternários presentes na matriz polimérica por condutimetria. A remoção de Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI, em meio aquoso, foi investigada em processo de batelada. A adsorção mostrou ser dependente do pH para o Cr (VI e Se (VI, com um pH ótimo de adsorção, entre 4,0 a 6,0. Para o Mo (VI a adsorção manteve-se quase constante no intervalo de pH entre 4,0 e 11,5. O modelo de isoterma de Langmuir descreveu melhor os dados de equilíbrio na faixa de concentração investigada. No presente estudo, um grama do sal quaternário de quitosana reticulado com glutaraldeído adsorveu 68,3 mg de Cr, 63,4 mg de Mo e 90,0 mg de Se. A velocidade de adsorção, no processo, segue a equação cinética de pseudo segunda-ordem, sendo que o equilíbrio para os três íons foi alcançado próximo aos 200 minutos. A análise dispersiva de raios-X para o Cr (VI mostrou que o principal mecanismo de adsorção é a troca iônica entre os íons Cl- da superfície do polímero pelos oxiânions. O trocador aniônico apresentou a seguinte ordem de seletividade: Cr (VI > Mo (VI > Se (VI.Quaternary chitosan salt was synthesized in the presence of glycidyl trimetyl ammonium chloride. The polymer was characterized by spectroscopic techniques: infrared, 13C and ¹H NMR, while the amount of quaternary ammonium groups was obtained by condutimetry. The removal of Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI from aqueous solutions was carried out in batch adsorption processes. The process seemed to be pH dependent for Cr (VI and Se (VI with an optimum pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.0; while for Mo (VI the adsorption remained almost constant within the range between 4.0 and 11.5. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data over the whole concentration investigated. In the experiment

  5. Synthesis, structure and properties of oxo- and dioxochloride complexes of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, V.L.; Sergienko, V.S.; Egorova, O.A.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of oxo- and dioxochlorides of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline of molecular and intracomplex type are synthesized and studied by the method of IR spectroscopy. The complexes have octahedral structure. It is proposed that 8-oxyquinoline in molecular complexes is coordinated by central atom through nitrogen atom of heterocycle, but in intracomplex compounds - through heterocyclic nitrogen atom and oxygen atom of deprotonated OH-group. Thermal stability of the complexes is studied [ru

  6. Working group summary: new technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.

    1983-01-01

    The discussion of undulator magnets includes conventional static undulators, gratings as undulators, crystals as undulators, pump wave undulators, magnetic measurements, magnetic fields, trajectories, and matching of an undulator with a storage ring

  7. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  8. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Costa, Ana M. Rosa da; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Matos, Antonio Pedro; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  9. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group III - Peri-Implantitis Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Suárez-López del Amo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 3 was to review and update the existing data concerning non-surgical, surgical non-regenerative and surgical regenerative treatment of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the preventive and supporting therapy in case of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  10. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group II - Peri-Implantitis Diagnostics and Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Fikret Tözüm

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 2 was to review and update the existing data concerning clinical and genetic methods of diagnostics of peri-implantitis. Special interest was paid to the peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF overview including analysis of enzymes and biomarkers and microbial profiles from implants. Material and Methods: The main areas of interest were as follows: effect of smoking and history of periodontitis, prosthetic treatment mistakes, excess cement, overloading, general diseases influence on peri-implantitis development. The systematic review and/or meta-analysis were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was searched and reported using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. The method of preparation of systematic reviews of the literature based on comprehensive search strategies was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic review and/or meta-analysis is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  11. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-01-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF)

  12. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by coconut coir: Spectroscopic investigation on the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with lignocellulosic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Ying-Shuian; Wang, Shan-Li; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Jang-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) from water by coconut coir (CC) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that, upon reaction with CC at pH 3, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either bound to CC or released back into solution. As revealed by the FTIR spectra of CC before and after reacting with Cr(VI), the phenolic methoxyl and hydroxyl groups of lignin in CC are the dominant drivers of Cr(VI) reduction, giving rise to carbonyl and carboxyl groups on CC. These functional groups can subsequently provide binding sites for Cr(III) resulting from Cr(VI) reduction. In conjunction with forming complexes with carbonyl and carboxyl groups, the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate could also readily occur as revealed by the linear combination fitting of the Cr K-edge XANES spectrum using a set of reference compounds. The phenolic groups in lignin are responsible for initiating Cr(VI) reduction, so lignocellulosic materials containing a higher amount of phenolic groups are expected to be more effective scavengers for removal of Cr(VI) from the environment.

  13. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by coconut coir: Spectroscopic investigation on the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ying-Shuian [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shan-Li, E-mail: slwang@nchu.edu.tw [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Jang-Hung [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) from water by coconut coir (CC) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that, upon reaction with CC at pH 3, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either bound to CC or released back into solution. As revealed by the FTIR spectra of CC before and after reacting with Cr(VI), the phenolic methoxyl and hydroxyl groups of lignin in CC are the dominant drivers of Cr(VI) reduction, giving rise to carbonyl and carboxyl groups on CC. These functional groups can subsequently provide binding sites for Cr(III) resulting from Cr(VI) reduction. In conjunction with forming complexes with carbonyl and carboxyl groups, the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate could also readily occur as revealed by the linear combination fitting of the Cr K-edge XANES spectrum using a set of reference compounds. The phenolic groups in lignin are responsible for initiating Cr(VI) reduction, so lignocellulosic materials containing a higher amount of phenolic groups are expected to be more effective scavengers for removal of Cr(VI) from the environment.

  14. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by coconut coir: spectroscopic investigation on the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with lignocellulosic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying-Shuian; Wang, Shan-Li; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Jang-Hung

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) from water by coconut coir (CC) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that, upon reaction with CC at pH 3, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either bound to CC or released back into solution. As revealed by the FTIR spectra of CC before and after reacting with Cr(VI), the phenolic methoxyl and hydroxyl groups of lignin in CC are the dominant drivers of Cr(VI) reduction, giving rise to carbonyl and carboxyl groups on CC. These functional groups can subsequently provide binding sites for Cr(III) resulting from Cr(VI) reduction. In conjunction with forming complexes with carbonyl and carboxyl groups, the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate could also readily occur as revealed by the linear combination fitting of the Cr K-edge XANES spectrum using a set of reference compounds. The phenolic groups in lignin are responsible for initiating Cr(VI) reduction, so lignocellulosic materials containing a higher amount of phenolic groups are expected to be more effective scavengers for removal of Cr(VI) from the environment. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of flavin compounds on uranium(VI) reduction- kinetic study using electrochemical methods with UV-vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The reduction of uranium hexavalent (U(VI)) to tetravalent (U(IV)) is an important reaction because of the change in its mobility in the natural environment. Although the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) has acted as an electron shuttle for the U(VI) reduction in vivo system, which is called an electron mediator, only the rate constant for the electron transfer from FMN to U(VI) has been determined. This study examined the rate constant for the U(VI) reduction process by three flavin analogues (riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide) to elucidate their substituent group effect on the U(VI) reduction rate by electrochemical methods. The formation of the U(IV) was monitored by UV-vis spectrometry at 660 nm during the constant potential electrolysis of the U(VI) solution in the presence of the mediator. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that the three flavin analogues behaved as electron mediator to reduce U(VI). The logarithmic rate constant for the U(VI) reduction was related to the standard redox potential of the mediators. This linear relationship indicated that the redox-active group of the mediator and the substituent group of the mediator dominate capability of the U(VI) reduction and its rate, respectively. The apparent reduction potential of U(VI) increased about 0.2 V in the presence of the mediators, which strongly suggests that the biological electron mediator makes the U(VI) reduction possible even under more oxidative conditions. - Highlights: • The rate constant for the U(VI) reduction by flavin analogues was determined. • The flavins showed a mediator effect on the U(VI) reduction. • The logarithmic rate constants for the U(VI) reduction was proportional to redox potential of the mediator. • The presence of the mediator increased about 0.2 V apparent redox potential of U(VI) to U(IV).

  16. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents summaries of three articles relevant to school crisis response: (1) "Factors Contributing to Posttraumatic Growth," summarized by Steve DeBlois; (2) "Psychological Debriefing in Cross-Cultural Contexts" (Stacey Rice); and (3) "Brain Abnormalities in PTSD" (Sunny Windingstad). The first summary reports the findings of a…

  17. cis-dioxomolybdenum(VI)-(ONO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various ONO type Schiff base ligands L(H)2 used for the preparation of ... and derivatives.6–33 Depending on the method of prepa- ration .... HCl. Scheme 6. Synthesis of a Mo(VI) Schiff base complexe by selective inversion at C–1 carbon of a ...

  18. VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaal / Leonhard Lapin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lapin, Leonhard, 1947-

    2005-01-01

    15.-17. IX Tallinnas Niguliste kirikus toimuval VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil esinevad inglise arhitektuurikriitik Peter Davey, šveitsi arhitekt Peter Zumthor, soome arhitekt Juha Leviskä, eesti arhitekt Vilen Künnapu, eesti kunstiajaloolane Juhan Maiste jt. Külastatakse KUMU, tutvutab autor Pekka Vapaavuori

  19. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Each session of the workshop consisted of a number of presentations followed by a panel discussion moderated by the session Chairs. A summary of each session and subsequent discussion that ensued are provided. Session 1: National approaches for long term interim storage facilities. Seven papers were presented during this session by representatives of research institutes in USA (EPRI) and in Norway (IFE), governmental authorities for the nuclear industry in Finland (STUK) and Slovak Republic (UJD), technical support organizations in Germany (GRS) and France (IRSN) and the public company in charge of waste management in Spain (ENRESA). The papers discussed the national policy, the regulatory framework and the current situation for storage of SF and HLW in various European countries (Germany, Spain, Finland, Norway and Slovak Republic). The main activities the EPRI is undertaking to establish the technical bases for extended (long-term) storage and the IRSN's definition of the safety principles and objectives for new storage facilities regarding long-term storage are also discussed. Session 2: Safety requirements, regulatory framework and implementation issues. Eleven papers were presented during this session by representatives from international groups (the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)), representatives of regulatory bodies from the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) and Germany (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS)), German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), operators from the United Kingdom (Sellafield Limited, UK) and France (EDF), vendors (AREVA), and representatives of TSOs in Germany (TUV and Oko-Institut). Session 3: Technical issues and operational experience, needs for R and D. This session was chaired by Karl Wasinger (AREVA, Germany) and Fumihisa Nagase (JAEA, Japan). Ten papers were presented during this session by representatives of research institutes of Japan (CRIEPI

  20. Spectroscopic Studies on Complex Formation of U(VI)-thiosalicylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wan Sik; Cho, Hye Ryun; Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The dynamic interaction between radionuclides and organic ligands is largely dependent on the composition of functional groups in a ligand chemical structure. Therefore, the structural mimics of natural ligands possessing specific functional groups, such as hydroxy, phenol, carboxyl, thiol and amine groups, have been studied to understand their influence on the migration of radionuclides including actinide species under geological groundwater conditions. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the fraction of hydrolyzed U(VI) species occurring in weak acidic solutions (pH {approx}4.5) is significantly influenced by the presence of salicylate (Sal) ligand due to the simultaneous participation of both phenol and carboxyl groups in the formation of U(VI)-complexes. Thiosalicylic acid (TSalH{sub 2}) is a good model compound for studying the effects of both carboxyl and thiol (-SH) groups. The fraction of di-anionic ligand form (TSal{sup 2-}) is higher at near neutral pH due to the lower pKa ({approx} 8) of the thiol group than the case of salicylic acid (pKa, {approx}13 for salicylic -OH), despite the structural similarity. In addition, the redox capability of the thiol group is expected to influence the reducible radiouclides and the chemical structures of natural ligands by creating cross-linkage (-S-S-) upon oxidation. The goal of the present study is to investigate aqueous U(VI)-TSal complexation equilibrium via laser-based spectroscopic techniques including time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In this preliminary work, we report the results of spectroscopic studies using conventional UVVis absorbance and fluorescence (FL) measurement methods. The photo-stability of U(VI)-TSal complex or ligand itself upon exposure to a series of laser pulses is estimated by monitoring the change in their absorption bands. Additionally, TSal FL-quenching effect by U(VI) ions is discussed in comparison with that of Sal FL-quenching

  1. Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multi-year summaries of one or more meteorological elements at a station or in a state. Primarily includes Form 1078, a United States Weather Bureau form designed...

  2. Survey Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Nursing home summary information for the Health and Fire Safety Inspections currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including dates of the three most recent...

  3. Removal of chromium (VI) from electroplating wastewater using an anion exchanger derived from rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Dang, Zhi; Yia, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Chen; Lu, Gui-Ning; Liu, Yun-Feng; Huang, Se-Yan; Zheng, Liu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    An anion exchanger from rice straw was used to remove Cr (VI) from synthetic wastewater and electroplating effluent. The exchanger was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and it was found that the quaternary amino group and hydroxyl group are the main functional groups on the fibrous surface of the exchanger. The effect of contact time, initial concentration and pH on the removal of Cr (VI), and adsorption isotherms at different temperature, was investigated. The results showed that the removal of Cr (VI) was very rapid and was significantly affected by the initial pH of the solution. Although acidic conditions (pH = 2-6) facilitated Cr (VI) adsorption, the exchanger was effective in neutral solution and even under weak base conditions. The equilibrium data fitted well with Langmuir adsorption model, and the maximum Cr (VI) adsorption capacities at pH 6.4 were 0.35, 0.36 and 0.38 mmol/g for 15, 25 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The exchanger was finally tested with real electroplating wastewater, and at sorbent dosage of 10 g/L, the removal efficiencies for Cr (VI) and total Cr were 99.4% and 97.8%, respectively. In addition, the positive relationship between adsorbed Cr (VI) and desorbed Cl- suggested that Cr (VI) was mainly removed by ion exchange with chlorine.

  4. Benchmark analysis of MCNP trademark ENDF/B-VI iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, J.D.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets

  5. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U V species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U VI /U V oxo cluster [U(UO 2 ) 5 (μ 3 -O) 5 (PhCOO) 5 (Py) 7 ]. This cluster is only the second example of a U VI /U V cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U V center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U 12 IV U 4 V O 24 cluster {[K(Py) 2 ] 2 [K(Py)] 2 [U 16 O 24 (PhCOO) 24 (Py) 2 ]}.

  6. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Inst. de Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U{sup V} species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U{sup VI}/U{sup V} oxo cluster [U(UO{sub 2}){sub 5}(μ{sub 3}-O){sub 5}(PhCOO){sub 5}(Py){sub 7}]. This cluster is only the second example of a U{sup VI}/U{sup V} cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U{sup V} center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U{sub 12}{sup IV}U{sub 4}{sup V}O{sub 24} cluster {[K(Py)_2]_2[K(Py)]_2[U_1_6O_2_4(PhCOO)_2_4(Py)_2]}.

  7. Vi mangler endnu et panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Vi mangler højtuddannede værdiskabere, som transformerer gode idéer og teknologier til indtjening og velstand. Først i mødet med markedet afgøres fremtiden. Troels Lund Poulsen bør nedsætte et kommercialiseringspanel, der byder ind med løsninger, hvordan Danmark bliver et land ikke kun med gode...

  8. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  9. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    1999-03-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the thirteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998. The meeting was attended by 30 scientists from 10 Member States and 2 international organizations concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  10. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G

    2001-02-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 4-7 December 2000. The meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 7 Member States and 1 international organization concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  11. Clinical evaluation of complete solo surgery with the "ViKY®" robotic laparoscope manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Masanori; Nishinari, Naoto; Matsuya, Hideki; Tosha, Tsutomu; Minagawa, Yukihiro; Shimooki, Osamu; Abe, Tadashi

    2017-02-01

    Advancement in both surgical technique and medical equipment has enabled solo surgery. ViKY ® Endoscope Positioning System (ViKY ® ) is a robotic system that remotely controls an endoscope and provides direct vision control to the surgeon. Here, we report our experience with ViKY ® -assisted solo surgery. We retrospectively examined 25 cases of solo surgery TAPP with ViKY ® . ViKY ® was setup by the surgeon alone, and the setup duration was determined as the time at which the side rail was positioned and that when the endoscope was installed. For assessing the control unit, the number of false movements was counted. We compared the operative results between ViKY ® -assisted solo surgery TAPP and the conventional method with an assistant. The average time to set up ViKY ® was 7.9 min. The average number of commands for ViKY ® during surgery was 98.3, and the average number of errors and no response of control unit was 7.9. The mean duration of surgery was 136 min for the ViKY ® group, including the setup time, and 117 min for the conventional method. No case required an assistant during the operation. There was also no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative complications and the rate of recurrence. ViKY ® proved reliable in recognizing orders with very few failures, and the operations were performed safely and were comparable to the conventional operations with assistants. Solo surgery with ViKY ® was beneficial in this clinical evaluation.

  12. Retention of U(VI) onto silica in presence of model organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, T.T.H.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Drot, R.; Lagarde, G.; Simoni, E.; Lambert, J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well-known that the organic matter influences the retention of ions onto mineral surfaces. However, the major part of concerned studies implies humic substances and complex solids. Another approach for identifying the sorption mechanisms is possible by studying simpler solids than those present in natural medium. So, silica is chosen as mineral surface because of its abundance in soils and of the presence of Si-O groups in clayey minerals. Uranium (VI) is selected as cation. Simple organic molecules like acetic (one carboxylic group) and oxalic (two carboxylic functions) acids are considered as models of the natural organic matter for understanding their role in the retention of U(VI) onto powders and slides of silica. Binary (organics/silica, U(VI)/silica) and ternary systems (organics/silica/U(VI)) are studied by complementary approaches. Sorption edges as function of pH are obtained by liquid scintillation methods and capillary electrophoresis. Different spectroscopic techniques are used to deduce the interactions between the organic matter and U(VI) sorbed onto the silica whose: Time-Resolved Laser induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMA). The results of the effect of these model organic molecules onto the U(VI) retention showed a good agreement between the different techniques. Concerning the acetic acid, there are not differences in the sorption percentages of uranyl (see the figure). All these results indicate that the uranyl-acetate complexes stay in the aqueous solution rather than sorbing onto the silica. On the contrary, oxalic acid influences the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. The sorption percentage of U(VI) in the ternary system (oxalic acid/silica/U(VI)) is lower than the binary system (U(VI)/silica) (see the figure). So, the presence of oxalic acid decreases the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. (authors)

  13. Probing uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of amidoxime ligands using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adetayo M; Pasilis, Sofie P

    2013-10-15

    Extraction processes using poly(acrylamidoxime) resins are being developed to extract uranium from seawater. The main complexing agents in these resins are thought to be 2,6-dihydroxyiminopiperidine (DHIP) and N(1),N(5)-dihydroxypentanediimidamide (DHPD), which form strong complexes with uranyl(VI) at the pH of seawater. It is important to understand uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of these and similar amidoxime ligands to understand factors affecting uranyl(VI) adsorption to the poly(acrylamidoxime) resins. Experiments were carried out in positive ion mode on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The ligands investigated were DHIP, DHPD, and N(1),N(2)-dihydroxyethanediimidamide (DHED). DHED and DHPD differ only in the number of carbons separating the oxime groups. The effects on the mass spectra of changes in uranyl(VI):ligand ratio, pH, and ligand type were examined. DHIP binds uranyl(VI) more effectively than DHPD or DHED in the pH range investigated, forming ions derived from solution-phase species with uranyl(VI):DHIP stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:3. The 2:3 uranyl(VI):DHIP complex appears to be a previously undescribed solution species. Ions related to uranyl(VI):DHPD complexes were detected in very low abundance. DHED is a more effective complexing agent for uranyl(VI) than DHPD, forming ions having uranyl(VI):DHED stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 2:3. This study presents a first look at the solution chemistry of uranyl(VI)-amidoxime complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The appearance of previously undescribed solution species suggests that the uranyl-amidoxime system is a rich and relatively complex one, requiring a more in-depth investigation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. A critical review of ferrate(VI)-based remediation of soil and groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prabhat Kumar; Lee, Jechan; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Kwon, Eilhann E; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Over the past few decades, diverse chemicals and materials such as mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles, metal oxides, and zeolites have been used for soil and groundwater remediation. Ferrate (Fe VI O 4 2- ) has been widely employed due to its high-valent iron (VI) oxo compound with high oxidation/reduction potentials. Ferrate has received attention for wide environmental applications including water purification and sewage sludge treatment. Ferrate provides great potential for diverse environmental applications without any environmental problems. Therefore, this paper provides comprehensive information on the recent progress on the use of (Fe VI O 4 2- ) as a green material for use in sustainable treatment processes, especially for soil and water remediation. We reviewed diverse synthesis recipes for ferrates (Fe VI O 4 2- ) and their associated physicochemical properties as oxidants, coagulants, and disinfectants for the elimination of a diverse range of chemical and biological species from water/wastewater samples. A summary of the eco-sustainable performance of ferrate(VI) in water remediation is also provided and the future of ferrate(VI) is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairo F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Vairo,1–3 Andressa Federhen,1,3,4 Guilherme Baldo,1,2,5–7 Mariluce Riegel,1,6 Maira Burin,1 Sandra Leistner-Segal,1,8 Roberto Giugliani1,5,6,81Medical Genetics Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2Department of Genetics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 3Clinical Research Group on Medical Genetics, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 4Post-Graduate Program in Child and Adolescent Health, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 5Gene Therapy Center, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 6Post-Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 7Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 8Post-Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene

  16. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    assessment process, licensee actions, regulatory actions. Summaries from the three days of workshop discussions as well as information from the licensee and regulatory responses to two pre-workshop surveys are presented. Also included are highlights from the numerous invited presentations. The conclusions and findings from the extensive group and plenary discussions are summarised too. Supporting material, discussion group presentation slides, slides from the invited presenters, and information/responses to the licensee and regulatory surveys are included in the attached Appendices

  17. Research Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Stephen E., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This column features summaries of research articles from 3 recent crisis management publications. The first, "School Shootings and Counselor Leadership: Four Lessons from the Field" summarized by Kristi Fenning, was conducted as the result of the increased demand for trained crisis personnel on school campuses. Survey participants were…

  18. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the international conference on radioactive waste management of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: storage and disposal; hydrogeology and geochemistry; transportation; buffers and backfill; public attitudes; tailings; site investigations and geomechanics; concrete; economics; licensing; matrix materials and container design; durability of fuel; biosphere modelling; radioactive waste processing; and, future options

  19. Executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nimwegen, N.; van Nimwegen, N.; van der Erf, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Demography Monitor 2008 gives a concise overview of current demographic trends and related developments in education, the labour market and retirement for the European Union and some other countries. This executive summary highlights the major findings of the Demography Monitor 2008 and further

  20. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal by polyethylenimine- and phosphorus-codoped hierarchical porous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shixia; Wang, Jun; Wu, Zeliang; Deng, Qiang; Tu, Wenfeng; Dai, Guiping; Zeng, Zheling; Deng, Shuguang

    2018-08-01

    The amino- and phosphorus-codoped (N,P-codoped) porous carbons derived from oil-tea shells were facilely fabricated through a combination of phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) activation and amino (polyethylenimine, PEI) modification method. The as-synthesized carbon adsorbents were systematically characterized and evaluated for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous solutions. The relationship between adsorbent properties and adsorption behaviors was illustrated. Moreover, the influences of contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, coexisting anions and temperature were also investigated. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) could be perfectly described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) on the carbon adsorbents synthesized in this work was 355.0 mg/g, and this excellent Cr(VI) capacity could be sustained with other coexisting anions. In addition to high surface area and suitable pore size distribution, the high Cr(VI) removal capacity is induced by rich heteroatoms incorporation and the Cr(VI) removal mechanism was clearly illustrated. Furthermore, the continuous column breakthrough experiment on obtained N,P-codoped carbon was conducted and well fitted by the Thomas model. This work revealed that PEI modification and P-containing groups could significantly enhance Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and make these N,P-codoped biomass-derived carbons potent adsorbents in practical water treatment applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A simple Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system for rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidative degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yanan; Yang, Shaojie [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China); Zhou, Danna, E-mail: zdncug@163.com [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Feng [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of organic pollutants occur. • Oxysulfur radicals generated in Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system oxidize the organic pollutants. • Acidic pH facilitates the reactions from both directions of reduction and oxidation. • Degradation potential of aromatic amines depends on the substituted groups. • Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system is promising for “waste control by waste”. - Abstract: Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a heavy-metal contaminant, can be easily reduced to less toxic trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) by sulfite ions (S(IV)). However, S(IV) has not drawn as much attention as the ferrous ion has. We report herein a novel Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system containing sulfite ions that rapidly and simultaneously reduces Cr(VI) and oxidize organic pollutants in the presence of oxygen in aqueous solutions. This Cr(VI)–S(IV)-O{sub 2} system contains the initiator Cr(VI), the reductant S(IV), and the oxidant O{sub 2}, which produce oxysulfur radicals (mainly SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and SO{sub 5}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radicals (OH·). The Cr(VI)/S(IV) molar ratio, pH, and oxygen content play important roles in the entire reaction system. Acidic conditions (pH 3.0) facilitated degradation of organic compounds and reduction of Cr(VI) as well. In addition, experiments of rapid degradation of several kinds of organic pollutants such as azo dye (acid orange 7, AO7), aniline, phenol, bisphenol A etc were also conducted. Preliminary results show that the removal rates of the analogs of phenols or aromatic amines in this Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system have a relationship with the electronic parameters (Hammett constant, σ) of the substituted groups. Thus, the Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system, provides an excellent strategy of “waste control by waste” for removing multiple industrial contaminants.

  2. Conference Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinkham, M.

    1991-01-01

    This summary will begin with short remarks, trying to recall some of the spirit of the presentations of each of the speakers during the first day, with no attempt at detail or completeness, given the need for a 20:1 compression relative to the original talk. The author hopes these idiosyncratic recollections do not infuriate the speakers too much. Since the speakers on the second day presented such interlocking topics, he simply tries to present some sort of consensus report, to which he adds some comments of his own. The two talks preceding this Summary on the final day dealt with the prospects for applications; since he had no chance to attempt to prepare a proper report on these, he says only a few words about those presentations

  3. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains summaries of 28 papers presented at the 27. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. These papers discuss the general situation of the Canadian nuclear industry and the CANDU reactor; dialogue with the public; the International Atomic Energy Agency; and economic goals and operating lessons. It also contains summaries of 70 papers presented at the 8. conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, which discuss plant life extension; safety and the environment; reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; risk assessment; the CANDU spacer location and repositioning project; CANDU operations; safety research after Chernobyl; fuel channels; and nuclear technology developments. The individual papers are also available in INIS-mf--13673 (CNA), and INIS-mf--12909 (CNS). (L.L.)

  4. Summary talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, H.

    1978-10-01

    A general overview is given in this high energy physics conference summary. Quantum chromodynamics as a theory of strong interactions and studied by experimental tests, SU(2) x U(1) theory of weak and electromagnetic interactions and its experimental tests, weak interactions above 100 GeV, simple unification of weak and electromagnetic interactions, and the grand and the ultimate unifications with extended supergravity are discussed. 28 references

  5. Summary talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    In this summary talk some implications of points raised during the Daresbury Study Weekend on heavy-ion reactions are examined and discussed in particular those concerning polarized heavy ions, the connection between analyzing powers and dynamics, transfer reactions, total reaction cross section measurements with polarized beams, and the implications of break-up reaction results for theories of nuclear reactions involving loosely bound projectiles. (U.K.)

  6. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 31. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and the 12. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: reactor physics; thermalhydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components, safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; fuel behaviour and performance; reactor safety; reactor engineering; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining and processing

  7. A skin colour code for the Nigerian (Negroid) population SUMMARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    SUMMARY. Some researchers have codified various people of different racial and pigment backgrounds into skin types. The West African native population generally falls into type VI – least likely to burn. There is a need for skin colour code in a multiethnic country like Nigeria especially for the purpose of health matters.

  8. Effect of porosity and surface chemistry on the adsorption-desorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rice straw-based biochars modified with different chemical regents were used as an adsorbent for uranium(VI). Effect of pyrolysis temperature and nature of modifying agent's as well as surface chemistry, surface charge, and pore structure on U(VI) removal was investigated. Amount and nature of the surface groups has, in general, more influence than its porosity on U(VI) adsorption. The adsorption was maximum for the initial pH of 5.5. Rice straw derived biochars had comparable U(VI) adsorption as compared to other adsorbents. The U(VI) removal was 90 % from groundwater. NaHCO 3 was found to be the most efficient desorbent eluent for U(VI). (author)

  9. Når vi taler om 68

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Metz, Georg

    Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi......Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi...

  10. Dependency Defence and Dependency Analysis Guidance. Volume 1: Summary and Guidance (Appendix 1-2). How to analyse and protect against dependent failures. Summary report of the Nordic Working group on Common Cause Failure Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, Gunnar; Hellstroem, Per; Makamo, Tuomas; Bento, Jean-Pierre; Knochenhauer, Michael; Poern, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    The safety systems in Nordic nuclear power plants are characterised by substantial redundancy and/or diversification in safety critical functions, as well as by physical separation of critical safety systems, including their support functions. Viewed together with the evident additional fact, that the single failure criterion has been systematically applied in the design of safety systems, this means that the plant risk profile as calculated in existing PSA:s is usually strongly dominated by failures caused by dependencies resulting in the loss of more than one system sub. The overall objective with the working group is to support safety by studying potential and real CCF events, process statistical data and report conclusions and recommendations that can improve the understanding of these events eventually resulting in increased safety. The result is intended for application in NPP operation, maintenance, inspection and risk assessments. The NAFCS project is part of the activities of the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG), and is financed jointly by the Nordic utilities and authorities. The work is divided into one quantitative and one qualitative part with the following specific objectives: Qualitative objectives-The goal with the qualitative analysis is to compile experience data and generate insights in terms of relevant failure mechanisms and effective CCF protection measures. The results shall be presented as a guide with checklists and recommendations on how to identify current CCF protection standard and improvement possibilities regarding CCF defences decreasing the CCF vulnerability. Quantitative objectives-The goal with the quantitative analysis is to prepare a Nordic C-book where quantitative insights as Impact Vectors and CCF parameters for different redundancy levels are presented. Uncertainties in CCF data shall be reduced as much as possible. The high redundancy systems sensitivity to CCF events demand a well structured quantitative analysis in support of

  11. Re-examination of immune response and estimation of anti-Vi IgG protective threshold against typhoid fever-based on the efficacy trial of Vi conjugate in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Shousun C; Klugman, Keith P; Hunt, Steven

    2014-04-25

    The capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, Vi antigen, is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen. Similar to other polysaccharide vaccines, the protective action of Vi, both to the polysaccharide alone or when presented as a conjugate, is mediated by serum IgG Vi antibodies. The evaluation of Vi capsular polysaccharide based vaccines to prevent typhoid fever would be significantly facilitated by the identification of a "protective level" of serum antibodies to Vi antigen. The protective level of anti-Vi IgG against typhoid fever was derived from the protective efficacy and immune response of a Vi-rEPA conjugate vaccine efficacy trial. The estimation was derived by two methods: correlation of the percent efficacy and the antibody distribution profile in the vaccine group at a given period of observation, and use of the relative ratio of anti-Vi IgG levels between the vaccine and placebo groups greater or equal to the Relative Risk of typhoid fever used in the efficacy determination. Both methods predicted a similar range of a minimum protective level of anti-Vi IgG between 1.4 and 2.0μg/ml (short term threshold). When applying a protective threshold of 10μg/ml at 6 months post immunization, an IgG level in excess of 1.4μg/ml was achieved by 90% of children at 46 months post immunization, consistent with an 89% level of protection over the duration of the study. We thus suggest that the proportion of children with Vi IgG>10μg/ml (long term threshold) 6 months after immunization may reflect the proportion protected over at least a 4 year period. The current assignment of an anti-Vi IgG protective level may be of value when evaluating vaccine performance of future Vi conjugate vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Econophys-Kolkata VI Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, Bikas; Chakraborti, Anirban; Ghosh, Asim

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of the book is to present the ideas and research findings of active researchers such as physicists, economists, mathematicians and financial engineers working in the field of “Econophysics,” who have undertaken the task of modeling and analyzing systemic risk, network dynamics and other topics. Of primary interest in these studies is the aspect of systemic risk, which has long been identified as a potential scenario in which financial institutions trigger a dangerous contagion mechanism, spreading from the financial economy to the real economy. This type of risk, long confined to the monetary market, has spread considerably in the recent past, culminating in the subprime crisis of 2008. As such, understanding and controlling systemic risk has become an extremely important societal and economic challenge. The Econophys-Kolkata VI conference proceedings are dedicated to addressing a number of key issues involved. Several leading researchers in these fields report on their recent work and al...

  13. An electrochemical study of U(VI) and Cr(VI) in molten borates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigaudeau, M.; Gregori de Pinochet, I. de

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), in molten Na 2 B 4 O 7 at 800 deg C was studied by means of linear sweep voltammetry, and chronopotentiometry. The reduction of U(VI) to U(V) proceeded reversibly at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for the U(VI) species at 800 deg C was 4.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 . The activation energy of diffusion was (34,8 +- 0,8) kcal. mole -1 . Electrochemical studies of Cr(VI) at 800 0 C reveal a two-step reduction process at a platinum electrode. Only the voltammogram for the first step charge transfer process was studied. Analysis indicated that Cr(VI) is reversibly reduced to Cr(III) at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for Cr(VI) at 800 0 C is 1,9.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 [fr

  14. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    On 18 May 2001, the Finnish Parliament ratified the Decision in Principle on the final disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto, within the municipality of Eurajoki. The Municipality Council and the government has made positive decisions earlier, at the end of 2000, and in compliance with the Nuclear Energy Act, Parliament's ratification was then required. The decision is valid for the spent fuel generated by the existing Finnish nuclear power plants and means that the construction of the final disposal facility is considered to be in line with the overall good of society. Earlier steps included, amongst others, the approval of the technical project by the Safety Authority. Future steps include construction of an underground rock characterisation facility, ONKALO (2003-2004), and application for separate construction and operating licences for the final disposal facility (from about 2010). How did this political and societal decision come about? The FSC Workshop provided the opportunity to present the history leading up to the Decision in Principle (DiP), and to examine future perspectives with an emphasis on stakeholder involvement. This Executive Summary gives an overview of the presentations and discussions that took place at the workshop. It presents, for the most part, a factual account of the individual presentations and of the discussions that took place. It relies importantly on the notes that were taken at the meeting. Most materials are elaborated upon in a fuller way in the texts that the various speakers and session moderators contributed for these proceedings. The structure of the Executive Summary follows the structure of the workshop itself. Complementary to this Summary and also provided with this document, is a NEA Secretariat's perspective aiming to place the results of all discussions, feedback and site visit into an international perspective. (authors)

  15. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    This paper is an 'executive summary' of work undertaken to review proposals for transport, handling and emplacement of high level radioactive wastes in an underground repository, appropriate to the U.K. context, with particular reference to: waste block size and configuration; self-shielded or partially-shielded block; stages of disposal; transportation within the repository; emplacement in vertical holes or horizontal tunnels; repository access by adit, incline or shaft; and costs. The paper contains a section on general conclusions and recommendations. (U.K.)

  16. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  17. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains conference summaries of the 28. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 9. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: power reactors; fuel cycles; nuclear power and public understanding; future trends; applications of nuclear technology; CANDU reactors; operational enhancements; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning/decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and radiation applications - medical and industrial

  18. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  19. Natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in Europe: summary of the working group reports of the Euro-NOTES meeting 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meining, A; Feussner, H; Swain, P

    2011-01-01

    The fourth Euro-NOTES workshop took place in September 2010 and focused on enabling intensive scientific dialogue and interaction between participants to discuss the state of the practice and development of natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) in Europe. Five working groups were...... collaboration and indications, robotics and platforms, and matters related to training and education. This review summarizes consensus statements of the working groups to give an overview of what has been achieved so far and what might be relevant for research related to NOTES in the near future....

  20. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Erika [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L{sup -1} U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  1. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Santos, Erika; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L -1 U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L -1 Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  2. Data quality objectives summary report for the 100-BC-1, 100-BC-2, and 100-DR-1, and 100-DR-2 group 3 waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The 100-BC-1, 100-BC-2, 100-DR-1, and 100-DR-2 Group 3 waste sites contain 22 past-practice liquid waste disposal sites and process effluent piping associated with four plutonium-production nuclear reactors that operated from 1944 to 1967. The 100-BC-1, 100-BC-2, 100-DR-1, and 100-DR-2 Group 3 waste sites are the third set of Hanford 100 Area sites to undergo remediation to the extent practicable. Like the sites listed in Groups 1 and 2, the Group 3 sites are considered high-priority because of the contaminants present and their proximity to the Columbia River. Remediation of the 100-BC-1, 100-HR-1 and 100-DR-1 radioactive liquid waste sites is planned to occur in two phases: The first phase, which has been completed, was a demonstration project in the 100-B/C Area to test field techniques and acquire contamination data. The second phase is full-scale remediation of all the reactor areas, starting in the 10-B/C Area, using the field experience gained in the first phase and each subsequent reactor area remediation. This document provides the DQO in support of remediation sampling and analysis at selected sites in the 100-B/C and 100-D Areas

  3. Study for Agricultural Engineering Development in Brazil. Summary Report of Joint Study Group on Agricultural Engineering in Brazil (July 24-August 12, 1972).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    The joint study group was established to identify the most urgent research and training needs in agricultural engineering in Brazil and to recommend how best to meet those needs. Specific recommendations are given for a long-term program to establish quality programs in education and research in agricultural engineering in Brazil and means to gain…

  4. Researching College- and Career Ready Standards to Improve Student Outcomes: Technical Working Group Meeting. Meeting Summary (Washington, DC, August 19-20, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Education Sciences, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In August, IES worked with the National Science Foundation and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to convene a technical working group to discuss research objectives related to college- and career-ready standards in English language arts and mathematics. Forty people (including researchers,…

  5. Summary of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development-best pharmaceuticals for Children Act Pediatric Formulation Initiatives Workshop-Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Amidon, Gordon L; Kaul, Ajay; Lukacova, Viera; Vinks, Alexander A; Knipp, Gregory T

    2012-11-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) allows compounds to be classified based on their in vitro solubility and intestinal permeability. The BCS has found widespread use in the pharmaceutical community to be an enabling guide for the rational selection of compounds, formulation for clinical advancement, and generic biowaivers. The Pediatric Biopharmaceutics Classification System (PBCS) Working Group was convened to consider the possibility of developing an analogous pediatric-based classification system. Because there are distinct developmental differences that can alter intestinal contents, volumes, permeability, and potentially biorelevant solubilities at different ages, the PBCS Working Group focused on identifying age-specific issues that need to be considered in establishing a flexible, yet rigorous PBCS. We summarized the findings of the PBCS Working Group and provided insights into considerations required for the development of a PBCS. Through several meetings conducted both at The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health, Human Development-US Pediatric Formulation Initiative Workshop (November 2011) and via teleconferences, the PBCS Working Group considered several high-level questions that were raised to frame the classification system. In addition, the PBCS Working Group identified a number of knowledge gaps that need to be addressed to develop a rigorous PBCS. It was determined that for a PBCS to be truly meaningful, it needs to be broken down into several different age groups that account for developmental changes in intestinal permeability, luminal contents, and gastrointestinal (GI) transit. Several critical knowledge gaps were identified, including (1) a lack of fully understanding the ontogeny of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the GI tract, in the liver, and in the kidney; (2) an incomplete understanding of age-based changes in the GI, liver, and kidney physiology; (3) a clear need to better understand

  6. Learning the vi and Vim Editor

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold; Hannah, Elbert

    2008-01-01

    There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's. vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi. However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this

  7. Investigation of equilibrium and kinetics of Cr(VI) adsorption by dried Bacillus cereus using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) based on three-variable-five-level central composite rotatable design was used to analyze the effects of combined and individual operating parameters (biomass dose, initial concentration of Cr(VI) and pH) on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of dried Bacillus cereus. A quadratic polynomial equation was obtained to predict the adsorbed Cr(VI) amount. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of biomass dose was the key factor in the removal of Cr(VI). The maximum adsorbed Cr(VI) amount (30.93 mg g(-1)) was found at 165.30 mg L(-1), 2.96, and 3.01 g L(-1) for initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, and biosorbent dosage, respectively. The surface chemical functional groups and microstructure of unloaded and Cr(VI)-loaded dried Bacillus cereus were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Besides, the results gained from these studies indicated that Langmuir isotherm and the second-order rate expression were suitable for the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. The results revealed RSM was an effective method for optimizing biosorption process, and dried Bacillus cereus had a remarkable performance on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater.

  8. Approaches for the integration of human factors into the upgrading and refurbishment of control rooms - Summary and conclusions - Principal Working Group 1 on Operating Experience and Human Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    a broad range of interested parties, in relation to the upgrading and refurbishing of control rooms. The workshop attracted 16 contributions from 13 different countries and provided a range of insights and lessons based on design experience, practical experience, research and regulatory needs, and an opportunity for the exchange of experiences and approaches on a range of important topics. The workshop also sought to identify and prioritize areas meriting further consideration and research. The 34 participants shared their experiences and perceptions on a broad number of aspects including: - The identification of human factors issues from the utility, vendor, and regulatory perspectives. - Ensuring the inclusion and implementation of human factors issues within the upgrade or refurbishment process. - How this change process should be managed. - Feedback from practical experience and real concerns. - Meeting modern human factors requirements. This report presents a summary of the conclusions and recommendations from the workshop. five main points were considered by the participants in the workshop as important areas for future work or research: - There is a need to collate a 'lessons learnt' database relating to human factors and control room upgrades; - There is a need to co-ordinate the method/tool development and use in order to better support evaluations and comparisons; - there is a need to show how to establish a performance baseline before change in order to demonstrate that performance is at least as good, or better, that prior to the change; - It is important to support the use of a 'control room philosophy' prior to, during, and after the upgrade; - There is a need to have a better-shared understanding of the design process and how the different disciplines involved contribute to it

  9. CSNI group of experts on statistics and decision theories applicable to rare events. Final report may 1978 summary for presentation to the Garching meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The essential features of statistical techniques which are most useful for rare events may be grouped around four poles corresponding to four kinds of problems: decomposition of events and combination of probabilities; extrapolation (extreme values); Bayesian methods (and their relation with biased methods); dependencies (common modes). The main shadows, for the statistician point of view, are related to the confidence which can be attached to the data. Concerning rare events, much remains to be done in order to clarify the role and limits of efficiency of statistical methods. Recommendations are given: methods assembled by the group should be applied to different types of rare events encountered in nuclear safety; the necessary taking into account of the balance between the socio-economic advantages and potential drawbacks of nuclear technology

  10. Uranium (Vi) sorption onto zirconium diphosphate chemically modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia G, N.; Ordonez R, E.

    2010-10-01

    This work deals with the uranium (Vi) speciation after sorption onto zirconium diphosphate (ZrP 2 O 7 ) surface, hydrated and in a surface modified with organic acids. Oxalic and citric acids were chosen to modify the ZrP 2 O 7 surface because they have poly carboxylic groups and they mimic the organic matter in nature. Thus the interest of this work is to evaluate the uranium (Vi) sorption edge at different s ph values in natural and modified surfaces. The luminescence technique (fluorescence and phosphorescence, respectively) was used for the quantification and speciation of uranyl sorbed at the zirconium diphosphate interface. The fluorescence experiment, showed that adsorption of uranyl on surface of zirconium diphosphate tends to 100%. The speciation shows that there are different complexes in surface which were formed between zirconium diphosphate and uranyl, since it is produced a displacement of wavelength in fluorescence spectra of each system. (Author)

  11. On the 'Interim summary of requirements and criteria for nationwide scientific screening by the geological disposal technology working group.'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochiyama, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    In order to make progress on the permanent geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, the government of Japan revised, in May 2015, the basic plan to expand the site selection process, in which a set of site screening criteria was issued based on the existing geoscientific knowledge. These criteria were developed by the Geological Disposal Technology Working Group of the Nuclear Energy Subcommittee which was created by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). (author)

  12. Extended analysis of Mo VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlen, B.; Rahimullah, K.; Tauheed, A.; Chaghtai, M.S.Z.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis of the RbI-like spectrum Mo VI has been extended to include a total of some 110 classified lines and 44 energy levels belonging to the one-electron configurations 4s 2 4p 6 ( 1 S)nl with n ranging up to 9 and l up to 7. The analysis is based on recordings of vacuum spark spectra made at Lund in the region 230-2350 A, complemented by a list of lines from 2193 to 6336 A observed and identified by Romanov and Striganov in a Penning type arc discharge. The one-electron level system is partly mixed with core-excited configurations, not treated in the present paper. Especially the nf series is strongly perturbed by 4s 2 4p 5 4d 2 , and an anomalous behaviour of the ng series is explained by interaction with the 2 G term of 4s4p 6 4d 2 . The ionization limit, derived from 6h, 7i and 8k by means of the polarization formula, is found to be 555 132+-2 cm -1 . (orig.)

  13. Kiintoainehäviöselvitys

    OpenAIRE

    Ylimys, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Teoriaosassa käydään läpi yleisesti pyörrepuhdistuslaitoksen toimintaa sekä kiintoainehäviöitä paperi- ja kartonkitehtailla. Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tutkia Metsä Boardin Kyröskosken tehtaan kiintoainehäviötä. Työssä selvitettiin, minkälaista kiintoainetta jätevesilaitokselle päätyy ja miksi. Selvityksen kohteena oli myös, missä kohteissa kiintoainehäviöt tarkalleen syntyvät ja kuinka paljon häviötä tapahtuu. Kahden edellä mainitun tiedon perusteella selvitettiin, kuinka palj...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allows employees to consume food or beverages at a worksite where chromium (VI) is present, the employer... effect on productivity. 2. Plating Bath Surface Tension Management and Fume Suppression • Lower surface...

  15. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2, Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The Department of energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used

  16. International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Meeting of Specialists on the Value of Plutonium Alpha, Winfrich, UK, 30 June - 1 July 1969. Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-15

    The meeting of specialists on the value of plutonium alpha was held at Winfrith in accordance to the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors, and in agreement with the UK authorities. Participants from six countries and two international organizations took part in the meeting. A short review on available data for plutonium alpha received by the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit was presented. Three experiments recently known where the measurements of the alpha-value have been made in the energy range of interest were referred to.

  17. Formation of nitridotechnetium(VI) μ-oxo dimer complexes with EDTA and EDDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, T.; Kani, Y.; Sekine, T.; Kudo, H.; Yoshihara, K.

    1995-01-01

    Reactions of [ 99 TcNCl 4 ] - with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid 4 (ETDA) and ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) in a mixture of water and acetone gave Tc VI N-EDTA and Tc VI N-EDTA complexes. The infrared spectra of both reaction products showed the existence of the Tc≡N and C=O groups. The elemental analysis indicated the 1:1 TcN-ligand ratio in the EDTA and EDDA complexes. Electrophoresis showed that the Tc VI -EDTA complex was an anionic species in a perchlorate solution. For the Tc VI N-EDDA complex, neutral and anionic species were formed, depending on the pH of the solution. Formation of the μ-oxo dimer complexes was suggested from the UV-Vis absorption spectra. (author) 11 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Adsorption studies on fruits of Gular (Ficus glomerata): Removal of Cr(VI) from synthetic wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Rifaqat A.K.; Rehman, Fouzia

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of Cr(VI) was studied in batch system using fruits of Ficus glomerata as adsorbent. The effect of temperature, pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration and time was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to investigate surface morphology and active functional groups present on the adsorbent surface. Thermodynamic parameters like free energy change (ΔG 0 ), enthalpy (ΔH 0 ) and entropy (ΔS 0 ) indicate the spontaneous, endothermic and increased randomness nature of Cr(VI) adsorption. Equilibrium data were fitted well with Langmuir isotherm at 50 deg. C. The magnitude of mean free energy indicates chemical nature of adsorption. The breakthrough and exhaustive capacities were found to be 5 and 23.1 mg g -1 respectively. The applicability of the adsorbent has been demonstrated by removing Cr(VI) from electroplating wastewater.

  19. Conference summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Tim [Inta Communication Limited for European Service Network/ DG Research, Trillium House, 32 New Street, St. Neots, Cambridge PE19 1AJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The summaries were derived from presentations, interviews and discussions at the conference. The summaries are given at two levels, overall for the conference and for specific sessions as follows: 1) Overall Conference: 'A Sound Scientific Basis for Serious Decisions; 2) Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues: 'Promoting Safety and Protecting Society'; 3) Session on P and T: 'Partitioning and Transmutation: A Technical Fix or Technical Training?'; 4) Sessions on Geological Disposal and Research Networking: 'No Technical Barriers to Geological Disposal'. First an overall summary of Euradwaste '04 is presented. Significant progress was made on the technical and scientific basis for geological disposal of radioactive waste during the European Commission's Fifth EURATOM Framework Programme for Research (FP5). Deep geological disposal is technically feasible now and can demonstrate the guarantees of long-term isolation and protection of the public. In parallel, socio-political studies have produced methodologies for constructive dialogue with potential host communities that reflect the honesty and openness expected by a democratic society. A harmonized legislative framework for nuclear safety and waste disposal across the enlarged European Union is currently being discussed. Disposal in deep (> 300 metre) geological repositories, the favoured strategy in Europe for long-lived high-level radioactive waste, is now possible. The Sessions on EC Policy and Socio-Political Issues are summarized as follows. The opening day of Euradwaste '04 focused on European Commission policy, including the proposed Directives on disposal of radioactive waste and nuclear safety and socio-political aspects including governance and decision making, public perception/acceptance of waste disposal and its sustainability. A decision on the proposed package will now be made after Union enlargement. Public agreement on the siting of

  20. 24 CFR 971.11 - HOPE VI developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HOPE VI developments. 971.11... § 971.11 HOPE VI developments. Developments with HOPE VI implementation grants that have approved HOPE... with reasonable revitalization plans. Future HUD actions to approve or deny proposed HOPE VI...

  1. Individual and Group Extension Methods: Perspectives from Vi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs) tools including semi-structured questionnaires were administrated to 90 randomly selected farmers who had received extension services from the project. In addition, twelve project extension workers were interviewed. Data were analysed using SPSS computer package and descriptive ...

  2. Uranium(VI) speciation by spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The application of UV-Vis and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopies to direct of uranium(VI) in environmental samples offers various prospects that have, however, serious limitations. While UV-Vis spectroscopy is probably not sensitive enough to detect uranium(VI) species in the majority of environmental samples, TRLFS is principially able to speciate uranium(VI) at very low concentration levels in the nanomol range. Speciation by TRLFS can be based on three parameters: excitation spectrum, emission spectrum and lifetime of the fluorescence emission process. Due to quenching effects, the lifetime may not be expected to be as characteristics as, e.g., the emission spectrum. Quenching of U(VI) fluorescence by reaction with organic substances, inorganic ions and formation of carbonate radicals is one important limiting factor in the application of U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy. Fundamental photophysical criteria are illustrated using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra of U(VI) hydrolysis and carbonato species as examples. (author)

  3. U.S. Geological Survey Subsidence Interest Group conference, Edwards Air Force Base, Antelope Valley, California, November 18-19, 1992; abstracts and summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Keith R.; Galloway, Devin L.; Leake, Stanley A.

    1995-01-01

    with this unprecedented increase in pumpage, substantial amounts of land subsidence were observed in several areas of the United States, most notably in Arizona, California, and Texas. Beginning in 1955, under the direction of Joseph Poland, the Geological Survey began the "Mechanics of Aquifers Project," which focused largely on the processes that resulted in land subsidence due to the withdrawal of ground water. This research team gained international renown as they advanced the scientific understanding of aquifer mechanics and land-subsidence theory. The results of field studies by members of this research group not only verified the validity of the application of Terzaghi's consolidation theory to compressible aquifers, but they also provided definitions, methods of quantification, and confirmation of the interrelation among hydraulic head declines, aquifer-system compaction, and land subsidence. In addition to conducting pioneering research, this group also formed a "center of expertise," providing a focal point within the Geological Survey for the dissemination of technology and scientific understanding in aquifer mechanics. However, when the "Mechanics of Aquifers Project" was phased out in 1984, the focal point for technology transfer no longer existed. Interest among various state and local agencies in land subsidence has persisted, and the Geological Survey has continued to participate in a broad spectrum of cooperative and Federally funded projects in aquifer mechanics and land subsidence. These projects are designed to identify and monitor areas with the potential for land subsidence, to conduct basic research in the processes that control land subsidence and the development of earth fissures, as well as to develop new quantitative tools to predict aquifer-system deformation. In 1989 an ad hoc "Aquifer Mechanics and Subsidence Interest Group" (referred to herein as the "Subsidence Interest Group") was formed

  4. Les Houches ''Physics at TeV Colliders 2003'' Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanach, B

    2004-03-01

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 26 May-6 June, 2003. The research presented is original, and was performed specifically for the workshop. Tools for calculations in the minimal supersymmetric standard model are presented, including a comparison of the dark matter relic density predicted by public codes. Reconstruction of supersymmetric particle masses at the LHC and a future linear collider facility is examined. Less orthodox supersymmetric signals such as non-pointing photons and R-parity violating signals are studied. Features of extra dimensional models are examined next, including measurement strategies for radions and Higgs', as well as the virtual effects of Kaluza Klein modes of gluons. Finally, there is an update on LHC Z' studies.

  5. Summary of Recommendations of the GBIF Task Group on the Global Strategy and Action Plan for the Digitisation of Natural History Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter G. Berendsohn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Biodiversity Information Facility’s Task Group has formulated three basic recommendations to the GBIF Governing Board in order to increase the rate of the digitization of natural history collections and improve the usage of this information resource: (i GBIF must facilitate access to information about non-digitized collection resources by publicizing the research potential of collections through metadata and assessing the number of non-digitized specimens; (ii GBIF must work with collections to continue to increase the efficiency of specimen data capture and to enhance data quality by means of technical measures, by means of ensuring attribution and professional credit and influencing institutional priorities, and by engaging with funding agencies; (iii GBIF must continue to improve and promote the global infrastructure used to mobilize digitized collection data through technical measures, outreach activities and political measures.

  6. Annual summary report on the surveillance and maintenence plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for period ending September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-11-01

    Surveillance and maintenance (S ampersand M) of 75 sites was conducted by the Remedial Action Section for the Environmental Restoration Program for surplus facilities and sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. S ampersand M activities on these facilities and sites was started at the end of their operating life and will continue until final facility disposal or site stabilization. The objectives of the Waste Area Grouping S ampersand M Program are met by maintaining a program of routine S ampersand M as well as by implementing interim corrective maintenance when deemed necessary as a result of site surveillance. This report briefly presents this program's activities and includes tables indicating tank levels and dry well data for FY 1992

  7. Symposium summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, G.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is provided of the issues discussed at the climate change implications for water and ecological resources conference, and recommendations that came out of the conference. The objectives of the meeting were to present and discuss results of recent climate change experiments undertaken in Canada; evaluate a variety of climate models and impact analyses and to develop methods and strategies for future study; and to establish working linkages between modellers and analysts in the fields of climate, hydrology, and ecosystem research, as well as between social scientists and policy makers interested in the implications of climate change. Recommendations were made in the five areas of research, monitoring, risk assessment, policy and information dissemination. Additional research should be undertaken to foster improved understanding of relationships between climate, climate change, and ecological and human processes. A suitable monitoring program, including a national wetlands monitoring program, should be established. Risk assessments should be undertaken to evaluate vulnerabilities of ecosystem components, to assess options, and to provide the information required to develop and implement appropriate policy objectives. The impacts of a range of public policy responses and feedbacks should be assessed. The dissemination of well-targeted and accurate information is vital if basic societal attitudes regarding the value of water and ecosystems are to be changed

  8. Session summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Y.

    2002-01-01

    In the summary session, possible international activities in the field of basic studies on high-temperature engineering were discussed within the framework of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). It was recommended to include topics relevant to fission-product behaviour and safety issues of HTGR in next meeting, in addition to the topics discussed in this meeting. The chairperson of the last session summarised the recommendations to be presented to the NSC into the following five topics as possible international activities: - Basic studies on behaviour of irradiated graphite/carbon and ceramic materials including their composites under both operation and storage conditions. - Development of in-core material characterisation and instrumentation methods. - Improvement in material properties through high-temperature irradiation. - Basic studies on HTGR fuel fabrication and performance including fission-product release. - Basic studies on safety issues of HTGR. It was also recommended that a further information exchange meeting focused on the organisation of the interactive collaboration activity with regard to the above topics be planned in 2003, tentatively in Oarai, Japan. (author)

  9. Management summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A most pressing problem in many environmental assessments is determining the extent of contamination to the biosphere resulting from a given activity. This could result from the planned or accidental release of a contaminant to the environment and its subsequent transport through air, water, or the food chain. In either case, three critical questions need to be raised in the environmental assessment of the problem: Where are the contaminants; When will they arrive at a specific location; How much of the contaminant will be at the point of uptake. The location of the contaminant is important, since a contaminant isolated from man both now and in the future may represent little hazard, even in rather large quantities. Under other conditions, small amounts of contaminants arriving at critical locations over a short period may involve severe hazard. The problem of location is simplified by concentrating on those places where the contaminants will interface with the biosphere. Applications in evaluating the consequences of ground water contamination are discussed. Environmental consequences or impacts are most effectively and efficiently communicated by: Blending extensive technical results and reducing them to simple summary relationships, i.e., the arrival distributions; focusing on the arrival distributions as the central theme of communication efforts; and determining quantitative consequences or impacts to the biosphere through use of the arrival distributions. Appropriately applied, these principles can reduce a voluminous impact statement on subsurface pollution to a few pages that are directly useful to decision-makers and the public

  10. Theory summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    This is a summary of the advances in magnetic fusion energy theory research presented at the 17th International Atomic Energy Agency Fusion Energy Conference from 19 24 October, 1998 in Yokohama, Japan. Theory and simulation results from this conference provided encouraging evidence of significant progress in understanding the physics of thermonuclear plasmas. Indeed, the grand challenge for this field is to acquire the basic understanding that can readily enable the innovations which would make fusion energy practical. In this sense, research in fusion energy is increasingly able to be categorized as fitting well the 'Pasteur's Quadrant' paradigm, where the research strongly couples basic science ('Bohr's Quadrant') to technological impact ('Edison's Quadrant'). As supported by some of the work presented at this conference, this trend will be further enhanced by advanced simulations. Eventually, realistic three-dimensional modeling capabilities, when properly combined with rapid and complete data interpretation of results from both experiments and simulations, can contribute to a greatly enhanced cycle of understanding and innovation. Plasma science theory and simulation have provided reliable foundations for this improved modeling capability, and the exciting advances in high-performance computational resources have further accelerated progress. There were 68 papers presented at this conference in the area of magnetic fusion energy theory

  11. Catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid under an irradiation of simulated solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jing; Lan, Yeqing

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid with simulated solar light was investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(II) could significantly accelerate Cr(VI) reduction and the reaction obeyed to pseudo zero-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI). The removal of Cr(VI) was related to the initial concentrations of Cu(II), citric acid, and the types of organic acids. The optimal removal of Cr(VI) was achieved at pH 4, and the rates of Cu(II) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids were in the order: tartaric acid (two α-OH groups, two -COOH groups)>citric acid (one α-OH group, three -COOH groups)>malic acid (one α-OH group, two -COOH groups)>lactic acid (one α-OH group, one -COOH group)≫succinic acid (two -COOH groups), suggesting that the number of α-OH was the key factor for the reaction, followed by the number of -COOH. The formation of Cu(II)-citric acid complex could generate Cu(I) and radicals through a pathway of metal-ligand-electron transfer, promoting the reduction of Cr(VI). This study is helpful to fully understanding the conversion of Cr(VI) in the existence of both organic acids and Cu(II) with solar light in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

  13. Balancing cardiovascular and gastrointestinal risks in patients with osteoarthritis receiving nonsteroidal anti‑inflammatory drugs. A summary of guidelines from an international expert group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Wassim; Farkouh, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, extensive research has assessed the use of traditional nonsteroidal anti‑inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and the newer cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX-2) inhibitor drugs, in the treatment of chronic pain syndromes. The proper use of NSAIDs has been the subject of significant debate, bringing together multidisciplinary researchers and clinicians to discuss the risks and benefits of these therapies. Current guidelines discussing the proper use of NSAIDs do not address the issue of the risks of COX‑2‑selective NSAIDs and nonselective NSAIDs for both the gastrointestinal (GI) and cardiovascular (CV) systems in patients on low‑dose aspirin. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary expert group was organized to review the current evidence with the aim of developing statements devoted to guide clinicians in making evidence‑based and individualized selections of NSAIDs. This review will discuss and summarize the most recent evidence on this topic to give an insight into the most effective and safest therapeutic options, thus preventing serious adverse CV and GI events. NSAIDs should be used cautiously and as infrequently as possible, with nonpharmacological approaches prescribed first. If the use of NSAIDs is required, the choice should balance the possible CV and GI risks.

  14. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    'burning' of the associated extremely long-life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. This additional important mission for the LMFBR is gaining worldwide interest. In the framework of disarmament of nuclear weapons and the utilization of the nuclear material for peaceful purposes a role for fast reactors can be also considered. Over the past 25 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in Fast Breeder Reactor Technology. At the present time the Working Group on Fast Reactors is the oldest and one of the most active groups in the Division of Nuclear Power. The present document contains information on the status of fast breeder reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1991, as reported at the 25th jubilee Annual Meeting of the IWGFR in Vienna, 27-30 April 1992. The publication is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFBR development in IAEA Member States and CEC

  15. Status of national programmes on fast breeder reactors. Twenty-fifth annual meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. Summary report. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-07-01

    'burning' of the associated extremely long-life transuranic waste, particularly actinides, thus reducing the required isolation time for high level waste from tens of thousands of years to hundreds of years for fission products only. This additional important mission for the LMFBR is gaining worldwide interest. In the framework of disarmament of nuclear weapons and the utilization of the nuclear material for peaceful purposes a role for fast reactors can be also considered. Over the past 25 years, the IAEA has actively encouraged and advocated international cooperation in Fast Breeder Reactor Technology. At the present time the Working Group on Fast Reactors is the oldest and one of the most active groups in the Division of Nuclear Power. The present document contains information on the status of fast breeder reactor development and on worldwide activities in this advanced nuclear power technology during 1991, as reported at the 25th jubilee Annual Meeting of the IWGFR in Vienna, 27-30 April 1992. The publication is intended to provide information regarding the current status of LMFBR development in IAEA Member States and CEC.

  16. Biomechanical spinal growth modulation and progressive adolescent scoliosis – a test of the 'vicious cycle' pathogenetic hypothesis: Summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burwell R Geoffrey

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE introduced the electronic focus group (EFG as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The text for this debate was written by Dr Ian A Stokes. It evaluates the hypothesis that in progressive scoliosis vertebral body wedging during adolescent growth results from asymmetric muscular loading in a "vicious cycle" (vicious cycle hypothesis of pathogenesis by affecting vertebral body growth plates (endplate physes. A frontal plane mathematical simulation tested whether the calculated loading asymmetry created by muscles in a scoliotic spine could explain the observed rate of scoliosis increase by measuring the vertebral growth modulation by altered compression. The model deals only with vertebral (not disc wedging. It assumes that a pre-existing scoliosis curve initiates the mechanically-modulated alteration of vertebral body growth that in turn causes worsening of the scoliosis, while everything else is anatomically and physiologically 'normal' The results provide quantitative data consistent with the vicious cycle hypothesis. Dr Stokes' biomechanical research engenders controversy. A new speculative concept is proposed of vertebral symphyseal dysplasia with implications for Dr Stokes' research and the etiology of AIS. What is not controversial is the need to test this hypothesis using additional factors in his current model and in three-dimensional quantitative models that incorporate intervertebral discs and simulate thoracic as well as lumbar scoliosis. The growth modulation process in the vertebral body can be viewed as one type of the biologic phenomenon of mechanotransduction. In certain connective tissues this involves the

  17. The new geographic information system in ETVA VI.PE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xagoraris, Zafiris; Soulis, George

    2016-08-01

    ETVA VI.PE. S.A. is a member of the Piraeus Bank Group of Companies and its activities include designing, developing, exploiting and managing Industrial Areas throughout Greece. Inside ETVA VI.PE.'s thirty-one Industrial Parks there are currently 2,500 manufacturing companies established, with 40,000 employees and € 2.5 billion of invested funds. In each one of the industrial areas ETVA VI.PE guarantees the companies industrial lots of land (sites) with propitious building codes and complete infrastructure networks of water supply, sewerage, paved roads, power supply, communications, cleansing services, etc. The development of Geographical Information System for ETVA VI.PE.'s Industrial Parks started at the beginning of 1992 and consists of three subsystems: Cadastre, that manages the information for the land acquisition of Industrial Areas; Street Layout - Sites, that manages the sites sold to manufacturing companies; Networks, that manages the infrastructure networks (roads, water supply, sewerage etc). The mapping of each Industrial Park is made incorporating state-of-the-art photogrammetric, cartographic and surveying methods and techniques. Passing through the phases of initial design (hybrid GIS) and system upgrade (integrated Gis solution with spatial database), the system is currently operating on a new upgrade (integrated gIS solution with spatial database) that includes redesigning and merging the system's database schemas, along with the creation of central security policies, and the development of a new web GIS application for advanced data entry, highly customisable and standard reports, and dynamic interactive maps. The new GIS bring the company to advanced levels of productivity and introduce the new era for decision making and business management.

  18. Am(VI) Extraction Final Report: FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tillotson, Richard Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report summarizes activities related to hexavalent Am extraction for FY16, in completion of FCR&D Milestone M3FT-16IN030103027. Activities concentrated on three areas of research: 1) centrifugal contactor hot testing, 2) Am(VI) stability studies, and 3) alternative oxidant studies. A brief summary of each task follows. Hot Testing: A new engineering-scale oxidation and solvent extraction test bed was built at Idaho National Laboratory to allow for solvent extraction testing of minor actinide separation concepts. The test bed consists of an oxidation vessel, filtration apparatus, four, 3D printed, 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors, feed/product vessels, and sample ports. This system replaced the previous 3 stage, 5-cm contactor test bed that was used for the initial testing in FY14. In the FY16 hot test, a feed simulant was spiked with 243Am and 139Ce and treated with 60 g/L sodium bismuthate for two hours to oxidize the Am(III) to Am(VI). This solution was then pumped through a filter and into the four-stage centrifugal contactor setup. The organic phase solvent formulation was 1 M diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA)/dodecane. The test showed that Am(VI) was produced by bismuthate oxidation and the residual oxidant was successfully filtered without back pressure buildup. Sixty-four percent of Am was extracted in the contactors using DEHBA. Both Am and Ce were quantitatively stripped by 0.1 M H2O2. Successful demonstration of the utility of small, printable contactors suggests that hot testing of separations concepts can now be conducted more often, since it is cheaper, generates less waste, and entails much less radcon risk than previous testing. Am(VI) stability: A rigorous examination of reagents was conducted to determine if contaminants could interfere with Am oxidation and extraction. An series of DAm measurements showed that bismuthate particle size, water source, acid quality, and DAAP batch or pre-treatment had little effect on extraction efficiency

  19. Magnetic chitosan for removal of uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stopa, Luiz Claudio Barbosa

    2007-01-01

    The chitosan, an aminopolysaccharide formed for repeated units of D-glucosamine, is a deacetylation product of chitin. It presents favorable ionic properties acting as chelant, being considered a removing ionic of contaminants from water effluents. It has ample bioactivity, that is, is biocompatible, biodegradable, bioadhesive and biosorbent. The chitosan interacts for crosslinked by means of its active groups with other substances, can still coat superparamagnetic materials as magnetite nanoparticles producing one conjugated polymer-magnetite. Superparamagnetic materials are susceptible for the magnetic field, thus these particles can be attracted and grouped by a magnetic field and as they do not hold back the magnetization, they can be disagrouped and reused in processes for removal of contaminants from industrial effluents and waste water. The present work consisted of preparing coated magnetic magnetite particles with chitosan (PMQ). The PMQ powder has showed a magnetic response of intense attraction in the presence of a magnetic field without however becoming magnetic, a typical behavior of superparamagnetic material. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and measurements of magnetization. Its performance of Uranium (VI) adsorption as uranyl species, U0 2 2+ , was evaluated with regard to the influence of adsorbent dose, speed of agitation, pH, the contact time and had studied the isotherms of adsorption as well as the behavior of desorption using ions of carbonate and oxalate. The optimal pH to the best removal occurred in pH 5 and that the increase of the dose increases the removal, becoming constant above of 20 g.L -1 . In the kinetic study the equilibrium was achieved after 20 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, being the maximum adsorption capacity equal 41.7 mg.g -1 . In the desorption studies were verified 94% of U0 2 2+ recovered with carbonate ion and 49.9% with oxalate ion

  20. Relative shortening and functional tethering of spinal cord in adolescent scoliosis - Result of asynchronous neuro-osseous growth, summary of an electronic focus group debate of the IBSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Winnie Cw; Lam, Wynnie Mw; Ng, Bobby Kw; Tze-Ping, Lam; Lee, Kwong-Man; Guo, Xia; Cheng, Jack Cy; Burwell, R Geoffrey; Dangerfield, Peter H; Jaspan, Tim

    2008-06-27

    There is no generally accepted scientific theory for the causes of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). As part of its mission to widen understanding of scoliosis etiology, the International Federated Body on Scoliosis Etiology (IBSE) introduced the electronic focus group (EFG) as a means of increasing debate on knowledge of important topics. This has been designated as an on-line Delphi discussion. The Statement for this debate was written by Dr WCW Chu and colleagues who examine the spinal cord to vertebral growth interaction during adolescence in scoliosis. Using the multi-planar reconstruction technique of magnetic resonance imaging they investigated the relative length of spinal cord to vertebral column including ratios in 28 girls with AIS (mainly thoracic or double major curves) and 14 age-matched normal girls. Also evaluated were cerebellar tonsillar position, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), and clinical neurological examination. In severe AIS compared with normal controls, the vertebral column is significantly longer without detectable spinal cord lengthening. They speculate that anterior spinal column overgrowth relative to a normal length spinal cord exerts a stretching tethering force between the two ends, cranially and caudally leading to the initiation and progression of thoracic AIS. They support and develop the Roth-Porter concept of uncoupled neuro-osseous growth in the pathogenesis of AIS which now they prefer to term 'asynchronous neuro-osseous growth'. Morphological evidence about the curve apex suggests that the spinal cord is also affected, and a 'double pathology' is suggested. AIS is viewed as a disorder with a wide spectrum and a common neuroanatomical abnormality namely, a spinal cord of normal length but short relative to an abnormally lengthened anterior vertebral column. Neuroanatomical changes and/or abnormal neural function may be expressed only in severe cases. This asynchronous neuro-osseous growth concept is regarded as

  1. Chromium sorption and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by grape stalks and yohimbe bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Núria; Escudero, Carlos; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2008-07-01

    In this work, two low cost sorbents, grape stalks and yohimbe bark wastes were used to remove Cr(VI) and Cr(III) from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were designed to obtain Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption data. The mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by the two vegetable wastes, has been investigated. Fourier transform infrared rays (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on solid phase were performed to determine the main functional groups that might be involved in metal uptake and to confirm the presence of Cr(III) on the sorbent, respectively. Results put into evidence that both sorbents are able to reduce Cr(VI) to its trivalent form.

  2. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040±0.010 and 0.055±0.015 g g dry -1 , respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10 -4 mol l -1 Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment

  3. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy, Robert F.; Tajima, Eizo

    1987-01-01

    The Historical Review describes the events leading up to the present reassessment of the dosimetry of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. To make that reassessment, working groups were set up in Japan and in the United States. These groups organized their efforts into ten major areas: yields of the bombs, radiation leakage from the bombs, transport of radiation in air over ground, thermoluminescence measurements of gamma rays, measurements of neutrons, residual radioactivity, house and terrain shielding, organ dosimetry, preparation of a dosimetry system, and uncertainty analysis. In this report on the reassessment, one chapter is devoted to each of the first nine areas; a future will deal with the last area, uncertainty analysis. The chapters were prepared by writing groups, listed as the authors of the chapters. The chapters are based on a large number of individual papers, some of which are included in this report as appendixes to the relevant chapters

  4. Bacillus lichenformis γ-glutamyl exopolymer: Physicochemical characterization and U(VI) interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, L.M.; Neu, M.P.; Vanderberg, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Complexation by microbially produced exopolymers may significantly impact the environmental mobility and toxicity of metals. This study focused on the conformational structure of the bacterial exopolymer, γ-D-poly(glutamic acid) and its interactions with U(VI) examined using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Solution pH, polymer concentration, and ionic strength affected the conformation of the exopolymer, and U(VI) binding was monitored. At low pH, low concentration, or low ionic strength, this exopolymer exists in an α-helical conformation, while at high pH, concentration, or ionic strength the exopolymer exhibits a β-sheet structure. The change in exopolymer conformation is likely to influence the number and nature of exposed surface functional groups, sites most responsible for metal complexation. The authors found the polyglutamate capsule binds U(VI) in a binuclear, bidentate fashion; in contrast the glutamate monomer forms a mononuclear, bidentate complex with U(VI). The apparent polynuclear binding of U(VI) may induce β-sheet structure formation provided the U(VI) Concentration is sufficiently high

  5. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    systems. The scope of the workshop comprised reactor physics, fuel performance and fuel material technology, thermal-hydraulics, core behaviour and fuel cycle of advanced reactors with different types of fuels or fuel lattices. Reactor types considered were water-cooled, high-temperature gas-cooled and fast spectrum reactors as well as hybrid reactors with fast and thermal neutron spectra. The emphasis was on innovative concepts and issues related to the reactor and fuel. The workshop concluded with a wide-ranging panel discussion which considered some difficult questions from which it is hoped that some recommendations for future priorities can be derived. A record of the discussion is included at the end of this summary. (author)

  6. Characterization of Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions by a surplus agricultural waste-Rice straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hui; Liu Yunguo; Zeng Guangming; Xu Weihua; Li Ting; Xia Wenbin

    2008-01-01

    The removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by rice straw, a surplus agricultural byproduct was investigated. The optimal pH was 2.0 and Cr(VI) removal rate increased with decreased Cr(VI) concentration and with increased temperature. Decrease in straw particle size led to an increase in Cr(VI) removal. Equilibrium was achieved in about 48 h under standard conditions, and Cr(III), which appeared in the solution and remained stable thereafter, indicating that both reduction and adsorption played a part in the Cr(VI) removal. The increase of the solution pH suggested that protons were needed for the Cr(VI) removal. A relatively high level of NO 3 - notably restrained the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), while high level of SO 4 2- supported it. The promotion of the tartaric acid modified rice straw (TARS) and the slight inhibition of the esterified rice straw (ERS) on Cr(VI) removal indicated that carboxyl groups present on the biomass played an important role in chromium remediation even though were not fully responsible for it. Isotherm tests showed that equilibrium sorption data were better represented by Langmuir model and the sorption capacity of rice straw was found to be 3.15 mg/g

  7. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W.; Chiang, P.N.; Liu, J.C.; Kuan, W.H.; Huang, J.H.; Hung, J.T.; Tzou, Y.M.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Low molecular weights (M w ) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. ► The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). ► Low M w of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. ► Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M w of HA. ► Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M w ): >100, 50–100, 10–50 and w HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M w of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H 2 O 2 through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  8. ViA: a perceptual visualization assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Chris G.; St. Amant, Robert; Elhaddad, Mahmoud S.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an automated visualized assistant called ViA. ViA is designed to help users construct perceptually optical visualizations to represent, explore, and analyze large, complex, multidimensional datasets. We have approached this problem by studying what is known about the control of human visual attention. By harnessing the low-level human visual system, we can support our dual goals of rapid and accurate visualization. Perceptual guidelines that we have built using psychophysical experiments form the basis for ViA. ViA uses modified mixed-initiative planning algorithms from artificial intelligence to search of perceptually optical data attribute to visual feature mappings. Our perceptual guidelines are integrated into evaluation engines that provide evaluation weights for a given data-feature mapping, and hints on how that mapping might be improved. ViA begins by asking users a set of simple questions about their dataset and the analysis tasks they want to perform. Answers to these questions are used in combination with the evaluation engines to identify and intelligently pursue promising data-feature mappings. The result is an automatically-generated set of mappings that are perceptually salient, but that also respect the context of the dataset and users' preferences about how they want to visualize their data.

  9. GeoViQua: quality-aware geospatial data discovery and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, L.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualization for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is a recently started FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and evaluation tools, which will be integrated in the GEO-Portal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators, also contributing to the definition of a quality label (GEOLabel). GeoViQua proposed solutions will be assessed in several pilot case studies covering the whole Earth Observation chain, from remote sensing acquisition to data processing, to applications in the main GEOSS Societal Benefit Areas. This work presents the preliminary results of GeoViQua Work Package 4 "Enhanced geo-search tools" (WP4), started in January 2012. Its major anticipated technical innovations are search and evaluation tools that communicate and exploit data quality information from the GCI. In particular, GeoViQua will investigate a graphical search interface featuring a coherent and meaningful aggregation of statistics and metadata summaries (e.g. in the form of tables, charts), thus enabling end users to leverage quality constraints for data discovery and evaluation. Preparatory work on WP4 requirements indicated that users need the "best" data for their purpose, implying a high degree of subjectivity in judgment. This suggests that the GeoViQua system should exploit a combination of provider-generated metadata (objective indicators such as summary statistics), system-generated metadata (contextual

  10. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    countries (MC) and concerned both initial safety assessment of new facilities and reassessment of existing ones (periodic safety review). It also considered trends of future improvement of safety assessment techniques. The workshop was organised in an opening session, four technical sessions, one special session and a conclusion session. The technical sessions were focussed on: - General approach including human aspects (9 papers); - Front end facilities (5 papers); - Chemical hazards - release limits (6 papers); and - Back end facilities (6 papers). In addition, a special session (4 presentations) was held to discuss the lessons learnt for FCFs from the Fukushima accident in Japan. The workshop ended with an organized site visit to Cameco Corporation's Port Hope Conversion Facility in Port Hope, Ontario on the last day of the workshop. This paper presents the Summary of the technical and special sessions, the General Conclusions and Recommendation of the workshop and some future directions

  11. Summary Record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    (II-3) - Uncertainty analysis of the steady state benchmark. It should be recognized that the purpose of this benchmark is not only to compare currently available macroscopic approaches but above-all to encourage the development of novel next-generation approaches that focus on more microscopic processes. Thus, the benchmark problem includes both macroscopic and microscopic measurement data. In this context, the sub-channel grade void fraction data are regarded as the macroscopic data and the digitized computer graphic images are the microscopic data. The technical topics to be addressed at the workshop include: - Review of the benchmark activities after the 4. Workshop; - Presentation and discussion of summary of comparisons of final submitted results for Exercise 1 of Phase I (I-1); for Exercise 0 of Phase II (II-0); and for Exercise 1 of Phase II (II-1); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase I (I-2); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 3 of Phase I (I-3); - Presentation and discussion of comparison of final submitted results for Exercise 2 of Phase II (II-2); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 4 of Phase I (I-4); - Presentation and discussion of preliminary uncertainty results for Exercise 3 of Phase II (II-3); - Preparing a special issue in a journal with participants' BFBT papers; - Defining a work plan and schedule outlining actions to advance the two phases of the benchmark activities

  12. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The international workshop on 'Nuclear Power Plant Life Management in a Changing Business World' was held in Washington, DC, on 26-27 June 2000. This workshop was attended by more than 50 experts from 12 countries and three international organisations. The workshop included a series of presentations to a plenary session of all participants. A spectrum of experiences in plant life extension activities as well as experiences in operating a nuclear power plant (NPP) in a 'free-market' electricity environment were presented: The workshop also included three working groups in which major issues facing PLIM activities for NPPs were identified and discussed. The three working groups covered technology, regulation and business. The following sections of this report consist of summaries of the discussions that took place in each of the three working groups. (author)

  13. Summary of southeastern group breakout sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Ford; Charles P. Nicholson

    1993-01-01

    The breakout sessions held by the southeastern representatives at the Partners In Flight meeting in Colorado were extremely well attended Most states were represented, as well as several federal agencies (including USFS, USFWS, TVA, EPA), and non-government organizations. Two sessions were held, one to discuss a strategy of management by...

  14. HIDE working groups: synchrotron based system: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.

    1978-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the work resulting from a one-week workshop on the use of synchrotrons in heavy ion fusion, i.e., a Heavy Ion Demonstration Experiment (HIDE). Topics discussed concerned the number of beams on target, space charge limitations, choice of ion charge state, and areas identified as needing further work

  15. experimental biology group: summaries of scientific papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. E. WARD, PH.D., AND H. F. SEIGLER, M.D., Division of Immunology, Duke University, V.A. Hospital, Durham, North. Carolina ... system have been elucidated. A multi-enzyme ... interaction with acidic serum proteins, gammaglobulin from.

  16. Gradual linguistic summaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbik, A.M.; Kaymak, U.; Laurent, A.; Strauss, O.; Bouchon-Meunier, xx

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new type of protoform-based linguistic summary – the gradual summary. This new type of summaries aims in capturing the change over some time span. Such summaries can be useful in many domains, for instance in economics, e.g., "prices of X are getting smaller" in eldercare,

  17. Executive summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Junge, A; Dvorak, J

    2014-01-01

    and women with type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, muscle mass and bone mineral density increases in a number of participant groups, including 65-75-year-old men. The functional capacity is elevated with increases in VO2 max of 10-15%, and 50-100% improvements in the capacity to perform intermittent work within...... structure and improves its function. Blood pressure is markedly reduced with the mean arterial blood pressure being lowered by ~10 mmHg for hypertensive men and women training 2-3 times/week for 12-26 weeks. Triglycerides and cholesterol are lowered and body fat declines, especially in middle-aged men...

  18. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The special session on Fuel cycle strategies and transition scenarios comprised three invited papers and five oral presentations: INL (USA) was invited to present US activities on fuel cycle transition scenarios; JAEA (Japan) presented the current status of the Japanese nuclear fuel cycle; CEA and EDF (France) gave a presentation on the French fuel cycle strategy and transition scenarios; CEA and INL presented the latest outcomes from the NEA activity on fuel cycle transition scenarios and the European approach; JAEA reported on the results of global scenarios for fast reactor deployment; AECL (Canada) discussed actinide transmutation in Candu reactors, which may efficiently transmute TRU; Materials assessments, which could be used in advanced nuclear fuel cycles from a safeguard perspective, were presented by LANL (USA); The technical session about Impact on P and T on waste management and geological disposal comprised one invited paper and two oral presentations: JAEA presented on the concept of waste management and geological disposal incorporating P and T technology; CIEMAT (Spain) gave a summary of the RED-IMPACT study, which is the study of the impact of P and T on the HLW management programme of the EC; Chalmers University(Sweden) presented an estimation of maximum permissible step losses in P and T processing; The technical session about Progress in transmutation fuels and targets comprised one invited paper and seven oral presentations: The invited talk of the session was given by ITU (EC), on advanced fuel fabrication processes for transmutation; INL presented the development status of transuranic-bearing metal fuels in the USA; CEA summarised European projects on design, development and qualification of advanced fuels for an industrial ADS prototype; The Japanese study of the microstructural evolution and Am migration behaviour in Am-containing MOX fuels at the initial stage of irradiation was presented by JAEA discussed Japanese status on the

  19. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) organised a workshop to assess current understanding on the use of cementitious materials in radioactive waste disposal. The workshop was hosted by the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (Ondraf/Niras), in Brussels, Belgium on 17-19 November 2009. The workshop brought together a wide range of people involved in supporting safety case development and having an interest in cementitious materials: namely, cement and concrete experts, repository designers, scientists, safety assessors, disposal programme managers and regulators. The workshop was designed primarily to consider issues relevant to the post-closure safety of radioactive waste disposal, but also addressed some related operational issues, such as cementitious barrier emplacement. Where relevant, information on cementitious materials from analogous natural and anthropogenic systems was also considered. The workshop agenda is included as Appendix A. The workshop focused on: - The uses of different cementitious materials in various repository designs. - The evolution of cementitious materials over long time scales (1000s to 100000s of years). - The interaction of cementitious materials with surrounding components of the repository (e.g. waste, container, buffer, backfill, host rock). - The workshop comprised: - Plenary sessions in which the state-of-the-art on repository design and understanding the phenomenology of cementitious materials and their interactions were presented and discussed. - Dedicated working group sessions, which were used to discuss key safety assessment and safety case questions in more detail. For example: How strong is the scientific basis for incorporating the various aspects of the behaviour and interactions of cementitious materials in safety assessments and safety cases? How can the behaviour and interactions of cementitious materials best be incorporated within the

  20. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This is a report on studies that value the environmental impacts resulting from generation and conservation of electric power. The purpose is to review the literature on the methodologies used to assign monetary costs to environmental externalities and to present the results of studies which have applied these methodologies. For those environmental damages for which the literature has not established a value, the report identifies the indicated ranges of adverse effects and provides a road map of issues that require research. The report is intended to assist utilities, government regulators, legislators, policy analysts and public interest groups in estimating the costs of the environmental impacts of electricity. It should be useful, as well, to assist in valuing the environmental impacts of pollutants from other industries, for setting environmental control standards, and in establishing pollution taxes or fees

  1. Enhanced accumulation of U(VI) by Aspergillus oryzae mutant generated by dielectric barrier discharge air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wencheng Song; North China Electric Power University, Beijing; Xiangxue Wang; Soochow University, Suzhou; Wen Tao; Hongqing Wang; Tasawar Hayat; Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad; Xiangke Wang; Soochow University, Suzhou; King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae was isolated from radionuclides' contaminated soils, and dielectric barrier discharge plasma was used to mutate A. oryzae to improve bioremediation capability of U(VI) pollution. The maximum accumulation capacities of U(VI) on mutated A.oryzae was 627.4 mg/g at T = 298 K and pH = 5.5, which was approximately twice than that of raw A.oryzae. XPS analysis indicated that U(VI) accumulation on mutated A. oryzae was largely attributable to nitrogen- and oxygen-containing functional groups on fungal mycelia. The mutated A. oryzae can be harnessed as bioremediation agents for radionuclides pollution. (author)

  2. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-12-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The main aim of the document was to summarise 'best practice' in dealing with bleeding risk in AF patients when approaching antithrombotic therapy, by addressing the epidemiology and size of the problem, and review established bleeding risk factors. We also summarise definitions of bleeding in the published literature. Patient values and preferences balancing the risk of bleeding against thromboembolism as well as the prognostic implications of bleeding are reviewed. We also provide an overview of published bleeding risk stratification and bleeding risk schema. Brief discussion of special situations (e.g. periablation, peri-devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators [ICD] or pacemakers, presentation with acute coronary syndromes and/or requiring percutanous coronary interventions/stents and bridging therapy) is made, as well as a discussion of the prevention of bleeds and managing bleeding complications. Finally, this document puts forwards consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and assist in everyday clinical practice.

  3. 76 FR 60593 - Title VI; Proposed Circular

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ..., several of them related to ambiguous language in the existing Circular. The proposed Circular reorganizes... regional entity, and inclusive of public and private entities. This term is used exclusively in Chapter IV... revisions to the Title VI Circular. The section that addresses the existing requirement for a Language...

  4. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Vi har selv designet naturens love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Martin Mose

    2014-01-01

    ForskerZonenNaturlovene er universelt gyldige i de flestes øjne. De gælder altid, uanset hvad vi tænker. Men dette billede står ikke uimodsagt i videnskabsfilosofien, og der er meget, der tyder på, at det ikke er specielt empirisk korrekt...

  6. Energy balance of ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    ENDF/B-VI through Release 2 has been tested for neutron-photon energy balance using the Heater module of the NJOY nuclear data procesing system. The situation is much improved over ENDF/B-V, but there are still a number of maerials that show problems

  7. Cr(VI) retention and transport through Fe(III)-coated natural zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Gaoxiang [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Geosciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Libing [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Hanson, Renee; Leick, Samantha; Hoeppner, Nicole [Geosciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2012-06-30

    Graphical abstract: Breakthrough curves of Cr(VI) from columns packed with raw zeolite (a) and Fe(III)-zeolite (b). The solid line in (b) is the HYDRUS-1D fit to the observed data with adsorption term only, while the dashed line in (b) includes a reduction term in the HYDRUS-1D fit. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite modified with Fe(III) could be used for adsorption and retention of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fe present on zeolite was in an amorphous Fe(OH){sub 3} form. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of 82 mg/kg was found on Fe(III)-zeolite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Cr(VI) retardation factor of 3 or 5 was determined from column and batch studies. - Abstract: Cr(VI) is a group A chemical based on the weight of evidence of carcinogenicity. Its transport and retention in soils and groundwater have been studied extensively. Zeolite is a major component in deposits originated from volcanic ash and tuff after alteration. In this study, zeolite aggregates with the particle size of 1.4-2.4 mm were preloaded with Fe(III). The influence of present Fe(III) on Cr(VI) retention by and transport through zeolite was studied under batch and column experiments. The added Fe(III) resulted in an enhanced Cr(VI) retention by the zeolite with a capacity of 82 mg/kg. The Cr(VI) adsorption on Fe(III)-zeolite followed a pseudo-second order kinetically and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm thermodynamically. Fitting the column experimental data to HYDRUS-1D resulted in a retardation factor of 3 in comparison to 5 calculated from batch tests at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 3 mg/L. The results from this study showed that enhanced adsorption and retention of Cr(VI) may happen in soils derived from volcanic ash and tuff that contains significant amounts of zeolite with extensive Fe(III) coating.

  8. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors)

  9. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the β-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH 2 SO 4 of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author)

  10. Biomass energy systems program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Research programs in biomass which were funded by the US DOE during fiscal year 1978 are listed in this program summary. The conversion technologies and their applications have been grouped into program elements according to the time frame in which they are expected to enter the commercial market. (DMC)

  11. Executive Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vari, Anna; Sakuma, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    KASAM (Sweden), NRC (USA), NWMO (Canada), and HSK (Switzerland), as well as representatives of NEA and its working parties the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) and the Regulators? Forum. Presentations, discussions, and lessons learned are summarised in this paper

  12. The 1st Baltic Osseointegration Academy and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Consensus Conference 2016. Summary and Consensus Statements: Group I - Peri-Implantitis Aetiology, Risk Factors and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stacchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The task of Group 1 was to review and update the existing data concerning aetiology, risk factors and pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Previous history of periodontitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking and presence of general diseases have been considered among the aetiological risk factors for the onset of peri-implant pathologies, while late dental implant failures are commonly associated with peri-implantitis and/or with the application of incorrect biomechanical forces. Special interest was paid to the bone cells dynamics as part of the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Material and Methods: The main areas indagated by this group were as follows: influence of smoking, history of periodontitis and general diseases on peri-implantitis development, bio-mechanics of implant loading and its influence on peri-implant bone and cellular dynamics related to the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. The systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses were registered in PROSPERO, an international prospective register of systematic reviews: http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. The literature in the corresponding areas of interest was screened and reported following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Statement: http://www.prisma-statement.org/. Method of preparation of the systematic reviews, based on comprehensive search strategies, was discussed and standardized. The summary of the materials and methods employed by the authors in preparing the systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses is presented in Preface chapter. Results: The results and conclusions of the review process are presented in the respective papers. One systematic review with meta-analysis, three systematic reviews and one theoretical analysis were performed. The group′s general commentaries, consensus statements, clinical recommendations and implications for research are presented in this article.

  13. 77 FR 64399 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Region VI AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession... its Field Offices (Region VI). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region VI. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D...

  14. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters; Reduction enzymatique de U(VI) dans des eaux souterraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W. [Center for Radioactive Waste Management, Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University, Albuquerque (United States); Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1999-03-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors) 12 refs.

  15. Adsorption behavior of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal—polyethyleneimine composite for removal of Cr(VI) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao; Jin, Ru-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-kun, E-mail: xkouyang@zjou.edu.cn; Wang, Yang-Guang

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • A carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal-polyethyleneimine composite (CCN-PEI) was prepared. • The as-prepared CCN-PEI was characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS. • Results suggested that the reusable CCN-PEI could remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions with a high adsorption capacity. • The adsorption isotherm, thermodynamics, and kinetics of the adsorption process are also discussed. - Abstract: In this study, a composite adsorbent (CCN-PEI) composed of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals (CCN) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) was prepared through an amidation reaction between the carboxyl groups of the CCN and the amine groups of the PEI. The adsorption performance of the CCN-PEI was tested by removing Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The physicochemical properties of the CCN and the Cr(VI) ion-loaded CCN-PEI were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To investigate the adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) ions onto this newly developed CCN-PEI, we performed experiments under different adsorption conditions, by varying the contact time, solution pH, initial Cr(VI) ion concentration, and adsorption temperature. The prepared CCN-PEI exhibited an encouraging uptake capacity of 358.42 mg × g{sup −1}. The adsorption process was fast: within the first 100 min, Cr(VI) ion adsorption onto the CCN-PEI was about 65%, and the adsorption equilibrium was reached within 250 min. Kinetics experiments indicated that the adsorption process could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, our adsorption equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherms well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, such as the free energy change (ΔG = −2.93 kJ × mol{sup −1}), enthalpy change (ΔH = −5.69 kJ × mol{sup −1}), and entropy change (ΔS = −9.14 kJ × mol{sup −1}), indicate that the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions onto CCN

  16. High performance of phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide for the selective adsorption of U(VI) from acidic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Li, Jiaxing, E-mail: lijx@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (China); School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123, Suzhou (China); Wang, Xiangxue; Chen, Changlun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Wang, Xiangke [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, 230031 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (China); School for Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X), Soochow University, 215123, Suzhou (China); Faculty of Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-11-15

    In this study, phosphate-functionalized graphene oxide (PGO) was prepared by grafting triethyl phosphite onto the surface of GO using Arbuzov reaction. The as-prepared PGO was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and Zeta potential. The application of the PGO to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was investigated with a maximum adsorption capacity of 251.7 mg/g at pH = 4.0 ± 0.1 and T = 303 K. The adsorption mechanism was also investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, indicating a chemical adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface. Moreover, experimental results gave a better removal efficiency toward U(VI) on PGO surface than other heavy metal ions at acidic solution, indicating the selective extraction of U(VI) from environmental pollutants. - Highlights: • The successful grafting phosphonate to graphene oxide by the Arbuzov reaction. • Selective adsorption of U(VI) on PGO surface over other heavy metal ions from acidic solution. • Electrostatic interactions of U(VI) with phosphonate and oxygen-containing functional groups on PGO surface. • Higher sorption capacity on PGO surface than GO surface for the U(VI) removal.

  17. Facile synthesis of magnetic Fe3O4/graphene composites for enhanced U(VI) sorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Donglin; Zhu, Hongyu; Wu, Changnian; Feng, Shaojie; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Chen, Changlun

    2018-06-01

    A novel magnetic Fe3O4/graphene composite (FGC) was fabricated by a facile one-step reaction route and shown to be effective for sorbing U(VI) from aqueous solution. The structure, properties and application of the prepared FGC composite were well evaluated. The high saturation magnetization (45.6 emu/g) made FGC easier to be separated from the media within several seconds under an external magnetic. Effects of different ambient conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength, contact time, temperatures) on sorption behaviors of U(VI) on FGC were carried out by batch experiments. According to the calculation of Langmuir model, the maximum sorption capacity of U(VI) on the FGC at pH 5.5 and 298 K was 176.47 mg/g. The sorption was correlated with the effects of pH, contact time, and temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that U(VI) was sorbed on FGC via oxygen-containing functional groups. This work demonstrated that FGC could be recycled and used as an effective recyclable sorbent for sorption of U(VI).

  18. Pneumothoraces in collagen VI-related dystrophy: a case series and recommendations for management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L. Fraser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Collagen VI-related dystrophy (collagen VI-RD is a rare neuromuscular condition caused by mutations in the COL6A1, COL6A2 or COL6A3 genes. The phenotypic spectrum includes early-onset Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, adult-onset Bethlem myopathy and an intermediate phenotype. The disorder is characterised by distal hyperlaxity and progressive muscle weakness, joint contractures and respiratory insufficiency. Respiratory insufficiency is attributed to chest wall contractures, scoliosis, impaired diaphragmatic function and intercostal muscle weakness. To date, intrinsic parenchymal lung disease has not been implicated in the inevitable respiratory decline of these patients. This series focuses on pneumothorax, an important but previously under-recognised disease manifestation of collagen VI-RD. We describe two distinct clinical presentations within collagen VI-RD patients with pneumothorax. The first cohort consists of neonates and children with a single pneumothorax in the setting of large intrathoracic pressure changes. The second group is made up of adult patients with recurrent pneumothoraces, associated with chest computed tomography scan evidence of parenchymal lung disease. We describe treatment challenges in this unique population with respect to expectant observation, tube thoracostomy and open pleurodesis. Based on this experience, we offer recommendations for early identification of lung disease in collagen VI-RD and definitive intervention.

  19. Lizards and Amphisbaenians, municipality of Viçosa, state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a survey of lizards and amphisbaenians from municipality of Viçosa, in Atlantic Forest from state ofMinas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, based on data of the herpetological collections of Museu de Zoologia João Moojen,Universidade Federal de Viçosa, and Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo. One hundred and forty sixspecimens of 14 species were analyzed, belonging to the following families: Amphisbaenidae, Anguidae, Gekkonidae,Gymnophthalmidae, Leiosauridae, Polychrotidae, Scincidae, Teiidae and Tropiduridae. We hope to supply basicinformation that helps to understand species distribution of this group in the Atlantic Forest of Minas Gerais andsoutheastern Brazil.

  20. Effect of the gamma irradiation on the bio-sorption of Cr (Vi) by orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo L, V.; Barrera D, C. E.; Sanchez M, V.; Urena N, F.

    2009-01-01

    The orange peel (Citrus sp.) is a bioadsorbent that contains functional groups able to remove Cr (Vi). To study the effect of gamma irradiation in the sorption capacity, the Nn materials were irradiated with gamma rays using a Co 60 source to dose from 10 to 3500 KGy (Nlγ). The biomass irradiation with gamma rays was successful since it increased the hexavalent chromium removal obtaining a maximum removal percentage of 100%. Sorption isotherms were realized to determine the concentration effect of initial Cr (Vi), the ph effect of the solution and the relationship m/v. (Author)

  1. Enhanced Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation in ice phase: Important role of dissolved organic matter from biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Xiaoling [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.edu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210046 (China); Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Gress, Julia; Harris, Willie [Department of Soil and Water Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Li, Yuncong [Soil and Water Science Department, Tropical Research and Education Center, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 33031-3314 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Biochar-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) effectively reduced Cr(VI) and oxidized As(III). • Cr(VI) and As(III) could serve as a redox couple. • Cr(VI) and As(III) redox conversion was more effective in the ice phase than aqueous phase. • FTIR and ESR showed that biochar DOM served as both electron donor and acceptor. - Abstract: This study evaluated the impact of DOM from two biochars (sugar beet tailing and Brazilian pepper) on Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation in both ice and aqueous phases with a soil DOM as control. Increasing DOM concentration from 3 to 300 mg C L{sup −1} enhanced Cr(VI) reduction from 20% to 100% and As(III) oxidation from 6.2% to 25%; however, Cr(VI) reduction decreased from 80–86% to negligible while As(III) oxidation increased from negligible to 18–19% with increasing pH from 2 to 10. Electron spin resonance study suggested semiquinone radicals in DOM were involved in As(III) oxidation while Fourier transform infrared analysis suggested that carboxylic groups in DOM participated in both Cr(VI) reduction and As(III) oxidation. During Cr(VI) reduction, part of DOM (∼10%) was oxidized to CO{sub 2}. The enhanced conversion of Cr(VI) and As(III) in the ice phase was due to the freeze concentration effect with elevated concentrations of electron donors and electron acceptors in the grain boundary. Though DOM enhanced both Cr(VI) reduction and As(III)oxidation, Cr(VI) reduction coupled with As(III) oxidation occurred in absence of DOM. The role of DOM, Cr(VI) and/or As(III) in Cr and As transformation may provide new insights into their speciation and toxicity in cold regions.

  2. On quaternary oxotungstates(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, T.; Hoppe, R.

    1985-01-01

    For the first time, Na 6 Li 2 [W 2 O 10 ] has been prepared by annealing mixtures of WO 3 , Na 2 O and Li 2 O with W:Na:Li = 1:3:1 [closed Pt-tube in quartz-glass ampoule, 840 0 C, 60 d (single crystals)]. The colourless crystals are of squatted shape. The structure determination confirms the space group P-1 with a = 784.66(11), b = 602.53(7), c = 563.81(11) pm, α = 106.784(14) 0 , β = 114.548(14) 0 , γ = 91.082(13) 0 , Z = 2, d/sub X/ = 4.92 g x cm -3 , d/sub pyk/ = 4.58 g x cm -3 . The structure may be described as a distorted derivative of the NaCl-type. The Madelung Part of Lattice Energy, Effective Coordination Numbers, these via Mean Fictive ionic Radii are calculated and discussed. (author)

  3. Hvor skal vi hen, du?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Helle

    2014-01-01

    ” by Breidahl and Seemann (2009) to answer the first question. The employees have made 15 drawings and giving their ideas and impressions on resources, challenges and important areas the coming years, as a part of a group interview for 11 people. These drawings afterwards have been analyzed in the theoretical...... for students. The speed of the transformation has been very high. In this situation it is relevant to ask: Where to go next? If asking the employees of the department. This leads to these questions: Questions 1. What impression do the employees have of the department, which resources and challenges can...... frame of Leavitt, Ry-Nielsen and Klaudi Klausen. Results and conclusion The result of the investigation shows the impression of Psychomotor Therapy organization as a warmhearted family like working place with great resources of collaboration, connectedness and trust between employees and leader...

  4. Prevention of Cyberbullying and Cyber Victimization: Evaluation of the ViSC Social Competence Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradinger, Petra; Yanagida, Takuya; Strohmeier, Dagmar; Spiel, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    It is well-documented that cyberbullying and victimization co-occur with traditional forms indicating that they share similar mechanisms. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the general antibullying program ViSC might also be effective in tackling these new forms of bullying. A longitudinal randomized control group design has been applied to…

  5. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, T.; Bashmakov, I.; Bernstein, L.; Bogner, J.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Davidson, O.; Fisher, B.; Grubb, M.; Gupta, S.; Halsnaes, K.; Heij, B.; Kahn Ribeiro, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Levine, M.; Martino, D.; Masera Cerutti, O.; Metz, B.; Meyer, L.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Najam, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Holger Rogner, H.; Roy, J.; Sathaye, J.; Schock, R.; Shukla, P.; Sims, R.; Smith, P.; Swart, R.; Tirpak, D.; Urge-Vorsatz, D.; Dadi, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO 2 Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  6. Thromboembolism and antithrombotic therapy for heart failure in sinus rhythm: an executive summary of a joint consensus document from the ESC Heart Failure Association and the ESC Working Group on Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Piotrponikowski, Piotr; Andreotti, Felicita; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Homma, Shunichi; Morais, Joao; Pullicino, Patrick; Rasmussen, Lars H; Marín, Francisco; Lane, Deirdre A

    2012-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) with either reduced or preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction is common and remains an extremely serious disorder with a high mortality and morbidity. Many complications related to heart failure can be related to thrombosis. Epidemiological and pathophysiological data also link HF to an increased risk of thrombosis, leading to the clinical consequences of sudden death, stroke, systemic thromboembolism and/or venous thromboembolism. This executive summary of a joint consensus document of the Heart Failure Association (EHFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the ESC Working Group on Thrombosis reviews the published evidence, summarises 'best practice', and puts forward consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and assist management decisions in everyday clinical practice. In HF patients with atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation is clearly recommended, and the CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scores should be used to determine the likely risk-benefit ratio (thromboembolism prevention versus risk of bleeding) of oral anticoagulation. In HF patients with reduced LV ejection fraction who are in sinus rhythm there is no evidence of an overall benefit of vitamin K antagonists (e.g. warfarin) on mortality, with risk of major bleeding. Whilst there is the potential for a reduction in ischaemic stroke, there is currently no compelling reason to routinely use warfarin for these patients. Risk factors associated with increased risk of thromboembolic events should be identified and decisions regarding use of anticoagulation individualised. Patient values and preferences are important determinants when balancing the risk of thromboembolism against bleeding risk. Novel oral anticoagulants that offer a different risk-benefit profile compared with warfarin may appear as an attractive therapeutic option, but this would need to be confirmed in clinical trials.

  7. Bullying prevention in schools by targeting cognitions, emotions, and behavior: Evaluating the effectiveness of the REBE-ViSC program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Simona; Bora, Carmen; Sipos-Gug, Sebastian; Tocai, Ioana; Gradinger, Petra; Yanagida, Takuya; Strohmeier, Dagmar

    2015-10-01

    The effectiveness of a class-based antibullying prevention program on cognitions, emotions, and behaviors was investigated. The program consists of a cognitive-behavioral (Rational Emotive Behavioral Education; REBE) and a behavioral (Viennese Social Competence; ViSC) component. The REBE program is based on rational emotive behavioral theory and contains 9 student lessons. The ViSC program is based on social learning theory and comprises 10 student lessons. The order of the programs was experimentally manipulated. The REBE-ViSC program was implemented in 5 schools (14 classes), the ViSC-REBE program was implemented in 3 schools (9 classes), and 3 schools (11 classes) served as an untreated control group. Data were collected during 1 school year at pretest, midpoint, and posttest. Emotions (overt and internalizing anger), cognitions (learning and entitlement), and behaviors (bullying perpetration and bullying victimization) were measured with self-assessments. To examine the effectiveness of the REBE-ViSC/ViSC-REBE program, multilevel growth models were applied (time points at Level 1, individuals at Level 2, and classes at Level 3). The analyses revealed that the program effects differed depending on the order of the programs. The REBE-ViSC condition was more effective in changing negative emotions than the ViSC-REBE condition; both experimental conditions were effective in reducing dysfunctional cognitions, whereas no behavioral change was found in the 2 experimental groups when compared with the control group. To improve program effectiveness regarding behavioral changes, a multilevel whole-school approach including a teacher component is recommended. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Hvad ved vi? Hvad vil vi? Hvad gør vi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Lisbeth Angela Lunde

    2011-01-01

    fokus på professionslæring og kompetenceudvikling i et livslangt læringsperspektiv. DEtte kan gøres ved at man i kommunerne tænker i tre forskellige former for mentoring de første to år.: en til en menoring, supervision og transparen det første år og gruppementoring det andet år efterfulgt af peer......-group mentoring de følgende år som led i dels den kommunale skoleudvikling, dels i lærernes fortsatte professionelle udvikling....

  9. Hvad skal vi med Trump-satire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?......Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?...

  10. Vacuum considerations: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blechschmidt, D.; Halama, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    A summary is given of the efforts of a vacuum systems study group of the workshop on a Heavy Ion Demonstration Experiment (HIDE) for heavy ion fusion. An inadequate knowledge of cross-sections prevents a more concrete vacuum system design. Experiments leading to trustworthy numbers for charge exchange, stripping and capture cross-sections are badly needed and should start as soon as possible. In linacs, beam loss will be almost directly proportional to the pressure inside the tanks. The tanks should, therefore, be built in such a way that they can be baked-out in situ to improve their vacuum, especially if the cross-sections turn out to be higher than anticipated. Using standard UHV techniques and existing pumps, an even lower pressure can be achieved. The vacuum system design for circular machines will be very difficult, and in some cases, beyond the present state-of-the-art

  11. The status of ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussin, R.; Dunford, C.; McKnight, R.; Young, P.

    1988-01-01

    A new version of the United States evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF/B-VI, is presently under development. Major emphasis is being placed on correcting some long-standing nuclear data problems that adversely affect applied calculations for both fission and fusion reactors. The paper reviews modifications to the formats and utility codes, outlines the evaluation activities, discusses the data testing programs, and projects a date for the unrestricted release of the new library. 27 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Prospek pengembangan industri perkulitan pada pelita VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Karyadi

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The leather industry is one of the strong competitive industry, as it comes from renewable natural resources. Therefore, the leather industry has good prospect to develop at the Pelita VI to be the industrial products export competitive. To develop leather industry and leather products should be given closed attention and well managed, especially concerning raw material supply, quality and leather waste treatment.

  13. ENDF/B-VI data for MCNP trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Frankle, S.C.; Court, J.D.

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear and atomic data are the foundation upon which the radiation transport codes are built. For neutron transport the international standard is the Evaluated Nuclear Data File from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The latest version, ENDF/B-VI release 2, has recently become available for use in the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. These neutron cross-section data are designated by ZAID identifiers ending in .60c and are referred to as the ENDF60 library. The ENDF60 data library was processed from the ENDF/B-VI evaluations using the NJOY code. Fifty-two percent of the data evaluations are translations from ENDF/B-V. The remaining 48% are new evaluations which have sometimes changed significantly. The RSIC release package contains the ENDF60 neutron library, a new photon library MCPLIB02, the electron library EL1, and an updated XSDIR file. The authors report here the work done by the LANL Radiation Transport Group (X-6) in testing and validating the ENDF60 data library and in developing the necessary new sampling and detector schemes. When the ENDF60 library should be used in preference to the previous libraries, is also considered. The development of the new photon library MCPLIB02 is also discussed

  14. Vi behøver innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2007-01-01

    -Produktion og Maskiner. Innovation og bæredygtighed er to områder som vi i Skandinavien giver meget stor opmærksomhed for at kunne vedligeholde vores globale konkurrencekraft og stærke velfærdssamfund. Gennem årene har mange brancher bidraget til skabelsen af vidensbaserede innovationer, og det faktum, at de......Analyse: Vi behøver innovation En ny miljøbølge ruller, og danske virksomheder bør ride med Af Tim McAloone, fredag 02. feb 2007 kl. 04:50 Tim McAloone Lektor og ph.d. ved Institut for mekanik, energi og konstruktion ved DTU. Tim McAloone skriver fremover jævnligt kommentarer i Ingeniøren...... skandinaviske lande er relativt små, har ledt til en interessant evne til at etablere og derefter samarbejde inden for tætte netværk, som strækker sig over både faglige og geografiske grænser. Samtidig har vi set miljøhensyn vinde og tabe samfundsmæssig og industriel opmærksomhed på en nærmest periodisk basis...

  15. The response to Typhi Vi vaccination is compromised in individuals with primary immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarage, Jeevani; Seneviratne, Suranjith L; Senaratne, Vijitha; Fernando, Amitha; Gunasekera, Kirthi; Gunasena, Bandu; Gurugama, Padmalal; Peiris, Sudath; Parker, Antony R; Harding, Stephen; de Silva, Nilhan Rajiva

    2017-06-01

    Measurement of an individuals ability to respond to polysaccharide antigens is a crucial test to determine adaptive immunity. Currently the response to Pneumovax ® is utilized but with the success of Prevnar ® , measurement of the response to Pneumovax may be challenging. The aim of the study was to assess the response to Typhi Vi vaccination in both children and adult control groups and patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID). In the control groups, >95% of the individuals had pre Typhi Vi vaccination concentrations 94% achieving ≥3 fold increase in concentration (FI). The response to Typhi Vi vaccination was significantly lower in both children ( p = 0.006) and adult ( p = 0.002) PID groups when compared to their control groups. 11% and 55% of the children and adult PID groups respectively did not obtain a response >3FI. There were no significant differences between the responses obtained in the children and adult PID groups. When all individuals with PID were separated into those with either hypogammaglobulinemia (HYPO) or common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), both groups had a significantly lower median FI than the control group (19, 95%CI 5-56 vs 59, 95%CI 7-237; p = 0.01 and 1, 95%CI 1-56 vs 32, 95%CI 5-136; p = 0.005). Further, a >3FI differentiated the antibody responses between both the CVID and HYPO groups and their control groups (AUC: 0.83, 95%CI: 0.65-1.00, p = 0.005 and 0.81, 95% CI: 0.65-0.97, p = 0.01). The data suggests that measurement of the response to Typhi Vi vaccination could represent a complementary assay for the assessment of the response to a polysaccharide vaccine.

  16. Modeling the effectiveness of U(VI) biomineralization in dual-porosity porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, B. E.; Barry, D. A.; Gerhard, J. I.; Small, J. S.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryUranium contamination is a serious environmental concern worldwide. Recent attention has focused on the in situ immobilization of uranium by stimulation of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB). The objective of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of this approach in heterogeneous and structured porous media, since such media may significantly affect the geochemical and microbial processes taking place in contaminated sites, impacting remediation efficiency during biostimulation. A biogeochemical reactive transport model was developed for uranium remediation by immobile-region-resident DMRB in two-region porous media. Simulations were used to investigate the parameter sensitivities of the system over wide-ranging geochemical, microbial and groundwater transport conditions. The results suggest that optimal biomineralization is generally likely to occur when the regional mass transfer timescale is less than one-thirtieth the value of the volumetric flux timescale, and/or the organic carbon fermentation timescale is less than one-thirtieth the value of the advective timescale, and/or the mobile region porosity ranges between equal to and four times the immobile region porosity. Simulations including U(VI) surface complexation to Fe oxides additionally suggest that, while systems exhibiting U(VI) surface complexation may be successfully remediated, they are likely to display different degrees of remediation efficiency over varying microbial efficiency, mobile-immobile mass transfer, and porosity ratios. Such information may aid experimental and field designs, allowing for optimized remediation in dual-porosity (two-region) biostimulated DMRB U(VI) remediation schemes.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and application of Lagerstroemia speciosa embedded magnetic nanoparticle for Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shalini; Agrawal, Shashi Bhushan; Mondal, Monoj Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Lagerstroemia speciosa bark (LB) embedded magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation of Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ salt solution with ammonia and LB for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution. The native LB, magnetic nanoparticle (MNP), L. speciosa embedded magnetic nanoparticle (MNPLB) and Cr(VI) adsorbed MNPLB particles were characterized by SEM-EDX, TEM, BET-surface area, FT-IR, XRD and TGA methods. TEM analysis confirmed nearly spherical shape of MNP with an average diameter of 8.76nm and the surface modification did not result in the phase change of MNP as established by XRD analysis, while led to the formation of secondary particles of MNPLB with diameter of 18.54nm. Characterization results revealed covalent binding between the hydroxyl group of MNP and carboxyl group of LB particles and further confirmed its physico-chemical nature favorable for Cr(VI) adsorption. The Cr(VI) adsorption on to MNPLB particle as an adsorbent was tested under different contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, adsorbent dose, initial pH, temperature and agitation speed. The results of the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption were well described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters suggest spontaneous and endothermic nature of Cr(VI) adsorption onto MNPLB. The maximum adsorption capacity for MNPLB was calculated to be 434.78mg/g and these particles even after Cr(VI) adsorption were collected effortlessly from the aqueous solution by a magnet. The desorption of Cr(VI)-adsorbed MNPLB was found to be more than 93.72% with spent MNPLB depicting eleven successive adsorption-desorption cycles. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Annual report and summary financial statement 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1991-92 Annual Report for Scottish Hydro-Electric PLC is presented. It includes key financial statistics, the financial calendar, details of the Board of Directors, the Chairman's Statement, the Chief Executives' review of operations, operational statistics, a summary financial statement, a summary group profit and loss account, summary balance sheets, the Auditors' Report and a customer map. (UK)

  19. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, P.N. [The Experimental Forest, National Taiwan University, Nantou, 55743 Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, J.C. [Agricultural Research Institute No. 189, Jhongjheng Rd., Wufong, Taichung County, 41301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuan, W.H. [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei, 24301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, J.H. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Hung, J.T. [Department of Horticulture, National Taitung Junior College, Taitung, 95045 Taiwan, ROC (China); Tzou, Y.M., E-mail: ymtzou@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.C. [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 116 Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, M.K. [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low molecular weights (M{sub w}) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low M{sub w} of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M{sub w} of HA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M{sub w}): >100, 50-100, 10-50 and <10 kDa. Each HA fraction was characterized by spectroscopic analyses followed by examining Cr(VI) removal on each fraction of HA at pH 1-5. Spectroscopic results indicated that low-M{sub w} HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M{sub w} of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  20. Oxidation of indometacin by ferrate (VI): kinetics, degradation pathways, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junlei; Wang, Yahui; Liu, Guoguang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Fengliang; Ma, Jingshuai; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Haijin; Lv, Wenying

    2017-04-01

    The oxidation of indometacin (IDM) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) was investigated to determine the reaction kinetics, transformation products, and changes in toxicity. The reaction between IDM and Fe(VI) followed first-order kinetics with respect to each reactant. The apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) decreased from 9.35 to 6.52 M -1  s -1 , as the pH of the solution increased from 7.0 to 10.0. The pH dependence of k app might be well explained by considering the species-specific rate constants of the reactions of IDM with Fe(VI). Detailed product studies using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated that the oxidation products were primarily derived from the hydrolysis of amide linkages, the addition of hydroxyl groups, and electrophilic oxidation. The toxicity of the oxidation products was evaluated using the Microtox test, which indicated that transformation products exhibited less toxicity to the Vibrio fischeri bacteria. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis calculated by the ecological structure activity relationship (ECOSAR) revealed that all of the identified products exhibited lower acute and chronic toxicity than the parent pharmaceutical for fish, daphnid, and green algae. Furthermore, Fe(VI) was effective in the degradation IDM in water containing carbonate ions or fulvic acid (FA), and in lake water samples; however, higher Fe(VI) dosages would be required to completely remove IDM in lake water in contrast to deionized water.

  1. ColVI myopathies: where do we stand, where do we go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allamand Valérie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collagen VI myopathies, caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen type VI (ColVI, represent a clinical continuum with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD and Bethlem myopathy (BM at each end of the spectrum, and less well-defined intermediate phenotypes in between. ColVI myopathies also share common features with other disorders associated with prominent muscle contractures, making differential diagnosis difficult. This group of disorders, under-recognized for a long time, has aroused much interest over the past decade, with important advances made in understanding its molecular pathogenesis. Indeed, numerous mutations have now been reported in the COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 genes, a large proportion of which are de novo and exert dominant-negative effects. Genotype-phenotype correlations have also started to emerge, which reflect the various pathogenic mechanisms at play in these disorders: dominant de novo exon splicing that enables the synthesis and secretion of mutant tetramers and homozygous nonsense mutations that lead to premature termination of translation and complete loss of function are associated with early-onset, severe phenotypes. In this review, we present the current state of diagnosis and research in the field of ColVI myopathies. The past decade has provided significant advances, with the identification of altered cellular functions in animal models of ColVI myopathies and in patient samples. In particular, mitochondrial dysfunction and a defect in the autophagic clearance system of skeletal muscle have recently been reported, thereby opening potential therapeutic avenues.

  2. Reduction and Removal of Chromium VI in Water by Powdered Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cr adsorption on wood-based powdered activated carbon (WPAC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The highest Cr(VI adsorption (40.04% was obtained under acidic conditions (pH 3, whereas Cr removal at pH 10 was only 0.34%. The mechanism of Cr(VI removal from aqueous solutions by WPAC was based on the reduction of Cr(VI to Cr(III with the concomitant oxidation of C-H and C-OH to C-OH and C=O, respectively, on the surface of WPAC, followed by Cr(III adsorption. Raman spectroscopy revealed a change in the WPAC structure in terms of the D/G band intensity ratio after Cr(VI adsorption. SEM-EDS analysis showed that the oxygen/carbon ratio on the WPAC surface increased from 9.85% to 17.74%. This result was confirmed by XPS measurements, which showed that 78.8% of Cr adsorbed on the WPAC surface was in the trivalent state. The amount of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface increased due to the oxidation of graphitic carbons to C-OH and C=O groups.

  3. Determination of thermodynamic parameters of Cr(VI) adsorption from aqueous solution onto Agave lechuguilla biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, J. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Peralta-Videa, J.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Rodriguez, E. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Ramirez, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, J.L. [Environmental Science and Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)]. E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu

    2005-04-15

    The temperature dependence of the Cr(VI) bioadsorption and its possible reduction to Cr(III) by Agave lechuguilla biomass were studied. The experimental data obtained in batch experiments at different temperatures were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted well with the Freundlich model. The average model parameters calculated from Freundlich's isotherms (adsorption capacity K{sub F} = 4 . 10{sup -2} mol . g{sup -1} and an average adsorption intensity value n = 13.07) showed that A. lechuguilla can be considered as an effective biomaterial for Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution. Thermodynamic parameters ({delta}G{sup .}, {delta}H{sup .}, and {delta}S{sup .}) for Cr(VI) adsorption determined in the temperature range from (283 to 313) K suggest that a portion of Cr(VI) may be bound to functional groups on the surface of the adsorbent and then reduced to Cr(III). Additionally, the parameters of the Dubinin-Radushkevick equation indicated that the sorption of chromium species onto lechuguilla biomass mainly proceeds through binding surface functional groups.

  4. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Asha, Padmaja [National Centre for Aquatic Animal Health, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin (India); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Yitao [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Macau (China); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation.

  5. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation.

  6. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial carbides and nitrides of early transition metals in Groups IV-VI exhibit platinum-like behavior which makes them a promising candidate to replace noble metals in a wide variety of reactions. Most synthetic methods used to prepare

  7. FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The FEMA Disaster Declarations Summary is a summarized dataset describing all federally declared disasters, starting with the first disaster declaration in 1953,...

  8. Voltammetry of Os(VI)-modified polysaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trefulka, Mojmír; Paleček, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 16 (2010), s. 1837-1845 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GPP301/10/P548; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651 Program:KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : chemical modification of polysaccharides * electroactive labels * osmium(VI) complexes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  9. Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by flocculant with the capacity of reduction and chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Gang; Chang, Qing; Han, Xiaoting; Zhang, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We report a novel flocculant with the properties of reduction and chelation for Cr. ► The removal of Cr(VI) by the flocculant depends highly on pH value. ► Some coexisting ions inhibit Cr (VI) removal, but promote total Cr removal. ► Cr and turbidity can be removed simultaneously in the treated wastewater. ► The interaction mechanism is investigated by FTIR and SEM. -- Abstract: A novel agent polyethyleneimine-sodium xanthogenate (PEX) with the multifunction of reduction, chelation, flocculation and precipitation was synthesized by using polyethyleneimine (PEI), carbon disulfide (CS 2 ), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The effects of different important parameters, such as pH value, initial Cr(VI) concentration, coexisting ions and turbidity etc., on the removal of chromium from aqueous solution by PEX were investigated in flocculation experiments. The experiments results demonstrated that PEX could efficiently remove Cr(VI) and total Cr (Cr(VI) + Cr(III)) in strongly acidic media. It was proved that the presence of coexisting ions (Na + , Ca 2+ , F − , Cl − , and SO 4 2− ) in the solution had a little influence on the removal of chromium. Furthermore, it was conformed that Cr(VI) ions and turbidity could be simultaneously removed when water samples contained both Cr(VI) ions and turbidity. Finally, the mechanism of interaction between chromium and PEX was further confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results reveal that dithiocarboxylic acid groups on PEX macromolecule play a major role in Cr(VI) reduction and Cr(III) chelation, and the flocs formation is attributed to the interparticle bridging mechanism of PEX

  10. Environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, May-Helen; Cochrane, Sabine; Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    There has been an environmental investigation in Region VI Halten Bank. This report presents the results of the chemical and biological assays performed on samples from a total of 316 stations in 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (AG)

  11. Fremtidens lavenergibyggeri - kan vi gøre som vi plejer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    2011-01-01

    Stramninger af kravene til energiforbruget i vores boliger medfører stor fokus på energiberegningen, men erfaringer fra lavenergiboliger opført i dag viser, at vi, for at sikre succes for fremtidens boliger, også skal inddrage dokumentation af indeklimaet og forbedre samarbejdet mellem arkitekter...

  12. Synthesis, characterization and oxidative behaviour of dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, D.D.; Rastogi, Rachana

    1995-01-01

    Dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes are found to give low yield of epoxide but good yield of cyclohexanone. The complexes are electro active giving metal centered Ru VI /Ru V couple. Cis-stilbene gives trans epoxide and benzaldehyde. Norbornene gives exo epoxy norbornene. The selectivity for allylic oxidation is high. In the present note the synthesis of dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes and their oxidation behaviour is reported. The dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes have been stoichiometrically found to be good oxidants. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab

  13. Enzymatic U(VI) reduction by Desulfosporosinus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; Banfield, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Here we tested U(VI) reduction by a Desulfosporosinus species (sp.) isolate and type strain (DSM 765) in cell suspensions (pH 7) containing 1 mM U(VI) and lactate, under an atmosphere containing N 2 -CO 2 -H 2 (90: 5: 5). Although neither Desulfosporosinus species (spp.) reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions with 0.25% Na-bicarbonate or 0.85% NaCl, U(VI) was reduced in these solutions by a control strain, desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 642). However, both Desulfosporosinus strains reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions depleted in bicarbonate and NaCl. No U(VI) reduction was observed without lactate and H 2 electron donors or with heat-killed cells, indicating enzymatic U(VI) reduction. Uranium(VI) reduction by both strains was inhibited when 1 mM CuCl 2 was added to the cell suspensions. Because the Desulfosporosinus DSM 765 does not contain cytochrome c 3 used by Desulfovibrio spp. to reduce U(VI), Desulfosporosinus species reduce uranium via a different enzymatic pathway. (orig.)

  14. Cr(VI) adsorption from electroplating plating wastewater by chemically modified coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2012-07-15

    Coir pith samples were chemically modified by grafting with acrylic acid for the removal of Cr(VI) from electroplating wastewater. The presence of acrylic acid on the coir pith surface was verified by a scanning electron microscope with an electron dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TG). The carbonyl groups (C==O) from the carboxylic acids (COOH) increased on the coir pith surface after grafting with acrylic acid. In addition, the thermal stability of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith also improved. The optimum conditions for grafting the acrylic acid on the coir pith consisted of 2 M acrylic acid and 0.00125 M ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN, as an initiator). The maximum Cr(VI) removal (99.99 ± 0.07%) was obtained with the following conditions: a 1.3% (w/v) dosage of acrylic acid-grafted coir pith, a system pH of 2, a contact time of 22 h, a temperature of 30 °C, a particle size of <150 μm and an initial Cr(VI) of 1,171 mg l(-1). At system pH of 2, Cr(VI) in the HCrO(4)(-) form can be adsorbed with acrylic acid-grafted coir pith via an electrostatic attraction. The adsorption isotherm of 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith exhibited a good fit with the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of the 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was 196.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent, whereas for coir pith without grafting, the maximum Cr(VI) removal was 165.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent. The adsorption capacity of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith for Cr(VI) was higher compared to the original coir pith. This result was due to the enhancement of the carbonyl groups on the coir pith surface that may have involved the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The X-ray absorption near edged structure (XANES) and desorption studies suggested that most of the Cr(III) that presented on the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was due to the Cr(VI) being reduced to Cr(III) on the adsorbent surface. FTIR

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF POTASSIUM DICHROMATE Cr (VI ADMINISTRATION DURATION ON GLOBULAR RESISTANCE IN FEMALE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LETIŢIA STANA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The „in vivo” experiment has had as aim the study of different Cr(VI doses administration on globular resistance in female rats related to administration duration. Study was carried out on 56 female rats divided in 8 groups, 6 experimental and 2 control that received potassium dichromate in drinking water in doses of 25 ppm, 50 ppm and 75ppm Cr(VI, for 3 months, respectively, 6 months. Decrease of globular resistance (in terms of haemolysis degree in hypotonic solutions at increasing dose (up to 0.8% NaCl at 75 ppm dose in all experimental groups, in direct relation with the duration of administration was registered. Control groups were in physiological limits. The results of the present study revealed the affecting of erythrocyte membrane in function of administration duration and chromium intake level, because of oxidative lesions produced by it.

  16. Summary information report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Summary Information Report (SIR) provides summary data concerning NRC and its licensees for general use by the Chairman, other Commissioners and Commission staff offices, the Executive Director for Operations, and the Office Directors. SIR is published quarterly by the Management Information Branch (49-27834) of the Office of Resource Management

  17. Effect of uranium (VI) on the growth of yeast and influence of metabolism of yeast on adsorption of U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Wakai, Eiichi; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out the growth experiments of 3 strains of yeast in a medium containing uranium (VI) to elucidate the effect of U (VI) on the growth of microorganisms. Hansenula fabianii J640 grew in the liquid medium containing 0.1 mM U (VI) at lower rate than the control, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not grow under this condition. The H. fabianii J640 pre-cultured for 21 h in the liquid medium without U (VI) grew even after the exposure to 1 mM U (VI), but did not grow without pre-cultivation. For the pre-cultured H. fabianii J640, radioactivity of U in the medium was the same as the initial one for 110 h, and then gradually decreased. TEM-EDS analysis of H. fabianii J640 exposed to 1 mM U (VI) for 165 h showed accumulation of U (VI) on the cells. When H. fabianii J640 was not pre-cultured, radioactivity of U in the medium was lower than the initial one. These results indicated that U (VI) inhibits the growth of yeast, and that the adsorption of U (VI) by the cells depends on the metabolism of yeast. (author)

  18. An “on-off-on” fluorescent nanoprobe for recognition of chromium(VI) and ascorbic acid based on phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped carbon quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xiaojuan, E-mail: gxj1124@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Liu, Yang; Yang, Zhenhua; Shuang, Shaomin [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Zhang, Zeyu [Faculty of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, 100029 (China); Dong, Chuan, E-mail: dc@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2017-05-22

    Chromium (VI) [Cr(VI)] is a harsh environmental contaminates and has been proved to be highly toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic. Therefore, developing an inexpensive, good selective and highly sensitive nanoprobe for the detection of Cr(VI) is in urgent demand. Recently, the highly fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have been successfully utilized as efficient fluorescent nanoprobes for the detection of ions, pH and molecular substances. In this work, an “on-off” fluorescence phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped CQDs (PNCQDs) probe was developed for the determination of Cr(VI) based on inner filter effect (IFE). The proposed PNCQDs nanoprobe shows its distinct merits of simplicity, convenience, fast implementation, good selectivity and high sensitivity towards Cr(VI), allowing its potential application in the determination of Cr(VI) in environment and biosystem. In addition, the chelation effect of the functional groups in reductant and Cr(VI), and the easy-conversion of Cr(VI) to reduced states (i.e. Cr(III) and Cr(0)) by reductants makes the minimization of IFE with a concomitant recovery of PNCQDs fluorescence possible. Hence, the PNCQDs/Cr(VI) hybrid was used as an “off-on” fluorescence probe for sensing ascorbic acid (AA), which is a model reductant. For the detection of Cr(VI), the linear range and the limit of detection achieved were 1.5–30 μmol/L and 23 nmol/L, respectively. For the detection of AA, the linear range and the limit of detection obtained were 5.0–200 μmol/L and 1.35 μmol/L, respectively. The as-constructed “on-off-on” PNCQDs fluorescent nanoprobe was successfully applied for detecting Cr(VI) and AA in biosystem. Furthermore, the as-constructed fluorescent sensing system was successfully applied to the analyses of AA in fresh fruits and in commercial fruit juices with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • Fast synthesis of phosphorus/nitrogen dual-doped CQDs (PNCQDs) by acid-base neutralization carbonization method.

  19. ENDF/B summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, R.

    1979-07-01

    This publication provides a localized source of descriptions for the evaluations contained in the ENDF/B Library. The summary documentation presented is intended to be a more detailed description than the (File 1) comments contained in the computer readable data files, but not so detailed as the formal reports describing each ENDF/B evaluation. The summary documentations were written by the CSEWB (Cross Section Evaluation Working Group) evaluators and compiled by NNDC (National Nuclear Data Center). This edition includes documentation for materials found on ENDF/B Version V tapes 501 to 516 (General Purpose File) excluding tape 504. ENDF/B-V also includes tapes containing partial evaluations for the Special Purpose Actinide (521, 522), Dosimetry (531), Activation (532), Gas Production (533), and Fission Product (541-546) files. The materials found on these tapes are documented elsewhere. Some of the evaluation descriptions in this report contain cross sections or energy level information

  20. ENDF/B summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsey, R. (comp.)

    1979-07-01

    This publication provides a localized source of descriptions for the evaluations contained in the ENDF/B Library. The summary documentation presented is intended to be a more detailed description than the (File 1) comments contained in the computer readable data files, but not so detailed as the formal reports describing each ENDF/B evaluation. The summary documentations were written by the CSEWB (Cross Section Evaluation Working Group) evaluators and compiled by NNDC (National Nuclear Data Center). This edition includes documentation for materials found on ENDF/B Version V tapes 501 to 516 (General Purpose File) excluding tape 504. ENDF/B-V also includes tapes containing partial evaluations for the Special Purpose Actinide (521, 522), Dosimetry (531), Activation (532), Gas Production (533), and Fission Product (541-546) files. The materials found on these tapes are documented elsewhere. Some of the evaluation descriptions in this report contain cross sections or energy level information. (RWR)

  1. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the {beta}-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH{sup 2}SO{sup 4} of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author) 121 refs. , 15 tabs. , 13 figs

  2. VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics 17-25 November 2015, Chiapas, Mexico The VI School on Cosmic Rays and Astrophysics was held at the MCTP, at the Autonomous University of Chiapas (UNACH), Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico thanks to the Science for Development ICTP-UNACH-UNESCO Regional Seminar, 17-25 November 2015 (http://mctp.mx/e-VI-School-on-Cosmic-Rays-and-Astrophysics.html). The School series started in La Paz, Bolivia in 2004 and it has been, since then, hosted by several Latin American countires: 1.- La Paz, Bolivia (August, 2004), 2.- Puebla, Mexico (September, 2006), 3.- Arequipa, Peru (September, 2008), 4.- Santo André, Brazil (September, 2010), 5.- La Paz, Bolivia (August, 2012). It aims to promote Cosmic Ray (CR) Physics and Astrophysics in the Latin American community and to provide a general overview of theoretical and experimental issues on these topics. It is directed to undergraduates, postgraduates and active researchers in the field. The lectures introduce fundamental Cosmic Ray Physics and Astrophysics with a review of standards of the field. It is expected the school continues happening during the next years following a tradition. In this edition, the list of seminars included topics such as experimental techniques of CR detection, development of CR showers and hadronic interactions, composition and energy spectrum of primary CR, Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), neutrino Astrophysics, spacecraft detectors, simulations, solar modulation, and the current state of development and results of several astroparticle physics experiments such as The Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, HAWC in Mexico, KASCADE and KASCADE Grande, HESS, IceCube, JEM-EUSO, Fermi-LAT, and others. This time the school has been complemented with the ICTP-UNACH-UNESCO Seminar of theory on Particle and Astroparticle Physics. The organization was done by MCTP, the Mesoamerican Centre for Theoretical Physics. The school had 46 participants, 30 students from Honduras, Brazil

  3. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the ... time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited .... Lead (II) and nickel (II) adsorption kinetics .... heavy metal by Talaromyces helicus: a trained fungus for copper and.

  4. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.; Jackson, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured

  5. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  6. A CMOS rail-to-rail linear VI-converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, P.P.; Vervoort, P.P.; Wassenaar, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    A linear CMOS VI-converter operating in strong inversion with a common-mode input range from the negative to the positive supply rail is presented. The circuit consists of three linear VI-converters based on the difference of squares principle. Two of these perform the actual V to I conversion,

  7. Cloning and expression of a Vi mimotope of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... A recombinant His-Vi protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was successfully constructed and cloned into ... mainly through consumption of food or water contami- nated with .... and healthy individuals (double arrows) followed by the detection using recombinant His-Vi protein as the primary antibody ...

  8. Research progress in the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macova, Zuzana; Bouzek, Karel; Hives, Jan; Sharma, Virender K.; Terryn, Raymond J.; Baum, J. Clayton

    2009-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the +6 oxidation state of iron, ferrate (VI) (Fe VI O 4 2- ), because of its potential as a benign oxidant for organic synthesis, as a chemical in developing cleaner ('greener') technology for remediation processes, and as an alternative for environment-friendly battery cathodes. This interest has led many researchers to focus their attention on the synthesis of ferrate(VI). Of the three synthesis methods, electrochemical, wet chemical and thermal, electrochemical synthesis has received the most attention due to its ease and the high purity of the product. Moreover, electrochemical processes use an electron as a so-called clean chemical, thus avoiding the use of any harmful chemicals to oxidize iron to the +6 oxidation state. This paper reviews the development of electrochemical methods to synthesize ferrate(VI). The approaches chosen by different laboratories to overcome some of the difficulties associated with the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI) are summarized. Special attention is paid to parameters such as temperature, anolyte, and anode material composition. Spectroscopic work to understand the mechanism of ferrate(VI) synthesis is included. Recent advances in two new approaches, the use of an inert electrode and molten hydroxide salts, in the synthesis of ferrate(VI) are also reviewed. Progress made in the commercialization of ferrate(VI) continuous production is briefly discussed as well

  9. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  10. ASA conference on radiation and health, Coolfont VI: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The 1986 ASA Conference on Radiation and Health (Coolfont VI) continued the procedure established in 1981 of holding forenoon and evening sessions, leaving afternoons free for discussion and relaxation. One exception was made this year in that Michael and Marie Stoline were invited to discuss the Chernobyl Disaster on Monday afternoon. The program consisted of the following topics: a general overview of radiation and health problems; cytogenetics and radiation (human and animal studies and statistical analysis of dose-response curves); uranium and health effects, including continuing emphasis on radon, which has attracted considerable national interest lately; epidemiologic studies of workers at nuclear power plants and an uranium processing plant; the latest assessment of atomic bomb dosimetry. These Coolfont Conferences provide an excellent environment for an interchange of ideas and information in an assemblage of scientists from a variety of disciplines. Unfortunately there is one important factor which limits this interchange: language. In order to overcome the difficulty of statisticians understanding nuclear scientists and nuclear scientists understanding statisticians, I suggested one of two procedures: each group prepare a set of commonly used terms with definitions which would be understood by the other group(s); have an introductory session in which each group attempts to explain its language to the other group(s). This problem of communication is even more serious when scientists attempt to explain their research efforts to the general public. The Coolfont Conferences on Radiation and Health should be ideal forums for development of a language which could be understood by the general public as well as different scientific groups. This document contains the abstracts of 12 presented papers

  11. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  12. Spectrophotometry of Comet West 1976 VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenbush, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    Spectra obtained for the coma, nuclear fragments A and D, and tail of Comet West 1976 VI on April 1, 2 and 7, 1976 are noted to encompass coma spectra which differed from those of the nuclear fragments, which exhibited a strong continuum with superimposed emissions that included a stronger CO(+)-band system than that of the coma. A detailed comparison between fragment spectra has revealed great differences in both quasi-simultaneously obtained and five-day-separated cases. The relative intensities of different CO(+) bands are compared to the theoretical ones, and the abundances of CO(+) ions corresponding to different vibrational transitions are determined relative to that of CN. 24 references

  13. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, I.J.; Smoker, W.R.; Kuta, A.J.; Felton, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  14. New energy level identifications in Kr VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauheed, A.; Pinnington, E.H.; Ansbacher, W.; Kernahan, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Beam-foil delayed spectra from 89.0 to 101.0 nm are used to identify the intercombination lines connecting the 4s4p 2 4 P and 4s 2 4p 2 P levels in Kr VI. The existing analysis is extended to include the 4s 2 5s 2 S 1/2 , 4f 2 F 5/2 , 2 F 7/2 , 4p 3 2 D 3/2 , 2 D 5/2 , 2 P 3/2 , 4 S 3/2 and 4s4p 2 4 P 1/2 , 4 P 3/2 , 4 P 5/2 levels. Lifetime measurements for the 4s4p 2 4 P 1/2 , 4 P 5/2 , 4p 3 2 D 3/2 and 2 D 5/2 levels are also discussed in support of these assignments. (orig.)

  15. Summary big data

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of Cukier the book: "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How we Live, Work, and Think" by Viktor Mayer-Schonberg and Kenneth. Summary of the ideas in Viktor Mayer-Schonberg's and Kenneth Cukier's book: " Big Data " explains that big data is where we use huge quantities of data to make better predictions based on the fact we identify patters in the data rather than trying to understand the underlying causes in more detail. This summary highlights that big data will be a source of new economic value and innovation in the future. Moreover, it shows that it will

  16. Biofuels: Project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US DOE, through the Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) is addressing the issues surrounding US vulnerability to petroleum supply. The BSD goal is to develop technologies that are competitive with fossil fuels, in both cost and environmental performance, by the end of the decade. This document contains summaries of ongoing research sponsored by the DOE BSD. A summary sheet is presented for each project funded or in existence during FY 1993. Each summary sheet contains and account of project funding, objectives, accomplishments and current status, and significant publications.

  17. Spectrum and energy levels of Y VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, W.; Reader, J.

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the five-times-ionized yttrium atom (Y VI), excited in a sliding-spark discharge, was studied in the 160--2500 A-circle range. About 900 Y VI lines were classified as transitions between 101 odd and 69 even energy levels.The energy-level system established includes almost all levels of the 4s 2 4p 4 , 4s4p 5 , 4s 2 4p 3 4d, 5d, 5s, 6s, and 5p configurations and a number of levels of the 7s, 4f, and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. The observed level system has been theoretically interpreted by means of Hartree--Fock calculations and least-squares parametric fits. Strong configuration mixings are found between the 4s4p 5 and 4s 2 4p 3 4d configurations, between the 4s 2 4p 3 5p and 4s4p 4 4d configurations, and between the 4s 2 4p 3 4f and 4s4p 4 4d configurations. From the optimized energy-level values, a system of Ritz-type wavelength standards with accuracies varying from 0.0003 to 0.003 A-circle in the range 179--500 A-circle has been determined. The ionization energy as determined from 4s 2 4p 3 ns levels (n = 5-7) is 737 110 +- 200 cm/sup -1/ (91.390 +- 0.025 eV)

  18. Investigation of uranium (VI) adsorption by polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi, S. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasiri, M., E-mail: mnasiri@semnan.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mesbahi, A. [Faculty of Chemical, Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Semnan University, Semnan 35195-363 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khani, M.H. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran, 14395-836 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The adsorbent (polypyrrole) was synthesized by a chemical method using PEG, DBSNa and CTAB as the surfactant. • The solution pH was one of the most important parameters affecting the adsorption of uranium. • The CTAB provided higher removal percentage compared with the other surfactants. • The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir isotherm was 87.72 mg/g. • The pseudo second-order model fitted well with the adsorption kinetic of polypyrrole to uranium. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the adsorption of uranium (VI) ions on the polypyrrole adsorbent. Polypyrrole was synthesized by a chemical method using polyethylene glycol, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the surfactant and iron (III) chloride as an oxidant in the aqueous solution. The effect of various surfactants on the synthesized polymers and their performance as the uranium adsorbent were investigated. Adsorbent properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The effect of different parameters such as pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentrations, adsorbent dose, and the temperature was investigated in the batch system for uranium adsorption process. It has been illustrated that the adsorption equilibrium time is 7 min. The results showed that the Freundlich model had the best agreement and the maximum adsorption capacity of polypyrrole for uranium (VI) was determined 87.72 mg/g from Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the mentioned adsorption process was fast and the kinetic data were fitted to the Pseudo first and second order models. The adsorption kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, the thermodynamic parameters ΔG{sup 0}, ΔH{sup 0} and ΔS{sup 0} showed that the uranium adsorption process by polypyrrole was endothermic and spontaneous.

  19. Chromium(VI) sorption efficiency of acid-activated banana peel over organo-montmorillonite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Anam; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Ok, Yong Sik; Murtaza, Ghulam; Shahid, Muhammad; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Li, Dongwei; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-07-03

    In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont) as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration at a sorbent dose of 4 g L -1 and at 20 ± 1°C in aqueous solutions. In sorption edge experiments, maximum Cr(VI) removal was obtained at pH 3 after 2 hours by AABP and O-mont (88% and 69%). Sorption isotherm data showed that the sorption capacity of AABP was higher than O-mont (15.1 vs. 6.67 mg g -1 , respectively, at pH 4). Freundlich and Langmuir models provided the best fits to describe Cr(VI) sorption onto AABP (R 2 = 0.97) and O-mont (R 2 = 0.96). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy elucidated that for AABP mainly the -OH, -COOH, -NH 2 , and for O-mont intercalated amines and -OH surface functional groups were involved in Cr(VI) sorption. The scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses, although partly, indicate that the (wt. %) proportion of cations (e.g., Ca, Mg) in AABP decreased after Cr(VI) sorption. This may be due to ion exchange of chromite (Cr(III)) (produced from Cr(VI) reduction) with cationic elements in AABP. Also, Cr(VI) desorption (using phosphate solution) from AABP was lower (29%) than that from O-mont (51%) up to the third regeneration cycle. This bench scale comparative study highlights that the utilization of widely available and low-cost acid-activated biomaterials has a greater potential than organo-clays for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous media. However, future studies are warranted to precisely delineate different mechanisms of Cr(VI) sorption/reduction by acid-activated biomaterials and organo-clays.

  20. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  1. Technology-derived storage solutions for stabilizing insulin in extreme weather conditions I: the ViViCap-1 device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Pesach, Gidi; Nagar, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Injectable life-saving drugs should not be exposed to temperatures 30°C/86°F. Frequently, weather conditions exceed these temperature thresholds in many countries. Insulin is to be kept at 4-8°C/~ 39-47°F until use and once opened, is supposed to be stable for up to 31 days at room temperature (exception: 42 days for insulin levemir). Extremely hot or cold external temperature can lead to insulin degradation in a very short time with loss of its glucose-lowering efficacy. Combined chemical and engineering solutions for heat protection are employed in ViViCap-1 for disposable insulin pens. The device works based on vacuum insulation and heat consumption by phase-change material. Laboratory studies with exposure of ViViCap-1 to hot outside conditions were performed to evaluate the device performance. ViViCap-1 keeps insulin at an internal temperature phase-change process and 'recharges' the device for further use. ViViCap-1 performed within its specifications. The small and convenient device maintains the efficacy and safety of using insulin even when carried under hot weather conditions.

  2. U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. Effects of pH, U(VI) concentration and oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Gao; Ziqian Yang; Keliang Shi; Xuefeng Wang; Zhijun Guo; Wangsuo Wu

    2010-01-01

    U(VI) sorption on kaolinite was studied as functions of contact time, pH, U(VI) concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V) by using a batch experimental method. The effects of sulfate and phosphate on U(VI) sorption were also investigated. It was found that the sorption kinetics of U(VI) can be described by a pseudo-second-order model. Potentiometric titrations at variable ionic strengths indicated that the titration curves of kaolinite were not sensitive to ionic strength, and that the pH of the zero net proton charge (pH PZNPC ) was at 6.9. The sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite increased with pH up to 6.5 and reached a plateau at pH >6.5. The presence of phosphate strongly increased U(VI) sorption especially at pH <5.5, which may be due to formation of ternary surface complexes involving phosphate. In contrast, the presence of sulfate did not cause any apparent effect on U(VI) sorption. A double layer model was used to interpret both results of potentiometric titrations and U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. (author)

  3. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of NpO 2+ and PuO 2 2+ by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO 2 O 2+ was rapidly reduced to form NpO 2 + organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO 2 2+ was predominantly reduced to Pu 4+ , resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO 2 2+ and PuO 2 P 2+ in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present

  4. Worldwide Airfield Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Worldwide Airfield Summary contains a selection of climatological data produced by the U.S. Air Force, Air Weather Service. The reports were compiled from dozens...

  5. Annual Meteorological Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Single-year summaries of observations at Weather Bureau and cooperative stations across the United States. Predominantly the single page Form 1066, which includes...

  6. Summary of Research 1997

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, William B.; Cleary, David D.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains summaries of research projects in the Department of Physics. A list of recent publications in also included which consists of conference presentations and publications, books, contributions to books, published jounal papers, technical reports, and thesis abstracts.

  7. Global Climate Summaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Hourly Summaries are simple indicators of observational normals which include climatic data summarizations and frequency distributions. These typically...

  8. Cancer Information Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer-reviewed, evidence-based summaries on topics including adult and pediatric cancer treatment, supportive and palliative care, screening, prevention, genetics, and complementary and alternative medicine. References to published literature are included.

  9. Summaries of poster contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The 10. meeting covered subjects on the application of electron microscopy in numerous fields such as biology and medicine, solid state physics, semiconductor research and production, crystallography, materials science, and chemistry of polymers. 174 summaries of poster contributions are included

  10. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  11. MSIS State Summary Datamarts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page provides background needed to take advantage of the capabilities of the MSIS State Summary Datamart. This mart allows the user to develop high-level...

  12. Summary of blog

    CERN Document Server

    Reader, Capitol

    2013-01-01

    This ebook consists of a summary of the ideas, viewpoints and facts presented by Hugh Hewitt in his book "Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation that's Changing Your World". This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case Hugh Hewitt's book.Hewitt argues that blogs have an important potential and he believes that it would be a dreadful mistake to avoid their power.

  13. Site environmental report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment

  14. Comparative EXAFS study of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) sorption onto kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Reich, Ta.; Jermolajev, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: We investigated the surface sorption process of U(VI) and Np(V) on kaolinite by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 10 μM concentration range. Batch experiments with kaolinite in CO 2 -equilibrated systems showed that the adsorption edge of U(VI) occurs at pH 5.5, i.e., near the pH PZC of kaolinite. The adsorption edge of Np(V) occurs well above the pH PZC value at pH 8.5. This may indicate that the bonds between Np(V) and the surface functional groups of kaolinite are not as strong as in the case of U(VI). U(VI) and Np(V) have in common that the amount which is adsorbed decreases when the pH is increased beyond the absorption maximum. This behavior can be attributed to the formation of U(VI) and Np(V) carbonato complexes in the aqueous solutions. The aim of this comparative EXAFS study was to investigate the reason for the different affinities of U(VI) and Np(V) for kaolinite by measuring their local environments at the clay surface. Samples were prepared from 4 g/L kaolinite, 0.1 M NaClO 4 , pH 3.0 - 10.5, presence and absence of ambient CO 2 . The U L 3 - and Np L 2 -edge EXAFS spectra of the wet paste samples were measured at room temperature in fluorescence mode at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured U-O and U-Al/Si distances indicate inner-sphere sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite. There was no evidence of uranium neighbors in the EXAFS spectra, suggesting that the adsorbed U(VI) complexes were predominantly monomeric. The average distance between uranium and its equatorial oxygen atoms, O eq , increased from 2.32 to 2.38 Angstrom in the presence of atmospheric CO 2 when the pH was increased from 5.0 to 8.5. In the CO 2 -free system, the U-O eq distance was independent from pH and equal to 2.32 Angstrom. The lengthening of the average U-O eq distance in the presence of carbonate (or bicarbonate) suggests the formation of ternary U(VI

  15. Effect of the gamma irradiation on the bio-sorption of Cr (Vi) by orange peel;Efecto de la irradiacion gamma en la biosorcion de Cr(VI) por cascara de naranja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo L, V.; Barrera D, C. E.; Sanchez M, V. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Urena N, F., E-mail: violelugol@yahoo.e [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The orange peel (Citrus sp.) is a bioadsorbent that contains functional groups able to remove Cr (Vi). To study the effect of gamma irradiation in the sorption capacity, the Nn materials were irradiated with gamma rays using a Co{sup 60} source to dose from 10 to 3500 KGy (Nlgamma). The biomass irradiation with gamma rays was successful since it increased the hexavalent chromium removal obtaining a maximum removal percentage of 100%. Sorption isotherms were realized to determine the concentration effect of initial Cr (Vi), the ph effect of the solution and the relationship m/v. (Author)

  16. Salivary carbonic anhydrase VI and its relation to salivary flow rate and buffer capacity in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Jyrki; Laine, Merja; Parkkila, Seppo; Rajaniemi, Hannu

    2003-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that pregnancy may have unfavourable effects on oral health. The pH and buffer capacity (BC) of paraffin-stimulated saliva, for example, have been found to decrease towards late pregnancy. Salivary carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI) probably protects the teeth by accelerating the neutralization of hydrogen ions in the enamel pellicle on dental surfaces. Since estrogens and androgens are known to regulate CA expression in some tissues, we studied here whether salivary CA VI concentration shows pregnancy-related changes. Paraffin-stimulated salivary samples were collected from nine pregnant women 1 month before delivery and about 2 months afterwards and assayed for salivary CA VI concentration, BC and flow rate. The enzyme concentration was determined using a specific time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. The control group consisted of 17 healthy non-pregnant women. The results indicated that salivary CA VI levels varied markedly among individuals, but no significant differences in mean concentrations were seen between the samples collected during late pregnancy and postpartum. BC values were lower during pregnancy, however. Our findings suggest that CA VI secretion is not significantly affected by the hormonal alterations associated with pregnancy, and confirm the earlier reports that CA VI is not involved in the regulation of actual salivary BC.

  17. Behaviour of chromium(VI) in stormwater soil infiltration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Ingvertsen, Simon T.; Jensen, Marina B.

    2013-01-01

    mm in 2 h) and extreme (100 mm in 3 h) rain events. The objectives were to understand the behaviour of the anionic and toxic Cr(VI) in soil at neutral pH and to asses treatment efficiency towards Cr(VI). During normal rain events Cr(VI) was largely retained (more than 50, even though pH was neutral......The ability of stormwater infiltration systems to retain Cr(VI) was tested by applying a synthetic stormwater runoff solution with a neutral pH and high Cr(VI) concentrations to four intact soil columns excavated from two roadside infiltration swales in Germany. Inlet flow rates mimicked normal (10......, while under extreme rain events approximately 20% of Cr(VI) was retained. In both cases effluent concentrations of Cr(VI) would exceed the threshold value of 3.4 mu g/L if the infiltrated water were introduced to freshwater environments. More knowledge on the composition of the stormwater runoff...

  18. Electrochemical alkaline Fe(VI) water purification and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Yu, Xingwen

    2005-10-15

    Fe(VI) is an unusual and strongly oxidizing form of iron, which provides a potentially less hazardous water-purifying agent than chlorine. A novel on-line electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification methodology is introduced. Fe(VI) addition had been a barrier to its effective use in water remediation, because solid Fe(VI) salts require complex (costly) syntheses steps and solutions of Fe(VI) decompose. Online electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification avoids these limitations, in which Fe(VI) is directly prepared in solution from an iron anode as the FeO42- ion, and is added to the contaminant stream. Added FeO42- decomposes, by oxidizing a wide range of water contaminants including sulfides (demonstrated in this study) and other sulfur-containing compounds, cyanides (demonstrated in this study), arsenic (demonstrated in this study), ammonia and other nitrogen-containing compounds (previously demonstrated), a wide range of organics (phenol demonstrated in this study), algae, and viruses (each previously demonstrated).

  19. Density functional study of uranyl (VI) amidoxime complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi Fang-Ting; Xiong Jie; Hu Sheng; Xia Xiu-Long; Wang Xiao-Lin; Li Peng; Gao Tao

    2012-01-01

    Uranyl (VI) amidoxime complexes are investigated using relativistic density functional theory. The equilibrium structures, bond orders, and Mulliken populations of the complexes have been systematically investigated under a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Comparison of (acet) uranyl amidoxime complexes ([UO 2 (AO) n ] 2−n , 1 ≤ n ≤ 4) with available experimental data shows an excellent agreement. In addition, the U−O(1), U−O(3), C(1)−N(2), and C(3)−N(4) bond lengths of [UO 2 (CH 3 AO) 4 ] 2− are longer than experimental data by about 0.088, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.056 Å. The angles of N(3)−O(3)−U, O(2)−N(1)−C(1), N(3)−C(3)−N(4), N(4)−C(3)−C(4), and C(4)−C(3)−N(3) are different from each other, which is due to existing interaction between oxygen in uranyl and hydrogen in amino group. This interaction is found to be intra-molecular hydrogen bond. Studies on the bond orders, Mulliken charges, and Mulliken populations demonstrate that uranyl oxo group functions as hydrogen-bond acceptors and H atoms in ligands act as hydrogen-bond donors forming hydrogen bonds within the complex

  20. National stakeholder workshop summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This is a summary of the plenary sessions and small group discussion sessions from the fourth National Stakeholder Workshop sponsored by the DOE Office of Worker and Community Transition held in Atlanta, Georgia on March 13--15, 1996. Topics of the sessions included work force planning and restructuring, worker participation in health and safety, review of actions and commitments, lessons learned in collective bargaining agreements, work force restructuring guidance, work force planning, update on community transition activities. Also included are appendices listing the participants and DOE contacts.

  1. Effective Adsorption/Reduction of Cr(VI) Oxyanion by Halloysite@Polyaniline Hybrid Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianzhu; Li, Cuiping; Jin, Huiling; Lian, Yangyang; Han, Wenmei

    2017-02-22

    Halloysite@polyaniline (HA@PANI) hybrid nanotubes are synthesized by the in situ chemical polymerization of aniline on halloysite clay nanotubes. By facilely tuning the dopant acid, pH, and apparent weight proportion for aniline (ANI) and halloysite (HA) nanotubes in the synthesis process, PANI with tuned oxidation state, doping extent, and content are in situ growing on halloysite nanotubes. The reaction system's acidity is tuned by dopant acid, such as HCl, H 2 SO 4 , HNO 3 , and H 3 PO 4 . The adsorption result shows the fabricated HA@PANI hybrid nanotubes can effectively adsorb Cr(VI) oxyanion and the adsorption ability changes according to the dopant acid, pH, and apparent weight proportion for ANI and HA in the synthesis process. Among them, the HA@PANI fabricated with HCl as dopant acid tuning the pH at 0.5 and 204% apparent weight proportion for ANI and HA (HP/0.5/204%-HCl) shows the highest adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity is in accordance well with the doping extent of PANI in HA@PANI. Furthermore, when HP/0.5/204%-HCl is redoped with HNO 3 , H 2 SO 4 , and H 3 PO 4 , the adsorption capacity declines, implying the dopant acid in the process of redoping exhibits a marked effect on Cr(VI) oxyanion adsorption for the HA@PANI hybrid nanotubes. HP/0.5/204%-HCl and HP/0.5/204%-H 3 PO 4 have demonstrated good regenerability with an above 80% removal ratio after four cycles. Moreover, the HA@PANI adsorbent has better sedimentation ability than that of pure PANI. The adsorption behavior is in good agreement with Langmuir and pseudo second-order equations, indicating the adsorption of HA@PANI for Cr(VI) oxyanion is chemical adsorption. FT-IR and XPS of HA@PANI after Cr(VI) oxyanion adsorption indicate that the doped amine/imine groups (-NH + /═N + - groups) are the main adsorption sites for the removal of Cr(VI) oxyanion by electrostatic adsorption and reduction of the adsorbed Cr (VI) oxyanion to Cr(III) simultaneously.

  2. Spectrophotometric Quantification of Toxicologically Relevant Concentrations of Chromium(VI in Cosmetic Pigments and Eyeshadow Using Synthetic Lachrymal Fluid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wurster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium(VI salts are possible contaminants of the chromium(III pigments used as colorants in eyeshadow preparations. The use of products containing these contaminants poses acute risks for sensitization and contact allergies. Chromium(VI compounds are also classified as carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 1. An analytical method to analyse trace levels of chromium(VI in eyeshadow was developed in this study. The method is based on an extraction of the chromium(VI from the sample using a maximum extraction with alkali and additionally with synthetic lachrymal fluid to simulate physiological conditions. Following derivatization with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide, the extracted chromium(VI is then quantified by spectrophotometry (540 nm. Validation tests indicated a method standard deviation (inter- and intraday of 8.7% and a linear range up to 25 mg/kg. The average recovery was 107.9%, and the detection limit was 2.7 mg/kg. The applicability of the procedure was confirmed by the analysis of pigments and authentic eyeshadow matrices.

  3. The reduction of plutonium (IV) and neptunium (VI) ions by N,N-ethyl (hydroxyethyl) hydroxylamine in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltunov, V.S.; Baranov, S.M.; Mezhov, E.A.; Taylor, R.J.; May, I.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of the reduction of neptunium (VI) and plutonium (IV) ions in nitric acid solution by a new rapid salt free reductant, N,N-ethyl (hydroxyethyl) hydroxylamine, have been studied and rate equations determined. Under equivalent conditions, both Np(VI) and Pu(IV) are reduced faster than by the related reagent, N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine, and it is suggested that this is due to the introduction of the hydroxy group into the reductant molecule. Possible reaction mechanisms have been suggested to account for the observed reaction stoichiometry. (orig.)

  4. Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesch, Benjamin; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the second iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi), a set theoretical visual analytics dashboard of big social data. In order to further demonstrate its usefulness in large-scale visual analytics tasks of individual and collective behavior of actors in social networks......, the current iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) in version II builds on recent advancements in visualizing set intersections. The development of the SoSeVi dashboard involved cutting-edge open source visual analytics libraries (D3.js) and creation of new visualizations such as of actor mobility...

  5. Wavelengths and energy levels of I V and I VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, V.; Sugar, J.; Joshi, Y.N.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of iodine were photographed in the 139--1500-Aat;O region on various spectrographs. Earlier analyses of I V and I VI were revised and extended. For I V 26 lines were classified, and for I VI 35 lines were classified. Ionization energies have been estimated to be 415 510 atm≅ 300 cm -1 (51.52 atm≅ 0.04 eV) and 599 800 atm≅ 3 000 cm -1 (74.37 atm≅ 0.37 eV) for I V and I VI, respectively

  6. Uranium(VI) and ruthenium extraction by dialkyldithio-phosphoric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, R.; Musikas, C.

    1980-01-01

    Oxygen donors like dialkylphosphoric acids are good extractants for actinide ions, but little is known about their sulfur homologs. Investigations of U(VI) and Ru extraction from various aqueous media are reported. This includes extraction of U(VI) from nitric, perchloric, and phosphoric acids by solutions of dialkyldithiophosphoric acids in dodecane or benzene. Extraction of U(VI) by synergistic mixtures, of which at least one of the components is a sulfur donor, has been investigated. The extracted species have been identified, and a comparison with the complexes obtained by extraction with the homologous oxygen donors is made. The sulfur-actinide bond is weaker than the oxygen-actinide one, but in some synergistic extractions the dialkyldithiophosphonates are more efficient than the oxygen donors. In addition to size effects, this behavior could be attributed to the weakness of the hydrogen bonds of the SH groups, which allows a greater variety of the ligands to enter the coordination sphere of the metal. Ruthenium, like the d-transition elements, gives strong bonds with the sulfur donors. However, its extraction from nitric acid is slow. We investigated the influence of several parameters on the distribution coefficients and found that the presence of a reagent which destroys nitrous ions is necessary to achieve quantitative extraction. The role of RuNO groups is also discussed

  7. Isolation and characterization of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M.; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2013-06-01

    The nature and extent of covalency in uranium bonding is still unclear compared with that of transition metals, and there is great interest in studying uranium-ligand multiple bonds. Although U=O and U=NR double bonds (where R is an alkyl group) are well-known analogues to transition-metal oxo and imido complexes, the uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond has long remained a synthetic target in actinide chemistry. Here, we report the preparation of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond. We highlight the importance of (1) ancillary ligand design, (2) employing mild redox reactions instead of harsh photochemical methods that decompose transiently formed uranium(VI) nitrides, (3) an electrostatically stabilizing sodium ion during nitride installation, (4) selecting the right sodium sequestering reagent, (5) inner versus outer sphere oxidation and (6) stability with respect to the uranium oxidation state. Computational analyses suggest covalent contributions to U≡N triple bonds that are surprisingly comparable to those of their group 6 transition-metal nitride counterparts.

  8. Removal of Cr(VI from Aqueous Solutions Using mino-fuctionalized Nanoporous MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Ghorbani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An amino-functionalized nanoporous material was prepared by grafting 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS group onto MCM-41. The as-synthesized material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements (BET, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR to confirm the ordered mesoporous structure and the functionalization of the amino group. The NH2-MCM-41 thus obtained was employed as the sorbent to remove Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption process was carried out to evaluate the effects of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, metal ion concentration, and temperature. Results revealed that removal efficiency increased to a maximum of 124 mg.g‒1 and metal uptake decreased (0.1 g.l‒1 with increasing sorbent dosage from 0.1 to 3.5 g.l‒1. A reverse trend was, however, observed with increasing Cr(VI concentration. It was also found that a pH equal to 3 was the optimum level for the removal of Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions. Thermodynamic examinations revealed the strong dependence of the adsorption process on temperature such that adsorption capacity increased with increasing temperature, indicating the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the adsorption process.

  9. Overview and summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The ITER Physics Basis presents and evaluates the physics rules and methodologies for plasma performance projections, which provide the basis for the design of a tokamak burning plasma device whose goal is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. This Chapter summarizes the physics basis for burning plasma projections, which is developed in detail by the ITER Physics Expert Groups in subsequent chapters. To set context, the design guidelines and requirements established in the report of ITER Special Working Group 1 are presented, as are the specifics of the tokamak design developed in the Final Design Report of the ITER Engineering Design Activities, which exemplifies burning tokamak plasma experiments. The behaviour of a tokamak plasma is determined by the interaction of many diverse physics processes, all of which bear on projections for both a burning plasma experiment and an eventual tokamak reactor. Key processes summarized here are energy and particle confinement and the H-mode power threshold; MHD stability, including pressure and density limits, neoclassical islands, error fields, disruptions, sawteeth, and ELMs; power and particle exhaust, involving divertor power dispersal, helium exhaust, fuelling and density control, H-mode edge transition region, erosion of plasma facing components, tritium retention; energetic particle physics; auxiliary power physics; and the physics of plasma diagnostics. Summaries of projection methodologies, together with estimates of their attendant uncertainties, are presented in each of these areas. Since each physics element has its own scaling properties, an integrated experimental demonstration of the balance between the combined processes which obtains in a reactor plasma is inaccessible to contemporary experimental facilities: it requires a reactor scale device. It is argued, moreover, that a burning plasma experiment can be sufficiently flexible to permit

  10. Correlation between bulk- and surface chemistry of Cr-tanned leather and the release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S., E-mail: yolanda@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Lidén, Carola, E-mail: carola.liden@ki.se [Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Odnevall Wallinder, Inger, E-mail: ingero@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Released reducing/complexing leather-specific species can reduce released Cr(VI). • No co-released species enable the formation of Cr(VI) in solution. • The major Cr species released from leather in phosphate buffer was Cr(III) (>82%). • No Cr(VI) was released into artificial sweat. - Abstract: About 1–3% of the adult general population in Europe is allergic to chromium (Cr). The assessment of the potential release of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from leather is hence important from a human health and environmental risk perspective. The Cr(VI) content in leather was recently restricted in the European Union. The aim of this study was to assess possible correlations between the bulk and surface chemistry of leather, released Cr(III) and Cr(VI), and capacities of co-released leather specific species to reduce and complex released Cr. Four differently tanned leathers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and the diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method. Their characteristics were compared with results on Cr(III) and Cr(VI) release into artificial sweat (ASW, pH < 6.5) and phosphate buffer (PB, pH 7.5–8.0), measured by means of spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Co-released leather-specific species were shown to reduce Cr(VI), both in ASW and in PB. Their reduction capacities correlated with findings of the surface content of Cr and of released Cr. Leather samples without this capacity, and with less aromatic surface groups visible by ATR-FTIR, revealed Cr(VI) both at the surface and in solution (PB)

  11. Overview of the contents of ENDF/B-VI [Evaluated Nuclear Data File

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, C.L.; Pearlstein, S.

    1989-01-01

    The sixth release of the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF/B-VI) is now being prepared for general distribution. This data file serves as the primary source of nuclear data for nuclear applications in the United States and Canada and in many other countries of the world. The data library is maintained and distributed by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory from evaluations provided by members of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). Unlike its predecessor, ENDF/B-V, this file will be available to all requesters without restrictions. Compared to ENDF/B-V, released more than 11 yr ago, the ENDF/B-VI data library contains significant improvements for both fission and fusion reaction design. Future work will continue with limited staffing and foreign cooperation to provide the data needed for future nuclear applications

  12. Sorption of chromium(VI) and chromium(III) on aluminium hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that influence the sorption of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) on aluminium hydroxide were investigated. The sorption of chromates decreases as the pH of the suspension increases. The mechanism of CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption was interpreted in terms of reactions between chromates and -OH and/or Hsub(2)O groups at the hydroxide/liquid interface. It was shown that chromates are more tightly sorbed on aluminium hydroxide compared to other anions, e.g. chlorides. On the other hand, specifically absorbed anions, such as molybdates, compete strongly with chromates for the sorption sites. The sorption of chromium(III) increases with the pH of the suspension. Also, the sorption of chromium(III) is suppressed in the presence of citrate ions. The best conditions for the fixation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by aluminium hydroxide are presented. (author)

  13. Wind tunnel test of musi VI bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permata, Robby; Andika, Matza Gusto; Syariefatunnisa, Risdhiawan, Eri; Hermawan, Budi; Noordiana, Indra

    2017-11-01

    Musi VI Bridge is planned to cross the Musi River in Palembang City, South Sumatera Province, Indonesia. The main span is a steel arch type with 200 m length and side span length is 75 m. Finite element analysis results showed that the bridge has frequency ratio for torsional and heaving mode (torsional frequency/heaving frequency)=1.14. This close to unity value rises concern about aerodynamic behaviour and stability of the bridge deck under wind loading. Sectional static and free vibration wind tunnel test were performed to clarify this phenomena in B2TA3 facility in Serpong, Indonesia. The test followed the draft of Guide of Wind Tunnel Test for Bridges developed by Indonesian Ministry of Public Works. Results from wind tunnel testing show that the bridge is safe from flutter instability and no coupled motion vibration observed. Therefore, low value of frequency ratio has no effect to aerodynamic behaviour of the bridge deck. Vortex-induced vibration in heaving mode occurred in relatively low wind velocity with permissible maximum amplitude value.

  14. Separation of Rhenium (VII) from Tungsten (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.; Lukic, D.; Stoiljkovic, M.; Milosevic, M.; Orlic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Examined were the conditions for an effective separation of tungsten (VI) and rhenium (VII) on alumina if the solution of 0.20 mol dm -3 NaCl, ph=2.6 is used as the aqueous phase. Under the given experimental conditions alumina was found to be much better adsorbent for tungsten than for rhenium. The breakthrough and saturation capacities of alumina at pH=2 are 24 and 78 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 , respectively. With the increase of pH these values decrease. So, at pH=6 they are only 4 and 13 mg W/g Al 2 O 3 respectively. The elution volume for rhenium for the given column dimensions and quantity of the adsorbent is about 16 ml. These results were confirmed by the experiments of the radiological separations. Tungsten-187 remains firmly bound to the alumina. The radionuclide purity of the eluted 186'188 Re at pH=2 is very high. (authors)

  15. VIM: Initial ENDF/B-VI experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    The VIM Monte Carlo particle transport code uses detailed continuous-energy cross sections produced from ENDF/B data by a set of specialized codes developed or adapted for use at Argonne National Laboratory. ENDF/B-IV data were used until about 1979, and Version V data since then. These VIM libraries were extensively benchmarked against the MC 2 -2 code and against ZPR and ZPPR criticals for fast spectrum calculations, as well as other fast and thermal experiments and calculations. Recently, the cross section processing codes have been upgraded to accommodate ENDF/B-VI files, and a small library has been tested. Several fundamental tasks comprise the construction of a faithful representation of ENDF data for VIM calculations: (1) The resolved resonance parameters are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous-energy cross sections with energy grids suitable for linear-linear interpolation. (2) The unresolved resonance parameter distributions are sampled to produce many (40-400) resonance ladders in each energy band. These are converted to Doppler-broadened continuous energy resonance cross sections that are then binned by cross section, accumulating ladders until statistical convergence, the result being probability tables of total cross sections and conditional mean scattering and fission cross sections. VIM samples these tables at run time, and File 3 back ground cross sections are added. (3) Anisotropic angular distribution data are converted to angular probability tables. All other ENDF data are unmodified, except for format

  16. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50's structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG's charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure

  17. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers; Bilan 2007 des changements climatiques: l'attenuation des changements climatiques. Contribution du Groupe de travail 3 au quatrieme rapport d'evaluation du Groupe d'Experts Intergouvernemental sur l'Evolution du Climat (GIEC). Resume a l'attention des decideurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, T.; Bashmakov, I.; Bernstein, L.; Bogner, J.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Davidson, O.; Fisher, B.; Grubb, M.; Gupta, S.; Halsnaes, K.; Heij, B.; Kahn Ribeiro, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Levine, M.; Martino, D.; Masera Cerutti, O.; Metz, B.; Meyer, L.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Najam, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Holger Rogner, H.; Roy, J.; Sathaye, J.; Schock, R.; Shukla, P.; Sims, R.; Smith, P.; Swart, R.; Tirpak, D.; Urge-Vorsatz, D.; Dadi, Z

    2007-07-01

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO{sub 2} Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  18. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers; Bilan 2007 des changements climatiques: l'attenuation des changements climatiques. Contribution du Groupe de travail 3 au quatrieme rapport d'evaluation du Groupe d'Experts Intergouvernemental sur l'Evolution du Climat (GIEC). Resume a l'attention des decideurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, T; Bashmakov, I; Bernstein, L; Bogner, J; Bosch, P; Dave, R; Davidson, O; Fisher, B; Grubb, M; Gupta, S; Halsnaes, K; Heij, B; Kahn Ribeiro, S; Kobayashi, S; Levine, M; Martino, D; Masera Cerutti, O; Metz, B; Meyer, L; Nabuurs, G J; Najam, A; Nakicenovic, N; Holger Rogner, H; Roy, J; Sathaye, J; Schock, R; Shukla, P; Sims, R; Smith, P; Swart, R; Tirpak, D; Urge-Vorsatz, D; Dadi, Z

    2007-07-01

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO{sub 2} Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  19. Research reactor utilization. Summary reports of three study group meetings: Irradiation techniques at research reactors, held in Istanbul 15-19 November 1965; Research reactor operation and maintenance problems, held in Caracas 6-10 December 1965; and Research reactor utilization in the Far East, held in Lucas Heights 28 February - 4 March 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The three sections of this book, which are summary reports of three Study Group meetings of the IAEA: Irradiation techniques at research reactors, Istanbul, 15-19 November 1965; Research reactor operation and maintenance problems, Caracas, 6-10 December 1965; and Research reactor utilization in the Far East, Lucas Heights, Australia, 28 February - 4 March 1966. These meetings were the latest in a series designed to promote efficient utilization of research reactors, to disseminate information on advances in techniques, to discuss common problems in reactor operations, and to outline some advanced areas of reactor-based research. (author)

  20. Indexing for summary queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Ke; Wang, Lu; Wei, Zhewei

    2014-01-01

    ), of a particular attribute of these records. Aggregation queries are especially useful in business intelligence and data analysis applications where users are interested not in the actual records, but some statistics of them. They can also be executed much more efficiently than reporting queries, by embedding...... returned by reporting queries. In this article, we design indexing techniques that allow for extracting a statistical summary of all the records in the query. The summaries we support include frequent items, quantiles, and various sketches, all of which are of central importance in massive data analysis....... Our indexes require linear space and extract a summary with the optimal or near-optimal query cost. We illustrate the efficiency and usefulness of our designs through extensive experiments and a system demonstration....

  1. Extraction behavior of uranium(VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingchia Huang; Donghwang Chen; Muchang Shieh; Chingtsven Huang

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution with polyether-based polyurethane (PU) foam was studied. The effects of the kinds and concentrations of nitrate salts, uranium(VI) concentration, temperature, nitric acid concentration, pH, the content of poly(ethylene oxide) in the polyurethane foam, and the ratio of PU foam weight and solution volume on the extraction of uranium(VI) were investigated. The interferences of fluoride and carbonate ions on the extraction of uranium(VI) were also examined, and methods to overcome both interferences were suggested. It was found that no uranium was extracted in the absence of a nitrate salting-out agent, and the extraction behaviors of uranium(IV) with polyurethane foam could be explained in terms of an etherlike solvent extraction mechanism. In addition, the percentage extraction of a multiple stage was also estimated theoretically

  2. BEHA VI OUR OF TOPI IN A SHADELESS ENVIRONMENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BEHA VI OUR OF TOPI IN A SHADELESS ENVIRONMENT ... one population for signs of behavioural adaptiveness in the species' environmental relation- .... The major change is obviously in the proportion of topi which had their heads up, as.

  3. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  4. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-01-01

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel and the UO 2+x , in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO 2 2+ polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO 2+x , to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements

  5. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, El-Maraghy B.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO 4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  6. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, E M.B. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Education

    1980-08-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO/sub 4/ and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible.

  7. Potentiometric studies on quaternary complexes of dioxouranium(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Vinod; Chaturvedi, G K [Agra Coll., (India). Chemical Laboratories

    1979-10-01

    The formation of quaternary complexes of dioxouranium(VI) with three different organic acids (OX, MALN and SA, SSA, TAR or TMA) has been inferred from the potentiometric studies. The formation constants for the resulting triligand complexes have been evaluated.

  8. Approaches to surface complexation modeling of Uranium(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.A.; Meece, D.E.; Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    surface functional groups available for adsorption in the surface coatings; 2) the electric field at the mineral-water interface; and 3) surface reactions of major ions in the aqueous phase, such as Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, SO42-, H4SiO4, and organic acids. In contrast, a semi-empirical surface complexation modeling approach can be used to describe the U(VI) experimental data more precisely as a function of aqueous chemical conditions. This approach is useful as a tool to describe the variation in U(VI) retardation as a function of chemical conditions in field-scale reactive transport simulations, and the approach can be used at other field sites. However, the semi-empirical approach is limited by the site-specific nature of the model parameters. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. MIV Project: Executive Summary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzotti, Mariolina T.; Jørgensen, John Leif; Neefs, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a reference mission scenario was defined. This report gives an executive summary of the achievements and results from the project.......Under the ESA contract #11453/95/NL/JG(SC), aiming at assessing the feasibility of Rendez-vous and docking of unmanned spacecrafts, a reference mission scenario was defined. This report gives an executive summary of the achievements and results from the project....

  10. strong>Hvad skal vi med en hjerne?strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Judy

    2009-01-01

    neurologen Antonio Damasio, at sikre vores overlevelse og velbefindende (i nævnte rækkefølge). Vi ved, at der findes såkaldte belønningsstrukturer i hjernen på både dyr og mennesker, som aktiverer følelser af velbehag, når vi gør "det rigtige", dvs. noget der er godt for os. Men hvordan de mere konkret...

  11. Extraction of uranium (VI) sulphate complexes by Adogen amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyamani, I S; Abd Elmessieh, E N [Nuclear chemistry department, hot laboratories center, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The distribution of U(VI) between aqueous H{sub 2} So{sub 4} solutions and organic phases of adogen-368 has been described. The dependence of extraction on acidity, diluent type, metal and extractant concentrations was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism is discussed in the light of results obtained. The separation of U(VI) from rare earths is suggested. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization by novel carbonaceous modified magnetic Fe_3O_4/halloysite nanohybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Xike; Wang, Weiwei; Tian, Na; Zhou, Chaoxin; Yang, Chao; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel magnetic nonohybrids (Fe_3O_4/HNTs@C) were synthesized for Cr(VI) removal. • Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) by Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles and hydroxyl groups. • Cr ions were attached on Fe_3O_4/HNTs@C by ion exchange and coordination interaction. - Abstract: In this work, a novel “Dumbbell-like” magnetic Fe_3O_4/Halloysite nanohybrid (Fe_3O_4/HNTs@C) with oxygen-containing organic group grafting on the surface of natural halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and homogeneous Fe_3O_4 nanospheres selectively aggregating at the tips of modified halloysite nanotubes was successfully synthesized. XRD, TEM, IR spectroscopy, XPS and VSM were used to characterize this newly halloysite nanohybrid and its formation mechanism was discussed. Cr(VI) ions adsorption experiments showed that the Fe_3O_4/halloysite nanohybrid exhibited higher adsorption ability with a maximum adsorption capacity of 132 mg/L at 303 K, which is about 100 times higher than that of unmodified halloysite nanotubes. More importantly, with the reduction of Fe_3O_4 and electron–donor effect of oxygen-containing organic groups, Cr(VI) ions were easily reduced into low toxicity Cr(III) and then adsorbed onto the surface of halloysite nanohybrid. In addition, appreciable magnetization was observed due to the aggregation of magnetite nanoparticles, which make adsorbent facility separated from aqueous solutions after Cr pollution adsorption.

  13. The calculational VVER burnup Credit Benchmark No.3 results with the ENDF/B-VI rev.5 (1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gual, Maritza [Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: mrgual@ctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this papers to present the results of CB3 phase of the VVER calculational benchmark with the recent evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI Rev.5 (1999). This results are compared with the obtained from the other participants in the calculations (Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Slovaquia, Spain and the United Kingdom). The phase (CB3) of the VVER calculation benchmark is similar to the Phase II-A of the OECD/NEA/INSC BUC Working Group benchmark for PWR. The cases without burnup profile (BP) were performed with the WIMS/D-4 code. The rest of the cases have been carried with DOTIII discrete ordinates code. The neutron library used was the ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999). The WIMS/D-4 (69 groups) is used to collapse cross sections from the ENDF/B-VI Rev. 5 (1999) to 36 groups working library for 2-D calculations. This work also comprises the results of CB1 (obtained with ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999), too) and CB3 for cases with Burnup of 30 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 and 5 years and for case with Burnup of 40 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 year. (author)

  14. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University. 10555 West Flagler St. Suite 2100, Miami Fl 33175 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10{sup 6} cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO{sub 3}{sup -}] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell

  15. Investigation on Microbial Dissolution of Uranium (VI) from Autunite Mineral - 13421

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda, Paola; Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel

    2013-01-01

    Precipitating autunite minerals by polyphosphate injection was identified as a feasible remediation strategy for sequestering uranium in contaminated groundwater and soil in situ at the Hanford Site. Autunite stability under vadose and saturated zone environmental conditions can help to determine the long-term effectiveness of this remediation strategy. The Arthrobacter bacteria are one of the most common groups in soils and are found in large numbers in Hanford soil as well as other subsurface environments contaminated with radionuclides. Ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, these bacteria can play a significant role in the dissolution of minerals and the formation of secondary minerals. The main objective of this investigation was to study the bacterial interactions under oxidizing conditions with uranium (VI); study the potential role of bicarbonate, which is an integral complexing ligand for U(VI) and a major ion in groundwater compositions; and present data from autunite dissolution experiments using Arthrobacter strain G968, a less U(VI)-tolerant strain. Sterile 100 mL glass mixed reactors served as the major bioreactor for initial experimentation. These autunite-containing bioreactors were injected with bacterial cells after the autunite equilibrated with the media solution amended with 0 mM, 3 mM 5 mM and 10 mM concentrations of bicarbonate. G968 Arthrobacter cells in the amount of 10 6 cells/mL were injected into the reactors after 27 days, giving time for the autunite to reach steady state. Abiotic non-carbonate controls were kept without bacterial inoculation to provide a control for the biotic samples. Samples of the solution were analyzed for dissolved U(VI) by means of kinetic phosphorescence analyzer KPA-11 (Chemcheck Instruments, Richland, WA). Analysis showed that as [HCO 3 - ] increases, a diminishing trend on the effect of bacteria on autunite leaching is observed. Viability of cells was conducted after 24 hours of cell incubation with

  16. Electronic structure, fluorescence and photochemistry of the uranyl ion, and comparison with octahedral uranium (VI), ruthenyl (VI), rhenium (V) and osmium (VI) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, C K [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland)

    1977-01-01

    The highly anisotropic uranyl complexes (with very short U-O distances and very long distances to the ligating atoms in the equatorial plane) are compared with trans-dioxo complexes of 4d/sup 2/Ru(VI) and 5d/sup 2/Re(V) and Os(VI). A major difference is the low-lying empty 5f orbitals, and the first excited state is highly oxidizing, and sufficiently long-lived to abstract hydrogen atoms from most organic molecules. It is argued that even the low concentrations of uranyl carbonate present in sea water is excited by solar radiation roughly every 10 minutes. Octahedral U(VI)O/sub 6/ in perovskites and UF/sub 6/ are also discussed, as well as trans-lawrencium chemistry.

  17. Atomic Structure of Type VI Contractile Sheath from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Osman; He, Shaoda; Planamente, Sara; Stach, Lasse; MacDonald, James T; Manoli, Eleni; Scheres, Sjors H W; Filloux, Alain; Freemont, Paul S

    2018-02-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs), H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS, each belonging to a distinct group. The two T6SS components, TssB/VipA and TssC/VipB, assemble to form tubules that conserve structural/functional homology with tail sheaths of contractile bacteriophages and pyocins. Here, we used cryoelectron microscopy to solve the structure of the H1-T6SS P. aeruginosa TssB1C1 sheath at 3.3 Å resolution. Our structure allowed us to resolve some features of the T6SS sheath that were not resolved in the Vibrio cholerae VipAB and Francisella tularensis IglAB structures. Comparison with sheath structures from other contractile machines, including T4 phage and R-type pyocins, provides a better understanding of how these systems have conserved similar functions/mechanisms despite evolution. We used the P. aeruginosa R2 pyocin as a structural template to build an atomic model of the TssB1C1 sheath in its extended conformation, allowing us to propose a coiled-spring-like mechanism for T6SS sheath contraction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Vi-da: vitiligo diagnostic assistance mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, G. A.; Nurhudatiana, A.; Bahana, R.

    2018-03-01

    Vitiligo is a skin disorder in which white patches of depigmentation appear on different parts of the body. Usually, patients come to hospitals or clinics to have their vitiligo conditions assessed. This can be very tiring to the patients, as vitiligo treatments usually take a relatively long period of time, which can range from months to years. To address this challenge, we present in this paper a prototype of an Android-based mobile application called Vi-DA, which stands for Vitiligo Diagnostic Assistance. Vi-DA consists of three subsystems, which are user sign-up subsystem, camera and image analysis subsystem, and progress report subsystem. The mobile application was developed in Java programming language and uses MySQL as the database system. Vi-DA adopts a vitiligo segmentation algorithm to segment input image into normal skin area, vitiligo skin area, and non-skin area. Results showed that Vi-DA gave comparable results to the previous system implemented in Matlab. User acceptance testing results also showed that all respondents agreed on the usefulness of the system and agreed to use Vi-DA again in the future. Vi-DA benefits both dermatologists and patients as not only a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool but also as a smart application that can be used for self-assessment at home.

  19. Recovery of uranium (VI) from low level aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshrestha, Mukul

    1996-01-01

    Investigation was undertaken to evaluate the uranium (VI) removal and recovery potential of a naturally occurring, nonviable macrofungus, Ganoderma Lucidum from the simulated low level aqueous nuclear waste. These low level waste waters discharged from nuclear mine tailings and nuclear power reactors have a typical U(VI) concentration of 10-100 mg/L. It is possible to recover this uranium economically with the advent of biosorption as a viable technology. Extensive laboratory studies have revealed Ganoderma Lucidum to be a potential biosorbent with a specific uptake of 2.75 mg/g at an equilibrium U(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L at pH 4.5. To recover the sorbed U(VI), the studies indicated 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 to be an effective elutant. The kinetics of U(VI) desorption from loaded Ganoderma Lucidum with 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 as elutant, was found to be rapid with more than 75% recovery occurring in the first five minutes, the specific metal release rate being 0.102 mg/g/min. The equilibrium data fitted to a linearised Freundlich plot and exhibited a near 100% recovery of sorbed U(VI), clearly revealing a cost-effective method of recovery of precious uranium from low level wastewater. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Editorial das organizadoras do VI ENANCIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Maria Arruda Café

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available EDITORIAL A história das idéias, em um determinado campo do conhecimento, se faz por meio de seus cientistas e de suas instituições. Ela torna visível a produção intelectual deste campo, construída por seus atores individuais e coletivos. Neste sentido, o ENANCIB é um elemento-chave neste processo de construção, o momento por excelência da disseminação do conhecimento nesta área. Ele permite a continuidade da história, o desenvolvimento da Ciência da Informação que se faz no Brasil e a coesão de sua comunidade. Por meio de debates, da troca de idéias e de experiências, promovem a construção da identidade deste campo científico, sua visibilidade, a delimitação de suas fronteiras e sua interrelação com outras áreas do conhecimento. O ENANCIB permite, além disso, a construção de novas parcerias científicas e a consolidação dos grupos de trabalho existentes. Este evento vem se estabelecendo, desde 1994, como fundamental para a consolidação e estruturação da área da Ciência da Informação brasileira, influenciando o desenvolvimento dos cursos de pós-graduação do país. Um campo se constrói somente se compreender as especificidades dos processos que atravessam o seu caminho. Em sua evolução, a Ciência da Informação, nos últimos 50 anos, tem se caracterizado pela diversidade de suas abordagens buscando definir a sua essência, por diferentes estudos e teorias. Nestes estudos, inúmeros aportes conceituais vêm sendo apresentados por diferentes pensadores por meio da visão particular de cada um deles. Na realidade, cada um adota uma forma distinta de observar, representar e explicitar a realidade com base na sua visão de mundo. Alguns autores enfatizam os aspectos comunicacionais da Ciência da Informação; outros destacam sua função social; outros, ainda, ressaltam sua forte ligação com as tecnologias. Este número da revista Encontros Bibli traz quatorze artigos apresentados no VI ENANCIB