WorldWideScience

Sample records for group home settings

  1. Autonomy among physically frail older people in nursing home settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    -dimension in the Measure of Actualisation of Potential test. Programmes were based on participants' individual assessment of their most important daily activities. Staff at all nursing homes who usually organize physical training, social or creative activities carried out individually tailored programmes using their usual...... methods and equipment. Participants in each nursing home were divided by lot into either a control group or an intervention group. The control groups received their usual care and treatment. DISCUSSION: This study is designed to assess the status of perceived autonomy at baseline and to provide......BACKGROUND: Experiencing autonomy is recognised to promote health and well-being for all age groups. Perceived lack of control has been found to be detrimental to physical and mental health. There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge elucidating how frail older people in nursing home settings...

  2. Pressure ulcer prevention in care home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael

    2017-03-31

    Pressure ulcer prevention in the care home setting can be challenging and is often compromised by a lack of access to education and resources. There are measures that have been shown to consistently improve outcomes in pressure ulcer prevention including assessment of the patient and their individual risks, delivery of a consistent plan of care that meets patients' needs, and regular evaluation to identify shortfalls. In addition, there should be a robust approach to investigating events that lead to a person developing a pressure ulcer and that information should be used to improve future practice. Pressure ulcer prevention in care homes is achievable and nurses should all be aware of the necessary measures detailed in this article.

  3. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry to measure the effects of a thirteen-week moderate to vigorous aquatic exercise and nutritional education intervention on percent body fat in adults with intellectual disabilities from group home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Amanda; Boyd, Colin; Mackenzie, Sasho; Rasmussen, Roy

    2012-05-01

    People with intellectual disability are more likely to be obese and extremely obese than people without intellectual disability with rates remaining elevated among adults, women and individuals living in community settings. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured the effects of a 13-week aquatic exercise and nutrition intervention on percent body fat in eight adults with intellectual disabilities (aged 41.0 ± 13.7 yrs) of varying fat levels (15%-39%) from two group homes. A moderate to vigorous aquatic exercise program lasted for the duration of 13 weeks with three, one-hour sessions held at a 25m pool each week. Nutritional assistants educated participants as to the importance of food choice and portion size. A two-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test determined the impact of the combined intervention on body fat percentage and BMI at pre and post test. Median body fat percentage (0.8 %) and BMI (0.3 kg/m(2)) decreased following the exercise intervention, but neither were statistically significant, p = .11 and p = .55, respectively. The combined intervention was ineffective at reducing percent body fat in adults with intellectual disability according to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. These results are in agreement with findings from exercise alone interventions and suggest that more stringent nutritional guidelines are needed for this population and especially for individuals living in group home settings. The study did show that adults with intellectual disability may participate in moderate to vigorous physical activity when given the opportunity.

  4. A New Minimal Rough Set Axiom Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jian-hua

    2004-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study, and the purpose is to characterize rough set theory using independable and minimal axiom groups. Thus, rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods. To characterize rough set theory, an axiom group named H consisting of 4 axioms, is proposed. That validity of the axiom group in characterizing rough set theory is reasonable, is proved. Simultaneously, the minimization of the axiom group, which requires that each axiom is an inequality and each is independent, is proved. The axiom group is helpful for researching rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  5. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  6. Home as a health promotion setting for older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, Marianne; Sarvimäki, Anneli; Clancy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    life. Conclusions: Only by taking into consideration the meaning of home and the resources of the individual older person can home function as a true health promoting setting. If health personnel focus solely on risk prevention, they can neglect the perspectives of the older person, resulting in dis...

  7. Home as a health promotion setting for older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahler, Marianne; Sarvimäki, Anneli; Clancy, Anne;

    2014-01-01

    life. Conclusions: Only by taking into consideration the meaning of home and the resources of the individual older person can home function as a true health promoting setting. If health personnel focus solely on risk prevention, they can neglect the perspectives of the older person, resulting in dis-empowerment...

  8. Supreme Court eases restriction on group homes for disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-16

    The Supreme Court ruled, in a six to three decision, that municipalities may not use occupancy limits to bar the establishment of group homes in residential settings if those limits do not apply to families as well. This ruling has made it harder for municipalities to prevent group homes for people with disabilities from locating in single-family neighborhoods. The court held that single-family zoning laws in Edmonds, WA, which forbid occupancy by more than five unrelated people, are not exempt from coverage under the Fair Housing Amendment Act (FHAA) because they do not apply to all people. The case which spurred the court ruling began when the City of Edmonds issued criminal citations against Oxford House-Edmonds, an alcohol and drug addiction treatment group home for ten to twelve adults, for violating the zoning law limiting to five the number of unrelated people allowed to live in a single-family home. The decision establishes a rule for the lower courts that local ordinances are not automatically exempt and must be measured against the anti-discrimination provisions of the Fair Housing Act.

  9. 24 CFR 982.610 - Group home: Who may reside in a group home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disabilities in accordance with 24 CFR part 8. See § 982.316 concerning occupancy by a live-in aide. (c) Except for a live-in aide, all residents of a group home, whether assisted or unassisted, must be elderly... reside in the unit, including assisted and unassisted residents and any live-in aide....

  10. Situated Adult Learning: The Home Education Neighbourhood Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Leslie Safran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Many families who home educate turn to a neighbourhood home education group for support, resources and guidance. The purpose of this paper is to first outline briefly the context of home education in the UK and US, to analyse three different types of home education neighbourhood group as communities of practice and then to theorise how these parents learn some of what it is to be home educators through participation in such groups as members. The analysis is based on evidence from long-term home educating parents collected through thirty-four in-depth interviews and the Community of Practice framework (Wenger, 1998.It will be argued that although communities of practice have variable features depending on the type of neighbourhood home education group a parent joins, they all engage in a form of collective situated life learning which helps transform parents to the point where they become ‘home educators’.

  11. Isodiametric sets in the Heisenberg group

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardi, Gian Paolo; Rigot, Severine; Vittone, Davide

    2010-01-01

    In the sub-Riemannian Heisenberg group equipped with its Carnot-Caratheodory metric and with a Haar measure, we consider isodiametric sets, i.e. sets maximizing the measure among all sets with a given diameter. In particular, given an isodiametric set, and up to negligible sets, we prove that its boundary is given by the graphs of two locally Lipschitz functions. Moreover, in the restricted class of rotationally invariant sets, we give a quite complete characterization of any compact (rotatio...

  12. Does Model Matter? Examining Change across Time for Youth in Group Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Seifert, Heather; Wagner, H. Ryan; Burns, Barbara J.; Murray, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Group homes are a frequently used but controversial treatment setting for youth with mental health problems. Within the relatively sparse literature on group homes, there is some evidence that some models of treatment may be associated with more positive outcomes for youth. This article explores this possibility by examining differences across…

  13. Groups generated by a finite Engel set

    CERN Document Server

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Tortora, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    A subset $S$ of a group $G$ is called an Engel set if, for all $x,y\\in S$, there is a non-negative integer $n=n(x,y)$ such that $[x,\\,_n y]=1$. In this paper we are interested in finding conditions for a group generated by a finite Engel set to be nilpotent. In particular, we focus our investigation on groups generated by an Engel set of size two.

  14. Predictors of home death among palliative cancer patients in a primary care setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Vedsted, Peter;

      Background: In most western countries, the majority of palliative cancer patients wish to die at home, where GPs are often deeply involved. However, most research focuses on specialised palliative care, which results in a lack of reliable predictors of home death in primary care. Aim: To analyse...... predictors of home death among deceased palliative cancer patients in a primary care setting. Methods: Using Danish registers, we identified 787 deceased cancer patients and sent a questionnaire to their GPs. The questions concerned the GPs' involvement and the duration of the palliative period at home. We......-of-hours, and whether the GP had had contact with the relatives. Results: 350 questionnaires were filled out. In the preliminary analysis we found that even though many patients died in hospital, this group spent nearly as much of their last time at home as the patients who actually died at home. The analysis...

  15. Home advantage in soccer--A matter of expectations, goal setting and tactical decisions of coaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufenbiel, Kathrin; Lobinger, Babett; Strauss, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    In soccer, home teams win about 67% of decided games. The causes for this home advantage are still unresolved. There is a shortage of research on the psychological states of actors involved. In this study, we examined soccer coaches' expectations, goal setting and tactical decisions in relation to game location. Soccer coaches (N = 297) with different expertise levels participated in an experimental, online management game and were randomly assigned to one of two groups, "home game (HG)" or "away game." Participants received information on the game for which they were asked to make decisions in multiple points. The only differing information between groups was game location. Regardless of expertise, HG coaches had higher expectations to win, set more challenging goals and decided for more offensive and courageous playing tactics. Possible consequences of these findings concerning home advantage in soccer are discussed.

  16. Generator Sets for the Alternating Group

    CERN Document Server

    Rotbart, Aviv

    2010-01-01

    Although the alternating group is an index 2 subgroup of the symmetric group, there is no generating set that gives a Coxeter structure on it. Various generating sets were suggested and studied by Bourbaki, Mitsuhashi, Regev-Roichman, Vershik-Vserminov and others. In a recent work of Brenti- Reiner-Roichman it is explained that palindromes in Mitsuhashi's generating set play a role similar to that of re ections in a Coxeter system. We study in detail the length function with respect to the set of palindromes. Results include an explicit combinatorial description, a generating function, and an interesting connection to Broder's restricted Stirling numbers.

  17. DESIGNING THE SET IN NIGERIAN HOME VIDEO FILMS: A STUDY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitch

    takes a look at designing the set for the Nigerian home movie industry using Amazing. Grace as a .... After getting this information list them in your notebook .... to the candles used and lamps because there actually was no electricity. They had ...

  18. Toward integrating a common nursing data set in home care to facilitate monitoring outcomes across settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Gail; Stocker, Julia; Barkauskas, Violet; Treder, Marcy; Heath, Crystal

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to identify a realistic subset of North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA), Nursing Outcome Classification (NOC), and Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) terms specific to the home care (HC) setting. A subset of 89 NOC outcomes were identified for study in HC through a baseline survey. Three research assistants then observed the care of 258 patients to whom the 89 NOC outcomes applied and recorded the associated NANDA and NIC terms. Follow-up surveys and focus groups were conducted with the nurses and research assistants. There were 81 different NANDA and 226 NIC labels used to describe study patients' care. Only 36 of the 89 NOC labels studied were deemed clinically useful for HC. We found that expert opinion about terminology usage before actual experience under practice conditions is unreliable.

  19. Home Appliances as Home Controllers: Concepts and Set-Top Box Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jovanovic

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a novel softwarebased home control platform suitable as an extension to digital home appliances that are equipped with a CPU (settop boxes, home theatre systems, TV sets, gaming consoles, etc. By using an appliance they are already accustomed to, users become able to control lights, appliances and media playback in their homes. Intelligence and awareness are achieved with a support for execution of recipes – preprepared scripts that define timely actions and respond to triggers obtained from sensors. Software abstraction layer facilitates integration of any desired communication protocol. In our prototype, we supported Zigbee and DMX for light control, X10 for light/appliances control over power line, as well as Ethernet-based optical cameras as motion/presence sensors and UPnP/DLNA based equipment for distributed media playback.

  20. Authenticated Key Agreement in Group Settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming; WANG Yong; GU Da-wu; BAI Ying-cai

    2006-01-01

    An enhanced definition of implicit key authentication and a secure group key agreement scheme from pairings are presented. This scheme combines the merits of group public key and key trees to achieve a communication-efficient and authenticated group key agreement protocol. Besides, it avoids dependence on signature or MAC by involving member's long-term keys and short-term keys in the group key. Furthermore, the idea behind this design can be employed as a general approach to extend the authenticated two-party Diffie-Hellman protocols to group settings.

  1. Assisted Living Facilities, group homes, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Assisted Living Facilities dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'group homes'. Data by...

  2. Using women advocacy groups to enhance knowledge and home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using women advocacy groups to enhance knowledge and home management of ... parents who witness an episode of FC, would think the child is going to die. ... The perceived causes of febrile convulsion included fever (28%), witch craft ...

  3. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  4. Creativity in a cooperative group setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gerald W.; Penick, John E.

    This study was to determine whether cooperative small groups would stimulate creativity of fith and sixth grade students more than an individualized learning environment. Student aptitudes for creative and academic work were assessed on the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Verbal Form A), analysis of student created electrical circuit diagrams, and a batteries and bulbs prediction test. A measure of student perceptions was also used to indicate any changes in attitudes toward the science activity and learning environment. A posttest control group design was used with 11 I fifth and sixth grade students. Half of the population worked by themselves, while the other half (experimental) worked in a student-structured environment on the same science activity which involved creating as many different types of electrical circuits from a given set of batteries and bulbs as possible. An overall conclusion is that fifth and sixth grade students working within small cooperative groups can be more creative as measured by a figural creativity test with electrical circuits than students working alone. The implication of this study is that small cooperative groups as well as individualized groups should be used in elementary science classes when creativity is one of the instructional objectives.

  5. Functional Grouping in Residential Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Macdonald, Susan; Ashman, Bev

    2003-01-01

    The effects of functional grouping of 303 people with intellectual disabilities on care practices in English group homes were investigated. Residents who were non-ambulant were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth and residents with severe challenging behavior were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth and…

  6. Feasibility of home management using ACT for childhood malaria episodes in an urban setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsagha, Dickson S; Elat, Jean-Bosco N; Ndong, Proper Ab; Tata, Peter N; Tayong, Maureen-Nill N; Pokem, Francois F; Wankah, Christian C

    2012-01-01

    Over 90% of malaria cases occur in Sub-Saharan Africa, where a child under the age of 5 years dies from this illness every 30 seconds. The majority of families in Sub- Saharan Africa treat malaria at home, but therapy is often incomplete, hence the World Health Organization has adopted the strategy of home management of malaria to solve the problem. The purpose of this study was to determine community perception and the treatment response to episodes of childhood malaria in an urban setting prior to implementation of home management using artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). This qualitative exploratory study on the home management of malaria in urban children under 5 years of age used 15 focus group discussions and 20 in-depth interviews in various categories of caregivers of children under 5 years. One hundred and eighteen people participated in the focus group discussions and 20 in the in-depth interviews. The study explored beliefs and knowledge about malaria, mothers' perception of home management of the disease, health-seeking behavior, prepackaged treatment of malaria using ACT and a rapid diagnostic test, preferred channels for home management of uncomplicated malaria, communication, the role of the community in home management of malaria, and the motivation of drug distributors in the community. The mothers' perception of malaria was the outcome of events other than mosquito bites. Home treatment is very common and is guided by the way mothers perceive signs and symptoms of malaria. Frequent change of malarial drugs by the national health policy and financial difficulties were the main problems mothers faced in treating febrile children. Rapid diagnostic testing and prepackaged ACT for simple malaria in children under 5 years would be accepted if it was offered at an affordable price. Tribalism and religious beliefs might hinder the delivery of home management of malaria. The availability of rapid diagnostic testing and ACT all year round is one of

  7. Perceived motivators to home food preparation: focus group findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila A; Walter, Janelle; Soliah, LuAnn; Phifer, Janna T

    2014-10-01

    Family meals are positively associated with increased consumption of fruits and vegetables and numerous nutrients, promoting good eating habits and disease prevention. Families benefiting from home-cooked meals are more likely to consume smaller portions and fewer calories, less fat, less salt, and less sugar. Some Western cultures have lost confidence in preparing meals and tend to rely on foods prepared outside the home. The ability of young adults to prepare foods at home may be impaired. The purpose of our study is to identify motivators and, consequently, barriers to preparing foods at home vs purchasing preprepared foods from a deli or eating in a restaurant. Focus groups of college students (n=239) from two universities were asked questions about motivators to preparing meals at home in two subsequent sessions. The primary motivators among the students were that they desired to save money; had a model in food preparation; were familiar with cooking techniques; and had enough time to shop, cook, and clean up after meals. Food and nutrition practitioners have opportunities to promote cost-effective, simple, and time-saving home food preparation techniques as healthful habits. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health care needs of older people living permanently in a residential home setting in Gauteng

    OpenAIRE

    MM Chabeli

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews some of the prevailing health needs of elderly people living permanently in a residential old age home. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive design was employed. Twenty-one black elderly people were purposively selected to participate in a focus group interview session for the purpose of describing their perception of their health care needs. From descriptive content analysis, three main data sets emerged, namely physical health needs, unmet psychological needs and ...

  9. Evolocumab lowers LDL-C safely and effectively when self-administered in the at-home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Ricardo; Joshi, Raju; Stephen Djedjos, C; Legg, Jason; Elliott, Mary; Geller, Michelle; Meyer, Dawn; Somaratne, Ransi; Recknor, Chris; Weiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Evolocumab has been shown to consistently reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) across populations. The phase 3 studies included administration in the home-use and in-clinic settings but did not specifically evaluate the feasibility of home-use administration. Two clinical studies enrolled patients with hypercholesterolemia or mixed dyslipidemia on statin therapy and with/without ezetimibe received evolocumab in the home-use setting. Patients were randomized to self-administer evolocumab using one of two injection devices biweekly over 6 weeks (autoinjector or prefilled syringe; n = 149; ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01849497) or monthly over 12 weeks (autoinjector or automated minidoser; n = 164; NCT01879319). The first self-administration occurred in the in-clinic setting, and two more were performed in the at-home setting. Patients were successful in self-administering evolocumab in the home-use setting in approximately 95 % of attempts and experienced LDL-C reductions from baseline to week 6 or the mean of weeks 10 and 12 of approximately 65 %. Rates of successful self-administration and LDL-C reduction were similar across dosing schedules and study devices. Adverse events were similar between randomized groups and generally mild in severity. In two clinical studies, therefore, patients were able to successfully self-administer evolocumab in both the in-clinic and at-home settings regardless of which dosing schedule or device they used.

  10. Feasibility of home management using ACT for childhood malaria episodes in an urban setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nsagha DS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dickson S Nsagha1,2, Jean-Bosco N Elat2,3, Proper AB Ndong2,4, Peter N Tata2,5, Maureen-Nill N Tayong2, Francios F Pokem2, Christian C Wankah61Department of Public Health and Hygiene, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon; 2Public Health Research Group, Yaounde, Cameroon; 3National AIDS Control Committee, Ministry of Public Health, Cameroon; 4National Malaria Control Programme, Ministry of Public Health, Cameroon; 5Department of Anthropology, Faculty of Arts, Letters and Social Sciences, University of Yaounde 1, Yaounde, Cameroon; 6Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde 1, Yaounde, CameroonBackground: Over 90% of malaria cases occur in Sub-Saharan Africa, where a child under the age of 5 years dies from this illness every 30 seconds. The majority of families in Sub-Saharan Africa treat malaria at home, but therapy is often incomplete, hence the World Health Organization has adopted the strategy of home management of malaria to solve the problem. The purpose of this study was to determine community perception and the treatment response to episodes of childhood malaria in an urban setting prior to implementation of home management using artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT.Methods: This qualitative exploratory study on the home management of malaria in urban children under 5 years of age used 15 focus group discussions and 20 in-depth interviews in various categories of caregivers of children under 5 years. One hundred and eighteen people participated in the focus group discussions and 20 in the in-depth interviews. The study explored beliefs and knowledge about malaria, mothers' perception of home management of the disease, health-seeking behavior, prepackaged treatment of malaria using ACT and a rapid diagnostic test, preferred channels for home management of uncomplicated malaria, communication, the role of the community in home management of malaria, and

  11. Negative pressure wound therapy technologies for chronic wound care in the home setting: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Susan M; Valle, M Frances; Wilson, Lisa M; Lazarus, Gerald; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Robinson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is increasing in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. We conducted a systematic review on the efficacy and safety of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds in the home setting. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, up to June 2014. Two independent reviewers screened search results. Seven studies met our criteria for inclusion. Six of the studies compared NPWT devices to other wound care methods and one study compared two different NPWT technologies. Data were limited by variability in the types of comparator groups, methodological limitations, and poor reporting of outcomes. We were unable to draw conclusions about the efficacy or safety of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds in the home setting due to the insufficient evidence. Consensus is needed on the methods of conducting and reporting wound care research so that future studies are able inform decisions about the use of NPWT in the home environment for chronic wounds.

  12. [Nutritional support in the home-based hospitalization setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, L; Planas, M; Pérez-Portabella, C; Vélez, C; San José, A

    2009-01-01

    The Hospital at Home (HAD) is a choice of care that enables own care in a hospital at home patient. Moreover, the nutritional support (NS) -enteral or parenteral nutrition- is usually indicated in patients with serious underlying disease, and/or frequently remain severely disabled. To analyze the characteristics of the patients, attended at home for specific questions of the NS that receive. descriptive and retrospective study of the patients attended by the Nutritional Support Unit (NSU), in the area of the HAD, from September 1, 2006 until August 31, 2007. At home, the realized procedure was: refill of gastrostomia or jejunostomia feeding tube in 158 cases; modification of the guideline of enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) in 53 cases; training of the skill of artificial nutrition in 14 cases. 39 visits were realized by complications -by infection or lead throught the estoma and by obstruction of the feeding tube-. Only in 3 patients (7.7%) the domiciliary assistance indicated the movement of the patient to the Emergency Unit. In our center, the infrastructure of the HAD has allowed to give answer to the needs of the patients who receive NS at home in our area of influence.

  13. Health care needs of older people living permanently in a residential home setting in Gauteng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabeli, M M

    2003-12-01

    This article reviews some of the prevailing health needs of elderly people living permanently in a residential old age home. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive design was employed. Twenty-one black elderly people were purposively selected to participate in a focus group interview session for the purpose of describing their perception of their health care needs. From descriptive content analysis, three main data sets emerged, namely physical health needs, unmet psychological needs and the need for a healthy social relationship. Recommendations to deal with these health needs were made based on the empirical data supported by literature. Measures of trustworthiness were ensured as described by Lincoln and Guba (1985:316-327).

  14. Doctors' learning experiences in end-of-life care - a focus group study from nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2017-01-31

    Doctors often find dialogues about death difficult. In Norway, 45% of deaths take place in nursing homes. Newly qualified medical doctors serve as house officers in nursing homes during internship. Little is known about how nursing homes can become useful sites for learning about end-of-life care. The aim of this study was to explore newly qualified doctors' learning experiences with end-of-life care in nursing homes, especially focusing on dialogues about death. House officers in nursing homes (n = 16) participated in three focus group interviews. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed with systematic text condensation. Lave & Wenger's theory about situated learning was used to support interpretations, focusing on how the newly qualified doctors gained knowledge of end-of-life care through participation in the nursing home's community of practice. Newly qualified doctors explained how nursing home staff's attitudes taught them how calmness and acceptance could be more appropriate than heroic action when death was imminent. Shifting focus from disease treatment to symptom relief was demanding, yet participants comprehended situations where death could even be welcomed. Through challenging dialogues dealing with family members' hope and trust, they learnt how to adjust words and decisions according to family and patient's life story. Interdisciplinary role models helped them balance uncertainty and competence in the intermediate position of being in charge while also needing surveillance. There is a considerable potential for training doctors in EOL care in nursing homes, which can be developed and integrated in medical education. This practice based learning arena offers newly qualified doctors close interaction with patients, relatives and nurses, teaching them to perform difficult dialogues, individualize medical decisions and balance their professional role in an interdisciplinary setting.

  15. Supporting Integrated Healthcare Solutions with Patients in Home Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Bjerring

    2016-01-01

    : The state-of-the-art of how national ICT infrastructures are designed has been identified and problems of that approach discussed. The foundation for a patient centric home/local infrastructure, to integrate data using applications and data providing applications e.g. medical devices, has been developed...

  16. Home advantage in high-level volleyball varies according to set number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Rui; Mesquita, Isabel; Palao Andrés, José Manuel; Sampaio, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the probability of winning each Volleyball set according to game location (home, away). Archival data was obtained from 275 sets in the 2005 Men's Senior World League and 65,949 actions were analysed. Set result (win, loss), game location (home, away), set number (first, second, third, fourth and fifth) and performance indicators (serve, reception, set, attack, dig and block) were the variables considered in this study. In a first moment, performance indicators were used in a logistic model of set result, by binary logistic regression analysis. After finding the adjusted logistic model, the log-odds of winning the set were analysed according to game location and set number. The results showed that winning a set is significantly related to performance indicators (Chisquare(18)=660.97, pteams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams, regardless of the set number. Home teams have more advantage at the beginning of the game (first set) and in the two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets), probably due to facilities familiarity and crowd effects. Different game actions explain these advantages and showed that to win the first set is more important to take risk, through a better performance in the attack and block, and to win the final set is important to manage the risk through a better performance on the reception. These results may suggest intra-game variation in home advantage and can be most useful to better prepare and direct the competition. Key pointsHome teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams.Home teams have higher performance in reception, set and attack in the total of the sets.The advantage of home teams is more pronounced at the beginning of the game (first set) and in two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets) suggesting intra-game variation in home advantage.Analysis by sets showed that home teams have a better performance in the attack and

  17. Hospital Experiences of Older People with Intellectual Disability: Responses of Group Home Staff and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth; Bowers, Barbara; Bigby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the hospitalisation experiences of older adults with intellectual disability living in group homes. Methods: Grounded dimensional analysis was used to guide data collection and analysis. Group home residents were tracked prospectively over a 3-year period. Interviews were conducted with family, group home, and…

  18. Hospital Experiences of Older People with Intellectual Disability: Responses of Group Home Staff and Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth; Bowers, Barbara; Bigby, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study reports on the hospitalisation experiences of older adults with intellectual disability living in group homes. Methods: Grounded dimensional analysis was used to guide data collection and analysis. Group home residents were tracked prospectively over a 3-year period. Interviews were conducted with family, group home, and…

  19. Availability of Group Homes for Persons with Mental Retardation in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Matthew P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A survey of each state's mental retardation/developmental disablity agency determined results such as that each state has group home programs, that at least 57,494 persons reside in 6,302 group homes, and that 42,212 persons were in group homes of 15 persons or less. (Author/MC)

  20. Minimal axiom group of similarity-based rough set model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Jian-hua; PAN Yun-he

    2006-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study to characterize rough set theory using dependable and minimal axiom groups.Thus,rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods.The classical rough set theory is based on equivalence relation,but the rough set theory based on similarity relation has wide applications in the real world.To characterize similarity-based rough set theory,an axiom group named S,consisting of 3 axioms,is proposed.The reliability of the axiom group,which shows that characterizing of rough set theory based on similarity relation is rational,is proved.Simultaneously,the minimization of the axiom group,which requests that each axiom is an equation and independent,is proved.The axiom group is helpful to research rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  1. Good care in group home living for people with dementia. Experiences of residents, family and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zadelhoff, Ezra; Verbeek, Hilde; Widdershoven, Guy; van Rossum, Erik; Abma, Tineke

    2011-09-01

    To investigate experiences of residents, their family caregivers and nursing staff in group living homes for older people with dementia and their perception of the care process. Traditional nursing homes for people with dementia have several shortcomings related to depersonalisation, passivity, loss of skills and use of physical restraints. Group living homes are seen as an alternative to regular nursing homes, but experiences with this new care setting have rarely been investigated. The study followed a naturalistic design. Qualitative data were collected over a period of 6 months in two group living homes located in the southern part of the Netherlands. Systematic participatory observations were carried out during daily life, care and activities in both homes. In addition, semi-structured interviews were held with residents, their family and nursing staff. These data were inductively analysed and related to Tronto's care ethical framework. According to all parties, group living homes create structural opportunities for individualised care and attention to the residents' personal needs. The increased attentiveness and responsiveness for residents' well-being was seen as a sign of good care and fits with the phases of caring about and receiving care of Tronto's care ethical model. However, tensions occurred relating to the phases of taking responsibility and carrying out care. Not all residents and family members want or are able to take responsibility and perform self-care. Group living homes create conditions for good care and stimulate attentiveness and responsiveness. Tensions in these homes may relate to the new division of responsibilities and tasks.   Values of attention to needs and responsiveness are of high importance for nursing staff to provide good care for people with dementia in a nursing home setting. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Home use of misoprostol for early medical abortion in a low resource setting: secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Kirti; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie; Iyengar, Sharad D; Paul, Mandira; Essén, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2016-02-01

    Although home use of misoprostol for early medical abortion is considered to be safe, effective and feasible, it has not become standard service delivery practice. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of home use of misoprostol with clinic misoprostol in a low-resource setting. This was a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial conducted in six primary care clinics in India. Women seeking medical abortion within up to nine gestational weeks (n = 731) received mifepristone in the clinic and were allocated either to home or clinic administration of misoprostol. Follow-up contact was after 10-15 days. Of 731 participants, 73% were from rural areas and 55% had no formal education. Complete abortion rates in the home and clinic misoprostol groups were 94.2 and 94.4%, respectively. The rate of adverse events was similar in both groups (0.3%). A greater proportion of home users (90.2%) said that they would opt for misoprostol at home in the event of a future abortion compared with clinic users (79.7%) who would opt for misoprostol at the clinic in a similar situation (p = 0.0002). Ninety-six percent women using misoprostol at home or in the clinic were satisfied with their abortion experience. Home-use of misoprostol for early medical abortion is as effective and acceptable as clinic use, in low resource settings. Women should be offered a choice of this option regardless of distance of their residence from the clinic and communication facilities. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Shared caregiving: comparisons between home and child-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, L; Rickert, H; Lamb, M E

    2000-05-01

    The experiences of 84 German toddlers (12-24 months old) who were either enrolled or not enrolled in child care were described with observational checklists from the time they woke up until they went to bed. The total amount of care experienced over the course of a weekday by 35 pairs of toddlers (1 member of each pair in child care, 1 member not) did not differ according to whether the toddlers spent time in child care. Although the child-care toddlers received lower levels of care from care providers in the centers, their mothers engaged them in more social interactions during nonworking hours than did the mothers of home-only toddlers, which suggests that families using child care provided different patterns of care than families not using child care. Child-care toddlers experienced high levels of emotional support at home, although they experienced less prompt responses to their distress signals. Mothers' ages were unrelated to the amounts of time toddlers spent with them, but older mothers initiated more proximity.

  4. Group homes for elders with dementia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traphagan, John W; Nagasawa, Tomoko

    2008-01-01

    In this article we explore the development of group homes for elders with dementia in Japan since the inception of the long-term care insurance program in 2000. We suggest that the combination of demographic and policy trends in recent years have created a context in which entrepreneurial activities related to elder care have increased significantly. By focusing on one of the new institutions that has emerged, we show one way in which social policy has had a significant influence on the lives of elders suffering from dementia and their families. Finally, we point out some of the problems that have arisen along with the growth of these new forms of care, such as a lack of involvement by family members in visiting and caring for elders.

  5. Migratory Homes: Redesigning Group Identity, Prototyping Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traganou, Jilly

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes Migratory Homes, two collaborative projects that investigate the notion of home/land and belonging in conditions of displacement. The fundamental question that Migratory Homes asks is “how can the disparate identities that constitute mixed societies collectively and equally participate in the creation of a common ‘home/land’ that would be co-designed, co-produced, and co-owned”? Through iterative engagements with conditions of everyday materiality, and by activating processes of co-design as research, Migratory Homes attempt to prototype conditions for social change.

  6. HOME ADVANTAGE IN HIGH-LEVEL VOLLEYBALL VARIES ACCORDING TO SET NUMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Marcelino

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify the probability of winning each Volleyball set according to game location (home, away. Archival data was obtained from 275 sets in the 2005 Men's Senior World League and 65,949 actions were analysed. Set result (win, loss, game location (home, away, set number (first, second, third, fourth and fifth and performance indicators (serve, reception, set, attack, dig and block were the variables considered in this study. In a first moment, performance indicators were used in a logistic model of set result, by binary logistic regression analysis. After finding the adjusted logistic model, the log-odds of winning the set were analysed according to game location and set number. The results showed that winning a set is significantly related to performance indicators (Chi-square(18=660.97, p<0.01. Analyses of log-odds of winning a set demonstrate that home teams always have more probability of winning the game than away teams, regardless of the set number. Home teams have more advantage at the beginning of the game (first set and in the two last sets of the game (fourth and fifth sets, probably due to facilities familiarity and crowd effects. Different game actions explain these advantages and showed that to win the first set is more important to take risk, through a better performance in the attack and block, and to win the final set is important to manage the risk through a better performance on the reception. These results may suggest intra-game variation in home advantage and can be most useful to better prepare and direct the competition

  7. [Home enteral nutrition. Annual report 1999. NADYA-SENPE Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Candela, C; Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C; Planas Vilá, M; Castellá, M; García Luna, P P; Parejo, J; Chamorro Quirós, J; Irles Rocamora, J A; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Carbonell, M D; Parés Marimón, R M; Gómez Enterría, P; Salas, J; Mancha, A; Ferrón Vidán, F; Celador Almaraz, A; Bobis, M A; Martín Peña, G; Martí Bonmatí, E; Morejón, E; Jiménez Sanz, M; Martínez, I; Muñoz, A; de la Rubia Nieto, A; Ordóñez González, J; Tusón Rovira, C; Carrera Macazaga, J A

    2002-01-01

    During 1999, as in previous years, the NADYA-SENPE Group has maintained an annual register of patients with Artificial Nutrition at Home in order to keep up to date our available knowledge of this therapy. The present paper analyzes the results of the sixth National Register of patients under treatment with Enteral Nutrition at Home corresponding to 1999, produced with the co-operation of twenty-three centres in the Spanish national health network. The data were collected through a closed questionnaire included on our web site (www.nadya-senpe.com). Apart from epidemiological information, the form includes the indication that led to the prescription of nutrition, nutritional treatment, access path, complications and admissions to hospital, follow-up of the treatment, patients' quality of life and progress. All of the data are processed by the co-ordinating team. The Nutrition Unit at La Paz Teaching Hospital in Madrid has acted as the group co-ordinator. During 1999, a total of 2,262 patients at the twenty-three collaborating centres followed treatment with Home Enteral Nutrition (NED in its Spanish acronym). The mean age was 63.6 (19.67 years (males: 57.6%; females: 42.3%). The mean time with nutritional treatment is 5.89 (4.25 months. The neurological alterations (37.5%) and neoplasias (36.8%) were the most frequent indications for NED. Most patients used oral administration (50.7%), the use of artificial routes is less frequent, with 5NG being used on 27.9% and PEG on 12.7%. The polymeric formulas are the ones most commonly used (87.7%). The number of complications recorded amounted to 1,403 episodes, representing 0.62 complications per patient per year, of which 40.8% were gastro-intestinal (0.26 complications per patient per year) and 18.7% were mechanical complications, with only 9 recorded cases of bronchoaspiration. It was necessary to admit patients to hospital on 836 occasions (0.38 admissions per patient), albeit generally for causes not associated with

  8. Risk adjustment methods for Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIs based on the minimum data set for home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirdes John P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing interest in enhancing accountability in health care. As such, several methods have been developed to compare the quality of home care services. These comparisons can be problematic if client populations vary across providers and no adjustment is made to account for these differences. The current paper explores the effects of risk adjustment for a set of home care quality indicators (HCQIs based on the Minimum Data Set for Home Care (MDS-HC. Methods A total of 22 home care providers in Ontario and the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority (WRHA in Manitoba, Canada, gathered data on their clients using the MDS-HC. These assessment data were used to generate HCQIs for each agency and for the two regions. Three types of risk adjustment methods were contrasted: a client covariates only; b client covariates plus an "Agency Intake Profile" (AIP to adjust for ascertainment and selection bias by the agency; and c client covariates plus the intake Case Mix Index (CMI. Results The mean age and gender distribution in the two populations was very similar. Across the 19 risk-adjusted HCQIs, Ontario CCACs had a significantly higher AIP adjustment value for eight HCQIs, indicating a greater propensity to trigger on these quality issues on admission. On average, Ontario had unadjusted rates that were 0.3% higher than the WRHA. Following risk adjustment with the AIP covariate, Ontario rates were, on average, 1.5% lower than the WRHA. In the WRHA, individual agencies were likely to experience a decline in their standing, whereby they were more likely to be ranked among the worst performers following risk adjustment. The opposite was true for sites in Ontario. Conclusions Risk adjustment is essential when comparing quality of care across providers when home care agencies provide services to populations with different characteristics. While such adjustment had a relatively small effect for the two regions, it did

  9. 75 FR 10318 - Briggs & Stratton Power Products Group, LLC., Home Power Division, a Subsidiary of Briggs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ...-72,718B] Briggs & Stratton Power Products Group, LLC., Home Power Division, a Subsidiary of Briggs... Group, and Aerotek, Jefferson, WI; Briggs & Stratton Power Products Group, LLC., Home Power Division... Lifestyle Staffing, Adecco, Techstaff, The Alaris Group, and Aerotek, Jefferson, WI; Briggs & Stratton...

  10. Health care needs of older people living permanently in a residential home setting in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Chabeli

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the prevailing health needs of elderly people living permanently in a residential old age home. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive design was employed. Twenty-one black elderly people were purposively selected to participate in a focus group interview session for the purpose of describing their perception of their health care needs. From descriptive content analysis, three main data sets emerged, namely physical health needs, unmet psychological needs and the need for a healthy social relationship. Recommendations to deal with these health needs were made based on the empirical data supported by literature. Measures of trustworthiness were ensured as described by Lincoln and Guba (1985:316-327.

  11. Worked Example Effects in Individual and Group Work Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnowati, Endah; Ayres, Paul; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the effects of worked example and problem-solving approaches in individual or group work settings on learning to solve geometry problems. One hundred and one seventh graders from Indonesia were randomly allocated to four experimental groups using a 2 (problem-solving vs. worked examples) x 2 (individual vs. group study) design.…

  12. Systematic review of paediatric weight management interventions delivered in the home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, B M; Moss, O A; Cerwinske, L A

    2016-10-01

    To increase their accessibility, paediatric weight management interventions are increasingly designed to be delivered in the home setting by trained staff. This systematic review summarizes the available evidence for interventions featuring home visitation and identifies key gaps in the literature. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for intervention studies that reported change in objectively measured adiposity outcomes in youth ages 2-18 years. Studies published between 1 January 1995 and 12 February 2016 were analysed. Of 15 eligible studies, nine reported that interventions with home visitation were either superior to a control/comparison condition or achieved significant within-subjects reductions in adiposity. Interventions in which professional staff (e.g. dietitians and exercise trainers) conducted home visits tended to be more efficacious than those delivered by paraprofessional or community-based staff, as were interventions with more frequent contact. Most studies were judged to have low or unclear risk of bias across various domains. As most studies compared interventions with home visits with less intensive and qualitatively different approaches, it remains unclear whether home visitation per se enhances weight loss efficacy. Overall, paediatric weight management interventions that feature home visitation are promising, but the incremental benefit of the home visitation treatment modality remains to be rigorously evaluated. © 2016 World Obesity.

  13. A Case for Increasing Empirical Attention to Head Start's Home-Based Program: An Exploration of Routine Collaborative Goal Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Patricia H.; Lehtinen, Jaana; Bracaliello, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative goal setting among home visitors and family members is a mandate for Head Start's home-based program. Yet, a dearth of research is available for advancing evidence-based practices for setting and monitoring home visiting goals or for understanding how family characteristics or program features are associated with them. With the…

  14. Improper sharp disposal practices among diabetes patients in home care settings: Need for concern?

    OpenAIRE

    Anindo Majumdar; Jayaprakash Sahoo; Gautam Roy; Sadishkumar Kamalanathan

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, outbreaks of blood-borne infections have been reported from assisted living facilities, which were traced back to improper blood glucose monitoring practices. Needle-stick injuries have been implicated in many such cases. This directly raises concerns over sharp disposal practices of diabetic patients self-managing their condition in home care settings. With India being home to a huge diabetic population, this issue, if neglected, can cause substantial damage to the healt...

  15. Home-based music therapy--a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Thomas

    2010-10-14

    Almost every Western healthcare system is changing to make their services more centered around out-patient care. In particular, long-term or geriatric patients who have been discharged from the hospital often require home-based care and therapy. Therefore, several programs have been developed to continue the therapeutic process and manage the special needs of patients after discharge from hospital. Music therapy has also moved into this field of healthcare service by providing home-based music therapy (HBMT) programs. This article reviews and summarizes the settings and conditions of HBMT for the first time. The following databases were used to find articles on home-based music therapy: AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX. The search terms were "home-based music therapy" and "mobile music therapy". Included articles were analyzed with respect to participants as well as conditions and settings of HBMT. Furthermore, the date of publication, main outcomes, and the design and quality of the studies were investigated. A total of 20 international publications, 11 clinical studies and nine reports from practice, mainly from the United States (n = 8), were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Six studies had a randomized controlled design and included a total of 507 patients. The vast majority of clients of HBMT are elderly patients living at home and people who need hospice and palliative care. Although settings were heterogeneous, music listening programs played a predominant role with the aim to reduce symptoms like depression and pain, or to improve quality of life and the relationship between patients and caregivers as primary endpoints. We were able to show that HBMT is an innovative service for future healthcare delivery. It fits with the changing healthcare system and its conditions but also meets the therapeutic needs of the increasing number of elderly and severely impaired people. Apart from music therapists, patients and their

  16. Patterns of maltreatment and diagnosis across levels of care in group homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane Seifert, Heather T; Farmer, Elizabeth M Z; Wagner, H Ryan; Maultsby, Linda T; Burns, Barbara J

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of Axis I psychiatric diagnosis and maltreatment history were explored among youth in group homes, including match of clinical need to level or restrictiveness of care. Data on demographics, diagnoses, maltreatment, and group home level of care (Level I, II, or III homes, representing lower to higher intensity of supervision and treatment) were obtained from 523 youth who participated in a quasi-experimental study of group homes. Three quarters of youth had a diagnosis and two-thirds of youth had a maltreatment history. Youth in higher level homes had more diagnoses and higher rates of all disorders except adjustment disorders. Youth in Level I homes had a history of more maltreatment types, particularly high rates of neglect. Sexual abuse, physical abuse, and emotional abuse were most common among youth in higher level homes. Regardless of diagnosis history, comparable proportions of youth had a maltreatment history, and similar patterns were found across levels of care. Together, findings indicate that group homes with varying degrees of restrictiveness serve youth with different psychiatric diagnosis and maltreatment histories. Youth triaged to higher level homes had more diagnoses, while youth placed in the least restrictive homes had a history of more maltreatment subtypes. Further, distinct patterns of diagnosis types and maltreatment subtypes were seen across homes. Implications include the importance of assessing unique clinical needs of youth to promote an appropriate match to level of care and treatment plan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The association between the quality of life and depression of elderly in a nursing home institutional setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubica Ilievová

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Obtaining information on depression and the quality of life of elderly in nursing home settings should be introduced as a standard part of nursing activities in order to improve the quality of customer care in the nursing homes.

  18. Community-based family-style group homes for children orphaned by AIDS in rural China: an ethnographic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Li

    2015-09-01

    As the number of children orphaned by AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) has reached 17.3 million, most living in resource-poor settings, interest has grown in identifying and evaluating appropriate care arrangements for them. In this study, we describe the community-based family-style group homes ('group homes') in rural China. Guided by an ecological framework of children's wellbeing, we conducted a series of ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews and group discussions in the rural areas of Henan Province, which has been severely impacted by the AIDS endemic through commercial blood collection. Based on our observations and discussions, group homes appear to provide stable and safe living environments for children orphaned by AIDS. Adequate financial support from non-government organizations (NGOs) as well as the central and provincial governments has ensured a low child-caregiver ratio and attention to the basic needs of the children at group homes. The foster parents were selected from the local community and appear to have adequate qualifications and dedication. They receive a monthly stipend, periodical evaluation and parenting consultation from supporting NGOs. The foster parents and children in the group homes have formed strong bonds. Both children and foster parents reported positively on health and education. Characteristics of community-based group homes can be replicated in other care arrangements for AIDS orphans in resource-poor settings for the optimal health outcomes of those vulnerable children. We also call for capacity building for caregivers and communities to provide sustainable and supportive living environment for these children. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  19. Resident, nursing home, and state factors affecting the reliability of Minimum Data Set quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ning; Mor, Vincent; Roy, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Nursing home quality measures impact policy decisions such as reimbursement or consumer choice. Quality indicators in the United States are collected through the federally mandated Minimum Data Set (MDS). Bias in MDS data collection or coding can thus have a negative impact on policy applications. To understand whether bias was present in coding, the authors studied 5174 pairs of MDS assessments that were independently collected by nursing home staff and study nurses from 206 nursing homes. The authors developed multivariate multilevel models to identify nursing home and resident characteristics that were significantly associated with the data quality of multiple MDS measures of nursing home quality. The outcomes were coding differences between nursing home staff and study nurses. Resident characteristics explained little of the variation in coding differences among facilities, while facilities characteristics explained 4% to 20% of the variation and state location further explained 13% to 34% of the variation. A generalized effect of nursing home state location tended to be consistent across measures. States that overidentified problems also tended to have worse quality indicators and vice versa. Comparisons of MDS-based quality indicators reflect differences in assessment practices at least as much as true quality differences. Efforts to standardize assessment practices across states are needed.

  20. The conduct and process of mental capacity assessments in home health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Charlotte; McGraw, Caroline

    2016-11-02

    The assessment of capacity to consent to treatment is key to shared practitioner-patient decision-making. It is the responsibility of the person closest to the decision being made to carry out the assessment. The aim was to examine the factors that influence mental capacity assessments in home health care settings and identify the facilitators and inhibitors to the conduct and process of assessments as perceived and experienced by non-medical health practitioners providing generalist community services. Semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of community nurses, community physiotherapists and community occupational therapists in one NHS Trust in London. Data were analysed thematically. The main themes were issues relating to: intrinsic patient factors and behaviours; recognising, managing and utilising the influence of the family; practitioner motivation and competence; working together as a team to optimise shared decision making, and; the importance of place. While some issues appear germane to both hospital and home health care settings, others are unique to - or manifest very differently in - home health care settings. The findings suggest that the influence of family members, long-term practitioner-patient relationships and physical distance from co-workers make the conduct and process of mental capacity assessments in home health care settings an inherently complex endeavour.

  1. Working in group living homes for older people with dementia: the effects on job satisfaction and burnout and the role of job characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Boekhorst, Selma; Willemse, Bernadette; Depla, Marja F I A; Eefsting, Jan A; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2008-10-01

    Group living homes are a fast-growing form of nursing home care for older people with dementia. This study seeks to determine the differences in job characteristics of nursing staff in group living homes and their influence on well-being. We examined the Job Demand Control Support (JDCS) model in relation to 183 professional caregivers in group living homes and 197 professional caregivers in traditional nursing homes. Multilevel linear regression analysis was used to study the mediator effect of the three job characteristics of the JDCS-model (demands, control and social support) on job satisfaction and three components of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and decreased personal accomplishment). Demands were lower in group living homes, while control and social support from co-workers were higher in this setting. Likewise, job satisfaction was higher and burnout was lower in group living homes. Analysis of the mediator effects showed that job satisfaction was fully mediated by all three psychosocial job characteristics, as was emotional exhaustion. Depersonalization was also fully mediated, but only by control and social support. Decreased personal accomplishment was partially mediated, again only by job characteristics, control and support. This study indicates that working in a group living home instead of a traditional nursing home has a beneficial effect on the well-being of nursing staff, largely because of a positive difference in psychosocial job characteristics.

  2. The effects of group reminiscence therapy on depression, self esteem, and life satisfaction of elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Hsing-Yuan; Wu, Chiu-Yen; Jin, Suh-Fen; Chu, Tsung-Lan; Huang, Tzu-Shin; Clark, Mary Jo

    2006-03-01

    The need to provide quality mental health care for elders in nursing home settings has been a critical issue, as the aging population grows rapidly and institutional care becomes a necessity for some elders. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to describe the effect of participation in reminiscence group therapy on older nursing home residents' depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Purposive sampling was used to recruit participants who met the study criteria. Residents of one ward were assigned to the reminiscence therapy group intervention, while residents of the other ward served as controls. Nine weekly one-hour sessions were designed to elicit reminiscence as group therapy for 12 elders in the experimental group. Another 12 elders were recruited for a control group matched to experimental subjects on relevant criteria. Depression, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were measured one week before and after the therapy. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 10.0) was used to analyze data. Results indicated that group reminiscence therapy significantly improved self-esteem, although effects on depression and life satisfaction were not significant. Reminiscence groups could enhance elders' social interaction with one another in nursing home settings and become support groups for participants. The model we created here can serve as a reference for future application in institutional care.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: The Imery Group — Proud Green Home, Serenbe, GA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    The first certified Zero Energy Ready Home in Georgia was honored in the Custom Builder category of the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. The 2,811-ft2, two-story custom home has 2x6 advanced framed walls filled with R-20 of open-cell spray foam, plus an R-6.6 insulated coated OSB sheathing. Also included is electronic monitoring equipment that tracks the PV, solar thermal water heater, ERV, mini-split heat pump with three indoor heads, solar water heater, and LED and CFL lighting.

  4. Autonomy among physically frail older people in nursing home settings: a study protocol for an intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresen Mette

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experiencing autonomy is recognised to promote health and well-being for all age groups. Perceived lack of control has been found to be detrimental to physical and mental health. There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge elucidating how frail older people in nursing home settings themselves perceive autonomy in daily life. Further, there are no studies on the extent to which this perception can be influenced positively by participating in an individually tailored programme based on residents' own wishes for daily activities. Methods and design A total of 9 nursing homes and 55 participants aged 65 years or older were included in the study. All the participants were restricted in performing at least one P-ADL activity unassisted and had a Mini Mental State Examination-score above 16. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks by The Autonomy Sub-dimension in the Measure of Actualisation of Potential test. Programmes were based on participants' individual assessment of their most important daily activities. Staff at all nursing homes who usually organize physical training, social or creative activities carried out individually tailored programmes using their usual methods and equipment. Participants in each nursing home were divided by lot into either a control group or an intervention group. The control groups received their usual care and treatment. Discussion This study is designed to assess the status of perceived autonomy at baseline and to provide information about the effectiveness of individually tailored programmes according to perceptions of autonomy registered in institutionalised physically frail older people. This will add knowledge to assist response to present and future challenges in relation to health promotion initiatives for this group. Trial registration number NCT00783055

  5. Evolocumab lowers LDL-C safely and effectively when self-administered in the at-home setting

    OpenAIRE

    Dent,Ricardo; Joshi, Raju; Stephen Djedjos, C.; Legg, Jason; Elliott, Mary; Geller, Michelle; Meyer, Dawn; Somaratne, Ransi; Recknor, Chris; Weiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Evolocumab has been shown to consistently reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) across populations. The phase 3 studies included administration in the home-use and in-clinic settings but did not specifically evaluate the feasibility of home-use administration. Two clinical studies enrolled patients with hypercholesterolemia or mixed dyslipidemia on statin therapy and with/without ezetimibe received evolocumab in the home-use setting. Patients were randomized to self-administer ev...

  6. Examining differences in nurses' language, accent, and comprehensibility in nursing home settings based on birth origin and country of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Laura M; Brush, Barbara L; Castle, Nicholas G; Eaton, Michelle; Capezuti, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    As nursing homes turn abroad to fill vacancies, the diverse linguistic backgrounds of nurse hires are creating new challenges in comprehensibility between nurses, providers, and residents. Accents are a natural part of spoken language that may present difficulty even when the parties involved are speaking the same language. We surveyed 1,629 nurses working in 98 nursing homes (NHs) in five U.S. states to determine if and how language difficulties were perceived by nurses and others (e.g. physicians, residents and family members). We found that when participants were asked how often other care team members and residents/families had difficulty understanding them due to language use or accent, foreign born nurses were significantly more likely to report that they experienced difficulty at least some of the time across all groups. This study supports an assessment of nurses' language, accents, and comprehensibility in these settings.

  7. Antiepileptic drug use in a nursing home setting: a retrospective study in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Camilla; Ielmini, M; Bianchi, L; Lucano, M; Bertù, L; Vender, Simone

    2016-05-13

    The authors set out to examine qualitatively the use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a population of older adults in a nursing home setting, evaluating aspects such as specialist prescriptions and changes in dosage. This retrospective prevalence study was carried out in a state-funded nursing home that provides care and rehabilitation for elderly people. The first objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of AED use in this population. The second objective was to monitor AED dosage modifications during the fifteen-month study period, focusing on the safety and the tolerability of AEDs. In the period of time considered, 129 of 402 monitored patients received at least one anti-epileptic therapy. The prevalence of AED use was therefore 32%. Gabapentin was found to be the most commonly prescribed drug, with a frequency of 29%, and it was used mainly for anxiety disorders, psychosis, neuropathic pain and mood disorders.

  8. Algorithm for Identifying Nursing Home Days Using Medicare Claims and Minimum Data Set Assessment Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Jung; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Brandt, Nicole; Lucas, Judith A

    2016-11-01

    No consensus exists about methods of measuring nursing home (NH) length-of-stay for Medicare beneficiaries to identify long-stay and short-stay NH residents. To develop an algorithm measuring NH days of stay to differentiate between residents with long and short stay (≥101 and algorithm with Minimum Data Set (MDS) alone and Medicare claims data. We linked 2006-2009 MDS assessments to Medicare Part A skilled nursing facility (SNF) data. This algorithm determined the daily NH stay evidence by MDS and SNF dates. NH length-of-stay and characteristics were reported in the total, long-stay, and short-stay residents. Long-stay residents identified by the algorithm were compared with the NH evidence from MDS-alone and Medicare parts A and B data. Of 276,844 residents identified by our algorithm, 40.8% were long stay. Long-stay versus short-stay residents tended to be older, male, white, unmarried, low-income subsidy recipients, have multiple comorbidities, and have higher mortality but have fewer hospitalizations and SNF services. Higher proportions of long-stay and short-stay residents identified by the MDS/SNF algorithm were classified in the same group using MDS-only (98.9% and 100%, respectively), compared with the parts A and B data (95.0% and 67.1%, respectively). NH length-of-stay was similar between MDS/SNF and MDS-only long-stay residents (mean±SD: 717±422 vs. 720±441 d), but the lengths were longer compared with the parts A and B data (approximately 474±393 d). Our MDS/SNF algorithm allows the differentiation of long-stay and short-stay residents, resulting in an NH group more precise than using Medicare claims data only.

  9. Home-based music therapy - a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Almost every Western healthcare system is changing to make their services more centered around out-patient care. In particular, long-term or geriatric patients who have been discharged from the hospital often require home-based care and therapy. Therefore, several programs have been developed to continue the therapeutic process and manage the special needs of patients after discharge from hospital. Music therapy has also moved into this field of healthcare service by providing home-based music therapy (HBMT) programs. This article reviews and summarizes the settings and conditions of HBMT for the first time. Methods The following databases were used to find articles on home-based music therapy: AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX. The search terms were "home-based music therapy" and "mobile music therapy". Included articles were analyzed with respect to participants as well as conditions and settings of HBMT. Furthermore, the date of publication, main outcomes, and the design and quality of the studies were investigated. Results A total of 20 international publications, 11 clinical studies and nine reports from practice, mainly from the United States (n = 8), were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Six studies had a randomized controlled design and included a total of 507 patients. The vast majority of clients of HBMT are elderly patients living at home and people who need hospice and palliative care. Although settings were heterogeneous, music listening programs played a predominant role with the aim to reduce symptoms like depression and pain, or to improve quality of life and the relationship between patients and caregivers as primary endpoints. Conclusions We were able to show that HBMT is an innovative service for future healthcare delivery. It fits with the changing healthcare system and its conditions but also meets the therapeutic needs of the increasing number of elderly and severely impaired people. Apart from

  10. Home-based music therapy - a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostermann Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost every Western healthcare system is changing to make their services more centered around out-patient care. In particular, long-term or geriatric patients who have been discharged from the hospital often require home-based care and therapy. Therefore, several programs have been developed to continue the therapeutic process and manage the special needs of patients after discharge from hospital. Music therapy has also moved into this field of healthcare service by providing home-based music therapy (HBMT programs. This article reviews and summarizes the settings and conditions of HBMT for the first time. Methods The following databases were used to find articles on home-based music therapy: AMED, CAIRSS, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, and PSYNDEX. The search terms were "home-based music therapy" and "mobile music therapy". Included articles were analyzed with respect to participants as well as conditions and settings of HBMT. Furthermore, the date of publication, main outcomes, and the design and quality of the studies were investigated. Results A total of 20 international publications, 11 clinical studies and nine reports from practice, mainly from the United States (n = 8, were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Six studies had a randomized controlled design and included a total of 507 patients. The vast majority of clients of HBMT are elderly patients living at home and people who need hospice and palliative care. Although settings were heterogeneous, music listening programs played a predominant role with the aim to reduce symptoms like depression and pain, or to improve quality of life and the relationship between patients and caregivers as primary endpoints. Conclusions We were able to show that HBMT is an innovative service for future healthcare delivery. It fits with the changing healthcare system and its conditions but also meets the therapeutic needs of the increasing number of elderly and severely

  11. [Evaluation of 24-hour home help services in a community by the focus group interview method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, T; Maeda, A; Motohashi, Y

    1999-11-01

    The 24-hour home help services that provide day and night care services at home becomes a public health interest in Japan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the system of 24-hour home help services in a community that has successfully developed it. Participants of this focus group interview were home helpers who were actually engaged in 24-hour home help services in A town of Akita Prefecture. The focus group session was tape-recorded and the tapes were transcribed. The transcripts were evaluated and summarized in order to identify major categories and number of descriptive statements in each category. The results were as follows. First, the home helpers considered that their system of 24-hour home help services could be technically transferred to other communities in Japan. Secondary, the political leadership and the democratic system of community participation were the essential elements for promoting the 24-hour home help services. Thirdly, the regular meetings for discussion about cases and opinion exchanges were required more extensively in the future.

  12. Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke JR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Joshua R Burke, Rachael Morley, Mustafa Khanbhai Academic Surgery Unit, Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is the continuous or intermittent application of subatmospheric pressure to the surface of a wound that improves the wound environment, accelerates healing, and reduces wound closure time. Since its first documented use, this technology has lent itself to a number of adaptations, most notably, the development of portable devices facilitating treatment in the home care setting. With advancing surgical standards, wound healing is an important rate-limiting factor in early patient discharge and often a major cost of inpatient treatment. The efficacy of NPWT in the home care setting has been investigated through rate of wound closure, time in care, and patient experience. Rate of wound closure is the most appropriate primary end point. Much can be gleaned from patient experience, but the future success of portable NPWT will be measured on time in care and therefore cost effectiveness. However, there is a lack of level 1a evidence demonstrating increased efficacy of portable over inpatient NPWT. The development of portable NPWT is an encouraging innovation in wound care technology, and extending the benefits to the home care setting is both possible and potentially more beneficial. Keywords: portable, negative pressure wound therapy, vacuum-assisted closure, topical negative pressure therapy

  13. Cooperative Study Groups: Give Your Students the Home Team Advantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerma, Tony

    2007-01-01

    In this article I discuss the factors that led me to implement study groups in the teaching of mathematics. An important influence in this decision began with an experimental study conducted with two College Algebra classes in which students were randomly assigned to treatment groups. While there was no statistical difference between the study…

  14. Ranking Cognitive Flexibility in a Group Setting of Rhesus Monkeys with a Set-Shifting Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnitko, Tatiana A.; Allen, Daicia C.; Gonzales, Steven W.; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    Attentional set-shifting ability is an executive function underling cognitive flexibility in humans and animals. In humans, this function is typically observed during a single experimental session where dimensions of playing cards are used to measure flexibility in the face of changing rules for reinforcement (i.e., the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST)). In laboratory animals, particularly non-human primates, variants of the WCST involve extensive training and testing on a series of dimensional discriminations, usually in social isolation. In the present study, a novel experimental approach was used to assess attentional set-shifting simultaneously in 12 rhesus monkeys. Specifically, monkeys living in individual cages but in the same room were trained at the same time each day in a set-shifting task in the same housing environment. As opposed to the previous studies, each daily session began with a simple single-dimension discrimination regardless of the animal’s performance on the previous session. A total of eight increasingly difficult, discriminations (sets) were possible in each daily 45 min session. Correct responses were reinforced under a second-order schedule of flavored food pellet delivery, and criteria for completing a set was 12 correct trials out of a running total of 15 trials. Monkeys progressed through the sets at their own pace and abilities. The results demonstrate that all 12 monkeys acquired the simple discrimination (the first set), but individual differences in the ability to progress through all eight sets were apparent. A performance index (PI) that encompassed progression through the sets, errors and session duration was calculated and used to rank each monkey’s performance in relation to each other. Overall, this version of a set-shifting task results in an efficient assessment of reliable differences in cognitive flexibility in a group of monkeys. PMID:28386222

  15. An interactive distance solution for stroke rehabilitation in the home setting - A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmcrantz, Susanne; Borg, Jörgen; Sommerfeld, Disa; Plantin, Jeanette; Wall, Anneli; Ehn, Maria; Sjölinder, Marie; Boman, Inga-Lill

    2017-09-01

    In this study an interactive distance solution (called the DISKO tool) was developed to enable home-based motor training after stroke. The overall aim was to explore the feasibility and safety of using the DISKO-tool, customized for interactive stroke rehabilitation in the home setting, in different rehabilitation phases after stroke. Fifteen patients in three different stages in the continuum of rehabilitation after stroke participated in a home-based training program using the DISKO-tool. The program included 15 training sessions with recurrent follow-ups by the integrated application for video communication with a physiotherapist. Safety and feasibility were assessed from patients, physiotherapists, and a technician using logbooks, interviews, and a questionnaire. Qualitative content analysis and descriptive statistics were used in the analysis. Fourteen out of 15 patients finalized the training period with a mean of 19.5 minutes spent on training at each session. The DISKO-tool was found to be useful and safe by patients and physiotherapists. This study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of the DISKO-tool and provides guidance in further development and testing of interactive distance technology for home rehabilitation, to be used by health care professionals and patients in different phases of rehabilitation after stroke.

  16. Patients' experience of home and hospital based cardiac rehabilitation: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Miren I; Greenfield, Sheila; Jolly, Kate

    2009-03-01

    New cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes, such as home programmes using the Heart Manual, are being introduced but little is known about patients' experiences of these. To compare the views of patients who had completed a home or hospital-based CR programme and explore the benefits and problems of each programme. 16 patients from 4 hospital programmes attended one of 3 focus groups; 10 home programme patients attended one of 2 focus groups. Some themes were common to all focus groups: loss of confidence; continuing to exercise and lifestyle changes; understanding of heart disease. Hospital programme patients particularly enjoyed exercising in a group and mixing with other people, and gained motivation and support from others. Home programme patients spoke very highly of the Heart Manual and valued the one-to-one support of the nurse facilitators. They described the home programme as a lifestyle change compared to the hospital programme which they suggested was more like a treatment. Patients in the hospital programme enjoyed the camaraderie of group exercise and patients in the home programme valued the wealth of information and advice in the Heart Manual and this gave them a feeling of being in control of their health.

  17. 24 CFR 982.613 - Group home: Rent and voucher housing assistance payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Meaning of pro-rata portion. For a group home, the term “pro-rata portion” means the ratio derived by... owner for an assisted person may not exceed the pro-rata portion of the reasonable rent for the group...-rata portion of the payment standard amount on the PHA payment standard schedule for the group...

  18. Acupuncture Therapy in a Group Setting for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Nielsen, Arya; Kohrrer, Corinne; Schmid, Tracy; Waltermaurer, Eve; Perez, Elidania; Merrell, Woodson

    2017-06-08

     This project was designed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of acupuncture therapy given in a group setting for chronic pain.  Nonrandomized, repeated measures quasi-experimental trial.  Care was delivered in a primary care clinic waiting area after clinic hours.  Included were primary care patients (≥18 years old) with chronic pain of the neck, back, shoulder, or osteoarthritis of any site of at least three months' duration.  Subjects received eight weekly acupuncture therapy sessions in a group setting. Acupuncture therapy included a combination of palpation, acupuncture needling, Tui na, Gua sha, and auricular treatment. Baseline pain levels were established in a two- to four-week run-in; assessment of the intervention impact on pain intensity, mood, and functional status were made at the end of the treatment period (eight weeks) and 16 weeks after completion of intervention (24 weeks).  Of the total 113 participants recruited for the trial, 96 completed the 24-week protocol. We found a statistically and clinically significant decrease in pain severity, pain interference, and depression in our study population. There were no serious adverse events.  Acupuncture therapy offered in the group setting was effective in reducing pain severity, pain interference, and depression in patients with chronic neck, back, or shoulder pain or osteoarthritis. Benefit persisted through the 24-week measure despite no additional treatment. This finding has potentially important implications for improving access to effective acupuncture treatment for patients with limited financial resources.

  19. Interdisciplinary approach to the management of medical supplies in the nursing home setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Peris Martí

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the impact of pressure ulcers in institutionalized elderly people, an interdisciplinary approach to the care of ulcers and the management of medical supplies is essential. The aim of this study is to describe and evaluate the management of medical supplies by an interdisciplinary team in order to promote their rational use in the nursing home setting. Methods: An interdisciplinary team was set up, coordinated by a Pharmacy Unit including representatives of 18 elderly nursing homes (1,599 beds. Team interventions were assessed in terms of improvements in the management of wound care supplies. In addition, a retrospective descriptive study was carried out on those patients with pressure ulcers, in order to consider future interventions. Results: The team interventions led to a selection of 15% of the 180 wound care supplies from the public tender process. The monthly savings in wound dressing material purchases was at least 17%. Furthermore, a reduction in consumption greater than 50% was found in 7 centres. The prevalence of ulcers was 5.59%. A fourth of these ulcers were originated outside nursing homes. Conclusions: The creation of an interdisciplinary team, in which the pharmacist gets closer to patient needs, and where nurses share responsibility for the selection and management of medical supplies, leads to positive results and represents an opportunity for improvement in elderly care.

  20. Influences of Task Type on Interaction under Group Work Setting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓萍

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between learners under group work setting is considered to be signifieantly influenced by task types. The present empirical study was designed to explore interaction characteristics under convergent tasks and divergent tasks from three aspects: language production, meaning negotiation and attention to form while performing different types of tasks. The results reveal that there was significant statistical difference in the total language production between two types of tasks. In terms of the occurrence of meaning negotiation and the extent to which students paid attention to language form, there were no significant difference between the two task types.

  1. Admissible groups, symmetric factor sets, and simple algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Mollin

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Let K be a field of characteristic zero and suppose that D is a K-division algebra; i.e. a finite dimensional division algebra over K with center K. In Mollin [1] we proved that if K contains no non-trivial odd order roots of unity, then every finite odd order subgroup of D* the multiplicative group of D, is cyclic. The first main result of this paper is to generalize (and simplify the proof of the above. Next we generalize and investigate the concept of admissible groups. Finally we provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a simple algebra, with an abelian maximal subfield, to be isomorphic to a tensor product of cyclic algebras. The latter is achieved via symmetric factor sets.

  2. Safe handling and administration considerations of oral anticancer agents in the clinical and home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Joanne

    2012-12-01

    The use of hormonal, chemotherapeutic, and targeted biologic oral agents has exponentially increased since the early 2000s. Oral therapies have the advantage of persistent exposure of the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and the tumor environment. The use of oral anticancer agents provides therapeutic drug treatment for patients with cancer in the comfort of their home or alternative settings, such as retirement homes and assisted living or extended-care facilities. Practices to ensure safe storage, handling, administration, and disposal of oral agents are necessary to prevent additional exposure of hazardous substances to the environment, professionals, patients, family members, and caretakers. Providers should consider potential barriers to adherence and compliance, and develop strategies to ensure optimal therapeutic benefit prior to initiation of oral agents.

  3. Blood pressure differences between office and home settings among Japanese normotensive subjects and hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hisao; Ukai, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Hareaki; Yuasa, Shouhei; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Chin, Keiichi; Katsumata, Takuma; Umemura, Satoshi

    2016-10-06

    This study attempted to clarify the differences in blood pressure (BP) between the office (clinic) and home settings in patients with controlled, sustained, masked or white-coat hypertension. The following formula was used: office mean systolic BP (omSBP)-mean morning home SBP (mmhSBP)/office mean diastolic BP (omDBP)-mean morning home DBP (mmhDBP). The paired t-test was used for statistical analysis. The omSBP-mmhSBP/omDBP-mmhDBP calculation yielded the following results: among normotensive subjects, -1.1±11.2/-1.7±8.5 mm Hg (mean SBP and mean DBP were higher at home than in the office; n=451, P=0.038 in SBP, P=0.000 in DBP); in controlled hypertensive patients, -0.42±10.9/-2.2±8.2 mm Hg (n=1362, P=0.160 in SBP, P=0.000 in DBP); among sustained hypertensive patients, 5.6±14.7/0.048±9.9 mm Hg (n=1370, P=0.000 in SBP, P=0.857 in DBP); in masked hypertensive patients, -15.3±12.9/-9.3±9.5 mm Hg (n=1308, both P=0.000); and among white-coat hypertensive patients, 23.7±13.2/8.2±9.1 mm Hg (n=580, both P=0.000). Our results showed a difference of 5 mm Hg in SBP among sustained hypertensive patients, as recommended by the Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension; however, in other hypertensive patient types, the differences in SBP and DBP between office and home measurements differed by >5 mm Hg. Office and home BP measurements should be interpreted cautiously, keeping in mind the clinical setting.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 6 October 2016; doi:10.1038/hr.2016.125.

  4. Strategies for organizational change from group homes to individualized supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam

    2012-10-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to transform. Although the approach taken by each organization was unique, there were also some common strategies, which included generating commitment to common values and mission, a turn or return to authentic person-centered planning, shifting power and control, using community supports and relationships, moving away from facility-based settings, and nurturing staff engagement. Ultimately, organizational change is an ongoing process that requires organizational perseverance and commitment.

  5. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  6. Low-frequency group exercise improved the motor functions of community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area when combined with home exercise with self-monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Yoshito; Asakawa, Yasuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined whether low-frequency group exercise improved the motor functions of community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area when combined with home exercise with self-monitoring. [Subjects] The subjects were community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area of Japan. [Methods] One group (n = 50) performed group exercise combined with home exercise with self-monitoring. Another group (n = 37) performed group exercise only. Low-frequency group exercise (warm-up, exercises for motor functions, and cool-down) was performed in seven 40 to 70-minute sessions over 9 weeks by both groups. Five items of motor functions were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] Significant interactions were observed between groups and assessment times for all motor functions. Improvements in motor functions were significantly greater in the group that performed group exercise combined with home exercise with self-monitoring than in the group that performed group exercise only. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant differences in 3 items of motor functions. No significant improvements were observed in motor functions in the group that performed group exercise only. [Conclusions] Group exercise combined with home exercise with self-monitoring improved motor functions in the setting of low-frequency group exercise for community-dwelling elderly people in a rural area. PMID:27065520

  7. Improper sharp disposal practices among diabetes patients in home care settings: Need for concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindo Majumdar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, outbreaks of blood-borne infections have been reported from assisted living facilities, which were traced back to improper blood glucose monitoring practices. Needle-stick injuries have been implicated in many such cases. This directly raises concerns over sharp disposal practices of diabetic patients self-managing their condition in home care settings. With India being home to a huge diabetic population, this issue, if neglected, can cause substantial damage to the health of the population and a marked economic loss. This article discusses the sharp disposal practices prevalent among diabetes patients, the importance of proper sharp disposal, barriers to safe disposal of sharps, and the options available for doing the same. For adopting an environmentally safe wholesome approach, disposal of plastics generated as a result of diabetes self-care at home is important as well. The article also looks at the possible long-term solutions to these issues that are sustainable in an Indian context.

  8. Group decisions and individual differences: route fidelity predicts flight leadership in homing pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Robin; Mann, Richard; Guilford, Tim; Biro, Dora

    2011-02-23

    How social-living animals make collective decisions is currently the subject of intense scientific interest, with increasing focus on the role of individual variation within the group. Previously, we demonstrated that during paired flight in homing pigeons, a fully transitive leadership hierarchy emerges as birds are forced to choose between their own and their partner's habitual routes. This stable hierarchy suggests a role for individual differences mediating leadership decisions within homing pigeon pairs. What these differences are, however, has remained elusive. Using novel quantitative techniques to analyse habitual route structure, we show here that leadership can be predicted from prior route-following fidelity. Birds that are more faithful to their own route when homing alone are more likely to emerge as leaders when homing socially. We discuss how this fidelity may relate to the leadership phenomenon, and propose that leadership may emerge from the interplay between individual route confidence and the dynamics of paired flight.

  9. Heuristic Scheme for Home Circuit Grouping andWavelength Assignment in LOBS-HC Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ximin; Yi, Bo; Tang, Wan; Li, Jingcong

    2014-09-01

    Grouping the Home Circuits (HCs) with the same source is a critical issue of Labeled Optical Burst Switching with Home Circuit (LOBS-HC). To maximize the wavelength utilization in LOBS-HC ring networks, an HC grouping and wavelength assignment scheme, called Longest Path Matching and Graph Coloring (LPMGC), is proposed. LPMGC consists of two phases: grouping and wavelength assignment. First, a heuristic algorithm, named Longest Path Matching (LPM), is proposed to group the HCs according to the longest common path matching between HCs and to make each group as large as possible. And then, Graph Coloring (GC) is introduced to assign wavelengths for HC groups. The numerical results show that the proposed scheme performances better than Complementary HC Assignment (CHA) and some other heuristics in both unidirectional and bidirectional LOBS-HC ring networks in terms of wavelength utilization.

  10. Group processes and process evaluations in a new treatment setting: inpatient group psychotherapy followed by internet-chat aftercare groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Sedway, Jan; Kordy, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about processes characterizing therapeutic Internet-chat groups, which offer a novel way of providing group therapy over distances. In this study group processes and group evaluations were examined in a treatment setting where face-to-face inpatient groups are followed by chat aftercare groups. For a sample of 121 patients who participated in both treatment modalities, group processes and group evaluations were modeled using hierarchical linear modeling. The group evaluations followed a consistent upward course from the beginning of therapy until the end of chat aftercare. For the process measures Activity and Emotional Reactivity, the initial scores at the beginning of the chat groups were lower than at the end of the inpatient treatment, but higher than at admission. During chat aftercare, Activity and Emotional Reactivity scores increased less than during the inpatient phase, but on average Activity and Emotional Reactivity were higher during Internet-chat aftercare. The predictive value of the acquaintance of the therapist from inpatient treatment and the course of group evaluations during inpatient treatment on the course of group evaluations during chat aftercare were examined.

  11. PRagmatic trial Of Video Education in Nursing homes: The design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized trial in the nursing home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Vincent; Volandes, Angelo E; Gutman, Roee; Gatsonis, Constantine; Mitchell, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Background/Aims Nursing homes are complex healthcare systems serving an increasingly sick population. Nursing homes must engage patients in advance care planning, but do so inconsistently. Video decision support tools improved advance care planning in small randomized controlled trials. Pragmatic trials are increasingly employed in health services research, although not commonly in the nursing home setting to which they are well-suited. This report presents the design and rationale for a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial that evaluated the "real world" application of an Advance Care Planning Video Program in two large US nursing home healthcare systems. Methods PRagmatic trial Of Video Education in Nursing homes was conducted in 360 nursing homes (N = 119 intervention/N = 241 control) owned by two healthcare systems. Over an 18-month implementation period, intervention facilities were instructed to offer the Advance Care Planning Video Program to all patients. Control facilities employed usual advance care planning practices. Patient characteristics and outcomes were ascertained from Medicare Claims, Minimum Data Set assessments, and facility electronic medical record data. Intervention adherence was measured using a Video Status Report embedded into electronic medical record systems. The primary outcome was the number of hospitalizations/person-day alive among long-stay patients with advanced dementia or cardiopulmonary disease. The rationale for the approaches to facility randomization and recruitment, intervention implementation, population selection, data acquisition, regulatory issues, and statistical analyses are discussed. Results The large number of well-characterized candidate facilities enabled several unique design features including stratification on historical hospitalization rates, randomization prior to recruitment, and 2:1 control to intervention facilities ratio. Strong endorsement from corporate leadership made randomization

  12. Recognizing and Enhancing the Communication Skills of Your Group Home Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Beverly A.

    The manual examines ways in which nonprofessional group home health care workers can enhance the communication and interaction skills of developmentally disabled clients. The communication process is explored in terms of information exchange, both verbal and nonverbal. Examples of vocal, nonvocal, and echolalic speech are offered and suggestions…

  13. Foster Youth Evaluate the Performance of Group Home Services in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rex S.; Ellis, Peter T.

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 foster youth employed by a foster youth advocacy organization suggested that an evaluation of group home services to foster youth be conducted in Alameda County, California. This report presents the development and conduct of this evaluation study; how funding was obtained; and how foster youth were hired, trained, and employed to produce…

  14. Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings: Washington, D.C. (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  15. Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings: Washington, D.C. (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  16. Doing more with Less: A client-centred approach to healthcare logistics in a nursing home setting

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis Moeke; Lineke Verkooijen

    2013-01-01

    Doing More with Less: A Client-Centred Approach to Healthcare Logistics in a Nursing Home Setting Dutch nursing homes are currently confronted with two seemingly incompatible goals: a more client-centred approach and the necessity to reduce costs at the same time. It is becoming increasingly apparent that healthcare logistics can contribute to providing high-quality care and support at a reasonable cost. Moreover, care and support which takes the client’s preferences as starting point. A l...

  17. [Facilitators and barriers regarding end of life care at nursing homes: A focus group study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-García, María Remedios; Moreno-Rodríguez, Marina; Hueso-Montoro, César; Campos-Calderón, Concepción; Varella-Safont, Ana; Montoya-Juárez, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    To identify the facilitators and barriers experienced by professional related to end of life care in nursing homes. Descriptive qualitative research with phenomenological orientation, through content analysis. Nursing Homes at Primary Care District in Granada (Spain). Fifteen clinical professionals with, at least 6 months of experience in nursing homes, without specific background in palliative care. Three focus groups were undertaken with professionals of different disciplines and nursing homes. Interviews were recorded and transcribed literally. An open and axial coding was performed to identify relevant categories. Professionals identified difficulties in the communication with families related to relatives' feelings of guilt, difficulty in understanding the deterioration of their relative, and addressing too late the issue of death. Regarding decision making, professionals recognized that they do not encourage participation of patients. Advance directives are valued as a necessary tool, but they do not contemplate implementing them systematically. Other difficulties that professionals highlighted are lack of coordination with other professionals, related to misunderstanding of patients' needs, as well as lack of training, and lack of material and human resources. Facilitators include relationships with primary care teams. It is necessary to improve communication among nursing homes professionals, families, patients and other health workers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Characteristics of the home health practice setting that attract and retain physical therapists: results of a survey and implications for home health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tracey L

    2011-03-01

    An electronic survey of the home health (HH) section members of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) found that physical therapists (PTs) are attracted to HH for flexible work hours, the ability to work one on one with a patient, the functional setting, and salary, in that order. They continue to practice in HH because they take pride in their work, the relationships they have with their patients/caregivers, their ability to make autonomous work decisions, their control over their schedule, the relationships they have within the home health agency (HHA), salary, the relationships they have with peers, their benefits, and their ability to handle documentation demands, in that order.

  19. [Home based and group based exercise programs in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, S; Costa, S; Mesquita, C; Duarte, J

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation of the joints of the spine and sacroiliac and to a lesser percentage of the peripheral joints. It is a debilitating condition which reduces quality of life in patients with AS. The practice of physical therapy is recommended as non-pharmacological treatment as well as the treatment and prevention of associated deformities. To collect and summarize the available evidence in scientific databases to realize the effectiveness of home based and group based programs in patients with AS. Systematic review, where articles for the study were collected from scientific database PubMed. We have found 65 articles with publication date between January 1, 2004 and January 31, 2014. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established to make the selection of articles to include in the study. All investigators provided their agreement in presencial meeting for a final selection, and at a later stage, the articles were read in full by the three investigators. The present systematic review includes eight randomized controlled trials. All articles show functional benefits in patients with AS subject to exercise programs in group based and / or home based. From the eight articles, 4 addressed programs conducted in home based context and 4 addressed in group based context programs. There appears to be evidence that the programs carried out based on group are more effective than those home based conducted in patients with AS. It was concluded also be advantageous to carry out home based exercise programs than the absence of any exercise program..

  20. Home based and group based exercise programs in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Lopes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation of the joints of the spine and sacroiliac and to a lesser percentage of the peripheral joints. It is a debilitating condition which reduces quality of life in patients with AS. The practice of physical therapy is recommended as non-pharmacological treatment as well as the treatment and prevention of associated deformities. Objective: To collect and summarize the available evidence in scientific databases to realize the effectiveness of home based and group based programs in patients with AS. Methods: Systematic review, where articles for the study were collected from scientific database PubMed. We have found 65 articles with publication date between January 1, 2004 and January 31, 2014. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established to make the selection of articles to include in the study. All investigators provided their agreement in presencial meeting for a final selection, and at a later stage, the articles were read in full by the three investigators. Results: The present systematic review includes eight randomized controlled trials. All articles show functional benefits in patients with AS subject to exercise programs in group based and / or home based. From the eight articles, 4 addressed programs conducted in home based context and 4 addressed in group based context programs. Conclusion: There appears to be evidence that the programs carried out based on group are more effective than those home based conducted in patients with AS. It was concluded also be advantageous to carry out home based exercise programs than the absence of any exercise program.

  1. Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A fiery feminist piece that argues that Indian women are all homeless; animals have homes but Indian women have none, because they have to depend on the mercy of their "keepers"; therefore, Indian women live a life worse than animals.

  2. Training for Direct Support Staff at Group Homes for People with Chronic Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirsadri, Alireza; Pizzuti, Albert; Smith, Daicia; Duckett, Danielle; Arfken, Cynthia L

    2017-07-28

    For people with chronic mental illness, their support system (including direct support staff at group homes) play a key role in ameliorating exacerbations leading to crisis care. However, little information exists on curriculum or training programs focused on reducing exacerbations while promoting compassionate care. We developed, implemented and evaluated such a program that featured role-playing and animated videos supplemented with limited didactics. During development phase, direct support staff reviewed videos and rated them as depicting realistic situations with high acceptability. During implementation, the 6-week course (at least one staff from six different group homes not involved in the development phase) using a 3-month pre-post design found reductions in total number of incident reports and pre-specified outcomes of recipient right complaints, emergency calls, and psychiatric hospitalizations. The program demonstrated acceptability, improved care and better outcomes on some but not all outcomes. Improved training of direct support staff is possible and has positive outcomes.

  3. Short Blue Light Pulses (30 Min) in the Morning Support a Sleep-Advancing Protocol in a Home Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdink, Moniek; Walbeek, Thijs J; Beersma, Domien G M; Hommes, Vanja; Gordijn, Marijke C M

    2016-10-01

    Many people in our modern civilized society sleep later on free days compared to work days. This discrepancy in sleep timing will lead to so-called 'social jetlag' on work days with negative consequences for performance and health. Light therapy in the morning is often proposed as the most effective method to advance the circadian rhythm and sleep phase. However, most studies focus on direct effects on the circadian system and not on posttreatment effects on sleep phase and sleep integrity. In this placebo-controlled home study we investigated if blue light, rather than amber light therapy, can phase shift the sleep phase along with the circadian rhythm with preservation of sleep integrity and performance. We selected 42 participants who suffered from 'social jetlag' on workdays. Participants were randomly assigned to either high-intensity blue light exposure or amber light exposure (placebo) with similar photopic illuminance. The protocol consisted of 14 baseline days without sleep restrictions, 9 treatment days with either 30-min blue light pulses or 30-min amber light pulses in the morning along with a sleep advancing scheme and 7 posttreatment days without sleep restrictions. Melatonin samples were taken at days 1, 7, 14 (baseline), day 23 (effect treatment), and day 30 (posttreatment). Light exposure was recorded continuously. Sleep was monitored through actigraphy. Performance was measured with a reaction time task. As expected, the phase advance of the melatonin rhythm from day 14 to day 23 was significantly larger in the blue light exposure group, compared to the amber light group (84 min ± 51 (SD) and 48 min ± 47 (SD) respectively; t36 = 2.23, p light group compared to slightly later in the amber light group (-21 min ± 33 (SD) and +12 min ± 33 (SD) respectively; F1,35 = 9.20, p light group compared to the blue light group during sleep in the treatment period (F1,32 = 4.40, p light treatment (F1,13 = 17.1, p light condition (F1

  4. Supplier Selection Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets Group Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of suppliers had always been a key point of the supply chain management, directly impact the operation of supply chain. In this context, firstly introduced the study situation of supplier selection, established the evaluation index system based on the research and then puts forward a new method for supplier selection based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets. Finally, using an example to illustrate the application of indicators and the method provides a new method for supplier selection.

  5. Impact of discussion on preferences elicited in a group setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne Ruairidh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completeness of preferences is assumed as one of the axioms of expected utility theory but has been subject to little empirical study. Methods Fifteen non-health professionals was recruited and familiarised with the standard gamble technique. The group then met five times over six months and preferences were elicited independently on 41 scenarios. After individual valuation, the group discussed the scenarios, following which preferences could be changed. Changes made were described and summary measures (mean and median before and after discussion compared using paired t test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out to explore attitudes to discussing preferences. These were transcribed, read by two investigators and emergent themes described. Results Sixteen changes (3.6% were made to preferences by seven (47% of the fifteen members. The difference between individual preference values before and after discussion ranged from -0.025 to 0.45. The average effect on the group mean was 0.0053. No differences before and after discussion were statistically significant. The group valued discussion highly and suggested it brought four main benefits: reassurance; improved procedural performance; increased group cohesion; satisfying curiosity. Conclusion The hypothesis that preferences are incomplete cannot be rejected for a proportion of respondents. However, brief discussion did not result in substantial number of changes to preferences and these did not have significant impact on summary values for the group, suggesting that incompleteness, if present, may not have an important effect on cost-utility analyses.

  6. Conducting Nursing Intervention Research in a Cooperative Group Setting – A Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Heidi S.; Nolte, Susan; Edwards, Robert P.; Wenzel, Lari

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide a history on nursing science within the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG); to discuss challenges and facilitators of nursing science in the cooperative group (CG) using a current nurse-led protocol (GOG-0259) as an exemplar; and to propose recommendations aimed at advancing nursing science in the CG setting. Data Source GOG reports and protocol databases, online databases of indexed citations, and experiences from the development and implementation of GOG-0259. Conclusions Benefits of CG research include opportunities for inter-disciplinary collaboration and ability to rapidly accrue large national samples. Challenges include limited financial resources to support non-treatment trials, a cumbersome protocol approval process, and lack of experience with nursing/quality of life intervention studies. Formal structures within GOG need to be created to encourage nurse scientists to become active members; promote collaboration between experienced GOG advanced practice nurses and new nurse scientists to identify nursing research priorities; and consider innovative funding structures to support pilot intervention studies. Implications for Nursing Practice Understanding the CG research process is critical for nurse scientists. A multi-disciplinary team of CG leaders can help investigators navigate a complex research environment and can increase awareness of the value of nursing research. PMID:24559780

  7. [Emotional and instrumental orientations in interpersonal attraction and their relationship to group norms in a group-work setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, J

    1996-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between group norms and interpersonal attraction in group work setting. It may be assumed that interpersonal attraction, like group functions, has two conflictive orientations: instrumentality and emotionality. Relationship of the two orientations in interpersonal attraction to group norms was examined in two experiments. Results of Experiment 1, with 66 female university students, suggested that specific contents of group norms influenced both instrumental and emotional attraction. Experiment 2, with 60 female university students, indicated that emotional attraction had normative influence on task selection and goal setting. Conflicting dynamics of the two orientations in group-work setting are discussed.

  8. Cognitive impairment and reduced quality of life among old-age groups in Southern Urban India: home-based community residents, free and paid old-age home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, R; McLachlan, C S; Mahadevan, U; Isaac, V

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study were (i) to screen for cognitive impairment using Mini-Mental Status Examination among three old-age groups based on dwelling types in Chennai, India i.e. residential paid old-age homes, residential free (charitable) homes and home-based community-dwelling residents; (ii) secondly to investigate factors (demographic, psychological, medical and disability) associated with cognitive impairment in the these old-age; (iii) third, to investigate the independent association between cognitive impairment and health-related quality of life (QOL) among elderly across aged care dwelling types. A total of 499 elderly from three old-age groups were interviewed in this cross-sectional study (173 elderly home-based community-dwellers, 176 paid-home and 150 free-home residents). All the participants were interviewed for their socio-economic condition, medical morbidity, self-reported worry and anxiety, disability and QOL. 42.7% free-home elderly residents were found to have cognitive impairment, whereas 32.4% of paid-home and 21.9% of community-dwelling elderly had cognitive impairment. The residents of free-home were less educated, had lower income and reported higher incidence of worry, anxiety, disability and poor QOL than community-dwelling or paid-home residents. Increasing age, low education, female gender, high blood pressure and disability were associated with cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment had significant negative effect on their health-related QOL (b = -0.10, P = 0.01), independent of age, gender, education, chronic illness and dwelling type. The burden of cognitive impairment was high in all aged-care dwelling types in urban India; with free charitable home residents being worse affected. Cognitive impairment was associated with disability and poor health-related QOL in these age-care settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For

  9. Renormalization Group Invariance and Optimal QCD Renormalization Scale-Setting

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Fu, Hai-Bing; Ma, Hong-Hao; Brodsky, Stanley J; Mojaza, Matin

    2014-01-01

    A valid prediction from quantum field theory for a physical observable should be independent of the choice of renormalization scheme -- this is the primary requirement of renormalization group invariance (RGI). Satisfying scheme invariance is a challenging problem for perturbative QCD (pQCD), since truncated perturbation series do not automatically satisfy the requirements of the renormalization group. Two distinct approaches for satisfying the RGI principle have been suggested in the literature. One is the "Principle of Maximum Conformality" (PMC) in which the terms associated with the $\\beta$-function are absorbed into the scale of the running coupling at each perturbative order; its predictions are scheme and scale independent at every finite order. The other approach is the "Principle of Minimum Sensitivity" (PMS), which is based on local RGI; the PMS approach determines the optimal renormalization scale by requiring the slope of the approximant of an observable to vanish. In this paper, we present a deta...

  10. Boundary Conformal Field Theories and Limit Sets of Kleinian Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Kholodenko, A L

    2000-01-01

    In this paper,based on the available mathematical works on geometry and topology of hyperbolic manifolds and discrete groups, some results of Freedman et al (hep-th/9804058) are reproduced and broadly generalized. Among many new results the possibility of extension of work of Belavin,Polyakov and Zamolodchikov to higher dimensions is investigated. Known in physical literature objections against such extension are removed and the possibility of an extension is convincingly demonstrated.

  11. Enhancing the early home learning environment through a brief group parenting intervention: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The quality of the home learning environment has a significant influence on children’s language and communication skills during the early years with children from disadvantaged families disproportionately affected. This paper describes the protocol and participant baseline characteristics of a community-based effectiveness study. It evaluates the effects of ‘smalltalk’, a brief group parenting intervention (with or without home coaching) on the quality of the early childhood home l...

  12. Ensuring evidence-based practices for falls prevention in a nursing home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Zenewton A S; Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Saturno, Pedro J

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an ad hoc multifaceted program to improve structure, professional behavior, and outcomes related to falls prevention. Internal quality improvement cycle. Nursing home in Spain. An institution with 130 residents. Local building of quality criteria, audit and feedback, and a specific intervention to improve based on educational and sensitization activities and changes in the process and recording systems. Quality of falls prevention was assessed using reliable evidence-based criteria (4 of structure and 9 of process), at baseline and 6 months after a specific intervention to improve. Number of falls was recorded in a random sample (n = 60) of residents (≥ 65 years) during a 1-year follow-up and summarized fortnightly as an indicator analyzed using a statistical control chart. Baseline structure and fall prevention practices were poor. After the intervention, all structure criteria were present and 8 of 9 process criteria improved significantly. Thirty-two falls occurred 6 months before and 21 after the intervention started, showing a significant decrease in the fortnightly incidence (P < .01). Adherence to evidence-based recommendations was poor in our setting, but the internal quality improvement cycle was useful in ensuring safe practices and in achieving better outcomes. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. "We Occasionally Miss a Bath but We Never Miss Stories": Fathers Reading to Their Young Children in the Home Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Jon; Cara, Olga; Mallows, David

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a mixed methods research project in 2011, which set out to examine the extent and nature of father and child shared home reading practices. There was a particular focus on exploring fathers' perceptions of their role in reading with their child, aged five years old. The research was commissioned by Booktrust and…

  14. Consequences of Empowered CNA Teams in Nursing Home Settings: A Longitudinal Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Dale E.; Cready, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have concluded that there is a lack of "patient-centered" care in nursing homes and subsequently a need for nursing home culture change. As a result, a variety of new, promising initiatives have been introduced, with most of these incorporating the use of "empowered" employees. The purpose of this study…

  15. Group asthma education in a pediatric inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomeo, Concettina

    2009-12-01

    Asthma education is an important component of asthma care and management. Children and parents often do not receive asthma education, and frequently, education programs are time consuming. The purpose of this medical record review was to retrospectively determine the impact of a short, group-based, inpatient asthma self-management program on the number of children/parents who received complete asthma education before discharge. The self-management program was instituted in 2006. Participants consisted of all children admitted to a New England children's hospital from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2006, with a primary diagnosis of asthma. Findings revealed that significantly more (p asthma education before discharge in 2006 versus 2005.

  16. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens Species Group Recovery from Human Homes Varies Seasonally and by Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K Remold

    Full Text Available By shedding light on variation in time as well as in space, long-term biogeographic studies can help us define organisms' distribution patterns and understand their underlying drivers. Here we examine distributions of Pseudomonas in and around 15 human homes, focusing on the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups. We describe recovery from 10,941 samples collected during up to 8 visits per home, occurring on average 2.6 times per year. We collected a mean of 141 samples per visit, from sites in most rooms of the house, from the surrounding yards, and from human and pet occupants. We recovered Pseudomonas in 9.7% of samples, with the majority of isolates being from the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups (approximately 62% and 23% of Pseudomonas samples recovered respectively. Although representatives of both groups were recovered from every season, every house, and every type of environment sampled, recovery was highly variable across houses and samplings. Whereas recovery of P. putida group was higher in summer and fall than in winter and spring, P. fluorescens group isolates were most often recovered in spring. P. putida group recovery from soils was substantially higher than its recovery from all other environment types, while higher P. fluorescens group recovery from soils than from other sites was much less pronounced. Both species groups were recovered from skin and upper respiratory tract samples from healthy humans and pets, although this occurred infrequently. This study indicates that even species that are able to survive under a broad range of conditions can be rare and variable in their distributions in space and in time. For such groups, determining patterns and causes of stochastic and seasonal variability may be more important for understanding the processes driving their biogeography than the identity of the types of environments in which they can be found.

  17. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson's Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Monari, Erin H; Eilers, Amanda; Thompson-Avila, Amanda; Hwynn, Nelson H; Sriram, Ashok; Haq, Ihtsham; Hardwick, Angela; Malaty, Irene A; Okun, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Objective. (1) To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a rural setting. (2) To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s) of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work). One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS). Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program.

  18. The Effects of Staff Training on the Types of Interactions Observed at Two Group Homes for Foster Care Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosland, Kimberly A.; Dunlap, Glen; Sager, Wayne; Neff, Bryon; Wilcox, Catherine; Blanco, Alfredo; Giddings, Tamela

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: An extensive literature base exists for behavioral parent training; however, few studies have focused on training direct care staff at group home and residential facilities for children. This study was conducted to determine whether a behavioral staff training program consisting of classroom training and in-home feedback would improve…

  19. The Relationship of Interpersonal Attraction and Attraction to Group in a Growth Group Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nancy J.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the relationship of interpersonal attraction and attraction to groups. Students (N=56) participating in growth groups completed the Group Attitude Scale and individual rating scales early, midway, and late in the group. Data indicated an increasing relationship between interpersonal and group attraction throughout the life of the…

  20. Facilitating Active Engagement of the University Student in a Large-Group Setting Using Group Work Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Gemma K.; Mahon, Catherine; Lillis, Seamus

    2017-01-01

    It is envisaged that small-group exercises as part of a large-group session would facilitate not only group work exercises (a valuable employability skill), but also peer learning. In this article, such a strategy to facilitate the active engagement of the student in a large-group setting was explored. The production of student-led resources was…

  1. Interprofessional team building in the palliative home care setting: Use of a conceptual framework to inform a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James; Kearney, Colleen; Glenns, Brenda; McKay, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Home-based palliative care is increasingly dependent on interprofessional teams to deliver collaborative care that more adequately meets the needs of clients and families. The purpose of this pilot evaluation was to qualitatively explore the views of an interprofessional group of home care providers (occupational therapists, nurses, personal support work supervisors, community care coordinators, and a team coordinator) regarding a pilot project encouraging teamwork in interprofessional palliative home care services. We used qualitative methods, informed by an interprofessional conceptual framework, to analyse participants' accounts and provide recommendations regarding strategies for interprofessional team building in palliative home health care. Findings suggest that encouraging practitioners to share past experiences and foster common goals for palliative care are important elements of team building in interprofessional palliative care. Also, establishing a team leader who emphasises sharing power among team members and addressing the need for mutual emotional support may help to maximise interprofessional teamwork in palliative home care. These findings may be used to develop and test more comprehensive efforts to promote stronger interprofessional teamwork in palliative home health care delivery.

  2. Perceived autonomy and activity choices among physically disabled older people in nursing home settings: a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Runge, Ulla; Hoff, Morten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To evaluate the effect of individually tailored programs on perceived autonomy in institutionalized physically disabled older people and to describe participants' activity wishes and content of the programs. METHOD. This blinded randomized trial with follow up included a total of nine...... the correspondence between the individual wishes for activities and the concrete content of the programs was not obvious, results indicate potential for enabling the perception of autonomy among physically disabled older nursing home residents. The clinical consequences may suggest a focus on existing traditions...... nursing homes and 50 nursing home residents who were randomized into either a control group or an intervention group. Perceived autonomy was measured at baseline (T1), after 12 weeks (T2) of intervention and after 24 weeks (T3) Wishes for daily activities was identified at T1. Weekly reports of individual...

  3. Effects of a simple home-based exercise program on fall prevention in older adults: A 12-month primary care setting, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boongird, Chitima; Keesukphan, Prasit; Phiphadthakusolkul, Soontraporn; Rattanasiri, Sasivimol; Thakkinstian, Ammarin

    2017-04-24

    To investigate the effects of a simple home-based exercise program on falls, physical functioning, fear of falling and quality of life in a primary care setting. Participants (n = 439), aged ≥65 years with mild-to-moderate balance dysfunction were randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 219) or control (n = 220) group. The program consisted of five combined exercises, which progressed in difficulty, and a walking plan. Controls received fall prevention education. Physical functioning and other outcomes were measured at 3- and 6-month follow-up visits. Falls were monitored with fall diaries and phone interviews at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months respectively. The 12 months of the home-based exercise program showed the incidence of falls was 0.30 falls per person year in the exercise group, compared with 0.40 in the control group. The estimated incidence rate ratio was 0.75 (95% CI 0.55-1.04), which was not statistically significant. The fear of falling (measured by the Thai fall efficacy scale) was significantly lower in the exercise than control group (24.7 vs 27.0, P = 0.003). Also, the trend of program adherence increased in the exercise group. (29.6% to 56.8%). This simple home-based exercise program showed a reduction in fear of falling and a positive trend towards exercise adherence. Further studies should focus on factors associated with exercise adherence, the benefits of increased home visits and should follow participants longer in order to evaluate the effects of the program. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. A minimal axiom group for rough set based on quasi-ordering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代建华; 陈卫东; 潘云鹤

    2004-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study to characterize rough set theory using dependable and minimal axiom groups.Thus,rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods.The classic rough set theory is based on equivalent relation,but rough set theory based on reflexive and transitive relation(called quasi-ordering)has wide applications in the real world.To characterize topological rough set theory,an axiom group named RT,consisting of 4 axioms,is proposed.It is proved that the axiom group reliability in characterizing rough set theory based on similai relation is reasonable.Simultaneously,the minimization of the axiom group,which requires that each axiom is an equation and each is independent,is proved.The axiom group is helpful for researching rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  5. A minimal axiom group for rough set based on quasi-ordering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代建华; 陈卫东; 潘云鹤

    2004-01-01

    Rough set axiomatization is one aspect of rough set study to characterize rough set theory using dependable and minimal axiom groups. Thus, rough set theory can be studied by logic and axiom system methods. The classic rough set theory is based on equivalent relation, but rough set theory based on reflexive and transitive relation (called quasi-ordering) has wide applications in the real world. To characterize topological rough set theory, an axiom group named RT, consisting of 4 axioms, is proposed. It is proved that the axiom group reliability in characterizing rough set theory based on similar relation is reasonable. Simultaneously, the minimization of the axiom group, which requires that each axiom is an equation and each is independent, is proved. The axiom group is helpful for researching rough set theory by logic and axiom system methods.

  6. Safe start at home: what parents of newborns need after early discharge from hospital - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Elisabeth; Krähenbühl, Katrin; Eicher, Manuela; Rodmann, Susanne; Fölmli, Luzia; Conzelmann, Cornelia; Zemp, Elisabeth

    2016-03-08

    The length of postpartum hospital stay is decreasing internationally. Earlier hospital discharge of mothers and newborns decreases postnatal care or transfers it to the outpatient setting. This study aimed to investigate the experiences of new parents and examine their views on care following early hospital discharge. Six focus group discussions with new parents (n = 24) were conducted. A stratified sampling scheme of German and Turkish-speaking groups was employed. A 'playful design' method was used to facilitate participants communication wherein they used blocks and figurines to visualize their perspectives on care models The visualized constructions of care models were photographed and discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Text and visual data was thematically analyzed by a multi-professional group and findings were validated by the focus group participants. Following discharge, mothers reported feeling physically strained during recuperating from birth and initiating breastfeeding. The combined requirements of infant and self-care needs resulted in a significant need for practical and medical support. Families reported challenges in accessing postnatal care services and lacking inter-professional coordination. The visualized models of ideal care comprised access to a package of postnatal care including monitoring, treating and caring for the health of the mother and newborn. This included home visits from qualified midwives, access to a 24-h helpline, and domestic support for household tasks. Participants suggested that improving inter-professional networks, implementing supervisors or a centralized coordinating center could help to remedy the current fragmented care. After hospital discharge, new parents need practical support, monitoring and care. Such support is important for the health and wellbeing of the mother and child. Integrated care services including professional home visits and a 24-hour help line may help meet the needs of

  7. EnviroAtlas - Commute Modes and Working from Home by Block Group for the Conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset portrays the percent of workers who commute to work using various modes, and the percent who work from home within each Census Block Group...

  8. Effect of Caffeine on Attention and Alertness Measured in a Home-Setting, Using Web-Based Cognition Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasman, Wilrike J; Boessen, Ruud; Donner, Yoni; Clabbers, Nard; Boorsma, André

    2017-09-07

    There is an increasing interest among nutritional researchers to perform lifestyle and nutritional intervention studies in a home setting instead of testing subjects in a clinical unit. The term used in other disciplines is 'ecological validity' stressing a realistic situation. This becomes more and more feasible because devices and self-tests that enable such studies are more commonly available. Here, we present such a study in which we reproduced the effect of caffeine on attention and alertness in an at-home setting. The study was aimed to reproduce the effect of caffeine on attention and alertness using a Web-based study environment of subjects, at home, performing different Web-based cognition tests. The study was designed as a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Subjects were provided with coffee sachets (2 with and 2 without caffeine). They were also provided with a written instruction of the test days. Healthy volunteers consumed a cup of coffee after an overnight fast. Each intervention was repeated once. Before and 1 hour after coffee consumption subjects performed Web-based cognitive performance tests at home, which measured alertness and attention, established by 3 computerized tests provided by QuantifiedMind. Each test was performed for 5 minutes. Web-based recruitment was fast and efficient. Within 2 weeks, 102 subjects applied, of whom 70 were eligible. Of the 66 subjects who started the study, 53 completed all 4 test sessions (80%), indicating that they were able to perform the do it yourself tests, at home, correctly. The Go-No Go cognition test performed at home showed the same significant improvement in reaction time with caffeine as found in controlled studies in a metabolic ward (P=.02). For coding and N-back the second block was performed approximately 10% faster. No effect was seen on correctness. The study showed that the effects of caffeine consumption on a cognition test in an at-home setting revealed similar

  9. Late group-based rehabilitation has no advantages compared with supervised home-exercises after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Majbritt; Larsen, Kristian; Madsen, Inger Kirkegård;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to test whether group-based rehabilitation focusing on strength training, education and self-management is more effective than individual, supervised home-training after fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA).......This study aimed to test whether group-based rehabilitation focusing on strength training, education and self-management is more effective than individual, supervised home-training after fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA)....

  10. Home-based Computer Assisted Arm Rehabilitation (hCAAR) robotic device for upper limb exercise after stroke: results of a feasibility study in home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Manoj; Gallagher, Justin; Makower, Sophie; Keeling, David; Bhakta, Bipin; O'Connor, Rory J; Levesley, Martin

    2014-12-12

    Home-based robotic technologies may offer the possibility of self-directed upper limb exercise after stroke as a means of increasing the intensity of rehabilitation treatment. The current literature has a paucity of robotic devices that have been tested in a home environment. The aim of this research project was to evaluate a robotic device Home-based Computer Assisted Arm Rehabilitation (hCAAR) that can be used independently at home by stroke survivors with upper limb weakness. hCAAR device comprises of a joystick handle moved by the weak upper limb to perform tasks on the computer screen. The device provides assistance to the movements depending on users ability. Nineteen participants (stroke survivors with upper limb weakness) were recruited. Outcome measures performed at baseline (A0), at end of 8-weeks of hCAAR use (A1) and 1 month after end of hCAAR use (A2) were: Optotrak kinematic variables, Fugl Meyer Upper Extremity motor subscale (FM-UE), Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Medical Research Council (MRC) and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Chedoke Arm and Hand Activity Inventory (CAHAI) and ABILHAND. Two participants were unable to use hCAAR: one due to severe paresis and the other due to personal problems. The remaining 17 participants were able to use the device independently in their home setting. No serious adverse events were reported. The median usage time was 433 minutes (IQR 250 - 791 min). A statistically significant improvement was observed in the kinematic and clinical outcomes at A1. The median gain in the scores at A1 were by: movement time 19%, path length 15% and jerk 19%, FM-UE 1 point, total MAS 1.5 point, total MRC 2 points, ARAT 3 points, CAHAI 5.5 points and ABILHAND 3 points. Three participants showed clinically significant improvement in all the clinical outcomes. The hCAAR feasibility study is the first clinical study of its kind reported in the current literature; in this study, 17 participants used the robotic device independently

  11. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinsnes AG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anne G Vinsnes1, Jorunn L Helbostad2, Signe Nyrønning3, Gene E Harkless1,4, Randi Granbo5, Arnfinn Seim61Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 2Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 3Søbstad Community Hospital and Teaching Nursing Home, Trondheim, Norway; 4University of New Hampshire, College of Health and Social Services, Nursing Faculty, Durham, New Hampshire, USA; 5Department of Physiotherapy, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 6Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Residents in nursing homes (NHs are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48 or a control group (n = 50 after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15. Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis

  12. The Effect of Small Group Discussion on Cutoff Scores during Standard Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deunk, Marjolein I.; van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2014-01-01

    Standard setting methods, like the Bookmark procedure, are used to assist education experts in formulating performance standards. Small group discussion is meant to help these experts in setting more reliable and valid cutoff scores. This study is an analysis of 15 small group discussions during two standards setting trajectories and their effect…

  13. Sluggish cognitive tempo and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattention in the home and school contexts: Parent and teacher invariance and cross-setting validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G Leonard; Becker, Stephen P; Servera, Mateu; Bernad, Maria Del Mar; García-Banda, Gloria

    2017-02-01

    This study examined whether sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) inattention (IN) symptoms demonstrated cross-setting invariance and unique associations with symptom and impairment dimensions across settings (i.e., home SCT and ADHD-IN uniquely predicting school symptom and impairment dimensions, and vice versa). Mothers, fathers, primary teachers, and secondary teachers rated SCT, ADHD-IN, ADHD-hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), anxiety, depression, academic impairment, social impairment, and peer rejection dimensions for 585 Spanish 3rd-grade children (53% boys). Within-setting (i.e., mothers, fathers; primary, secondary teachers) and cross-settings (i.e., home, school) invariance was found for both SCT and ADHD-IN. From home to school, higher levels of home SCT predicted lower levels of school ADHD-HI and higher levels of school academic impairment after controlling for home ADHD-IN, whereas higher levels of home ADHD-IN predicted higher levels of school ADHD-HI, ODD, anxiety, depression, academic impairment, and peer rejection after controlling for home SCT. From school to home, higher levels of school SCT predicted lower levels of home ADHD-HI and ODD and higher levels of home anxiety, depression, academic impairment, and social impairment after controlling for school ADHD-IN, whereas higher levels of school ADHD-IN predicted higher levels of home ADHD-HI, ODD, and academic impairment after controlling for school SCT. Although SCT at home and school was able to uniquely predict symptom and impairment dimensions in the other setting, SCT at school was a better predictor than ADHD-IN at school of psychopathology and impairment at home. Findings provide additional support for SCT's validity relative to ADHD-IN. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Palliative care for cancer patients in a primary health care setting:Bereaved relatives' experience, a qualitative group interview study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Mette Asbjørn; Olesen, Frede; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2008-01-01

    Background: Knowledge about the quality and organisation of care to terminally ill cancer patients with a relatives' view in a primary health care setting is limited. The aim of the study is to analyse experiences and preferences of bereaved relatives to terminally ill cancer patients in a primary...... care setting to explore barriers and facilitators for delivery of good palliative home care. Methods: Three focus group interviews with fourteen bereaved relatives in Aarhus County, Denmark. Results: Three main categories of experience were identified: 1) The health professionals' management, where...... a need to optimize was found. 2) Shared care, which was lacking. 3) The relatives' role, which needs an extra focus. Conclusion: Relatives experience insufficient palliative care mainly due to organizational and cultural problems among professionals. Palliative care in primary care in general needs...

  15. Exploring the Experience of Nursing Home Residents Participation in a Hope-Focused Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L. Moore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative intervention was used to explore how older adults living in a long-term care environment (nursing home understand hope and experience being participants in a group in which a hope intervention was carried out. A group project in which each session focused intentionally on a hope strategy was carried out with a convenience sample of 10 women (ages 75–99 who were members of an existing group. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis of the interviews (conducted before the group intervention was carried out and again at the end, field notes, and collaborative conversations regarding emerging themes. Findings from this study suggest that hope is not static and that it can change over time in response to one’s situations and circumstances. Also evident in this study is the potential for using a group process in long-term care to foster hope in an intentional way to make it more visible in the lives of the residents and their environment suggesting that one is “never too old for hope.”

  16. Exploring the Experience of Nursing Home Residents Participation in a Hope-Focused Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sharon L.; Hall, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    A qualitative intervention was used to explore how older adults living in a long-term care environment (nursing home) understand hope and experience being participants in a group in which a hope intervention was carried out. A group project in which each session focused intentionally on a hope strategy was carried out with a convenience sample of 10 women (ages 75–99) who were members of an existing group. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis of the interviews (conducted before the group intervention was carried out and again at the end), field notes, and collaborative conversations regarding emerging themes. Findings from this study suggest that hope is not static and that it can change over time in response to one's situations and circumstances. Also evident in this study is the potential for using a group process in long-term care to foster hope in an intentional way to make it more visible in the lives of the residents and their environment suggesting that one is “never too old for hope.” PMID:24551450

  17. Doctor-patient communication without family is most frequently practiced in patients with malignant tumors in home medical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takuma; Imanaga, Teruhiko; Matsuzaki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Promotion of home medical care is absolutely necessary in Japan where is a rapidly aging society. In home medical care settings, triadic communications among the doctor, patient and the family are common. And "communications just between the doctor and the patient without the family" (doctor-patient communication without family, "DPC without family") is considered important for the patient to frankly communicate with the doctor without consideration for the family. However, the circumstances associated with DPC without family are unclear. Therefore, to identify the factors of the occurrence of DPC without family, we conducted a cross-sectional mail-in survey targeting 271 families of Japanese patients who had previously received home medical care. Among 227 respondents (83.8%), we eventually analyzed data from 143, excluding families of patients with severe hearing or cognitive impairment and severe verbal communication dysfunction. DPC without family occurred in 26.6% (n = 38) of the families analyzed. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed using a model including Primary disease, Daily activity, Duration of home medical care, Interval between doctor visits, Duration of doctor's stay, Existence of another room, and Spouse as primary caregiver. As a result, DPC without family was significantly associated with malignant tumor as primary disease (OR, 3.165; 95% CI, 1.180-8.486; P = 0.022). In conclusion, the visiting doctors should bear in mind that the background factor of the occurrence of DPC without family is patient's malignant tumors.

  18. Tooth loss and the condition of the prosthodontic appliances in a group of elderly home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catović, A; Jerolimov, V; Catić, A

    2000-03-01

    The study assessed the number of missing teeth, the state of the existing prosthodontic appliances and the need for their replacement. Dental status and anamnesis were taken on a group of 120 elderly home residents by trained examiners. Prosthodontic appliances were evaluated according to the Karlsson's index for the crowns and bridges, and according to the modified Nevalainen et al. index for the evaluation of the complete dentures, as well as the need for prosthetic treatment. The most persistent teeth in both jaws were lower canines, while the most commonly missing teeth were lower first molars. On average, the crowns were older and in poorer condition than the bridges. Lower complete dentures had better stability but were also less retentive in comparison with the upper complete dentures. More than 82% of the subjects were in need of either fixed, removable or combined prosthodontic treatment. The high prevalence of needs for prosthodontic treatment pointed to the requirement for frequent dental check ups within elderly home residents in order to better identify and meet their dental needs.

  19. Hesitant fuzzy soft sets with application in multicriteria group decision making problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-qiang; Li, Xin-E; Chen, Xiao-hong

    2015-01-01

    Soft sets have been regarded as a useful mathematical tool to deal with uncertainty. In recent years, many scholars have shown an intense interest in soft sets and extended standard soft sets to intuitionistic fuzzy soft sets, interval-valued fuzzy soft sets, and generalized fuzzy soft sets. In this paper, hesitant fuzzy soft sets are defined by combining fuzzy soft sets with hesitant fuzzy sets. And some operations on hesitant fuzzy soft sets based on Archimedean t-norm and Archimedean t-conorm are defined. Besides, four aggregation operations, such as the HFSWA, HFSWG, GHFSWA, and GHFSWG operators, are given. Based on these operators, a multicriteria group decision making approach with hesitant fuzzy soft sets is also proposed. To demonstrate its accuracy and applicability, this approach is finally employed to calculate a numerical example.

  20. Time spent in home meal preparation affects energy and food group intakes among midlife women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yen Li; Addo, O Yaw; Perry, Courtney D; Sudo, Noriko; Reicks, Marla

    2012-04-01

    Time spent in meal preparation may be indicative of the healthfulness of meals and therefore with weight status. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between amount of time spent preparing meals and meal food group and nutrient content by meal occasion (breakfast, lunch, and dinner) among 1036 midlife women. Participants completed a 1-day food record and eating occasion questionnaires for each meal occasion. ANCOVA was used to identify possible associations. Approximately half of the participants reported spending time spent preparing breakfast was associated with lower energy and fat intakes (ptime spent preparing lunch and dinner was associated with lower vegetable and sodium intakes (ptime spent preparing meals and meal content by weight status. Nutrition education should encourage home meal preparation while stressing the selection of healthier options. The differing associations by meal occasion suggest that interventions should be tailored according to meal type. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION AND SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF HOME GROUPS AND PEASANT FAMILIES IN THE LOWLANDS OF GUANAJUATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Ruiz Rueda

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The arrival of Vicente Fox in the year 2000 to thepresidency openly imposed the exercise of “a governmentof business men and for business men”, whose impact in thelowlands of Guanajuato was translated into a higher level ofunderstanding of neoliberal farming policies. In front of aneconomical bankrupt of grains production imposed by thosepolicies, the peasants had intensify the migration, mainly inthe US, which originated a varied process of socialstructure, that goes beyond, the one that points out that inthe rural communities only lives women, old people andchildren. It´s precisely this process of social structure,which will be analyzed in this work. To do this, will beaddressed the case of study of a village from theMunicipality of Irapuato, Guanajuato, where would bepossible to identify the different types of social structurearound the families and peasant home groups, taking countthat Guanajuato, and in particular the lowlands, is theregion that most migrants send to US.

  2. Sympatric woodland Myotis bats form tight-knit social groups with exclusive roost home ranges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A August

    Full Text Available The structuring of wild animal populations can influence population dynamics, disease spread, and information transfer. Social network analysis potentially offers insights into these processes but is rarely, if ever, used to investigate more than one species in a community. We therefore compared the social, temporal and spatial networks of sympatric Myotis bats (M. nattereri (Natterer's bats and M. daubentonii (Daubenton's bats, and asked: (1 are there long-lasting social associations within species? (2 do the ranges occupied by roosting social groups overlap within or between species? (3 are M. daubentonii bachelor colonies excluded from roosting in areas used by maternity groups?Using data on 490 ringed M. nattereri and 978 M. daubentonii from 379 colonies, we found that both species formed stable social groups encompassing multiple colonies. M. nattereri formed 11 mixed-sex social groups with few (4.3% inter-group associations. Approximately half of all M. nattereri were associated with the same individuals when recaptured, with many associations being long-term (>100 days. In contrast, M. daubentonii were sexually segregated; only a quarter of pairs were associated at recapture after a few days, and inter-sex associations were not long-lasting. Social groups of M. nattereri and female M. daubentonii had small roost home ranges (mean 0.2 km2 in each case. Intra-specific overlap was low, but inter-specific overlap was high, suggesting territoriality within but not between species. M. daubentonii bachelor colonies did not appear to be excluded from roosting areas used by females.Our data suggest marked species- and sex-specific patterns of disease and information transmission are likely between bats of the same genus despite sharing a common habitat. The clear partitioning of the woodland amongst social groups, and their apparent reliance on small patches of habitat for roosting, means that localised woodland management may be more important to

  3. Working in group living homes for older people with dementia: the effects on job satisfaction and burnout and the role of job characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, S. te; Willemse, B.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Eefsting, J.A.; Pot, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Group living homes are a fast-growing form of nursing home care for older people with dementia. This study seeks to determine the differences in job characteristics of nursing staff in group living homes and their influence on well-being. Methods: We examined the Job Demand

  4. Working in group living homes for older people with dementia: the effects on job satisfaction and burnout and the role of job characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, S. te; Willemse, B.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Eefsting, J.A.; Pot, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Group living homes are a fast-growing form of nursing home care for older people with dementia. This study seeks to determine the differences in job characteristics of nursing staff in group living homes and their influence on well-being. Methods: We examined the Job Demand Cont

  5. The Effects of Environmental Management Systems on Source Separation in the Work and Home Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris von Borgstede

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Measures that challenge the generation of waste are needed to address the global problem of the increasing volumes of waste that are generated in both private homes and workplaces. Source separation at the workplace is commonly implemented by environmental management systems (EMS. In the present study, the relationship between source separation at work and at home was investigated. A questionnaire that maps psychological and behavioural predictors of source separation was distributed to employees at different workplaces. The results show that respondents with awareness of EMS report higher levels of source separation at work, stronger environmental concern, personal and social norms, and perceive source separation to be less difficult. Furthermore, the results support the notion that after the adoption of EMS at the workplace, source separation at work spills over into source separation in the household. The potential implications for environmental management systems are discussed.

  6. The impact of medical technology on sense of security in the palliative home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Berit; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The increase in the use of medical devices in palliative home care requires that patients and next-of-kin feel secure. Therefore, the aim was to describe medical technology's impact on the sense of security for patients, next-of-kin and district nurses. Deductive content analysis was conducted on data from three previous studies, using the theoretical framework 'palliative home care as a secure base'. The use of medical technology was shown to have an impact on the sense of security for all involved. A sense of control was promoted by trust in staff and their competence in managing the technology, which was linked to continuity. Inner peace and being in comfort implied effective symptom relief facilitated by pain pumps and being relieved of responsibility. Health care professionals need to have practical knowledge about medical technology, but at the same time have an awareness of how to create and maintain a sense of security.

  7. The effects of alcohol expectancies on drinking behaviour in peer groups: Observations in a naturalistic setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, S.M.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Knibbe, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To study the functionality of alcohol expectancies in predicting drinking behaviour in existing peer groups of young adults in a 'naturalistic' setting. DESIGN AND SETTING: Young adults were invited to join an experiment with their peer group in a bar annex laboratory. During a 'break' of 50 m

  8. On Construction of Global Actions of Finite Partial Group Actions on Sets

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ram Parkash; Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    A generalization of G-sets, called partial G-sets, are the sets that admit an action of partial maps on their subsets. Partial actions are a powerful tool to generalize many results of group actions. These generalizations are obtained by using global actions when they exist. The main objective of this paper is to construct the global action of a given finite partial group action on a set. For this, first we generalize orbit-stabilizer theorem for partial group actions and use it to know the e...

  9. Sex Education and Young People in Group Homes: Balancing Risks, Rights and Resilience in Sexual Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, Malin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from focus group interviews conducted in Swedish government group homes for young people with a history of psychosocial problems, substance misuse and criminal behaviour. Participants were asked to reflect on a newly developed sex education curriculum located within a harm-reduction paradigm prior to its…

  10. Acceptability of Home-Assessment Post Medical Abortion and Medical Abortion in a Low-Resource Setting in Rajasthan, India. Secondary Outcome Analysis of a Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandira Paul

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating acceptability of simplified follow-up after medical abortion have focused on high-resource or urban settings where telephones, road connections, and modes of transport are available and where women have formal education.To investigate women's acceptability of home-assessment of abortion and whether acceptability of medical abortion differs by in-clinic or home-assessment of abortion outcome in a low-resource setting in India.Secondary outcome of a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial.Outpatient primary health care clinics in rural and urban Rajasthan, India.Women were eligible if they sought abortion with a gestation up to 9 weeks, lived within defined study area and agreed to follow-up. Women were ineligible if they had known contraindications to medical abortion, haemoglobin < 85 mg/l and were below 18 years.Abortion outcome assessment through routine clinic follow-up by a doctor was compared with home-assessment using a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and a pictorial instruction sheet. A computerized random number generator generated the randomisation sequence (1:1 in blocks of six. Research assistants randomly allocated eligible women who opted for medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol, using opaque sealed envelopes. Blinding during outcome assessment was not possible.Women's acceptability of home-assessment was measured as future preference of follow-up. Overall satisfaction, expectations, and comparison with previous abortion experiences were compared between study groups.731 women were randomized to the clinic follow-up group (n = 353 or home-assessment group (n = 378. 623 (85% women were successfully followed up, of those 597 (96% were satisfied and 592 (95% found the abortion better or as expected, with no difference between study groups. The majority, 355 (57% women, preferred home-assessment in the event of a future abortion. Significantly more women, 284 (82%, in the home-assessment group preferred

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit J to Subpart A of... - Manufactured Home Sites, Rental Projects and Subdivisions: Development, Installation and Set-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., installation and set-up practices and concepts for manufactured homes. It is intended for FmHA or its successor... environmental analysis required for a particular application, each manufactured home or lot involved shall be... successor agency under Public Law 103-354 environmental policies and the consideration of important land use...

  12. Perceptions of telecare training needs in home healthcare services: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Veslemøy; Wiig, Siri

    2017-02-23

    The implementation and use of telecare requires significant changes to healthcare service organisation and delivery, including new ways of working for staff. Competency development and training for healthcare professionals is therefore required to enable necessary adaptation of clinical practice and ensure competent provision of telecare services. It is however unclear what skills healthcare staff need when providing care at a distance and there is little empirical evidence on effective training strategies for telecare practice. Training should however emphasise the experiences and preferences of prospective trainees to ensure its relevance to their educational needs. The aim of this study was to explore healthcare professionals' perceptions of training related to the general use of telecare, and to identify specific training needs associated with the use of virtual visits in the home healthcare services. Six focus group interviews were held with a total of 26 participants working in the home healthcare services in Norway, including registered nurses, enrolled nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, health workers, and healthcare assistants. The data material was analysed by way of systematic text condensation. The analysis resulted in five categories relevant to telecare training for healthcare professionals: Purposeful training creates confidence and changes attitudes; Training needs depend on ability to cope with telecare; The timing of training; Training must facilitate practical insight into the patients' perspective; and Training content must focus on the telecare process. Findings are discussed in light of implications for the form and content of a training program for healthcare professionals on how to undertake virtual home healthcare visits. Appropriate preparation and training for telecare use is important for healthcare professionals and must be taken seriously by healthcare organisations. To facilitate the knowledge, skills

  13. Surveying multiple health professional team members within institutional settings: an example from the nursing home industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa A; Roman, Anthony; Rogers, Michelle L; Tyler, Denise A; Mor, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Quality improvement and cost containment initiatives in health care increasingly involve interdisciplinary teams of providers. To understand organizational functioning, information is often needed from multiple members of a leadership team since no one person may have sufficient knowledge of all aspects of the organization. To minimize survey burden, it is ideal to ask unique questions of each member of the leadership team in areas of their expertise. However, this risks substantial missing data if all eligible members of the organization do not respond to the survey. Nursing home administrators (NHA) and directors of nursing (DoN) play important roles in the leadership of long-term care facilities. Surveys were administered to NHAs and DoNs from a random, nationally representative sample of U.S. nursing homes about the impact of state policies, market forces, and organizational factors that impact provider performance and residents' outcomes. Responses were obtained from a total of 2,686 facilities (response rate [RR] = 66.6%) in which at least one individual completed the questionnaire and 1,693 facilities (RR = 42.0%) in which both providers participated. No evidence of nonresponse bias was detected. A high-quality representative sample of two providers in a long-term care facility can be obtained. It is possible to optimize data collection by obtaining unique information about the organization from each provider while minimizing the number of items asked of each individual. However, sufficient resources must be available for follow-up to nonresponders with particular attention paid to lower resourced, lower quality facilities caring for higher acuity residents in highly competitive nursing home markets.

  14. Associations between factors within the home setting and screen time among children aged 0–5 years: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Valerie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive engagement in screen time has several immediate and long-term health implications among pre-school children. However, little is known about the factors that influence screen time in this age group. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use the Ecologic Model of Sedentary Behavior as a guide to examine associations between intrapersonal, interpersonal, and physical environment factors within the home setting and screen time among pre-school children. Methods Participants were 746 pre-school children (≤ 5 years old from the Kingston, Ontario, Canada area. From May to September, 2011, parents completed a questionnaire regarding several intrapersonal (child demographics, interpersonal (family demographics, parental cognitions, parental behavior, and physical environment (television, computer, or video games in the bedroom factors within the home setting. Parents also reported the average amount of time per day their child spent watching television and playing video/computer games. Associations were examined using linear and logistic regression models. Results Most participants (93.7% watched television and 37.9% played video/computer games. Several intrapersonal, interpersonal, and physical environment factors within the home setting were associated with screen time. More specifically, age, parental attitudes, parental barriers, parental descriptive norms, parental screen time, and having a television in the bedroom were positive predictors of screen time; whereas, parental education, parental income, and parental self-efficacy were negative predictors of screen time in the linear regression analysis. Collectively these variables explained 64.2% of the variance in screen time. Parental cognitive factors (self-efficacy, attitudes, barriers, descriptive norms at the interpersonal level explained a large portion (37.9% of this variance. Conclusions A large proportion of screen time in pre-school children was

  15. Bodily pain intensity in nursing home residents with pressure ulcers: analysis of national minimum data set 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyochol; Stechmiller, Joyce; Fillingim, Roger; Lyon, Debra; Garvan, Cynthia

    2015-06-01

    Clinical reports suggest that superficial pressure ulcers produce pain, but that pain decreases as the wound advances in stage. This study of the relationship between pressure ulcer stage and bodily pain intensity in nursing home residents was a secondary analysis of the national Minimum Data Set 3.0 assessment data in long-term care facilities, collected from nursing home residents at least 65 years of age. Data were examined from residents with pressure ulcers who completed a bodily pain intensity interview between January and March 2012 (N = 41,680) as part of the MDS comprehensive assessment. After adjusting for other variables (e.g., cognition, functional impairment, presence of comorbidities, use of scheduled pain medication, and sociodemographic variables), bodily pain intensity for those with more severe pressure ulcers in comparison to those with Stage I ulcers was higher by 11% (Stage II), 14% (Stage III), 24% (Stage IV), and 22% (suspected deep tissue injury). Because multivariate analysis showed that greater bodily pain intensity was associated with an advanced stage of pressure ulcer, health care providers should assess bodily pain intensity and order appropriate pain management for nursing home residents with pressure ulcers, particularly for those with advanced pressure ulcers who are vulnerable to greater bodily pain intensity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Beliefs and habits: staff experiences with key word signing in special schools and group residential homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombouts, Ellen; Maes, Bea; Zink, Inge

    2017-06-01

    Even though use of aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) by staff has been extensively researched, few studies relate to unaided AAC strategies such as key word signing (KWS). We explored the KWS views of two groups: direct support staff in group residential homes and teachers from special education secondary schools. We examined transcripts from individual semi-structured interviews with five direct support staff and five teachers using thematic analysis. Participants discussed consistency of KWS use and reasons for implementing KWS. Compared to direct support staff, teachers described more use of KWS throughout the day with more individuals with intellectual disability. Teachers discussed use of KWS to facilitate students' present and future interactions, while direct support staff primarily discussed immediate effects. Participants experienced KWS implementation as a learning process and aimed to turn the use of manual signs into a routine habit. This required considerable self-monitoring, and the effort that this continuous self-feedback required, combined with environmental factors, could hinder KWS implementation. These preliminary findings suggest that preservice KWS training and on-site KWS assistance may need to be enhanced.

  17. PA7 Developing a culture of medication safety in the palliative care home setting - supporting choices in place of care and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Caroline; Scott, Anne

    2015-04-01

    It is common informal practice in Australia for carers to be trained to administer PRN subcutaneous medications, especially in the last few days of life. A safe, legal and ethical framework for practice was needed to support end of life decision-making. To develop a culture of safety in the palliative care home setting by applying a Health Promoting Palliative Care philosophy, Kellehear (1999), to enable choice in place of care and death. Team brainstorming and literature review - developed: Carer education programme to evaluate a carer's preparedness to administer subcutaneous medications. Guideline Evaluation and Communication strategy Support Focus Ease of access to equipment Piloted 2009 RESULTS: Pilot 93% participants achieved wish to die at home - consistent at approximately 90% medication errors reduced. Carer confidence increased to confident and most confident. Hospital admissions reduced - remains approximately 8-10% of all days on service spent in hospital. Staff safety and satisfaction increased with reduction in after-hours home visits - averages remain at one or two per year. After-hours phone calls did not increase in response to practice changes. Health promotion, enablement and promotion of autonomy and support rather than control and disablement are powerful determinants of carer's ability to cope when caring for the dying, and enduring bereavement. This project is now standard practice and has transformed community practice of palliative care empowering consumers and health professionals with such potential. However, in response to criticism of this practice the carer's perspective will be captured in a carer survey. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Building, testing and validating a set of home-made von Frey filaments: a precise, accurate and cost effective alternative for nociception assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Marcelo Victor Pires; Ferraresi, Cleber; de Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-07-30

    A von Frey filament (vFF) is a type of aesthesiometer usually made of nylon perpendicularly held in a base. It can be used in paw withdrawal pain threshold assessment, one of the most popular tests for pain evaluation using animal models. For this test, a set of filaments, each able to exert a different force, is applied to the animal paw, from the weakest to the strongest, until the paw is withdrawn. We made 20 low cost vFF using nylon filaments of different lengths and constant diameter glued perpendicularly to the ends of popsicle sticks. They were calibrated using a laboratory balance scale. Building and calibrating took around 4h and confirmed the theoretical prediction that the force exerted is inversely proportional to the length and directly proportional to the width of the filament. The calibration showed that they were precise and accurate. We analyzed the paw withdrawal threshold assessed with the set of home-made vFF and with a high quality commercial set of 5 monofilaments vFF (Stoelting, Wood Dale, USA) in two groups (n=5) of healthy mice. The home-made vFF precisely and accurately measured the hind paw withdrawal threshold (20.3±0.9 g). The commercial vFF have different diameters while our set has the same diameter avoiding the problem of lower sensitivity to larger diameter filaments. Building a set of vFF is easy, cost effective, and depending on the kind of tests, can increase precision and accuracy of animal nociception evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Supervising the beginning group leader in inpatient and partial hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannicelli, Marsha

    2014-04-01

    This paper provides a guide for supervisors in inpatient and partial hospital settings who train beginning group therapists in a variety of group modalities. It addresses basic issues facing the neophyte therapist, including structural aspects of the group, problematic member behaviors, and useful interventions that maximize member engagement and increase overall therapeutic effectiveness.

  20. Student Counseling Groups in Senior High School Settings: An Evaluation of Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Susan E.; Kilmann, Peter R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies which evaluated counseling groups in senior high school settings. A methodological evaluation was conducted within four areas: subjects, counselors, treatment, and outcome criteria. Overall, behavioral and directive groups achieved greater success than nondirective or client-centered groups. (Author)

  1. Setting up and Running a Loss and Bereavement Support Group for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Paul; Freeman, Adele; Offen, Liz

    2010-01-01

    Following evidence based literature, the Birmingham Clinical Psychology Service for People with Learning Disabilities ran a Loss and Bereavement Psychotherapy Group. The group consisted of five adults with mild learning disabilities, who met for 8 consecutive weeks. This paper reports the process of setting up a bereavement group for people with…

  2. Micro-skills of group formulations in care settings: Working with expressions of staff distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Louisa; Fielden, Amy; Pearson, Steven

    2017-05-01

    The help of specialist clinicians is often sought to advise staff in residential and nursing care homes about how to work with people with dementia whose behaviour is challenging. The Newcastle Model ( James, 2011 ) is a framework and a process developed to help care staff understand and improve their care of this group. The model emphasises the use of sharing information with staff to develop effective care plans. In the Shared Formulation Sessions characteristic of the Newcastle Model, clinicians take the role of a group facilitator, helping the staff reach a consensus about what needs to change. These sessions can be difficult to manage as intra and inter-group processes emerge and the group express their anxieties. This paper aims to explore the processes that might be in play Shared Formulation Sessions and to suggest ways in which the facilitator might approach this to manage effective collaborative working.

  3. Planning for health promotion in low-income preschool child care settings: focus groups of parents and child care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveras, Elsie M; LaPelle, Nancy; Gupta, Ruchi S; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    To identify potentially successful strategies, barriers, and facilitators for health promotion in preschool child care settings. We conducted 6 focus groups including each of the following: parents of children attending child care centers and home-based family child care (2 in English, 1 in Spanish) and directors of child care centers and family child care providers (2 in English, 1 in Spanish). Systematic thematic analysis was conducted to generate themes to address study questions. A total of 24 parents and 45 child care providers, serving predominantly urban, low-income children in Boston, participated. Parents and child care providers agreed that in-person group discussions would be the most effective strategy for providing health education information to parents. Several barriers that could affect implementation emerged. First, some providers expressed frustration toward parents' attitudes about child safety and health. Second, there was diversity of opinion among providers on whether conducting health promotion activities was consistent with their training and role. In addition, literacy, language, and cultural barriers were identified as potential barriers to health promotion in child care. In order to be successful, health promotion strategies in child care settings will need to overcome tensions between providers and parents, allow professional growth of child care providers to serve in a health promotion role, and better integrate external health resources and personnel. Group sessions and peer learning opportunities that are culturally and linguistically sensitive are potentially successful strategies for implementation of health promotion interventions for many parents.

  4. Acceptability of Home-Assessment Post Medical Abortion and Medical Abortion in a Low-Resource Setting in Rajasthan, India. Secondary Outcome Analysis of a Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mandira; Iyengar, Kirti; Essén, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Iyengar, Sharad D.; Bring, Johan; Soni, Sunita; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies evaluating acceptability of simplified follow-up after medical abortion have focused on high-resource or urban settings where telephones, road connections, and modes of transport are available and where women have formal education. Objective To investigate women’s acceptability of home-assessment of abortion and whether acceptability of medical abortion differs by in-clinic or home-assessment of abortion outcome in a low-resource setting in India. Design Secondary outcome of a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial. Setting Outpatient primary health care clinics in rural and urban Rajasthan, India. Population Women were eligible if they sought abortion with a gestation up to 9 weeks, lived within defined study area and agreed to follow-up. Women were ineligible if they had known contraindications to medical abortion, haemoglobin Abortion outcome assessment through routine clinic follow-up by a doctor was compared with home-assessment using a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and a pictorial instruction sheet. A computerized random number generator generated the randomisation sequence (1:1) in blocks of six. Research assistants randomly allocated eligible women who opted for medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol), using opaque sealed envelopes. Blinding during outcome assessment was not possible. Main Outcome Measures Women’s acceptability of home-assessment was measured as future preference of follow-up. Overall satisfaction, expectations, and comparison with previous abortion experiences were compared between study groups. Results 731 women were randomized to the clinic follow-up group (n = 353) or home-assessment group (n = 378). 623 (85%) women were successfully followed up, of those 597 (96%) were satisfied and 592 (95%) found the abortion better or as expected, with no difference between study groups. The majority, 355 (57%) women, preferred home-assessment in the event of a future abortion. Significantly more women, 284 (82

  5. Group supervision in a private setting: Practice and method for theory and practice in psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziana Mangiacavallo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The report aims to tell the experience of a supervision group in a private setting. The group consists of professional psychotherapists driven by the more experienced practitioner, who shares a clinical reasoning on psychotherapy with younger colleagues. The report aims to present the supervision group as a methode and to showcase its features. The supervision group becomes a container of professional experiences that speak of the new way of doing psychotherapy. 

  6. The significance of 'facilitator as a change agent'--organisational learning culture in aged care home settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grealish, Laurie; Henderson, Amanda; Quero, Fritz; Phillips, Roslyn; Surawski, May

    2015-04-01

    To explore the impact of an educational programme focused on social behaviours and relationships on organisational learning culture in the residential aged care context. The number of aged care homes will continue to rise as the frail older elderly live longer, requiring more formal care and support. As with other small- to medium-sized health services, aged care homes are faced with the challenge of continuous development of the workforce and depend upon registered nurses to lead staff development. A mixed-method evaluation research design was used to determine the impact of an educational programme focused on social aspects of learning on organisational learning culture. One hundred and fifty-nine (pre) and 143 (post) participants from three aged care homes completed the Clinical Learning Organisational Culture survey, and three participant-researcher registered nurse clinical educators provided regular journal entries for review. While each site received the same educational programme over a six-month period, the change in organisational learning culture at each site was notably different. Two aged care homes had significant improvements in affiliation, one in accomplishment and one in recognition. The educators' journals differed in the types of learning observed and interventions undertaken, with Eucalyptus focused on organisational change, Grevillea focused on group (student) change and the Wattle focused on individual or situational change. Clinical educator activities appear to have a significant effect on organisational learning culture, with a focus on the organisational level having the greatest positive effect on learning culture and on individual or situational level having a limited effect. Clinical educator facilitation that is focused on organisational rather than individual interests may offer a key to improving organisational learning culture. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Hepatitis A outbreak among adults with developmental disabilities in group homes--Michigan, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Susan R; Berger, Keira Wickliffe; Hackert, Pamela B; Renas, Richard; Brunette, Suzanne; Parker, Nicole; Padro, Carolyn; Hocking, Anne; Hedemark, Mary; Edwards, Renai; Bush, Russell L; Khudyakov, Yury; Nelson, Noele P; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-02-20

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infections among persons with developmental disabilities living in institutions were common in the past, but with improvements in care and fewer persons institutionalized, the number of HAV infections has declined in these institutions. However, residents in institutions are still vulnerable if they have not been vaccinated. On April 24, 2013, a resident of a group home (GH) for adults with disabilities in southeast Michigan (GH-A) was diagnosed with hepatitis A and died 2 days later of fulminant liver failure. Four weeks later, a second GH-A resident was diagnosed with hepatitis A. None of the GH-A residents or staff had been vaccinated against hepatitis A. Over the next 3 months, six more cases of hepatitis A were diagnosed in residents in four other Michigan GHs. Three local health departments were involved in case investigation and management, including administration of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP). Serum specimens from seven cases were found to have an identical strain of HAV genotype 1A. This report describes the outbreak investigation, the challenges of timely delivery of PEP for hepatitis A, and the need for preexposure vaccination against hepatitis A for adults living or working in GHs for the disabled.

  8. The efficacy of conjoint behavioral consultation on parents and children in the home setting: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Susan M; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Garbacz, S Andrew; Kunz, Gina M; Chumney, Frances L

    2013-12-01

    The present study is a large-scale randomized trial testing the effects of a family-school partnership model (i.e., Conjoint Behavioral Consultation, CBC) for promoting behavioral competence and decreasing problem behaviors of children identified by their teachers as disruptive. CBC is a structured approach to problem-solving that involves consultants, parents, and teachers. The effects of CBC on family variables that are commonly associated with important outcomes among school-aged children (i.e., family involvement and parent competence in problem solving), as well as child outcomes at home, were evaluated. Participants were 207 children with disruptive behaviors from 91 classrooms in 21 schools in kindergarten through grade 3 and their parents and teachers. Results indicated that there were significantly different increases in home-school communication and parent competence in problem solving for participants in the CBC relative to control group. Likewise, compared to children in the control group, children in the CBC group showed significantly greater decreases in arguing, defiance, noncompliance, and tantrums. The degree of family risk moderated parents' competence in problem solving and children's total problem behaviors, teasing, and tantrums.

  9. Planning and Decision Making about the Future Care of Older Group Home Residents and Transition to Residential Aged Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, C.; Bowers, B.; Webber, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Planning for future care after the death of parental caregivers and adapting disability support systems to achieve the best possible quality of life for people with intellectual disability as they age have been important issues for more than two decades. This study examined perceptions held by family members, group home staff and…

  10. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community: Factor Validity and Effect of Subject Variables for Adults in Group Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The factor validity of the new Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Community (ABC-C) was determined with 1,040 adults, ages 18-89, who were mentally retarded and living in group homes. The original ABC factor structure appeared valid for scoring the ABC-C with this population. Variables studied included age, gender, level of mental retardation,…

  11. Planning and Decision Making about the Future Care of Older Group Home Residents and Transition to Residential Aged Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, C.; Bowers, B.; Webber, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Planning for future care after the death of parental caregivers and adapting disability support systems to achieve the best possible quality of life for people with intellectual disability as they age have been important issues for more than two decades. This study examined perceptions held by family members, group home staff and…

  12. The Nonsignificant Impact of an Agenda Setting Treatment for Groups: Implications for Future Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridbord, Karen; DeLucia-Waack, Janice L.; Jones, Edlyn; Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    This pilot study compared the effect of two writing techniques, Agenda Setting and Group Focus, to a cognitive technique, reading process notes at the start of a group session, to examine their impact on social climate, member involvement, and behavior. Theoretically an intervention that helps members to focus directly on their goals and potential…

  13. Large and small sets with respect to homomorphisms and products of groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Gusso

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We study the behaviour of large, small and medium subsets with respect to homomorphisms and products of groups. Then we introduce the definition af a P-small set in abelian groups and we investigate the relations between this kind of smallness and the previous one, giving some examples that distinguish them.

  14. The Effect of Goal Setting on Group Performance: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleingeld, Ad; van Mierlo, Heleen; Arends, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    Updating and extending the work of O'Leary-Kelly, Martocchio, and Frink (1994), with this meta-analysis on goal setting and group performance we show that specific difficult goals yield considerably higher group performance compared with nonspecific goals (d = 0.80 plus or minus 0.35, k = 23 effect sizes). Moderately difficult and easy goals were…

  15. Motivational Effects of Feedback and Goal-Setting on Group Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Carol

    In studies examining the impact of performance information on motivation, both feedback and goal setting have been found to improve performance. To explore the generalizability of E. A. Locke's (1968) theory of task motivation to groups, 180 male masters of business administration (MBA) students were randomly organized into 60 three-person groups.…

  16. Treating panic symptoms within everyday clinical settings: the feasibility of a group cognitive behavioural intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, S.F.; Sumbundu, A.D.; Lykke, J.

    2008-01-01

    , anxiety and depressive symptoms and marked improvement in mobility. These improvements were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Outcomes supported the feasibility of a brief group cognitive-behavioural intervention for GP-referred patients. Implications of these results are discussed in terms...... implemented in everyday clinical settings. The aim of the following pilot study was to examine the feasibility of a brief group cognitive-behavioural intervention carried out in a clinical setting. Salient issues in determining feasibility include: representativeness of patient group treated, amount...

  17. The meaning of consolation as experienced by nurses in a home-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxberg, Asa; Eriksson, Katie; Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Fridlund, Bengt

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate nurses' experiences of consolation and how these experiences relate to suffering and care. Consolation is commonly associated with the relief of suffering. The question of consolation in terms of its definition and relevance for care has, however, been a matter of discussion among nurse researchers. The question raised concerns about the nature of consolation, its place and its role in relation to care and the caring sciences. An explorative qualitative interview study with 12 participants, six registered and six enrolled nurses, was carried out in a home-care context. A phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur was used for the text analysis. Results. Two main aspects of consolation appeared: 'the present consolation', which is flexible, sustaining and opening and 'the absent consolation', which conceals the suffering and is incapable of consoling. The result was interpreted from a philosophical-ethical perspective, based on the works of Levinas and Lögstrup. Consolation appears as a complex phenomenon, both in terms of its existence and its absence consolation, constituting a caring and non-caring consolation. A caring consolation entails meeting the other as different and being present in a way that gives the other space to be the one he or she really is. It requires acceptance, accepting the sufferer and his/her way of suffering as unique. Relevance to clinical practice. The clinical nurse is involved in complex care situations, which entails both reflecting upon and using intuition when consoling. A caring consolation is a contradictory phenomenon that requires a nurse to be capable of both reflecting upon and acting intuitively on the unique suffering of the other.

  18. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes – such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study’s results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  19. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Group Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit for 30% Energy Savings, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-11-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes – such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study’s results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  20. Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Mike [Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes – such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study’s results will be used to identify cost-effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  1. Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, M.

    2013-08-01

    Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

  2. Acceptability of Home-Assessment Post Medical Abortion and Medical Abortion in a Low-Resource Setting in Rajasthan, India. Secondary Outcome Analysis of a Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mandira; Iyengar, Kirti; Essén, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Iyengar, Sharad D; Bring, Johan; Soni, Sunita; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Studies evaluating acceptability of simplified follow-up after medical abortion have focused on high-resource or urban settings where telephones, road connections, and modes of transport are available and where women have formal education. To investigate women's acceptability of home-assessment of abortion and whether acceptability of medical abortion differs by in-clinic or home-assessment of abortion outcome in a low-resource setting in India. Secondary outcome of a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial. Outpatient primary health care clinics in rural and urban Rajasthan, India. Women were eligible if they sought abortion with a gestation up to 9 weeks, lived within defined study area and agreed to follow-up. Women were ineligible if they had known contraindications to medical abortion, haemoglobin Abortion outcome assessment through routine clinic follow-up by a doctor was compared with home-assessment using a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and a pictorial instruction sheet. A computerized random number generator generated the randomisation sequence (1:1) in blocks of six. Research assistants randomly allocated eligible women who opted for medical abortion (mifepristone and misoprostol), using opaque sealed envelopes. Blinding during outcome assessment was not possible. Women's acceptability of home-assessment was measured as future preference of follow-up. Overall satisfaction, expectations, and comparison with previous abortion experiences were compared between study groups. 731 women were randomized to the clinic follow-up group (n = 353) or home-assessment group (n = 378). 623 (85%) women were successfully followed up, of those 597 (96%) were satisfied and 592 (95%) found the abortion better or as expected, with no difference between study groups. The majority, 355 (57%) women, preferred home-assessment in the event of a future abortion. Significantly more women, 284 (82%), in the home-assessment group preferred home-assessment in the future, as

  3. HOME USERS SECURITY AND THE WEB BROWSER INBUILT SETTINGS, FRAMEWORK TO SETUP IT AUTOMATICALLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Serrhini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are living in the electronic age where electronic transactions such as e-mail, e-banking, e-commerce and e-learning becoming more and more prominent. To access online for this services, the web browser is today’s almost unique software used. These days’ hackers know that browsers are installed into all computers and can be used to compromise a machine by distributing malware via malicious or hacked websites. Also these sites use JavaScript to manipulate browsers and can drive user system to failures. Each browser have inbuilt features setting that define his behavior, unfortunately most of end users are unwilling to enable or disable this features securely, because many of them still do not understand even basic security concepts nor variety of security technologies present in a browser. This study will deeply discuss specific modern browser inbuilt features settings and associated security risks and we present a framework developed to enhance user surfing safety by configuring automatically all installed browsers features settings securely, we call it Automatic Safe Browser Launcher, to solidify the claim, we check each browser before and after with free tool (browser_tests-1.03 which is a collection of test cases to test browser vulnerability. The more configured security features your browser has, the better protected you are from online threats.

  4. Safety risks associated with physical interactions between patients and caregivers during treatment and care delivery in Home Care settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hignett, Sue; Edmunds Otter, Mary; Keen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    To explore the safety risks associated with physical interactions between patients and caregivers during treatment and care delivery in Home Care settings. Seven-stage framework from the PRISMA statement for research question, eligibility (definition), search, identification of relevant papers from title and abstract, selection and retrieval of papers, appraisal and synthesis. British Nursing Index (BNI), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA), Cinahl, Cochrane Library, Embase, Ergonomics Abstracts, Health Business Elite, Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC), Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus, Social Care online, Social Science Citation Index. The included references (n=42) were critically appraised using a modified version of Downs and Black checklist and the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. The risk factors are reported using the modified model of human factors of health care in the home to represent the roles of both patients and caregivers in the system. The results are grouped as environment (health policy, physical and social), artefacts (equipment and technology), tasks (procedures and work schedules) and care recipient/provider. These include permanent and temporary building design and access, communication and lone working, provision of equipment and consumables, and clinical tasks. The topics with strong evidence from at least 2 papers relate to risks associated with awkward working positions, social environment issues (additional tasks and distractions), abuse and violence, inadequate team (peer) support, problems with workload planning, needle stick injuries and physical workload (moving and handling patients). As home care increases, there is a need to ensure the safety of both patients and caregivers with an understanding of the physical interactions and tasks to manage safety risks and plan safer care delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Knowledge and practice for pressure injury prevention among care managers in a home care setting: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohta M

    2017-08-01

    new risk assessment scale as a bridge between both medical professionals and social welfare professionals. Practically, the authors recommend care managers should receive continuous education and practical training for pressure injury prevention in a home care setting. Keywords: long term care, Braden scale, questionnaire, risk assessment, pressure ulcer

  6. THE HIDDEN POWER IN GAPS: COMMUNITY HOME CARE VOLUNTEER GROUP PARTICIPANT OF A CATHOLIC CHURCH IN CARIACICA – ES - BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clésio de Oliveira Venâncio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the voluntary community home care mode while a network of affective work in the region of Porto Santana in Cariacica – one of the municipalities of the Metropolitan Area of Greater Vitória – ES – Brazil. Method: an exploratory study, qualitative approach, held together with a group that develops community home care in the territory in which they live in the period April to October 2010. To obtain data group visits were made, targeted interviews and follow-up on their routines, if configuring a cartographic process. Results: the reports of the group's members and of the observations made during the trail pointed to the materialization of a practice where caring configures itself from the movement of living affections within a territory, having elements that make this natural alternative practice in an environment of constant motion.

  7. Design and methods of a multi-component physical activity program for adults with intellectual disabilities living in group homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bik C. Chow

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID often live a sedentary lifestyle and have higher rates of overweight and obesity. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and methods of a multi-component physical activity (PA intervention program that aims to increase PA levels in adults with ID who live in group homes. The study employed a multi-component delayed treatment control group design involving adults with ID who lived in two group homes. Interventions included 30 exercise sessions in groups over a 10-week period and three educational lessons based on social cognitive theory that aimed to improve self-efficacy and social support for PA in the participants. In addition, staff training in exercise and advice on institutional PA policies were provided to the caregivers working in the group homes. Outcome measures on three aspects were collected: (1 physical fitness, (2 PA as assessed by an ActiGraph accelerometer, and (3 self-efficacy and social support for PA. Our major objective was to develop the intervention protocol, and the successful completion of this study will provide valuable evidence on how to promote active lifestyles in adults with ID.

  8. Supplier Selection Group Decision Making in Logistics Service Value Cocreation Based on Intuitionistic Fuzzy Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intuitionistic fuzzy information aggregation plays an important role in intuitionistic fuzzy set theory and is widely used in group decision making. In this paper, an induced intuitionistic fuzzy Einstein hybrid aggregation operator (I-IFEHA is investigated for supplier selection group decision making in logistics service value cocreation based on fuzzy measures. We first introduce some aggregation operators and Einstein operations on intuitionistic fuzzy sets and develop a new induced intuitionistic fuzzy Einstein hybrid aggregation operator to accommodate the environment in which the given arguments are intuitionistic fuzzy values. Then, we study the supplier selection group decision model in logistics service value cocreation based on intuitionistic fuzzy sets with the I-IFEHA operator. Finally, an example of 3PL supplier selection in logistics service value cocreation environment is given to verify the developed approach and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed approach.

  9. A rough set approach for determining weights of decision makers in group decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Du, Ping-an; Wang, Yong; Liang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to present a novel approach for determining the weights of decision makers (DMs) based on rough group decision in multiple attribute group decision-making (MAGDM) problems. First, we construct a rough group decision matrix from all DMs’ decision matrixes on the basis of rough set theory. After that, we derive a positive ideal solution (PIS) founded on the average matrix of rough group decision, and negative ideal solutions (NISs) founded on the lower and upper limit matrixes of rough group decision. Then, we obtain the weight of each group member and priority order of alternatives by using relative closeness method, which depends on the distances from each individual group member’ decision to the PIS and NISs. Through comparisons with existing methods and an on-line business manager selection example, the proposed method show that it can provide more insights into the subjectivity and vagueness of DMs’ evaluations and selections. PMID:28234974

  10. Simplified neutrosophic sets and their applications in multi-criteria group decision-making problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Juan-juan; Wang, Jian-qiang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hong-yu; Chen, Xiao-hong

    2016-07-01

    As a variation of fuzzy sets and intuitionistic fuzzy sets, neutrosophic sets have been developed to represent uncertain, imprecise, incomplete and inconsistent information that exists in the real world. Simplified neutrosophic sets (SNSs) have been proposed for the main purpose of addressing issues with a set of specific numbers. However, there are certain problems regarding the existing operations of SNSs, as well as their aggregation operators and the comparison methods. Therefore, this paper defines the novel operations of simplified neutrosophic numbers (SNNs) and develops a comparison method based on the related research of intuitionistic fuzzy numbers. On the basis of these operations and the comparison method, some SNN aggregation operators are proposed. Additionally, an approach for multi-criteria group decision-making (MCGDM) problems is explored by applying these aggregation operators. Finally, an example to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method is provided and a comparison with some other methods is made.

  11. Psychotropic medication in a randomly selected group of citizens receiving residential or home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Futtrup, Tina Bergmann; Helnæs, Ann Kathrine; Schultz, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment with one or more psychotropic medications (PMs), especially in the elderly, is associated with risk, and the effects of treatment are poorly validated. The aim of this article was to describe the use of PM in a population of citizens receiving either residential care or home...... care with focus on the prevalence of drug use, the combination of different PMs and doses in relation to current recommendations. METHODS: The medication lists of 214 citizens receiving residential care (122) and home care (92) were collected together with information on age, gender and residential...... number 2007-58-0015....

  12. [A discussion on setting up target age group for immunization against leptospirosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, J T; Wang, S S; Lan, W L

    1995-08-01

    This paper presented the lesson of setting up a false immunization priority age group for leptospirosis which failed to prevent the leptospirosis outbreak. Our experience was that in the rice paddy field type endemic area the priority age group for the vaccination against leptopirosis should be 15 to 34 year olds followed by 35 years old or above. There was no preventive effect in the vaccination for the children 14 years old or yaunger, to our observation.

  13. On the Set of the Numbers of Conjugates of Noncyclic Proper Subgroups of Finite Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Jiangtao; Zhang, Cui

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a finite group and (G) the set of the numbers of conjugates of noncyclic proper subgroups of G. We prove that (1) if |(G)| ≤ 2, then G is solvable, and (2) G is a nonsolvable group with |(G)| = 3 if and only if G≅PSL(2,5) or PSL(2,13) or SL(2,5) or SL(2,13)....

  14. Group sessions with Paro in a nursing home: Structure, observations and interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Hayley; Broadbent, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that a companion robot reduced residents' loneliness in a randomised controlled trial at an aged-care facility. This report aims to provide additional, previously unpublished data about how the sessions were run, residents' interactions with the robot and staff perspectives. Observations were conducted focusing on engagement, how residents treated the robot and if the robot acted as a social catalyst. In addition, 16 residents and 21 staff were asked open-ended questions at the end of the study about the sessions and the robot. Observations indicated that some residents engaged on an emotional level with Paro, and Paro was treated as both an agent and an artificial object. Interviews revealed that residents enjoyed sharing, interacting with and talking about Paro. This study supports other research showing Paro has psychosocial benefits and provides a guide for those wishing to use Paro in a group setting in aged care. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  15. Nutritional self-care among a group of older home-living people in rural Southern Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Dale B; Söderhamn U

    2015-01-01

    Bjørg Dale, Ulrika SöderhamnCentre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, NorwayBackground: Older home-living people are an at-risk group for undernutrition, particularly those who are living alone. Lack of knowledge about healthy dietary habits, altered taste sensation, and declined health status are shown to be some of the factors related to undernutrition. The aims of this study were to explo...

  16. Which Setting to Choose: Comparison of Whole-Class vs. Small-Group Computer Simulation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Lara K.; Bell, Randy L.

    2014-01-01

    Studies considering whole-class use of computer simulations are limited, despite the increasing interest in this mode of use. The current study explored how a collection of computer simulations was integrated into both whole-class and small-group instructional settings during a high school chemistry unit on atomic structure. Participants included…

  17. Teaching children clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) in a group setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobussen-Boekhorst, H.J.; Kuppenveld, J. van; Verheij, P.P.; Jong, L.W.A.M. de; Gier, R.P.E. de; Kortmann, B.B.M.; Feitz, W.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To teach children to perform clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) at our institution, the nurse practitioner uses a step-by-step approach in combination with an instruction model in an outpatient setting. For a small group of children the procedure remains difficult to learn. Fo

  18. A Review of the Use of Group Contingencies in Preschool Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorski, Elizabeth A.; Barton, Erin E.; Ledford, Jennifer R.

    2017-01-01

    Individual contingency management systems have been used successfully to improve behaviors in school settings--including preschools--but often come with associated challenges in time and personnel management. Group contingencies, in the form of independent, interdependent, and dependent contingencies, have been used in preschools to address these…

  19. A Review of the Use of Group Contingencies in Preschool Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorski, Elizabeth A.; Barton, Erin E.; Ledford, Jennifer R.

    2017-01-01

    Individual contingency management systems have been used successfully to improve behaviors in school settings--including preschools--but often come with associated challenges in time and personnel management. Group contingencies, in the form of independent, interdependent, and dependent contingencies, have been used in preschools to address these…

  20. The Good Behavior Game for Latino English Language Learners in a Small-Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jennifer; Bray, Melissa A.; Bilias-Lolis, Evelyn; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency intervention that has effectively reduced disruptive behavior and improved classroom management in many replications, for various settings and populations. The student composition of American public schools is changing, leading to culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms with unique…

  1. The Good Behavior Game for Latino English Language Learners in a Small-Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Jennifer; Bray, Melissa A.; Bilias-Lolis, Evelyn; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency intervention that has effectively reduced disruptive behavior and improved classroom management in many replications, for various settings and populations. The student composition of American public schools is changing, leading to culturally and linguistically diverse classrooms with unique…

  2. The impact of existential vulnerability for nursing home doctors in end-of-life care: A focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Kristian; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase

    2016-12-01

    Explore the impact of existential vulnerability for nursing home doctors' experiences with dying patients and their families. We conducted a qualitative study based on three focus group interviews with purposive samples of 17 nursing home doctors. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed with systematic text condensation. Nursing home doctors experienced having to balance treatment compromises in order to assist patients' and families' preparation for death, with their sense of professional conduct. This was an arduous process demanding patience and consideration. Existential vulnerability also manifested as powerlessness mastering issues of life and death and families' expectations. Standard phrases could help convey complex messages of uncertainty and graveness. Personal commitment was balanced with protective disengagement on the patient's deathbed, triggering both feelings of wonder and guilt. Existential vulnerability is experienced as a burden of powerlessness and guilt in difficult treatment compromises and in the need for protective disengagement, but also as a resource in communication and professional coping. End-of-life care training for nursing home doctors should include self-reflective practice, in particular addressing treatment compromises and professional conduct in the dialogue with patient and next-of-kin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Paleotectonic Setting of Dongyan Group of Middle and Upper Proterozoic in Central Fujian Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Da; Wu Ganguo; Ye Yujiang; Zhang Xiangxin; Peng Runmin; Wu Jianshe; Wang Qunfeng

    2004-01-01

    The central Fujian Province, situated on the juncture of paleo-uplift of Wuyishan, Yongmei Late Paleozoic depression and the eastern volcanic rift-faulting zone, is mainly composed of the outcropped metamorphic basements in the Middle-Late and Early Proterozoic, which constitute two upper and lower giant thick formations of Precambrian volcanic-sedimentary cycles, respectively. The formation of Dongyan Group is an important Middle-Upper Proterozoic component, and the Dongyan Group is directly related to massive sulfide deposit in this area. In recent years, plenty of lead, zinc, copper, silver and gold deposits have been found and explored. The Precambrian paleorift setting of the central Fujian Province served as a favorite metallogenic background for the formation of large- and superlarge-scale volcanic massive sulfide (VMS) lead and zinc polymetal deposits. The Dongyan Group consists chiefly of a set of ancient volcanic sedimentary formations that are composed mainly of greenschist. Its major lithologic types comprise greenschist, marble, quartzite and granofels class including various components. The metamorphic rocks of Dongyan Group are the main composition of Middle and Upper Proterozoic volcanic-sedimentary cycle. The original rock of Dongyan Group, a stable rock association, is volcanic sedimentation and normal marine sedimentation. But the original volcanic rocks, basic and acid, are bimodal. The volcanic rocks were formed in the extensional continental rift setting.

  4. Holistic Medicine IV: Principles of Existential Holistic Group Therapy and the Holistic Process of Healing in a Group Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    experience as �the spiritual design�. This design is actually an underlying regulation that appears when people, through their feelings and engagement for each other, tie the group together and engage their complex emotional intelligence. Practically, this means that all participants are sunk in the same information matrix, so that everybody learns from each other. Everything that happens in the perception of each trainee has immediate and developing relevance for him.Spontaneous healing happens far more effectively in a group setting, where all the participants stand together and support each other, than it does in the clinic, where the therapist is alone with the patient. A 5-day course in personal development can be compatible to a half year of holistic individual therapy.

  5. Holistic medicine IV: principles of existential holistic group therapy and the holistic process of healing in a group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Merrick, Joav

    2003-12-23

    ". This design is actually an underlying regulation that appears when people, through their feelings and engagement for each other, tie the group together and engage their complex emotional intelligence. Practically, this means that all participants are sunk in the same information matrix, so that everybody learns from each other. Everything that happens in the perception of each trainee has immediate and developing relevance for him. Spontaneous healing happens far more effectively in a group setting, where all the participants stand together and support each other, than it does in the clinic, where the therapist is alone with the patient. A 5-day course in personal development can be compatible to a half year of holistic individual therapy.

  6. Reconstruction of protoliths of metamorphic rocks and tectonic setting of Wolegen Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Parametamorphic rocks from Arong County in southeastern Inner Mongolia-Daxinganling district are regarded as Proterozoic in age,belonging to the Wolegen Group and composed of volcanoclastic and sandstone in origin,and have been disputed in tectonic setting.Because of the stability in metamorphism,the rare earth dements indicate the features of their protoliths.The authors integrated the petrologic methods with the geochemical parameters which include ∑REE,∑LREE/∑HREE,δCe,δEu,La/Yb,Sm/Nd,Th/Sc and the standard values of chondrite.The results show that the protoliths of Wolengen Group may be a group of voleanoclastic and continental margin elastic rocks,and their tectonic setting is the continent island arc.

  7. Comparing the effects of group and home-based physical activity on mental health in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Salehe Mortazavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The present study focuses on comparing the effects of home-based (HB and group-based (GB physical activity on mental health in a sample of older adults in Shahr-e-kord. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, a twice-weekly physical activity program for 2 months was provided either individually at home or in a group format for 181 people who were divided into two groups (HB and GB. The outcome, mental health, was measured with the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28. Results: Mental health status improved after participation in the physical activity program. The decrease in GHQ-28 total score in GB group, 3 months after intervention, was 3.61 ΁ 2.28 (P < 0.001. In HB group, this reduction was 1.20 ΁ 2.32 during the same period (P < 0.001. The difference of these "before-after differences" between the two groups in the GHQ-28 and all its subscales was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Also, the effects of GB physical activity on mental health compared with HB physical activity, adjusted for related baseline variables, were significant. Conclusions: These findings reveal the probable effects of GB rather than HB physical activity on mental health among the elderly.

  8. Regularity of sets with constant horizontal normal in the Engel group

    CERN Document Server

    Bellettini, Costante

    2012-01-01

    In the Engel group with its Carnot group structure we study subsets of locally finite subRiemannian perimeter and possessing constant subRiemannian normal. We prove the rectifiability of such sets: more precisely we show that, in some specific coordinates, they are upper-graphs of entire Lipschitz functions (with respect to the Euclidean distance). However we find that, when they are written as intrinsic upper-graphs with respect to the direction of the normal, then the function defining the set might even fail to be continuous. Nevertheless, we can prove that one can always find other horizontal directions for which the set is the upper-graph of a function that is Lipschitz-continuous with respect to the intrinsic distance (and in particular H\\"older-continuous for the Euclidean distance). We further discuss a PDE characterization of the class of all sets with constant horizontal normal. Finally, we show that our rectifiability argument extends to the case of filiform groups of the first kind.

  9. Goal-directed outpatient rehabilitation following TBI: a pilot study of programme effectiveness and comparison of outcomes in home and day hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Emmah; Fleming, Jennifer; Kuipers, Pim; Cornwell, Petrea; Khan, Asad

    2011-01-01

    To determine (i) the effectiveness of a goal-directed, environment-focused occupational therapy intervention and (ii) to compare rehabilitation gains across a day hospital (outpatient) setting and home setting. Repeated measures cross-over design with pre-post test measures and a baseline control period, random allocation to a treatment setting sequence and an independent outcome assessor who was blinded to treatment sequence. Descriptive and non-parametric comparative analyses employed. Fourteen participants with severe traumatic brain injury completed a 12 week outpatient occupational therapy programme. The programme was directed by the participant's chosen goals, which were established using a client-centred, structured, goal-planning process. Outcome measures included Goal attainment scaling, the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, the Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index, the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors and self-rated satisfaction with therapy. The therapy programme resulted in significant improvements in goal attainment, occupational performance, psychosocial reintegration and ability and adjustment levels, compared with baseline. Differences in gains made in home vs day hospital settings were not statistically significant, with the exception of higher levels of patient satisfaction with therapy at home. To assist further with decision-making about where to conduct therapy, further research is needed to compare the outcomes and determine the cost effectiveness of therapy at home and in day hospital settings.

  10. Quality evaluation of value sets from cancer study common data elements using the UMLS semantic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to develop an approach to evaluate the quality of terminological annotations on the value set (ie, enumerated value domain) components of the common data elements (CDEs) in the context of clinical research using both unified medical language system (UMLS) semantic types and groups. Materials and methods The CDEs of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Data Standards Repository, the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) concepts and the UMLS semantic network were integrated using a semantic web-based framework for a SPARQL-enabled evaluation. First, the set of CDE-permissible values with corresponding meanings in external controlled terminologies were isolated. The corresponding value meanings were then evaluated against their NCI- or UMLS-generated semantic network mapping to determine whether all of the meanings fell within the same semantic group. Results Of the enumerated CDEs in the Cancer Data Standards Repository, 3093 (26.2%) had elements drawn from more than one UMLS semantic group. A random sample (n=100) of this set of elements indicated that 17% of them were likely to have been misclassified. Discussion The use of existing semantic web tools can support a high-throughput mechanism for evaluating the quality of large CDE collections. This study demonstrates that the involvement of multiple semantic groups in an enumerated value domain of a CDE is an effective anchor to trigger an auditing point for quality evaluation activities. Conclusion This approach produces a useful quality assurance mechanism for a clinical study CDE repository. PMID:22511016

  11. Learning dementia care in three contexts: practical training in day-care, group dwelling and nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, M; Negussie, B; Grafström, M

    2000-07-01

    During the period 1996-1999, 18 licensed practical nurses (LPNs) received specialized training to become caregivers and mentors in the field of dementia care at the Silvia Home Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden. The aim of the study was to illuminate how the trainees utilized their practical training to learn about dementia care. The trainees gained practical training within three care models for elderly persons with dementia. The three forms of care and the context for practical training included the school's integrated day-care, a group dwelling and a nursing home. The findings show that the trainees made use of each training context in a similar fashion but there were differences between the contexts. A perspective of human dignity characterized the day-care. This was an opportunity for the nursing philosophy taught by the programme to be put to practical use, and for reflection and experiences pertaining to the individual patient to be developed. In the group dwelling, the trainees encountered patients with different forms of dementia and studied how the care-giving could be adapted to the individual patient's symptoms - the disease perspective. In the nursing home, the trainees chose a staff perspective in which they focused on organization, management and working conditions as well as staff attitudes and the effects of these factors on patient care.

  12. Grouping Gene Ontology terms to improve the assessment of gene set enrichment in microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Alex; Grieve, Ian C

    2006-10-03

    Gene Ontology (GO) terms are often used to assess the results of microarray experiments. The most common way to do this is to perform Fisher's exact tests to find GO terms which are over-represented amongst the genes declared to be differentially expressed in the analysis of the microarray experiment. However, due to the high degree of dependence between GO terms, statistical testing is conservative, and interpretation is difficult. We propose testing groups of GO terms rather than individual terms, to increase statistical power, reduce dependence between tests and improve the interpretation of results. We use the publicly available package POSOC to group the terms. Our method finds groups of GO terms significantly over-represented amongst differentially expressed genes which are not found by Fisher's tests on individual GO terms. Grouping Gene Ontology terms improves the interpretation of gene set enrichment for microarray data.

  13. Grouping Gene Ontology terms to improve the assessment of gene set enrichment in microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grieve Ian C

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene Ontology (GO terms are often used to assess the results of microarray experiments. The most common way to do this is to perform Fisher's exact tests to find GO terms which are over-represented amongst the genes declared to be differentially expressed in the analysis of the microarray experiment. However, due to the high degree of dependence between GO terms, statistical testing is conservative, and interpretation is difficult. Results We propose testing groups of GO terms rather than individual terms, to increase statistical power, reduce dependence between tests and improve the interpretation of results. We use the publicly available package POSOC to group the terms. Our method finds groups of GO terms significantly over-represented amongst differentially expressed genes which are not found by Fisher's tests on individual GO terms. Conclusion Grouping Gene Ontology terms improves the interpretation of gene set enrichment for microarray data.

  14. Schottky-type groups and minimal sets of horocycle and geodesic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, M. S.

    2004-02-01

    In the first part of the paper the following conjecture stated by Dal'bo and Starkov is proved: the geodesic flow on a surface M=\\mathbb H^2/\\Gamma of constant negative curvature has a non-compact non-trivial minimal set if and only if the Fuchsian group \\Gamma is infinitely generated or contains a parabolic element. In the second part interesting examples of horocycle flows are constructed: 1) a flow whose restriction to the non-wandering set has no minimal subsets, and 2) a flow without minimal sets.In addition, an example of an infinitely generated discrete subgroup of \\operatorname{SL}(2,\\mathbb R) with all orbits discrete and dense in \\mathbb R^2 is constructed.

  15. A randomized comparison of home visits and hospital-based group follow-up visits after early postpartum discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, G J; Braveman, P A; Ackerson, L; Odouli, R; Coleman-Phox, K; Capra, A M; Wong, C; Lieu, T A

    2001-09-01

    Short postpartum stays are common. Current guidelines provide scant guidance on how routine follow-up of newly discharged mother-infant pairs should be performed. We aimed to compare 2 short-term (within 72 hours of discharge) follow-up strategies for low-risk mother-infant pairs with postpartum length of stay (LOS) of costs were studied using computerized databases and chart review. Breastfeeding continuation, maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal satisfaction were assessed by means of telephone interviews at 2 weeks postpartum. During a 17-month period in 1998 to 1999, we enrolled and randomized 1014 mother-infant pairs (506 to the control group and 508 to the intervention group). There were no significant differences between the study groups with respect to maternal age, race, education, household income, parity, previous breastfeeding experience, early initiation of prenatal care, or postpartum LOS. There were no differences with respect to neonatal LOS or Apgar scores. In the control group, 264 mother-infant pairs had an individual visit only, 157 had a group visit only, 64 had both a group and an individual visit, 4 had a home health and a hospital-based follow-up, 13 had no follow-up within 72 hours, and 4 were lost to follow-up. With respect to outcomes within 2 weeks after discharge, there were no significant differences in newborn or maternal hospitalizations or urgent care visits, breastfeeding discontinuation, maternal depressive symptoms, or a combined clinical outcome measure indicating whether a mother-infant pair had any of the above outcomes. However, mothers in the home visit group were more likely than those in the control group to rate multiple aspects of their care as excellent or very good. These included the preventive advice delivered (76% vs 59%) and the skills and abilities of the provider (84% vs 73%). Mothers in the home visit group also gave higher ratings on overall satisfaction with the newborn's posthospital care (71% vs 59

  16. Small primary care practices face four hurdles--including a physician-centric mind-set--in becoming medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutting, Paul A; Crabtree, Benjamin F; McDaniel, Reuben R

    2012-11-01

    Transforming small independent practices to patient-centered medical homes is widely believed to be a critical step in reforming the US health care system. Our team has conducted research on improving primary care practices for more than fifteen years. We have found four characteristics of small primary care practices that seriously inhibit their ability to make the transformation to this new care model. We found that small practices were extremely physician-centric, lacked meaningful communication among physicians, were dominated by authoritarian leadership behavior, and were underserved by midlevel clinicians who had been cast into unimaginative roles. Our analysis suggests that in addition to payment reform, a shift in the mind-set of primary care physicians is needed. Unless primary care physicians can adopt new mental models and think in new ways about themselves and their practices, it will be very difficult for them and their practices to create innovative care teams, become learning organizations, and act as good citizens within the health care neighborhood.

  17. Effectiveness of communication strategies for deaf or hard of hearing workers in group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Scott

    2014-01-01

    In group settings, background noise and an obstructed view of the speaker are just a few of the issues that can make workplace communication difficult for an individual who is deaf or hard of hearing. Accommodation strategies such as amplification of the speaker's voice or the use of text-based alternatives exist to address these issues. However, recent studies have shown that there are still unmet needs related to workplace communication in group settings for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. Identify the most common strategies used by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to improve communication in group settings and gauge the perceived effectiveness of those strategies. An online survey was conducted with individuals who self-identified as deaf or hard of hearing. The survey presented specific communication strategies based on three functional approaches (aural/oral, text, visual). The strategies applied to both receptive and expressive communication in five different meeting types ranging in size and purpose. 161 adults (age 22-90 yrs.) with limited hearing ability completed the survey. Text-based strategies were typically the least frequently used strategies in group settings, yet they ranked high in perceived effectiveness for receptive and expressive communication. Those who used an interpreter demonstrated a strong preference for having a qualified interpreter present in the meeting rather than an interpreter acting remotely. For expressive communication, participants in general preferred to use their own voice or signing abilities and ranked those strategies as highly effective. A more accessible workplace for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing would incorporate more ubiquitous text-based strategy options. Also, qualified interpreters, when used, should be present in the meeting for maximum effectiveness.

  18. Development and evaluation of a set of group delay standards. [deep space tracking station calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Beatty, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A set of cable assemblies serving as group delay standards having nominal delays of 15, 30, and 60 nsec are described. Various types of measurements were performed on the cable standards, including impedance, microwave phase shift, RF pulse burst delay, modulation pulsed delay, and envelope phase shift measurements. The results of these tests are given, and various sources of error are discussed, in particular, dispersion and internal reflections.

  19. Parenting capacity assessment for the court in a multifamily group setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Di Pasquale

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Parenting capacity assessment in court evaluations is a particularly complex task, given that it is necessary to consider the vast array of distinct and interrelated aspects and abilities which represent parenting, as well as the elevated number of contextual levels that influence parenting quality. The perspective we want to introduce regards the potentiality of the multifamily group as the elective observational setting in parenting capacity assessment.

  20. The use of computer simulations in whole-class versus small-group settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Lara Kathleen

    This study explored the use of computer simulations in a whole-class as compared to small-group setting. Specific consideration was given to the nature and impact of classroom conversations and interactions when computer simulations were incorporated into a high school chemistry course. This investigation fills a need for qualitative research that focuses on the social dimensions of actual classrooms. Participants included a novice chemistry teacher experienced in the use of educational technologies and two honors chemistry classes. The study was conducted in a rural school in the south-Atlantic United States at the end of the fall 2007 semester. The study took place during one instructional unit on atomic structure. Data collection allowed for triangulation of evidence from a variety of sources approximately 24 hours of video- and audio-taped classroom observations, supplemented with the researcher's field notes and analytic journal; miscellaneous classroom artifacts such as class notes, worksheets, and assignments; open-ended pre- and post-assessments; student exit interviews; teacher entrance, exit and informal interviews. Four web-based simulations were used, three of which were from the ExploreLearning collection. Assessments were analyzed using descriptive statistics and classroom observations, artifacts and interviews were analyzed using Erickson's (1986) guidelines for analytic induction. Conversational analysis was guided by methods outlined by Erickson (1982). Findings indicated (a) the teacher effectively incorporated simulations in both settings (b) students in both groups significantly improved their understanding of the chemistry concepts (c) there was no statistically significant difference between groups' achievement (d) there was more frequent exploratory talk in the whole-class group (e) there were more frequent and meaningful teacher-student interactions in the whole-class group (f) additional learning experiences not measured on the assessment

  1. PalliPA: How can general practices support caregivers of patients at their end of life in a home-care setting? A study protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, K.; Boelter, R.; Engeser, P.; Szecsenyi, J.; Campbell, S.M.; Peters-Klimm, F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The care of patients with a life-threatening, progressive and far advanced illness in a home-care setting requires appropriate individual care and requires the active support of family caregivers. General practice teams are usually the primary care givers and first contact and are best p

  2. A study of medication reviews to identify drug-related problems of polypharmacy patients in the Dutch nursing home setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkers, F.; Maring, J. G.; Boersma, F.; Taxis, K.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the extent of drug-related problems of polypharmacy patients in Dutch nursing homes. Objectives: We investigated the feasibility of teams of hospital pharmacists and nursing home physicians carrying out medication reviews. We aimed to identify the number and nature

  3. Defective homing is associated with altered Cdc42 activity in cells from patients with Fanconi anemia group A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Shang, Xun; Guo, Fukun; Murphy, Kim; Kirby, Michelle; Kelly, Patrick; Reeves, Lilith; Smith, Franklin O.; Williams, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies showed that Fanconi anemia (FA) murine stem cells have defective reconstitution after bone marrow (BM) transplantation. The mechanism underlying this defect is not known. Here, we report defective homing of FA patient BM progenitors transplanted into mouse models. Using cells from patients carrying mutations in FA complementation group A (FA-A), we show that when transplanted into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) recipient mice, FA-A BM cells exhibited impaired homing activity. FA-A cells also showed defects in both cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. Complementation of FA-A deficiency by reexpression of FANCA readily restored adhesion of FA-A cells. A significant decrease in the activity of the Rho GTPase Cdc42 was found associated with these defective functions in patient-derived cells, and expression of a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant was able to rescue the adhesion defect of FA-A cells. These results provide the first evidence that FA proteins influence human BM progenitor homing and adhesion via the small GTPase Cdc42-regulated signaling pathway. PMID:18565850

  4. Person-Centered Care in the Home Setting for Parkinson’s Disease: Operation House Call Quality of Care Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawaz Hack

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. (1 To evaluate the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a home visit program for persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD in a rural setting. (2 To have movement disorders fellows coordinate and manage health care delivery. Background. The University of Florida, Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration established Operation House Call to serve patients with PD who could not otherwise afford to travel to an expert center or to pay for medical care. PD is known to lead to significant disability, frequent hospitalization, early nursing home placement, and morbidity. Methods. This was designed as a quality improvement project. Movement disorders fellows travelled to the home(s of underserved PD patients and coordinated their clinical care. The diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease was confirmed using standardized criteria, and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale was performed and best treatment practices were delivered. Results. All seven patients have been followed up longitudinally every 3 to 6 months in the home setting, and they remain functional and independent. None of the patients have been hospitalized for PD related complications. Each patient has a new updatable electronic medical record. All Operation House Call cases are presented during video rounds for the interdisciplinary PD team to make recommendations for care (neurology, neurosurgery, neuropsychology, psychiatry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and social work. One Operation House Call patient has successfully received deep brain stimulation (DBS. Conclusion. This program is a pilot program that has demonstrated that it is possible to provide person-centered care in the home setting for PD patients. This program could provide a proof of concept for the construction of a larger visiting physician or nurse program.

  5. Nutritional self-care among a group of older home-living people in rural Southern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bjørg Dale, Ulrika SöderhamnCentre for Caring Research – Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, NorwayBackground: Older home-living people are an at-risk group for undernutrition, particularly those who are living alone. Lack of knowledge about healthy dietary habits, altered taste sensation, and declined health status are shown to be some of the factors related to undernutrition. The aims of this study were to explore how a small group of older people in Southern Norway perceived their nutritional self-care.Methods: An exploratory qualitative approach, combined with a simple self-report questionnaire, was used. Five persons living in rural areas in Southern Norway, who in a former study were screened and found to be at risk for undernutrition, participated. Qualitative data assessed by means of individual self-care talks in the persons' own homes were analyzed using directed content analysis. A simple self-report questionnaire containing demographic variables, two health-related questions, and the Nutritional Form For the Elderly (NUFFE-NO instrument was filled out at baseline and 6 months after the self-care talks.Results: The qualitative data showed that the participants had adequate knowledge about healthy and nutritious diets. They were aware of and motivated to adapt their diet to their current state of health and to perform the necessary actions to maintain an optimal nutritional status and nutritional self-care.Conclusion: Older people living at home are a diverse group. However, this study showed that they may have sufficient knowledge, willingness, and ability to perform nutritional self-care, even if they live alone and have several chronic illnesses and impaired health.Keywords: adapting, decision-making, knowledge, self-care talks

  6. Relationship between Isometric Strength of Six Lower Limb Muscle Groups and Motor Skills among Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckinx, F; Croisier, J L; Reginster, J Y; Petermans, J; Goffart, E; Bruyère, O

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the correlation between isometric muscle strength of the lower limb and motor skills. This is a cross sectional study performed among volunteer nursing home residents included in the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. The present analysis focused on isometric muscle strength of 6 lower limb muscle groups (i.e. knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, ankle flexors and ankle extensors), assessed using a validated hand-held dynamometer (i.e. the MicroFET2 device), and motor skills evaluated using the Tinetti test, the Timed Up and Go test, the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB) and the walking speed. The relationship between all these parameters was tested by means of a multiple correlation, adjusted on age, sex and body mass index. 450 nursing home residents (69.8% of women) with a mean age of 83.1±9.4 years were included in this study. Our results showed a significant inverse correlation between lower limb muscle strength and the time required to perform the TUG test or gait speed, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. The relationship between the Tinetti test or the SPPB score, and lower limb muscle strength was significant, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. In conclusion, a positive association between lower limb muscle strength of the four main muscle groups and motor skills of the elderly nursing residents was found in this research. Therefore, special attention should be given to these muscle groups during rehabilitation programs.

  7. Parallel group independent component analysis for massive fMRI data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Qiu, Huitong; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Pekar, James J.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Eloyan, Ani; Caffo, Brian S.

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is widely used in the field of functional neuroimaging to decompose data into spatio-temporal patterns of co-activation. In particular, ICA has found wide usage in the analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Recently, a number of large-scale data sets have become publicly available that consist of rs-fMRI scans from thousands of subjects. As a result, efficient ICA algorithms that scale well to the increased number of subjects are required. To address this problem, we propose a two-stage likelihood-based algorithm for performing group ICA, which we denote Parallel Group Independent Component Analysis (PGICA). By utilizing the sequential nature of the algorithm and parallel computing techniques, we are able to efficiently analyze data sets from large numbers of subjects. We illustrate the efficacy of PGICA, which has been implemented in R and is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network, through simulation studies and application to rs-fMRI data from two large multi-subject data sets, consisting of 301 and 779 subjects respectively. PMID:28278208

  8. Parallel group independent component analysis for massive fMRI data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Huang, Lei; Qiu, Huitong; Nebel, Mary Beth; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Pekar, James J; Lindquist, Martin A; Eloyan, Ani; Caffo, Brian S

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is widely used in the field of functional neuroimaging to decompose data into spatio-temporal patterns of co-activation. In particular, ICA has found wide usage in the analysis of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) data. Recently, a number of large-scale data sets have become publicly available that consist of rs-fMRI scans from thousands of subjects. As a result, efficient ICA algorithms that scale well to the increased number of subjects are required. To address this problem, we propose a two-stage likelihood-based algorithm for performing group ICA, which we denote Parallel Group Independent Component Analysis (PGICA). By utilizing the sequential nature of the algorithm and parallel computing techniques, we are able to efficiently analyze data sets from large numbers of subjects. We illustrate the efficacy of PGICA, which has been implemented in R and is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network, through simulation studies and application to rs-fMRI data from two large multi-subject data sets, consisting of 301 and 779 subjects respectively.

  9. US Home Injuries Kill 20,000 a Year,Group Says

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎黄杉

    2002-01-01

    本文的主题句真好。人人认为,Home is a heaven.但是,It is notnecessarily safe.(家是天堂,但未必就很安全)。美国每年在家中受到的伤害(注:非家庭暴力之伤害)令人震惊:more than 20 million medical visits result fromhome injuries each year.(不妨学习此表达的英语味,汉译:每年因家庭伤害而去医院门诊的人数就超过两千万人次)。另外,People don’t think about homesafety until something happens。一句也弥漫英语味,且很实用。

  10. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huygens Flavia

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data.

  11. Improved group contribution parameter set for the application of solubility parameters to melt extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Susann; Sievert, Frank; Thommes, Markus; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    Hot-melt extrusion is gaining importance for the production of amorphous solid solutions; in parallel, predictive tools for estimating drug solubility in polymers are increasingly demanded. The Hansen solubility parameter (SP) approach is well acknowledged for its predictive power of the miscibility of liquids as well as the solubility of some amorphous solids in liquid solvents. By solely using the molecular structure, group contribution (GC) methods allow the calculation of Hansen SPs. The GC parameter sets available were derived from liquids and polymers which conflicts with the object of prediction, the solubility of solid drugs. The present study takes a step from the liquid based SPs toward their application to solid solutes. On the basis of published experimental Hansen SPs of solid drugs and excipients only, a new GC parameter set was developed. In comparison with established parameter sets by van Krevelen/Hoftyzer, Beerbower/Hansen, Breitkreutz and Stefanis/Panayiotou, the new GC parameter set provides the highest overall predictive power for solubility experiments (correlation coefficient r = -0.87 to -0.91) as well as for literature data on melt extrudates and casted films (r = -0.78 to -0.96).

  12. Facebook usage among those who have received treatment for an eating disorder in a group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Kristina; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Kass, Andrea E; Wilfley, Denise E; Taylor, Craig Barr; Trockel, Mickey

    2016-08-01

    This study explored Facebook use among individuals with a history of receiving treatment for an eating disorder (ED) in a group setting (e.g., inpatient, residential, outpatient group), focusing primarily on comparisons individuals make about their bodies, eating, or exercise to those of their peers from treatment on Facebook and the relation between these comparisons and ED pathology. Individuals (N = 415; mean age 28.15 years ± 8.41; 98.1% female) who self-reported receipt of ED treatment in a group setting were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey. Participants reported having an average of 10-19 Facebook friends from treatment and spending up to 30 min per day interacting on Facebook with individuals from treatment or ED-related organizations. More comparison to treatment peers on Facebook was associated with greater ED psychopathology and ED-related impairment. Conversely, positive interaction with treatment peers on Facebook was associated with lower ED psychopathology and ED-related impairment. Individuals who had been in treatment longer, more times, and more recently had more Facebook friends from treatment and ED-related organizations as well as spent more time in ED groups' pages on Facebook. Few participants (19.5%) reported that a therapist asked about the impact of Facebook on pathology. Interactions on Facebook could affect patients' recovery and potential for relapse. It may be helpful for treatment providers to discuss Facebook use and its potential benefits and drawbacks with patients preparing for discharge from group treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:764-777). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The group of homeomorphisms of the Cantor set has ample generics

    CERN Document Server

    Kwiatkowska, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    We show that the group of homeomorphisms of the Cantor set $H(K)$ has ample generics, that is, for every $m$ the diagonal conjugacy action $g\\cdot(h_1,h_2,..., h_m)=(gh_1g^{-1},gh_2g^{-1},..., gh_mg^{-1})$ of $H(K)$ on $H(K)^m$ has a comeager orbit. This answers a question of Kechris and Rosendal. We show that the generic tuple in $H(K)^m$ can be taken to be the limit of a certain projective Fraisse family. We also present a proof of the existence of the generic homeomorphism of the Cantor set in the context of the projective Fraisse theory.

  14. The (Ir)relevance of Group Size in Health Care Priority Setting: A Reply to Juth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Lars; Gustavsson, Erik

    2017-03-01

    How to handle orphan drugs for rare diseases is a pressing problem in current health-care. Due to the group size of patients affecting the cost of treatment, they risk being disadvantaged in relation to existing cost-effectiveness thresholds. In an article by Niklas Juth it has been argued that it is irrelevant to take indirectly operative factors like group size into account since such a compensation would risk discounting the use of cost, a relevant factor, altogether. In this article we analyze Juth's argument and observe that we already do compensate for indirectly operative factors, both outside and within cost-effectiveness evaluations, for formal equality reasons. Based on this we argue that we have reason to set cost-effectiveness thresholds to integrate equity concerns also including formal equality considerations. We find no reason not to compensate for group size to the extent we already compensate for other factors. Moreover, groups size implying a systematic disadvantage also on a global scale, i.e. taking different aspects of the health condition of patients suffering from rare diseases into account, will provide strong reason for why group size is indeed relevant to compensate for (if anything).

  15. Group intervention for siblings of children with disabilities: a pilot study in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granat, Tina; Nordgren, Ingrid; Rein, George; Sonnander, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of a group intervention in a clinical setting designed to increase knowledge of disability and improve sibling relationship among siblings of children with disabilities. A self-selected sample of 54 younger and older siblings with typical development (ages 8-12 years) of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (9), Asperger syndrome (7), autistic disorder (13), physical disability (8) and intellectual disability (17) participated in collateral sibling groups. The Sibling Knowledge Interview (SKI) and Sibling Relationship Questionnaire (SRQ) were administered pre- and post-intervention. SKI scores increased (p < 0.001) from pre- to post-intervention when merged diagnostic groups were compared. Comparisons of SRQ pre- and post-intervention scores across diagnostic sibling groups showed significantly different (p < 0.05) score patterns. The results were encouraging and contribute to further development of interventions meeting the needs of siblings of children with disabilities. In view of the limited empirical research on group interventions for siblings of children with disabilities future work is needed to investigate the effectiveness of such interventions. Particular attention should be given to siblings of children with autism and siblings of children with intellectual disability.

  16. Iron in galaxy groups and clusters: confronting galaxy evolution models with a newly homogenized data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Robert M.; Thomas, Peter A.; Henriques, Bruno M. B.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the iron abundance in the hot gas surrounding galaxy groups and clusters. To do this, we first compile and homogenize a large data set of 79 low-redshift (tilde{z} = 0.03) systems (159 individual measurements) from the literature. Our analysis accounts for differences in aperture size, solar abundance, and cosmology, and scales all measurements using customized radial profiles for the temperature (T), gas density (ρgas), and iron abundance (ZFe). We then compare this data set to groups and clusters in the L-GALAXIES galaxy evolution model. Our homogenized data set reveals a tight T-ZFe relation for clusters, with a scatter in ZFe of only 0.10 dex and a slight negative gradient. After examining potential measurement biases, we conclude that some of this negative gradient has a physical origin. Our model suggests greater accretion of hydrogen in the hottest systems, via stripping from infalling satellites, as a cause. In groups, L-GALAXIES over-estimates ZFe, indicating that metal-rich gas removal (via e.g. AGN feedback) is required. L-GALAXIES is consistent with the observed ZFe in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the hottest clusters at z = 0, and shows a similar rate of ICM enrichment as that observed from at least z ˜ 1.3 to the present day. This is achieved without needing to modify any of the galactic chemical evolution (GCE) model parameters. However, the ZFe in intermediate-T clusters could be under-estimated in our model. We caution that modifications to the GCE modelling to correct this disrupt the agreement with observations of galaxies' stellar components.

  17. Language Barrier as a Risk Factor for Injuries From Patient Violence Among Direct Care Workers in Home Settings: Findings From a U.S. National Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byon, Ha Do; Zhu, Shijun; Unick, George; Storr, Carla; Lipscomb, Jane

    2017-08-15

    This study explored potential risk factors for injuries from patient violence among direct care workers in U.S. homes (DCWHs). A national probability sample of 3,377 DCWHs including home health and personal care aides was analyzed using complex sample analysis and generalized estimating equation. Injury from violence was defined as a workrelated injury sustained by aggression, violence, or abuse that was reported to the agency, required medical attention or resulted in absenteeism from work. An association between suffering an injury from patient violence and having a language barrier with patients was noted (OR = 4.44; 95% CI = 1.57, 12.56; p = .005). Findings illuminate the importance of homecare providers to match language between DCWHs and patients to reduce patient violence and improve quality of care in the home setting.

  18. Enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders adapted for a group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Stephanie; Byrne, Sue; Allen, Karina

    2017-08-01

    This randomized control trial is an evaluation of the effectiveness of enhanced cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT-E) for eating disorders adapted for a group setting. The study aimed to examine the effects of group CBT-E on eating disorder psychopathology and additional maintaining pathology. A transdiagnostic sample of individuals with eating disorders with a BMI ≥ 18 kg/m(2) (N = 40) were randomized to an immediate-start or delayed-start condition so as to compare therapeutic effects of group CBT-E with a waitlist control. Global Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) scores, BMI, and measures of Clinical Perfectionism, Self-Esteem, Interpersonal Difficulties, and Mood Intolerance were measured across the 8-week control period, throughout the group treatment and at 3-months post-treatment. Over 70% of those who entered the trial completed treatment. The first eight weeks of group CBT-E were more effective at reducing Global EDE-Q scores than no treatment (waitlist control). By post-treatment, good outcome (a Global EDE-Q within 1 SD of Australian community norms plus BMI ≥ 18.5) was achieved by 67.9% of treatment completers and 66.7% of the total sample. Symptom abstinence within the previous month was reported by 14.3% of treatment completers and 10.3% of the total sample. Significant reductions in Clinical Perfectionism, Self-Esteem, Interpersonal Difficulties, and Mood Intolerance were also observed. This study demonstrated that a group version of CBT-E can be effective at reducing eating disorder psychopathology in a transdiagnostic sample of individuals with eating disorders. Group CBT-E could provide a means of increasing availability of evidence-based treatment for eating disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Interventions to delay institutionalization of frail older persons: design of a longitudinal study in the home care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Almeida Mello Johanna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people usually prefer staying at home rather than going into residential care. The Belgian National Institute for Health and Disability Insurance wishes to invest in home care by financing innovative projects that effectively help older people to stay at home longer. In this study protocol we describe the evaluation of 34 home care projects. These projects are clustered according to the type of their main intervention such as case management, night care, occupational therapy at home and psychological/psychosocial support. The main goal of this study is to identify which types of projects have the most effect in delaying institutionalization of frail older persons. Methods/design This is a longitudinal intervention study based on a quasi-experimental design. Researchers use three comparison strategies to evaluate intervention - comparison among different types of projects, comparisons between older persons in the projects and older persons not benefiting from a project but who are still at home and between older persons in the projects and older persons who are already institutionalized. Projects are asked to include clients who are frail and at risk of institutionalization. In the study we use internationally validated instruments such as the interRAI Home Care instrument, the WHO-QOL-8 and the Zarit Burden Interview-12. These instruments are filled out at baseline, at exit from the project and 6 months after baseline. Additionally, caregivers have to do a follow-up every 6 months until exit from the project. Criteria to exit the cohort will be institutionalization longer than 3 months and death. The main analysis in the study consists of the calculation of incidence rates, cumulative incidence rates and hazard rates of definitive institutionalization through survival analyses for each type of project. Discussion This research will provide knowledge on the functional status of frail older persons who are still living at

  20. [Pharmaceutical reference pricing in Germany: definition of therapeutic groups, price setting through regression procedure and effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stargardt, T; Schreyögg, J; Busse, R

    2005-07-01

    The German reference pricing system defines a reimbursement threshold for groups of pharmaceuticals. Pharmaceuticals are grouped according to certain criteria by the Federal Joint Committee. To make different active ingredients comparable, so called reference values are defined. Subsequently, the federal association of sickness funds sets reference prices using a regression procedure. However, the impact of the reference price system is limited. On the one hand there is a strong incentive for pharmaceutical companies to decrease prices to the reference price. On the other hand there is no incentive for further price reductions. Additionally, only one part of the pharmaceutical market is affected by reference pricing. Therefore the instrument has only managed to lower pharmaceutical expenditure in the short run. For sustainable long-term cost containment the use of other regulatory instruments is necessary. Nevertheless, compared to other instruments of price-regulation, reference pricing seems to be a good alternative to control pharmaceutical prices, since rationing is kept as little as possible.

  1. Facebook Usage Amongst Those Who Have Received Treatment for an Eating Disorder in a Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Kristina; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Kass, Andrea E.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr; Trockel, Mickey

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study explored Facebook use among individuals with a history of receiving treatment for an eating disorder (ED) in a group setting (e.g., inpatient, residential, outpatient group), focusing primarily on comparisons individuals make about their bodies, eating, or exercise to those of their peers from treatment on Facebook and the relation between these comparisons and ED pathology. Method Individuals (N = 415; mean age 28.15 years ± 8.41; 98.1% female) who self-reported receipt of ED treatment in a group setting were recruited via email and social media to complete an online survey. Results Participants reported having an average of 10–19 Facebook friends from treatment and spending up to 30 minutes per day interacting on Facebook with individuals from treatment or ED-related organizations. More comparison to treatment peers on Facebook was associated with greater ED psychopathology and ED-related impairment. Conversely, positive interaction with treatment peers on Facebook was associated with lower ED psychopathology and ED-related impairment. Individuals who had been in treatment longer, more times, and more recently had more Facebook friends from treatment and ED-related organizations as well as spent more time in ED groups’ pages on Facebook. Few participants (19.5%) reported that a therapist asked about the impact of Facebook on pathology. Discussion Interactions on Facebook could affect patients’ recovery and potential for relapse. It may be helpful for treatment providers to discuss Facebook use and its potential benefits and drawbacks with patients preparing for discharge from group treatment. PMID:27302908

  2. Innovative group-decoupling design of a segment erector based on G F set theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wentao; Guo, Weizhong; Gao, Feng; Mo, Pinxi

    2013-03-01

    The segment erector is a key part of the shield machines for tunnel engineering. The available segment erectors are all of serial configuration which is suffering from the problems of low rigidity and accumulative motion errors. The current research mainly focuses on improving assembly accuracy and control performance of serial segment erectors. An innovative design method is proposed featuring motion group-decoupling, based on which a new type of segment erector is developed and investigated. Firstly, the segment installation manipulation is analyzed and decomposed into three motion groups that are decoupled. Then the type synthesis for the 4-DOF motion group is performed based on the general function( G F ) set theory and a new configuration of (1T⊕1R⊕1PS&3UPS) is attained according to the segment manipulation requirements. Consequently, the kinematic models are built and the reducibility and accuracy are analyzed. The dexterity is verified though numerical simulation and no singular points appear in the workspace. Finally, a positioning experiment is carried out by using the prototype developed in the lab that demonstrates a 13.1% improvement of positioning accuracy and the feasibility of the new segment erector. The presented group-decoupling design method is able to invent new type of hybrid segment erectors that avoid the accumulative motion error of erecting.

  3. Ingroup/Outgroup Attitudes and Group Evaluations: The Role of Competition in British Classroom Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia L. Lam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Children’s intergroup bias is one of the consequences of their readiness to categorise people into ingroups and outgroups, even when groups are assigned arbitrarily. The present study examined the influence of intergroup competition on children’s ingroup and outgroup attitudes developed within the minimal-group setting in British classrooms. One hundred and twelve children in two age groups (6-7- and 9-10-year-olds were assessed on classification skills and self-esteem before being allocated to one of two colour “teams.” In the experimental condition, children were told that the teams would have a competition after two weeks and teachers made regular use of these teams to organise activities. In the control condition, where no competition ensued, teachers did not refer to “teams.” Then children completed trait attributions to their own-team (ingroup and other-team (outgroup members and group evaluations. It was found that children developed positive ingroup bias across conditions, but outgroup negative bias was shown only by 6-7-year-olds in the experimental condition, particularly if they lost the competition, where they evaluated their team more critically. Better classification skills were associated with less negativity towards the outgroup in the experimental condition. Findings are discussed in relation to relevant theoretical premises and particulars of the intergroup context.

  4. A group randomized controlled trial integrating obesity prevention and control for postpartum adolescents in a home visiting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haire-Joshu, Debra L; Schwarz, Cynthia D; Peskoe, Sarah B; Budd, Elizabeth L; Brownson, Ross C; Joshu, Corinne E

    2015-06-26

    Adolescence represents a critical period for the development of overweight that tracks into adulthood. This risk is significantly heightened for adolescents that become pregnant, many of whom experience postpartum weight retention. The aim of this study was to evaluate Balance Adolescent Lifestyle Activities and Nutrition Choices for Energy (BALANCE), a multicomponent obesity prevention intervention targeting postpartum adolescents participating in a national home visiting child development-parent education program. A group randomized, nested cohort design was used with 1325 adolescents, 694 intervention and 490 control, (mean age = 17.8 years, 52 % underrepresented minorities) located across 30 states. Participatory methods were used to integrate lifestyle behavior change strategies within standard parent education practice. Content targeted replacement of high-risk obesogenic patterns (e.g. sweetened drink and high fat snack consumption, sedentary activity) with positive behaviors (e.g. water intake, fruit and vegetables, increased walking). Parent educators delivered BALANCE through home visits, school based classroom-group meetings, and website activities. Control adolescents received standard child development information. Phase I included baseline to posttest (12 months); Phase II included baseline to follow-up (24 months). When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents who were ≥12 weeks postpartum were 89 % more likely (p = 0.02) to maintain a normal BMI or improve an overweight/obese BMI by 12 months; this change was not sustained at 24 months. When compared to the control group, BALANCE adolescents significantly improved fruit and vegetable intake (p = .03). In stratified analyses, water intake improved among younger BALANCE teens (p = .001) and overweight/obese BALANCE teens (p = .05) when compared to control counterparts. There were no significant differences between groups in sweetened drink and snack consumption

  5. Using Group II Introns for Attenuating the In Vitro and In Vivo Expression of a Homing Endonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhin Kumar Guha

    Full Text Available In Chaetomium thermophilum (DSM 1495 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA small ribosomal subunit (rns gene a group IIA1 intron interrupts an open reading frame (ORF encoded within a group I intron (mS1247. This arrangement offers the opportunity to examine if the nested group II intron could be utilized as a regulatory element for the expression of the homing endonuclease (HEase. Constructs were generated where the codon-optimized ORF was interrupted with either the native group IIA1 intron or a group IIB type intron. This study showed that the expression of the HEase (in vivo in Escherichia coli can be regulated by manipulating the splicing efficiency of the HEase ORF-embedded group II introns. Exogenous magnesium chloride (MgCl2 stimulated the expression of a functional HEase but the addition of cobalt chloride (CoCl2 to growth media antagonized the expression of HEase activity. Ultimately the ability to attenuate HEase activity might be useful in precision genome engineering, minimizing off target activities, or where pathways have to be altered during a specific growth phase.

  6. Development of the interRAI Pressure Ulcer Risk Scale (PURS for use in long-term care and home care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Gail

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In long-term care (LTC homes in the province of Ontario, implementation of the Minimum Data Set (MDS assessment and The Braden Scale for predicting pressure ulcer risk were occurring simultaneously. The purpose of this study was, using available data sources, to develop a bedside MDS-based scale to identify individuals under care at various levels of risk for developing pressure ulcers in order to facilitate targeting risk factors for prevention. Methods Data for developing the interRAI Pressure Ulcer Risk Scale (interRAI PURS were available from 2 Ontario sources: three LTC homes with 257 residents assessed during the same time frame with the MDS and Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk, and eighty-nine Ontario LTC homes with 12,896 residents with baseline/reassessment MDS data (median time 91 days, between 2005-2007. All assessments were done by trained clinical staff, and baseline assessments were restricted to those with no recorded pressure ulcer. MDS baseline/reassessment samples used in further testing included 13,062 patients of Ontario Complex Continuing Care Hospitals (CCC and 73,183 Ontario long-stay home care (HC clients. Results A data-informed Braden Scale cross-walk scale using MDS items was devised from the 3-facility dataset, and tested in the larger longitudinal LTC homes data for its association with a future new pressure ulcer, giving a c-statistic of 0.676. Informed by this, LTC homes data along with evidence from the clinical literature was used to create an alternate-form 7-item additive scale, the interRAI PURS, with good distributional characteristics and c-statistic of 0.708. Testing of the scale in CCC and HC longitudinal data showed strong association with development of a new pressure ulcer. Conclusions interRAI PURS differentiates risk of developing pressure ulcers among facility-based residents and home care recipients. As an output from an MDS assessment, it eliminates duplicated

  7. Home front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-04

    Ninety-year-old Ivy Tabberer protested against the closure of her care home at the Houses of Parliament last week. She was joined by fellow residents in the Havering Action Against Home Closures group and three generations of her family. Ms Tabberer is pictured with daughter Doreen Walpole (left), granddaughter Annette (far right) and great granddaughter Shereen (middle). 'If all the homes close,' said Ms Tabberer, 'where are we going to stay?'

  8. Comparison of the HUI3 and the EQ-5D-3L in a nursing home setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Accurately assessing changes in the quality of life of older people living permanently in nursing homes is important. The multi-attribute utility instrument most commonly used and recommended to assess health-related quality of life in the nursing home population is the three-level EuroQol EQ-5D-3L. To date, there have been no studies using the Health Utilities Index Mark III (HUI3). The purpose of this study was to compare the level of agreement and sensitivity to change of the EQ-5D-3L and HUI3 in a nursing home population. Methods EQ-5D-3L and HUI3 scores were measured as part of a cluster randomised controlled trial of nurse led care coordination in a nursing home population in Perth, Western Australia at baseline and 6-month follow up. Results Both measures were completed for 199 residents at baseline and 177 at 6-month follow-up. Mean baseline utility scores for EQ-5D-3L (0.45; 95% CI 0.41–0.49) and HUI3 (0.15; 95% CI 0.10–0.20) were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p<0.01) and agreement was poor to moderate between absolute scores from each instrument (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.63). The EQ-5D-3L appeared more sensitive to change over the 6-month period. Conclusion Our findings show that the EQ-5D-3L and HUI3 estimate different utility scores among nursing home residents. These differences should be taken into account, particularly when considering the implications of the cost-effectiveness of particular interventions and we conclude that the HUI3 is no better suited to measuring health-related quality of life in a nursing home population when compared to the EQ-5D-3L. PMID:28234983

  9. The association between the quality of life and depression of elderly in a nursing home institutional setting

    OpenAIRE

    Ľubica Ilievová; Peter Žitný; Jana Jakobejova

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The quality of life is perceived individually and subjectively. The quality of life of elderly people in nursing home nursing homes depends on the degree to which their needs are fulfilled. The need to adapt to a new environment in an older age is a risky situation and may result in depression. The aim of the study was to analyze the change of quality of life and level of depression, as well as possible association of quality of life and level of depression, in elderly people ad...

  10. High acceptance of home-based HIV counseling and testing in an urban community setting in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Mugerwa Micheal; List Justin; Sempeera Hassard; Sekandi Juliet N; Asiimwe Stephen; Yin Xiaoping; Whalen Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background HIV testing is a key component of prevention and an entry point into HIV/AIDS treatment and care however, coverage and access to testing remains low in Uganda. Home-Based HIV Counseling and Testing (HBHCT) has potential to increase access and early identification of unknown HIV/AIDS disease. This study investigated the level of acceptance of Home-Based HIV Counseling and Testing (HBHCT), the HIV sero-prevalence and the factors associated with acceptance of HBHCT in an urba...

  11. Hitting Closer to Home: A Multiple Family Prevention Group for Adolescent Disordered Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Colleen E.; Rayle, Andrea Dixon

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an innovative multiple family psychoeducational group for the prevention of disordered eating among adolescent females. An overview of the concerns facing adolescents today is presented, including sociocultural norms, body dissatisfaction associated with pubertal changes, teasing regarding weight and shape, and family…

  12. Taking action against malnutrition in Asian healthcare settings: an initiative of a Northeast Asia Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiguchi, Takashi; Arai, Hidenori; Claytor, Ling Hui; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Kotani, Joji; Lee, Shyh-Dye; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Nogami, Tetsushi; Peng, Nanhai

    2017-03-01

    Malnutrition is common in Asia, especially among people who are critically ill and/or older. Study results from China, Japan, and Taiwan show that malnutrition or risk of malnutrition is found in up to 30% of communitydwelling people and as much as 50% of patients admitted to hospitals-with prevalence even higher among those older than 70 years. In Asia, malnutrition takes substantial tolls on health, physical function, and wellbeing of people affected, and it adds huge financial burdens to healthcare systems. Attention to nutrition, including protein intake, can help prevent or delay disease- and age-related disabilities and can speed recovery from illness or surgery. Despite compelling evidence and professional guidelines on appropriate nutrition care in hospital and community settings, patients' malnutrition is often overlooked and under-treated in Asian healthcare, as it is worldwide. Since the problem of malnutrition continues to grow as many Asian populations become increasingly "gray", it is important to take action now. A medical education (feedM.E.) Global Study Group developed a strategy to facilitate best-practice hospital nutrition care: screen-intervene-supervene. As members of a newly formed feedM.E. Northeast Asia Study Group, we endorse this care strategy, guiding clinicians to screen each patient's nutritional status upon hospital admission or at initiation of care, intervene promptly when nutrition care is needed, and supervene or follow-up routinely with adjustment and reinforcement of nutrition care plans, including post-discharge. To encourage best-practice nutrition in Asian patient care settings, our paper includes a simple, stepwise Nutrition Care Pathway (NCP) in multiple languages.

  13. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) in a Primary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Judith R; Dawson, Samantha; Krsmanovic, Adrijana

    2017-05-02

    Primary care is where many patients with insomnia first ask for professional help. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the recommended treatment for chronic insomnia. Although CBT-I's efficacy is well established, its effectiveness in real-life primary care has seldom been investigated. We examined the effectiveness of CBT-I as routinely delivered in a Canadian primary care setting. The patients were 70 women and 11 men (mean age = 57.0 years, SD = 12.3); 83% had medical comorbidity. For the first 81 patients who took the six-session group program we compared initial and postprogram sleep diaries, sleep medication use, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and visits to the family physician. Sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and ISI scores improved significantly (p sleep medication decreased (p 7). Wait-list data from 42 patients showed minimal sleep and mood improvements with the passage of time. Number of visits to the family physician six months postprogram decreased, although not significantly (p = .108). The CBT-I program was associated with improvement on all sleep and mood measures. Effect sizes were similar to, or larger than, those found in randomized controlled trials, demonstrating the real-world effectiveness of CBT-I in an interdisciplinary primary care setting.

  14. An unadjusted 25 group neutron cross section set for fast reactor core calculations from JENDL-2 library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devan, K.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Lee, S.M. [Nuclear Data Section Indira Ganhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamilnadu (India)

    1994-12-31

    We have created a 25 group neutron cross section set (IGCJENDL) for nuclides of interest to LMFBRs from the Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library - Version 2 (JENDL-2) in the format of French adjusted Cadarache Version 2 set (1969). The integral validation of IGCJENDL set was done by analyzing nine fast critical assemblies proposed by Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). The calculated integral parameters agreed reasonably well with the reported measured values. It is found that this set predicts the integral parameters, k-eff in particular, close to that predicted by adjusted CARNAVAL IV (French) or BNAB-78 (Russian) sets, for a 1200 MWe theoretical benchmark, representing a large power reactor.

  15. Holistic Medicine IV: Principles of Existential Holistic Group Therapy and the Holistic Process of Healing in a Group Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Soren Ventegodt; Niels Jorgen Andersen; Joav Merrick

    2003-01-01

    In existential holistic group therapy, the whole person heals in accordance with the holistic process theory and the life mission theory. Existential group psychotherapy addresses the emotional aspect of the human mind related to death, freedom, isolation, and meaninglessness, while existential holistic group therapy addresses the state of the person�s wholeness. This includes the body, the person�s philosophy of life, and often also love, purpose of life, and the spiritual dimension, to the ...

  16. Renormalization group invariance and optimal QCD renormalization scale-setting: a key issues review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Yang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Fu, Hai-Bing; Ma, Hong-Hao; Brodsky, Stanley J; Mojaza, Matin

    2015-12-01

    A valid prediction for a physical observable from quantum field theory should be independent of the choice of renormalization scheme--this is the primary requirement of renormalization group invariance (RGI). Satisfying scheme invariance is a challenging problem for perturbative QCD (pQCD), since a truncated perturbation series does not automatically satisfy the requirements of the renormalization group. In a previous review, we provided a general introduction to the various scale setting approaches suggested in the literature. As a step forward, in the present review, we present a discussion in depth of two well-established scale-setting methods based on RGI. One is the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) in which the terms associated with the β-function are absorbed into the scale of the running coupling at each perturbative order; its predictions are scheme and scale independent at every finite order. The other approach is the 'principle of minimum sensitivity' (PMS), which is based on local RGI; the PMS approach determines the optimal renormalization scale by requiring the slope of the approximant of an observable to vanish. In this paper, we present a detailed comparison of the PMC and PMS procedures by analyzing two physical observables R(e+e-) and [Formula: see text] up to four-loop order in pQCD. At the four-loop level, the PMC and PMS predictions for both observables agree within small errors with those of conventional scale setting assuming a physically-motivated scale, and each prediction shows small scale dependences. However, the convergence of the pQCD series at high orders, behaves quite differently: the PMC displays the best pQCD convergence since it eliminates divergent renormalon terms; in contrast, the convergence of the PMS prediction is questionable, often even worse than the conventional prediction based on an arbitrary guess for the renormalization scale. PMC predictions also have the property that any residual dependence on the choice

  17. Doing more with Less : A client-centred approach to healthcare logistics in a nursing home setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeke, Dennis; Verkooijen, Lineke

    2013-01-01

    Dutch nursing homes are currently confronted with two seemingly incompatible goals: a more client-centred approach and the necessity to reduce costs at the same time. It is becoming increasingly apparent that healthcare logistics can contribute to providing high-quality care and support at a reasona

  18. Crime Prevention Starts at Home! Setting the Stage for Community Action To Prevent Violence and Other Crimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Crime Prevention Council, Washington, DC.

    Crime prevention works. This simple fact is often forgotten in the ongoing debate over crime and its causes. Prevention works when individuals take common-sense actions to protect themselves, their families and property. The theme from Crime Prevention Month 1995 goes back to these basics: good home security, self-protection skills for kids and…

  19. Medium-sized Universities Connect to Their Libraries: Links on University Home Pages and User Group Pages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Harpel-Burk

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available From major tasks—such as recruitment of new students and staff—to the more mundane but equally important tasks—such as providing directions to campus—college and university Web sites perform a wide range of tasks for a varied assortment of users. Overlapping functions and user needs meld to create the need for a Web site with three major functions: promotion and marketing, access to online services, and providing a means of communication between individuals and groups. In turn, college and university Web sites that provide links to their library home page can be valuable assets for recruitment, public relations, and for helping users locate online services.

  20. Managing a work-life balance: the experiences of midwives working in a group practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereday, Jennifer; Oster, Candice

    2010-06-01

    To explore how a group of midwives achieved a work-life balance working within a caseload model of care with flexible work hours and on-call work. in-depth interviews were conducted and the data were analysed using a data-driven thematic analysis technique. Children, Youth and Women's Health Service (CYWHS) (previously Women's and Children's Hospital), Adelaide, where a midwifery service known as Midwifery Group Practice (MGP) offers a caseload model of care to women within a midwife-managed unit. 17 midwives who were currently working, or had previously worked, in MGP. analysis of the midwives' individual experiences provided insight into how midwives managed the flexible hours and on-call work to achieve a sustainable work-life balance within a caseload model of care. it is important for midwives working in MGP to actively manage the flexibility of their role with time on call. Organisational, team and individual structure influenced how flexibility of hours was managed; however, a period of adjustment was required to achieve this balance. the study findings offer a description of effective, sustainable strategies to manage flexible hours and on-call work that may assist other midwives working in a similar role or considering this type of work setting. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Depositional setting and vertebrate biostratigraphy of the Triassic Dockum Group of Texas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas Lehman; Sankar Chatterjee

    2005-06-01

    Triassic strata of the Dockum Group in Texas comprise two major upward-fining alluvial–lacustrine depositional sequences. The two sequences are represented by the (1) Santa Rosa–Tecovas, and (2) Trujillo–Cooper Canyon Formations. The second sequence is much thicker than the first, and occupies a greater geographic part of the Dockum basin. Each sequence of alluvial and lacustrine sediment accumulation is characterized by sediment derivation from a different source terrain. The unconformable relationship between the two depositional sequences, the change in mineralogical composition and presumed source areas between these units, differences in paleocurrent orientation between units, and evidence for intervening episodes of local deformation indicate that the sequences are of tectonic origin. These strata are not the product of a single sediment dispersal system, such as the centripetally-drained lacustrine delta complex previously envisioned for the Dockum basin. Both Dockum sequences are comprised largely of two typical alluvial facies associations; stream channel facies, and overbank flood-plain facies, that are similar to those described in nearly all fluvial deposits. In addition, the Dockum Group contains a peculiar lacustrine facies that accumulated in local flood-plain depressions, and probably resulted from subsidence over areas of subsurface salt dissolution. Vertebrate fossil assemblages are found in all three Dockum facies associations. Five fossiliferous sites in the Dockum are discussed in the context of these three depositional settings. The Dockum tetrapod diversity is reviewed in a hierarchical phylogeny with remarks on the history of collection, stratigraphic distribution of genera, and their taxonomic status. The stratigraphic ranges of tetrapod taxa do not support the recently proposed successive Otischalkian, Adamanian, Revueltian, and Apachean biochrons within the Dockum Group. Instead, a few index fossils provide a broad framework

  2. Quality Group Home Care for Adults with Developmental Disabilities and/or Mental Health Disorders: Yearning for Understanding, Security and Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipton, Leah; Lashewicz, Bonnie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to uncover and understand factors influencing quality of care received by adults with developmental disabilities and/or mental health disorders living in group homes. Methods: The present authors conducted a secondary analysis of data from nine focus group discussions with adults with developmental…

  3. Cognitive behavioral therapy for depression among adults in Japanese clinical settings: a single-group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Toshiaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for treating Japanese patients with major depression is lacking, therefore, a feasibility study of CBT for depression in Japanese clinical settings is urgently required. Findings A culturally adapted, 16-week manualized individual CBT program for Japanese patients with major depressive disorder was developed. A total of 27 patients with major depression were enrolled in a single-group study with the purpose of testing the feasibility of the program. Twenty six patients (96% completed the study. The mean total score on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II for all patients (Intention-to-treat sample improved from 32.6 to 11.7, with a mean change of 20.8 (95% confidence interval: 17.0 to 24.8. Within-group effect size at the endpoint assessment was 2.64 (Cohen's d. Twenty-one patients (77.7% showed treatment response and 17 patients (63.0% achieved remission at the end of the program. Significant improvement was observed in measurement of subjective and objective depression severity (assessed by BDI-II, Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Rated, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, dysfunctional attitude (assessed by Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, global functioning (assessed by Global Assessment of Functioning of DSM-IV and subjective well-being (assessed by WHO Subjective Well-being Inventory (all p values Conclusions Our manualized treatment comprised of a 16-week individual CBT program for major depression appears feasible and may achieve favorable treatment outcomes among Japanese patients with major depression. Further research involving a larger sample in a randomized, controlled trial design is warranted. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002542.

  4. Home-based music therapy - a systematic overview of settings and conditions for an innovative service in healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermann Thomas; Schmid Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Almost every Western healthcare system is changing to make their services more centered around out-patient care. In particular, long-term or geriatric patients who have been discharged from the hospital often require home-based care and therapy. Therefore, several programs have been developed to continue the therapeutic process and manage the special needs of patients after discharge from hospital. Music therapy has also moved into this field of healthcare service by provi...

  5. A usability study of patients setting up a cardiac event loop recorder and BlackBerry gateway for remote monitoring at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Jane; Valaitis, Ruta; McKibbon, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a usability study of remote noninvasive cardiac testing in homes. We studied the Vitaphone 3100BT (Bluetooth®) event loop recorder (Vitaphone GmbH, Mannheim, Germany) and paired BlackBerry® Curve™ 8520 smartphone (Research In Motion, Ltd., Waterloo, ON, Canada). This application requires independent device set-up by patients in their own homes following receipt by mail out of the kit (instructions plus the event loop recorder and smartphone). The case studies of five participants, each with varying experience with technology, were documented as they interacted with the devices. Participants were videotaped following written instructions as they performed a "think aloud" procedure while completing 20 device set-up tasks. Interviews provided insight into how the independent device set-up and processes could be improved. This study concluded that gender, age, and familiarity with technology seemed to influence the participants' abilities to successfully set up these devices and that sending the kit by mail appeared to be an acceptable strategy to provide remote noninvasive cardiac diagnostic services. This study provides a foundation for future research assessing usability of mobile healthcare technology.

  6. The Visual Matrix Method: Imagery and Affect in a Group-Based Research Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Froggett

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The visual matrix is a method for researching shared experience, stimulated by sensory material relevant to a research question. It is led by imagery, visualization and affect, which in the matrix take precedence over discourse. The method enables the symbolization of imaginative and emotional material, which might not otherwise be articulated and allows "unthought" dimensions of experience to emerge into consciousness in a participatory setting. We describe the process of the matrix with reference to the study "Public Art and Civic Engagement" (FROGGETT, MANLEY, ROY, PRIOR & DOHERTY, 2014 in which it was developed and tested. Subsequently, examples of its use in other contexts are provided. Both the matrix and post-matrix discussions are described, as is the interpretive process that follows. Theoretical sources are highlighted: its origins in social dreaming; the atemporal, associative nature of the thinking during and after the matrix which we describe through the Deleuzian idea of the rhizome; and the hermeneutic analysis which draws from object relations theory and the Lorenzerian tradition of scenic understanding. The matrix has been conceptualized as a "scenic rhizome" to account for its distinctive quality and hybrid origins in research practice. The scenic rhizome operates as a "third" between participants and the "objects" of contemplation. We suggest that some of the drawbacks of other group-based methods are avoided in the visual matrix—namely the tendency for inter-personal dynamics to dominate the event. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs150369

  7. Yoga-based Psychotherapy Groups for Boys Exposed to Trauma in Urban Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Monica; Brown-Elhillali, Abena Nyamekye; Held, April Rose; Ryce, Patrice Carlotta; Ofonedu, Mirian Ebere; Hoover, Daniel William; Ensor, Kaitlin Mary; Belcher, Harolyn Millicent Edith

    2016-01-01

    their children's functioning was closer but still lower than the children's self-reports on all subscales. The attendance rate for the YBPG was among the highest for group therapies at the center. The study provided preliminary evidence for the feasibility of YBPG as an effective intervention for boys exposed to trauma in urban settings.

  8. The impact of individual and organisational factors on engagement of individuals with intellectual disability living in community group homes: a multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X; Tichá, R; Larson, S A; Stancliffe, R J; Wuorio, A

    2015-06-01

    Being engaged in daily activities is a strong indicator of quality of life for individuals with intellectual disability (ID) who live in small community group homes. This study aimed to identify individual and organisational factors that predict high levels of engagement. Individuals with ID (n = 78), direct support professionals (DSPs; n = 174) and supervisors (n = 21) from 21 US group homes participated in the study. For each individual with ID, we conducted 80 min of observation at the person's residence. Information was also gathered regarding demographic characteristics, DSP competence, supervisor years of experience and management practices. Data were analysed using multilevel modelling. On average, individuals were engaged in social activities 12% of observed time and non-social activities 35% of the time. Individuals with greater adaptive skills who were supported by more competent staff showed significantly higher levels of social engagement. Individuals with less severe deficits in adaptive behaviours and less challenging behaviour showed higher levels of non-social engagement. Although none of the factors related to group homes were significant, 24% of the variance in non-social engagement existed among group homes. These results suggested that engagement is a dynamic construct. The extent to which an individual with ID is engaged in daily life is a result of interplay between the individual's characteristics and the group home environment. Future research is needed to investigate the influence of variables specific to the group home on the engagement level of individuals with disabilities. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Group vs. single mindfulness meditation: exploring avoidance, impulsivity, and weight management in two separate mindfulness meditation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzios, Michail; Giannou, Kyriaki

    2014-07-01

    Recent research has identified that mindfulness meditation in group settings supports people who are trying to lose weight. The present research investigated mindfulness meditation in group and individual settings, and explored the potential impact on weight loss and other factors (i.e. mindfulness, impulsivity, and avoidance) that may assist or hinder weight loss. Specifically, the hypotheses tested were that the group setting assisted dieters more than the individual setting by reducing weight, cognitive-behavioral avoidance, and impulsivity and by increasing mindfulness. Participants (n = 170) who were trying to lose weight were randomly assigned to practice meditation for 6 weeks within a group or independently. Measurements in mindfulness, cognitive-behavioral avoidance, impulsivity, and weight occurred twice (pre- and post-intervention). Results indicated that participants in the group setting lost weight and lowered their levels of cognitive-behavioral avoidance, while impulsivity and mindfulness remained stable. On the other hand, participants in the individual condition lost less weight, while there was an increase in cognitive-behavioral avoidance and mindfulness scores, but a decrease in impulsivity. Seeing that benefits and limitations observed in group settings are not replicated when people meditate alone, this study concluded that mindfulness meditation in individual settings needs to be used with caution, although there are some potential benefits that could aid future weight loss research.

  10. Hierarchy in the home cage affects behaviour and gene expression in group-housed C57BL/6 male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Yasuyuki; Nagasawa, Tatsuhiro; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Aki; Tanave, Akira; Matsumoto, Yuki; Nagayama, Hiromichi; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Yasuda, Michiko T; Shimoi, Kayoko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2017-08-01

    Group-housed male mice exhibit aggressive behaviour towards their cage mates and form a social hierarchy. Here, we describe how social hierarchy in standard group-housed conditions affects behaviour and gene expression in male mice. Four male C57BL/6 mice were kept in each cage used in the study, and the social hierarchy was determined from observation of video recordings of aggressive behaviour. After formation of a social hierarchy, the behaviour and hippocampal gene expression were analysed in the mice. Higher anxiety- and depression-like behaviours and elevated gene expression of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone and hippocampal serotonin receptor subtypes were observed in subordinate mice compared with those of dominant mice. These differences were alleviated by orally administering fluoxetine, which is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. We concluded that hierarchy in the home cage affects behaviour and gene expression in male mice, resulting in anxiety- and depression-like behaviours being regulated differently in dominant and subordinate mice.

  11. Comparison of group-based exercise versus home-based exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: effects on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, quality of life and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Hale; Akkoc, Yeşim; Sari, Ismail; Eyigor, Sibel; Akar, Servet; Kirazli, Yeşim; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this non-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the impact of group-based exercise programme and a home-based exercise programme on Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Indices, depression and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Approximately 41 patients in a rehabilitation unit were divided into two groups, either group- or home-based exercise programme. Exercise sessions were performed three times a week for a period of 6 weeks. The patients were compared before and after the rehabilitation programme, with respect to Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Assessment Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP). A statistically significant improvement was observed on BASDAI, BASMI and energy, pain, reaction of emotional and sleep subscores of NHP in both exercise groups after the exercise programme (p exercise groups (p > 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between the two exercise programmes (p > 0.05). Group and home-based exercise programmes are efficient in improving symptoms and mobility and had an important effect on quality of life in patients with AS. Home-based exercise programme, as it is cheaper, more easily performed and efficient, may be preferable for the management programme in AS.

  12. Psychosocial risk factors in home and community settings and their associations with population health and health inequalities: A systematic meta-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petticrew Mark

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of psychosocial risk factors on population health and health inequalities has featured prominently in epidemiological research literature as well as public health policy strategies. We have conducted a meta-review (a review of reviews exploring how psychosocial factors may relate to population health in home and community settings. Methods Systematic review (QUORUM of literature reviews (published in any language or country on the health associations of psychosocial risk factors in community settings. The literature search included electronic and manual searches. Two reviewers appraised included reviews using criteria for assessing systematic reviews. Data from the more robust reviews were extracted, tabulated and synthesised. Results Thirty-one reviews met our inclusion criteria. These explored a variety of psychosocial factors including social support and networks, social capital, social cohesion, collective efficacy, participation in local organisations – and less favourable psychosocial risk factors such as demands, exposure to community violence or anti-social behaviour, exposure to discrimination, and stress related to acculturation to western society. Most of the reviews focused on associations between social networks/support and physical or mental health. We identified some evidence of favourable psychosocial environments associated with better health. Reviews also found evidence of unfavourable psychosocial risk factors linked to poorer health, particularly among socially disadvantaged groups. However, the more robust reviews each identified studies with inconclusive findings, as well as studies finding evidence of associations. We also identified some evidence of apparently favourable psychosocial risk factors associated with poorer health. Conclusion From the review literature we have synthesised, where associations have been identified, they generally support the view that favourable psychosocial

  13. Self-Consistency Requirements of the Renormalization Group for Setting the Renormalization Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, Xing-Gang [Chongqing Univ. (China); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2012-08-07

    In conventional treatments, predictions from fixed-order perturbative QCD calculations cannot be fixed with certainty due to ambiguities in the choice of the renormalization scale as well as the renormalization scheme. In this paper we present a general discussion of the constraints of the renormalization group (RG) invariance on the choice of the renormalization scale. We adopt the RG based equations, which incorporate the scheme parameters, for a general exposition of RG invariance, since they simultaneously express the invariance of physical observables under both the variation of the renormalization scale and the renormalization scheme parameters. We then discuss the self-consistency requirements of the RG, such as reflexivity, symmetry, and transitivity, which must be satisfied by the scale-setting method. The Principle of Minimal Sensitivity (PMS) requires the slope of the approximant of an observable to vanish at the renormalization point. This criterion provides a scheme-independent estimation, but it violates the symmetry and transitivity properties of the RG and does not reproduce the Gell-Mann-Low scale for QED observables. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) satisfies all of the deductions of the RG invariance - reflectivity, symmetry, and transitivity. Using the PMC, all non-conformal {βRi}-terms (R stands for an arbitrary renormalization scheme) in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling, and one obtains a unique, scale-fixed, scheme-independent prediction at any finite order. The PMC scales and the resulting finite-order PMC predictions are both to high accuracy independent of the choice of initial renormalization scale, consistent with RG invariance.

  14. Is the Cardiovascular Response Equivalent Between a Supervised Center-Based Setting and a Self-care Home-Based Setting When Rating of Perceived Exertion Is Used to Guide Aerobic Exercise Intensity During a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lars H.; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Berg, Selina K.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate if exercise intensity guided by rating of perceived exertion (RPE) results in an equivalent cardiovascular response when applied in either a center-based or a home-based setting. DESIGN: Data from patients with heart disease (post-valve surgery...... intensity was objectively measured using heart rate (HR) monitors. RESULTS: A total of 2622 RPE values with corresponding HR data were available. There was no difference in the level of association (interaction P = 0.51) between HR and RPE seen in the center-based setting (mean of 6.1 beats/min per 1...... of association between RPE and HR. CONCLUSIONS: Independent of exercise setting, RPE appears to be equally effective in guiding exercise intensity of patients participating in cardiac rehabilitation....

  15. A conceptual model of family surrogate end-of-life decision-making process in the nursing home setting: goals of care as guiding stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern-Klug, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    An increasing proportion of dying is occurring in America's nursing homes (NH). Family members are involved in (and affected by) medical decision-making on behalf of NH residents approaching the end of life, especially when the resident is cognitively impaired. This article proposes an empirically derived conceptual model of the key factors NH family surrogate decision-makers consider when establishing or changing goals of care and the iterative process as applied to the NH setting. This model also establishes the importance of family social role expectations toward their loved one as well as the concept, "stance toward dying," as key in establishing or changing the main goal of care. NH staff and physicians can use the model as a framework for providing information and support to family members. Research is needed to better understand how to prepare staff and settings to support family surrogate decision-makers, in particular around setting goals of care. The model can be generalized beyond nursing homes.

  16. Nursing Home

    OpenAIRE

    Allocca Hernandez, Giacomo Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Getting old involves a lot of changes in life. Family and social relations change and mobility can decrease. These variations require new settings, and of course special care. A nursing home is a place dedicated to help with this situation. Sometimes nursing homes can be perceived as mere institutions by society, and even by future residents. Inside, senior citizens are suppose to spend the rest of their lives doing the same activities day after day. How can we improve these days? Archite...

  17. UVB phototherapy in an outpatient setting or at home: a pragmatic randomised single-blind trial designed to settle the discussion. The PLUTO study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Weelden Huib

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home ultraviolet B (UVB treatment is a much-debated treatment, especially with regard to effectiveness, safety and side effects. However, it is increasingly being prescribed, especially in the Netherlands. Despite ongoing discussions, no randomised research has been performed, and only two studies actually compare two groups of patients. Thus, firm evidence to support or discourage the use of home UVB phototherapy has not yet been obtained. This is the goal of the present study, the PLUTO study (Dutch acronym for "national trial on home UVB phototherapy for psoriasis". Methods We designed a pragmatic randomised single-blind multi-centre trial. This trial is designed to evaluate the impact of home UVB treatment versus UVB phototherapy in a hospital outpatient clinic as to effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. In total 196 patients with psoriasis who were clinically eligible for UVB phototherapy were included. Normally 85% of the patients treated with UVB show a relevant clinical response. With a power of 80% and a 0.05 significance level it will be possible to detect a reduction in effectiveness of 15%. Effectiveness will be determined by calculating differences in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI and the Self Administered PASI (SAPASI scores. Quality of life is measured using several validated generic questionnaires and a disease-specific questionnaire. Other outcome measures include costs, side effects, dosimetry, concomitant use of medication and patient satisfaction. Patients are followed throughout the therapy and for 12 months thereafter. The study is no longer recruiting patients, and is expected to report in 2006. Discussion In the field of home UVB phototherapy this trial is the first randomised parallel group study. As such, this trial addresses the weaknesses encountered in previous studies. The pragmatic design ensures that the results can be well generalised to the target population

  18. 国内外护理岗位设置现状分析%Analysis on status quo of nursing post setting at home and in abroad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 叶文琴; 田东惠

    2013-01-01

    主要介绍国内外护理岗位设置、护士岗位管理现状,提出我国护士岗位管理还处于探索阶段,应建立适合我国国情的护士岗位管理体系.%It introduced nursing post setting at home and in abroad and status quo of nurses post management; and it put forward that status quo of nurses post management is still in exploration phase in China. Nurse post management system that suited to China's national conditions should be established.

  19. Quality of life of residents with dementia in long-term care settings in the Netherlands and Belgium: design of a longitudinal comparative study in traditional nursing homes and small-scale living facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luijkx Katrien G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increase in the number of people with dementia will lead to greater demand for residential care. Currently, large nursing homes are trying to transform their traditional care for residents with dementia to a more home-like approach, by developing small-scale living facilities. It is often assumed that small-scale living will improve the quality of life of residents with dementia. However, little scientific evidence is currently available to test this. The following research question is addressed in this study: Which (combination of changes in elements affects (different dimensions of the quality of life of elderly residents with dementia in long-term care settings over the course of one year? Methods/design A longitudinal comparative study in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings, which follows a quasi-experimental design, will be carried out in Belgium and the Netherlands. To answer the research question, a model has been developed which incorporates relevant elements influencing quality of life in long-term care settings. Validated instruments will be used to evaluate the role of these elements, divided into environmental characteristics (country, type of ward, group size and nursing staff; basic personal characteristics (age, sex, cognitive decline, weight and activities of daily living; behavioural characteristics (behavioural problems and depression; behavioural interventions (use of restraints and use of psychotropic medication; and social interaction (social engagement and visiting frequency of relatives. The main outcome measure for residents in the model is quality of life. Data are collected at baseline, after six and twelve months, from residents living in either small-scale or traditional care settings. Discussion The results of this study will provide an insight into the determinants of quality of life for people with dementia living in traditional and small-scale long-term care settings in

  20. An Analysis of Training Focused on Improving SMART Goal Setting for Specific Employee Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Jeannie M.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the proficiency of employee SMART goal setting following the intervention of employee SMART goal setting training. Current challenges in higher education substantiate the need for employees to align their performance with the mission, vision, and strategic directions of the organization. A performance management…

  1. An Analysis of Training Focused on Improving SMART Goal Setting for Specific Employee Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Jeannie M.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the proficiency of employee SMART goal setting following the intervention of employee SMART goal setting training. Current challenges in higher education substantiate the need for employees to align their performance with the mission, vision, and strategic directions of the organization. A performance management…

  2. On Non-commuting Sets in a Finite p-group with Derived Subgroup of Prime Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu-lei; Liu He-guo

    2016-01-01

    Let G be a finite group. A nonempty subset X of G is said to be non-commuting if xy = yx for any x, y ∈ X with x = y. If |X| ≥ |Y| for any other non-commuting set Y in G, then X is said to be a maximal non-commuting set. In this paper, we determine upper and lower bounds on the cardinality of a maximal non-commuting set in a finite p-group with derived subgroup of prime order.

  3. The Attunement Principles: A Comparison of Nurture Group and Mainstream Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Daniela; MacKay, Tommy

    2017-01-01

    Two key areas identified for research are differences in practice between nurture groups and mainstream classrooms, and nurturing approaches in rural and low-density populations. This study compared classroom practice in a nurture group serving a wide rural area with the four mainstream classes to which the five children in the group belonged. The…

  4. [Registry of home-based enteral nutrition in Spain for the year 2006 (NADYA-SENPE Group)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda, C; Chicharro, M L; Frías, L; García Luna, P P; Cardona, D; Camarero, E; Penacho, M A; Calañas, A; Parés, R M; Martínez Olmos, M A; Zapata, A; Rabassa Soler, A; Gómez Candela, C; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Lecha, M; Luis, D de; Luengo, L M; Wanden-Berghe, C; Laborda, L; Matía, P; Cantón, A; Martí, E; Irles, J A

    2008-01-01

    To communicate the results obtained from the registry of Home-Based Enteral Nutrition (HBEN) of the NADYA-SENPE group for the year 2006. Recompilation of the data from the HBEN registry of the NADYA-SENPE group from January 1st to December 31st of 2006. During the year 2006, 3,921 patients (51% men) from 27 hospital centers were registered. Ninety-seven percent were older than 14 years. The mean age for those or = 14 years, it was 68.5 +/- 18.2 years. The most common underlying disease was neurological pathology (42%), followed by cancer (28%). Enteral nutrition was administered p.o. in 44% of the patients, through nasogastric tube in 40%, gastrostomy in 14%, and jejunostomy in 1%. The average time of nutritional support was 8.8 months. The most common reasons for ending the therapy were patient's death (54%) and switching to oral feeding (32%). Thirty-one percent of the patients presented a limited activity and 40% were confined to bed/coach. Most of the patients required partial (25%) or total (43%) care assistance. The nutritional formula was provided by the hospital in 62% of the cases and from the reference pharmacy in 27%. The fungible material was provided by the hospital in 80% of the cases and by primary care in the remaining patients. Although the number of registered patients is slightly higher than that from the last years, there are no important changes in the patients characteristics, or way of administration and duration of enteral nutrition.

  5. An interrater reliability study of the assessment of pressure ulcer risk using the Braden scale and the classification of pressure ulcers in a home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, Jan; Halfens, Ruud; Dassen, Theo

    2009-10-01

    Measurement error can seriously affect the validity of pressure ulcer risk assessment and of pressure ulcer classification. Determination of interrater reliability and agreement of pressure ulcer risk and pressure ulcers using the Braden scale and the EPUAP system. Duplicate assessments by trained nurses during two nationwide pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in the years 2007 and 2008 in The Netherlands in the home care setting. Home care clients which participated in 2007 (n=352) and 2008 (n=339) in the pressure ulcer prevalence surveys. The Braden scale was used to assess pressure ulcer risk. Skin examination was conducted to detect pressure related tissue damages and to classify them according to the EPUAP. In 2007 and 2008, Intraclass Correlation Coefficients for Braden scale sum scores were 0.90 (95% CI: 0.88-0.92) and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85-0.91) respectively, and corresponding Standard Errors of Measurement were 1.00 and 0.98. 95% limits of agreement were -2.8 to 2.8 and -2.7 to 2.7 respectively. The items "moisture", "sensory perception" and "nutrition" contained largest amounts of measurement error. Proportions of agreement for the classification of pressure ulcers were 96% and interrater reliability was 0.81 and 0.79. Most disagreements were observed for the classification of grade 1 pressure ulcers. The standardized study procedure applied in the annual nationwide pressure ulcer prevalence surveys leads to reliable and reproducible results regarding pressure ulcer risk and pressure ulcer prevalence in the home care setting. Researchers and practitioners should be careful when drawing inferences from single pressure ulcer risk factors included in the Braden scale. Descriptions of the items "moisture", "sensory perception" and "nutrition" should be made more clearly and unambiguous.

  6. Finite Groups with the Set of the Number of Subgroups of Possible Order Containing Exactly Two Elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yanheng Chen; Guiyun Chen

    2013-11-01

    Let be a finite group, and $n(G)$ be the set of the number of subgroups of possible order of . We investigate the structure of satisfying that $n(G) = \\{1, m\\}$ for any positive integer > 1. At first, we prove that the nilpotent length of is less than 2. Secondly, we investigate nilpotent groups with $m = p + 1$ or $p^2 + p + 1$ ( is a prime), and we get the classification of such kinds of groups. At last, we investigate non-nilpotent groups with $m = p + 1$ and get the classification of the groups under consideration.

  7. A person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention in nursing homes - study protocol for the U-Age nursing home multi-centre, non-equivalent controlled group before-after trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, David; Sjögren, Karin; Lood, Qarin; Bergland, Ådel; Kirkevold, Marit; Sandman, Per-Olof

    2017-01-17

    The literature suggests that person-centred care can contribute to quality of life and wellbeing of nursing home residents, relatives and staff. However, there is sparse research evidence on how person-centred care can be operationalised and implemented in practice, and the extent to which it may promote wellbeing and satisfaction. Therefore, the U-Age nursing home study was initiated to deepen the understanding of how to integrate person-centred care into daily practice and to explore the effects and meanings of this. The study aims to evaluate effects and meanings of a person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention in nursing homes through a multi-centre, non-equivalent controlled group before-after trial design. Three nursing homes across three international sites have been allocated to a person-centred and thriving-promoting intervention group, and three nursing homes have been allocated to an inert control group. Staff at intervention sites will participate in a 12-month interactive educational programme that operationalises thriving-promoting and person-centred care three dimensions: 1) Doing a little extra, 2) Developing a caring environment, and 3) Assessing and meeting highly prioritised psychosocial needs. A pedagogical framework will guide the intervention. The primary study endpoints are; residents' thriving, relatives' satisfaction with care and staff job satisfaction. Secondary endpoints are; resident, relative and staff experiences of the caring environment, relatives' experience of visiting their relative and the nursing home, as well as staff stress of conscience and perceived person-centredness of care. Data on study endpoints will be collected pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at a six-month follow up. Interviews will be conducted with relatives and staff to explore experiences and meanings of the intervention. The study is expected to provide evidence that can inform further research, policy and practice development on if and how

  8. TeleWound care – providing remote wound assessment and treatment in the home care setting: current status and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaria N

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nick Santamaria,1 Suzanne Kapp2 1University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Royal District Nursing Service Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: The use of wound telemedicine systems in the home care environment has been expanding for the last decade. These systems can generally be grouped into two main types: store and forward systems and video conference type systems; additionally, there are also hybrid systems available that include elements of both. Evidence to date suggests that these systems provide significant benefits to patients, clinicians, and to the health care system generally. Reductions in resource use, visit substitution, costs, and high patient and clinician satisfaction have been reported; however, there is a lack of integration with existing health care technology and no clearly defined technical or clinical standards as yet. Similarly, the legalities associated with wound telemedicine and remote consultation remain unclear. As wound telemedicine systems continue to evolve and be deployed in different locations, there remains significant potential to harness their power to benefit patients being treated at home. Keywords: telemedicine, home care, e-health

  9. Can auditory and visual speech perception be trained within a group setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preminger, Jill E; Ziegler, Craig H

    2008-06-01

    This study attempted to determine whether auditory-only and auditory-visual speech perception could be trained in a group format. A randomized controlled trial with at least 16 participants per group was completed. A training-only group completed at least 5 hr of group speech perception training; a training plus psychosocial group completed at least 5 hr of group speech perception training and psychosocial exercises; and a control group did not receive training. Evaluations were conducted before and after training and included analytic and synthetic measures of speech perception, hearing loss-related and generic quality of life scales, and a class evaluation form. No significant group changes were measured on any of the analytic auditory-only or auditory-visual measures of speech perception, yet the majority of training participants (regardless of training group) reported improvement in auditory and auditory-visual speech perception. The training participants demonstrated a significant reduction on the emotional subscale of the hearing loss-related quality of life scale, while the control participants did not demonstrate a change on this subscale. Benefits of group audiologic rehabilitation classes may not result from an actual improvement in auditory or visual speech perception abilities, but participants still perceive training in these areas as useful.

  10. Vääna-Viti hoolekandeküla = Vääna-Viti community setting group home / Tõnu Laigu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laigu, Tõnu, 1956-

    2015-01-01

    Vääna-Viti hoolekandeküla Harku vallas Aiba tee 8/7, valminud 2013. Hoonete arhitektid Tõnu Laigu, Koit Ojaliiv, Mari Rass (QP Arhitektid OÜ), sisearhitektid Andres Labi, Janno Roos (Ruumilabor OÜ). 2014. aasta Kultuurkapitali Arhitektuuripreemia kandidaat

  11. Vääna-Viti hoolekandeküla = Vääna-Viti community setting group home / Tõnu Laigu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laigu, Tõnu, 1956-

    2015-01-01

    Vääna-Viti hoolekandeküla Harku vallas Aiba tee 8/7, valminud 2013. Hoonete arhitektid Tõnu Laigu, Koit Ojaliiv, Mari Rass (QP Arhitektid OÜ), sisearhitektid Andres Labi, Janno Roos (Ruumilabor OÜ). 2014. aasta Kultuurkapitali Arhitektuuripreemia kandidaat

  12. The home range of a recently established group of Southern ground-hornbill (Bucorvus leadbeateri in the Limpopo Valley, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Theron

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about Southern ground-hornbill (SGH population ecology outside of large, formally protected areas where the largest declines in numbers have been recorded. The SGH has started re-colonising, establishing group territories and breeding successfully in the Limpopo Valley on the northern border of South Africa, following localised extinction from the 1950s to the 1970s. A group of SGH was monitored over a period of 14 months by means of radio telemetry across privately owned land in order to investigate their seasonal habitat movements in this semi-arid, predominantly livestock-based environment. We also investigated seasonal fluctuations in invertebrate prevalence, as an indication of food availability and its influence on seasonal SGH group movements and foraging activity patterns. There was a clear increase in food availability during the summer rainfall period allowing the group to forage over a wider area, whilst winter foraging remained localised within their range. Kernel home range analysis indicated a marked difference in size between the summer (13 409 ha and winter (5280 ha home ranges, with an overall home range of 19 372 ha, which is approximately double that of home ranges recorded that fall within formally and informally protected reserves. In this article, we proposed that food availability is the driving force for home range size and seasonal activity patterns in a semi-arid livestock-ranching habitat.Conservation implications: The Limpopo Valley SGH population is one of the most significant outside protected areas in South Africa. This population is especially vulnerable to threats such as poisoning, persecution for window breaking and drought, as shown by their near extirpation from the area. Conservation efforts need to focus on awareness amongst local farmers, provision of artificial nests and continued monitoring of groups.

  13. Home infusion program with enzyme replacement therapy for Fabry disease: The experience of a large Italian collaborative group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Concolino

    2017-09-01

    We conclude that home infusions in eligible patients with FD are safe, contribute to improve treatment compliance and therapeutic clinical outcomes, and may have a positive impact on self-perceived QoL.

  14. Developmental Pacing as an Alternative to Ability Grouping in a Primary Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, John A.

    An alternative to ability grouping for instructional purposes exists. Cognitive developmental grouping (CDG), sometimes labeled "tracking" or "pacing," organizes students in terms of similar learning styles and takes into consideration the child's intellectual maturation rather than performance within a particular curriculum…

  15. Two cases of group A streptococcal vulvovaginitis in premenopausal adults in a sexual health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Susan; Morgan, Jane

    2006-09-01

    Two cases of group A streptococcus (GAS) causing vulvovaginitis in premenopausal adults are described. A review of the literature of genital GAS is made, as this is an uncommon cause of vulvovaginitis in premenopausal adults. Contrasts are made between anogenital carriage of GAS and group B streptococcus (GBS) to highlight the differences in anogenital carriage between these two organisms.

  16. Student Perceptions about Group Based Problem Solving Process in Online and In-Class Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Birişçi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study, through qualitative measures, was to systematically examine the perspectives and meanings formed by the teachers about teaching and learning. This study took place in the spring semester of the 2010-2011 academic year of Artvin Çoruh University. The sample size was 27. The participants were divided in two groupsGroup 1 with group work taking place in an online test (D1, N=12; Group 2 with group work taking place in a classroom experiment (D2, N=12. After six weeks implementation, semi-structured interviews were conducted in order to determine students’ thoughts on problem solving and group work with success on attitudes towards mathematics. Positive change in students’ attitudes towards mathematics occurred in both the D1 and D2 groups. According to the application, the students stated that they developed increased interest towards mathematics and it turned into enjoyable.Key Words:    Problem solving, group study, online learning, student views

  17. MD-Logic overnight type 1 diabetes control in home settings: A multicentre, multinational, single blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimri, Revital; Bratina, Natasa; Kordonouri, Olga; Avbelj Stefanija, Magdalena; Fath, Maryam; Biester, Torben; Muller, Ido; Atlas, Eran; Miller, Shahar; Fogel, Aviel; Phillip, Moshe; Danne, Thomas; Battelino, Tadej

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the safety, efficacy and need for remote monitoring of the MD-Logic closed-loop system during short-term overnight use at home. Seventy-five patients (38 male; aged 10-54 years; average A1c, 7.8% ± 0.7%, 61.8 ± 7.2 mmol/mol) were enrolled from 3 clinical sites. Patients were randomly assigned to participate in 2 overnight crossover periods, each including 4 consecutive nights, 1 under closed-loop control and 1 under sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy in the patient's home. Both study arms were supervised using a remote-monitoring system in a blinded manner. Primary endpoints were time spent with glucose levels below 70 mg/dL and percentage of nights in which mean overnight glucose levels were within 90 to 140 mg/dL. The median [interquartile range] percentage of time spent in hypoglycaemia was significantly lower on nights when MD-Logic was used, compared to SAP therapy (2.07 [0, 4.78] and 2.6 [0, 10.34], respectively; P = .004) and the percentage of individual nights with a mean overnight glucose level in target was significantly greater (75 [42, 75] and 50 [25,75], respectively; P = .008). The time spent in target range was increased by a median of 28% (P = .001), with the same amount of insulin (10.69 [7.28, 13.94] and 10.41[6.9, 14.07], respectively; P = .087). The remote monitoring triggered calls for hypoglycaemia at twice the rate during SAP therapy compared to closed-loop control (62 and 29, respectively; P = .002). The MD-Logic system demonstrated a safe and efficient profile during overnight use by children, adolescents and adults with type 1 diabetes and, therefore, provides an effective means of mitigating the risk of nocturnal hypoglycaemia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Validation of Doloplus-2 among nonverbal nursing home patients - an evaluation of Doloplus-2 in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkevold Øyvind

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain measurement in nonverbal older adults is best based on behavioural observation, e.g. using an observational measurement tool such as Doloplus-2. The purposes of this study were to examine the use of Doloplus-2 in a nonverbal nursing home population, and to evaluate its reliability and validity by comparing registered nurses' estimation of pain with Doloplus-2 scores. Method In this cross-sectional study, Doloplus-2 was used to observe the pain behaviour of patients aged above 65 years who were unable to self-report their pain. Nurses also recorded their perceptions of patient pain (yes, no, don't know before they used Doloplus-2. Data on demographics, medical diagnoses, and prescribed pain treatment were collected from patient records. Daily life functioning was measured and participants were screened using the Mini Mental State Examination. Results In total, 77 nursing home patients were included, 75% were women and the mean age was 86 years (SD 6.6, range 68-100. Over 50% were dependent on nursing care to a high or a medium degree, and all were severely cognitively impaired. The percentage of zero scores on Doloplus-2 ranged from 17% (somatic reactions to 40% (psychosocial reactions. Cronbach's alpha was 0.71 for the total scale. In total, 52% of the patients were judged by nurses to be experiencing pain, compared with 68% when using Doloplus-2 (p = 0.01. For 29% of the sample, nurses were unable to report if the patients were in pain. Conclusions In the present study, more patients were categorized as having pain while using Doloplus-2 compared with nurses' estimation of pain without using any tools. The fact that nurses could not report if the patients were in pain in one third of the patients supports the claim that Doloplus-2 is a useful supplement for estimating pain in this population. However, nurses must use their clinical experience in addition to the use of Doloplus-2, as behaviour can have different meaning

  19. Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Spagnuolo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.

  20. Small Group Collaboration in the Large Lecture Setting: Collaborative Process, Pedagogical Paradigms, and Institutional Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalchik, Vera; Schaeffer, Evonne; Tovar, Lawrence; Steinbeck, Reinhold; Bhargava, Tina; Kerns, Charles; Engel, Claudia; Levtov, Ruti

    This paper focuses on some of the key issues involved in implementing a collaborative design project in the setting of the large undergraduate lecture course at a major research university, offering a preliminary analysis of the assignment mainly as a function of how students managed and interpreted it. The collaborative design project was…

  1. Goal Setting during Early Childhood Parent-Teacher Conferences: A Comparison of Three Groups of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2013-01-01

    Parent-teacher communication and partnerships are important in children's early years. This study compared goal setting, conducted in English, during Head Start parent-teacher conferences with native Spanish speaking, Latino bilingual, and native English speaking parents and their children's teachers. To understand conference goal-setting…

  2. Provenance and tectonic setting of the Triassic Yidun Group, the Yidun Terrane, Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai-Qiu Wang

    2013-11-01

    Prominently high Zr/Sc ratio or Hf concentration and Paleoproterozoic Nd modal ages (1.94–2.21 Ga point to input of recycling components derived from old sedimentary source in a relatively stable tectonic setting.

  3. Sporting programs for inactive population groups : factors influencing implementation in the organized sports setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, Linda; Veenhof, Cindy; Schipper-van Veldhoven, Nicolette; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organized sports sector has received increased attention as a setting to promote health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) to the general population. For significant public health impact, it is important that successful HEPA programs are widely adopted, implemented and continued as

  4. Goal Setting during Early Childhood Parent-Teacher Conferences: A Comparison of Three Groups of Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, Gregory A.; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.

    2013-01-01

    Parent-teacher communication and partnerships are important in children's early years. This study compared goal setting, conducted in English, during Head Start parent-teacher conferences with native Spanish speaking, Latino bilingual, and native English speaking parents and their children's teachers. To understand conference goal-setting…

  5. [Interdisciplinarity in the hospital setting: between daily challenge and group stakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutet, Marius; Guisado, Huguette; Butel, Jacques; Vuagnat, Hubert; Zulian, Gilbert

    2014-01-15

    Group functioning may limit interdisciplinarity. Four scenarios of health professionals' meetings are described. A) If priority is timing, the group isn't interdisciplinary any longer; decisions are endorsed without questioning or criticism. B) When positions' stakes aren't clarified, speaking helps active persons to take power and passive ones to strengthen their criticisms. C) If caregivers are turned to their duties and territory, recourse to interdisciplinary process is only made in case of difficulties. D) When the group is moved by implicit standards, resources are underutilized. In conclusion, added value of interdisciplinary work is superior when divergent options are brought without influence of recurring problems or protocols.

  6. Clinical and no-clinical setting specificities in first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulić, Aleksandra Mindoljević

    2011-03-01

    Modern history of short-term group psychotherapy dates back to the late 1950-ies. From then to present day, this psychotherapeutic method has been used in various forms, from dynamic-oriented to cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Although it has always been considered rather controversial, due its cost-effectiveness, it has been capturing more and more popularity. This paper presents the specificities of first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group through session work with two examined groups: a group of 20 adult women who suffer from mild or moderate forms of unipolar depression and a group of 20 students of the School of Medicine in Zagreb without any psychiatric symptomatology. The results indicate the high importance of having structure in first psychodrama session, of relating it with the previously thoroughly conducted, initial, clinical, interviews, and of the clarity and focus in terms of determining the goals of therapy, especially in a clinical context. This study also confirmed assumptions regarding the need for different approaches of warming-up in psychodrama, both in the clinical and in non-clinical samples. A psychodrama psychotherapist should have good time managing skills and capability to convert the time available into an opportunity for directly boosting the group energy and work on therapeutic alliance.

  7. A Bigger Picture: Community Music Therapy Groups in Residential Settings for People with Learning Disabilities

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    Alistair Robert Clarkson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces our development of the concepts of Community Music Therapy and systemic thinking within our music therapy service. The work, which was in a supported living setting for adults with learning disabilities (intellectual disabilities, was set up in response to the challenges of providing a more conventional music therapy service within the London Borough of Sutton Clinical Health Team for people with learning disabilities (Intellectual disabilities. We discovered that collectively our clients, their support workers, and ourselves were being reduced in our human value by not being seen or heard. The Clinical Health Team for people with Learning Disabilities is made up of a variety of health professionals and is part of the London Borough of Sutton's Disability Services. The creative therapy part of the service is music and dramatherapy. Creative therapies look at a wide range of emotional and mental health needs for people with learning disabilities such as depression, anxiety, challenging behaviour, transition, and change.

  8. A Preliminary Core Domain Set for Clinical Trials of Shoulder Disorders: A Report from the OMERACT 2016 Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Beaton, Dorcas; Kopkow, Christian; Lenza, Mario; Jain, Nitin B; Richards, Bethan; Richards, Pamela; Voshaar, Marieke; van der Windt, Danielle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2017-01-15

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to develop a core outcome set (COS) for clinical trials of shoulder disorders. In preparation for OMERACT 2016, we systematically examined all outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in 409 randomized trials of interventions for shoulder disorders published between 1954 and 2015. Informed by these data, we conducted an international Delphi consensus study including shoulder trial experts, clinicians, and patients to identify key domains that should be included in a shoulder disorder COS. Findings were discussed at a stakeholder premeeting of OMERACT. At OMERACT 2016, we sought consensus on a preliminary core domain set and input into next steps. There were 13 and 15 participants at the premeeting and the OMERACT 2016 SIG meeting, respectively (9 attended both meetings). Consensus was reached on a preliminary core domain set consisting of an inner core of 4 domains: pain, physical function/activity, global perceived effect, and adverse events including death. A middle core consisted of 3 domains: emotional well-being, sleep, and participation (recreation and work). An outer core of research required to inform the final COS was also formulated. Our next steps are to (1) analyze whether participation (recreation and work) should be in the inner core, (2) conduct a third Delphi round to finalize definitions and wording of domains and reach final endorsement for the domains, and (3) determine which instruments fulfill the OMERACT criteria for measuring each domain.

  9. A tool to measure the attributes of receiving IV therapy in a home versus hospital setting: the Multiple Sclerosis Relapse Management Scale (MSRMS

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    Chataway Jeremy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravenous steroids are routinely used to treat disabling relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS. Theoretically, the infusion could take place at home, rather than in hospital. Findings from other patient populations suggest that patients may find the experiences of home relapse management more desirable. However, formal comparison of these two settings, from the patients' point of view, was prevented by the lack of a clinical scale. We report the development of a rating scale to measure patient's experiences of relapse management that allowed this question to be answered confidently. Methods Scale development had three stages. First, in-depth interviews of 21 MS patients generated a conceptual model and pool of potential scale items. Second, these items were administered to 160 people with relapsing-remitting MS. Standard psychometric techniques were used to develop a scale. Third, the psychometric properties of the scale were evaluated in a randomised controlled trial of 138 patients whose relapses were managed either at home or hospital. Results A preliminary conceptual model with eight dimensions, and a pool of 154 items was generated. From this we developed the MS Relapse Management Scale (MSRMS, a 42-item with four subscales: access to care (6 items, coordination of care (11 items, information (7 items, interpersonal care (18 items. The MSRMS subscales satisfied most psychometric criteria but had notable floor effects. Conclusions The MSRMS is a reliable and valid measure of patients' experiences of MS relapse management. The high floor effects suggest most respondents had positive care experiences. Results demonstrate that patients' experiences of relapse management can be measured, and that the MSRMS is a powerful tool for determining which services to develop, support and ultimately commission.

  10. Psychoeducative groups help control type 2 diabetes in a primary care setting

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    Miguel Ángel Cervantes Cuesta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of a psychoeducational group intervention in diabetes using glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c, the body mass index (BMI and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF compared with conventional educational measures provided individually. Methods: A quasi-experimental study (pre/post-intervention with a non-equivalent control group was conducted, including 72 type 2 individuals with diabetes (mean data: age 63.08 years, HbA1C 6.98%, BMI 30.48 kg/m². The beneficial effect of psychoeducational group therapy in the study group (PGT was compared with conventional diabetes education in the control group (CG. Results: The PGT had a higher mean HbA1c reduction (-0.51 ± 1.7 vs. -0.06 ± 0.53%, p 0.003, met the objectives of optimal control of HbA1c to a higher degree (80% vs. 48%, p 0.005 and greater mean weight reduction (-1.93 ± 3.57 vs. 0.52 ± 1.73 kg, p 0002 than the CG.A significant improvement in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was achieved in PGT (all p < 0.05. Conclusions: PGT patients achieved a significant improvement in HbA1C, BMI and CVRF, and outperformed the conventional diabetes education group in achieving the optimal diabetes control objectives. Structural changes in the assistance programs should be considered to introduce these more efficient therapies for diabetes education in primary care.

  11. General practitioners' reasoning about using mobile distance-spanning technology in home care and in nursing home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Andersson, Staffan; Axelsson, Karin

    2011-03-01

    The trend for health care and nursing care turns from hospital to health care and nursing care at home. Studies have shown that health care professionals have no access to patient records in home and nursing home settings. Technological development creates opportunities for a host of mobile technology solutions. The aim of this study was to describe the reasoning among general practitioners (GPs) about the use of mobile distance-spanning technology (MDST) in care at home and in nursing homes. Seventeen GPs were divided in five groups for a group interview. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The qualitative content analysis resulted in four areas about the MDST, MDST has an impact on GPs' work, the nurses' profession, and the patient and the family, with nine adherent categories. The findings were interpreted and formulated in the theme: MDST should be used with caution. The results show quite a few expressions about the MDST as useful and valuable in health care at home and in nursing home settings; however, in every category, there were text that we interpreted as caution when using the MDST. The MDST cannot be used in all situations and cannot replace human meetings in health care and nursing care at home and in nursing homes. The MDST should primarily be a tool for the profession, and understanding the professions' reasoning about technology use in health care at home and in nursing home settings must be the base for implementing MDST.

  12. First Things First: Anger Management Group Work in a Mainstream High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Martin; O'Gorman, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to support the emotional development and behavioural choices of young students in grades 7-10, a six session therapeutic group programme was devised--culminating in a written manual to enable future replication of the programme. This pilot programme was introduced as a once-weekly, morning session aimed at prioritising a student's…

  13. Promoting Individual and Group Regulated Learning in Collaborative Settings: An Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onrubia, Javier; Rochera, Maria José; Engel, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We present a teaching innovation intervention aimed at promoting individual and group learning regulation in undergraduate students working in a computer supported collaborative learning environment. Participants were 127 students and three teachers of a compulsory course on Educational Psychology at the University of Barcelona (Spain). As a…

  14. Learning through Discussions: Comparing the Benefits of Small-Group and Large-Class Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Philip H.; Hamann, Kerstin; Wilson, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    The literature on teaching and learning heralds the benefits of discussion for student learner outcomes, especially its ability to improve students' critical thinking skills. Yet, few studies compare the effects of different types of face-to-face discussions on learners. Using student surveys, we analyze the benefits of small-group and large-class…

  15. Task Groups in the School Setting: Promoting Children's Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Velsor, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Through social and emotional learning (SEL), individuals develop skill in negotiating relationships successfully and expressing emotions appropriately. The socially and emotionally intelligent child reaps benefits in school and later life. Counselors are best qualified to promote children's SEL and the task group in the classroom provides an…

  16. The MIIT Again Urged to Set Up Large Rare Earth Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>According to the"Economic Operation of The Rare Earth Industry in 2013"public notice published by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology,speeding up the establishment of large rare earth enterprise group was placed at conspicuous position.Recently,the Department of Raw Materials,Ministry of Industry and Information

  17. Children's sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Gaar, V M; van Grieken, A; Jansen, W; Raat, H

    2017-02-14

    The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) may contribute to the development of overweight among children. The present study aimed to evaluate associations between family and home-related factors and children's SSB consumption. We explored associations within ethnic background of the child. Cross-sectional data from the population-based 'Water Campaign' study were used. Parents (n = 644) of primary school children (6-13 years) completed a questionnaire on socio-demographic characteristics, family and home-related factors and child's SSB intake. The family and home-related factors under study were: cognitive variables (e.g. parental attitude, subjective norm), environmental variables (e.g. availability of SSB, parenting practices), and habitual variables (e.g. habit strength, taste preference). Regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations between family and home-related factors and child's SSB intake (p children was 9.4 years (SD: 1.8) and 54.1% were girls. The child's average SSB intake was 0.9 litres (SD: 0.6) per day. Child's age, parents' subjective norm, parenting practices, and parental modelling were positively associated with the child's SSB intake. The availability of SSB at home and school and parental attitude were negatively associated with the child's SSB intake. The associations under study differed according to the child's ethnic background, with the explained variance of the full models ranging from 8.7% for children from Moroccan or Turkish ethnic background to 44.4% for children with Dutch ethnic background. Our results provide support for interventions targeting children's SSB intake focussing on the identified family and home-related factors, with active participation of parents. Also, the relationships between these factors and the child's SSB intake differed for children with distinct ethnic backgrounds. Therefore, we would recommend to tailor interventions taking into account the ethnic background of the family

  18. Active Aging: Exploration into Self-Ratings of “Being Active,” Out-of-Home Physical Activity, and Participation among Older Australian Adults Living in Four Different Settings

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    Rosemary L. Aird

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether self-ratings of “being active” among older people living in four different settings (major city high and lower density suburbs, a regional city, and a rural area were associated with out-of-home participation and outdoor physical activity. A mixed-methods approach (survey, travel diary, and GPS tracking over a one-week period was used to gather data from 48 individuals aged over 55 years. Self-ratings of “being active” were found to be positively correlated with the number of days older people spent time away from home but unrelated to time traveled by active means (walking and biking. No significant differences in active travel were found between the four study locations, despite differences in their respective built environments. The findings suggest that additional strategies to the creation of “age-friendly” environments are needed if older people are to increase their levels of outdoor physical activity. “Active aging” promotion campaigns may need to explicitly identify the benefits of walking outdoors to ambulatory older people as a means of maintaining their overall health, functional ability, and participation within society in the long-term and also encourage the development of community-based programs in order to facilitate regular walking for this group.

  19. Modeling the Formation Process of Grouping Stimuli Sets through Cortical Columns and Microcircuits to Feature Neurons

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    Frank Klefenz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model of a self-structuring neuronal net is presented in which repetitively applied pattern sets induce the formation of cortical columns and microcircuits which decode distinct patterns after a learning phase. In a case study, it is demonstrated how specific neurons in a feature classifier layer become orientation selective if they receive bar patterns of different slopes from an input layer. The input layer is mapped and intertwined by self-evolving neuronal microcircuits to the feature classifier layer. In this topical overview, several models are discussed which indicate that the net formation converges in its functionality to a mathematical transform which maps the input pattern space to a feature representing output space. The self-learning of the mathematical transform is discussed and its implications are interpreted. Model assumptions are deduced which serve as a guide to apply model derived repetitive stimuli pattern sets to in vitro cultures of neuron ensembles to condition them to learn and execute a mathematical transform.

  20. Development of a Provisional Core Domain Set for Polymyalgia Rheumatica : Report from the OMERACT 12 Polymyalgia Rheumatica Working Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helliwell, Toby; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Pease, Colin T.; Hughes, Rodney; Hill, Catherine L.; Neill, Lorna M.; Halls, Serena; Simon, Lee S.; Mallen, Christian D.; Boers, Maarten; Kirwan, John R.; Mackie, Sarah L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) working group aims to develop a core set of outcome measures to be used in clinical trials for PMR. Previous reports from OMERACT 11 included a qualitative study of the patient experience and a preliminary literat

  1. Minimum Competency Standards Set by Three Divergent Groups of Raters Using Three Judgmental Procedures: Implications for Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Gerald; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Although arbitrary, whenever multiple judgmental standard-setting procedures are utilized by different groups concurrently, stability across raters can be achieved and decisions can be made in a relatively judicious manner. Greater stability across methods (Ebel, Nedelsky, Angoff) may be effected by slightly modifying the Ebel approach. (Author/PN)

  2. Mum and Dad Prefer Me to Speak Bengali at Home: Code Switching and Parallel Speech in a Primary School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagett, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Although it contains a statutory inclusion statement, England's National Curriculum "hardly acknowledges the learning practices of different minority groups" ( Gregory and Williams, 2003, p. 103). Through observation and interview, this study examines the repertoire of languages that six children for whom English is an additional…

  3. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation.

  4. Synthesis, Photophysical and Photochemical Properties of a Set of Silicon Phthalocyanines Bearing Anti-Inflammatory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Belgin; Topal, Sevinc Zehra; Atilla, Devrim

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a series of novel silicon (IV) phthalocyanines conjugated axially with anti-inflammatory (sulindac) and triethylene glycol groups has been synthesized. Different synthetic strategies were attempted to obtain the targeted molecules in high yield. The compounds were fully characterized by using different analyses techniques. Our objectives were to generate a system with sulindac group which enhances the singlet oxygen generation and exhibits anti-cancer effect. Therefore, photophysical and photochemical properties of these compounds were investigated in different solvents. The substituent effect on fluorescence quantum yield and singlet oxygen generation was evaluated for efficiency in photodynamic therapy (PDT) as photosensitizer. The molecules exhibited no aggregation tendency, solubility in common organic solvents, high singlet oxygen quantum yield and high photostability in DMSO so these favourable properties make them good candidates as photosensitizer for PDT. In addition, their stabilities were investigated in DMSO, THF, acetonitrile and DMF.

  5. Boundary conformal field theories, limit sets of Kleinian groups and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, Arkady L.

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, based on the available mathematical works on geometry and topology of hyperbolic manifolds and discrete groups, some results of Friedman et al. (Nuclear Phys. B 456 (1999) 96-118) are reproduced and broadly generalized. Among many new results, the possibility of extension of work of Belavin, Polyakov and Zamolodchikov to higher dimensions is investigated. Objections known in the physical literature against such an extension are removed and the possibility of an extension is convincingly demonstrated.

  6. Problem-based learning: facilitating multiple small teams in a large group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Jennifer H; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is often described as resource demanding due to the high staff-to-student ratio required in a traditional PBL tutorial class where there is commonly one facilitator to every 5-16 students. The veterinary science program at Charles Sturt University, Australia, has developed a method of group facilitation which readily allows one or two staff members to facilitate up to 30 students at any one time while maintaining the benefits of a small PBL team of six students. Multi-team facilitation affords obvious financial and logistic advantages, but there are also important pedagogical benefits derived from uniform facilitation across multiple groups, enhanced discussion and debate between groups, and the development of self-facilitation skills in students. There are few disadvantages to the roaming facilitator model, provided that several requirements are addressed. These requirements include a suitable venue, large whiteboards, a structured approach to support student engagement with each disclosure, a detailed facilitator guide, and an open, collaborative, and communicative environment.

  7. Entrainment of the Human Circadian Clock to the Light-Dark Cycle and its Impact on Patients in the ICU and Nursing Home Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Hannah K; Stothard, Ellen R; Wright, Kenneth P

    2015-01-01

    A robust circadian timekeeping system is important for human health and well-being. Inappropriately timed light exposure can cause circadian and sleep disruption, which has been shown to have negative health consequences. Lighting in medical care facilities, such as the NICU, ICU, and nursing homes, is not typically controlled and may be associated with circadian disruption observed in such settings. Cycled lighting and increased exposure to sunlight in medical care facilities have been shown to have positive effects on patient recovery and well-being, and expedite hospital discharge. Additional clinical research is needed to determine the optimal light exposure timing, duration, intensity, and spectrum to best promote recovery, health and well-being in the context of medical care.

  8. Temporal and Geographic variation in the validity and internal consistency of the Nursing Home Resident Assessment Minimum Data Set 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Shubing

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Minimum Data Set (MDS for nursing home resident assessment has been required in all U.S. nursing homes since 1990 and has been universally computerized since 1998. Initially intended to structure clinical care planning, uses of the MDS expanded to include policy applications such as case-mix reimbursement, quality monitoring and research. The purpose of this paper is to summarize a series of analyses examining the internal consistency and predictive validity of the MDS data as used in the "real world" in all U.S. nursing homes between 1999 and 2007. Methods We used person level linked MDS and Medicare denominator and all institutional claim files including inpatient (hospital and skilled nursing facilities for all Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries entering U.S. nursing homes during the period 1999 to 2007. We calculated the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV of diagnoses taken from Medicare hospital claims and from the MDS among all new admissions from hospitals to nursing homes and the internal consistency (alpha reliability of pairs of items within the MDS that logically should be related. We also tested the internal consistency of commonly used MDS based multi-item scales and examined the predictive validity of an MDS based severity measure viz. one year survival. Finally, we examined the correspondence of the MDS discharge record to hospitalizations and deaths seen in Medicare claims, and the completeness of MDS assessments upon skilled nursing facility (SNF admission. Results Each year there were some 800,000 new admissions directly from hospital to US nursing homes and some 900,000 uninterrupted SNF stays. Comparing Medicare enrollment records and claims with MDS records revealed reasonably good correspondence that improved over time (by 2006 only 3% of deaths had no MDS discharge record, only 5% of SNF stays had no MDS, but over 20% of MDS discharges indicating hospitalization had no associated

  9. Learning for Living: A Program Prepared for Use in a Group Home for Children. Leader's Guide (Experimental Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Marlene

    This report describes an Education for Parenthood demonstration program developed by the Salvation Army for teenagers living at a Salvation Army children's home in Philadelphia. Weekly sessions, held over a 6-month period, emphasized self-esteem, knowledge about children, and career development in the child care field. Firsthand experience in a…

  10. Focus Groups in Elderly Ophthalmologic Patients: Setting the Stage for Quantitative Preference Elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Marion; Vennedey, Vera; Hiligsmann, Mickaël; Fauser, Sascha; Stock, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    Patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are rarely actively involved in decision-making, despite facing preference-sensitive treatment decisions. This paper presents a qualitative study to prepare quantitative preference elicitation in AMD patients. The aims of this study were (1) to gain familiarity with and learn about the special requirements of the AMD patient population for quantitative data collection; and (2) to select/refine patient-relevant treatment attributes and levels, and gain insights into preference structures. Semi-structured focus group interviews were performed. An interview guide including preselected categories in the form of seven potentially patient-relevant treatment attributes was followed. To identify the most patient-relevant treatment attributes, a ranking exercise was performed. Deductive content analyses were done by two independent reviewers for each attribute to derive subcategories (potential levels of attributes) and depict preference trends. The focus group interviews included 21 patients. The interviews revealed that quantitative preference surveys in this population will have to be interviewer assisted to make the survey feasible for patients. The five most patient-relevant attributes were the effect on visual function [ranking score (RS): 139], injection frequency (RS: 101), approval status (RS: 83), side effects (RS: 79), and monitoring frequency (RS: 76). Attribute and level refinement was based on patients' statements. Preference trends and dependencies between attributes informed the quantitative instrument design. This study suggests that qualitative research is a very helpful step to prepare the design and administration of quantitative preference elicitation instruments. It especially facilitated familiarization with the target population and its preferences, and it supported attribute/level refinement.

  11. Impact of specialist home-based palliative care services in a tertiary oncology set up: A prospective non-randomized observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil R Dhiliwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Home-based specialist palliative care services are developed to meet the needs of the patients in advanced stage of cancer at home with physical symptoms and distress. Specialist home care services are intended to improve symptom control and quality of life, enable patients to stay at home, and avoid unnecessary hospital admission. Materials and Methods: Total 690 new cases registered under home-based palliative care service in the year 2012 were prospectively studied to assess the impact of specialist home-based services using Edmonton symptom assessment scale (ESAS and other parameters. Results: Out of the 690 registered cases, 506 patients received home-based palliative care. 50.98% patients were cared for at home, 28.85% patients needed hospice referral and 20.15% patients needed brief period of hospitalization. All patients receiving specialist home care had good relief of physical symptoms ( P < 0.005. 83.2% patients received out of hours care (OOH through liaising with local general practitioners; 42.68% received home based bereavement care and 91.66% had good bereavement outcomes. Conclusion: Specialist home-based palliative care improved symptom control, health-related communication and psychosocial support. It promoted increased number of home-based death, appropriate and early hospice referral, and averted needless hospitalization. It improved bereavement outcomes, and caregiver satisfaction.

  12. [Nutritional support groups at a hospital setting. Size, composition, relationships and actions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana Porbén, S; Barreto Penié, J

    2007-01-01

    The hospital Nutricional Support Group (NSG) represents the ultimate step in the evolution of the forms of provision of nutritional and feeding care to hospitalized patients. The NSG outdoes other preceeding forms for its harmony and cohesion among its members, the multi-, inter- and transdisciplinarity, the dedication to the activity on a full time basis, and the capability to self-finance by means of the savings derived from the implementation of a nutritional policy consistent with the Good Practices of Feeding and Nutrition. It is to be expected that the inception and operation of a NSG in a hospital environment allows the realization of the benefits embedded into the Metabolic, Nutritional and Feeding Intervention Programs. Guidelines and recommendations for the definition of the size and composition of an hospital NSG are presented in this article, along with the responsabilities, functions and tasks to be assumed by its members, and a timetable for its implementation, always from the experiencies of the authors after conducting a NSG in a tertiary-care hospital in Havana (Cuba).

  13. The geological setting and style of copper mineralization at the Bushman group of deposits, northeastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. M.; Blaine, J. L.; Doig, R.; Byron, C. L.

    1994-02-01

    The Bushman group of CuPbZn deposits occur within the north-northeasterly trending Bushman shear zone in northeastern Botswana. The deposits are hosted by a sliver of sheared and altered, carbonate rocks and chloritic and graphitic schists that resemble and are presumed correlative with metasedimentary rocks of the Matsitama schist belt to the east. This sliver is surrounded by sheared and altered granitic gneisses. Within the sliver, the mineralized zones are a chalcopyrite and pyrite bearing quartz-calcite±alkali feldspar vein breccias near the sheared contact between the carbonate rocks and the chloritic and graphitic schists. Elsewhere within the granitic gneisses, those zones are marked by barren quartz breccias surrounded by a zone dominated by red, turbid orthoclase in turn surrounded by a zone dominated by green epidote. Initially hydrothermal alteration propylitized the host rocks and then porphyroblasts of orthoclase, albite and quartz grew with the introduction of calcite. Away from the mineralized zones, four generations of veins occur, the first two directly traceable to CuPbZn mineralization and the third carrying galena and sphalerite. Isotopic data suggest that the protolith of the granitic gneisses was emplaced sometime between about 2.57 Ga and 2.3 Ga ago. After this protolith was deformed and metamorphosed, CuPbZn mineralization occurred about 1926 Ma ago from fluids at a temperature of about 360°C. The Pb isotopic compositions of the sulfide minerals indicate that the fluids giving rise to the CuPbZn mineralization were possibly the same as those giving rise to Pb and Zn mineralization. In both instances, however, the Pb came from several sources. More recently, shear zones parallel to the Bushman shear zone may have controlled in part the emplacement of kimberlite pipes.

  14. Potential Health Risks from Uranium in Home Well Water: An Investigation by the Apsaalooke (Crow) Tribal Research Group

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, Margaret J.; Anita L. Moore-Nall; Doyle, John T.; Myra J. Lefthand; Sara L. Young; Ada L. Bends; Crow Environmental Health Steering Committee; Camper, Anne K.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to uranium can damage kidneys, increase long term risks of various cancers, and cause developmental and reproductive effects. Historically, home well water in Montana has not been tested for uranium. Data for the Crow Reservation from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) database showed that water from 34 of 189 wells tested had uranium over the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 30 μg/L for drink...

  15. Potential Health Risks from Uranium in Home Well Water: An Investigation by the Apsaalooke (Crow Tribal Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret J. Eggers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to uranium can damage kidneys, increase long term risks of various cancers, and cause developmental and reproductive effects. Historically, home well water in Montana has not been tested for uranium. Data for the Crow Reservation from the United States Geological Survey (USGS National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE database showed that water from 34 of 189 wells tested had uranium over the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL of 30 μg/L for drinking water. Therefore the Crow Water Quality Project included uranium in its tests of home well water. Volunteers had their well water tested and completed a survey about their well water use. More than 2/3 of the 97 wells sampled had detectable uranium; 6.3% exceeded the MCL of 30 μg/L. Wells downgradient from the uranium-bearing formations in the mountains were at highest risk. About half of all Crow families rely on home wells; 80% of these families consume their well water. An explanation of test results; associated health risks and water treatment options were provided to participating homeowners. The project is a community-based participatory research initiative of Little Big Horn College; the Crow Tribe; the Apsaalooke Water and Wastewater Authority; the local Indian Health Service Hospital and other local stakeholders; with support from academic partners at Montana State University (MSU Bozeman.

  16. Extended Functional Groups (EFG: An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Salmina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a classification system termed “extended functional groups” (EFG, which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models.

  17. Home Sweet Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A family-run nursing home that gives elderly people the feel of a real of a real home Jiang Shaoju’s three-year-old family-run nursing home for the elderly in Dalian breaks all stereotypes people might attach to traditional homes for the aged.There are no nurses in uniforms,no numbered bedding and there is a lot of laughter. Jiang,56,has given almost every one of the 12 elderly women in her nursing home a nickname.She calls 92-year-old Xuan Shoulan"vice principal"because Xuan likes giving orders to others in the house and

  18. Report from the kick-off meeting of the Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J; Deckert, S; Alam, M; Apfelbacher, C; Barbaric, J; Bauer, A; Chalmers, J; Chosidow, O; Delamere, F; Doney, E; Eleftheriadou, V; Grainge, M; Johannsen, L; Kottner, J; Le Cleach, L; Mayer, A; Pinart, M; Prescott, L; Prinsen, C A C; Ratib, S; Schlager, J G; Sharma, M; Thomas, K S; Weberschock, T; Weller, K; Werner, R N; Wild, T; Wilkes, S R; Williams, H C

    2016-02-01

    A major obstacle of evidence-based clinical decision making is the use of nonstandardized, partly untested outcome measurement instruments. Core Outcome Sets (COSs) are currently developed in different medical fields to standardize and improve the selection of outcomes and outcome measurement instruments in clinical trials, in order to pool results of trials or to allow indirect comparison between interventions. A COS is an agreed minimum set of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all clinical trials of a specific disease or trial population. The international, multidisciplinary Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN) aims to develop and implement COSs in dermatology, thus making trial evidence comparable and, herewith, more useful for clinical decision making. The inaugural meeting of CSG-COUSIN was held on 17-18 March 2015 in Dresden, Germany, as the exclusive theme of the Annual Cochrane Skin Group Meeting. In total, 29 individuals representing a broad mix of different stakeholder groups, professions, skills and perspectives attended. This report provides a description of existing COS initiatives in dermatology, highlights current methodological challenges in COS development, and presents the concept, aims and structure of CSG-COUSIN.

  19. Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet-and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the study was to establish the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Methods Patients referred for treatment by their physician, or self-referred, were telephone-screened by a psychiatric nurse. Patients fulfilling screening criteria underwent an in-person structured clinical interview carried out by a psychiatrist. A total of 113 consecutive patients were then randomly assigned to 10 weeks of either guided Internet delivered CBT (n = 53 or group CBT (n = 60. After treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up, patients were again assessed by the psychiatrist, blind to treatment condition. Results Immediately after randomization 9 patients dropped out, leaving 104 patients who started treatment. Patients in both treatment conditions showed significant improvement on the main outcome measure, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS after treatment. For the Internet treatment the within-group effect size (pre-post on the PDSS was Cohen's d = 1.73, and for the group treatment it was d = 1.63. Between group effect sizes were low and treatment effects were maintained at 6-months follow-up. We found no statistically significant differences between the two treatment conditions using a mixed models approach to account for missing data. Group CBT utilised considerably more therapist time than did Internet CBT. Defining effect as proportion of PDSS responders, the cost-effectiveness analysis concerning therapist time showed that Internet treatment had superior cost

  20. The mitochondrial LSU rRNA group II intron of Ustilago maydis encodes an active homing endonuclease likely involved in intron mobility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Pfeifer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The a2 mating type locus gene lga2 is critical for uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance during sexual development of Ustilago maydis. Specifically, the absence of lga2 results in biparental inheritance, along with efficient transfer of intronic regions in the large subunit rRNA gene between parental molecules. However, the underlying role of the predicted LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene I-UmaI located within the group II intron LRII1 has remained unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the enzymatic activity of I-UmaI in vitro based on expression of a tagged full-length and a naturally occurring mutant derivative, which harbors only the N-terminal LAGLIDADG domain. This confirmed Mg²⁺-dependent endonuclease activity and cleavage at the LRII1 insertion site to generate four base pair extensions with 3' overhangs. Specifically, I-UmaI recognizes an asymmetric DNA sequence with a minimum length of 14 base pairs (5'-GACGGGAAGACCCT-3' and tolerates subtle base pair substitutions within the homing site. Enzymatic analysis of the mutant variant indicated a correlation between the activity in vitro and intron homing. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that putatively functional or former functional I-UmaI homologs are confined to a few members within the Ustilaginales and Agaricales, including the phylogenetically distant species Lentinula edodes, and are linked to group II introns inserted into homologous positions in the LSU rDNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present data provide strong evidence that intron homing efficiently operates under conditions of biparental inheritance in U. maydis. Conversely, uniparental inheritance may be critical to restrict the transmission of mobile introns. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that I-UmaI-associated introns have been acquired independently in distant taxa and are more widespread than anticipated from available genomic data.

  1. Home Appliance Kingdom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUMBO; ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    With 900 chain stores and three retail brands, Gome, China’s largest home appliance retail group, is pursuing grandiose dreams of becoming a home appliance kingdomOn November 22, 2006, Chinese home appliance retail heavyweights Beijing-based Gome Electri

  2. A Within-Group Analysis of African American Mothers' Authoritarian Attitudes, Limit-Setting and Children's Self-Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeCuyer, Elizabeth A; Swanson, Dena Phillips

    2017-03-01

    Research suggests that higher levels of authoritarian parenting exist in African American (AA) families than in European American (EA) families, and that authoritarian attitudes may be associated with more positive outcomes in AA families than EA families. However, less is known about authoritarian attitudes and children's development within AA families. This within-group study of 50 African American mothers and their 3-year-old children examined associations between maternal authoritarian attitudes, observed maternal limit-setting strategies, and children's self-regulation during a limit-setting interaction. The findings indicate that while AA families may hold more authoritarian attitudes than EA families, the direction of effect of authoritarian attitudes on children's outcomes appears to be the same in both ethnic groups. In this sample, when examining AA authoritarian attitudes relative to those of other AA mothers, less or lower authoritarian attitudes were associated with authoritative limit-setting behavior (firm limits within the context of overall warmth and responsiveness) and better children's self-regulation.

  3. Snails home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, D. J.; Hodgson, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    Many gardeners and horticulturalists seek non-chemical methods to control populations of snails. It has frequently been reported that snails that are marked and removed from a garden are later found in the garden again. This phenomenon is often cited as evidence for a homing instinct. We report a systematic study of the snail population in a small suburban garden, in which large numbers of snails were marked and removed over a period of about 6 months. While many returned, inferring a homing instinct from this evidence requires statistical modelling. Monte Carlo techniques demonstrate that movements of snails are better explained by drift under the influence of a homing instinct than by random diffusion. Maximum likelihood techniques infer the existence of two groups of snails in the garden: members of a larger population that show little affinity to the garden itself, and core members of a local garden population that regularly return to their home if removed. The data are strongly suggestive of a homing instinct, but also reveal that snail-throwing can work as a pest management strategy.

  4. Setting the question for inquiry: The effects of whole class vs small group on student achievement in elementary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnetto, Andy Roy

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of two different student-centered approaches to setting the question for inquiry. The first approach (whole class) consisted of students setting a single question for inquiry after which students worked in small groups during an investigation phase of the activity with all groups exploring the same question. The second approach (small group) consisted of each group of students setting a question resulting in numerous questions being explored per class. A mixed method quasi-experimental design was utilized. Two grade five teachers from a small rural school district in the Midwestern United States participated, each teaching two sections of science (approximately 25 students per section). Results indicate three major findings. Instructional approach (whole class vs. small group) did not effect student achievement in science or language arts. Observational data indicated the actions and skills teachers utilized to implement the approaches were similar. Specifically, the pedagogical skills of dialogical interaction (which was found to be influenced by teacher level of control of learning and teacher content knowledge) and effective rather than efficient use of time were identified as key factors in teachers' progression toward a student-centered, teacher-managed instructional approach. Unit exams along with qualitative and quantitative teacher observation data indicated that these factors do have an impact on student achievement. Specifically increased dialogical interaction in the forms of greater student voice, and increased cognitive demands placed on students by embedding and emphasizing science argument within the student inquiry corresponded to positive gains in student achievement. Additionally, teacher's perception of student abilities was also found to influence professional growth. Finally, allowing students to set the questions for inquiry and design the experiments impact the classroom environment as teacher

  5. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Outcome of Home-Based Early Intervention for Autism in Sri Lanka: Follow-Up of a Cohort and Comparison with a Nonintervention Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemamali Perera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the outcome of a home-based autism intervention program (HBAIP in 18- to 40-month-old children newly diagnosed and treatment naïve. Intervention was exclusively implemented at home. Outcome was measured at 3 months and 6 months after intervention and compared with a group of newly diagnosed children with autism who were >40 months at intake but had not received any autism specific clinical management. Aim was also to estimate whether natural development would contribute to gain in skills and compare with the effect of intervention. Five selected parameters of behavior representing social interaction and social communication were used to assess outcome. Results showed a statistically significant improvement between preintervention and postintervention in all the measured parameters. The effect size was large when compared to preintervention and gains were indicated by changes in mean scores and p values within a narrow confidence interval. Highest gains were in first 3 months of postintervention which continued up to 6 months. Although the comparison group was more advanced in the measured skills at intake, they were significantly below the level reached by experimental group at 3 months and 6 months after intervention. This study was registered in the Sri Lanka Clinical Trials Registry (SLCTR/2009/011.

  7. Report on the Working Group set up to Study the Requirements for Operating the SPS within the INB Framework (INBOPS)

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, A; Charavay, R; Elsener, K; Faugier, A; Jacot, C; Jirdén, L; Menzel, Hans Gregor; Pajunen, J; Poole, John; Roy, G; Silari, Marco; Spinks, Alan; Tsesmelis, E; Wahl, H

    2001-01-01

    The convention signed with the French authorities for the LHC defines a new Installation Nucléaire de Base (INB). The LHC machine tunnel, the experiments, some buildings which cover access shafts to the machine and the SPS with its extraction lines up to the targets are all inside the new perimeter. The new convention came into effect in September 2000 and therefore the SPS fell within the new context from that time. As a consequence, SL has to operate the SPS within this new regulatory framework and a small working group was set up to look at the requirements and to estimate the resources required. The conclusions of the working group are reported in this paper.

  8. Focus on Methodology: Beyond paper and pencil: Conducting computer-assisted data collection with adolescents in group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelli, Marcela; Armstrong, Jessica; Tran, Steve P; Griffith, Aisha N; Walker, Kathrin; Gutierrez, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    Computer-assisted data collection offers advantages over traditional paper and pencil measures; however, little guidance is available regarding the logistics of conducting computer-assisted data collection with adolescents in group settings. To address this gap, we draw on our experiences conducting a multi-site longitudinal study of adolescent development. Structured questionnaires programmed on laptop computers using Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interviewing (ACASI) were administered to groups of adolescents in community-based and afterschool programs. Although implementing ACASI required additional work before entering the field, we benefited from reduced data processing time, high data quality, and high levels of youth motivation. Preliminary findings from an ethnically diverse sample of 265 youth indicate favorable perceptions of using ACASI. Using our experiences as a case study, we provide recommendations on selecting an appropriate data collection device (including hardware and software), preparing and testing the ACASI, conducting data collection in the field, and managing data.

  9. Sleep Patterns and Sleep Problems Among Preschool and School-Aged Group Children in a Primary Care Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohammadi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe sleep patterns and sleep problems among preschool and school aged group children in a primary care setting in Iran. Material & Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in two primary care pediatric clinics in Tehran from March 2006 to September 2006.Findings: Sleep patterns of 215 children studied (101 were in preschool age group; 2-6 years old, and 114 were in primary school age group; 7-12 years old. Sleep problems were common in study group, as follows: bedtime problems 21.05%-56.44%, excessive daytime sleepiness 26.73%-42.98%, awakening during the night 13.86%-32.46%, regularity and duration of sleep 17.54%-27.72%, sleep-disordered breathing 10.53%-17.82%.Conclusion: These high frequencies of sleep problems in children explains the importance and burden of sleep disorders in children  which unfortunately are not noticed by primary care providers in Iran and inadequate attention to them may have negative consequences on a host of functional domains, including mood, behavior, school performance, and health outcomes.

  10. Aiming to be a breastfeeding mother in a neonatal intensive care unit and at home: a thematic analysis of peer-support group discussion in social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niela-Vilén, Hannakaisa; Axelin, Anna; Melender, Hanna-Leena; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants are usually breastfed less than full-term infants, and successful breastfeeding requires a supportive environment and special efforts from their mothers. A breastfeeding peer-support group, utilising social media, was developed for these mothers in order to support them in this challenge. Mothers were able to discuss breastfeeding and share experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants based on the postings in peer-support group discussions in social media. The actively participating mothers (n = 22) had given birth <35 gestational weeks. They were recruited from one university hospital in Finland. The social media postings (n = 305) were analysed using thematic analysis. A description of the process of breastfeeding a preterm infant from the point of view of a mother was created. The process consisted of three main themes: the breastfeeding paradox in hospital, the 'reality check' of breastfeeding at home and the breastfeeding experience as part of being a mother. The mothers encountered paradoxical elements in the support received in hospital; discharge was promoted at the expense of breastfeeding and pumping breast milk was emphasised over breastfeeding. After the infant's discharge, the over-optimistic expectations of mothers often met with reality - mothers did not have the knowledge or skills to manage breastfeeding at home. Successful breastfeeding was an empowering experience for the mothers, whereas unsuccessful breastfeeding induced feelings of disappointment. Therefore, the mothers of preterm infants need evidence-based breastfeeding counselling and systematic support in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at home. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Enantiodivergent Fluorination of Allylic Alcohols: Data Set Design Reveals Structural Interplay between Achiral Directing Group and Chiral Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Andrew J; Milo, Anat; Sigman, Matthew S; Toste, F Dean

    2016-03-23

    Enantioselectivity values represent relative rate measurements that are sensitive to the structural features of the substrates and catalysts interacting to produce them. Therefore, well-designed enantioselectivity data sets are information rich and can provide key insights regarding specific molecular interactions. However, if the mechanism for enantioselection varies throughout a data set, these values cannot be easily compared. This premise, which is the crux of free energy relationships, exposes a challenging issue of identifying mechanistic breaks within multivariate correlations. Herein, we describe an approach to addressing this problem in the context of a chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed fluorination of allylic alcohols using aryl boronic acids as transient directing groups. By designing a data set in which both the phosphoric and boronic acid structures were systematically varied, key enantioselectivity outliers were identified and analyzed. A mechanistic study was executed to reveal the structural origins of these outliers, which was consistent with the presence of several mechanistic regimes within the data set. While 2- and 4-substituted aryl boronic acids favored the (R)-enantiomer with most of the studied catalysts, meta-alkoxy substituted aryl boronic acids resulted in the (S)-enantiomer when used in combination with certain (R)-phosphoric acids. We propose that this selectivity reversal is the result of a lone pair-π interaction between the substrate ligated boronic acid and the phosphate. On the basis of this proposal, a catalyst system was identified, capable of producing either enantiomer in high enantioselectivity (77% (R)-2 to 92% (S)-2) using the same chiral catalyst by subtly changing the structure of the achiral boronic acid.

  12. [Aging at home with telecare in Spain. A dicourse analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceros, Juan C; Cavalcante, Maria Tereza Leal; Domènech, Miquel

    2016-08-01

    Caring for the elderly is turning to forms of community care and home care. Telecare is one of those emergent modalities of caring. This article will explore the meanings that older people give to the experience of staying at home in later life by using telecare. Discourse analysis is used to examine a set of focus groups and interviews with telecare users from different cities of Catalonia (Spain). The outcomes include three interpretative repertoires that we called: "Aging at home", "normal aging" and "unsafe aging". For each repertoire we examine how the permanence of older people in their homes is accounted, and which role telecare plays in such experience.

  13. Facility with the English language and problem-based learning group interaction: findings from an Arabic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, D J; Lanphear, J; Stewart, T; Das, M; Ridding, P; Dunn, E

    1998-09-01

    The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates (UAE) University is in a unique position to explore issues related to English language proficiency and medical student performance. All students entering the FMHS have English as a second language. This study focused on the issues of students' proficiency in English as measured by the TOEFL test, student background factors and interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) groups. Using a modification of Bales Interaction Process Analysis, four problem-based learning groups were observed over four thematic units, to measure the degree of student interaction within PBL groups and to compare this to individual TOEFL scores and key background variables. The students' contributions correlated highly with TOEFL test results in the giving of information (range r = 0.67-0.74). The female students adhered to interacting in English during group sessions, whereas the male students were more likely to revert to using Arabic in elaborating unclear phenomena (p TOEFL scores for the male students, but not for female students. Multivariate analysis was undertaken to analyse the relative contribution of the TOEFL, parental education and years of studying in English. The best predictor of students' contributions in PBL groups was identified as TOEFL scores. The study demonstrates the importance of facilitating a locally acceptable level of English proficiency prior to admission to the FMHS. However, it also highlights the importance of not focusing only on English proficiency but paying attention to additional factors in facilitating medical students in maximizing benefits from interactions in PBL settings.

  14. Gun storage patterns in US homes with children. A pediatric practice-based survey. Pediatric Practice Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senturia, Y D; Christoffel, K K; Donovan, M

    1996-03-01

    To describe gun storage patterns in gun-owning families with children. Survey of parents attending participating offices. Twenty-nine urban, suburban, and rural pediatric practices in Chicago, Ill; New Jersey; Houston, Tex; Utah; Georgia; Iowa; and South Carolina. Parents of children attending offices for well- or sick-child care. Consecutive sample of families seen during the 1-week study period. MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYSES: Logistic regression models were constructed to identify sociodemographic factors associated with keeping guns loaded. Of 5233 surveys, 1682 (32%) indicated ownership of at least one powder firearm. Of the gun-owning families, 61% reported at least one gun unlocked, and 15% reported at least one gun loaded. Rifles were more often stored unlocked (62% rifles vs 52% handguns, Pvs 27% handguns, Pbest-fit logistic regression model for keeping a gun loaded identified four predictor variables: owning a gun for self-protection, work-related gun ownership, owning a handgun, and no men in the home. Because most gun-owning families store guns loaded, unlocked, or both, anticipatory guidance should address gun storage in all such families. Interventions designed to alter the way work guns are dealt with after work, and to provide safe and effective means of self-protection might affect these storage patterns.

  15. PalliPA: How can general practices support caregivers of patients at their end of life in a home-care setting? A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Katja

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The care of patients with a life-threatening, progressive and far advanced illness in a home-care setting requires appropriate individual care and requires the active support of family caregivers. General practice teams are usually the primary care givers and first contact and are best placed to offer support to family caregivers and to recognise and respond to the burden of care giving on family members. The aim of this project is to develop a best practice model for engaging with and supporting family caregivers. Findings The project is framed as an exploratory trial for a subsequent implementation study, covering phases 0, I and II of the MRC (Medical Research Council framework for development, design and evaluation of complex interventions. The project is a multi-method procedure and has two phases. In the first phase, which has already been completed, we used a reflective practice procedure where general practice teams were asked about how they currently deal with family caregivers. In the second phase, a participatory action research approach aims to improve identification and response to when support is necessary for family caregivers. Ten participating general practice teams each enrol 40 eligible patients and their family caregiver, to identify structures and tools feasible for use in their practice. Standardised self-reported questionnaires (Burden Scale for Family Caregivers and Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative are being applied at study inclusion (prior to or during the implementation period and after 6 and 12 months to explore implementation effects. Qualitative assessment of general practice teams’ experiences will be triangulated with the quantitative evaluation of the implementation. Discussion This two-step approach, which is appropriate to primary palliative care in the German health care context, will enable general practice teams to develop feasible, acceptable and successful strategies

  16. Getting your home ready - after the hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000432.htm Getting your home ready - after the hospital To use the sharing features on this page, ... home ready after you have been in the hospital often requires much preparation. Set up your home ...

  17. Frank Aggregation Operators for Triangular Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Set and Its Application in Multiple Attribute Group Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindong Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an approach to multiple attribute group decision-making (MAGDM problems, in which the individual assessments are in the form of triangle interval type-2 fuzzy numbers (TIT2FNs. Firstly, some Frank operation laws of triangle interval type-2 fuzzy set (TIT2FS are defined. Secondly, some Frank aggregation operators such as the triangle interval type-2 fuzzy Frank weighted averaging (TIT2FFWA operator and the triangle interval type-2 fuzzy Frank weighted geometric (TIT2FFWG operator are developed for aggregation TIT2FNs. Furthermore, some desirable properties of the two aggregation operators are analyzed in detail. Finally, an approach based on TIT2FFWA (or TIT2FFWG operator to solve MAGDM is developed. An illustrative example about supplier selection is provided to illustrate the developed procedures. The results demonstrate the practicality and effectiveness of our new method.

  18. Chinese Gini Coefficient from 2005 to 2012, Based on 20 Grouped Income Data Sets of Urban and Rural Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiandong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data insufficiency has become the primary factor affecting research on income disparity in China. To resolve this issue, this paper explores Chinese income distribution and income inequality using distribution functions. First, it examines 20 sets of grouped data on family income between 2005 and 2012 by the China Yearbook of Household Surveys, 2013, and compares the fitting effects of eight distribution functions. The results show that the generalized beta distribution of the second kind has a high fitting to the income distribution of urban and rural residents in China. Next, these results are used to calculate the Chinese Gini ratio, which is then compared with the findings of relevant studies. Finally, this paper discusses the influence of urbanization on income inequality in China and suggests that accelerating urbanization can play an important role in narrowing the income gap of Chinese residents.

  19. Partially redundant functions of two SET-domain polycomb-group proteins in controlling initiation of seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongfang; Tyson, Mark D; Jackson, Shawn S; Yadegari, Ramin

    2006-08-29

    In Arabidopsis, a complex of Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins functions in the female gametophyte to control the initiation of seed development. Mutations in the PcG genes, including MEDEA (MEA) and FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT SEED 2 (FIS2), produce autonomous seeds where endosperm proliferation occurs in the absence of fertilization. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified MEA and a related protein, SWINGER (SWN), as SET-domain partners of FIS2. Localization data indicated that all three proteins are present in the female gametophyte. Although single-mutant swn plants did not show any defects, swn mutations enhanced the mea mutant phenotype in producing autonomous seeds. Thus, MEA and SWN perform partially redundant functions in controlling the initiation of endosperm development before fertilization in Arabidopsis.

  20. Clinical outcomes of an early intervention program for preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a community group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Valsamma; Crnčec, Rudi; Walter, Amelia

    2013-01-07

    Available evidence indicates that early intervention programs, such as the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), can positively affect key outcomes for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However, programs involving resource intensive one-to-one clinical intervention are not readily available or deliverable in the community, resulting in many children with ASD missing out on evidence-based intervention during their early and most critical preschool years. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the ESDM for preschool-aged children with ASD using a predominantly group-based intervention in a community child care setting. Participants were 26 children (21 male) with ASD with a mean age of 49.6 months. The ESDM, a comprehensive early intervention program that integrates applied behaviour analysis with developmental and relationship-based approaches, was delivered by trained therapists during the child's attendance at a child care centre for preschool-aged children with ASD. Children received 15-20 hours of group-based, and one hour of one-to-one, ESDM intervention per week. The average intervention period was ten months. Outcome measures were administered pre- and post-intervention, and comprised a developmental assessment - the Mullen Scales of Early Learning (MSEL); and two parent-report questionnaires - the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) and Vineland Adaptive Behaviours Scales-Second Edition (VABS-II). Statistically significant post-intervention improvements were found in children's performance on the visual reception, receptive language and expressive language domains of the MSEL in addition to their overall intellectual functioning, as assessed by standardised developmental quotients. Parents reported significant increases in their child's receptive communication and motor skills on the VABS-II, and a significant decrease in autism-specific features on the SCQ. These effects were of around medium size, and appeared to be in excess of what may

  1. Resistance to changing practice from pro re nata prescriptions to patient group directions in acute mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, O; Baker, J A

    2013-09-01

    Poor practice associated with pro re nata (PRN) prescriptions in mental health is known to be common and can increase the risk of serious and potentially fatal side effects. A contributing factor to poor practice is the lack of a clear chain of accountability between the decision to prescribe and administer PRN prescriptions. To address this problem, a patient group direction (PGD) for acute behavioural disturbance (lorazepam 0.5-2 mg) and staff training materials were developed. The intention was to replace PRN prescriptions with the PGD in two mental health trusts. One of the potential benefits of this would be the removal of the contribution of PRN to high and combined dose antipsychotic prescriptions. This proposal, however, was met with significant resistance in both trusts and did not replace PRN as a result. A series of interviews and focus groups were conducted with 16 RMNs working in the two trusts, to explore the reasons why the PGD was met with resistance. Senior nurses perceived resistance to be associated with anxieties over increased responsibility for decision making. Junior nurses reported concerns regarding the medicalization of the nursing role, the paperwork associated with the PGD and the training approach used. Future efforts to implement PGDs in mental health settings must carefully consider the methods for engaging effectively with participating organizations, in terms of managing change and completing the necessary groundwork for successful implementation.

  2. End uses of electric energy in homes of a group of dwellings; Usos finales de la energia electrica en hogares de un conjunto habitacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campero Littlewood, E.; Romero Cortes, J.; Alarcon Maldonado, E.; Silva Oliver, J.; Ortiz Segura, J.; Vargas Rubio, J. [Departamento de Energia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Unidad Azcapotzalco, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports the results of an inquiry conducted to a sample of homes of a group of dwellings. The objective of this inquiry was to know the number of dwellers, the electric household appliances and the type of artificial lighting characteristic of a three-bed room apartment of approximately 65 square meters. In the Introduction is given the information related to the distribution of the monthly consumption of the entire group of dwellings for two separate periods for more than six years, which allows to determine the yearly average rates of growth. The information collected in the inquiry is presented in graphical form of frequency of electric household appliances and the light bulb rating of the more typical electric appurtenances. The results correspond to the answers in 188 inquiries judged reliable (230 questionnaires were delivered to the homes). The analysis of the information allows the knowledge of the electricity consumption capacity that the sampled homes have and to infer the consumption capacity of the entire group of dwellings. [Espanol] En este trabajo se reportan los resultados de una encuesta aplicada a una muestra de hogares en un conjunto habitacional. El objetivo de la encuesta es conocer el numero de habitantes, el equipamiento en electrodomesticos y la iluminacion artificial que caracteriza a un departamento de tres recamaras de aproximadamente 65 m{sup 2}. En la introduccion se suministra la informacion de la distribucion del consumo mensual promedio de toda la unidad habitacional para dos periodos separados por mas de seis anos, lo que permite determinar las tasas promedio anuales de crecimiento. La informacion recopilada en la encuesta se presenta a manera de graficas de frecuencias de los electrodomesticos, de las capacidades de los focos o de las caracteristicas mas importantes de los aparatos electricos. Los resultados corresponden a las respuestas de 188 encuestas declaradas confiables (se entregaron cuestionarios a 230 hogares

  3. Chlamydia trachomatis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV distribution and sexual behaviors across gender and age group in an African setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Fleury Djoba Siawaya

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to (1 describe the distribution of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV cases across gender and age groups in Libreville (Gabon; (2 examine Gabonese Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs-related risk behaviour. METHODS: The sampled population was people attending the "Laboratoire National de Santé Plublique". Between 2007 and 2011, 14 667 and 9 542 people respectively, were tested for CT and HIV infections. 1 854 of them were tested for both infections. We calculated CT and HIV rates across gender and age groups. Also analysed was the groups' contribution to the general CT and HIV epidemiology. STIs-related risk behaviours were assessed in 224 men and 795 women (between July 2011 and March 2013 who agreed and answered a questionnaire including questions on their marital status, number of sex partners, sexual practices, history of STIs, sex frequency and condom use. RESULTS: Data showed a 24% dropped in the CT infection rate between 2007 and 2010, followed by a 14% increase in 2011. The HIV infection rates for the same period were between 15% and 16%. The risk of a CT-positive subject getting HIV is about 0.71 times the risk of a CT-negative subject. Young adult aged between 18 and 35 years old represented 65.2% of people who had STIs. 80% of women and 66% of men confessed to an inconsistent use of condoms. 11.6% of women and 48% of men declared having multiple sex partners. 61% of questioned women and 67% of men declared knowing their HIV status. CONCLUSIONS: In this Gabonese setting, the population-aged from 18 to 35 years is the most affected by STIs. Other matters of concern are the inconsistent use of protection and sex with non-spousal or non-life partners.

  4. Parents as Coresearchers at Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Given

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the use of observational video recordings to document young children’s use of technology in their homes. Although observational research practices have been used for decades, often with video-based techniques, the participant group in this study (i.e., very young children and the setting (i.e., private homes provide a rich space for exploring the benefits and limitations of qualitative observation. The data gathered in this study point to a number of key decisions and issues that researchers must face in designing observational research, particularly where nonresearchers (in this case, parents act as surrogates for the researcher at the data collection stage. The involvement of parents and children as research videographers in the home resulted in very rich and detailed data about children’s use of technology in their daily lives. However, limitations noted in the data set (e.g., image quality provide important guidance for researchers developing projects using similar methods in future. The article provides recommendations for future observational designs in similar settings and/or with similar participant groups.

  5. Gene-Set Local Hierarchical Clustering (GSLHC--A Gene Set-Based Approach for Characterizing Bioactive Compounds in Terms of Biological Functional Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Hsiang Chung

    Full Text Available Gene-set-based analysis (GSA, which uses the relative importance of functional gene-sets, or molecular signatures, as units for analysis of genome-wide gene expression data, has exhibited major advantages with respect to greater accuracy, robustness, and biological relevance, over individual gene analysis (IGA, which uses log-ratios of individual genes for analysis. Yet IGA remains the dominant mode of analysis of gene expression data. The Connectivity Map (CMap, an extensive database on genomic profiles of effects of drugs and small molecules and widely used for studies related to repurposed drug discovery, has been mostly employed in IGA mode. Here, we constructed a GSA-based version of CMap, Gene-Set Connectivity Map (GSCMap, in which all the genomic profiles in CMap are converted, using gene-sets from the Molecular Signatures Database, to functional profiles. We showed that GSCMap essentially eliminated cell-type dependence, a weakness of CMap in IGA mode, and yielded significantly better performance on sample clustering and drug-target association. As a first application of GSCMap we constructed the platform Gene-Set Local Hierarchical Clustering (GSLHC for discovering insights on coordinated actions of biological functions and facilitating classification of heterogeneous subtypes on drug-driven responses. GSLHC was shown to tightly clustered drugs of known similar properties. We used GSLHC to identify the therapeutic properties and putative targets of 18 compounds of previously unknown characteristics listed in CMap, eight of which suggest anti-cancer activities. The GSLHC website http://cloudr.ncu.edu.tw/gslhc/ contains 1,857 local hierarchical clusters accessible by querying 555 of the 1,309 drugs and small molecules listed in CMap. We expect GSCMap and GSLHC to be widely useful in providing new insights in the biological effect of bioactive compounds, in drug repurposing, and in function-based classification of complex diseases.

  6. The process of a group intervention for caregivers of demented persons living at home: conceptual framework, components, and characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, L; Gendron, C; Vézina, J; Hébert, R; Ducharme, F; Lavoie, J-P; Gendron, M; Voyer, L; Préville, M

    2002-08-01

    Most earlier group interventions for caregivers of demented persons lacked a theoretical basis to guide the intervention process and focused on providing information and practical advice and encouraging the expression of feelings. This article presents the process of a group intervention with emphasis on its conceptual framework, components and characteristics. As caregivers are exposed to numerous daily stressful demands, the intervention's conceptual framework was derived from Lazarus and Folkman's transactional theory of stress and coping and Folkman's Coping Effectiveness Training Program. The central aim of the intervention was to improve the ability of caregivers to cope with the stressful demands at the core of caring for a demented person, rather than to focus on information and the task-oriented aspects of caring. The two components of the intervention deal with the cognitive appraisal of stressors and coping strategies, with a view to determining which strategies are most appropriate on the basis of the changeability of stressors. Three coping strategies were proposed: problem solving (problem-focused coping to deal with changeable stressors), reframing (emotion-focused coping to manage the emotional response to unchangeable stressors), and seeking social support (problem- or emotion-focused coping). The most salient characteristics of this group intervention were its intensity (15 meetings) and its focus on the caregivers' daily reality, which provided concrete reference points for the discussion of conceptual notions.

  7. Effect of the Japanese preventive-care version of the Minimum Data Set--Home Care on the health-related behaviors of community-dwelling, frail older adults and skills of preventive-care managers: a quasi-experimental study conducted in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Ikegami, Naoki; Yamada, Yukari;

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the Japanese preventive-care version of the Minimum Data Set-Home Care improves the health-related behaviors of older adults and the skills of preventive-care managers. METHODS: Municipal preventive-care managers were instructed on the use of the Japanese preventive....... The skills of the preventive-care managers were assessed by considering the number of and variations in the needs of the clients, as reflected in the care plans formulated by the managers. RESULTS: The clients' self-care levels were higher in the intervention group than in the control group (P ....05). A greater number of needs, as reflected in the care plans, were noted in the intervention group than in the control group (P Japanese preventive-care version of the Minimum...

  8. The meaning of actualization of self-care resources among a group of older home-dwelling people—A hermeneutic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Söderhamn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-care is an activity of mature persons who have developed their abilities to take care of themselves. Individuals can choose to actualize their self-care abilities into self-care activities to maintain, restore, or improve health and well-being. It is of importance to understand the meaning of the actualization of self-care resources among older people. The aim of this study was to investigate the meaning of the actualization of self-care resources, i.e., actions taken to improve, maintain, or restore health and well-being, among a group of older home-dwelling individuals with a high sense of coherence. The design of this study was to reanalyse narratives revealing self-care activities from 11 (five females and six males Norwegian older home-dwelling people (65 years or older identified as having a high sense of coherence. In order to reveal the meaning and get an understanding of why these self-care resources were realized or actualized, a Gadamerian-based research method was chosen. The analysis revealed four themes that showed the meaning of actualization of self-care resources in the study group: “Desire to carry on”, “Be of use to others”, “Self-realization”, and “Confidence to manage in the future”. The findings showed what older people found meaningful to strive for, and this information can be used as a guide for health professionals when supporting older people in their self-care. Older people with self-care resources can also be an important resource for others in need of social contact and practical help. These resources have to be asked for in voluntary work among older people in need of help and, thereby, can be a valuable supplement to the community health care system.

  9. Effects of using nursing home residents to serve as group activity leaders: lessons learned from the RAP project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrajner, Michael J; Haberman, Jessica L; Camp, Cameron J; Tusick, Melanie; Frentiu, Cristina; Gorzelle, Gregg

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that persons with early to moderate stage dementia are capable of leading small group activities for persons with more advanced dementia. In this study, we built upon this previous work by training residents in long-term care facilities to fill the role of group activity leaders using a Resident-Assisted Programming (RAP) training regimen. There were two stages to the program. In the first stage, RAP training was provided by researchers. In the second stage, RAP training was provided to residents by activities staff members of long-term care facilities who had been trained by researchers. We examine the effects of RAP implemented by researchers and by activities staff member on long-term care resident with dementia who took part in these RAP activities. We also examined effects produced by two types of small group activities: two Montessori-based activities and an activity which focuses on persons with more advanced dementia, based on the work of Jitka Zgola. Results demonstrate that levels of positive engagement seen in players during RAP (resident-led activities) were typically higher than those observed during standard activities programming led by site staff. In general, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming® produced more constructive engagement than Zgola-based programming (ZBP), though ZBP did increase a positive form of engagement involving observing activities with interest. In addition, RAP implemented by activities staff members produced effects that were, on the whole, similar to those produced when RAP was implemented by researchers. Implications of these findings for providing meaningful social roles for persons with dementia residing in long-term care, and suggestions for further research in this area, are discussed.

  10. Descriptions of Home and Community Occupations Related to Home Economics; Descriptions of Specific Occupations Classified Into Six Clusters, Index to Areas of Work and Worker Trait Groups for Individual Occupations. Professional Education Series No. HE-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Beatrice

    This bulletin is a reference tool for the identification of home economics-related occupations and requirements and methods of entry into these occupations. A full description of 200 home economics-related occupations as found in the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles" Volume I, and page references which will facilitate the location of…

  11. Depositional setting and geochemistry of phosphorites and metalliferous black shales in the Carboniferous-Permian Lisburne Group, Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Julie A.; Slack, John F.; Whalen, Michael T.; Harris, Anita G.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatic rocks are distributed widely in the Lisburne Group, a mainly Carboniferous carbonate succession that occurs throughout northern Alaska. New sedimentologic, paleontologic, and geochemical data presented here constrain the geographic and stratigraphic extent of these strata and their depositional and paleogeographic settings. Our findings support models that propose very high oxygen contents of the Permo-Carboniferous atmosphere and oceans, and those that suggest enhanced phosphogenesis in iron-limited sediments; our data also have implications for Carboniferous paleogeography of the Arctic. Lisburne Group phosphorites range from granular to nodular, are interbedded with black shale and lime mudstone rich in radiolarians and sponge spicules, and accumulated primarily in suboxic outer- to middle-ramp environments. Age constraints from conodonts, foraminifers, and goniatite cephalopods indicate that most are middle Late Mississippian (early Chesterian; early late Visean). Phosphorites form 2- to 40-cm-thick beds of sand- to pebble-sized phosphatic peloids, coated grains, and (or) bioclasts cemented by carbonate, silica, or phosphate that occur through an interval =12 m thick. High gamma-ray response through this interval suggests strongly condensed facies related to sediment starvation and development of phosphatic hardgrounds. Phosphorite textures, such as unconformity-bounded coated grains, record multiple episodes of phosphogenesis and sedimentary reworking. Sharp bed bases and local grading indicate considerable redeposition of phosphatic material into deeper water by storms and (or) gravity flows. Lisburne Group phosphorites contain up to 37 weight percent P2O5, 7.6 weight percent F, 1,030 ppm Y, 517 ppm La, and 166 ppm U. Shale-normalized rare earth element (REE) plots show uniformly large negative Ce anomalies Ce/Ce*=0.11 + or - 0.03) that are interpreted to reflect phosphate deposition in seawater that was greatly depleted in Ce due to increased

  12. Discriminatory power of game-related statistics in 14-15 year age group male volleyball, according to set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hermoso, Antonio; Dávila-Romero, Carlos; Saavedra, Jose M

    2013-02-01

    This study compared volleyball game-related statistics by outcome (winners and losers of sets) and set number (total, initial, and last) to identify characteristics that discriminated game performance. Game-related statistics from 314 sets (44 matches) played by teams of male 14- to 15-year-olds in a regional volleyball championship were analysed (2011). Differences between contexts (winning or losing teams) and "set number" (total, initial, and last) were assessed. A discriminant analysis was then performed according to outcome (winners and losers of sets) and "set number" (total, initial, and last). The results showed differences (winning or losing sets) in several variables of Complexes I (attack point and error reception) and II (serve and aces). Game-related statistics which discriminate performance in the sets index the serve, positive reception, and attack point. The predictors of performance at these ages when players are still learning could help coaches plan their training.

  13. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  14. Analysis of Individual Mouse Activity in Group Housed Animals of Different Inbred Strains using a Novel Automated Home Cage Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Rasneer S; Cater, Heather L; Sillito, Rowland R; Chartsias, Agisilaos; Sneddon, Duncan; Concas, Danilo; Keskivali-Bond, Piia; Lukins, Timothy C; Wells, Sara; Acevedo Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Armstrong, J Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders such as autism as well as the range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease are commonly investigated using genetically altered mouse models. The current system for characterizing these mice usually involves removing the animals from their home-cage environment and placing them into novel environments where they undergo a battery of tests measuring a range of behavioral and physical phenotypes. These tests are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However, human manifestations of such disorders are often characterized by multiple phenotypes, presented over long periods of time and leading to significant social impacts. Here, we have developed a system which will allow the automated monitoring of individual mice housed socially in the cage they are reared and housed in, within established social groups and over long periods of time. We demonstrate that the system accurately reports individual locomotor behavior within the group and that the measurements taken can provide unique insights into the effects of genetic background on individual and group behavior not previously recognized.

  15. Home Health Quality Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The instrument-data collection tool used to collect and report performance data by home health agencies is called the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS)....

  16. Implementing guidelines in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diehl, Heinz; Graverholt, Birgitte; Espehaug, Birgitte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research on guideline implementation strategies has mostly been conducted in settings which differ significantly from a nursing home setting and its transferability to the nursing home setting is therefore limited. The objective of this study was to systematically review the effects o...

  17. The Ecology of Youth Participation in Work Settings: Implications for Linking Home, School, and Work for Facilitating Communication Between Youth and Adults. Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Deborah Dye; Beckman, Carol A.

    A study explored how an ecological perspective in human development, as conceptualized by Urie Bronfenbrenner, could be used as an analytic framework for discerning patterns of relationships among the environments of home, school, and work and resulting implications for youth development. Three hypotheses were tested regarding how linking youth…

  18. The Ecology of Youth Participation in Work Settings: Implications for Linking Home, School, and Work for Facilitating Communication Between Youth and Adults. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Deborah Dye; Beckman, Carol A.

    This technical report details all phases of a study to explore how an ecological perspective in human development, as conceptualized by Urie Bronfenbrenner, could be used as an analytic framework for discerning patterns of relationships among the environments of home, school, and work and resulting implications for youth development. (A summary is…

  19. An open trial of in-home CBT for depressed mothers in home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Robert T; Putnam, Frank W; Stevens, Jack; Bosse, Nicole R; Short, Jodie A; Bodley, Amy L; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2011-11-01

    Research has demonstrated that low income mothers participating in home visitation programs have high rates of depression. This study used an open trial design to evaluate In-Home Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (IH-CBT), an evidence-based treatment for depression that is delivered in the home setting and has been adapted to address the needs of low income mothers participating in home visitation. 64 depressed mothers recruited from a home visitation program and who had completed IH-CBT were compared to 241 mothers from the same setting who met identical screening criteria at enrollment but did not receive the treatment. In addition, pre- and post-treatment measures of depression and related clinical features were contrasted in the 64 mothers receiving IH-CBT. There was a significantly greater reduction in depressive symptoms in the IH-CBT group relative to their counterparts who did not receive the treatment. Results from pre-post comparisons showed that treated mothers had decreased diagnosis of major depression, lower reported stress, increased coping and social support, and increased positive views of motherhood at post-treatment. Findings suggest that IH-CBT is a promising approach to addressing maternal depression in the context of home visitation and warrants further study. Public health implications for home visiting programs are discussed.

  20. [Artificial nutrition in the home. 1995 yearly report. NADYA-SENPE Group (Natiional Registry of Patient-Spanish Society for Parnteral and Enterlal Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Candela, C; de Cos, A I; Iglesias, C; Carbonell, M D; Camarero, E; Celador, A; Celaya, S; Chamorro, J; Cortezón, A; Ferrón, F; García Luna, P P; Gil Canalda, I; Gómez Enterría, P; González Huix, F; León, M; Martí Bomarti, E; Ordóñez, J; Pavón, P; Pereira, J L; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Segura, M; Vázquez, C

    1998-01-01

    By means of a simplified questionnaire, the NADYA group has gathered and analyzed data with regard to the age, sex, diagnosis, access route, duration, form of administration, complications, and quality of life, in 812 patients (62% male; 37% female) with At Home Enteral Nutrition (AHEN), and 19 patients (42% male; 57% female) with At Home Parenteral Nutrition (AHPN) corresponding the National Registry of 1995. The most frequent indication of AHEN was a neoplasm (41%), followed by neurological alterations (33%). The most common access route is the NGT (37%) followed by oral administration in 37%, PEG in 13% and surgical ostomics in 8%. The mean treatment time is 8 months. The index of complications/patient-year is 0.50 (gasterointestinal 0.17, and mechanical alterations 0.9). At the end of the study, 63% of the patients continued to receive AHEN, showing a mortality rate of 70%. The majority of the patients undergoing treatment presented a sever social disability (20%) or were bed ridden (18%). The most common indications for the AHPN are: radical enteritis (26%), Crohn's disease (21%), and mesenteric ischemia (16%). AIDS, motility alterations, and neoplasic diseases are scantly represented (10%). Tunneled catheters are used in 58% of the cases, and Port-a-Cath in 31%). The mean duration for the treatment was 7.9 months. An index of 0.47 hospitalization/patient-year was seen in relation to the nutritional treatment (mainly due to catheter septicemia). A mortality of 16% is noted, and 21% show a recovery of the oral route. 42% of the patients did not present an assessable social disability.

  1. Group task-specific circuit training for patients discharged home after stroke may be as effective as individualised physiotherapy in improving mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Does task oriented circuit training improve mobility in patients with stroke compared with individualised physiotherapy? Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation and blinded outcome assessment. Nine outpatient rehabilitation centres in the Netherlands. Patients with a stroke who had been discharged home and who could walk 10 m without assistance were included. Cognitive deficits and inability to communicate were key exclusion criteria. Randomisation of 250 participants allocated 126 to task oriented circuit training and 124 to individualised physiotherapy. The task oriented circuit training group trained for 90 min twice-weekly for 12 weeks supervised by physiotherapists and sports trainers as they completed 8 mobility-related stations in groups of 2 to 8 participants. Individualised outpatient physiotherapy was designed to improve balance, physical conditioning, and walking. The primary outcome was the mobility domain of the stroke impact scale measured at 12 weeks and 24 weeks. The domain includes 9 questions about a patient's perceived mobility competence and is scored from 0 to 100 with higher scores indicating better mobility. Secondary outcome measures included other domains of the stroke impact scale, the Nottingham extended ADL scale, the falls efficacy scale, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, comfortable walking speed, 6-minute walk distance, and a stairs test. 242 participants completed the study. There were no differences in the mobility domain of the stroke impact scale between the groups at 12 weeks (mean difference (MD) -0.05 units, 95% CI -1.4 to 1.3 units) or 24 weeks (MD -0.6, 95% CI -1.8 to 0.5). Comfortable walking speed (MD 0.09 m/s, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.13), 6-minute walk distance (MD 20 m, 95% CI 35.3 to 34.7), and stairs test (MD -1.6s, 95% CI -2.9 to -0.3) improved a little more in the circuit training group than the control group at 12 weeks. The memory and thinking domain of the stroke impact scale (MD -1.6 units, 95% CI

  2. Paleomagnetic Results On Clastic Turbidite Systems In Compressional Settings: Example From The Eocene Hecho Group (southern Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oms, O.; Dinarès-Turell, J.; Remacha, E.

    The Hecho group clastic turbidites were deposited in the southpyrenean foreland basin during the Paleocene and Eocene. These turbidites have provided well-known strati- graphic and facies models, and can be considered as one of the most studied ancient turbidite models of the world. This is because of the quality and preservation of the sedimentary record (basin-wide lateral continuity of rock-bodies, physical correlation linking deep-sea with platform strata, clear interaction with tectonic structures etc.) However, the Hecho group has not been a target for paleomagnetic studies despite the overwhelming sedimentological knowledge (in fact, sediments from such sedimento- logical and tectonic settings have been largely overlooked in the magnetostratigraphic literature). Here we present the results from a 2200 m-thick section mostly located in the Aragón valley north of the Jaca village (Huesca province). Planktic forams and calcareous nannoplankton data place the section in the middle Eocene. The lower and middle part of the section is representative of the pure flysch stage of the basin evo- lution (in the appenninic sense) and is build up by deep clastic depositional systems including carbonate megabreccias. The upper part of the section involves the transi- tion to a molasse stage by the occurrence of channelized turbidites (known as Rapitán system) that further up evolve to prodelta and platform deposits (Larrés slope marls and Sabiñánigo sandstone formations, respectively). The paleomagnetic investigation is based on the study of about 280 samples from 80 sampling sites, including mea- surements of remanence, anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and rock magnetic experiments. Our data shows that magnetization is carried out mainly by iron sulphides that define a section dominated by reversed polarities although normal polarity zones are found. Considering the biostratigraphic constraints we make a cor- relation to the standard polarity scale

  3. Structure and depositional processes of a gravelly tsunami deposit in a shallow marine setting: Lower Cretaceous Miyako Group, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, S.; Masuda, F.; Tagomori, S.; Matsumoto, D.

    2006-06-01

    This study reports a newly discovered gravelly tsunami deposit from the Lower Cretaceous Miyako Group, Japan. The deposit was formed in an open shallow marine setting. The event deposit erosionally overlies shoreface deposits and shows marked lateral facies change. At the basin margin, the deposit is composed mainly of amalgamated HCS sandstones with liquefaction structures, overlain by finer sediments that contain many plant fragments or micas. Conglomerates accompanying the HCS sandstones contain molluscan fossils and many coral clasts. In the basin center, the event deposit is made up mainly of conglomerates and lenticular sandstone beds, and passes upwards into alternating sandstones and siltstones. A condensed organic debris layer is intercalated within the alternating section. Conglomerates contain abundant beach gravel, and also contain beachrock, coral blocks, and boulders. Bivalve fossils are well preserved despite their occurrence in grain-supported conglomerates. The event deposit is divided into sub-layers bounded by internal scours that are wavy and intersect. Each sub-layer consists of a conglomerate grading into a sandstone layer. Imbrications just above the scours in sub-layers show seawards paleocurrents; however, imbrications just beneath the sandstone horizons in the same sub-layers feature landward paleocurrents. Respective sub-layers in the tsunami deposit were formed by substrate erosion due to backwash flow, gravel deposition, reworking by flood flow, and sand deposition during the stagnant water period. The overall upward-fining trend reflects decline of the tsunami event. Development of the gravelly deposit in the central part of the basin and lateral facies change may be attributed to hydrodynamic response of the tsunami pulse to local bathymetry and geography.

  4. SET DOMAIN GROUP701 encodes a H3K4-methytransferase and regulates multiple key processes of rice plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kunpeng; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2017-07-01

    Chromatin-based epigenetic information plays an important role in developmental gene regulation, in response to environment, and in natural variation of gene expression levels. Histone H3 lysine 4 di/trimethylation (H3K4me2/3) is abundant in euchromatin and is generally associated with transcriptional activation. Strikingly, however, enzymes catalyzing H3K4me2/3 remain poorly characterized in crops so far. Here, we investigated the function of the rice SET DOMAIN GROUP 701 (SDG701) gene by molecular and biochemical characterization of the gene product, and by studying effects of its loss or gain of function on plant growth and development. We demonstrated that SDG701 encodes a methytransferase specifically catalyzing H3K4 methylation. Overexpression and knockdown experiments showed that SDG701 is crucial for proper sporophytic plant development as well as for gametophytic transmission that directly impacts rice grain production. In-depth analysis of plant flowering time revealed that SDG701 promotes rice flowering under either long-day or short-day photoperiods. Consistently, the SDG701 protein was found to bind chromatin to promote H3K4me3 and to enhance expression of the rice Hd3a and RFT1 florigens. Collectively, our results establish SDG701 as a major rice H3K4-specific methyltransferase and provide important insights into function of H3K4me3 deposition in transcription activation of florigens in promoting plant flowering. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Standard Setting in a Small Scale OSCE: A Comparison of the Modified Borderline-Group Method and the Borderline Regression Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Timothy J.; Humphrey-Murto, Susan M.; Norman, Geoffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    When setting standards, administrators of small-scale OSCEs often face several challenges, including a lack of resources, a lack of available expertise in statistics, and difficulty in recruiting judges. The Modified Borderline-Group Method is a standard setting procedure that compensates for these challenges by using physician examiners and is…

  6. Homing oneself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ida Wentzel

    2009-01-01

    expands on the notion that home indicates more than a house, but also responds to the overuse of the concept home. The aim of this article is to examine how home is done, stretched between everyday life, practices, dreams, loss and cultural ideas of home. My intention is not to remove home......, but to revitalize it to prevent it from turning into a pell-mell or a zombie (Beck 1999). This is important because we are moving away from the hegemonic idea of one home to the tactics of feeling at home, even in more mobile ways. The study is cross-disciplinary, drawing on cultural phenomenology, the history...

  7. Creating a new home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Housing research is increasingly focusing on how different groups of residents use their dwelling and transform it into a home. In this article, we look at the homes of immigrants in Danish social housing. The article is based on qualitative interviews with Somali, Iraqi and Turkish immigrants, a...

  8. The use of full-setting non-invasive ventilation in the home care of people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-motor neuron disease with end-stage respiratory muscle failure: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Vito Eduardo L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Little has been written about the use of non-invasive ventilation in the home care of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-motor neuron disease patients with end-stage respiratory muscle failure. Nocturnal use of non-invasive ventilation has been reported to improve daytime blood gases but continuous non-invasive ventilation dependence has not been studied in this regard. There continues to be great variation by country, economics, physician interest and experience, local concepts of palliation, hospice requirements, and resources available for home care. We report a case series of home-based amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-motor neuron disease patients who refused tracheostomy and advanced non-invasive ventilation to full-setting, while maintaining normal alveolar ventilation and oxygenation in the course of the disease. Since this topic has been presented in only one center in the United States and nowhere else, it is appropriate to demonstrate that this can be done in other countries as well. Case presentation We present here the cases of three Caucasian patients (a 51-year-old Caucasian man, a 45-year-old Caucasian woman and a 57-year-old Caucasian woman with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who developed continuous non-invasive ventilation dependence for 15 to 27 months without major complications and were able to maintain normal CO2 and pulse oxyhemoglobin saturation despite a non-measurable vital capacity. All patients were wheelchair-dependent and receiving riluzole 50 mg twice a day. Patient one developed mild-to-moderate bulbar-innervated muscle weakness. He refused tracheostomy but accepted percutaneous gastrostomy. Patient two had two lung infections, acute bronchitis and pneumonia, which were treated with antibiotics and cough assistance at home. Patient three had three chest infections (bronchitis and pneumonias and asthmatic episodes treated with antibiotics, bronchodilators and cough assistance at home. All patients had

  9. Home range and travels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    . Peromyscus generally used and maintained several or many different home sites and refuges in various parts of their home ranges, and frequently shifted about so that their principal activities centered on different sets of holes at different times. Once established, many Peromyscus remained in the same general area for a long time, perhaps for the duration of their lives. Extent of their travels in different directions and intensity of use of different portions of their home ranges varied within a general area in response to habitat changes, loss of neighbors, or other factors. Various authors have obtained both direct and indirect evidence of territoriality, in some degree, among certain species of Peromyscus. Young mice dispersed from their birth sites to establish home ranges of their own. Adults also sometimes left their home areas; some re-established elsewhere; others returned after exploratory travels. Most populations contained a certain proportion of transients; these may have been wanderers or individuals exploring out from established home ranges or seeking new ones. When areas were depopulated by removal trapping, other Peromyscus invaded. Invasion rates generally followed seasonal trends of reproduction and population density. Peromyscus removed from their home areas and released elsewhere returned home from various distances, but fewer returned from greater distances than from nearby; speed of return increased with successive trials. The consensus from present evidence is that ho-ming is made possible by a combination of random wandering and familiarity with a larger area than the day-to-day range. Records of juvenile wanderings during the dispersal phase and of adult explorations very nearly encompassed the distances over which any substantial amount of successful homing occurred. Methods of measuring sizes of home ranges and the limitations of these measurements were discussed in brief synopsis. It was co

  10. Transcript-based redefinition of grouped oligonucleotide probe sets using AceView: High-resolution annotation for microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cam Margaret C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracting biological information from high-density Affymetrix arrays is a multi-step process that begins with the accurate annotation of microarray probes. Shortfalls in the original Affymetrix probe annotation have been described; however, few studies have provided rigorous solutions for routine data analysis. Results Using AceView, a comprehensive human transcript database, we have reannotated the probes by matching them to RNA transcripts instead of genes. Based on this transcript-level annotation, a new probe set definition was created in which every probe in a probe set maps to a common set of AceView gene transcripts. In addition, using artificial data sets we identified that a minimal probe set size of 4 is necessary for reliable statistical summarization. We further demonstrate that applying the new probe set definition can detect specific transcript variants contributing to differential expression and it also improves cross-platform concordance. Conclusion We conclude that our transcript-level reannotation and redefinition of probe sets complement the original Affymetrix design. Redefinitions introduce probe sets whose sizes may not support reliable statistical summarization; therefore, we advocate using our transcript-level mapping redefinition in a secondary analysis step rather than as a replacement. Knowing which specific transcripts are differentially expressed is important to properly design probe/primer pairs for validation purposes. For convenience, we have created custom chip-description-files (CDFs and annotation files for our new probe set definitions that are compatible with Bioconductor, Affymetrix Expression Console or third party software.

  11. "Parents Don't Want Their Children to Speak Their Home Language": How Do Educators Negotiate Partnerships with Chinese Parents Regarding Their Children's Use of Home Language and English in Early Childhood Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangbo; Torr, Jane; Whiteman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated five Australian early childhood educators' negotiation of the complex terrain of working in partnership with Chinese parents regarding their children's language usage in early childhood settings. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken to explore educators' views on children's language usage in early childhood settings,…

  12. Effect of family style mealtimes on quality of life, physical performance, and body weight of nursing home residents: cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of family style mealtimes on quality of life, physical performance, and body weight of nursing home residents without dementia. Design Cluster randomised trial. Setting Five Dutch nursing homes. Participants 178 residents (mean age 77 years). Two wards in each home were randomised to intervention (95 participants) or control groups (83). Intervention During six months the intervention group took their meals family style and the control group received the usual i...

  13. Early discharge hospital at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Iliffe, Steve; Doll, Helen A; Broad, Joanna; Gladman, John; Langhorne, Peter; Richards, Suzanne H; Shepperd, Sasha

    2017-06-26

    Early discharge hospital at home is a service that provides active treatment by healthcare professionals in the patient's home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital inpatient care. This is an update of a Cochrane review. To determine the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with early discharge hospital at home compared with inpatient hospital care. We searched the following databases to 9 January 2017: the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and EconLit. We searched clinical trials registries. Randomised trials comparing early discharge hospital at home with acute hospital inpatient care for adults. We excluded obstetric, paediatric and mental health hospital at home schemes.   DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We followed the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and EPOC. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the body of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 32 trials (N = 4746), six of them new for this update, mainly conducted in high-income countries. We judged most of the studies to have a low or unclear risk of bias. The intervention was delivered by hospital outreach services (17 trials), community-based services (11 trials), and was co-ordinated by a hospital-based stroke team or physician in conjunction with community-based services in four trials.Studies recruiting people recovering from strokeEarly discharge hospital at home probably makes little or no difference to mortality at three to six months (risk ratio (RR) 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 1.48, N = 1114, 11 trials, moderate-certainty evidence) and may make little or no difference to the risk of hospital readmission (RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.66, N = 345, 5 trials, low-certainty evidence). Hospital at home may lower the risk of living in institutional setting at six months (RR 0.63, 96% CI

  14. The effects of home computer access and social capital on mathematics and science achievement among Asian-American high school students in the NELS:88 data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Mark Declan

    The purpose of this researcher was to examine specific environmental, educational, and demographic factors and their influence on mathematics and science achievement. In particular, the researcher ascertained the interconnections of home computer access and social capital, with Asian American students and the effect on mathematics and science achievement. Coleman's theory on social capital and parental influence was used as a basis for the analysis of data. Subjects for this study were the base year students from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) and the subsequent follow-up survey data in 1990, 1992, and 1994. The approximate sample size for this study is 640 ethnic Asians from the NELS:88 database. The analysis was a longitudinal study based on the Student and Parent Base Year responses and the Second Follow-up survey of 1992, when the subjects were in 12th grade. Achievement test results from the NELS:88 data were used to measure achievement in mathematics and science. The NELS:88 test battery was developed to measure both individual status and a student's growth in a number of achievement areas. The subject's responses were analyzed by principal components factor analysis, weights, effect sizes, hierarchial regression analysis, and PLSPath Analysis. The results of this study were that prior ability in mathematics and science is a major influence in the student's educational achievement. Findings from the study support the view that home computer access has a negative direct effect on mathematics and science achievement for both Asian American males and females. None of the social capital factors in the study had either a negative or positive direct effect on mathematics and science achievement although some indirect effects were found. Suggestions were made toward increasing parental involvement in their children's academic endeavors. Computer access in the home should be considered related to television viewing and should be closely

  15. Decision-Making Models with Sets of Strategies for Applications to Individuals and Groups in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Wanda E.

    Three decision-making models that have applications for college presidents and administrators are reviewed. While both individual and group decision-making are addressed, emphasis is placed on the importance of group decisions on institutional policy planning. The model of Edmund M. Burke (1979) presents specific decision-making strategies in…

  16. Community and Home-Based Care HIV Service Delivery Model in the Context of Paediatric HIV Management and Contributing to Health Systems Strengthening in a Resource-Limited Setting (Uganda): Operational Research

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is about the Tukula Fenna Project (TFP) that was set up at the Home Care Department of St. Raphael of St Francis Hospital (Nsambya Hospital) in Kampala, Uganda. In 2003, Associazione Casa Accoglienza alla vita “Padre Angelo” (ACAVPA) or “HOUSE FOR LIFE, Father Angelo” and other Italian partners; in particular, PENTA Foundation and University of Padova, Department of paediatrics collectively signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Nsambya Hospital. The aim of the MoU was t...

  17. [Home care in Sapporo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Kazuo

    2003-12-01

    We established a clinic specialized in home care in Sapporo in July 2001. In these 2 years we have provided medical home care service to 160 patients, and 97 are still receiving regular service. At first we accepted any patients living within 16 km from the clinic. However, bad traffic conditions in winter made it difficult to visit patients living in districts far away from the clinic. Therefore, we planned a network of home care physicians in Sapporo. Now 12 home care physicians hold monthly meetings. In Sapporo, meetings of home care related workers are organized in each ward, as suggested by the Sapporo Medical Association. There is a relatively good supply of home care related services and resources, including availability of an important number of visiting nurses. Patients being taken care of at home who present an acute exacerbation of symptoms are relatively easily accepted by acute hospitals. But those who have difficulties in continuing home care due to a sudden change in family conditions are not easily accepted by nursing hospitals. Recently, the number of group homes and lodging houses for elderly persons has markedly increased in Sapporo. It might have some problems in medical support in the near future.

  18. El soporte nutricional en el ámbito de la hospitalización a domicilio Nutritional support in the home-based hospitalization setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chicharro

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available La Hospitalización a Domicilio (HAD es una opción asistencial que posibilita proporcionar cuidados propios de un hospital en el domicilio del paciente. El soporte nutricional (SN -enteral por sonda o parenteral- suele indicarse en pacientes de edad avanzada y/o severamente discapacitados por lo que la nutrición artificial cobra gran interés en la atención domiciliaria. Objetivos: Analizar las características de los pacientes, atendidos en el domicilio, por cuestiones específicas del SN que reciben. Material y métodos: Estudio descriptivo, observacional y retrospectivo de los pacientes atendidos por la Unidad de Soporte Nutricional (SN, en el ámbito de la HAD, desde el 1 de Septiembre del 2006 hasta el 31 de Agosto del 2007. Resultados: En el domicilio del paciente el procedimiento realizado fue: recambio de sonda de ostomia en 158 ocasiones; modificación de la pauta de nutrición enteral (NE o nutrición parenteral (NP en 53 casos; adiestramiento de la técnica de nutrición artificial en 14 casos. Se realizaron 39 visitas urgentes por complicaciones -fundamentalmente por infección o incontinencia del estoma y por obstrucción de la sonda-. Sólo en 3 pacientes (7,7% la asistencia domiciliaria indicó el traslado del paciente al Servicio de Urgencias. Conclusión: En nuestro centro, la infraestructura de la HAD ha permitido dar respuesta a las necesidades de los pacientes que reciben SN domiciliario en nuestra área de influencia.The Hospital at Home (HAD is a choice of care that enables own care in a hospital at home patient. Moreover, the nutritional support (NS -enteral or parenteral nutrition- is usually indicated in patients with serious underlying disease, and/or frequently remain severely disabled. Aims: To analyze the characteristics of the patients, attended at home for specific questions of the NS that receive. Material and methods: descriptive and retrospective study of the patients attended by the Nutritional Support Unit

  19. Home hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agar, John W; Perkins, Anthony; Heaf, James G

    2015-01-01

    We describe the infrastructure that is necessary for hemodialysis in the home focusing on physical requirements, the organization of plumbing and water, and the key features that should guide the selection of machines that are suitable for home use....

  20. Population and forensic data for three sets of forensic genetic markers in four ethnic groups from Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lena; Farzad, Maryam Sharafi; Børsting, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    A total of 255 individuals (Persians, Lurs, Kurds and Azeris) from Iran were typed for three sets of forensic genetic markers with the NGM SElect™, DIPplex(®) and Argus X-12 kits. Statistically significant deviations (P≤0.002) from Hardy-Weinberg expectations were observed for the insertion...

  1. Implementation of Lifestyle Modification Program Focusing on Physical Activity and Dietary Habits in a Large Group, Community-Based Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoutenberg, Mark; Falcon, Ashley; Arheart, Kris; Stasi, Selina; Portacio, Francia; Stepanenko, Bryan; Lan, Mary L.; Castruccio-Prince, Catarina; Nackenson, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lifestyle modification programs improve several health-related behaviors, including physical activity (PA) and nutrition. However, few of these programs have been expanded to impact a large number of individuals in one setting at one time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a PA- and nutrition-based lifestyle…

  2. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed dramatically over the past several ... how accessible are they? How close is the nursing home to family members? How close ... much do basic services cost? What services are covered? What additional ...

  3. Positioning of Fifth Grade Students in Small-Group Settings: Naming Participation in Discussion-Based Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Ingrid S.

    2010-01-01

    Through the lens of Schegloff's (1996) Action Theory, this study examined the dynamics of four groups of fifth-grade students as they learned to talk about academic mathematical reasoning over the course of a school year using Freeze Frame Analysis (Leander & Rowe, 2006) to help map "talking spaces" and Critical Discourse Analysis to understand…

  4. The Effectiveness of Peer Taught Group Sessions of Physiotherapy Students within the Clinical Setting: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Dee; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether learning from peers, learning from a clinical educator, or being the peer teacher during clinical group sessions was more effective at enhancing student learning outcomes for different health conditions. A secondary aim was to determine which method students found more satisfactory. Physiotherapy students at…

  5. International neurocognitive normative study: neurocognitive comparison data in diverse resource-limited settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, S R; Marra, C M; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, T B; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S; Kumarasamy, N; la Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-08-01

    Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource-limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impedes research and clinical care. Here, we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At ten sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n = 240), India (n = 480), Malawi (n = 481), Peru (n = 239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n = 240), and Zimbabwe (n = 240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline and 770 at 6 months. Participants were enrolled in eight strata, gender (female and male), education (normative data needed to build infrastructure for future neurological and neurocognitive studies in diverse RLS. These normative data are a much-needed resource for both clinicians and researchers.

  6. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Kristina; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...... visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. OBJECTIVE: To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. METHODS: The study used...... participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care...

  7. Utility of the MMPI-2-RF (Restructured Form) Validity Scales in Detecting Malingering in a Criminal Forensic Setting: A Known-Groups Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellbom, Martin; Toomey, Joseph A.; Wygant, Dustin B.; Kucharski, L. Thomas; Duncan, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the utility of the recently released Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008) validity scales to detect feigned psychopathology in a criminal forensic setting. We used a known-groups design with the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms (SIRS;…

  8. Validation of the ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation from the perspective of patients with spinal cord injury using focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiachini, Beatrice; Cremascoli, Sonia; Escorpizo, Reuben; Pistarini, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation is an application of the ICF of the World Health Organization with the purpose of identifying problems and resources relevant for people in a vocational rehabilitation given a health condition. The objective of the study was to validate the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation from the perspective of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). The specific aims were to explore the aspects of functioning and health important to patients with SCI regarding return to work and to examine to what extent these aspects are represented by the current version of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation. Focus group interviews were conducted. The sampling of patients followed the maximum variation strategy. Sample size satisfied saturation criterion. The focus groups were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. The meaning condensation procedure was used for the data analysis. After qualitative data analysis, the resulting concepts were linked to ICF categories according to established linking rules. Twenty-four SCI patients participated in seven focus groups. Sixty-three ICF categories out of 90 ICF categories contained in the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation were reported by the patients. Forty-two additional categories that are not covered in the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation were found but adding the health condition-specific ICF Core Set for SCI in long-term context, only 11 categories were not covered. The existing version of the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation was confirmed almost entirely by the focus groups to explore the vocational situation of patients with SCI. Implications for Rehabilitation Validation of the ICF Core Set for Vocational Rehabilitation as a useful tool to facilitate social reintegration and rehabilitation of patients

  9. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  10. A low cost virtual reality system for home based rehabilitation of the arm following stroke: A randomised controlled feasibility trial

    OpenAIRE

    Standen, P.; Threapleton, K; Richardson, A; Connell, L; Brown, D.; Battersby, S; Platts, F; Burton, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of a home-based virtual reality system for rehabilitation of the arm following stroke. Design: Two group feasibility randomised controlled trial of intervention versus usual care. Setting: Patients’ homes. Participants: Patients aged 18 or over, with residual arm dysfunction following stroke and, no longer receiving any other intensive rehabilitation. Interventions: Eight weeks’ use of a low cost home-based virtu...

  11. Psychosocial stress but not exercise increases cortisol and reduces state anxiety levels in school classes - results from a stressor applicable in large group settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Mirko; Müller-Alcazar, Anett; Jäger, Anika; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Budde, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Both, psychosocial stress and exercise in the past have been used as stressors to elevate saliva cortisol and change state anxiety levels. In the present study, high-school students at the age of 14 were randomly assigned to three experimental groups: (1) an exercise group (n = 18), that was running 15 minutes at a medium intensity level of 65-75% HRmax, (2) a psychosocial stress group (n = 19), and (3) a control group (n = 18). The psychosocial stress was induced to the students by completing a standardized intelligence test under the assumption that their IQ scores would be made public in class. Results display that only psychosocial stress but not exercise was able to significantly increase cortisol levels but decreased cognitive state anxiety in adolescents. The psychosocial stress protocol applied here is proposed for use in future stress studies with children or adolescents in group settings, e.g., in school.

  12. Theories of behaviour change synthesised into a set of theoretical groupings: introducing a thematic series on the theoretical domains framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Jill J; O'Connor, Denise; Curran, Janet

    2012-04-24

    Behaviour change is key to increasing the uptake of evidence into healthcare practice. Designing behaviour-change interventions first requires problem analysis, ideally informed by theory. Yet the large number of partly overlapping theories of behaviour makes it difficult to select the most appropriate theory. The need for an overarching theoretical framework of behaviour change was addressed in research in which 128 explanatory constructs from 33 theories of behaviour were identified and grouped. The resulting Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) appears to be a helpful basis for investigating implementation problems. Research groups in several countries have conducted TDF-based studies. It seems timely to bring together the experience of these teams in a thematic series to demonstrate further applications and to report key developments. This overview article describes the TDF, provides a brief critique of the framework, and introduces this thematic series.In a brief review to assess the extent of TDF-based research, we identified 133 papers that cite the framework. Of these, 17 used the TDF as the basis for empirical studies to explore health professionals' behaviour. The identified papers provide evidence of the impact of the TDF on implementation research. Two major strengths of the framework are its theoretical coverage and its capacity to elicit beliefs that could signify key mediators of behaviour change. The TDF provides a useful conceptual basis for assessing implementation problems, designing interventions to enhance healthcare practice, and understanding behaviour-change processes. We discuss limitations and research challenges and introduce papers in this series.

  13. Manual Ability Classification System for Children With Cerebral Palsy in a School Setting and Its Relationship to Home Self-Care Activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, M. A.; van der Wilden, G. J.; Ketelaar, M.; Gorter, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Our aim in this study was to investigate the relationship between (a) the manual abilities of children with cerebral palsy (CP), assessed with the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) in a school rehabilitation setting, and (b) the children's performance of self-care activities at h

  14. The effect of Korean-group cognitive behavioural therapy among patients with panic disorder in clinic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y S; Lee, E J; Cho, Y

    2017-02-01

    by correcting these cognitive distortions by controlling negative thoughts and panic attacks. Aims This study verified whether group CBT is more effective than treatment as usual (TAU) in South Korean patients with panic disorder. Methods The study participants consisted of 76 panic disorder patients. Patients in the therapy condition attended sessions once a week for a total of 12 sessions in addition to drug treatment. Results In the therapy condition, there were significant decreases in panic-related bodily sensations and ranking and belief scores for catastrophic misinterpretation of external events. Discussion Group CBT, in comparison to TAU, decreases panic and agoraphobia symptom severity in South Korean patients with panic disorder. Our study provides evidence for the effectiveness of a panic disorder management programme that integrates group CBT and traditional pharmacotherapeutic treatment for patients with panic disorder. Implications for Practice The cognitive behavioural approach is needed to reduce panic and agoraphobia symptoms for hospitalized patients with panic disorder more than activity therapies, medications and supportive counselling by doctors and nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Grief and the Separation of Home and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    The division of labor, together with modern transport systems and certain cultural practices, enables the separation of home and work. This creates a setting for mourning very different from pre-urban societies. Three bereavement theories (reminder theory, dual process oscillation theory, and the importance of groups in the construction of…

  16. The EMCDDA/Pompidou Group treatment demand indicator protocol: a European core item set for treatment monitoring and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, R; Donmall, M; Hartnoll, R; Kokkevi, A; Ouwehand, A W; Stauffacher, M; Vicente, J

    1999-12-01

    Over the last decades inside and outside of Europe, treatment-based data have been used in epidemiological research on drugs and drug abuse. They offer information on hidden populations and allow to follow socially stigmatised behaviour. As this type of research can be done on rather low budgets, there are long-term projects run in many countries. Experts from the national systems in several EU member states have been working together to develop a common standard on the basis of the Pompidou Group (PG) Definitive Protocol. The items and basic definitions of the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA)/PG Treatment Demand Indicator Protocol are described, which plays an important role in the process of harmonisation of data collection for the EMCDDA. Implementation strategies are described, and future steps are discussed.

  17. Understanding potential uptake of a proposed mHealth program to support caregiver home management of childhood illness in a resource-poor setting: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Tirza Areli; Martin, Holly; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Frasso, Rosemary; Díaz Arroyo, Elsa Cecilia; Gozzer, Ernesto; Buttenheim, Alison M

    2017-01-01

    Extensive uptake of mobile phones offers an unprecedented opportunity to improve global healthcare delivery, especially among underserved populations. Mobile health (mHealth) has been increasingly recognized as a promising approach to addressing challenges in global maternal-child health and may play an important role in accelerating progress towards improved outcomes. However, more evidence guiding development of mHealth interventions is needed. The current study explores factors that may support or hinder adoption and use of a proposed mHealth intervention to improve caregiver home management of common childhood illnesses in order to shape program development. Elicitation interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 25 mothers recruited from a larger cluster-randomized survey sample in the Cono Norte region of Arequipa, Peru. Interview data were analyzed in Spanish to preserve important cultural nuances. Thematic analysis revealed potential facilitators of and barriers to uptake of the proposed mHealth program. Potential facilitators of caregiver participation include opportunity to engage in two-way communication with healthcare providers, development of instrumental and support knowledge to care for sick children, and healthcare challenges faced in a resource-poor community. Potential barriers include preference for in-person healthcare visits, program cost, text messaging abilities, and concern around program legitimacy. This study underscores the potential for mHealth to improve global healthcare delivery in the area of maternal-child health. It demonstrates that mHealth interventions can meet the needs of vulnerable populations by offering novel approaches to promoting evidence-based care. This in-depth understanding of factors that may influence participation and use of this proposed mHealth program will help shape development of the intervention in this community.

  18. Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggering an emergency response or checkup phone call. Healthcare professionals are finding that portable or mobile testing technology (home diagnostics), including x-rays and electrocardiograms (ECGs), ...

  19. Development of the fast reactor group constant set JFS-3-J3.2R based on the JENDL-3.2

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, G

    2002-01-01

    It is reported that the fast reactor group constant set JFS-3-J3.2 based on the newest evaluated nuclear data library JENDL3.2 has a serious error in the process of applying the weighting function. As the error affects greatly nuclear characteristics, and a corrected version of the reactor constant set, JFS-3-J3.2R, was developed, as well as lumped FP cross sections. The use of JFS-3-J3.2R improves the results of analyses especially on sample Doppler reactivity and reaction rate in the blanket region in comparison with those obtained using the JFS-3-J3.2.

  20. Short-term operational evaluation of a group-parenting program for Japanese mothers with poor psychological status: adopting a Canadian program into the Asian public service setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Aya; Yabe, Junko; Sasaki, Hitomi; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-07-01

    Although parenting practices differ across various sociocultural settings, scientific research on parenting intervention in Asia is scarce. We adopted a Canadian multilanguage group-based parenting program (Nobody's Perfect) into the Japanese public health service setting and evaluated its impact. Our program was feasible as a public service; was well-accepted among the participants with low psychological status, many of whom were first-time mothers; and had a potential positive impact on the mood of mothers and the self-evaluation of their abilities in society. Our results may facilitate and provide direction for similar research in Asia.

  1. The contribution of gender-role orientation, work factors and home stressors to psychological well-being and sickness absence in male- and female-dominated occupational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Olga; Steptoe, Andrew

    2002-02-01

    The associations of work stress, types of work and gender-role orientation with psychological well-being and sickness absence were investigated in a questionnaire survey of 588 male and female nurses and 387 male and female accountants. We hypothesised that health might be impaired among women working in the male-dominated occupation (accountancy), and men in the female-dominated occupation (nursing), but that effects might be moderated by job strain (perceptions of high demand and low control), work and home hassles, and traditional male (instrumentality) and female (expressivity) psychological characteristics. Responses were analysed from 172 female and 61 male nurses, and from 53 female and 81 male commercial accountants. Female accountants were more likely than other groups to have high anxiety scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales, while male nurses had the highest rates of sickness absence. Male nurses and female accountants also reported more work-related hassles than did female nurses and male accountants. Men and women in the same occupation did not differ in job strain or job social support, but nurses reported greater job strain than accountants, due to higher ratings of demands and lower skill utilisation. After adjusting for age, sex, occupation, paid work hours and a measure of social desirability bias, risk of elevated anxiety was independently associated with higher job strain, lower job social support, more work hassles, more domestic responsibility, lower instrumentality and higher expressivity. The association between sex and anxiety was no longer significant after instrumentality had been entered into the regression model. Sickness absence of more than three days over the past 12 months was independently associated with higher job strain, more work hassles, lower instrumentality and higher expressivity. The results suggest that when men and women occupy jobs in which they are in the cultural and numerical minority, there may be

  2. Children’s sugar-sweetened beverages consumption: associations with family and home-related factors, differences within ethnic groups explored

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.J. Kruitwagen - van de Gaar (Vivian); A. van Grieken (Amy); W. Jansen (Wilma); H. Raat (Hein)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) may contribute to the development of overweight among children. The present study aimed to evaluate associations between family and home-related factors and children’s SSB consumption. We explored associations within

  3. Regional depositional setting and pore network systems of the El Garia Formation (Metlaoui Group, Lower Eocene), offshore Tunisia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loucks, R.G.; Brown, A.A. [ARCO Exploration and Production Technology, Plano, TX (United States); Moody, R.T.J. [Kingston University (United Kingdom); Bellis, J.K. [ARCO International Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The Metlaoui Group was deposited on a broad ramp that deepened to the north-east into the Tethyan Sea. The ramp contains a series of broad facies belts. The inner-ramp facies belt is composed of three facies tracts: (1) Faid sabkha (most landward) characterised by skeletal-poor dolomudstones and wackestones and interbedded evaporites. (2) ain Merhotta restricted shallow-lagoon facies composed of sparse skeletal wackestones, packstones, and cross-bedded gastropod grainstones; (3) updip El Garia high-energy shoal complex (most seaward) composed of red algal-disocyclinid grainstones and packstones which are locally cross-bedded. Reservoir quality is variable, with most lime packstones and grainstones having moderate to high porosity (related to intraparticle and microporosity), but only poor to fair permeability (generally less than 10 mD). The higher-quality reservoirs have preserved interparticle porosity with permeabilities ranging from tens of millidarcys to several darcys. Permeable nummulitic packstones and grainstones are favoured by the following factors; (1) low abundance of lime mud, (2) low abundance of nummulithoclastic debris, (3) low abundance of echinoderm fragments, (4) moderate sorting, (5) minor precipitation of late burial cements, (6) dolomitization. (author)

  4. Intensive intervention for children and adolescents with autism in a community setting in Italy: a single-group longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Marco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have shown favourable results with intensive behavioural treatment for children with autism: evidence has emerged that treatment can be successfully implemented in a community setting and in adolescent participants. The aim of this study was to describe the 2-year adaptive functioning outcome of children and adolescents with autism treated intensively within the context of special autism centres, as well as to evaluate family satisfaction with the activity of the centres. Methods Sixty participants with autism (20 females and 40 males, aged between 4 and 18 years attending the semi-residential rehabilitation centres for autism located in the Abruzzo region (Central Italy were followed up and their adaptive functioning was evaluated both at baseline and after one and two years using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS. Parents' satisfaction with the service was evaluated using the Orbetello Satisfaction Scale for Children and Adolescent Mental Health. Results The increase in VABS scores was significant on several domains in the different gender and age categories. It is worth noting that male children had improved a great deal (roughly, an effect size >0.20 in the domains of communication, daily living and motor skills (effect sizes 0.34, 0.45 and 0.27 respectively whereas in male adolescents, a notable increase in VABS scores was recorded in the domain of socialization only (effect size 0.23. On the other hand, adaptive behaviour in female children increased in the domains of socialization and motor skills (effect sizes 0.27 and 0.42 respectively whereas in female adolescents, good results were achieved in the domains of daily living, socialization and motor skills (effect sizes 0.22, 0.26 and 0.20 respectively. The level of satisfaction of users of the service over time was found to be substantial, even when they had recently started the program. Conclusions Our results support the implementation of

  5. Intensive intervention for children and adolescents with autism in a community setting in Italy: a single-group longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Marco; Cerbo, Renato; Masedu, Francesco; De Caris, Marco; Sorge, Germana

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies have shown favourable results with intensive behavioural treatment for children with autism: evidence has emerged that treatment can be successfully implemented in a community setting and in adolescent participants. The aim of this study was to describe the 2-year adaptive functioning outcome of children and adolescents with autism treated intensively within the context of special autism centres, as well as to evaluate family satisfaction with the activity of the centres. Sixty participants with autism (20 females and 40 males, aged between 4 and 18 years) attending the semi-residential rehabilitation centres for autism located in the Abruzzo region (Central Italy) were followed up and their adaptive functioning was evaluated both at baseline and after one and two years using the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS). Parents' satisfaction with the service was evaluated using the Orbetello Satisfaction Scale for Children and Adolescent Mental Health. The increase in VABS scores was significant on several domains in the different gender and age categories. It is worth noting that male children had improved a great deal (roughly, an effect size >0.20) in the domains of communication, daily living and motor skills (effect sizes 0.34, 0.45 and 0.27 respectively) whereas in male adolescents, a notable increase in VABS scores was recorded in the domain of socialization only (effect size 0.23). On the other hand, adaptive behaviour in female children increased in the domains of socialization and motor skills (effect sizes 0.27 and 0.42 respectively) whereas in female adolescents, good results were achieved in the domains of daily living, socialization and motor skills (effect sizes 0.22, 0.26 and 0.20 respectively).The level of satisfaction of users of the service over time was found to be substantial, even when they had recently started the program. Our results support the implementation of special autism treatment community centres, based on a

  6. Implementing DDR in Settings of Ongoing Conflict: The Organization and Fragmentation of Armed Groups in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne Richards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is common for armed groups to splinter (or “fragment” during contexts of multi-party civil war, current guidance on Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR does not address the challenges that arise when recalcitrant fighters, unwilling to report to DDR, break ranks and form new armed groups. This Practice Note addresses this issue, drawing lessons from the multi-party context of the DRC and from the experiences of former members of three armed groups: the Rally for Congolese Democracy-Goma (RCD-Goma, the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP, and the DRC national army (FARDC. While the findings indicate that the fragmentation of armed groups may encourage desertion and subsequent participation in DDR, they also show that active armed groups may monitor DDR programs and track those who demobilize. Remobilization may follow, either as active armed groups target ex-combatants for forced re-recruitment or as ex-combatants remobilize in armed groups of their own choice. Given these dynamics, practitioners in settings of partial peace may find it useful to consider non-traditional methods of DDR such as the use of mobile patrols and mobile disarmament units. The temporary relocation of ex-combatants to safe areas free from armed groups, or to protected transitional assistance camps, may also help to minimize remobilization during the reintegration phase.

  7. Monte Carlo reference data sets for imaging research: Executive summary of the report of AAPM Research Committee Task Group 195.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Ali, Elsayed S M; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo; Boone, John M; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McMillan, Kyle L; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Rogers, D W O; Samei, Ehsan; Turner, Adam C

    2015-10-01

    The use of Monte Carlo simulations in diagnostic medical imaging research is widespread due to its flexibility and ability to estimate quantities that are challenging to measure empirically. However, any new Monte Carlo simulation code needs to be validated before it can be used reliably. The type and degree of validation required depends on the goals of the research project, but, typically, such validation involves either comparison of simulation results to physical measurements or to previously published results obtained with established Monte Carlo codes. The former is complicated due to nuances of experimental conditions and uncertainty, while the latter is challenging due to typical graphical presentation and lack of simulation details in previous publications. In addition, entering the field of Monte Carlo simulations in general involves a steep learning curve. It is not a simple task to learn how to program and interpret a Monte Carlo simulation, even when using one of the publicly available code packages. This Task Group report provides a common reference for benchmarking Monte Carlo simulations across a range of Monte Carlo codes and simulation scenarios. In the report, all simulation conditions are provided for six different Monte Carlo simulation cases that involve common x-ray based imaging research areas. The results obtained for the six cases using four publicly available Monte Carlo software packages are included in tabular form. In addition to a full description of all simulation conditions and results, a discussion and comparison of results among the Monte Carlo packages and the lessons learned during the compilation of these results are included. This abridged version of the report includes only an introductory description of the six cases and a brief example of the results of one of the cases. This work provides an investigator the necessary information to benchmark his/her Monte Carlo simulation software against the reference cases included here

  8. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  9. Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) versus Supportive Expressive Group Therapy (SET) for distressed breast cancer survivors: evaluating mindfulness and social support as mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Melanie P J; Tamagawa, Rie; Labelle, Laura E; Speca, Michael; Stephen, Joanne; Drysdale, Elaine; Sample, Sarah; Pickering, Barbara; Dirkse, Dale; Savage, Linette Lawlor; Carlson, Linda E

    2017-06-01

    Despite growing evidence in support of mindfulness as an underlying mechanism of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), it has been suggested that nonspecific therapeutic factors, such as the experience of social support, may contribute to the positive effects of MBIs. In the present study, we examined whether change in mindfulness and/or social support mediated the effect of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) compared to another active intervention (i.e. Supportive Expressive Group Therapy (SET)), on change in mood disturbance, stress symptoms and quality of life. A secondary analysis was conducted of a multi-site randomized clinical trial investigating the impacts of MBCR and SET on distressed breast cancer survivors (MINDSET). We applied the causal steps approach with bootstrapping to test mediation, using pre- and post-intervention questionnaire data of the participants who were randomised to MBCR (n = 69) or SET (n = 70). MBCR participants improved significantly more on mood disturbance, stress symptoms and social support, but not on quality of life or mindfulness, compared to SET participants. Increased social support partially mediated the impact of MBCR versus SET on mood disturbance and stress symptoms. Because no group differences on mindfulness and quality of life were observed, no mediation analyses were performed on these variables. Findings showed that increased social support was related to more improvement in mood and stress after MBCR compared to support groups, whereas changes in mindfulness were not. This suggests a more important role for social support in enhancing outcomes in MBCR than previously thought.

  10. Randomized clinical trial of yoga-based intervention in residents from elderly homes: Effects on cognitive function

    OpenAIRE

    Hariprasad, V. R.; Koparde, V.; Sivakumar, P. T.; Varambally, S.; Thirthalli, J.; Varghese, M; Basavaraddi, I. V.; B N Gangadhar

    2013-01-01

    Context: Elderly have increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia. Yoga therapy may be helpful in elderly to improve cognitive function. Aims: We examined the benefits of yoga-based intervention compared with waitlist control group on cognitive function in the residents of elderly homes. Settings and Design: Single blind controlled study with block randomization of elderly homes. Materials and Methods: Study sample included yoga group (n=62) and waitlist group (n=58). A total of 87 s...

  11. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  12. Home education: Constructions of choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth MORTON

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Families who choose to home educate generally do so due to dissatisfaction with schoolbased education. Common perceptions of home educators oscillate between images of the 'tree-hugging hippy' and the 'religious fanatic'. Whilst attempting to go beyond suchstereotypical dichotomies, this paper will examine three very different groupings of home educators and their varying constructions of childhood and the social world, demonstratingthe spectrum between home education as an expression of human rights and of fundamentalism. The first grouping construct home education as a 'natural' choice, often presented in political opposition to existing social structures. For the second grouping home education is predominantly a 'social' choice relating to the conscious transmission of various forms of capital. Finally there are 'last resort' home educators for whom home education is not perceived as a choice. Based on qualitative research, this paper will argue that, even where home education is constructed as natural, the social aspects and impacts of home education choices cannot be ignored.

  13. Mapping standards for home networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaa, G. van de; Hartog, F.T.H. den; Vries, H.J. de

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we apply a step-by-step approach for the identification of standards for home networking. We develop a classification and we use this classification to categorize sixty-four (sets of) standards. By developing this categorization, we have brought order to the chaos of home networking s

  14. The Influence of Setting on Findings Produced in Qualitative Health Research: A Comparison between Face-to-Face and Online Discussion Groups about HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guendalina Graffigna

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors focus their analysis in this article on online focus groups (FGs, in an attempt to describe how the setting shapes the conversational features of the discussion and influences data construction. Starting from a review of current dominant viewpoints, they compare face-to-face discussion groups with different formats of online FGs about AIDS, from a discourse analysis perspective. They conducted 2 face-to-face FGs, 2 chats, 2 forums, and 2 forums+plus+chat involving 64 participants aged 18 to 25 and living in Italy. Their findings seem not only to confirm the hypothesis of a general difference between a face-to-face discussion setting and an Internet-mediated one but also reveal differences among the forms of online FG, in terms of both the thematic articulation of discourse and the conversational and relational characteristics of group exchange, suggesting that exchanges on HIV/AIDS are characterized by the setting. This characterization seems to be important for situating the choice of tool, according to research objectives, and for better defining the technical aspects of the research project.

  15. I-PfoP3I: a novel nicking HNH homing endonuclease encoded in the group I intron of the DNA polymerase gene in Phormidium foveolarum phage Pf-WMP3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanglei Kong

    Full Text Available Homing endonucleases encoded in a group I self-splicing intron in a protein-coding gene in cyanophage genomes have not been reported, apart from some free-standing homing edonucleases. In this study, a nicking DNA endonuclease, I-PfoP3I, encoded in a group IA2 intron in the DNA polymerase gene of a T7-like cyanophage Pf-WMP3, which infects the freshwater cyanobacterium Phormidium foveolarum is described. The Pf-WMP3 intron splices efficiently in vivo and self-splices in vitro simultaneously during transcription. I-PfoP3I belongs to the HNH family with an unconventional C-terminal HNH motif. I-PfoP3I nicks the intron-minus Pf-WMP3 DNA polymerase gene more efficiently than the Pf-WMP4 DNA polymerase gene that lacks any intervening sequence in vitro, indicating the variable capacity of I-PfoP3I. I-PfoP3I cleaves 4 nt upstream of the intron insertion site on the coding strand of EXON 1 on both intron-minus Pf-WMP3 and Pf-WMP4 DNA polymerase genes. Using an in vitro cleavage assay and scanning deletion mutants of the intronless target site, the minimal recognition site was determined to be a 14 bp region downstream of the cut site. I-PfoP3I requires Mg(2+, Ca(2+ or Mn(2+ for nicking activity. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the intron and homing endonuclease gene elements might be inserted in Pf-WMP3 genome individually after differentiation from Pf-WMP4. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of a group I self-splicing intron encoding a functional homing endonuclease in a protein-coding gene in a cyanophage genome.

  16. Population and forensic data for three sets of forensic genetic markers in four ethnic groups from Iran: Persians, Lurs, Kurds and Azeris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, L; Farzad, M Sharafi; Børsting, C; Tomas, C; Pereira, V; Morling, N

    2015-07-01

    A total of 255 individuals (Persians, Lurs, Kurds and Azeris) from Iran were typed for three sets of forensic genetic markers with the NGM SElect™, DIPplex(®) and Argus X-12 kits. Statistically significant deviations (P≤0.002) from Hardy-Weinberg expectations were observed for the insertion-deletion markers HLD97 and HLD93 after Holm-Šidák correction. Statistically significant (Ppopulation structure when the individuals were grouped according to their ethnic group. The Iranian population grouped closely to populations living geographically near to Iran based on pairwise FST distances. The matching probabilities ranged from 1 in 3.2×10(7) males by using haplotype frequencies of four X-chromosomal haplogroups to 1 in 3.4×10(21) individuals for the 16 autosomal STRs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Indoor Particulate Matter Concentration, Water Boiling Time, and Fuel Use of Selected Alternative Cookstoves in a Home-Like Setting in Rural Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen D. Ojo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cookstoves are designed to improve biomass fuel combustion efficiency to reduce the amount of fuel used and lower emission of air pollutants. The Nepal Cookstove Trial (NCT studies effects of alternative cookstoves on family health. Our study measured indoor particulate matter concentration (PM2.5, boiling time, and fuel use of cookstoves during a water-boiling test in a house-like setting in rural Nepal. Study I was designed to select a stove to be used in the NCT; Study II evaluated stoves used in the NCT. In Study I, mean indoor PM2.5 using wood fuel was 4584 μg/m3, 1657 μg/m3, and 2414 μg/m3 for the traditional, alternative mud brick stove (AMBS-I and Envirofit G-series, respectively. The AMBS-I reduced PM2.5 concentration but increased boiling time compared to the traditional stove (p-values < 0.001. Unlike AMBS-I, Envirofit G-series did not significantly increase overall fuel consumption. In Phase II, the manufacturer altered Envirofit stove (MAES and Nepal Nutrition Intervention Project Sarlahi (NNIPS altered Envirofit stove (NAES, produced lower mean PM2.5, 1573 μg/m3 and 1341 μg/m3, respectively, relative to AMBS-II 3488 μg/m3 for wood tests. The liquid propane gas stove had the lowest mean PM2.5 concentrations, with measurements indistinguishable from background levels. Results from Study I and II showed significant reduction in PM2.5 for all alternative stoves in a controlled setting. In study I, the AMBS-I stove required more fuel than the traditional stove. In contrast, in study II, the MAES and NAES stoves required statistically less fuel than the AMBS-II. Reductions and increases in fuel use should be interpreted with caution because the composition of fuels was not standardized—an issue which may have implications for generalizability of other findings as well. Boiling times for alternative stoves in Study I were significantly longer than the traditional stove—a trade-off that may have implications for

  18. Indoor Particulate Matter Concentration, Water Boiling Time, and Fuel Use of Selected Alternative Cookstoves in a Home-Like Setting in Rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kristen D; Soneja, Sutyajeet I; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Khatry, Subarna K; LeClerq, Steven C; Checkley, William; Katz, Joanne; Breysse, Patrick N; Tielsch, James M

    2015-07-07

    Alternative cookstoves are designed to improve biomass fuel combustion efficiency to reduce the amount of fuel used and lower emission of air pollutants. The Nepal Cookstove Trial (NCT) studies effects of alternative cookstoves on family health. Our study measured indoor particulate matter concentration (PM2.5), boiling time, and fuel use of cookstoves during a water-boiling test in a house-like setting in rural Nepal. Study I was designed to select a stove to be used in the NCT; Study II evaluated stoves used in the NCT. In Study I, mean indoor PM2.5 using wood fuel was 4584 μg/m3, 1657 μg/m3, and 2414 μg/m3 for the traditional, alternative mud brick stove (AMBS-I) and Envirofit G-series, respectively. The AMBS-I reduced PM2.5 concentration but increased boiling time compared to the traditional stove (p-values Boiling times for alternative stoves in Study I were significantly longer than the traditional stove--a trade-off that may have implications for acceptability of the stoves among end users. These extended cooking times may increase cumulative exposure during cooking events where emission rates are lower; these differences must be carefully considered in the evaluation of alternative stove designs.

  19. Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved Using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Davis, Thomas; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Ricca, Jim; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    The Care Group approach, described in detail in a companion paper in this journal, uses volunteers to convey health promotion messages to their neighbors. This article summarizes the available evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach, drawing on articles published in the peer-reviewed literature as well as data from unpublished but publicly available project evaluations and summary analyses of these evaluations. When implemented by strong international NGOs with adequate funding, Care Groups have been remarkably effective in increasing population coverage of key child survival interventions. There is strong evidence that Care Groups can reduce childhood undernutrition and reduce the prevalence of diarrhea. Finally, evidence from multiple sources, comprising independent assessments of mortality impact, vital events collected by Care Group Volunteers themselves, and analyses using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST), that Care Groups are effective in reducing under-5 mortality. For example, the average decline in under-5 mortality, estimated using LiST, among 8 Care Group projects was 32%. In comparison, among 12 non-Care Group child survival projects, the under-5 mortality declined, on average, by an estimated 11%. Care Group projects cost in the range of US$3-$8 per beneficiary per year. The cost per life saved is in the range of $441-$3,773, and the cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted is in the range of $15-$126. The Care Group approach, when implemented as described, appears to be highly cost-effective based on internationally accepted criteria. Care Groups represent an important and promising innovative, low-cost approach to increasing the coverage of key child survival interventions in high-mortality, resource-constrained settings. Next steps include further specifying the adjustments needed in government health systems to successfully incorporate the Care Group approach, testing the feasibility of these adjustments and of the

  20. Culture change and nursing home quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; O'Malley, A James; Afendulis, Christopher C; Caudry, Daryl J; Elliot, Amy; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2014-02-01

    Culture change models are intended to improve the quality of life for nursing home residents, but the impact of these models on quality of care is unknown. We evaluated the impact of the implementation of nursing home culture change on the quality of care, as measured by staffing, health-related survey deficiencies, and Minimum Data Set (MDS) quality indicators. From the Pioneer Network, we have data on whether facilities were identified by experts as "culture change" providers in 2004 and 2009. Using administrative data, we employed a panel-based regression approach in which we compared pre-post quality outcomes in facilities adopting culture change between 2004 and 2009 against pre-post quality outcomes for a propensity score-matched comparison group of nonadopters. Nursing homes that were identified as culture change adopters exhibited a 14.6% decrease in health-related survey deficiency citations relative to comparable nonadopting homes, while experiencing no significant change in nurse staffing or various MDS quality indicators. This research represents the first large-scale longitudinal evaluation of the association of culture change and nursing home quality of care. Based on the survey deficiency results, nursing homes that were identified as culture change adopters were associated with better care although the surveyors were not blind to the nursing home's culture change efforts. This finding suggests culture change may have the potential to improve MDS-based quality outcomes, but this has not yet been observed.

  1. Location, Location, Location: Characteristics and Services of Long-Stay Home Care Recipients in Retirement Homes Compared to Others in Private Homes and Long-Term Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Jeffrey W; Sinn, Chi-Ling Joanna; Grinchenko, Galina; Blums, Jane; Peirce, Tom; Hirdes, John

    2017-02-01

    We examine recipients of publicly funded ongoing care in a single Ontario jurisdiction who reside in three different settings: long-stay home care patients in private homes and apartments, other patients in retirement homes and residents of long-term care homes, using interRAI assessment instruments. Among home care patients, those in retirement homes have higher proportions of dementia and moderate cognitive impairment, less supportive informal care systems as well as more personal care and nursing services above those provided by the public home care system, more frequent but shorter home support visits and lower than expected public home care expenditures. These lower expenditures may be because of efficiency of care delivery or by retirement homes providing some services otherwise provided by the public home care system. Although persons in each setting are mostly older adults with high degrees of frailty and medical complexity, long-term care home residents show distinctly higher needs. We estimate that 40% of retirement home residents are long-stay home care patients, and they comprise about one in six of this Community Care Access Centre's long-stay patients. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  2. An adaptation of family-based behavioral pediatric obesity treatment for a primary care setting: group health family wellness program pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Karin R; Lozano, Paula; Mohelnitzky, Amy; Rudnick, Sarah; Richards, Julie

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of family-based group pediatric obesity treatment in a primary care setting, to obtain an estimate of its effectiveness, and to describe participating parents' experiences of social support for healthy lifestyle changes. We adapted an evidence-based intervention to a group format and completed six 12- to 16-week groups over 3 years. We assessed program attendance and completion, changes in child and parent body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and changes in child quality of life in a single-arm before-and-after trial. Qualitative interviews explored social support for implementing healthy lifestyle changes. Thirty-eight parent-child pairs enrolled (28% of the 134 pairs invited). Of those, 24 (63%) completed the program and another 6 (16%) attended at least 4 sessions but did not complete the program. Children who completed the program achieved a mean change in BMI Z-scores (Z-BMI) of -0.1 (0.1) (p treatment of pediatric obesity is feasible and acceptable in a primary care setting. Change in child and parent BMI outcomes and child quality of life among completers were promising despite the pilot's low intensity. Parent experiences with lack of social support suggest possible ways to improve retention and adherence.

  3. Care Groups I: An Innovative Community-Based Strategy for Improving Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Henry; Morrow, Melanie; Borger, Sarah; Weiss, Jennifer; DeCoster, Mary; Davis, Thomas; Ernst, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    In view of the slow progress being made in reducing maternal and child mortality in many priority countries, new approaches are urgently needed that can be applied in settings with weak health systems and a scarcity of human resources for health. The Care Group approach uses facilitators, who are a lower-level cadre of paid workers, to work with groups of 12 or so volunteers (the Care Group), and each volunteer is responsible for 10-15 households. The volunteers share messages with the mothers of the households to promote important health behaviors and to use key health services. The Care Groups create a multiplying effect, reaching all households in a community at low cost. This article describes the Care Group approach in more detail, its history, and current NGO experience with implementing the approach across more than 28 countries. A companion article also published in this journal summarizes the evidence on the effectiveness of the Care Group approach. An estimated 1.3 million households—almost entirely in rural areas—have been reached using Care Groups, and at least 106,000 volunteers have been trained. The NGOs with experience implementing Care Groups have achieved high population coverage of key health interventions proven to reduce maternal and child deaths. Some of the essential criteria in applying the Care Group approach include: peer-to-peer health promotion (between mothers), selection of volunteers by mothers, limited workload for the volunteers, limited number of volunteers per Care Group, frequent contact between the volunteers and mothers, use of visual teaching tools and participatory behavior change methods, and regular supervision of volunteers. Incorporating Care Groups into ministries of health would help sustain the approach, which would require creating posts for facilitators as well as supervisors. Although not widely known about outside the NGO child survival and food security networks, the Care Group approach deserves broader

  4. [Falls in nursing homes and institutions: update by the Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures Working Group of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (GCOF-SEGG)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ramírez, Alfonso; Calvo Aguirre, Juan José; Lekuona Ancizar, Pilar; González Oliveras, Juan Luis; Marcellán Benavente, Teresa; Ruiz de Gordoa Armendia, Ana; Salvá Casanovas, Antoni; Alcalde Tirado, Pablo; González Alonso, Teresa; Padilla Clemente, Reyes; Clerencia Sierra, Mercedes; Ubis Diez, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The Workshop on Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures (GCOF) of The Spanish Geriatrics and Gerontology Society (SEGG) formed a committee in order to review the state of the art on the detection, risk factors and assessment tools for falls, and intervention protocols when falls occurs in nursing homes, long-term hospitals or medium-stay units. The different patient profiles are described in order to make a comprehensive approach to this heterogeneous topic and population, offering a risk classification and specific advice according to these categories. Copyright © 2011 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. One-to-one versus group setting for conducting computer-assisted TTO studies: findings from pilot studies in England and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Koonal K; Lloyd, Andrew; Oppe, Mark; Devlin, Nancy J

    2013-07-01

    We compare two settings for administering time trade-off (TTO) tasks in computer-assisted interviews (one-to-one, interviewer-led versus group, self-complete) by examining the quality of the data generated in pilot studies undertaken in England and the Netherlands. The two studies used near-identical methods, except that in England, data were collected in one-to-one interviews with substantial amounts of interviewer assistance, whereas in the Netherlands, the computer aid was used as a self-completion tool in group interviews with lesser amounts of interviewer assistance. In total, 801 members of the general public (403 in England; 398 in the Netherlands) each completed five TTO valuations of EQ-5D-5L health states. Respondents in the Netherlands study showed a greater tendency to give 'round number' values such as 0 and 1 and to complete tasks using a minimal number of iterative steps. They also showed a greater tendency to skip the animated instructions that preceded the first task and to take into account assumptions that they were specifically asked not to take into account. When faced with a pair of health states in which one state dominated the other, respondents in the Netherlands study were more likely than those in the England study to give a higher value to the dominant health state. On the basis of these comparisons, we conclude that the one-to-one, interviewer-led setting is superior to the group, self-complete setting in terms of the quality of data generated and that the former is more suitable than the latter for TTO studies being used to value EQ-5D-5L.

  6. Exploring Home Education in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher, Bozek

    2015-01-01

    Homeschooling is very unusual in Japan and therefore many Japanese people are not familiar with the idea at all. This paper presents the definition of homeschooling and some basic principles such as why parents decide to teach at home and what group of people homeschool the most. It also explores the advantages of teaching children at home instead of sending them to school.

  7. Understanding the role of gender in body image research settings: participant gender preferences for researchers and co-participants in interviews, focus groups and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Zali; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Drummond, Murray

    2013-09-01

    Participant gender preferences for body image researchers, interventionists and focus group and intervention co-participants have been largely ignored, despite recognition that such characteristics can influence the nature and quality of data collected and intervention effects. To address this, Australian women (n=505) and men (n=220) completed a questionnaire about their preferences for interviewers and focus group facilitators, for teachers delivering school-based interventions, and for co-participants in these settings. Women predominantly preferred female interviewers and teachers, and mixed-sex co-participants, but most had no preference for focus group facilitators. Body dissatisfied women were more likely to prefer female researchers and single-sex co-participants. Most men did not have specific preferences, however, body dissatisfied men were more likely to report a gender preference for interviewers and teachers. Professional capabilities, personal qualities and appearance were regarded as important researcher characteristics. These findings have important implications for body image research, particularly among high-risk groups.

  8. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. OBJECTIVE: To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. METHODS: The study used...... participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care...... with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when...

  9. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) Methodology: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.

    2011-11-01

    The test suite represents a set of cases applying the new Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) Methodology developed by NREL. (Judkoff et al. 2010a). The NREL team developed the test cases in consultation with the home retrofit industry (BESTEST-EX Working Group 2009), and adjusted the test specifications in accordance with information supplied by a participant with access to large utility bill datasets (Blasnik 2009).

  10. Effects of improved home heating on asthma in community dwelling children: randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Pierse, Nevil; Nicholls, Sarah; Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Viggers, Helen; Cunningham, Malcolm; Phipps, Robyn; Boulic, Mikael; Fjällström, Pär; Free, Sarah; Chapman, Ralph; Lloyd, Bob; Wickens, Kristin; Shields, David; Baker, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess whether non-polluting, more effective home heating (heat pump, wood pellet burner, flued gas) has a positive effect on the health of children with asthma. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Households in five communities in New Zealand. Participants 409 children aged 6-12 years with doctor diagnosed asthma. Interventions Installation of a non-polluting, more effective home heater before winter. The control group received a replacement heater at the end of the tria...

  11. Recent Development on Home Peritoneal Dialysis in Hainan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈裕盛

    2001-01-01

    Objective:In order to experience and contrast incidence rate of intection peritonitis. Exit-site infection,lunnitis, patients re cover one's works,still living survival and withdraw rate from CAPD in particular on home PD of Subtropical Zone of China. Method:134 cases patients PD with CRF were from January 1,1981 to February 1998. We used three kinds of device and dialysate to complete CAPD. 134 patients into three groups according to PD device and form. Group Ⅰ: Non o-set 74 cases. Pat to use bottled dialysate/bag dialysate infusion abdominal cavity made by general emulsion tube/or once emulsion tube for CAPD. Group Ⅱ: 60 cases. Made by the o-set(Baxter H. Itd. USA).Group Ⅲ:45 cases. Made by o-set for on home PD. Result: The occur rate of infection peritonitis in Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ Group were one/11.17,94.87 and 121.80 patient months. The infec tion rate of exit-site in Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ Group were 18.91%,6.66%,6.66%. The lunnitis incidence rate in Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ Group were 8.1%, 3.33%, and 4.44%, respectively. The patients recover one's works in group Ⅰ almost come to nought, group Ⅱ 30% and 45.6% in group Ⅲ. Survival still living: Group Ⅰ 12.83. Group Ⅱ≥23.25. Group Ⅲ≥27 months and among them ≥36 months 7 cases (15.55%).About withdraw:Group Ⅰ average 2%/year. Group Ⅱ and Group Ⅲ 1.4%/year. The death rate of average year in Ⅰ and Ⅱ Group patients were 2.66% lower than of HD death rate 10%. Conclusion: o-set it's indeed a device of develop of PD and home PD, because the o-set able to most limit lower occur rate of intection peritonitis especially fit into home PD subtropical zone area.

  12. [Catheter-related infection in home-based parenteral nutrition: outcomes from the NADYA group and presentation of a new protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda, Compés C; Bretón, Lesmes I; Bonada Sanjaume, A; Planas Vila, M

    2006-01-01

    Hom parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a nutritional support modality that allows for the supply of parenteral nutrition bags to the patient's home. Since its first use in the late 60s, this therapy has allowed maintaining patients with intestinal failure alive that previously were doomed to death. In our country, this therapy is used by 2.15 patients pmp. According to the NADYA data, catheter-related infections account for 50% of all HPN-related complications. In larger series, infection rates are 0.5-2 infections/1000 days or 0.3-0.5 infections/patient/year. Most of them are produced by gram-positive organisms that migrate from the skin or from catheter connections to the tip. These infections are diagnosed by means of clinical data and with different microbiological cultures. When treating these infections, it is important to keep the catheter in place, and administering antibiotics through it, conventionally or with the antibioticolade technique.

  13. Hospice Use Among Nursing Home Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unroe, Kathleen Tschantz; Sachs, Greg A.; Hickman, Susan E.; Stump, Timothy E.; Tu, Wanzhu; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Among hospice patients who lived in nursing homes, we sought to: (1) report trends in hospice use over time, (2) describe factors associated with very long hospice stays (>6 months), and (3) describe hospice utilization patterns. Design, setting, and participants We conducted a retrospective study from an urban, Midwest cohort of hospice patients, aged ≥65 years, who lived in nursing homes between 1999 and 2008. Measurements Demographic data, clinical characteristics, and health care utilization were collected from Medicare claims, Medicaid claims, and Minimum Data Set assessments. Patients with overlapping nursing home and hospice stays were identified. χ2 and t tests were used to compare patients with less than or longer than a 6-month hospice stay. Logistic regression was used to model the likelihood of being on hospice longer than 6 months. Results A total of 1452 patients received hospice services while living in nursing homes. The proportion of patients with noncancer primary hospice diagnoses increased over time; the mean length of hospice stay (114 days) remained high throughout the 10-year period. More than 90% of all patients had 3 or more comorbid diagnoses. Nearly 20% of patients had hospice stays longer than 6 months. The hospice patients with stays longer than 6 months were observed to have a smaller percentage of cancer (25% vs 30%) as a primary hospice diagnosis. The two groups did not differ by mean cognitive status scores, number of comorbidities, or activities of daily living impairments. The greater than 6 months group was much more likely to disenroll before death: 33.9% compared with 13.8% (P < .0001). A variety of patterns of utilization of hospice across settings were observed; 21 % of patients spent some of their hospice stay in the community. Conclusions Any policy proposals that impact the hospice benefit in nursing homes should take into account the difficulty in predicting the clinical course of these patients, varying

  14. Defending Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ Television audiences around the country were shocked on November 21,2009, when national broadcaster China Central Television showed clips of two families violently fighting lawenforcement officials who were evicting them from their homes. The first incident being broadcast happened in June 2008, when Pan Rong and her husband stood on the roof of their four-story house to confront a demolition crew that consisted of police officers, firefighters and a bulldozer. Their family home stood in the way of a Shanghai Hongqiao Airport expansion project. Pan shouted into a loudspeaker,"If you don't have a court verdict, you are violating our property rights."

  15. Training in basic Internet skills for special target groups in non-formal educational settings – conclusions from three pilot projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Berger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of Digital Inclusion, it becomes important to address marginalised groups that face specific barriers in being part of the information society. From 2009 to 2011 within the framework of the nation-wide Initiative Internet erfahren, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics, Stiftung Digitale Chancen has accompanied three pilot projects and researched the hindrances and motivations of specific target groups including young migrants from Russia, women in the low-wage sector and disabled elderly people, regarding their use of information and communication technology and related skills. This article describes the teaching methodologies in the training provided in non-formal education settings, exposes the different evaluation methods and sums up the results. A special focus in the discussion is given to the role of the teacher and the relationship between teacher and students as there turned out to be similarities in all three target groups. Understanding the balance between the training and abilities and preferences of the learners will facilitate the further development of training appropriate to those who are still digitally excluded.

  16. Comparisons of automated blood pressures in a primary health care setting with self-measurements at the office and at home using the Omron i-C10 device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Karkhi, Isam; Al-Rubaiy, Raad; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Falk, Magnus; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) levels recorded using the semiautomatic oscillometric Omron i-C10 BP device in patients with or without hypertension in three different settings: (a) when used by a doctor or a nurse at the office (OBP); (b) when used for self-measurement by the patient at the office (SMOBP); and (c) when used for 7 consecutive days at home (HBP). A total of 247 individuals were invited to participate, but 78 of these individuals declined and a further seven were excluded, leaving a final cohort of 162 participants. The mean OBP was higher than HBP (difference 8.1±14/3.1±8.8 mmHg, Poffice does not preclude an increase in BP when levels in the individual patients are compared with HBP using the same equipment. Thus, SMOBP with a semiautomatic device does not lead to a reduction in the white-coat effect in the same manner as fully automatic devices.

  17. Nursing Home Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing home: ____________________________________________________ Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone number: __________________________________________________________ Date of visit: _____________________________________________________________ Basic information Yes No Notes Is the nursing home Medicare certified? Is the nursing home Medicaid ...

  18. News Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Teaching: The epiSTEMe project: KS3 maths and science improvement Field trip: Pupils learn physics in a stately home Conference: ShowPhysics welcomes fun in Europe Student numbers: Physics numbers increase in UK Tournament: Physics tournament travels to Singapore Particle physics: Hadron Collider sets new record Astronomy: Take your classroom into space Forthcoming Events

  19. Home Education, School, Travellers and Educational Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arcy, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The difficulties Traveller pupils experience in school are well documented. Yet those in home educating go unreported. Monk suggests this is because some groups are overlooked; that gypsies and Travellers are often not perceived as home educators. This article highlights how the move to home education is seldom a free choice for Traveller…

  20. Legitimate Peripheral Participation and Home Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, L.

    2010-01-01

    After a description of home education, Lave and Wenger's (1991) theory of legitimate peripheral participation (LPP) is applied to the situation of home educators who join a neighbourhood home education group, a community of practice. Then, it is argued that the theory of LPP, with suitable modification, can also apply to and illuminate the…

  1. Genetics Home Reference: myotonic dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions myotonic dystrophy myotonic dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Myotonic dystrophy is part of a group of inherited disorders ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: episodic ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions episodic ataxia episodic ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Episodic ataxia is a group of related conditions that affect ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions osteogenesis imperfecta osteogenesis imperfecta Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of genetic disorders that ...

  4. Long-Term Effects of a Nursing Home Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Robert D.; Gurian, Bennett S.

    1976-01-01

    A survey was conducted by a mental health center to evaluate the effects of a nursing home education project which attempted 1) to teach mental health professionals and nursing home staff how to set up in-service education programs in nursing homes, and 2) to teach nursing home staff mental health principles. (Author/EJT)

  5. Returning home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jytte; Brøgger, Ditte

    2016-01-01

    flows. By focusing on these educational migrants, this paper explores how they connect to their rural homes. Guided by a critical reading of the migration-development scholarship, the paper examines how migrants and their relatives make sense of educational migrants’ remitting and returning practices...... and partake in important social remittance practices that represent a vision for impacting local development...

  6. Home Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I briefly discuss the importance of home automation system. Going in to the details I briefly present a real time designed and implemented software and hardware oriented house automation research project, capable of automating house's electricity and providing a security system to detect the presence of unexpected behavior.

  7. Defending Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A much-anticipated law protecting homeowners’ rights is on the horizon Television audiences around the country were shocked on November 21,2009,when national broadcaster China Central Television showed clips of two families violently fighting lawenforcement officials who were evicting them from their homes.

  8. Exploring the impact of common assessment instrumentation on communication and collaboration in inpatient and community-based mental health settings: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lynn; Hirdes, John P

    2014-10-03

    Recognition that integrated services can lead to more efficient and effective care has made the principle of integration a priority for health systems worldwide for the last decade. However, actually bringing fully integrated services to life has eluded most health care organizations. Mental health has followed the rule, rather than the exception, when it comes integrating services. The lack of effective mechanisms to evaluate the needs of persons across mental health care services has been an important barrier to communication between professionals involved in care. This study sought to understand communication among inpatient and community-based mental health staff during transfers of care, before and after implementation of compatible assessment instrumentation. Two focus groups were held with staff from inpatient (n = 10) and community (n = 10) settings in an urban, specialized psychiatric hospital in Ontario (Canada) - prior to and one year after implementation of compatible instrumentation in the community program. Transcripts were coded and aggregated into themes. Very different views of current communication patterns during transfers of care emerged. Inpatient mental health staff described a predictable, well-known process, whereas community-based staff emphasized unpredictability. Staff also discussed issues related to trust and the circle of care. All agreed that compatible assessments in inpatient and community mental health settings would facilitate communication through use of a common assessment language. However, no change in communication patterns was reported one year post implementation of compatible instrumentation. Though all participants agreed on the potential for compatible instrumentation to improve communication during transfers of care, this cannot happen overnight. A number of issues related to trust, evidence-based practice, and organizational factors act as barriers to communication. In particular, staff noted the need for the results

  9. Time from prior chemotherapy enhances prognostic risk grouping in the second-line setting of advanced urothelial carcinoma: a retrospective analysis of pooled, prospective phase 2 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Pond, Gregory R; Fougeray, Ronan; Choueiri, Toni K; Qu, Angela Q; Vaughn, David J; Niegisch, Guenter; Albers, Peter; James, Nicholas D; Wong, Yu-Ning; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Sridhar, Srikala S; Galsky, Matthew D; Petrylak, Daniel P; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Khan, Awais; Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Beer, Tomasz M; Stadler, Walter M; O'Donnell, Peter H; Sternberg, Cora N; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2013-04-01

    Outcomes for patients in the second-line setting of advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC) are dismal. The recognized prognostic factors in this context are Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) >0, hemoglobin level (Hb) value of time from prior chemotherapy (TFPC) independent of known prognostic factors. Data from patients from seven prospective trials with available baseline TFPC, Hb, PS, and LM values were used for retrospective analysis (n=570). External validation was conducted in a second-line phase 3 trial comparing best supportive care (BSC) versus vinflunine plus BSC (n=352). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate the association of factors, with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) being the respective primary and secondary outcome measures. ECOG-PS >0, LM, Hb 0, Hb <10 g/dl, and LM in the setting of second-line therapy for advanced UC. These data may facilitate drug development and interpretation of trials. Copyright © 2012 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Aromatherapy in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Lucile

    2015-01-01

    Pierre Delaroche de Clisson hospital uses essential oils as part of its daily organisation for the treatment of pain and the development of palliative care. The setting up of this project, in nursing homes and long-term care units, is the fruit of a complex mission carried out by a multidisciplinary team, which had to take into account the risks involved and overcome a certain amount of reluctance.

  11. Biomarkers of response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Working Group: standardization for use in the clinical trial setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, David A; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Johnson, Bruce E

    2008-02-20

    The body of literature on the correlations between molecular assessments and patient outcomes after treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors continues to grow. It will be important in the future to determine how to most effectively integrate molecular assays that assess the likelihood of therapeutic benefit into clinical practice. Although EGFR-targeted therapies such as erlotinib have been approved for use without molecular testing, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and mutational analyses of the EGFR gene have all been proposed as candidates to help predict response or survival benefit from EGFR-targeted therapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Further prospective validation from ongoing randomized studies will be needed to fully determine which assays are best to help predict patient outcome. In addition, it will be critical for these assays to undergo standardization before widespread clinical use. The Molecular Assays in NSCLC Working Group, under the sponsorship of Genentech Inc, Roche Pharmaceuticals, and OSI Pharmaceuticals, Inc, was convened to evaluate the available molecular assays for use in the clinical trial setting and provide recommendations for application and interpretation of these tests for future clinical trials. Recommendations of the Molecular Assays in NSCLC Working Group for the use of EGFR molecular assays are presented and include guidelines for tissue storage, handling, and processing. Recommendations for the standardization of molecular assays are also discussed.

  12. Use of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) to improve the nutrient adequacy of general food distribution rations for vulnerable sub-groups in emergency settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Camila M; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2010-01-01

    The term 'lipid-based nutrient supplements' (LNS) refers generically to a range of fortified, lipid-based products, including products like Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) (a large daily ration with relatively low micronutrient concentration) as well as highly concentrated supplements (1-4 teaspoons/day, providing groups [e.g. infants and children between 6 and 24 months of age, and pregnant and lactating women (PLW)]. Currently, the main food and nutrition interventions in emergency settings include general food distribution (GFD) rations, which are provided to the affected population as a whole, and selective (or supplementary) feeding programs (SFP), which are to be provided to nutritionally vulnerable or malnourished individuals. In addition to logistical and operational challenges that may limit the intended effect of these programs, the nutritional quality of the food commodities provided may be insufficient to meet the needs of infants and young children and PLW. Because these subgroups have particularly high nutrient needs for growth and development, meeting these needs is challenging in settings where the ration is limited to a few food commodities, with little access to a diverse diet and bioavailable sources of micronutrients. In recent years, there has been increased attention to adding micronutrient interventions, on top of the other food-based interventions (such as GFDs and SFPs), to fill micronutrient gaps in diets in emergency settings. The focus of this document is the potential role of LNS in meeting the nutritional needs of these vulnerable subgroups, with the goal of preventing malnutrition in emergency-affected populations. The document addresses the desired nutritional formulation of LNS for these target groups, taking into account the expected bioavailability of relevant nutrients and toxicity concerns. It also discusses the recommended chemical forms of the fortificants in LNS; stability and shelf-life considerations; production

  13. A randomized controlled trial of a senior centre group programme for increasing social support and preventing depression in elderly people living at home in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bøen Hege

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late-life depression is a common condition and a challenging public health problem. A lack of social support is strongly associated with psychological distress. Senior centres seem to be suitable arenas for community-based health promotion interventions, although few studies have addressed this subject. The objectives were to examine the effect of a preventive senior centre group programme consisting of weekly meetings, on social support, depression and quality of life. Methods A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 4,000 persons over 65 in Oslo, and a total of 2,387 completed questionnaires were obtained. These subjects served as a basis for recruitment of participants for a trial, with scores on HSCL-10 being used as a main inclusion criterion. A total of 138 persons were randomized into an intervention group (N = 77 and control group (N = 61. Final analyses included 92 persons. Social support (OSS-3, depression (BDI, life satisfaction and health were measured in interviews at baseline and after 12 months (at the end of the intervention programme. Perceptions of benefits from the intervention were also measured. Mean scores, SD, SE and CI were used to describe the changes in outcomes. Effect sizes were calculated based on the original scales and as Cohen’s d. Paired sample tests and ANOVA were used to test group differences. Results There was an increase in social support in both groups, but greatest in the intervention group. The level of depression increased for both groups, but more so in the control than the intervention group. There was a decrease in life satisfaction, although the decrease was largest among controls. There were almost no differences in reported health between groups. However, effect sizes were small and differences were not statistically significant. In contrast, most of the participants said the intervention meant much to them and led to increased use of the centre. Conclusions In

  14. Home recording for musicians for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Strong, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Invaluable advice that will be music to your ears! Are you thinking of getting started in home recording? Do you want to know the latest home recording technologies? Home Recording For Musicians For Dummies will get you recording music at home in no time. It shows you how to set up a home studio, record and edit your music, master it, and even distribute your songs. With this guide, you?ll learn how to compare studio-in-a-box, computer-based, and stand-alone recording systems and choose what you need. You?ll gain the skills to manage your sound, take full advantage of MIDI, m

  15. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  16. Improved Neuropsychological and Neurological Functioning Across Three Antiretroviral Regimens in Diverse Resource-Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5199, the International Neurological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.; Jiang, H.; Kumwenda, J.; Supparatpinyo, K.; Evans, S.; Campbell, T. B.; Price, R.; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N.; La Rosa, A.; Santos, B.; Silva, M. T.; Montano, S.; Kanyama, C.; Faesen, S.; Murphy, R.; Hall, C.; Marra, C. M.; Marcus, C.; Berzins, B.; Allen, R.; Housseinipour, M.; Amod, F.; Sanne, I.; Hakim, J.; Walawander, A.; Nair, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) A5199 compared the neurological and neuropsychological (NP) effects of 3 antiretroviral regimens in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand, and Zimbabwe were randomized to 3 antiretroviral treatment arms: A (lamivudine-zidovudine plus efavirenz, n = 289), B (atazanavir, emtricitabine, and didanosine-EC, n = 293), and C (emtricitabine-tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate plus efavirenz, n = 278) as part of the ACTG PEARLS study (A5175). Standardized neurological and neuropsychological (NP) screening examinations (grooved pegboard, timed gait, semantic verbal fluency, and finger tapping) were administered every 24 weeks from February 2006 to May 2010. Associations with neurological and neuropsychological function were estimated from linear and logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations. Results. The median weeks on study was 168 (Q1 = 96, Q3 = 192) for the 860 participants. NP test scores improved (P  .10). Significant country effects were noted on all NP tests and neurological outcomes (P < .01). Conclusions. The study detected no significant differences in neuropsychological and neurological outcomes between randomized ART regimens. Significant improvement occurred in neurocognitive and neurological functioning over time after initiation of ARTs. The etiology of these improvements is likely multifactorial, reflecting reduced central nervous system HIV infection, better general health, and practice effects. This study suggests that treatment with either of the World Health Organization –recommended first-line antiretroviral regimens in resource-limited settings will improve neuropsychological functioning and reduce neurological dysfunction. Clinical trials registration.  NCT00096824. PMID:22661489

  17. Research of Home Information Technology Adoption Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ao Shan; Ren Weiyin; Lin Peishan; Tang Shoulian

    2008-01-01

    The Information Technology at Home has caught the attention of various industries such as IT, Home Appliances, Communication, and Real Estate. Based on the information technology acceptance theories and family consumption behaviors theories, this study summarized and analyzed four key belief variables i.e. Perceived Value, Perceived Risk, Perceived Cost and Perceived Ease of Use, which influence the acceptance of home information technology. The study also summaries three groups of external variables. They axe social, industrial, and family influence factors. The social influence factors include Subjective Norm; the industry factors include the Unification of Home Information Technological Standards, the Perfection of Home Information Industry Value Chain, and the Competitiveness of Home Information Industry; and the family factors include Family Income, Family Life Cycle and Family Educational Level. The study discusses the relationship among these external variables and cognitive variables. The study provides Home Information Technology Acceptance Model based on the Technology Acceptance Model and the characteristics of home information technology consumption.

  18. Complex group-I introns in nuclear SSU rDNA of red and green algae: evidence of homing-endonuclease pseudogenes in the Bangiophyceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, P; Huss, V A; Nielsen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus pupukensis and the red alga Porphyra spiralis contain large group-IC1 introns in their nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA genes due to the presence of open reading frames at the 5' end of the introns. The putative 555 amino-acid Scenedesmus-encoded protein harbors...

  19. Feeling at home in nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Kerkstra, A.

    2001-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to examine determinants of feeling at home and in particular the privacy in nursing homes in The Netherlands. The first question was to what extent nursing homes differed in the degree residents feel at home and experience privacy. The second question was whether f

  20. Job satisfaction of rural public and home health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhl, N; Dunkin, J W; Stratton, T; Geller, J; Ludtke, R

    1993-03-01

    Based on Vroom's expectancy theory, this study was conducted to identify differences in job satisfaction between nurses working in public health settings, and staff nurses and administrators working in both settings. Questionnaires containing an adaptation of a job satisfaction scale were mailed to all 258 registered nurses practicing in public health and home health settings (response rate 57%) in a rural midwestern state. Respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with various dimensions of their jobs, as well as how important each aspect was to them. Although both groups of nurses reported low satisfaction with salary, public health nurses were significantly less satisfied with their salaries than were home health nurses (F = 32.96, P < or = 0.001); home health nurses, however, were significantly less satisfied with benefits/rewards (F = 11.85, P < or = 0.001), task requirements (F = 8.37, P < or = 0.05), and professional status (F = 5.30, P < or = 0.05). Although administrators did not differ significantly from staff nurses on job satisfaction, they did perceive organizational climate (F = 4.50, P < or = 0.05) to be an important feature of satisfaction. These differences may be partially explained by divergent salaries, roles, and responsibilities between public health and home health nurses.

  1. Home Safety, Safe Behaviors of Elderly People, and Fall Accidents At Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkal, Sibel

    2010-01-01

    The present study analyzed home safety and safe behaviors against fall accidents of elderly people living at home. The study group comprised 121 people aged 65+ living in the catchment area of Ankara Mamak Halil Ulgen Health Center. Data were collected via a personal information form and Home-Screen Scale. Statistical analysis used an independent…

  2. Sensor technology for smart homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan; Cooper, Rory A; Pasquina, Paul F; Fici-Pasquina, Lavinia

    2011-06-01

    A smart home is a residence equipped with technology that observes the residents and provides proactive services. Most recently, it has been introduced as a potential solution to support independent living of people with disabilities and older adults, as well as to relieve the workload from family caregivers and health providers. One of the key supporting features of a smart home is its ability to monitor the activities of daily living and safety of residents, and in detecting changes in their daily routines. With the availability of inexpensive low-power sensors, radios, and embedded processors, current smart homes are typically equipped with a large amount of networked sensors which collaboratively process and make deductions from the acquired data on the state of the home as well as the activities and behaviors of its residents. This article reviews sensor technology used in smart homes with a focus on direct environment sensing and infrastructure mediated sensing. The article also points out the strengths and limitations of different sensor technologies, as well as discusses challenges and opportunities from clinical, technical, and ethical perspectives. It is recommended that sensor technologies for smart homes address actual needs of all stake holders including end users, their family members and caregivers, and their doctors and therapists. More evidence on the appropriateness, usefulness, and cost benefits analysis of sensor technologies for smart homes is necessary before these sensors should be widely deployed into real-world residential settings and successfully integrated into everyday life and health care services.

  3. The average numbers of outliers over groups of various splits into training and test sets: A criterion of the reliability of a QSPR? A case of water solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Alla P.; Toropov, Andrey A.; Benfenati, Emilio; Gini, Giuseppina; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2012-07-01

    The validation of quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPR/QSAR) is an important challenge of modern theoretical chemistry. Analysis of QSPRs which are obtained with various distribution into sub-systems of training and of testing can be a useful approach to estimate reliability of QSPR predictions. The balance of correlation is an approach for the building up of QSPR with using three components of available data: (a) sub-training set (developer), (b) calibration set (critic), and (c) test set (estimator). Computational experiments have shown that the probabilistic interdependence between the distribution of available data into sub-training set, calibration set, and test set and the average numbers of outliers in the test set exists.

  4. Coming Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Xie Zhonggao,head of the Beijing office for AsiaVest Partners,had lived in the United States for 16 years before settling down in Beijing in 2004. Xie had felt like"going home."In the U.S.he was"amazed by the wide open market for Chinese consumer concepts,"and sensing an opportunity, he returned to China to invest in manufacturing and consumer product enterprises.Here he talks with Chinese Venture:about AsiaVest’s business focus and vision as well as about the venture capital market in China as a whole.

  5. Temporary Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Supplies can ensure the survivors in the camps are well fed and clothed The old woman,carrying a baby on her back,wandered around a sports field among long rows of tents built to shelter earthquake survivors."I just had a bowl of porridge for breakfast and I’m taking my grandson out of the tent for a morning walk,"she said.She was an evacuee from Anxian County,close to one of the worst-hit areas of Beichuan County, Sichuan Province."I miss my home so much,but I cannot

  6. Effects of Home Exercise Programmes During Home Visits After Hip Replacement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozlem; Tosun, Bet Uuml L

    2017-01-01

    This study systematically reviews the research, focused on the effects of home exercise programmes implemented during home visits after hip replacement on patients. PubMed (MEDLINE), Wiley Online Library, EBSCOhost, Science Direct databases (between 2004 and June 2015) were searched with the keywords "hip replacement, home exercise programme and home visit". Eleven original articles were retrieved. Different parameters were used in the trials to assess the physical functions, mobility and quality of life of patients. In six trials, the intervention group achieved significantly better improvements statistically in all parameters after home exercise programmes. In three trials, the intervention group achieved better but not significant outcomes. Early recovery in daily living activities with home exercise programme was reported only in one trial. Reviewed studies suggest that home exercise programmes, implemented during home visits after hip replacement, improve patients' physical functions and life quality.

  7. CASAS: A Smart Home in a Box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Diane J; Crandall, Aaron S; Thomas, Brian L; Krishnan, Narayanan C

    2013-07-01

    While the potential benefits of smart home technology are widely recognized, a lightweight design is needed for the benefits to be realized at a large scale. We introduce the CASAS "smart home in a box", a lightweight smart home design that is easy to install and provides smart home capabilities out of the box with no customization or training. We discuss types of data analysis that have been performed by the CASAS group and can be pursued in the future by using this approach to designing and implementing smart home technologies.

  8. Age Effects in a Study Abroad Context: Children and Adults Studying Abroad and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, Angels; Munoz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of learning context and age on second language development by comparing the language gains, measured in terms of oral and written fluency, lexical and syntactic complexity, and accuracy, experienced by four groups of learners of English: children in a study abroad setting, children in their at-home school, adults in…

  9. Age Effects in a Study Abroad Context: Children and Adults Studying Abroad and at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes, Angels; Munoz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effects of learning context and age on second language development by comparing the language gains, measured in terms of oral and written fluency, lexical and syntactic complexity, and accuracy, experienced by four groups of learners of English: children in a study abroad setting, children in their at-home school, adults in…

  10. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2006-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  11. Take-Home Training in Laparoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinggaard, Ebbe

    2017-04-01

    in a basic laparoscopic training programme. We also established a credible pass/fail level using the contrasting groups method. We concluded that the TABTL test could be used to assess novice laparoscopic trainees across different specialties and help trainees acquire basic laparoscopic competencies prior to supervised surgery. In the third study, we aimed to explore the consequences of the choice of standard setting method and whether there is a difference in terms of how high a score experienced and novice laparoscopic surgeons expect that novices should achieve during training. We used three different standard setting methods and found that pass/fail levels vary depending on the choice of standard setting method. We also asked experienced and novice laparoscopic surgeons how high a score they expected a novice laparoscopic surgeon should achieve on a test during training. We found a significant difference, with experienced surgeons setting a lower pass/fail level. We concluded that an established standard setting method supported by evidence should be used when setting a pass/fail level. In the first and second papers of this thesis, we found that off-site training is feasible and explored validity for the TABLT test. We used this knowledge in the fourth study to design a randomised controlled trial. The aim of the trial was to investigate the effect of take-home training in a simulation-based laparoscopic course. We hypothesised that training at home could help trainees plan their training according to their own schedule and thereby increase the effect of training. We found that participants had a distributed training pattern; they trained more frequently and in shorter sessions. We also found that participants were able to rate their own performance during unsupervised training and that selfrating was reliable. The fifth and final study of the thesis was a mixed-methods study that aimed to explore the use of take-home training. To meet this aim, we recruited

  12. Being an outpatient with rheumatoid arthritis - a focus group study on patients' self-efficacy and experiences from participation in a short course and one of three different outpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Jette; Wagner, Lis; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    A Danish study compared three different outpatient settings for persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All participants completed a short course before random allocation to one of three groups. A third of the patients continued with planned medical consultations. A third was allocated to a shared...... care setting with no planned consultations. The final third was allocated for planned nursing consultations every 3 months. Little knowledge exists of patients' experiences at different outpatient settings....

  13. El cuidado a la salud en el ámbito doméstico: interacción social y vida cotidiana Health care at home setting: social interaction and daily life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Hernández Tezoquipa

    2001-10-01

    their grandparents, mothers, and peers; and women's own experience while taking care of their family. Health care at home setting is a mixture of traditional healing practices and the conventional medical practices disseminated among the population. CONCLUSION: The different social interactions in which women are involved make up the way Mexican women take care of their own health and their family.

  14. Racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Donna Z; Gurvich, Olga; Savik, Kay; Eberly, Lynn E; Harms, Susan; Mueller, Christine; Garrard, Judith; Cunanan, Kristen; Wiltzen, Kjerstie

    2017-09-01

    Pressure ulcers increase the risk of costly hospitalization and mortality of nursing home residents, so timely healing is important. Disparities in healthcare have been identified in the nursing home population but little is known about disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers. To assess racial and ethnic disparities in the healing of pressure ulcers present at nursing home admission. Multi-levels predictors, at the individual resident, nursing home, and community/Census tract level, were examined in three large data sets. Minimum Data Set records of older individuals admitted to one of 439 nursing homes of a national, for-profit chain over three years with a stages 2-4 pressure ulcer (n=10,861) were searched to the 90-day assessment for the first record showing pressure ulcer healing. Predictors of pressure ulcer healing were analyzed for White admissions first using logistic regression. The Peters-Belson method was used to assess racial or ethnic disparities among minority group admissions. A significantly smaller proportion of Black nursing home admissions had their pressure ulcer heal than expected had they been part of the White group. There were no disparities in pressure ulcer healing disadvantaging other minority groups. Significant predictors of a nonhealing of pressure ulcer were greater deficits in activities of daily living and pressure ulcer severity. Reducing disparities in pressure ulcer healing is needed for Blacks admitted to nursing homes. Knowledge of disparities in pressure ulcer healing can direct interventions aiming to achieve equity in healthcare for a growing number of minority nursing home admissions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of using high facilitation when implementing the Gold Standards Framework in Care Homes programme: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinley, Julie; Stone, Louisa; Dewey, Michael; Levy, Jean; Stewart, Robert; McCrone, Paul; Sykes, Nigel; Hansford, Penny; Begum, Aysha; Hockley, Jo

    2014-10-01

    The provision of quality end-of-life care is increasingly on the national agenda in many countries. In the United Kingdom, the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes programme has been promoted as a national framework for improving end-of-life care. While its implementation is recommended, there are no national guidelines for facilitators to follow to undertake this role. It was hypothesised that action learning alongside high facilitation when implementing the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes programme will result in a reduced proportion of hospital deaths for residents and improvement in the care home staff ability to facilitate good end-of-life care. A cluster randomised controlled trial where 24 nursing homes received high facilitation to enable them to implement the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes programme. The managers of 12 nursing homes additionally took part in action learning sets. A third group (14 nursing homes) received the 'standard' Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes facilitation available in their locality. In total, 38 nursing homes providing care for frail older people, their deceased residents and their nurse managers. A greater proportion of residents died in those nursing homes receiving high facilitation and action learning but not significantly so. There was a significant association between the level of facilitation and nursing homes completing the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes programme through to accreditation. Year-on-year change occurred across all outcome measures. There is a danger that without national guidelines, facilitation of the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes programme will vary and consequently so will its implementation. The nurse manager of a care home must be actively engaged when implementing the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes programme. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Home care robot for socially supporting the elderly: focus group studies in three European countries to screen user attitudes and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsiga, Katalin; Edelmayer, Georg; Rumeau, Pierre; Péter, Orsolya; Tóth, András; Fazekas, Gábor

    2013-12-01

    The growing number of elderly individuals presents new challenges for society. Many elderly individuals have physical or cognitive impairments and require support from caregivers. An attempt to overcome the limitations caused by the lack of human caregivers is the inclusion of assistive technology such as socially active robots. The Domeo-project of the Ambient Assisted Living Joint Programme of the European Union aims to develop a new companion robotic system that would allow assistance to the elderly. The requirements and attitude of the potential users and caregivers have been assessed in Austria, France and Hungary. The robot functions were demonstrated to the participants. Three focus groups were formed: potential end users, older caregivers and younger caregivers. The discussions were recorded and processed according to six aspects: (i) acceptability and privacy, (ii) pertinence of services, (iii) possible obstacles, (iv) motivation level to use the proposed services, (v) organizational issues and (vi) recommendations. Minor differences were observed between the countries, but there were considerable differences regarding the age of the participants. The younger caregivers want to be assured of the safety of their client and to receive immediate notification in case of an emergency. As for the elderly, the most important aspect is to gain a companion and a physical helper. Many of the recommendations can be taken into consideration during robot development, but some of them are not realistic at present.

  17. Tamanho da área de vida e padrão de uso do espaço em grupos de sagüis, Callithrix jacchus (Linnaeus (Primates, Callitrichidae Home range size and pattern of range use in common marmoset groups, Callithrix jacchus (Linnaeus (Primates, Callitrichidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Soraia Soares de Castro

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of abundance and distribution of fruits and gums resources in home range size and pattern of range use were investigated in Callithrix jacchus. From October 1996 to January 1998 two groups (QT and PB that lived in a National Forest/IBAMA-RN in northeastern Brazil (6º5'S, 35º12'W, were observed once a week by instantaneous scan sampling. The frequency of quadrant's visit in the home range was recorded at five minute intervals. Trees used for feeding on fruits and/or gum by the study groups were marked with flagging tape and numbered. Samples of the food items were collected for identification. Data on the temporal variation in fruits abundance was based on the monthly phenological observations of the marked trees. Study groups showed small home range size (QT: 2.4 ha and PB: 0.7 ha. No significant differences in home range size between dry and wet months were found, but groups showed a tendency to broadened the range use in the wet months. This revealed a behavioral strategy which marmosets exploited more gums face to decreased in fruits abundance. The abundance and distribution in clusters of fruits and gums resources influenced the pattern of range use and home range size.

  18. Resolution on Creating Family-Style Children's Homes, August 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This Resolution approves a proposal of the V.I. Lenin Soviet Children's Fund for setting up "family-style" children's homes in the Soviet Union. Children's homes are to consist of a) children's towns--single-family, multiroom homes occupied by families raising at least ten orphaned children and children left without parental care; and b) premises of individual families raising at least five such children while occupying separate multiroom units in regular apartment buildings, specialized buildings, or groups of buildings. In addition to residential buildings, children's towns are to contain a secondary school, a sports and fitness center, preschool facilities, housekeeping and preventative health care buildings, auxiliary farming plots, and other land where children and adults can work together. Thirty homes are to be built in the period 1988-1991. The Resolution also approves proposals establishing an All-Union Wardship Council; charging public health officials with providing permanent, qualified health care, consultation, mental health care, and diagnostics to every family assuming the responsibility of raising children; setting the task of organizing expanded research on children's health and treatment; recommending that enterprises, organizations, and institutions provide transportation service to family-style children's homes and families of employees raising these children and give them passes to sanatoriums, preventoriums, recreation centers and vacation complexes; and pledging the Council of Ministers' participation in the financing, construction, outfitting, and equipping of these homes and in providing material assistance to families raising orphaned children and children left without parental care. The Council of Ministers also decided that the time foster parents spend in raising five or more such children will be added to their overall continuous work record for the purposes of pensions and benefits and to their length of service in their specialty

  19. Home Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with ...

  20. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...